Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 OCTOBER 2020

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptsf5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 Business Matters (w172x18zvp5kn8v)
US Election: Trump back on campaign trail in Florida

President Trump is in Florida trying to garner more support in his adopted state. Business Matters gets the very latest from Mary Ellen Klas, Tallahassee Bureau Chief for the Miami Herald. The BBC's Samira Hussain examines the key issues facing farmers in America as they decide whether to vote for Joe Biden or Donald Trump. Also in the programme, Spencer Dale, chief economist at oil giant BP, discusses the company's plan to cut its oil and gas production by 40% by the end of this decade. Plus we hear from Stuart Fowkes, the creator of the Future Cities project, a sound sharing project of natural and human sounds from more than 650 locations. Fergus Nicoll will be joined by Elizabeth Gwynn Nine News reporter in Albury, New South Wales, Australia for comment throughout the programme.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptsjy2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzc9c6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffgx6g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 Stumped (w3cszhjv)
Will split international teams benefit cricket?

Has cricket lost touch with the Black Lives Matter movement? West Indies captain Jason Holder tells me the game has gone quiet on racism.

Plus, could England and Australia playing different formats in different countries at the same time provide a financial lifeline to smaller nations?

And Nigeria women's captain Samantha Agazuma on the cricketing journey she hopes will take her all the way to the Big Bash in Australia.

Photo: Glenn Maxwell & Jos Buttler (Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptsnp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhq)
The battle for Florida’s Latino voters

Florida makes or breaks the US presidential election, and Spanish language ads have been bombarding Latino voters. BBC Monitoring journalist in Miami Luis Fajardo analyses the tactics and tunes being used by both Republicans and Democrats to swing the state.

Egypt’s septuagenarian record breaking footballer
Ezzeldin Bahader recently entered the record books as the world’s oldest professional footballer aged 74. BBC Arabic sports reporter Marwa Helmy has followed the inspiring story.

A trip to a Russian banya
Yulia James of BBC Russian shares her love of the famous Russian bath house, the banya: a place to warm up, cool down and relax with friends.

Nigeria's anti-SARS protests
Citizen protests against Nigeria’s Special Anti Robbery Squad or SARS turned violent this week, when protesters at a toll gate in the Lekke Island suburb of Lagos found themselves under fire. BBC Pidgin reporter Damilola Banjo has been covering the story since the beginning, and was there when the shooting took place.

Making a board game political
A new board game is about to hit the East Asian market. It’s called United Front: Fight Back Against China, and pits players representing Mongolia, Taiwan and Hong Kong against invading forces from China. Politically sensitive to say the least, as Lam Cho Wai of BBC Chinese explains.

Image: Poll worker at a ballot drop box in Miami Beach, Florida
Credit: EVA MARIE UZCATEGUI/AFP


SAT 02:50 Witness History (w3cszmvl)
Nasa's pioneering black women

Usually it is the names of astronauts that people remember about the space race. But less celebrated are the teams of people working on how to put a rocket into orbit. only in recent years have stories come to light of the contributions of the black women involved.

Many were recruited as 'computers', meaning that they carried out complex mathematical calculations by hand, before machines were invented that could do the job.

Christine Darden started her career in the computer pool, helping the engineers work out the trajectories needed to bring the Apollo Capsule back to Earth. Finally, she broke through the hidden barriers facing women at the time, gaining a promotion to engineer.

(Photo: Dr Christine Darden at a desk in Nasa's Langley Research Center, 1973. Credit: Bob Nye/Nasa/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptssfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnl)
What next for US foreign policy?

While US domestic policy has taken centre stage in the race for the White House, whichever man wins the presidency will also help define America’s place in the world for years to come. President Trump won 2016’s election, in part, on promising to reduce the number of military and diplomatic entanglements the country was involved in across the globe. In the Middle East he pulled US forces out of Syria, withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal negotiated during the Obama administration, and has strengthened ties with regional allies such as Israel, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. In Asia the US is engaged in a trade war with its single biggest trading partner - China. During his first term Donald Trump also had a frosty relationship with many of his NATO allies - and a much closer one with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin than any of his predecessors. Did those newly-defined strategic partnerships herald new achievements? Joe Biden has promised to turn back the clock on many of Mr Trump’s ‘America First’ themed policies, but which ones? And has the role the US plays on the world stage changed forever? As part of the BBC World Service's 'US Elections 2020: What the World Wants' series, Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss what's next for American foreign policy.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptsx5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzcnll)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffh8fv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3h)
Deborah Frances-White and Tats Nkonzo

Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini are joined by British-Australian comic Deborah Frances-White and top South African stand-up Tats Nkonzo to take on the global news headlines. This week, is it deal or no deal for the UK on Brexit? And are comedians really considered ‘essential workers’ in South Africa?
Get involved and tell us about the funny stories where you are.
#comediansvsthenews


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptt0xl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 Weekend (w172x7d1t25rd69)
US Covid cases rise

More than 70,000 new coronavirus cases were reported in the United States on Thursday. This steep rise in infections was a central theme in the presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

Also in the programme: Sudan and Israel agree to normalise relations and how the rivalry between China and the US is affecting the world.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues is Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels correspondent for The New York Times, covering the European Union and Oliver McTernan, co-founder and director of Forward Thinking.

(Picture: A sign for a COVID-19 drive-thru testing site in the US. Credit: REUTERS/Bing Guan)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptt4nq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d1t25rhyf)
Cardinal criticises Pope's comments on homosexuality

One of Pope Francis's fiercest critics in the Vatican has said that the Pontiff's recent comments supporting civil unions for same-sex couples are a 'private opinion', which ordinary Roman Catholics are not obliged to obey. Cardinal Raymond Burke reiterated official Catholic belief that homosexual acts were 'intrinsically disordered'.

Also in the programme: The US sees a rise in coronavirus cases and Chileans vote on changing their country's constitution.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues is Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels correspondent for The New York Times, covering the European Union and Oliver McTernan, co-founder and director of Forward Thinking.

(Picture: Pope Francis. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptt8dv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d1t25rmpk)
Parents separated from children at border missing

The American Civil Liberties Union says the parents of 545 children separated from their families at the US border, as part of the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy, cannot be traced. About two-thirds of those parents have been deported back to their country of origin, according to a court filing.

Also in the programme: Coronavirus cases continue to rise in the US.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues is Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels correspondent for The New York Times, covering the European Union and Oliver McTernan, co-founder and director of Forward Thinking.

(Picture: Hundreds of children are believed to be living without their parents in the US. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffhmp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:32 The Documentary (w3csz4pt)
The Superlinguists

The polyglots

Simon Calder meets people who keep learning new languages not because they have to, but because they want to. What motivates them? Situations like this - an immigrant hotel cleaner who is moved to tears because you speak to her in her native Albanian; A Nepalese Sherpa family that rolls about laughing in disbelief at hearing their foreign guest speak Sherpa. But do polyglots have a different brain from the rest of us? Simon travels to a specialised lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and undergoes a brain-scan himself, to find out.

Presenter: Simon Calder
Producer: Arlene Gregorius


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpttd4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0xjt)
US election: Trucking and farming

Nuala McGovern speaks with truck drivers and farmers in the United States as they share their thoughts on how their lives and livelihoods have been under the past four years of the Trump presidency.

Wisconsin is known as America’s Dairyland. It’s an important state in this election, where the vote could go either way, and where more than one in ten of the electorate are farmers. Three farmers in Wisconsin explain how trade deals by the US have impacted what happens on their farms and how that affects their votes this time.

And three truckers -Michael in Arizona, Pat in Indianapolis and Sunny in California - describe what they have seen driving across the country over the past four years. For some of them, the coronavirus pandemic had led to an upturn in their business prospects.

(Photo: Michael Ware Credit: Michael Ware)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffhrfc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw6)
Girl Taken

24/10/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 08:50 Over to You (w3cszf4z)
Listeners respond to The Response USA: The Return

The Response USA - the return. Four years after its original broadcast, listeners offer their views on whether this catch-up edition about the US presidential
election of 2016 did the job it was supposed to. Plus we need your help in tracking down interference problems on shortwave.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptthx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 Sportshour (w172x3c0rthb9pt)
Australia Grand Final Weekend

With the both the men's and women's NRL Grand Finals taking place this weekend, we preview both matches which will be played as a double header in front of a 40,000 person crowd. Current captain of the Brisbane Bronco's Ali Brigginshaw joins us to look ahead to what we can expect from both matches and how Brisbane are looking for their third win a row.

How diverse is the sport of cheerleading? Caroline Nyemi-Tei founded Cheer from Head to Toe to address poor representation in the sport. She tells us about a new video she has released which documents athletes and coaches experiences of racism in the industry and how the sport can be more inclusive.

We also look at the link between sport and elections. A study conducted ten years ago argues that the fate of the person who holds a seat can be influenced by other matters like whether the local sports team wins or loses in the weeks prior to an election. We explore if this is still relevant with Stanford University Professor Neil Malhotra who conducted the research.

From SuperBowl winner to sommelier -Will Blackmon won the SuperBowl in 2012 with the New York Giants but retired in 2018 to pursue another passion he had… wine! He tells us more about what he does now and he is the 'Wine MVP'.

Plus in this week's Sporting Witness as part of Black History Month we go back to 1978 when Viv Anderson became the first Black Footballer to play a full England international.

Photo: Broncos captain Ali Brigginshaw celebrates with team mates after winning the 2018 NRL Women's Premiership Grand Final match between the Sydney Roosters and the Brisbane Broncos at ANZ Stadium (Credit: Getty images)


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpttmn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzdd2c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffhzxm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:32 Global Questions (w3ct1cq5)
Global Questions

Who’s winning the USA-China tech wars?

Rivalry between Trump’s United States and Xi’s China is rampant: from disagreements on trade tariffs, on Hong Kong and the Uighurs and, of course, the source of Covid-19.

But underlying it all is the growing tech war between these two economic superpowers, with giants like Huawei on the battlefield. For its part, China denies access to Google, Facebook, Twitter and many other American firms. It’s called ‘tech nationalism’ - both powerhouses know that global superiority in technology and innovation will be the key to future economic domination of world trade.

Central to this growing tech war are semiconductors - the cornerstone technology of the information age and key to the US-China tech war. Semiconductors are crucial for microchips which in turn are needed for making everything from smart phones to satellite weapons systems.

President Trump‘s weapons in this war have included sanctions on major Chinese companies, the goal being a global tech ‘decoupling’ which would see many nations move away from Chinese technology altogether.

Join Zeinab Badawi and a panel of experts and question askers from around the world on this edition of Global Questions.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpttrdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 Music Life (w3csz6tj)
Music in our grandmother's DNA with Kelsey Lu and Beverly Glenn-Copeland

Singer and cellist Kelsey Lu is joined by Beverly Glenn-Copeland, Lotic, and Fatima Al Qadiri to discuss how their ancestral backgrounds influence the stories they tell, the use of nature as a metaphor, and if they ever feel alone being an artist.

Fatima Al Qadiri is an experimental Kuwaiti music producer and artist, currently based in Los Angeles. Last year she received a Cesar nomination for Best Original Score for her work on Mati Diop’s debut feature film Atlantics. Lotic is a Berlin-based electronic musician, born and raised in Houston, Texas. She has worked with and opened for Björk, who described her as “one of the fiercest performer DJs” she has ever heard. Beverly Glenn-Copeland is a Philadelphia-born singer, composer and transgender activist, whose recording career spans fifty years. His music fuses vision, technology, spirituality and place to create a genre-defying sound. And Kelsey is a classically trained cellist from Charlotte, North Carolina. She has collaborated with the likes of Skrillex, Sampha, Solange, and Florence and the Machine, and recently created an audiovisual project of meditative sound baths called Hydroharmonia.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpttw4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bj1s2)
Virus to stay 'at least until next summer' says France's President Macron

As further restrictions are introduced in France, President Macron says he expects the country to be fighting the virus until at least next summer.

Also in the programme: A BBC investigation has verified video evidence put up by an investigative website, showing the extrajudicial killings of two ethnic Armenians in Nagorno Karabakh. And a NASA space probe which successfully collected rock fragments from an asteroid earlier this week is at risk of losing the consignment.

(Photo: People in much of France must be home by 21:00 local time. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpttzwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ldrcxjjjy)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Fulham host Crystal Palace at Craven Cottage.

Lee James is joined by former Manchester City and Everton defender Sylvain Distin, ex-Australia international Alicia Ferguson and former Wolves and Nigeria goalkeeper Carl Ikem to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll also have the latest from the first men's El Clasico of the season with Barcelona and Real Madrid both looking to respond to La Liga defeats last weekend.

Elsewhere, we'll round up the sporting action from around the world - including the Formula One Portuguese Grand Prix, the Giro d'Italia and the women's Big Bash cricket.

Photo: Wilfried Zaha celebrates scoring against Manchester United (Getty Images)


SAT 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptvgw4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 17:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzf798)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 17:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffjv4j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 17:32 Trending (w3cszvsf)
Help! My mum is a conspiracy influencer

What would you do if your mum became a conspiracy theory influencer?

