Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 OCTOBER 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj08l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zhdvshp0)
Brexit - deal or no deal?

UK prime minister Boris Johnson has said the country must "get ready" for no EU trade deal by the end of the year - the BBC's Rob Watson explains why an agreement is proving so hard to reach. We look at the US election where astonishing sums are being spent; Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, talks us through the figures. A new study suggests the Great Barrier Reef has lost half its corals since 1995...the culprit is warmer seas according to researcher Renee Setter, from the University of Hawaii. Advertising using social media influencers is becoming a more and more common way for businesses to raise their profile but that relationship between business and the cool person they're paying to showcase their product isn’t always a happy one, as Sheetal Parmar has been finding out. Plus, we hear how the first flights from New Zealand in a special travel bubble have touched down in Sydney. And we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Ryan, ABC's senior business correspondent. (Photo of Boris Johnson by Wiktor Szymanowicz for Getty Images).


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj0db7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnl4rc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053prlm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjt)
Mickey Arthur & how Miandad's six shook cricket

With Sri Lanka's strict quarantine rules thwarting their return to the cricket field, we ask head coach Mickey Arthur if he can see a solution.

And the power of a six - we look back at Javed Miandad's era-defining six for Pakistan against India in 1986 - and other key moments that changed the course of cricketing history.

Plus, tributes to former New Zealand captain John Reid.

Photo: Mickey Arthur (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj0j2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhp)
How an election kicked off a Kyrgyz crisis

It’s less than a fortnight since elections in Kyrgyzstan triggered mass protests. Since then the prime minister has resigned, the president too, and a man who was in prison then is now prime minister and self-declared acting president. BBC Kyrgyz Editor Gulnara Kasmambet shares the view from Bishkek.

My Home Town: Byblos
In our series My Home Town, we revisit Byblos in Lebanon with Janay Boulos of BBC Arabic.

Giving Afghan mothers a name
Afghan women recently won a major victory; after a 3 year campaign mothers' names can now be recorded alongside fathers' on children's ID cards. Mahjooba Nowrouzi of BBC Afghan explains why this change is so significant.

BBC Persian reports the US election debates
Iranians are following the US presidential election closely, with the candidates taking opposite positions on US sanctions. BBC Persian’s Siavash Ardalan and Nicholas Niksadat talk about the challenges of simultaneously interpreting the raucous, and occasionally rude, first presidential debate.

In praise of mahjong
The tile-based game has been played in China for centuries, but what’s the appeal? It's a question we posed to our BBC Chinese colleagues and mahjong aficionados, Howard Zhang and Suping.
Image: A rally in Bishkek in support of the former Kyrgyz president
Credit: EPA/IGOR KOVALENKO


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvk)
Saddam Hussein's big movie project

In 1980 the Iraqi strongman, Saddam Hussein, tried to launch his country's entry into the world of movie making. He spent millions of dollars on an epic movie called Clash of Loyalties, filmed almost entirely on location in Iraq, and staring some of Britain's leading actors , including Oliver Reed, Helen Ryan and James Bolam. But soon after shooting of the film began, war erupted between Iraq and neighbouring Iran. Mike Lanchin speaks to the film's Iraqi-born British producer Lateif Jorephani and the Iraqi actor, Fatima al Rubai, about the ambitious project.

Photo Credit: Jorephani Productions


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj0mth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnk)
How dangerous is North Korea?

This week North Korea celebrated 75 years of communism with a military parade at which it unveiled an giant intercontinental missile. The heavily choreographed event featured all the pomp and circumstance the world has come to expect from North Korea's mass human performances. It also contained a surprisingly emotional speech from Chairman Kim Jong-Un, who at times wept as he spoke about the country's struggles. The country’s first military parade in two years signalled a shift back to the more aggressive stance it used to adopt before the now stalled nuclear talks with the Trump administration. So is there any hope that temporary thaw created enduring opportunities for engagement with the rest of the world - or are we seeing a return to past behaviour? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss - how dangerous is North Korea?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj0rkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnlhzr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053q3v0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3g)
Wonho Chung and Carol Zoccoli

Jordanian stand-up star Wonho Chung and brilliant Brazilian comedian Carol Zoccoli join comedy couple Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to give their unique take on the world’s headlines.

This week, how do Brazilians feel about the promise of a vaccine for Covid-19? And what does it take to be crowned the most beautiful camel in Dubai?

Get involved and tell us about the funny stories where you are.
#comediansvsthenews


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj0w9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d1fsvz7lg)
Protests against the King in Thailand

Thousands take to the streets of the Thai capital, Bangkok, demanding political reforms: The government responds with new powers.

Also, we hear live from New Zealand where voting is underway in a general election.

Plus, as people around Europe face various levels of coronavirus lockdown, how is the hunt for a vaccine going?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Kehinde Andrews, professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University, and author of the book "Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for 21st Century"; and Stephanie Baker, a senior investigations writer at Bloomberg.

(Picture: A protester shows the three-finger salute during anti-government protests in Bangkok, Thailand. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj101w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d1fsvzcbl)
Untold slave stories from the West Indies

We hear some of the untold histories of enslaved women in the West Indies.

Also, thousands take to the streets of the Thai capital, Bangkok, demanding political reforms: The government responds with new powers.

Plus, as people around Europe face various levels of coronavirus lockdown, how is the hunt for a vaccine going?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Kehinde Andrews, professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University, and author of the book "Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for 21st Century"; and Stephanie Baker, a senior investigations writer at Bloomberg.

(Picture: 'Slaves Fell the Ripe Sugar', a painting by William Clark of slaves cutting sugar cane on a plantation in the West Indies in 1823. Credit: British Library)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj13t0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d1fsvzh2q)
Challenges facing black students at Cambridge

We'll find out about the challenges facing black students at one of the world's top universities.

Also, a year after Bolovian President Evo Morales was forced into exile, can his party prevail in elections there?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Kehinde Andrews, professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University, and author of the book "Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for 21st Century"; and Stephanie Baker, a senior investigations writer at Bloomberg.

(Picture: The BBC follows eight black undergraduates through their experiences at the University of Cambridge. Credit: BBC)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053qh2d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x67)
Soul Music

The Star-Spangled Banner

America's national anthem was written by a lawyer, Francis Scott Key, after watching the British navy bombing Fort McHenry in 1814. It was set to an English social men's club song and recognized as the national anthem in 1889. Notoriously difficult to sing, and traditionally played at public sports events and orchestral concerts, the anthem has inspired emotion and attracted controversy.

We hear from Dr John Carlos who along with Dr Tommie Smith, raised their fists on the Olympic podium in the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 as the anthem was played; Jose Feliciano who sang the anthem at the 1968 World series and provoked criticism; Conrad Netting IV who discovered the truth about his fighter pilot father's history which led him to a cemetery in Normandy; writer Crista Cloutier who associated it with Obama's election; members of the Coldstream Guards band who played the anthem at the changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace the day after 9/11 and Leon Hendrix, Jimi's brother, who was in the army at the time of Woodstock, and was put on 'potato peeling duty' because of the 'dishonourable' version his brother had played.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj17k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0xjs)
US election: Losing your job

Our conversations reflect the impact Covid-19 has had on the US economy and on people’s jobs and wellbeing.

We introduce a cook in northern California and a PBX switchboard operator in Massachusetts. They both lost their jobs and are struggling to make ends meet and pay the bills. They talk about how they feel forgotten, how the social system isn’t working for them, and how the main presidential candidates are not talking to them.

And we bring a conversation between three flight attendants, who all lost their jobs after an economic relief plan in Congress stalled. They are all trying career changes but it’s not easy. They also share experiences of how passengers’ attitudes changed amid the pandemic, around issues such as wearing a face covering. One of them, Breaunna Ross, posted a video of her emotional farewell to passengers on her final flight, which has been viewed more than two million times on YouTube.

(Photo: Flight attendant Breaunna Ross. Credit: Breaunna Ross)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053qltj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw5)
Girl Taken

17/10/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4y)
The challenges of staging World Questions in Lebanon

World Questions this past week came from Beirut - the scene of a recent massive explosion. A listener from Lebanon asks the show’s presenter and producer about the production issues involved in recording in the city.Why the focus on a young audience and where did they come from?

Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj1c98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c0dk5k52z)
“You may end up being killed” – Kenyan footballer on defying drug gangs

Former Kenyan Premier League player Jacob Viera tells us how a Tanzanian gang almost killed him after he refused to be a drugs mule. He was electrocuted in the attack and his doctor felt he would need a miracle to survive. A subsequent trial at Newcastle United led to him seeking asylum in England. While waiting to gain UK residency he suffered a serious injury that ended his hopes of becoming a professional footballer. He’s now living in Liverpool and doing his refereeing qualifications. He aims to become a Fifa elite referee and says it would be a dream to take charge of a Merseyside Derby.

Legendary South Africa all-rounder Lance Klusener joins us in the week he completed a 200km endurance race on the dry salt pans of the Verneukpan in the Northern Cape. He was part of “Team Cricket” in the Battle of the Sports event to raise funds for covid relief in South Africa. He tells us how they battled the terrain, mental fatigue and sleep deprivation. Klusener also explains why he needed to do something to help people affected by the pandemic.

Leonessa Brescia won the Italian Baseball for the Blind Championship last week. Their assistant coach Michele Bianchi tells us why it was the biggest achievement in the club’s history. We also hear from one of the founders of blind baseball, Lorenzo de Regny, who tells us how the sport came about and what it means to see blind athletes competing in such a liberating sport. And Mariela Gonzales from the World Baseball Softball Confederation tells us their aspirations for blind baseball to one day feature at the Paralympic Games.

Kyra Condie is one of the first American women to qualify for climbing at an Olympic Games but her career nearly ended before it began. Shortly before she turned fourteen years old she had to have major surgery on her back as a result of Scoliosis. She tells us the first hospital she visited told her to forget about climbing and that she still keeps in touch with the surgeon who fixed her back, which she describes as having been like an “s” shape previously. She also explains her unique climbing style and how she burst into tears when she qualified for the Tokyo games.

Sports broadcaster Rikki Swannell joins us live from New Zealand as the All Blacks prepare to face Australia in front of a crowd of forty seven thousand people at Eden Park on Sunday. The country, with a population of 4.8 million people has been so successful in combating Covid-19 that it had only one new case in the 24 hours leading up to 13 October. Swannell also brings us the latest news ahead of the Super Netball Grand Final in Australia.

In Sporting Witness, we tell the story of the American Garrett McNamara, who pioneered surfing the colossal waves at Nazaré in Portugal and broke the world record for the biggest wave ever surfed.

And – the BBC’s football correspondent – John Murray – joins us live from Goodison Park ahead of Premier League leaders Everton facing the reigning champions Liverpool.

Photo: Jacob Viera refereeing the Merseyside County Cup Final at Goodison Park in 2019


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj1h1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnm7gj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053qv9s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct16c8)
Dyslexia: Into adulthood

Stella Sabin hears from dyslexic people across the world who reveal the challenges of growing up and working with dyslexia, and from experts at the cutting edge of dyslexia research.

Reading and writing are fundamental tools in most societies, necessary for even the most basic of tasks. For the dyslexic this can cause an agonising disjuncture from an early age. Many dyslexic people will recall the difficulties of decoding words, the horror of the spelling test, the forgetfulness, and the shame of struggling with things that other people find so simple.

Stella Sabin who has dyslexia herself, looks at the impact of the condition in adult life, and asks what difference does it make to know the name of what you are experiencing? Dyslexic people are disproportionally represented in low paying jobs and in the US and the UK 50% of the prison population are dyslexic. She visits the intelligence and security organisation GCHQ who are positively recruiting dyslexic thinkers, who are able to find unusual and imaginative solutions to complex problems…like cracking codes.

(Photo: Jumbled letters flying. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj1lsj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6th)
Recording tradition with Derya Yildirim and Yousra Mansour

A very exciting show this week, featuring the best artists from west Asia and north Africa. Turkish singer and saz player Derya Yildirim from Grup Simsek chats to Yousra Mansour, Hasan Nakhleh and Merve Erdem about how they work in the studio, what their songs tell us about tradition, and their biggest inspirations in the development of their work.

A very exciting show this week featuring the best artists from west Asia and north Africa. Yousra Mansour is a Moroccan guembri player and lead vocalist of Moroccan-French quartet, Bab L’ Bluz. They’re now at the forefront of the new wave of women fronting Gnawa bands.

Merve Erdem is a Turkish multi-disciplinary artist, born in Istanbul and now based in London. She writes, sings and produces multi-media visuals for her group Kit Sabastian, who last year released their debut album Matra Moderne.

And finally, Hasan Nakhleh is a keyboardist and guitarist who’s one half of Tootard, a band comprised of brothers from the Golan Heights. The band are described as “unleash[ing] a disco whirlwind that pays homage to the Middle Eastern dancefloor scenes of the 1980s”.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj1qjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0qx57)
France: Teacher beheaded after showing cartoons of Prophet Muhammad

French police are questioning four people after a teacher in a suburb of Paris was beheaded by a suspected Islamist extremist. We hear from Jean-Remi Girard, president of the National Union of School Teachers.

Also in the programme: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has won a landslide victory in the country's general election; and a city in eastern China has started offering a coronavirus vaccine to the general public - although it has not yet completed clinical trials.

(Photo: Flowers have been left at the school where the murdered man taught. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj1v8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ldd3lrcy3)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you full coverage of Chelsea vs. Southampton in the English Premier League, live from Stamford Bridge.

Lee James is joined by our new panel that includes former Australia international Alicia Ferguson, former Everton defender Slyvain Distin and former Wolves and Nigeria goalkeeper Carl Ikeme.

And with huge scorelines in the Premier League and the IPL we’ll also discuss the impact of no crowds at sporting events around the world.

Photo: Mason Mount of Chelsea looks on during the Premier League match between Chelsea and Liverpool at Stamford Bridge (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj2b89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnn2pf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053rpjp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvsd)
Disinfo wars and the all-American ‘troll farm’

The 2016 US election was beset by so-called “fake news” – but what’s happening this time around?

Four years ago, fictitious and scandalous news articles emanating from Russian backed troll farms went viral. Some even claim it may have changed the course of the election.

Now a new disinformation battle is raging, but this time the game has changed.
Instead of creating content overseas, a number of campaigns have been discovered enlisting American citizens in creating content designed to destabilise the political landscape.

That’s what happened to Colin Wood, a freelance writer from Binghamton, New York. He was delighted to start writing for a new left-wing website called PeaceData.

But as he soon learned, the site was being coordinated by people connected with Russia’s Internet Research Agency, the notorious troll farm responsible for much of the disinformation created in 2016.

The site’s editors turned out to be completely fictional, their social media profile photos generated by artificial intelligence.

And another disinformation campaign was unearthed, designed and coordinated entirely on US soil.

Turning Point, a right-wing lobby group, paid teenagers to systematically repost messages casting doubt on the legitimacy of the election.

Was the swift discovery of these networks a good news story? Or does it just show that disinformation is now an inextricable part of American politics?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Sam Judah

Picture credit: Getty Images


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxz)
Auction Theory - Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson

Paul Milgrom and his former tutor Robert Wilson worked together for years developing ways to run complicated auctions for large resources. This month the two Stanford University professors were awarded the Nobel memorial prize in economics for their work. The auction formats they designed facilitated the sale of goods and services that are difficult to sell in a conventional way, such as radio frequencies.

(L-R Paul Millgrom and Robert Wilson. Credit: Andrew Brodhead/ Stanford)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj2g0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Response (w3ct16l4)
The Response USA: The return

As an election approaches in America, we return to a unique experiment which took the temperature of the USA after the surprise election of Donald Trump.

In 2016 the BBC World Service, in association with American Public Media, focused on areas which the media had neglected – but made all the difference. We asked for smartphone voice recordings from key areas in the middle of America about their lives now, about why they voted the way they did, and their hopes for the future.

Now, in 2020, we return to those contributors to see how their lives changed in the last four years. What do they think of their initial reaction to the 2016 result, and what do they want to happen now?