Kate Shemirani is one of Twitter’s most popular anti-mask, anti-vaccine, anti-5G activists. She calls coronavirus a “plandemic” and a “scandemic”, makes the false claim that 5G radio waves cause the symptoms of the disease and even says, contrary to all the evidence, that the virus that causes Covid-19 doesn’t exist.

She’s built up a huge following on social media, speaks to rallies in London and encourages people to ignore guidelines on social distancing and mask wearing recommended by health authorities and written into law.

Her influence on public health has grown so much that one popular British newspaper recently asked: “Is this the most dangerous woman in Britain?”

But her son is worried that his mum has gone down the rabbit hole – and he’s sounding a warning for others who might be in the same situation.

Sebastian Shemirani describes how conspiracy theories always had a grip on his mother, but the coronavirus pandemic thrust her into the public eye.

Conspiracy theories have torn the family apart – and now Sebastian has spoken exclusively to the BBC about the toll it has taken on him.

Plus we hear from experts about the right way to talk to friends and family members who are being drawn in by conspiracy theories.

Presented by Jonathan Griffin and Marianna Spring

Photo: Sebastian Shemirani

Photo credit: BBC


SAT 17:50 More or Less (w3ct0py0)
US election: facts or fiction

Tim Harford hears about the sheer volume of false claims made during the campaign. President Trump is well known for making wild statements, but has his behaviour changed? And what about Joe Biden? So much attention is concentrated on Trump’s claims, how does the Democratic candidate fare? Glenn Kessler at the Washington Post and Katherine J Wu at the New York Times tell us about fact-checking during the run up to the election.


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptvlm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpk)
Why Portugal decriminalised all drugs

In the grips of a drug crisis, why Portugal took a radical approach in 2001 and became the first country in the world to decriminalise all drugs. Also searching for those who disappeared during apartheid rule in South Africa, how mistakes with the initial production of the polio vaccine made thousands of children ill in 1995, plus the black women who helped propel NASA's space programme and Joan Littlewood a giant in 20th century British theatre.

(Image: Staffers interview a new patient in Lisbon, Portugal (Credit: Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptvqcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3h)
Actor and rapper Riz Ahmed

Actor and musician Riz Ahmed discusses his new film Mogul Mowgli. Author Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi tells us why she chose to set her new novel The First Woman in 1970s Uganda and R&B star Usher performs a cover of The Chainsmokers’ track, Don’t Let Me Down.

British actress Romola Garai tells us why she has chosen to direct a horror movie as her first feature film; Star Trek’s George Takei talks about his long lasting friendships from the show and Chinese pianist Lang Lang plays through one of Bach’s best loved compositions.

Nikki Bedi’s guests this week are world class photographer Misan Harriman; and writer and critic Edwin Okolo who joins us from Lagos.

(Photo: Actor and rapper Riz Ahmed. Credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptvv3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bk0r3)
Doubts over US-brokered Sudan-Israel deal

A former Sudanese prime minister, Sadiq El Mahdi, says the US-brokered agreement between Sudan and Israel could help ignite a new war in the Middle East and jeopardize the authority of the transitional government.

Also in the programme: Early voting in the US presidential election; and hunting the Asian Giant Hornet

(US President Donald Trump speaks on a conference call with leaders of Israel and Sudan about a Sudan-Israel peace agreement; Credit: European Photopress Agency)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptvyvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


SAT 21:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffkb41)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:32 Trending (w3cszvsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:32 today]


SAT 21:50 More or Less (w3ct0py0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:50 today]


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptw2ls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzfv0x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffkfw5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct16c5)
Is this Egypt’s #metoo moment?

Egypt is currently in the midst of a growing movement calling out the culture of sexual assault that’s rife in the country. A UN study showed 99.3% of Egyptian women have experienced sexual harassment or violence, and although women’s rights activists have been campaigning for years, there continues to be victim blaming surrounding women and a lack of prosecutions. However, a recent high profile case of one man who allegedly sexually assaulted and blackmailed several women was brought to the public’s attention due to an Instagram account called Assault Police which shared victim’s testimonies. It’s encouraged more women to speak out about their own experiences. And significantly, the religious authority, the Al Azhar Mosque published guidelines against assault, specifically stating what women wear is not an excuse.

Salma El-Wardany, a UK based Muslim writer and poet, was born in Egypt and wants to uncover what impact this largely online movement is having. Will it create a lasting change in Egyptian society and result in prosecutions?
Salma will talk to the key women fighting for change, and the male allies using their platform to speak out. She’ll hear from Nadeen Ashraf, the young woman behind Assault Police, and Sabah Khodir who’s offering practical support and guidance for victims. Plus she’ll speak to Omar Samra a well-known adventurer who’s encouraging men to take responsibility for their actions. She’ll hear from Human Rights Watch about their concerns over women’s rights in the country, and she’ll speak to Egyptian American journalist Mona Eltahawy about her hopes for a feminist revolution.

Producer: Miriam Williamson

(Picture: Egyptian women hold signs during a protest against sexual harassment in Cairo, Egypt, June 2014 / Credit: Ahmed Ismail/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptw6bx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxb)
Nasa probe Osiris Rex lands on asteroid

Science in Action talks to Nasa researcher Hannah Kaplan who is part of the team for the space agency’s sampling mission to the asteroid Bennu. Mission scientists were overjoyed this week when the probe Osiris Rex momentarily touched the asteroid and sucked up some of the sand and grit on its surface.

What might we learn when the sample is returned to Earth in three years' time? There is some not-such-good news about a theory about immunity to the pandemic coronavirus, and medical researchers in the UK announce the world’s first study that will deliberately infect volunteers with the novel coronavirus. The so-called challenge study is planned to begin in London in January. The purpose is to speed up the quest for effective Covid-19 vaccines but will it be safe for the participants? And there’s a new green chemistry breakthrough for tackling the world’s plastic waste crisis.

And All living things are related to each other, from elephants to algae, e-coli to humans like us. Within our cells we hold genetic information in the form of DNA or RNA. But despite viruses sharing these molecules, many scientists don't consider them to be 'life'.
Viruses cannot reproduce on their own, but some can insert their DNA into a host to pass genes sideways through the branching tree of life. As a result, viruses’ relationship with life is.... complex.

Two of our listeners had viruses on the mind, so they sent in the same question to CrowdScience. Senan from Singapore and Melvin from South Africa want to know how viruses began to see if this can tell us whether they shared a common ancestor with humans.

To dig into this complexity Marnie Chesterton speaks with an expert on Koala genetics – Dr Rachael Tarlinton. Koalas are in the middle of tackling a retroviruses, a type of virus that plants DNA into our cells as a reproduction strategy. Her research could reveal why humans life has so much viral DNA within our genomes.

Marnie speaks with a computational biologist Professor Gustavo Caetano-Anolles, who has found a new way to trace the family tree for billions of years using proteins common to all life on earth, and speaks with Professor Chantal Abergel who paints a picture of how viruses went from being the losers of evolution, to being highly successful parasites of cells.

(Image: Nasa probe Osiris Rex lands on asteroid. Credit Nasa)



SUNDAY 25 OCTOBER 2020

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptwb31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sp7)
Has President Trump been good for trade?

How successful has President Trump's America First policy been? On Business Weekly we assess the legacy of his first term and ask what the world wants from the next resident of the White House. We take a look at how effective Covid-19 tracing apps are in tracking and stopping the spread of the disease. Could technology like this be the silver bullet the world is waiting for? As the Hindu festival of Durga Puja begins, we consider how those businesses that rely on the celebrations for the income will cope this year. And we examine the sharp rise in the price of pets during lockdown. Presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Made in USA barcode image, Getty Images)


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptwfv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxz)
Peter Frankopan: Can history offer us any lessons on the coronavirus pandemic?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Peter Frankopan, historian and author of the bestselling book The Silk Roads. There’s plentiful evidence that the coronavirus pandemic has inflicted more serious damage on the US than China. Has the impact of Covid-19 reinforced the notion that global power and influence is shifting to the East?


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffkt3k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3x)
#MeToo: The lawyers

Two lawyers who represent alleged victims of sexual assault and harassment join Kim Chakanetsa to discuss how #MeToo and other public movements have impacted their work.

Debra Katz is an American civil rights and employment lawyer, best known for representing alleged victims of sexual assault and sexual harassment, and the whistleblowers who bring these stories to light. Her clients have included Christine Blasey-Ford, Vanessa Tyson and Chloe Caras.

Karuna Nundy is an Indian Supreme Court lawyer who focusses on constitutional law, media law and legal policy. Her work includes helping draft an anti-rape bill in India, after the 2012 Delhi bus gang rape created outrage around the treatment of women.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Karuna Nundy (credit - Ankita Chandra)
R: Debra Katz


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptwkl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzgb0f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffkxvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct16c5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptwpbf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c6)
Fighting together in Korea

Seventy years ago tens of thousands of North Korean troops invaded South Korea. Over the next three years one of the bloodiest conflicts of the 20th Century claimed millions of lives.

On a more positive note, though, the Korean War helped precipitate social change in the United States. Following President Truman’s Executive Order 9981, the Korean conflict became the first in which US armed forces were desegregated.

It was not a smooth process but it did precede civil rights advances back home where segregation was still widespread, especially in the southern states.

This is the story of why President Truman, who had himself expressed clear racist views earlier in his career, took the decision to issue his executive order to desegregate the armed forces, and how the US armed forces reacted. It is also the story of how African-American military personnel were treated as they fought for their country.

Presented by former CNN correspondent Brian Palmer

(Phot: Machine Gun Crew Korea)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptwt2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q5)
The King and Thais

Thailand's monarchy is used to a culture of deference - and has many laws and friends in government to defend it. But in recent months the country's seen mass protests, especially by young people, questioning royal prerogatives and privilege - and calling its traditionalist, royalist government to account. There have been unprecedented scenes - and words - in Bangkok. The BBC's Jonathan Head explores what a new generation of protesters are rejecting - and want in future.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other dispatches from correspondents, journalists and writers around the world.

In China there's great public interest in the US Presidential Election - and Stephen McDonell finds that there are some surprising bedfellows among the people who'd prefer a win for Donald Trump. From senior Communist Party officials to pro-democracy dissidents, and members of ethnic minorities and the Falun Gong movement, there are some very different reasons for backing the incumbent candidate.

Jordan's social life and its economy both suffered this year during a Covid lockdown. Charlie Faulkner shares the personal consequences for one man in its capital, Amman: a cobbler from Egypt who's been repairing shoes in the same shop for decades. He's just one of many thousands of migrant workers in Jordan who are now nervous about leaving the country - even to visit family back home - for fear they might not be allowed back in.

And Andrew Harding considers American prestige on the African continent. What lessons has the Trump administration offered to African leaders? And what lessons might Africa have for America in return?


(Image: Anti-government protest in Bangkok. Credit: EPA/Rungroj Yongrit)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffl5by)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj2)
Ubernomics

Every time you book a journey from an app like Uber, you’ll be providing the company with data - and making one man in Chicago very happy. He’s an economist who’s been examining the data, and his findings are fascinating.

Image: A ride-sharing app (Credit: Henry Nicholls/Reuters)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptwxtp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzgp7t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffl932)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Trending (w3cszvsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0py0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:50 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptx1kt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d1t25vdvj)
Treaty banning nuclear weapons ratified

An international treaty banning nuclear weapons will come into force in three months' time, after it was ratified by the required 50 countries. The UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons bans their use, as well as their development, production, testing and stockpiling. But key nuclear states are not signatories, including the United States, Britain, France, China and Russia. 

Also in the programme: A big protest is planned in Belarus and Britain's first mainly black, Asian and ethnically diverse orchestra.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues is Colleen Graffy, former US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and Associate Professor of Law at Pepperdine Caruso School of Law; and Alex Andreou, actor, writer, presenter of The Bunker podcast and columnist for Byline Times.

(Picture: Computer Generated Image of a Nuclear explosion. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptx59y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d1t25vjln)
Final push to win votes in US election

President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden have been campaigning ahead of November's election. Some 57 million Americans have already cast their vote, including President Trump.

Also in the programme: How the Middle Eastern version of Sesame Street is trying to help children cope with the coronavirus pandemic and is China on the way to economic recovery?

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues is Colleen Graffy, former US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and Associate Professor of Law at Pepperdine Caruso School of Law; and Alex Andreou, actor, writer, presenter of The Bunker podcast and columnist for Byline Times.

(Picture: Democratic candidate, Joe Biden (R) and US President, Donald Trump (L). Credit: EPA/SHAWN THEW)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptx922)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d1t25vnbs)
Large demonstration planned in Belarus

The authorities in Belarus have been accused of using brutal tactics to crack down on the thousands of protestors who have been taking to the streets since August, calling for President Lukashenko to resign. The protests show no sign of stopping and a big demonstration is planned for today.