We also hear from contributors around the world to get an international perspective on the 3 November election. We’ll take a global view of America now, and a vote which will have impact across the world.

Presented by Angela Davis of MPR.

Image: Angela Davis (Credit: MPR/Nate Ryan)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj2krk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3g)
The BFI London Film Festival 2020

This week’s Arts Hour Special celebrates the 64th annual BFI London Film Festival with conversations with some of the most exciting filmmakers from across the globe.

Playwright Kemp Powers tells us about turning his award winning play One Night in Miami into a movie and working on Disney Pixar’s latest animated feature Soul.

Oscar winning director Steve McQueen and actor Letitia Wright whose film Mangrove opened the festival, discuss the importance of telling the stories of those who have fought against discrimination.

Filmmaker Harry MacQueen reveals the inspiration behind Supernova, his tender British road movie, starring Stanley Tucci and Colin Firth.

The actor and singer Nubiya Brandon explains how her virtual reality work All Kinds Of Limbo explores issues of identity.

Kenyan documentary maker Peter Murimi talks about following a gay couple in Kenya for 5 years to make I Am Samuel, a moving and thought provoking love story.

The award winning Israeli director Talya Lavie tells us about the influences behind her rom-com Honeymood which takes place over the course of a single night in a Jerusalem hotel.

And from India we hear from Chaitanya Tamhane whose acclaimed film The Disciple takes us into the world of Hindustani classical music

We’ll also be hearing how the organisers of this year’s London Film Festival have been adapting their screenings, premieres and events to go ahead during the global pandemic.

(Image: A still from 'Soul'. Credit: Disney/Pixar)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj2php)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0rw48)
France honours murdered teacher

People pay tribute to Samuel Paty, the teacher murdered in a Paris suburb yesterday as France's anti-terrorism prosecutor identifies the killer as an 18-year-old Russian citizen of Chechen origin.

Also in the programme: the aftermath of a rocket attack in Ganja, Azerbaijan; and we preview Bolivia's presidential election.

(Picture:People gather in front of the Bois d'Aulne college after the attack in the Paris suburb of Conflans St Honorine, France)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj2t7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q4)
Burning Issues

The Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos was Europe's largest holding facility for refugees and migrants - but last month it was burned to the ground. Gabriel Gatehouse investigates what happened there and why.

In Kenya, after months of complete closure during a Covid-19 lockdown, schools are opening their doors again. Anne Soy has been following how pupils, staff and school owners have managed during the months off - and how they're adapting to new lessons from the pandemic.

For decades Hong Kong has been a truly cosmopolitan city, with people and businesses from all over the world settling there, not only to make money but also to cultivate global relationships. As Beijing tightens its grip on the territory, Karishma Vaswani asks how long the city can hold on to this uniquely international character.

Last year there was particular concern around the world about the Amazon rainforest - threatened not only by deforestation and land-hungry industries, but also by an especially bad season for fires. As cattle ranching expands, trees disappear and blazes can rage out of control. This year, even parts of Brazil's Pantanal wetlands have been scorched. Katy Watson took a long journey to Sao Felix do Xingu, in the state of Para, to see a changing landscape for herself.

(Image: Refugees and migrants on the island of Lesbos, Greece, carry their belongings away from the Moria refugee camp as it burns down. Credit: Reuters/Alkis Konstantinidis)


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053s5j6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Trending (w3cszvsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 today]


SAT 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj2xzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnnpf2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053s98b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1659)
Russia's persecuted Jehovah’s Witnesses

There are hundreds of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia who are being prosecuted for their faith. Some of them say they have been tortured and their testimonies were never investigated. Others have to hide their prayers as they fear the secret services are spying on them through undercover agents.

The wave of arrests started in 2017 after the Russian Supreme Court declared Jehovah’s Witnesses organisation as extremist and banned all Jehovah’s Witnesses registered groups throughout the country.

Jehovah’s Witnesses renounce violence and do not possess arms, yet criminal cases against them claim they possess extremist materials and peaceful worship has been raided by armed police.

This programme will follow some of the most dramatic stories told by Jehovah’s Witnesses under prosecution and their family members. Among them is the story of imprisoned man Feliks as told by his wife Zhenya. Upon arrival to his colony Feliks had suffered such an atrocious beating that he spent months recovering in a prison hospital. In May this year he was stripped of his Russian citizenship and became the first Jehovah’s Witness forced into statelessness. We will also hear from Jehovah’s Witnesses who aren’t prosecuted but live in constant expectation of being disturbed by police.

All of them will share how their faiths help them to survive those dark days and how they continue to worship despite being scared and intimidated.

Presenter: Anastasia Gulubeva
Producer: Tatyana Movshevich

(Picture: Feliks Makhammadiev /Credit: jw-russia.org)



SUNDAY 18 OCTOBER 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj35h6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sp6)
Golden passports: just asking for trouble?

Cash for passports - a legitimate way for countries to get investment or a scheme open to abuse and corruption? That’s the big question we’ll be looking at on this episode of Business Weekly. We look at why the wealthy want to acquire them and hear from Cyprus where a passport corruption scandal has rocked the nation. We’ll also speak to the winner of this year’s Nobel prize for economics - about the strange way he found out he’d won - and of course discuss some of his work. And we’ll hear from the African animators who are taking on the world.

Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Coloured passport covers, Getty)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj397b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnp1ng)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053snhq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj3dzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct1643)
The TikTok election

TikTok has become one of the political stories in the run up to the US elections, exposing America's distrust of China. But its users and influencers could help decide who takes the White House. Journalist Sophia Smith Galer enters the hype houses of TikTok to find out how influential it really is.

(Image: TikTok users Joie, Maya and Matt. Credit: BBC/Getty Images/TikTok)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj3jql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053swzz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj1)
Why living in the city could make you happier

Why is more than half the world’s population living in cities? Why are some more successful than others? And what is their future post-pandemic? David Edmonds searches for answers to these questions and more with the world’s foremost economist on cities.

Image: Full moon over the City of London (Credit: Jeff Overs/BBC)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj3ngq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnpdwv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053t0r3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1659)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj3s6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d1fsw24hk)
Conflict over Nagorno Karabakh

The latest on the fighting over Nagorno Karabakh after a ceasefire was declared yesterday - but a very fragile one.

Also, as people across France gather to pay tribute to a teacher who was murdered on Friday, we'll hear from the mayor of the town where it happened.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Anna Machin, British evolutionary anthropologist, writer and broadcaster; and Mark Landler, American journalist and London bureau chief for the New York Times newspaper.

(Picture: A house allegedly damaged by recent shelling in Ganja, Azerbaijan. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj3wyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d1fsw287p)
Israel and Bahrain to establish diplomatic relations

An Israeli official says Israel and Bahrain will establish full diplomatic relations at a ceremony on Sunday in the Bahraini capital, Manama. We'll have reaction and analysis.

Also, with more than two weeks to go, a record early turnout for the US presidential election.

And can a controversial and unpopular leader stay in power in the west African state of Guinea?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Anna Machin, British evolutionary anthropologist, writer and broadcaster; and Mark Landler, American journalist and London bureau chief for the New York Times newspaper.

(Picture: President Trump after announcing that Bahrain would normalize relations with Israel. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj40q3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d1fsw2czt)
Nigerians protest police brutality

Protests continue in Nigeria against police brutality. We'll hear from Lagos where more than ten thousand demonstrators brought the city centre to a standstill on Saturday.

Also, Azerbaijan and Armenia accuse each other of breaching a second humanitarian ceasefire in Nagorno- Karabakh, just hours after they jointly declared it.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Anna Machin, British evolutionary anthropologist, writer and broadcaster; and Mark Landler, American journalist and London bureau chief for the New York Times newspaper.

(Picture: A protester holds a placard during a protest against police violence in Lagos, Nigeria. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053tczh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqj)
How does food make a president?

Presidential campaigns are all about connecting with voters, and Donald Trump and Joe Biden have both been using food to do it.

Emily Thomas hears how they’ve targeted food brands, food media and even food influencers to help bolster their image, promote their policies, and reach new audiences.