Also in the programme: How plagues have affected people throughout history; and Britain's first mainly black, Asian and ethnically diverse orchestra’s take on Black Lives Matter protests.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues is Colleen Graffy, former US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and Associate Professor of Law at Pepperdine Caruso School of Law; and Alex Andreou, actor, writer, presenter of The Bunker podcast and columnist for Byline Times.

(Picture: Belarusian President, Alexander Lukashenko Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcfflnbg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqk)
One election, two farmers

Four years ago some of the biggest electoral shifts in the US were seen in the north-central state of Wisconsin. It was one of the swing states that decided that election. And it could be again. This week Emily Thomas hears the stories of two farmers who live and work in this key battleground region. How much have Donald Trump's trade wars with China, Canada and Mexico challenged a traditionally Republican community? And has Joe Biden offered enough incentives for farmers to vote Democrat?

(Picture: Carrie Mess and Will Hsu. Credit: Will Hsu/Carrie Mess/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Carrie Mess, dairy farmer
Will Hsu, farmer and President - Hsu’s Ginseng Enterprises


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptxdt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffls2l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0g)
Adventures of the bootleg-busting brothers

Rob and Jason Holmes were first recruited as undercover agents when they were children. They were in Atlantic City on the lookout for black market goods - like replica designer clothes, sunglasses, watches. Their employer was their private detective dad and their fee was ice cream. Now they take on some of the world’s biggest counterfeiters. It’s all raids, Russian gangs, and (fake) Rolexes. This episode was first released on 10th November 2018.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Rob (L) and Jason (R) Holmes in their youth
Credit: Rob and Jason Holmes


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptxjkb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x54)
Overcoming imposter syndrome at work

"Alright, you got away with it so far, but your truth will be out soon." "I should just leave it for the people who are real experts." "Well done? Oh no, they’ve got it all wrong about me."

Are these the nasty little voices in your head you must always deal with? Is there a ‘fraud police’ in your mind that you feel can come knocking anytime you achieve something significant, and announce to the whole world how you do not deserve any accolades?

This is what psychologists call ‘imposter syndrome’, a prolonged feeling of self-doubt, inadequacy, and low self-worth. It is estimated to affect nearly 70% of people at some point in their lives.

So, what can we do about it? Is there a better way to condition the workplace culture? And can we figure out a way to overcome the underlying fear of being fake? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how to cope with imposter syndrome at our work and in our lives.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dolly Singh, content creator; Dr Roma Kumar, senior consultant psychologist; Surovi Dey Dhupar, diversity and inclusion professional


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcfflwtq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct16c5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptxn9g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzhdql)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffm0kv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct165f)
Climate Wars

Climate Wars: The new Cold War

Temperatures in the Arctic are rising at more than twice the global average, and as the ice pack melts, battle lines are being drawn between global superpowers eager to lay claim to newly uncovered mineral resources and trade routes.

Will Robson examines the ratcheting up of tensions between Russia and the United States, as a growing number of military bases, missile tests and military exercises threaten the area’s stability.

He also reveals how China has entered the fray – labelling itself as a “near-Arctic state” and investing in icebreakers and scientific research in an effort to gain access to the “polar silk road” – an increasingly ice-free and potentially profitable trade route across the Arctic ocean.

Is the area set to become the battleground for a new Cold War?


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptxs1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl43)
How has Trump changed America’s relationship with the world?

When he was elected, President Trump promised to put ‘America First’, but how has he governed?

Charmaine Cozier looks at trade, diplomacy, defence and the environment to examine the results of four years of a very different approach to international affairs.

(Image: Donald Trump at public address, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffm49z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3csz6lr)
The British and their fish

By the middle of the 20th century, the English town of Grimsby was the biggest fishing port in the world. When the catch was good “fishermen could live like rock stars”, says Kurt Christensen who first went to sea aged 15. He was instantly addicted to a tough and dangerous life on the waves. But from the 1970s onwards, the industry went into decline. Today it contributes just a tenth of one percent to Britain’s GDP – less than Harrods, London best known department store.
So how can such a tiny industry cause so much political havoc and threaten to scupper a post Brexit deal with Europe? Fishing communities have often blamed EU membership - and the foreign boats that have arrived as a result - for a steep fall in catches over the last half century. Many coastal towns voted overwhelmingly for Britain to leave the European Union.
Now, Grimsby’s recently-elected Conservative MP – the first non-socialist the town has sent to Westminster in nearly 100 years - has spoken of a modern fleet and fresh opportunities. For Assignment, Lucy Ash travels to Grimsby to hear how fishing towns like this, ignored for decades by London’s political elite, now hope finally to turn a corner. She explores the huge place fishing plays in the British psyche and asks if the cold, stormy seas around Britain really can make coastal communities rich once again.

Producer Mike Gallagher

(Image: A trader examines a haddock at the daily Grimsby Fish Market auction. Credit: Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptxwsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bm2f9)
Thousands on the streets of Belarus calling on President Lukashenko to resign.

Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets in Belarus for the eleventh consecutive Sunday - calling on President Lukashenko to resign.

Also in the programme: The people of Chile are to vote in a referendum on whether to rewrite their country’s constitution and Dr Anthony Fauci, the top US infectious disease specialist has contradicted President Trump's assertion that the country has turned a corner on the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Alexander Lukashenko. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpty0jv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpty48z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjw2)
Paul Robeson: Singer, actor and civil rights activist

The multi-talented Paul Robeson could have turned his hand to pretty much anything he set his mind to: lawyer, athlete and linguist were just some of the career paths he could have taken. But he chose to become an actor and singer, and in doing so reached into the lives of huge numbers of people as one of the most popular American entertainers of his time.

Outspoken on the issues of racism, colonialism and the rights of workers, he used his popularity to campaign against the injustice he saw in many countries across the world – not just injustice suffered by his fellow African Americans.

During the Cold War, his support for Soviet-style communism was deemed unacceptable by the American establishment, and some set out to destroy his career.

Joining Bridget Kendall to examine Paul Robeson’s life are Dr Gerald Horne, the Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston and the author of Paul Robeson: The Artist as Revolutionary; Dr Shana L Redmond, Professor of Musicology and African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the author of Everything Man: The Form and Function of Paul Robeson; and Tayo Aluko whose one-man play Call Mr Robeson has won numerous awards and toured countries around the world since its premiere in 2007.


Photo: Paul Robeson
Credit: Keystone Features/Getty Images


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpty813)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ldrcxmspf)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Wolves take on Newcastle United.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by former Chelsea, Stoke and Bournemouth goalkeeper Asmir Begovic to discuss the weekend's talking points.

We'll also have reaction to the day's early game between Southampton and league leaders Everton.

Elsewhere, we'll round up the sporting action around the world - including the Formula One Portuguese Grand Prix, the men's National Rugby League Final and the Baseball World Series.

Photo: Adama Traore (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptym8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzjcpm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffmzjw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Global Questions (w3ct1cq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptyr0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptyvrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bn1db)
Spain imposes national Covid-19 curfew

Spain has declared a state of emergency and imposed a nationwide curfew in an effort to control the spread of the Covid-19 virus. We speak to a Spanish epidemiologist about the new restrictions. Also in the programme: the United States says Armenia and Azerbaijan have agreed a third ceasefire in the conflict over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. We hear from both sides of the frontline; and the people of Chile vote in a referendum on rewriting their country’s constitution
(Photo: City-wide night time curfew in Salamanca; Credit: European Photopress Agency)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptyzhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzjqy0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffnbs8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptz380)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffngjd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]



MONDAY 26 OCTOBER 2020

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lq9l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0xjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16dnvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct16c2)
Anatomy Of Touch

Unwanted touch

Claudia Hammond explores unwanted touch and who we do and don’t mind touching us – and where. She draws on insights from the largest study that’s ever been conducted on the topic of touch – The Touch Test - commissioned by Wellcome Collection. Almost forty thousand people from all over the world chose to take part. Claudia discusses where we draw the boundaries between acceptable and unacceptable touch, at work or in the street, with Dr Amy Kavanagh, a visually impaired activist and campaigner, Joanna Bourke, Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London and the author of “Rape - a History”, and Dr Natalie Bowling, a psychologist at the University of Greenwich who co-created the Touch Test and has been crunching the numbers. After #meToo and Covid, could unwanted touch even become a thing of the past?


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lqfb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57x3hlqsnz)
Low tourism in Seychelles 'accelerated' opposition win

The Seychelles elects its first president from the opposition party since 1977. With a tourism-focused economy, the island nation has been devastated by the global pandemic. We hear about its concerns over food security in the larger context of African nations. The ‘final, final’ stretch of negotiations over the UK’s decision to leave the EU are about to happen, promise experts – we mull over the final sticking points with economist Holger Schmieding. Plus, what do the stock markets make of the latest twist in the run up to the US election: Donald Trump attempts to push his favourite lawyers to the Supreme Court. Finally, the James Bond film ‘No Time to Die’ was supposed to be the savior of the covid-struck cinema industry – but now its delayed release has more people worrying.

(Image: A picture taken on November 16, 2019, shows a near-empty beach on Silhouette Island in the Seychelles. Photo by Yasuyoshi CHIBA / AFP/ Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16dslm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lqk2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36r99hh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16dxbr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164p)
America in the world

This week, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson turn their attention to American foreign policy. The Trump administration made radical changes to the United States’ role on the world stage with its America First doctrine. Some say he spoke truth to power; others lament the upending of norms which guided international relations for decades. Katty and Carlos are joined by former UN Ambassador and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power, and American Enterprise Institute senior fellow Danielle Pletka, to ask if historians will look on the Trump administration more favourably in the future than in the present, and what a possible Biden presidency might mean for America’s relationships around the world.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Viv Jones, Iyore Odighizuwa, Maeve McGoran and Jonelle Awomoyi, and Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lqnth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5k)
Viv Anderson - first black England footballer

In November 1978, Viv Anderson became the first black footballer to play a full England international. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Anderson had to endure racial abuse from opposing fans to achieve his dream of reaching the very top of the professional game. He went on to win the European Cup twice with Nottingham Forest and to become Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Viv Anderson talks to Rebecca Kesby.

PHOTO: Viv Anderson on his England debut (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lqskm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36r9jzr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16f4v0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6c)
Am I related to a virus?

All living things are related to each other, from elephants to algae, e-coli to humans like us. Within our cells we hold genetic information in the form of DNA or RNA. But despite viruses sharing these molecules, many scientists don't consider them to be 'life'.
Viruses cannot reproduce on their own, but some can insert their DNA into a host to pass genes sideways through the branching tree of life. As a result, viruses’ relationship with life is.... complex.

Two of our listeners had viruses on the mind, so they sent in the same question to CrowdScience. Senan from Singapore and Melvin from South Africa want to know how viruses began to see if this can tell us whether they shared a common ancestor with humans.

To dig into this complexity Marnie Chesterton speaks with an expert on Koala genetics – Dr Rachael Tarlinton. Koalas are in the middle of tackling a retroviruses, a type of virus that plants DNA into our cells as a reproduction strategy. Her research could reveal why humans life has so much viral DNA within our genomes.

Marnie speaks with a computational biologist Professor Gustavo Caetano-Anolles, who has found a new way to trace the family tree for billions of years using proteins common to all life on earth, and speaks with Professor Chantal Abergel who paints a picture of how viruses went from being the losers of evolution, to being highly successful parasites of cells.

If you have a question for CrowdScience, please email: crowdscience@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Rory Galloway
Presented by Marnie Chesterton

Contributors:
Dr Chelsey Spriggs - Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan in the USA
Dr Rachael Tarlinton - Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham in the UK
Professor Gustavo Caetano-Anolles - The University of Illinois in Urbana Champagne, USA
Professor Chantal Abergel - Aix Marseille Université in France
Graeme Dick - Head Keeper, Longleat Zoo and Safari Park, UK


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lqx9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9c5ng)
Jubilation as Chile votes to rewrite constitution

The latest results from Chile indicate that a large majority has voted in favour of changing the constitution introduced by the dictator, General Pinochet.

The Australian island of Tasmania loosens Coronavirus restrictions - and the state of Victoria has recorded no new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours.

British navy commandos have stormed an oil tanker and detained the stowaways who had been threatening the crew.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lr11w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9c9dl)
Chile votes to replace its radical free market constitution

The latest results from Chile indicate that a large majority has voted in favour of changing the constitution introduced by the dictator General Pinochet.

The first of a number of judicial panels, set up to investigate police abuses in Nigeria, begins its work in Lagos today.

The political crisis in Thailand is being debated in parliament as protestors demonstrate for a second day against the powers of the king.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lr4t0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9cf4q)
Truce between Armenia and Azerbaijan

A ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan is underway from today; though two previous were broken almost immediately.

In Belarus, protests continue with the opposition calling for a nationwide strike to go ahead if the President does not step down.

Spain declares a state of emergency and imposes a night time curfew to tackle its second wave of Covid-19.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lr8k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc25)
Chris Packham: 'Finding the good in the bad' of Covid-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has inflicted huge economic damage, but it has also offered the natural world a little bit of respite – room to breathe. What will come next? Will it be a return to the old ways of resource exploitation and consumption? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Chris Packham, one of the UK’s best-known naturalists and environmental campaigners. Are we humans capable of fundamentally changing our priorities?

Photo: Chris Packham Credit: BBC


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16fmtj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7k5)
How to spot fake news

A former CIA analyst shares her tips on separating what’s true from what’s false. There’s been a lot of nervousness about the role of social media in the run up to next week’s US presidential elections with concerns over voting interference and disinformation campaigns from foreign actors. Cindy Otis was an analyst at the CIA for ten years and her job was to filter through information and weed out fake and misleading news. She has now written a book aimed at young adults called True or False: A CIA Analyst's Guide to Spotting Fake News and tells us how fake news works.


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkr)
When JFK won the US presidency

Ted Sorensen was a close aide and speechwriter for John F Kennedy. In an interview with Lucy Williamson he remembered the night that Kennedy won the US presidential election in 1960. It was a close race against the Republican contender Richard Nixon.


Photo: US President John F. Kennedy giving his first State of the Union address to Congress in January 1961. (Credit: NASA/SSPL/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lrd98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16frkn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lrj1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16fw9s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0py0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 17:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lrmsj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rbd6n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16g01x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cszj43)
Redesigning the world with Covid-19

What’s the best way to design ‘pandemic-resilient’ cities? Covid-19 has changed the way we move in public spaces, and social distancing has become the rule to live by. Kim Chakanetsa and her guests imagine what the world will look like in the future.

Toshiko Mori is a New York-based Japanese architect, founder of Toshiko Mori Architect and Professor at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. She is the first woman to be tenured there. Growing up in Japan, she witnessed the country’s recovery after World War Two. She firmly believes that architecture can transform communities, and that crises are an opportunity to build better places.

Maliam Mdoko is the first female President of the Malawi Institute of Architects and she works with Press Trust, a charity building schools, hospitals and housing facilities. Maliam is already working on redesigning the way people move inside buildings, and she thinks women need to be the driving force behind this huge cultural and societal change.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Maliam Mdoko (Courtesy of Maliam Mdoko)
R: Toshiko Mori (Credit: Ralph Gibson)

Producer: Alice Gioia


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lrrjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3x)
The black child raised by white supremacists

Shane McCrae is an award-winning African-American poet and writer whose work often addresses the black experience in the US. Poetry for him was a way of making sense of his difficult and abusive upbringing. As a child, Shane was raised by his white maternal grandparents in a deeply racist household. His grandmother taught him the Nazi salute, told him that he “tanned very easily” and that he was living with her because his black father didn’t want him. But when Shane was a teenager, he would learn the truth about the racial prejudice and deception that divided him from his father Stanley.

Shane's latest collections of poetry are called Sometimes I Never Suffered and The Gilded Auction Block.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Shane McCrae as a child
Credit: Courtesy Shane McCrae


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lrw8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rbmpx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16g7k5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ls00x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3g5nh)
New coronavirus measures in Italy and Spain

New restrictions have come into force in several European countries, as infections surge in many parts of the continent. A nationwide overnight curfew was brought in in Spain. In Italy, gyms, pools, cinemas and theatres have shut, and restaurants, bars and cafes will close for all but takeways.

Also, Australia says it has raised "grossly disturbing" reports with Qatar that women were strip-searched and examined before a flight from Doha to Sydney.

And, new Covid rules and state emergency in Spain and Italy.

(Photo: Bars and cafes across Italy must end table service by 18:00. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ls3s1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16gh1f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv4h2vfz5r)
Turkey's Erdogan urges boycott of French goods

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called on Turks to boycott French goods after French President Emmanuel Macron's defended the right to show cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Islamic teachings strictly forbid the making of his image. Mr Macron was speaking after the beheading of French teacher Samuel Paty, who had shown cartoons of the Prophet in his class. We get the latest from BBC Middle East business correspondent Sameer Hashmi. Japan's new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has pledged to make the country carbon neutral by 2050. We ask Takeshi Kuramochi, climate policy researcher from the New Climate Institute in Cologne, Germany, how this can be achieved. And we have a special report on medical oxyen, which has helped save the lives of hundreds of thousands during the coronavirus pandemic. In some countries though, oxygen has been in desperately short supply. Mike Johnson has been discovering why, and what’s being done to address the problem.

(Photo: A man in Istanbul holds a picture of Macron with a shoe print on it during a demonstration against French president's comments over Prophet Muhammad cartoons. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ls7j5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghbll0)
President Erdogan: Boycott French products

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called on people to not buy French products, amid the latest row with French President Emmanuel Macron over Islam. This comes after Macron said he would to defend secular values and fight radical Islam after a French teacher was murdered for showing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in class. We'll hear how Muslims in France feel about the what's happening.

Also, a medical expert joins us every day on show to answer listener questions and guide us though developments with the Covid-19 pandemic. Today, we are joined by Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University. We are also going to hear about the city of Kashgar in China, where the entire city of around 4.7 million people is being tested for Covid-19 amid a regional outbreak.

We'll also follow developments in the United States ahead of the president election, and will answer your questions about next month's vote. Race and racism continue to be key issues in the campaign, so we'll bring you a conversation with two former Neo-Nazi's to hear about the influence of extremist groups and white supremacy in the US.

(Photo: Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a ceremony in Malatya, Turkey October 25, 2020. Credit: Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lsc89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghbqb4)
US election conversations: Neo-Nazi groups

We are hearing conversations between voters in the US about their lives and the main issues ahead of next week's presidential election. The issue of white supremacy and race came to the fore in this election campaign when President Trump appeared reluctant to condemn it during the first presidential debate, he later said that he did condemn groups associated with white supremacy. To try and understand why people might become tempted to join right-wing extremist groups, we've brought together two people who both were part of Neo-Nazi groups in America when they were younger.

Also, every day on OS we are joined by one of the BBC's business correspondents from across the world to look at how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the livelihoods of people around the world. Today we'll speak to our business correspondent in the Middle East, to hear how the economies and jobs of people in the Gulf region have been hit by the pandemic.

And, in Chile an overwhelming majority have voted in support of rewriting the country's constitution, which dates to the military rule of General Augusto Pinochet. With almost all the ballots counted, 78% had voted "yes" in a referendum that was called after mass protests against inequality. We'll explain the story and hear from people who have been on the streets celebrating.

(Photo: White supremacists rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. Credit: Reuters/Joshua Roberts)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lsh0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lslrk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rcc5p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16gz0y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jv1jh3l6l)
2020/10/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lsqhp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16h2s2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct16c3)
Anatomy Of Touch

Affectionate touch

Claudia Hammond looks at the neuroscience behind our sense of touch. Why does a gentle touch from a loved one make us feel good? This is a question that neuroscientists have been exploring since the late 1990's, following the discovery of a special class of nerve fibres in the skin. There seems to be a neurological system dedicated to sensing and processing the gentle stroking you might receive from a parent or lover or friend, or that a monkey might receive from another grooming it. Claudia talks to neuroscientists Victoria Abraira, Rebecca Bohme, Katerina Fotopoulou and Francis McGlone who all investigate our sense of emotional touch, and she hears from Ian Waterman who lost his sense of touch at the age of eighteen.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lsv7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3h0wd)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lsyzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rcqf2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16hb8b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58qk76hpf8)
Turkey's Erdogan urges boycott of French goods

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called on Turks to boycott French goods after French President Emmanuel Macron's defended the right to show cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Islamic teachings strictly forbid the making of his image. Mr Macron was speaking after the beheading of French teacher Samuel Paty, who had shown cartoons of the Prophet in his class. We get the latest from BBC Middle East business correspondent Sameer Hashmi. Japan's new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has pledged to make the country carbon neutral by 2050. We ask Takeshi Kuramochi, climate policy researcher from the New Climate Institute in Cologne, Germany, how this can be achieved. And we have a special report on medical oxyen, which has helped save the lives of hundreds of thousands during the coronavirus pandemic. In some countries though, oxygen has been in desperately short supply. Mike Johnson has been discovering why, and what’s being done to address the problem.

(Picture: a man in Istanbul holds a picture of Macron with a shoe print on it during a demonstration against French President's comments over Prophet Muhammad cartoons. Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lt2r2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16hg0g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]



TUESDAY 27 OCTOBER 2020

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lt6h6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ltb7b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19218ylkb7)
French products boycotted by Muslim nations

Turkey's president calls for a boycott on French products - but do they work to stifle business, especially when driven by political or religious reasons? Plus, Japan has set itself an ambitious target to cut its harmful gas emissions to zero by 2050. We assess if they can do it. Cinemas are set to reopen in India, and we look at what it means for the Bollywood film industry, which has suffered hugely from halted productions during the coranavirus pandemic. We discuss all this with guests Tawnell Hobbs from the Wall Street Journal in Dallas, and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of digital news site The Current PK in Lahore.

(Image: Leaflet calling for a boycott of French goods are displayed in place of French products which have been removed in protest at a supermarket in Yemen. Photo by Mohammed Hamoud/Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ltfzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rd6dl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16ht7v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1642)
China's rocket man

Qian Xuesen is widely celebrated in China as the father of the country’s rocket programme, and the man who kick-started its exploration of space. China is now second only to the US in terms of its dominance among the stars. But Qian also had an important part to play in the early scientific advances, before World War Two,that would eventually take the US to the moon. However, he is almost entirely forgotten by the country that nurtured his talent for decades, before anti-communist persecution sent him back to China, the land of his birth. Kavita Puri traces the rise and fall - and rise again - of an extraordinary life.

This is also a story about national myth-making and geopolitics. Qian’s fortunes and misfortunes mirror Sino-American relations down the decades. And it is about the lies and betrayals that happen when individuals are caught up in the twists of history. There are important questions, too, about whom history remembers and whom it forgets, and whether Qian’s deportation in 1955 was the biggest blunder the US ever made. This is also a tale that does not end with Qian’s death in 2009. At a time when relations between America and China are again at a nadir, his story still has powerful resonances today.

Presenter: Kavita Puri

(Photo: Qian Xuesen)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ltkql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ltpgq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rdfwv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16j1r3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct16c3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ltt6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9g2kk)
President Trump gets his new Supreme Court judge

President Trump's nominee, Justice Amy Coney Barrett, has joined the US Supreme Court, just days before the presidential election.

Women airline passengers in Doha are undergoing intrusive examinations after a baby was found abandoned at the airport.

And we look at anthropodermic bibliopegy - that's the proper title for books bound in human skin.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ltxyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9g69p)
Amy Coney Barrett sworn in to US Supreme Court

Amy Coney Barrett has been sworn in as the US Supreme Court's newest judge sealing a two-thirds conservative majority on the top US judicial body.

Doctors in Spain begin an indefinite strike - the last Tuesday of each month - against working conditions.

Also we'll get more on the escalating diplomatic row between France and Turkey over the Prophet Mohamed.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lv1q3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9gb1t)
Deadly bomb explosion at a religious school in Pakistan

In the last few hours, seven people have been killed in a bomb attack on a religious school in the Pakistani city of Peshawar.

We go to the Syrian Turkish border to hear about the serious situation in the town of Idlib, where there's a fragile ceasefire in progress.

In the north European state of Belarus, protests have been continuing, as people heed a nationwide strike called by the opposition leader.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lv5g7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1z)
Saving Cape Cod’s dolphins

The mass stranding of dolphins, orcas and whales is depressingly common. We join a team on the East Coast of the United States who have dramatically improved the survival rates of beached dolphins there. And we are with them as they fight to save a dolphin mother and calf. Plus we look at how Silicon Valley AI tech, and its power to understand dolphin communication, could lead to even more being saved.


Produced and Presented by Ben Wyatt

Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16jjqm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8b6)
Cinemas: Open, but nothing to show

Delays to Hollywood blockbusters are prompting a crisis in the cinema industry. Movie studios are putting their biggest releases on hold while the pandemic is still affecting audience numbers.

Mooky Greidinger, boss of cinema giant Cineworld, tells us why this has forced him to close all his screens in the UK and US. Shawn Robbins, senior analyst at BoxOffice Pro, explains why the global success of Christopher Nolan's Tenet wasn't enough to convince the studios to take the risk. And Penn Ketchum, founder of Penn Cinemas in the US state of Pennsylvania, describes the impact that's having on independent cinema operators.

Presented by Ed Butler.

(Photo: A reopened cinema in Wuhan, China. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmq8)
Shirley Chisholm - the black woman who tried to be president

In January 1972 Shirley Chisholm became the first major-party black candidate to make a bid for the US Presidency. She was also the first black woman elected to Congress. In 2015, Farhana Haider spoke to former Congressman Charles Rangel who worked with Shirley Chisholm.

(Photo: Shirley Chisholm at the Democratic National Convention in 1972. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lv96c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1642)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16jngr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct16c3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lvdyh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lvjpm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rf93r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16jwz0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3csww94)
Tattoo artist Evan Kim

Evan Kim is one of the most in-demand tattoo artists in New York, thanks to a glamorous list of celebrity clientele which includes Brooklyn Beckham and Frank Ocean.