But the deep cultural connections that come with food can make it a risky policy - eating the wrong thing or in the wrong way on the campaign trail can have a devastating impact.

And, entertaining though all of this might be, does it detract from the serious food issues that affect the lives of every American, and the fact that actual food policies are rarely discussed?

Contributors:

Emily Contois, assistant professor of media studies at the University of Tulsa
Jeremy Jacobowitz, @brunchboys
Jayson Lusk, distinguished professor and head of the agricultural economics department at Purdue University

(Picture: Fries being dropped into a ballot box. Credit: Getty Images/Katie Horwich/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj44g7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053thqm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0f)
The downfall of 'The Screamers'

If you visited the controversial Atlantis commune in southern Colombia back in the 1990s, you’d have probably heard some disturbing noises. The group practiced primal screaming, a form of psychotherapy which seeks to address childhood pain. They’d hold confrontational group sessions, where they were encouraged to direct their anger at each other, hoping to develop themselves psychologically in the process.

The commune had started in London, founded by a therapist called Jenny James. They’d made the move to South America to be closer to nature, and they’d settled on a forested area of Colombia controlled by left wing Farc guerrillas. At first Atlantis coexisted with the Farc, but as the Colombian civil war intensified the guerrillas became more hostile, and when violence broke out it pulled the commune apart.

Presenter: Faye Planer
Producer: Harry Graham

Picture: The Atlantis commune in Southern Colombia
Credit: BBC


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj486c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x53)
What is the future of dining out?

Food and family are often said to be two of India’s biggest obsessions. For many Indians, sharing a meal with family is one of the most important parts of the day, and no celebration is considered complete without a proper dining sentiment attached to it.

But months of lockdown have harshly affected the country’s food & beverages industry. Recent reports estimate more than two million job losses, and also indicate that one in four restaurants may never open again.

So, how are palates and platters changing? Is cloud kitchen the new normal of dining out? And how will eateries ensure hygiene and safety as customers trickle back to fine dining?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how the pandemic is affecting the future of dining out in India.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Radhika Khandelwal, chef, owner, Fig & Maple; Abhinav Jindal, founder, CEO, Kimaya Himalayan Beverages LLP; Kainaz Contractor, owner, Bhawan, Rustom's


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053tmgr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1659)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj4cyh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnq4cm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053tr6w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct165d)
Climate Wars

Climate Wars: Water conflicts

India and Pakistan are on the front line of climate change and are two of the most water-stressed countries in the world. Drought has already caused violent clashes, deadly protests and a spate of farmer suicides. Now tensions between the two nations have been ratcheted up by an acrimonious dispute over a proposed dam on the River Indus.

Will Robson looks at how these conflicts over mankind’s most precious resource threaten the stability of the whole region. He starts at the local and interprovincial level, where the absence of formal dispute resolution mechanisms has led to an escalating threat of violence. He will also explore the geopolitical tensions surrounding the Indus River that runs from China through India and Pakistan, and at how climate change is threatening to derail historical treaties between these nuclear armed states.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj4hpm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Response (w3ct16l4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj4mfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0tt2b)
Armenia-Azerbaijan truce broken minutes after deal

The latest attempt at a ceasefire between Azerbaijan and Armenia has broken down within hours, with each side blaming the other. We hear from officials from both sides.

Also on the programme: Iran says it will not go on a weapons-buying spree despite the expiry of a UN arms embargo against the country; and we hear about the impact of the Trump administration's policies on the environment, and what might change if Joe Biden wins the election.

(Photo: A man removes debris in the Nagorno-Karabakh capital, Stepanakert. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj4r5w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct1643)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj4vy0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjw1)
Telling the time: From sundials to satnav

Many of us can find the time of day quickly and accurately but where did the idea of time keeping originate and how did our ancestors manage without the instant access we take for granted today?

From ancient shadow and water clocks to the latest super accurate optical clocks, Bridget Kendal explores time keeping with the Curator of the Royal Observatory in London, Dr Louise Devoy; the Director of the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford, Dr Silke Ackermann; and watch and clock expert Grégory Gardinetti from the Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie in Geneva.

Photo: World Clocks (Credit: EyeWire, Inc.)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj4zp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ldd3lvjbg)
Live Sporting Action

We’ll have live commentary of the London Derby between Tottenham and West Ham and will be joined by former Stoke City and Chelsea goalkeeper Asmir Begovic. Plus reaction from, Sheffield United against Fulham and Brighton’s trip to Crystal Palace.

Photo: Heung-Min Son of Tottenham Hotspur celebrates after scoring their fourth goal during the Premier League match between Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur at Old Trafford (Credit: Tottenham Hotspur FC/Tottenham Hotspur FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj5bxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnr3bn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053vq5x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj5gnn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6th)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj5lds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0vs1c)
France pays tribute to beheaded teacher

Thousands of people have taken part in demonstrations across France to honour Samuel Paty, a history teacher beheaded by a suspected Islamist on Friday in the north western Paris suburb of Conflans-Sainte-Honorine. We hear from Cecile Ribet-Retel, president of the parents' association at the school where he taught.

Also in the programme: The President of the west African state of Guinea, Alpha Conde, is running for a controversial third term -- he's Guinea's first democratically-elected leader but he won a referendum earlier in the year to allow him to change the constitution and permit that third mandate; and the writer PJ O'Rourke has been a wry and shrewd observer of political and cultural life in the United States for half a century -- as a Republican. He speaks to us about his latest book, "A Cry from the Far Middle: Dispatches from a Divided Land".

(Photo: People gather at the Place de la Republique in Paris, to pay tribute to Samuel Paty, the French teacher who was beheaded on the streets of the Paris suburb of Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, France, 18 October 2020. Placard reads "I am a teacher". Credit: Reuters/Charles Platiau)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj5q4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053w2f9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj5tx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnrlb5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053w65f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 19 OCTOBER 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpt9xng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57tkmj6fr1)
Nigerian police brutality protests spread

In Nigeria, protests against police brutality are shifting to a new focus – why some are treated worse than others because of their place in the economy; we hear from young people in Lagos who say the police are ‘messing with the wrong generation’. Also, it's been in place for 75 years, but a water sharing deal between the US and Mexico is in danger because of allegations of corruption, and climate change. Plus, vegetarian burgers may soon have to be labelled as ‘discs’, and meat-free sausages as ‘tubes’, as pro-meat and pro-vegetarian groups await an outcome from the European parliament that will determine how plant-based products are labelled.

(Image: Activists protesting police brutality by the Nigerian Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) demonstrate on Whitehall in London, England. Photo by David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff08xv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptb1dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlywstq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff0dnz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164n)
America’s economic divide

Katty and Carlos discuss America’s economy and why one of the world’s wealthiest countries is home to such extremes of inequality and poverty.

They are joined by Stephanie Kelton, a senior economic adviser to Bernie Sanders, and Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Stony Brook University in New York. Stephanie is a proponent of modern monetary theory (MMT), an economic school of thought that’s gaining popularity with some American thinkers and politicians. She argues that MMT could help America to build a bigger social safety net. Also joining the discussion is Teva Sienicki, CEO of Metro Caring, a non-profit organisation in Denver that serves 75,000 people per year. Teva shares the difficult stories of some of the people her charity helps, and reflects upon whether the ideal of the American Dream has contributed to the widespread belief that poverty is solely the fault of the poor.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Sandra Kanthal, Viv Jones, Iyore Odighizuwa, Maeve McGoran and Jonelle Awomoyi, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptb54q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5j)
Surfing the world's biggest waves

The story of how the legendary surfer, Garrett McNamara, pioneered riding the colossal 100ft waves at Nazaré on the Portuguese coast. At Nazaré in 2011 he broke the world record for the biggest wave ever surfed, officially judged to be 78ft (23.8m). Nazaré has since become a centre of big wave surfing. Garrett McNamara spoke to Alex Last about how he first came to surf Nazaré and why he risks his life to ride giant waves.