He's famed for his minimalist, fineline tattoos in black and grey. This is a new style of delicate, intricate graphic art which appeals to the Instagram generation.

Evan’s joined by hip hop artist, documentary-maker and fellow Korean American, Jaeki Cho, in his new studio just a few blocks from the Empire State Building. He’s about to start a fiendishly difficult task: creating a design which incorporates elements of Japanese anime, mythology and magic - but it has to be small enough to fit on the client’s upper arm.

We follow Evan as he works on the tricky design, and then the even trickier application. One slip could ruin those perfect circles and lines. Along the way, Evan shares with us his passion for tattoo design history. On his self-built shelves, there’s an entire library of books from traditional American Sailor Jerry works to Japanese tattoo master Horiyoshi III. But it’s not just a question of beautifying the body. Evan tries to take meaning from his clients’ stories and incorporate them into his designs.

Image: Evan Kim (Credit: Andrew T. White)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lvnfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkg)
On the frontline against chemical warfare

Hamish de Bretton-Gordon is a British chemical weapons expert whose work in Syria has attracted global attention. But working in a warzone is dangerous and not only has Hamish had to smuggle himself into countries, he's faced bombs, bullets and even the Islamic State group in order to investigate and document chemical warfare. Hamish has written a book called Chemical Warrior: Saving Lives on the Front Line of Modern Warfare.

If you visited the controversial Atlantis commune in Southern Colombia back in the 1990s, you’d have probably heard some disturbing noises. The group practised primal screaming, a form of psychotherapy which seeks to address childhood pain. The commune had started in London, founded by a therapist called Jenny James. They’d made the move to South America to be closer to nature, and they’d settled on a forested area of Colombia controlled by left wing Farc guerrillas. At first Atlantis coexisted with the Farc, but as the Colombian civil war intensified the guerrillas became more hostile, and when violence broke out it pulled the commune apart. Outlook’s Faye Planer went to visit the commune’s remaining members.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Hamish de Bretton-Gordon
Credit: Hamish de Bretton-Gordon


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lvs5w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rfjm0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16k4g8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct16c3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lvwy0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3k2kl)
Protests take place across Italy over anti-virus measures

Demonstrations have been taking place in Milan, Naples and other Italian cities against the imposition of new coronavirus restrictions. The demonstrations began soon after the national government's order to close restaurants, bars, gyms and cinemas came into effect on Sunday evening.

Also on the programme; A new study says coronavirus immunity weakens over time; and, with one week to go before the US election, a look at the state of Wisconsin, where the rate of COVID-19 cases have risen sharply.

(Picture: Protest in Naples Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lw0p4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct1642)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16kcyj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwsck1xgyf)
China Communist Party plenum begins in Beijing

The elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Andy Xie, an independent economist based in Shanghai, tell us what he expects to emerge from the meeting. Also in the programme, the cinema business is in trouble. Movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Ed Butler has been talking to industry insiders about the struggle for survival. And, while many businesses have suffered because of covid-19, some have thrived, including book publishing. Bloomsbury Publishing has had its best six months since 2008, as we hear from CEO Nigel Newton.

(Picture: China's President Xi Jinping. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lw4f8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghfhh3)
Coronavirus: 'Antibodies fall rapidly after infection'

In the biggest study of its kind, scientists at Imperial College London found that people's immune response to coronavirus reduces over time following infection. The study indicates that levels of protective antibodies waned quite rapidly after an infection. We discuss the implications with Dr Isaac Bogoch from Toronto.

We are also following a bomb attack on an Islamic religious school in Peshawar in Pakistan, and bring some voices from that city.

We continue to host conversations with Americans ahead of next week’s election. Today we bring together three farmers in Wisconsin. They talk about the past fours years of Trump presidency and how the pandemic has affected their businesses.

(Photo: Nurses turn a patient with COVID-19 from prone to supine position as part of care in the intensive care unit at the Etterbeek-Ixelles site of the Iris Sud Hospitals in Brussels, Belgium Credit: STEPHANIE LECOC/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lw85d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghfm77)
US election conversations: Farmers in Wisconsin

We continue to host conversations with Americans ahead of next week’s election. Today we bring together three farmers in Wisconsin. They talk about the past fours years of Trump presidency and how the pandemic has affected their businesses.

In the biggest study of its kind, scientists at Imperial College London found that people's immune response to coronavirus reduces over time following infection. The study indicates that levels of protective antibodies waned quite rapidly after an infection. We discuss the implications with Dr Rick Malley, who specialises in vaccines at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

And we bring together doctors and nurses working in hospitals in Belgium, Italy and France; three of the countries in Europe concerned about their rising levels of infection and the impact that is having on their medical services.

(Photo: Jerry Volenec Credit: Jerry Volenec)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lwcxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lwhnn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rg82s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16kvy1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jv1jh6h3p)
2020/10/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lwmds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1642)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16kzp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98t)
Why do we vote with paper in the age of the smart phone?

Despite a pandemic, nearly everyone voting in the upcoming US election will do so with a tick in a box on a piece of paper. They may post their ballot, or go in person to a voting station, but the process is still physical. Why? Presenter Gareth Mitchell will be asking election voting advisor Susan Greenhalgh.
Despite the prevalence of paper, there are some voting machines in the USA, Beatrice Atobatele tells us why she bought one online and how hacking into it could help to make the coming US election more secure.
Also on the programme, data is central to nearly everything in computing today. It presents issues, but imagine if you could train your machines on clean, orderly, high quality data? Well a new technique to generate clean data artificially has been released, open source, by MIT. We explore what this could mean with Nicolai Baldin, the CEO of the London company ‘Synthesized’.

(Image: Getty Images)

Presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert comment from Bill Thompson
Produced by Rory Galloway

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lwr4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3kxsh)
Covid deaths in Europe rise sharply

The World Health Organisation says Europe's daily Covid deaths rose by nearly 40% compared with the previous week. France, Spain, the UK, the Netherlands and Russia accounted for the majority of cases which increased by a third.

Also, doctors say Covid-19 is now rampant in the refugee camps of Idlib, north-west Syria.

And in Nigeria - a trial seen as a test of strict new laws on homosexuality has collapsed.

(Photo: Hospitals in Liège - Belgium - are transferring patients elsewhere and cancelling non-urgent surgeries as coronavirus admissions surge. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lwvx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rgmb5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16l75f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58qk76llbc)
China Communist Party plenum begins in Beijing

The elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Andy Xie, an independent economist based in Shanghai, tell us what he expects to emerge from the meeting. Also in the programme, the cinema business is in trouble. Movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Ed Butler has been talking to industry insiders about the struggle for survival. And, while many businesses have suffered because of covid-19, some have thrived, including book publishing. Bloomsbury Publishing has had its best six months since 2008, as we hear from CEO Nigel Newton.

(Picture: China's President Xi Jinping. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lwzn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16lbxk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3csww94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2020

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lx3d9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lx74f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19218ypg7b)
Less than a week to US election

With just a week to go until the US election, we’ll hear how the Biden and Trump campaigns are getting their final pitches in. Also in the programme, the elite Central Committee of China’s ruling Communist Party is meeting behind closed doors over four days to create the economic blueprint for world's second biggest economy. Meanwhile, a Hong Kong activist has been detained by plain-clothed police officers near the US consulate, before reportedly attempting to claim asylum. And the cinema business is in trouble: movie theatres are closed or limiting numbers because of the pandemic and the supply of new releases has dried up. Plus, we’ll hear how working from home could be making us less creative.

All through the show we’ll be joined by political journalist Erin Delmore in New York and Enda Curran of Bloomberg in Hong Kong.


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lxbwk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rh39p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16lq4y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct165g)
Climate Wars

Climate Wars: The Sahel

The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report identified the Sahel as a ‘climate change hot spot’, a region where human security is particularly threatened by the effects of global warming.

Will Robson explores the area’s war-torn history and investigates how climate change is acting as the catalyst to migration, violent disputes over water and the growth of brutal armed extremists. He hears from those caught in the middle of conflicts in Mali and the Lake Chad region and discovers how drought and rapid desertification are fanning the flames of violence.

Produced by Simon Jarvis and Tom Roseingrave. A Whistledown Production for the BBC World Service.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lxgmp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lxlct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rhbsy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16lyn6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lxq3y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9jzgn)
A week to go before election day in the US

A week before the US elections we compare the policies and campaigning styles of the presidential candidates - Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

The US imposes new restrictions on people sending money to Cuba and it's expected to have a major effect on the economy,

And what's it like to jump out of a helicopter, with no parachute, on purpose?


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lxtw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9k36s)
Covid-19: Pressure rises for European lockdowns

The number of coronavirus cases in Europe continues to rise, with growing pressure on hospitals and medical staff.

In Poland continuing protests over the government tightening laws over abortion have seen women's rights campaigners storm parliament.

And the right to bear arms in the US, much quoted by those who carry them, but the victims of gun crime keep on fighting for change.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lxym6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9k6yx)
Covid-19: Europe considering reimposing lockdowns

Tougher measures are being looked across Europe to stem the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

In Belgium the pressures on the health system are such that doctors have been asked to carry on working even after testing positive themselves

A week from today we may know who has won the race for the White House for the next four years.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ly2cb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc76)
Dominique Schnapper on secularism in France after Samuel Paty's killing

The beheading of a teacher by an 18-year-old outside Paris struck a particularly jarring blow to the French psyche. Samuel Paty was murdered for teaching his students, including young Muslims, about freedom of speech, including the freedom to mock religion. His killing was seen by some as an attack on France’s secular values. Stephen Sackur speaks to Dominique Schnapper, president of a council which advises the government on secularism in education. Is France's government getting its response to this tragedy right?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16mfmq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8nh)
The nuclear industry dreams small

Could the future of nuclear power be the mass production of cheap small modular reactors?

Justin Rowlatt visits a UK-based consortium led by Rolls Royce that is trying to develop these factory-produced miniature power stations. But how much funding does their chief executive Tom Samson think they need from the UK government to get started, and how long will it take them to deliver their first reactor?

Nuclear power has long had its sceptics. Greenpeace chief scientist Doug Parr explains why they continue to oppose nuclear on safety grounds, even as the need to find carbon-free sources of energy has become more urgent. Meanwhile, nuclear physicist M V Ramana of the University of British Columbia questions the business case for small reactors.

Plus, clean energy consultant Michael Liebreich gives his view on how big - and competitive - the market for small modular reactors could be.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Small modular reactor; Credit: Rolls Royce)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsj)
The Watergate scandal

In 1973, the US Senate began an investigation which would eventually lead to Richard Nixon standing down as President a year later. Senator Howard Baker was on the Watergate committee. In 2013, he spoke to Louise Hidalgo.

(Photo: Senator Howard Baker (left), Senator Sam Irvin, Sam Dash, Senator Herman Talmadge. Credit: Gene Forte/Getty Images.)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ly63g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct165g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16mkcv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p439ly9vl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lyflq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rj60v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16msw3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3csz4pv)
The Superlinguists

How to learn a language

Simon Calder asks how to go about acquiring a new tongue. He gets tips from those who know - innovative teachers and polyglots. The answers are surprising. At school, it is repetitive drills, shouted out loud by the whole class, that seem to lodge the grammar and pronunciation in the pupils’ brains. But if you are an adult learning by yourself, then, on the contrary, don’t stress about grammar and pronunciation, there are better, and more fun things to focus on. Simon has a go at learning Slovenian, can he order coffee and cake after just one lesson?

(Photo: Olly Richards and Katie Harris, with kind permission from both)


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lykbv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszds7)
I set up a radio station for aliens

John Shepherd is a self-taught electronics whizz. From a young age he was fascinated by science and electricity. He'd spend his days collecting discarded radio and tv sets and re-fashioning them into new devices. He used his skills for an unusual pursuit - he wanted to reach out to potential extra-terrestrial life. This was the 60s, the space race was in full swing and there was a collective fascination with alien life and UFOs. But how do you start a conversation with an alien? Initially he transmitted binary tones in an attempt to make contact. But he later settled on a different way to communicate, he started broadcasting reggae, afrobeat, jazz, and more, the ‘universal language’ of music. There's a Netflix documentary about John's story called John Was Trying to Contact Aliens.

Awa Farah is a British-Somali filmmaker behind Somalinimo – a film about Somali women at Cambridge University. Inspired by her mother’s journey from Somalia to Europe, she wanted to change the fact that growing up, she never saw stories about other black Muslim women.

Obi Emenlonye is a Nigerian filmmaker who normally works on buzzing movie sets. But when the Coronavirus lockdown shut down his industry, he decided to make his latest work remotely – directed entirely from his sofa.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Picture: John Shepherd
Credit: dougcurran.photography


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lyp2z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rjfj3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16n1cc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lysv3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3mzgp)
Germany poised to introduce partial COVID lockdown measures

With the number of COVID-19 cases rising sharply across Europe,German Chancellor Angela Merkel is urging state leaders to adopt partial lockdown measures next week.

Also in the programme, anti-government protesters in Nigeria remain defiant, despite the deaths of at least 12 people at the hands of the army last week and protecting Australia's Great Barrier Reef by paying farmers to reduce the amount of pollution they use on their land.

Photo: German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Berlin Mayor Michael Mueller attend a video conference with Federal State Premiers on how to respond to the spread of the coronavirus Credit: REUTERS/Guido Bergmann/BPA/Handout


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lyxl7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct165g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16n8vm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxlt8npp8t)
Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

As we go to air the chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google begin questioning by senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. We go live to the hearings and hear from independent tech analyst Stephanie Hare on its significance. Also in the programme, the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Our chief environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt has been to visit the headquarters of a new consortium led by the UK engineering giant Rolls Royce, which says it can manufacture a new small modular reactor in the next ten years.

(Picture: Sundar Pichai, Jack Dorsey and Mark Zuckerberg; the CEOs of Google, Twitter and Facebook, respectively. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lz1bc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghjdd6)
Turkey vows legal action over Erdogan cartoon

Turkey has said it will take legal and diplomatic actions over a cartoon of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in French magazine Charlie Hebdo. This is just the latest in a row between Turkey and France, after French President Emmanuel Macron's pledged to defend secularism after the murder of a French teacher who showed cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in class. We'll hear how Muslims in France and around the world feel about what's been happening.

Also, we continue to hear the conversations had by Americans ahead of next Tuesday’s presidential election. Today we return to one of the issues that has been forefront of the conversation in the US this year, the relationship between African-Americans and law enforcement. Philadelphia is the latest US city to see protesters and confrontation on the streets after the shooting dead of a 27-year-old black man by police. We reunite three people who we spoke to during Black Lives Matter protests earlier this year to hear how the issue of racial justice has featured in this election campaign.

We'll explain and hear the impact of Covid-19 on people's lives. In Europe, the story is of rising case, further restrictions and impositions on people’s movements and businesses, which in some places has led to protests. We’ll speak to restaurant owners in Italy and Spain who have been protesting against restrictions.

And every day we invite a medical expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer audience questions. Today, we will be joined by Dr Maria Sundaram from Toronto.

(Photo: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses his partys group meeting 28/10/2020. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lz52h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghjj4b)
US election conversations: Black Lives Matter

We continue to hear the conversations had by Americans ahead of next Tuesday’s presidential election. Today we return to one of the issues that has been forefront of the conversation in the US this year, the relationship between African-Americans and law enforcement. Philadelphia is the latest US city to see protesters and confrontation on the streets after the shooting dead of a 27-year-old black man by police. We reunite three people who we spoke to during Black Lives Matter protests earlier this year to hear how the issue of racial justice has featured in this election campaign.

Also, Turkey has said it will take legal and diplomatic actions over a cartoon of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in French magazine Charlie Hebdo. This is just the latest in a row between Turkey and France, after French President Emmanuel Macron's pledged to defend secularism after the murder of a French teacher who showed cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in class. We'll hear how Muslims in France and around the world feel about what's been happening.

And every day on OS we are joined by one of the BBC's business correspondents from across the world to look at how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the livelihoods of people around the world. Today we'll speak to our business correspondent in the South Africa, to hear how the economy and jobs of people there have been hit by the pandemic.

(Photo: A member of the Black Lives Matter movement stands at the Breonna Taylor Memorial in Louisville, Kentucky, USA, 26 October 2020. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lz8tm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszds7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lzdkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rk4zw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16nrv4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jv1jh9d0s)
2020/10/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lzj9w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct165g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16nwl8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccq)
Covid-19 plasma therapy trial results ‘disappointing’

For months now, many people hospitalised with Covid-19 have been given convalescent plasma – donated blood serum from people who’ve already had the illness. The hope has been that transfusing donated antibodies against the coronavirus will help to prevent deaths and serious illness. Convalescent plasma therapy received a high profile boost in the USA in August when the Trump administration announced emergency use authorisation for the treatment, despite the lack of robust evidence for its efficacy against the coronavirus. Now the results of the first completed randomised clinical trial of the therapy have been published in the British Medical Journal. The findings are not particularly encouraging. In this Indian study, there was no difference in the death rate or the progression from moderate to severe disease between patients given the therapy and those receiving only standard care. Claudia Hammond talks to Dr Aparna Mukherjee of the India Council of Medical Research and the BBC’s medicine and science correspondent James Gallagher about the prospects now for convalescent plasma therapy.

Health Check also asks whether vaccines against other diseases might provide some protection against the coronavirus, and features a report from California where a lot of mental health counselling has gone online or on the phone since the pandemic took hold. How do people with mental health problems and their therapists feel about the loss of face-to-face sessions?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: An Iraqi phlebotomist holds a bag of plasma donated by a recovered Covid-19 patient. Photo credit: Asaad Niazi/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lzn20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3ntpl)
Macron declares second national lockdown in France

The French president Emmanuel Macron has announced a new national lockdown starting Friday, to continue till at least the end of next month. Speaking on national television, Mr Macron said none of the coronavirus measures taken so far had worked, in the face of a second wave whose speed had caught all of Europe by surprise. He said that without further measures, hospitals would be overwhelmed.

Also, the heads of Facebook, Twitter and Google have defended free speech before American senators who are considering stricter controls on social media content.

And, we will look at the escalating row between France and Turkey over a cartoon depicting President Erdogan as a beer drinking sex pest.

(Photo: President Macron)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lzrt4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rkj78)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16p42j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58qk76ph7g)
Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

As we go to air the chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google begin questioning by senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. We go live to the hearings and hear from independent tech analyst Stephanie Hare on its significance. Also in the programme, the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Our chief environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt has been to visit the headquarters of a new consortium led by the UK engineering giant Rolls Royce, which says it can manufacture a new small modular reactor in the next ten years.

(Picture: Sundar Pichai, Jack Dorsey and Mark Zuckerberg; the CEOs of Google, Twitter and Facebook, respectively. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p439lzwk8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc76)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16p7tn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3csz4pv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]



THURSDAY 29 OCTOBER 2020

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m009d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m041j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19218ysc4f)
Tech chiefs face US Senate questions on internet law

The chief executives of Facebook, Twitter, and Google have faced intense grilling from senators over Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects web companies from liability when it comes to content posted by users. Rebecca Klar, a reporter with The Hill in Washington D.C., gives us the highlights. Also in the programme, financial markets have tumbled around the world for a second day this week amid concerns that a rise in coronavirus cases will hurt still tentative economic recoveries. And the nuclear industry is pinning its hopes on mass-producing small, cheap power stations to compete with renewable energy. Plus, the Kazakhstan tourism board attempt to capitalise on the release of the second Borat film.

All through the show we’ll be joined by Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai and Ralph Silva from the Silva Research Network in Toronto.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m07sn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rl06s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16pm21)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6ly)
US election: Socially distant

Ahead of the US presidential election on 3 November, two socially distanced views of the pre-election political landscape of America, explore different perspectives on key issues and themes from the last four years of the Trump presidency and a campaign curtailed by Covid-19 restrictions.

Susan Glasser writes a Letter from Trump’s Washington column for the New Yorker magazine where she is a staff writer and a long-standing reporter of US elections and politicians. She has been critical of the way Donald Trump has governed. Joe Borelli is a New York City Council member, a Republican who represents Staten Island. He is a regular contributor to talk radio and TV and is an outspoken critic of the Covid-19 policies of the city’s mayor Bill de Blasio and New York’s Governor Cuomo.

(Photo: US citizens wearing face masks with the word 'Vote'. Credit: Reuters)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m0cjs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszds7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m0h8x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rl7q1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16pvk9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m0m11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9mwcr)
France introduces second national lockdown

Starting from Friday, and at least till the end of November, people will only be allowed to leave home for essential work, school, or medical reasons

The US Supreme Court stops Republican efforts to block extended ballot deadlines in Pennsylvania and North Carolina for the presidential election.

And we hear from the sister of a female Saudi activist who has gone on hunger strike in jail.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m0qs5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9n03w)
Covid restrictions tightened as Europe deals with second wave

A second nationwide lockdown is announced in France, while more restrictions are planned in Germany and Spain.

We have a report form the city of Taiz in Yemen where residents live under the threat of snipers.

And we hear from the sister of jailed Saudi activist Loujain Al-Hathloul who has gone on hunger strike in the hope of being allowed to have visits from her family.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m0vj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9n3w0)
Covid: The view from France and Germany

Europe reacts to second wave by introducing stricter measures. President Macron orders France back in a lockdown.

With less than a week to go to the US elections, President Trump is trying hard to appeal to female voters - but are they listening?

And we hear why British scientists have produced a replica of a human tongue with the help of a 3D printer.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m0z8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl49)
Can President Trump still win the US presidential election?

National polls ahead of the US presidential election suggest a clear win for challenger Joe Biden. But could they be getting it wrong as they did four years ago? In 2016, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote, but - because of the US electoral system - lost the election. Could history repeat itself? In this week’s Inquiry, Tanya Beckett asks: can President Trump still win?


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16qbjt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7xz)
How Dharavi coped with coronavirus

Has one the biggest slums in India escaped the worst of Covid-19? Dharavi is one of the biggest slums in India, if not the whole of Asia. Ed Butler hears from Dharavi residents about life in the slums back in April, and now. Radhika Kapoor, a Delhi economist who's been focussed on the Government response to the crisis, says efforts to protect ordinary workers have been very limited. But the Government rejects that argument. Sanjeev Sanyal, the Prime Minister Narendra Modi's chief economic advisor, says the Government has done all that it can to stem the tide of the disease.

(A BMC health care worker collect swab sample of a resident at Dharavi. Photo by Satish Bate via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmn0)
Ronald Reagan and the Moral Majority

In June 1979 the Moral Majority was launched and changed the course of American politics. It was set up to promote family values by religious conservatives from Catholic, Jewish and evangelical Christian communities. It urged protestants in particular to go against the tradition of separating politics and religion and register to vote, and to vote Republican. Richard Viguerie was one of the driving forces behind the movement. He spoke to Claire Bowes in 2016.

(Photo: Ronald Reagan with Richard Viguerie in Atlanta, Georgia, 1975, courtesy of ConservativeHQ.com)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m130k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16qg8y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszccq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m16rp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjw8)
Dido of Carthage: A love story gone wrong

A Phoenician princess, who fled into exile to escape the cruel king of Tyre, sailed across the Mediterranean Sea to North Africa, where she founded the great city of Carthage in the ninth century BC. Well, that is one story about Dido, or Elissa, as she is known in today's Lebanon and Tunisia.
Another, from the Roman poet Virgil, puts her at the centre of a tragic love story: first entranced, then abandoned by the wandering Trojan hero Aeneas, Dido curses him and takes her own life. So who was the real Dido? Was she a powerful independent queen, or a victim - a spurned lover? And did she exist at all?

Bridget Kendall is joined by Josephine Quinn, professor of Ancient History at Oxford University, and the author of the book In Search of the Phoenicians;
Helene Sader, professor of Archaeology at the American University of Beirut, and the author of The History and Archaeology of Phoenicia;
Roald Docter, professor of Archaeology at Ghent University and the editor of Carthage Studies;
and Boutheina Maraoui Telmini, professor of Punic History and Archaeology at the University of Tunis.

(Image: A drawing of Dido and Aeneas hunting deer. Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5r)
Natalia Partyka - Youngest paralympian

In 2000, Poland’s Natalia Partyka became the youngest ever athlete to take part in the Paralympic Games when she competed in the table tennis tournament in Sydney at the age of 11. Now established as one of the greatest para-athletes of all time, she’s gone on to win five gold medals and also to take part in competitions for able-bodied athletes, including the London 2012 Olympics. She talks to Steve Hankey about her remarkable career. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Natalia Partyka at the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing (AFP)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m1bht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rm2xy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16qps6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqr)
How to enjoy eating with your own children

Mealtimes with small children, whether they are your own or someone else's, can be a far from relaxing experience. Dinner with a toddler can be a wild affair, leaving the adults around the table exhausted. Is this a key part of a child’s learning, or should we get in quick and teach table manners in the high chair? How can a parent banish mealtime battles and turn a child into a dream dinner companion? And what can we tell about our attitudes to food and parenting philosophies when we look at how we teach our children to eat?

Emily Thomas meets three parents from around the globe, who’ve mastered the art of a chilled family mealtime.

Contributors: Pamela Druckerman, author of French Children Don’t Throw Food, Sherlyn Kim, CEO of Molly Manners Korea and Vaishali Sudan Sharma of The Champa Tree parenting blog.


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m1g7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbp)
The stay-at-home mum who became a bodybuilding star

In her 30s Kiran Dembla was a full-time stay-at-home mum living in the Indian city of Hyderabad. She spent her days cooking and cleaning and caring for her children. Kiran always had the sense that something was missing, she describes feeling a 'blankness', but it was only when she discovered that she had a blood clot in her brain that she decided to do something about it.

The medication she was taking was causing her to put on weight so she joined the gym. That decision set her on the path to completely transforming her life - these days she's a celebrity trainer and a star bodybuilder. But it hasn't been an easy road - cultural and family expectations have often been at odds with her own aspirations.