Photo: Garrett McNamara riding his record breaking wave at Nazaré in November 2011 - recognised at the 2012 WSL Big Wave Awards (Credit:WSL/Ribiero)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptb8wv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyx19z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff0n57)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6b)
Why do I blush?

Curious CrowdScience listeners have suddenly been struck by the oddity of their behaviours. Elise ponders why she blushes. Thankfully, listener David is a vascular surgeon and knows a thing or two about blushing, as he performs operations on people debilitated by constant red-dening. He has some answers for us, but asks why did blushing evolve?

In the past, red cheeks have been linked to necrophilia, repressed cannibalism, and even a de-sire for men to experience menstruation! Thankfully, research has come a long way since then, as blushing experts Peter de Jong and Corine Dijk explain.

Scientists believe that it evolved as a nonverbal signal to show someone you’re sorry or that you care about what they think. This would have important for our survival in the group, en-suring we didn’t get into a fight or get kicked out the group.

Anand Jagatia gets to grips with blushing and other bodily behaviours – including a question from Thai listener Nitcha who wonders why we yawn as well as a question from Mohamed in Ghana and Biana in Trinidad and Tobago who both asked why people scratch their heads when they think. To answer these questions, Anand’s joined by yawning researcher Andrew Gallup and Sophie Scott as well as body language expert Blanca Cobb.
Produced by Graihagh Jackson for the BBC World Service.


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptbdmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21hynzp)
Chile inequality protests turn violent

Vandals burn down two churches in Santiago, and at least eighteen officers are injured.

We'll hear from a parent at the school in France where a history teacher was beheaded for showing cartoons depicting Mohammad.

And a BBC investigation has found systemic child abuse inside religious schools in Sudan.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptbjd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21hysqt)
Polls close in Bolivia's presidential election

The election comes after last year's disputed poll which forced Evo Morales to resign.

With rifts growing between central and regional governments over coronavirus restrictions, we ask if a revolt by the North of England over lockdown has been headed off?

And as Covid-19 deaths in Europe go past 250,000, we'll hear from a doctor in Spain on what they're getting right, and what they're getting wrong.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptbn47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21hyxgy)
Could Evo Morales return to Bolivia?

Exit polls say Morales' political heir, socialist candidate Luis Arce, won the country's presidential election, taking more than 52% of the vote.

Thousands rally in France to show solidarity for a teacher beheaded for showing pupils cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

And could cold water swimming hold a clue to a cure for dementia?


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptbrwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1z)
Armando Iannucci: Is this a bad time to be funny?

It’s the job of the professional satirist to find the funny and expose the absurd in humanity’s most serious endeavours. But are there times when satire just doesn’t work, and is now one of them? Should we be laughing at Covid-19, or at racial discrimination? Stephen Sackur speaks to Armando Iannucci, a hugely successful writer and director of comedy on TV and film, whose credits include Veep, In the Loop and The Death of Stalin. Is there ever a bad time and place to be funny?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff144r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jz)
Biotech: Guilt-free palm oil?

A commodity associated with the destruction of tropical rainforest in South East Asia may soon have a synthetic replacement.

But can it match palm oil's magic properties? Will consumers accept it in their food? And what will it mean for the farmers whose livelihoods depend on palm oil plantations?

Manuela Saragosa speaks to Shara Ticku, co-founder of the biotech firm C16 Biosciences, which is pioneering the new plantation-free product, as well as Anita Neville of Indonesia's largest privately owned palm oil grower, Golden Agri-Resources. Plus Veronika Pountcheva of the international food wholesalers Metro Group explains why they are actively looking at the synthetic alternative.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: A tub of palm oil; Credit: Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkk)
Why Portugal decriminalised all drugs

In the grip of a drugs crisis, the country took a radical approach in 2001 and became the first country in the world to decriminalise all drugs for personal use. Drug abuse and addiction began to be seen as a public health issue, not a criminal offence. Initial resistance to the policy faded after statistics proved that treatment, rather than punishment, was reducing the number of deaths caused by drugs in Portugal. Dr João Castel-Branco Goulão was one of the chief architects of the shift in policy. He's been explaining to Rebecca Kesby why Portugal had such a pronounced drug problem to begin with and how the shift in strategy helped to reduce it.

Image: Staffers interview a new patient in Lisbon, Portugal (Credit: Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptbwmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff17ww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptc0cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff1cn0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptc43r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyxwjw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff1hd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3x)
#MeToo: The lawyers

Two lawyers who represent alleged victims of sexual assault and harassment join Kim Chakanetsa to discuss how #MeToo and other public movements have impacted their work.

Debra Katz is an American civil rights and employment lawyer, best known for representing alleged victims of sexual assault and sexual harassment, and the whistleblowers who bring these stories to light. Her clients have included Christine Blasey-Ford, Vanessa Tyson and Chloe Caras.

Karuna Nundy is an Indian Supreme Court lawyer who focusses on constitutional law, media law and legal policy. Her work includes helping draft an anti-rape bill in India, after the 2012 Delhi bus gang rape created outrage around the treatment of women.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Karuna Nundy (credit - Ankita Chandra)
R: Debra Katz


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptc7vw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3q)
The space genius who needed a guide to life on earth

Sara Seager is an MIT astrophysicist. She has made it her life’s work to peer into the spaces around stars – looking for exoplanets outside our solar system, hoping to find the one-in-a-billion world that is enough like ours to sustain life. But after the unexpected death of her husband, Sara struggled with some of the new day-to-day tasks that she had to take on. She tells Jo Fidgen the story of how a three-page guide written by her late husband helped her to navigate life on earth, while she continued making ground-breaking discoveries in the skies.

Wanda Díaz-Merced is an astrophysicist from Puerto Rico. Unlike most people in her field Wanda is blind, but she has found a way to collect and study data from the stars and space. She uses a technique called sonification which changes visual data into sound waves, allowing her to hear the sounds of the stars.


Picture: Sara Seager
Credit: Justin Knight


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptccm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyy414)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff1qwd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptchc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7b1nzq)
French police visit suspected militant Islamists after beheading

French police are visiting suspected militant Islamists after the beheading of a teacher last week. The interior minister, Gerald Darmanin, said the operation was intended to send a message that there will be no respite for the enemies of the French republic.

Also in the programme: The socialist candidate Luis Arce looks set to win Bolivia's presidential election without the need for a run-off; and thousands of indigenous Australians are expected to join a legal action, claiming compensation for years of unpaid work on farms, mines and as domestic servants.


(Photo: Tribute to Samuel Paty, the French teacher who was beheaded in a suburb of Paris. Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptcm38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff1zcn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv29h21ghz)
Europe further tightens coronavirus restrictions

Belgium and Italy are among the latest countries to tighten restrictions over Covid-19. As cafes, bars and restaurants close for four weeks in Belgium, we get reaction to the move from Steven Rosseel of the Belgian Restaurants Association. Silvia Borrelli, Milan correspondent for the Financial Times, explains the changes being put into place in parts of Italy that are most heavily affected by the pandemic.
Also in the programme, new rules that change the way India's farmers do business have sparked protests across the country. Naresh Gujral is an MP from the Shiromani Akali Dal, which describes itself as a farmers' party, and tells us why it has pulled out of the National Democratic Alliance, led by prime minister Narendra Modi, in protest at the reforms. We get the perspective of a farmer who fears that he may have to sell some land to make ends meet as a result of the changes. And Ajit Ranade, chief economist at the Aditya Birla Group makes the case for the new law.
Plus, the BBC's Zoe Kleinman tells us why Instagram is being investigated by the Irish privacy watchdog over the way it handles children's personal data.

(Picture: A man walks past a closed bar in Brussels. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptcqvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff233s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptcvlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0qvpy6nc)
Being a teacher in France

We hear a conversation between teachers after the beheading of Samuel Paty. After Friday's attack and the protests that followed, how will it feel for them to return to the classroom?

Also, we talk through the latest coronavirus news with one of our regular experts, Dr Eleanor Murray, including a mass testing plan in Slovakia and what short, time-limited lockdowns can achieve.

And the party of former Bolivian president Evo Morales looks like it succeeded in the latest election there. So does that mean the former leader can return from exile? How do Bolivians see the future?

(Photo: People gather outside the Bois d'Aulne secondary school in homage to history teacher Samuel Paty. Credit: Anne-Christine Poujoulat / AFP)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptczbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptd32s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyyvhx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff2gc5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrvxpq2jt)
2020/10/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptd6tx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff2l39)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct16c2)
Anatomy Of Touch

Unwanted touch

Claudia Hammond explores unwanted touch and who we do and don’t mind touching us – and where. She draws on insights from the largest study that’s ever been conducted on the topic of touch – The Touch Test - commissioned by Wellcome Collection. Almost forty thousand people from all over the world chose to take part. Claudia discusses where we draw the boundaries between acceptable and unacceptable touch, at work or in the street, with Dr Amy Kavanagh, a visually impaired activist and campaigner, Joanna Bourke, Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London and the author of “Rape - a History”, and Dr Natalie Bowling, a psychologist at the University of Greenwich who co-created the Touch Test and has been crunching the numbers. After #meToo and Covid, could unwanted touch even become a thing of the past?


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptdbl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7b2j6m)
Bolivia election: Evo Morales's ally Luis Arce set for win

A quick count suggests socialist candidate Luis Arce of the Mas party is set to win Bolivia's presidential election in the first round.

Also in the programme: French government’s crackdown on those who spread hatred and division; and how cold-water swimming may not just be good for you now, but also when you are older.

(Photo: Presidential candidate Luis Arce of the Movement to Socialism party (MAS). Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptdgb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff2tlk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptdl29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyzbhf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff2ybp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ncmf39hm)
Europe further tightens coronavirus restrictions

Belgium and Italy are among the latest countries to tighten restrictions over Covid-19. As cafes, bars and restaurants close for four weeks in Belgium, we get reaction to the move from Steven Rosseel, who is on the board of the Belgian Restaurants Association. And Silvia Borrelli, Milan correspondent for the Financial Times, explains new the changes being put into place in parts of Italy that are most heavily affected by the pandemic. Also in the programme, new rules that will change the way India's farmers do business have sparked protests across the country. Naresh Gujral is an MP from the Shiromani Akali Dal, which describes itself as a farmers' party, and tells us why it has pulled out of the National Democratic Alliance, led by prime minister Narendra Modi, in protest at the reforms. We get the perspective of a farmer who fears that he may have to sell some land to make ends meet as a result of the changes. And Ajit Ranade, chief economist at the Aditya Birla Group makes the case for the new law. Plus, the BBC's Zoe Kleinman tells us why Instagram is being investigated by the Irish privacy watchdog, for the way it handles children's personal data.

(Picture: A man walks past a closed bar in Brussels. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 20 OCTOBER 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptdtkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zvp561ng)
European countries tighten covid lockdowns

A raft of Europe countries are locking down as the coronavirus pandemic returns with a vengeance. We'll be in Pakistan finding out why after just ten days the country has decided to reverse a decision to ban the social media site Tik Tok - journalist Mehmal Sarfraz in the country tells us how the app helped poorer people find employment. In India, new government farming reforms will loosen the rules around the sale, pricing and storage of farm produce - regulations that have protected India's farmers from the free market for decades. The BBC’s Nisha Patel reports. And as many of us have problems sleeping, we resort to ‘white noise’, or calming sounds to help us – but this could be doing more harm than good, says Mathias Basner, professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. We discuss all this live with economist Peter Morici at the University of Maryland in the US and journalist Jyoti Malhotra from The Print website in Delhi.

(Image: A mother infected with coronavirus meets her son through a plexiglass lock inside the contenair at the Buissonets retirement home, Belgium. Photo by JOHN THYS / AFP/ Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptdy9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyzpqt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff39l2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct16c4)
A perfect match

Journalist Ibby Caputo reveals some of the deep inequities in the American medical system through a highly personal story - asking why her friend died nine years after a life-saving bone marrow transplant. Thirteen years ago, Ibby underwent a bone marrow transplant in the US to treat an aggressive form of leukaemia. Because she is of Northern European descent, she believes she had a greater chance of survival, after finding a donor who was "a perfect match." Her friend, Terika Haughton, who was Jamaican, died of transplant-related causes in 2017. Terika did not have a perfect match, and after she died, Ibby explores how much that lack of a perfect match may have played a part in her death. Through these contrasting stories, Ibby explores race and ethnic disparities in healthcare.

(Photo: Terika Haughton and Ibby Caputo)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptf21t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptf5sy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlyzy72)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff3k2b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct16c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptf9k2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j1kws)
Nigeria SARS protests: army on standby

Rapper Falz tells us why he's protesting against the police unit, which is accused of brutality, extortion and mass murder

We have an interview with the man set to become Bolivia's new president, the former right-hand man of ousted Evo Morales. Can he unite his divided country?

And we get global perspectives on the US elections - part of a world service special. Turkey is expanding its regional influence as America's involvement declines - so will the election change that?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptff96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j1pmx)
Afghanistan: fading hope for peace as talks stall

Afghanistan's National Security adviser gives a stark warning about the future of the country with peace talks stalled and US troops leaving.

The US charges six Russian military intelligence officers with carrying out cyber attacks on, amongst other things, Ukraine's power grid and the 2017 French elections.

And how genetically modifying the hide of cows could help them cope with climate change.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptfk1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j1td1)
Afghan National Security Advisor on hopes for peace

There are challenging times ahead for Afghanistan with peace talks stalled and American troops leaving.

Restaurants, bars and hotels fight back against lockdown in the Netherlands by taking their government to court.

And what do jihadist groups think about the up-coming US Presidential election?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptfnsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1s)
How to put the internet in a box

What happens when you take a little box containing some of the vast knowledge amassed on the internet, to communities that live offline?

From a peaceful valley in the remote Himalayas to a bustling Rohingya refugee camp, people are carrying gigabytes of data - from school curricula to the whole of Wikipedia - into places where access to the internet is impossible.

Inspired by one of our listeners, we delve into the world of the “sneakernet” - a network of people who carry information to places where the signal doesn’t reach.

Produced and presented by Tom Colls

Photo Credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff411v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8b0)
Trading with the USA

When President Trump came to power in 2016 he vowed he would scrap the international trade agreements he believed had cost a huge number of US jobs, and declared his intent to tip the trade balance back in America's favour. He wanted to take on China and what he saw as its dominance in the global marketplace.

How has this 'America First' policy worked out in the ensuing four years, and what has it meant for the US's trading partners?

As part of our look at the US elections 2020: and What the World Wants, Manuela Saragosa examines whether President Trump has succeeded in his aim, and she finds out what companies from China to Canada hope will come out of the next presidency. Manuela talks to Herbert Lun, managing director of Wing Sang electrical, whose factory is in China's Pearl River Delta. He produces electronic hair products for the American market - how has his business coped with the threat of US tariffs? While Mark Rowlinson, counsel at the United Steelworkers of Canada, tells Manuela that tariffs have brought some Canadian steel and aluminium producers - operating in an already very tight market - to the edge of bankruptcy.

The BBC's economics correspondent, Andrew Walker, is on hand to provide context and analysis throughout, and you can read more on the BBC website and hear more about the USA and the rest of the world, across the World Service this week.

Manuela and her guests also consider the alternative to President Trump - a Joe Biden presidency - and whether that would make it any easier to do business with the US. There might be a change of tone, but would he actually dismantle the protectionist policies of the last four years?

Picture: Trump Tower in New York. Credit: Getty


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmq2)
Joan Littlewood, 'mother of modern British theatre'

The working class woman who shook up the British theatre establishment in the 1950s and 60s. Joan Littlewood introduced improvisation and helped break down class barriers. She set up a theatre in a working class area in the east end of London which put on plays written by amateur writers and actors, many without classical training. She delighted in the fact that the laziest person in the company might be working class and the poshest the one scrubbing the stage. She went on to create successes such as 'Oh! What a Lovely War' and 'A Taste of Honey'. Claire Bowes has been talking to her friend and biographer, Peter Rankin.