Also on the programme, our reporter Saskia Edwards goes in search of the elusive creator of what must be one of the most maddening games - the Rubik's Cube. On route she meets one of the fastest cubers in the world, Feliks Zemdegs. He can solve the puzzle in a matter of seconds but even he can't tell Saskia where she can find its inventor - Erno Rubik.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Kiran Dembla
Credit: Radesh Photography


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmn0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m1l02)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rmbf6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16qy8g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszccq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m1pr6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3qwcs)
France 'terrorist' attack: three stabbed to death

The mayor of the city of Nice says a suspect has been arrested following the fatal 'terrorist' attack at the Notre-Dame basilica. France's national anti-terror prosecutors have opened a murder inquiry.

Also on the programme: we hear from Kabul following a United Nations warning that the terrorist organisation Al Qaeda remains embedded within the Taliban; and China's five year plan and what it means for the future of Xi Jinping.

(PHOTO: Nice Mayor Christian Estrosi talks to Municipal Police at the site of a knife attack in church in Nice, France, October 29, 2020 in this still image obtained from social media. CREDIT: Courtesy Twitter / @CESTROSI via REUTERS)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m1thb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16r5rq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvyxtgdzbb)
Germans told to prepare for "four long, hard months"

Angela Merkel has warned Germans of "four long, hard months" of winter with coronavirus restrictions. A partial lockdown will begin across the country on 2 November and last until 30 November. As bars and restaurants prepare to close except for takeaway, we hear from the owners of two establishments in Berlin and get the details on all the restrictions that will come into force from the Financial Times Berlin bureau chief Guy Chazan. US GDP grew 7.4% between July and September - a record-breaking performance - but the economy, ravaged by coronavirus, is still smaller than a year ago. So what does it actually mean, for the US and its imminent election? We ask Chris Low, chief economist at FHN Financial in New York. Plus, we from Asia's largest slum, Dharavi, in India, to find out why there have been fewer coronavirus cases than had been feared. And online marketplace Etsy says its sales have more than doubled from a year ago, in large part due to the reliance on online shopping during pandemic lockdowns. We speak to Niki Molnar, who has been selling facemasks via the website.

(Picture: Angela Merkel address the Bundestag. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m1y7g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghm999)
US election conversations: Undecided voters

As the US Presidential election approaches, we hear from undecided voters - a group that could make the key difference in this tightly fought election.

Also, we bring you the latest from the French city of Nice, where three people have been killed in a knife attack. France has raised its national security alert system to its highest level and President Emmanuel Macron denounced the "Islamist terrorist attack".

And every day we invite a medical expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer audience questions. Today, we will be joined by Dr Emma Hodcroft, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Basel in Switzerland.

(Photo: Gordon Kou. Credit: Gordon Kou)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m21zl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghmf1f)
France attack: Reaction from Nice

We bring you the latest from the French city of Nice, where three people have been killed in a knife attack. France has raised its national security alert system to its highest level, and President Emmanuel Macron has denounced the "Islamist terrorist attack". We speak to people in the city to hear how they feel about what's happened.

Also, as the US presidential election approaches, we hear from undecided voters - a group that could make the key difference in the election.

And every day on OS, we are joined by one of the BBC's business correspondents to look at how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the livelihoods of people around the world. Today we'll speak to our reporter in South America, to hear how the economy and jobs there have been hit by the pandemic.

(People attend a mass at the Saint Sulpice Church to pay their respects to the victims of the terror attack at the Notre Dame basilica of Nice, in Paris, France, 29 October 2020. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m25qq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmn0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m29gv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rn1wz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16rnr7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jv1jhd8xw)
2020/10/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m2f6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16rshc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh17)
Osiris Rex stows asteroid material

Last week NASA’s Osiris-Rex mission successfully touched down on asteroid Bennu’s crumbly surface. But the spacecraft collected so much material that the canister wouldn’t close. NASA systems engineer Estelle Church tells Roland Pease how she and the team back on Earth performed clever manoeuvres to remotely successfully shut the lid.

As winter draws on in the North, and people spend more time indoors, there’s considerable debate about the conditions in which SARS-Cov2 is more likely to spread. Princeton University’s Dylan Morris has just published research exploring the coronavirus’s survival in different humidities and temperatures.

Indian agriculture in some areas uses vast amounts of water. Dr Vimal Mishra of the Indian Institute of Technology in Gandhinagar has discovered that this irrigation, plus very high temperatures, is causing not just extreme discomfort amongst the population but also more deaths.

In the 1930s serious dust storms over several years ruined crops and lives over a huge part of Midwest America. The dustbowl conditions were made famous by the folk songs of Woodie Guthrie and in John Steinbeck’s novel Grapes of Wrath. Now a study in Geophysical Research Letters suggests that levels of dust have doubled in the past twenty years. Roland Pease asks researchers and farmers if they think the dust bowl is returning.


(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Editor: Deborah Cohen


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m2jz3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3rqlp)
France attack: Three killed in 'Islamist terrorist' stabbings

Detectives in France, Italy and Tunisia are investigating a 21 year old Tunisian being held in hospital on suspicion of killing 3 churchgoers in the southern French city of Nice. It's reported that he arrived in Europe only last month, landing on the Italian island of Lampedusa. Several other people were wounded in the attack.

Also, UK Labour Party suspends its former leader, Jeremy Corbyn, over reaction to anti-Semitism report.

And a senior UN official warns Al-Qaeda still 'heavily embedded' within Taliban in Afghanistan.

(Photo: President Macron (third from left) has promised a crackdown on Islamic extremism in France. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m2nq7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rnf4c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16s0zm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58qk76sd4k)
Germans told to prepare for "four long, hard months"

Angela Merkel has warned Germans of "four long, hard months" of winter with coronavirus restrictions. A partial lockdown will begin across the country on 2 November and last until 30 November. As bars and restaurants prepare to close except for takeaway, we hear from the owners of two establishments in Berlin and get the details on all the restrictions that will come into force from the Financial Times Berlin bureau chief Guy Chazan. US GDP grew 7.4% between July and September - a record-breaking performance - but the economy, ravaged by coronavirus, is still smaller than a year ago. So what does it actually mean, for the US and its imminent election? We ask Chris Low, chief economist at FHN Financial in New York. Plus, we from Asia's largest slum, Dharavi, in India, to find out why there have been fewer coronavirus cases than had been feared. And online marketplace Etsy says its sales have more than doubled from a year ago, in large part due to the reliance on online shopping during pandemic lockdowns. We speak to Niki Molnar, who has been selling facemasks via the website.

(Picture: Angela Merkel address the Bundestag. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m2sgc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16s4qr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]



FRIDAY 30 OCTOBER 2020

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m2x6h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m30ym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19218yw81j)
Tech profits soar under Coronavirus

Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google all reported growing sales and profits despite the Coronavirus pandemic. We'll hear from the FT's San Francisco Correspondent Dave Lee. Also in the programme, we hear from WWNO reporter Patrick Madden in New Orleans, as Tropical Storm Zeta tears through Louisiana. Plus, we from Asia's largest slum, Dharavi, in India, to find out why there have been fewer coronavirus cases than had been feared. And online marketplace Etsy says its sales have more than doubled from a year ago, in large part due to the reliance on online shopping during pandemic lockdowns.

All through the show we'll be joined by Paddy Hirsch of Planet Money in Los Angeles and Stefanie Yuen Thio of TSMP Law in Singapore.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m34pr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rnx3w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16shz4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3csztgx)
A fresh start in Turkey and happy birthday Maradona!

Alanyaspor's Steven Caulker talks about life in Turkey and tells us how he's rebuilding his career after overcoming addiction problems. And Julio Arca wishes Diego Maradona a happy 60th birthday.

Picture: Steven Caulker of Alanyaspor during a Turkish Cup match against Kasimpasa (ANP Sport via Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m38fw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmn0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m3d60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rp4m4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16srgd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m3hy4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9qs8v)
France in shock after church attacks

President Macron insists the country will not give up on its values after the murder of three people in a church.

What impact could the postal vote have on next week's US Presidential election?

And the financial cost of coronavirus: we hear from 3 people who lost their jobs and had no money to buy food. They tell us how they survived.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m3mp8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9qx0z)
President Macron: France will never give in

A French MP gives his reaction after three people are killed in a knife attack in a church in Nice.

We visit Ohio - one of the key state in next week's US election - where, among other things, the role of the media is polarising positions.

And Poland's President tells a radio programme abortion can be allowed in certain conditions - so does he differ from his government which adopted a near total ban on abortion last week?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m3rfd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wk7n9r0s3)
France mourns church attack victims

We get a response from a French Muslim to the murder of three people in a church in Nice.

A scientist tells us about mutations to Covid-19 that could have contributed to this latest second wave in Europe.

And Russia is facing a record rise in covid cases and casualties - so what is President Putin doing to stem the tide?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m3w5j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszby5)
Jim Clyburn: Can Biden win?

According to the polls Joe Biden is strong favourite to be the next President of the United States. But the party’s leaders bear deep scars from 2016. Donald Trump overcame the odds and beat Hillary Clinton and he claims he can do it again next week. Even if Biden wins does America really know what his presidency would look like? Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the most senior Democrats in Congress, House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn. Is Democratic party confidence more than skin deep?

Photo: US House Oversight and Reform Subcommittee Chairman James E. Clyburn Credit: Getty Images


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16t7fx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz795)
What do parents owe adult children?

We speak to those who argue parents should give their children money long into adulthood - and others who say the whole of society should be responsible, not just parents.

Raphael Samuel is a 28 year old businessman in India who tried to sue his parents for giving birth to him - without his consent. An Indian court threw out the case on grounds of absurdity, but Raphael isn’t giving up. He’s now filed a case demanding that all parents prove - before they give birth - that they have the ability to give their child the ‘right to life’ - something he thinks should include being able to provide an education, proper food, and healthcare. He believes parents’ financial responsibility for their children doesn’t end when the child hits 18 years of age. In Italy, where almost two thirds of 18-34 year olds live at home, we hear from Tobia della Puppa, who explains why it can be hard to explain to the older generation why this is the case. We also get the perspective of Nina Bandel, a sociology professor at the University of California Irvine, who tells us how children went from being economically useful, to “priceless”. (Picture: Older person’s hand giving coin to young person’s hand; Credit: utah778/Getty Images)

Producer: Sarah Treanor, with extra production in Italy from Vera Mantengoli


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvs)
With the president on 9/11

On September 11 2001, President George W. Bush was visiting an elementary school in Florida as two planes hit the World Trade Center. In an image that would become iconic, the White House chief of staff, Andrew Card, broke the news to the president by whispering in his ear as he listened to schoolchildren practising their reading. In interviews from 2011, Andrew Card recalls the moment that transformed President Bush’s presidency and the course of recent history.

PHOTO: President George W. Bush shortly after learning of the 9/11 attacks (AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m3zxn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpk)
Senators accuse big tech of bias

US politicians clash over how social media firms will moderate content in future. Plus, how inkjet printing tech could help ramp-up Covid-19 testing and research. And a solar-powered solution to a shortage of medical oxygen in developing countries. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters James Clayton, Leo Kelion, and Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies remotely to the US Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, Credit: EPA/ Greg Nash/ POOL).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16tc61)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m43ns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcns)
US vs China: A new Cold War?

The central committee of China’s ruling Communist Party has been meeting this week in Beijing to map out its priorities for the next five years. While Americans decide whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden will set the direction of US foreign policy going forward, there’s little doubt that Chinese President Xi Jinping will remain in his post for the foreseeable future - party leaders have already abolished his term limits. Whoever wins on Nov. 3, Beijing is likely to continue advancing its interests across the Asia-Pacific region and globally, often at odds with US goals. UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres has warned more must be done to avoid ‘a new Cold War’, adding: "our world cannot afford a future where the two largest economies split the globe in a great fracture - each with its own trade and financial rules and internet and artificial intelligence capacities.” But as the Communist Party continues to successfully grow the Chinese economy and its influence overseas - while at the same time refusing to give ground on human rights or democratic reforms - is such a split inevitable? China’s military is expanding and the number of countries relying on investment from Beijing is growing too. As the country becomes more technologically and economically self-sufficient, are the chances of avoiding a global schism decreasing? Are we about to witness a new Cold War? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m47dx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rpzv1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16tlp9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m4c51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhx)
Inside the schools that chain boys

A BBC Arabic investigation has uncovered systemic child abuse inside Islamic schools in Sudan, known as khalwas. It found that boys are routinely chained, shackled and beaten; in some khalwas there was evidence of sexual abuse. The BBC’s Mamdouh Akbiek worked with a local investigative journalist on the story.

Boston's Brazilian party-goers
Boston’s large Brazilian community has stirred up controversy by holding huge outdoor parties despite Covid-19 restrictions, as BBC Brasil’s Ricardo Senra explains.