Photo: Joan Littlewood outside the Theatre Royal Stratford in 1974 (Press Association)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptfsjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff44sz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct16c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptfx8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptg10v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz0sfz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff4d97)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbw)
Sharon Olds: Poetry coming down my arm

The American poet Sharon Olds has been one of the leading voices in contemporary poetry since her first book was published in 1980. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 2013 for Stag’s Leap, her extraordinary collection of poems chronicling the breakup of her marriage, with its themes of love, family, sorrow, desire and memory, which have echoed throughout her work.

But her career as a poet nearly didn’t happen. Her first poems were dismissed by some editors who saw them as not literary enough, perhaps objecting to the intense way she wrote about sexual love and the minutiae of being a woman. But it’s precisely those qualities that have won her new generations of fans and critical praise across the world.

After a period of long isolation due to the pandemic, Sharon talks to Emma Kingsley about her work and how lockdown has affected her perception of the world. She describes how she creates new poems and how the words and images travel down her arm and out through the pen.

Photo of Sharon Olds by Brett Hall Jones

Presented and produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptg4rz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdk8)
A dangerous obsession

Canadian Julie Lalonde looked to all the world to be a fearless warrior for women's rights. Her job involved telling political and military leaders, mainly men, how to behave but every time she stood on stage she was terrified because she was being stalked by a former lover. She talks to Jo Fidgen about enduring a harmful obsession that lasted more than a decade and how she found the strength to go public.

She's written a book called Resilience is Futile.

If you’ve been affected by any of the issues in this episode, you can find details of organisations offering information and support at this address: bbc.co.uk/actionline.


Picture: Julie Lalonde
Credit: Brendan Brown


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptg8j3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz10y7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff4msh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct16c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptgd87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7b4kwt)
Lagos goes into curfew following protests

An indefinite 24-hour curfew has been declared in the Nigerian city and state of Lagos after unrest sparked by police brutality. We hear what locals have to say.

Also on the programme: scientists discover that babies may be swallowing millions of microplastic particles a day from bottled milk; and we hear about the new Covid-19 study in which young volunteers will be infected with the virus to help develop a vaccine.

(Photo: Protesters at Nigeria's Murtala Muhammed airport tollgate on October 19th 2020. Credit: Benson Ibeabuchi/AFP via Getty Images.)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptgj0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff4w8r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwq5y8hz8n)
First UK airport coronavirus testing begins

Passengers flying from London Heathrow to some destinations will be offered a coronavirus test. For about $100, from today, passengers travelling to Hong Kong can take a test at the airport and receive a result within an hour, as the BBC's Tom Burridge explains. But Simon Calder, travel editor of the Independent newspaper, tells us that with no global standard on testing, there is a pretty confusing picture for people who need to travel internationally.
Also in the programme, President Trump's America First policies have involved pressing the reset button on trade relations with the rest of the world, with the aim of bringing jobs back to the US and levelling the playing field between the US and China. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker assesses whether Mr Trump has achieved what he set out to do. And we get reaction to US trade policy changes from Mark Rowlinson, counsel at United Steelworkers, which is the largest union representing steel and aluminium workers in Canada.
Plus, with home office space in high demand as a result of the pandemic, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan argues a home office is the new selling point for estate agents all over the world.

(Picture: Seats marked out for social distancing at Heathrow airport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptgmrh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff500w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptgrhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0qvq13kg)
US election conversations: US truck drivers

Three truckers in the US describe what they have seen driving across the country over the past four years. Michael in Arizona, Pat in Indianapolis and Sunny from California also share their experiences of the economy, the pandemic and homelessness.

This week, the BBC World Service is running, “US Elections 2020: What the World Wants”. As part of the coverage, we've been getting messages from around the world about what people want to know about November's election. We have an expert to answer those questions and explain the background.

We also watch the situation in Afghanistan; the peace talks with Taleban have stalled and there's concern about “renewed civil war”. We have been collecting messages from Afghans and will put those in context and explain the latest situation with security.

(Photo: Michael Ware Credit: Michael Ware)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptgw7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptgzzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz1rf0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff5c88)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrvxpszfx)
2020/10/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpth3r0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff5h0d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98m)
Go Viral! online game

Go Viral! is a browser based game where you have a go at being a spreader of misinformation. Along the way, you learn the tactics of the trolls and you come out the other end, better able to differentiate the facts from the alternative facts online. Gareth discusses why these games can change peoples’ minds with one of the game’s co-developers, Jon Roozenbeek of the Department of Psychology at Cambridge University in England.

Human rights lawyer Flynn Coleman has just published a book called A Human Algorithm – how artificial intelligence is redefining who we are. She explains to Gareth why she’s concerned about the small group of individuals who are in charge of the digital world and what should be done to change that.

In the pandemic choreographer Alexander Whitley has had to postpone his live shows. Hannah Fisher reports on how he’s moved his dance project online and invited others to collaborate. The music is ‘Memory Arc’ by Rival Consoles.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

(Image: Cambridge University)


Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz
Studio Producer: Deborah Cohen
Studio Manager: Nigel Dix


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpth7h4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7b5f3q)
Google hit by landmark competition lawsuit in US

The US government has filed a lawsuit against Google in the biggest anti-trust case in decades.

Also in the programme: Riot police are to be immediately deployed across Nigeria as it struggles to contain violent protests against police brutality. And
why the town of Asbestos in Canada has changed its name.

(Photo: A phone showing Google. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpthc78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff5qhn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpthgzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz27dj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff5v7s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ncmf66dq)
Google accused of being a monopoly

The US government has filed charges against Google, accusing it of violating competition law to preserve its monopoly over internet searches and online advertising. The lawsuit marks the biggest challenge brought by US regulators against a major tech company in years. It follows more than a year of investigation and comes as the biggest tech firms face intense scrutiny of their practices at home and abroad. Google called the case "deeply flawed".
We speak with Tim Wu, an American attorney, professor at Columbia Law School and the author of The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age and also with Gabriel Weinberg, the founder of DuckDuckGo search engine.

Also in the programme, President Trump's America first policies have involved pressing the reset button on trade relations with the rest of the world, with the aim of bringing jobs back to the US and levelling the playing field between the US and China. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker assesses whether Mr Trump has achieved what he set out to do. And we get reaction to US trade policy changes from Mark Rowlinson, counsel at United Steelworkers, which is the largest union representing steel and aluminium workers in Canada.

And - how can the very name of a town put off investors? We hear from a town call Asbestos.

Picture: Google logo/Getty Images



WEDNESDAY 21 OCTOBER 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpthqgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zvp58ykk)
US Justice Department hits Google with antitrust lawsuit

The US government has filed charges against Google, accusing it of violating competition law to preserve its monopoly over internet searches and online advertising. The lawsuit marks the biggest challenge brought by US regulators against a major tech company in years. Google called the case "deeply flawed". We speak with Tim Wu, an American attorney, professor at Columbia Law School and the author of The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age and also with Gabriel Weinberg, the founder of DuckDuckGo search engine.

Also in the programme, we will go to Thailand where, despite threats, the protests continue. We look at why the protesters have had enough of the government.

Plus, President Trump's America first policies have involved pressing the reset button on trade relations with the rest of the world, with the aim of bringing jobs back to the US and levelling the playing field between the US and China. We assess whether Mr Trump has achieved what he set out to do.

And - how can the very name of a town put off investors? We hear from a town call Asbestos.

We are joined by guests Alison Van Digglelen in San Francisco and David Kuo in Singapore.

PHOTO: Google/Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpthv6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz2lmx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff66h5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct165f)
Climate Wars

Climate Wars: The new Cold War

Temperatures in the Arctic are rising at more than twice the global average, and as the ice pack melts, battle lines are being drawn between global superpowers eager to lay claim to newly uncovered mineral resources and trade routes.

Will Robson examines the ratcheting up of tensions between Russia and the United States, as a growing number of military bases, missile tests and military exercises threaten the area’s stability.

He also reveals how China has entered the fray – labelling itself as a “near-Arctic state” and investing in icebreakers and scientific research in an effort to gain access to the “polar silk road” – an increasingly ice-free and potentially profitable trade route across the Arctic ocean.