Somali storm in a teacup
A social media star was deported from the self-declared republic of Somaliland because of a cup of tea. Bilal Bulshawi is from Somalia, and posted a picture of himself drinking tea decorated with the Somalia flag, whilst in Somaliland. BBC Somali’s Bidhaan Dahir tells us about the online storm which followed.

Chile's referendum
Constanza Hola explains how a 30 pesos price rise for metro tickets last October led to the overwhelming referendum result this week to rewrite Chile's constitution.

Opening up about mental health in Pakistan
World mental health day is 10th October. To mark the date BBC Urdu’s Saher Baloch decided to speak up about a topic very close to her heart, living with someone with a mental health condition.

Image: Sudanese schoolboy chained
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m4gx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rq7b9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16tv5k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m4ln9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3ts8w)
France hardens stance against radical Islam

French leaders have ramped up their rhetoric against radical Islam after a Tunisian man killed three people in a church in the southern city of Nice. The interior minister, Gerald Darmanin, said France was at war with Islamist ideology both at home and abroad.

Also in the programme: a strong earthquake off the Aegean coast has struck Turkey and Greece leaving a trail of destruction; and we hear from the US public in Michigan about the differing campaign styles of the two candidates ahead of the presidential election.

(Image: Father Franklin Parmentier and member of the French Parliament Eric Ciotti pay their respect to the victims of the knife attack at a makeshift memorial at the entrance of the Notre Dame Basilica church in Nice, France, on 30 October 2020. Credit: EPA)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m4qdf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16v2nt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltb1c848cv)
Eurozone bounces back to economic growth

The economies of the eurozone bounced back in the third quarter of the year according to new official figures. Economic activity for the region as a whole was 12.7% higher than in the previous three months. But the growth was not enough to reverse the declines in the first half of 2020 due to the pandemic. We go through the numbers with Shanti Keleman, Investment Director at Brown Shipley. With new restrictions coming into force in France last night, journalist Anne-Elisabeth Moutet tells us how well they have been received by the French people. And we hear from the manager of Galignani bookshop in Paris - one of the oldest in the city - which, under the restrictions, is unable to open. The furlough scheme in the UK, which has ensured 9.5 million workers got up to 80% of their salary during the pandemic, is being replaced by a new government support programme. The BBC’s Emma Simpson has been to talking to businesses near London Gatwick airport, which had one of the highest proportions of furloughed workers in the country.

Also in the programme, we ask what if you've been stranded at sea since the start of the pandemic - and can't get home. An estimated 400,000 seafarers, are in that position. They are facing physical and mental exhaustion -- and repatriation to their home countries has become a matter of urgency. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic has managed to track down some of them.

Plus, India has applied for Geographical Indication status for Basmati rice, which would prohibit Pakistan from exporting it to the EU. Pakistan is, not surprisingly, unhappy with the move, as we hear from the BBC's Nikhil Inamdar in Mumbai.

(Picture: a man wearing a face mask in front of the Euro currency symbol. Credit: AFP.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m4v4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghq66d)
Earthquake hits Turkey and Greece

There has been a powerful earthquake off Turkey's Aegean coast, north of the Greek island of Samos. The 7.0 magnitude tremor is said to have centred off Turkey's Izmir province. Turkey put the magnitude of the quake at 6.6, with 20 buildings collapsing in Izmir. We get the latest.

Also, we talk about the aftermath of the suspected jihadist knife attack in Nice. The southern French city has been mourning for the three people stabbed to death at a church on Thursday. We look at the anti-French sentiment being expressed in several Muslim countries over President Macron’s stance on cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

And with four days to go until the US election, we’ll speak at length to our correspondent Clive Myrie on his reflections after reporting in the state of Arizona this week. How will the issues of racism and policing, as well as the coronavirus pandemic, shape the way people there will vote? And how does the political discourse in America today compare to what Clive has come across as a correspondent at previous elections?

(Photo: Locals and officials search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir. Credit: Reuters/Tuncay Dersinlioglu)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m4ywp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t2xghq9yj)
France attack: Nice in mourning after church stabbings

We talk about the aftermath of the suspected jihadist knife attack in Nice. The southern French city has been mourning for the three people stabbed to death at a church on Thursday. We look at the anti-French sentiment being expressed in several Muslim countries over President Macron’s stance on cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

Also, there has been a powerful earthquake off Turkey's Aegean coast, north of the Greek island of Samos. The 7.0 magnitude tremor is said to have centred off Turkey's Izmir province. Turkey put the magnitude of the quake at 6.6, with 20 buildings collapsing in Izmir. We get the latest.

And with four days to go until the US election, we’ll speak at length to our correspondent Clive Myrie on his reflections after reporting in the state of Arizona this week. How will the issues of racism and policing, as well as the coronavirus pandemic, shape the way people there will vote? And how does the political discourse in America today compare to what Clive has come across as a correspondent at previous elections?


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m52mt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m56cy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rqyt2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16vknb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jv1jhh5tz)
2020/10/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m5b42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16vpdg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6k)
Can I learn to sing in tune?

We’ve probably all got a friend who sings along wildly out of tune - or maybe you are that person. But why are some of us apparently tone deaf, while others can hold a melody? Can you train yourself to sing in tune, or is it mostly down to raw talent?

These musical questions, from CrowdScience listeners Jenny and Anastasia, certainly struck a chord with us. Anastasia loves to sing but her friends tell her she’s off-key - or that “a bear trod on her ear,” as they say in her native Russia. Is it possible for her to improve her singing voice, and what are the best ways of going about it?

Both musicians and scientists help us tackle these questions, and explain what’s going on in our ears, brains and throats when we try to sing the right notes. We learn about congenital amusia, a condition which makes it almost impossible to tell if you’re in tune or not, and attempt to tease out the relative influence of our genes and our environment when it comes to musical ability.

Presented by Marijke Peters and produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service.


Image: Child Singing. Credit: Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m5fw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z0kv3vmhs)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m5kmb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bh36rrb1g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16vxwq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58qk76w91n)
Eurozone bounces back to economic growth

The economies of the eurozone bounced back in the third quarter of the year according to new official figures. Economic activity for the region as a whole was 12.7% higher than in the previous three months. But the growth was not enough to reverse the declines in the first half of 2020 due to the pandemic. We go through the numbers with Shanti Keleman, Investment Director at Brown Shipley. With new restrictions coming into force in France last night, journalist Anne-Elisabeth Moutet tells us how well they have been received by the French people. And we hear from the manager of Galignani bookshop in Paris - one of the oldest in the city - which, under the restrictions, is unable to open. The furlough scheme in the UK, which has ensured 9.5 million workers got up to 80% of their salary during the pandemic, is being replaced by a new government support programme. The BBC’s Emma Simpson has been to talking to businesses near London Gatwick airport, which had one of the highest proportions of furloughed workers in the country.

Also in the programme, we ask what if you've been stranded at sea since the start of the pandemic - and can't get home. An estimated 400,000 seafarers, are in that position. They are facing physical and mental exhaustion -- and repatriation to their home countries has become a matter of urgency. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic has managed to track down some of them.

Plus, India has applied for Geographical Indication status for Basmati rice, which would prohibit Pakistan from exporting it to the EU. Pakistan is, not surprisingly, unhappy with the move, as we hear from the BBC's Nikhil Inamdar in Mumbai.

(Picture: a man wearing a face mask in front of the Euro currency symbol. Credit: AFP.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p439m5pcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszby5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pyk16w1mv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3csztgx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3csz6lr)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6ly)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6ly)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6ly)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6ly)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffgx6g)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffh8fv)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffhmp7)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffhrfc)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffhzxm)

BBC News Summary 17:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffjv4j)

BBC News Summary 21:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffkb41)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pwcffkfw5)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffkt3k)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffkxvp)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffl5by)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffl932)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pwcfflnbg)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffls2l)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffm0kv)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffm49z)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffmzjw)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffnbs8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pwcffngjd)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5pyk16dnvh)

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BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5pyk16f4v0)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5pyk16hb8b)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5pyk16hg0g)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16ht7v)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16j1r3)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16jjqm)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16jngr)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16jwz0)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16k4g8)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16kcyj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16kvy1)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16kzp5)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16l75f)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5pyk16lbxk)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5pyk16lq4y)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5pyk16lyn6)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5pyk16mfmq)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5pyk16mkcv)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5pyk16msw3)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5pyk16n1cc)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5pyk16n8vm)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5pyk16nrv4)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5pyk16nwl8)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5pyk16p42j)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5pyk16p7tn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5pyk16pm21)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5pyk16pvk9)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5pyk16qbjt)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5pyk16qg8y)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5pyk16qps6)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5pyk16qy8g)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5pyk16r5rq)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5pyk16rnr7)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5pyk16rshc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5pyk16s0zm)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5pyk16s4qr)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16shz4)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16srgd)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16t7fx)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16tc61)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16tlp9)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16tv5k)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16v2nt)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16vknb)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16vpdg)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16vxwq)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5pyk16w1mv)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptsf5y)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptsjy2)

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BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptssfb)

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BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptt0xl)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptt4nq)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptt8dv)

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BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptthx3)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p1xpttmn7)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p1xpttrdc)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p1xpttw4h)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p1xpttzwm)

BBC News 17:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptvgw4)

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BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptvqcd)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptvv3j)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptvyvn)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptw2ls)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p1xptw6bx)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p1xptwb31)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p1xptwfv5)

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BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5p1xptxdt6)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p1xptxn9g)

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BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p1xpty813)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p1xptz380)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p439lq9l3)

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BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5p439lr11w)

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BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p439lr8k4)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p439lrd98)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p439lrj1d)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p439lrmsj)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5p439lrrjn)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5p439lrw8s)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5p439ls00x)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5p439ls3s1)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p439ls7j5)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5p439lsc89)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5p439lsh0f)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5p439lslrk)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5p439lsqhp)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5p439lsv7t)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5p439lsyzy)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p439lt2r2)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p439lt6h6)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5p439ltb7b)

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BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5p439ltxyz)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5p439lv1q3)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5p439lv5g7)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p439lv96c)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p439lvdyh)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p439lvjpm)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5p439lvnfr)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p439lvs5w)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p439lvwy0)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5p439lw0p4)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p439lw4f8)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5p439lw85d)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p439lwcxj)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5p439lwhnn)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5p439lwmds)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5p439lwr4x)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5p439lwvx1)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p439lwzn5)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p439lx3d9)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p439lx74f)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p439lxbwk)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5p439lxgmp)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5p439lxlct)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5p439lxq3y)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5p439lxtw2)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5p439lxym6)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5p439ly2cb)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5p439ly63g)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5p439ly9vl)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5p439lyflq)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5p439lykbv)

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BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5p439lz1bc)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5p439lz52h)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5p439lz8tm)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5p439lzdkr)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5p439lzj9w)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p439lzn20)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p439lzrt4)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p439lzwk8)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p439m009d)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p439m041j)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p439m07sn)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p439m0cjs)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5p439m0h8x)

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BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5p439m0vj9)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5p439m0z8f)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5p439m130k)

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BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5p439m1bht)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5p439m1g7y)

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BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5p439m1y7g)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5p439m21zl)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5p439m25qq)

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BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5p439m2jz3)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5p439m2nq7)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p439m2x6h)

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BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5p439m5kmb)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p439m5pcg)

BBC OS Conversations 08:06 SAT (w3ct0xjt)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct0xjt)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t2xghbll0)

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BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t2xghm999)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t2xghmf1f)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t2xghq66d)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t2xghq9yj)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7k5)

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Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8nh)

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Business Matters 00:06 SAT (w172x18zvp5kn8v)

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Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x19218ysc4f)

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Business Weekly 00:06 SUN (w3ct0sp7)

Comedians Vs. The News 04:32 SAT (w3ct0x3h)

Comedians Vs. The News 21:06 SAT (w3ct0x3h)

Comedians Vs. The News 10:06 MON (w3ct0x3h)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv6c)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv6c)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv6c)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv6k)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98t)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz98t)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz98t)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz98t)

Discovery 00:32 MON (w3ct16c2)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct16c3)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct16c3)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct16c3)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct16c3)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9q5)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9q5)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9q5)

Girl Taken 08:32 SAT (w3ct0xw6)

Girl Taken 04:32 SUN (w3ct0xw6)

Girl Taken 23:32 SUN (w3ct0xw6)

Global Questions 10:32 SAT (w3ct1cq5)

Global Questions 19:32 SUN (w3ct1cq5)

HARDtalk 01:06 SUN (w3cszbxz)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc25)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3cszc25)

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HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3cszc76)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszby5)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3cszby5)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszccq)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszccq)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszccq)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszccq)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct16c5)

Heart and Soul 02:32 SUN (w3ct16c5)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct16c5)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3csww94)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3csww94)

More or Less 17:50 SAT (w3ct0py0)

More or Less 21:50 SAT (w3ct0py0)

More or Less 05:50 SUN (w3ct0py0)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0py0)

Music Life 11:06 SAT (w3csz6tj)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6tj)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wk7n9c5ng)

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Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wk7n9cf4q)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wk7n9g2kk)

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