Is the area set to become the battleground for a new Cold War?


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpthyyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptj2q1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz2v45)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff6fzf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptj6g5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j4gsw)
Nigeria SARS protests: reports of military firing on crowd

Witnesses say armed and uniformed men stopped ambulances from helping the wounded - and that CCTV cameras were taken down just before the military started shooting.

A nurse in Argentina talks about her work helping patients with Covid, as the country records more than a million cases.

And a space probe successfully sucks up samples of rocks and dust, which could reveal how our sun and solar system came into being billions of years ago.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptjb69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j4lk0)
Eye witness: security forces fired on #EndSARS protestors

The government in the state of Lagos, Nigeria say they will investigate alleged shooting.

A stand off between regional leaders in the North of the UK and the central government ends with the Prime Minister Boris Johnson introducing new coronavirus restrictions.

And we hear from the place that has so far managed to avoid Covid-19 altogether: Nunavut, in Canada.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptjfyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j4q94)
Nigeria: #EndSARS protesters killed in 'army' shooting

Lagos government says it will investigate claims that security forces killed anti-government protesters who were kneeling in surrender.

We head to the Republic of Ireland, the first country in the EU to undertake another full lockdown in the face of increased Covid infection numbers.

And, in Afghanistan, a stampede for visas leads to at least 15 people, most of them women, being killed,


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptjkpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc70)
Jack Kingston: Can Trump win?

In a few days time Americans will give their verdict on President Donald Trump. Do they want four more years of Trump in the White House, or will they opt for the other septuagenarian Joe Biden - wholly different in style and worldview? Stephen Sackur speaks to the former Republican Congressman and loyal Trump campaigner Jack Kingston. The polls consistently say Trump is in big trouble. Is there good reason to think they are wrong?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff6xyy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8n9)
Google hit by competition lawsuit

The US government has filed charges against Google, accusing the company of violating competition law to preserve its monopoly over internet searches and online advertising. As the Department of Justice sues the search engine google for being a monopoly, could all tech giants be under threat? We hear from Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google and Jack Poulsen, a software engineer and former Google employee. We also get the view of Sally Hubbard, a former New York anti-trust attorney and current director of enforcement strategy at the Open Markets Institute. (Pic of Google logo by Jakub Porzycki via Getty Images).


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsb)
The Cutter Incident

In April 1955, more than 100,000 children in America were inoculated with a defective batch of the brand-new polio vaccine. Because of a manufacturing mistake at a small company called Cutter Laboratories, the children were given live polio virus; around 160 were permanently paralysed and 10 died in the worst disaster in US pharmaceutical history. Simon Watts talks to Anne Gottsdanker, one of the victims of what became known as the Cutter Incident.

PHOTO: Anne Gottsdanker with her father Bob Gottsdanker in 1956 (personal archive)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptjpfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct165f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff71q2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptjt5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct1643)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptjxxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz3pc2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff796b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3csz4pt)
The Superlinguists

The polyglots

Simon Calder meets people who keep learning new languages not because they have to, but because they want to. What motivates them? Situations like this - an immigrant hotel cleaner who is moved to tears because you speak to her in her native Albanian; A Nepalese Sherpa family that rolls about laughing in disbelief at hearing their foreign guest speak Sherpa. But do polyglots have a different brain from the rest of us? Simon travels to a specialised lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and undergoes a brain-scan himself, to find out.

Presenter: Simon Calder
Producer: Arlene Gregorius


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptk1p2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszds1)
Half a rotten apple: Growing up in 70s China

Writer Xiaolu Guo grew up in 1970s China, in a tiny village by the East China Sea. She'd been left there to live with her grandparents, and didn't know where her parents were. When they returned to collect her age seven, it began a lifetime of change - and a reckoning with China's history, from the feudal era to the Cultural Revolution.

(Photo: Xiaolu Guo. Credit: Xiaolu Guo)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptk5f6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz3xvb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff7jpl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptk95b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7b7gsx)
Nigerian troops accused of killing protesters

Nigeria's president, Muhammadu Buhari, has appealed for understanding and calm after reports that the army fired on hundreds of protesters in the city of Lagos. A denial of involvement in the shootings by the army has been contradicted by the governor of Lagos, Babajide Sanwo-Olu.

Also in the programme: thousands of girls in Kenya have reportedly undergone female genital mutilation recently despite a ban on the practice; and Manchester United loses tens of millions of dollars as Coronavirus pandemic hits football.

(Photo: Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu visiting injured people in hospital on Wednesday. Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptkdxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct165f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff7s5v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxjmnw95m1)
Manchester United clocks up $30m loss

Premier League football club Manchester United registered a $30m loss amid the pandemic. Kieran Maguire wrote The Price of Football and is a lecturer in sports finance at Liverpool University, and tells us what's behind the loss. Meanwhile, there is talk of Manchester United being one of the clubs in a proposed new European Super League. Tom Greatrex of the English Football Supporters Association is a member of the FA Council, which oversees the game in England, and gives us his reaction to the idea. Also in the programme, Kolkata in India is celebrating the Hindu festival of Durga Puja. Millions of people normally go to temporary temples or pandals that are set up as the city shuts down for four days, and it's an important part of the city's economy. But as the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports, it's now at the centre of a court battle over striking a balance between saving the economy and saving lives. We hear reaction from economist Saswati Chaudhury, and writer Sandip Roy. Plus, there's been an increase in pet ownership since the pandemic forced many of us around the world to start working from home. Justine Thompson is editor of the website Pet Business World News, and talks us through the positive financial impact the trend is having on pet food suppliers and pet stores.

(Picture: Manchester United's Old Trafford stadium. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptkjnl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff7wxz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3csz4pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptkndq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0qvq40gk)
Unrest in Nigeria after protest shooting

Unrest is continuing in Nigeria's biggest city, Lagos, after the shooting of protesters. The Nigerian army has denied involvement but witnesses and human rights groups say troops opened fire on hundreds of demonstrators, killing a number of them on Tuesday. We hear the latest developments, explain the background and speak to protesters.

Also, as part of the BBC’s “US Election 2020: What the World wants”, we continue to get messages from around the world about the United States and November’s election. We answer those questions with the help of an American politics expert.

And our medical expert answers questions about the latest developments on Covid-19. Epidemiologist Dr Maria Sundaram discusses safety in the classroom after a study suggested that the back of the room is safest from transmission.

(Photo: Smoke rises from Lagos mainland, Nigeria. Credit: Jacob Parakilas/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptks4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszds1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptkwwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz4nb3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff885c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrvxpwwc0)
2020/10/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptl0n3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct165f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff8cxh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccj)
Do the Covid-19 drugs work?

What’s the evidence behind the drugs used to treat President Trump? The results of a World Health Organisation trial following patient outcomes in 204 countries are in. Remdesivir and hydroxychloroquine fail to reduce mortality over a 28 day period. Interferon and lopinavir are also shown to be ineffective. Is this the end of the road for using these drugs to treat Covid-19?

Some good news from another global health survey. Before the pandemic, our track record on treating other infectious diseases was impressive, contributing to a significant reduction in death rates in low and middle income countries. But the numbers of people suffering from non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes continues to rise putting us more at risk from Covid-19.

Could outdoor swimming slow dementia? Hypothermia in mice prompts a promising response but it’s not so easy to study in humans. And how to deliver devastating health news over the phone. There are things doctors can do to help but nothing beats face to face communication when the news is distressing.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Anna Buckley

(Picture: A man swims in the icy water of a frozen lake in the Houhai area of Beijing, China. Photo credit: Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptl4d7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7b8b0t)
Unrest in Nigeria after shootings

In Nigeria, Amnesty International says at least twelve protesters were shot dead by the security forces in Lagos. The Nigerian army denies involvement.

Also in the programme: At a ceremony in Paris, President Macron has led tributes to the teacher who was beheaded for showing a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed in class. And Pope Francis has made his strongest statement yet in favour of civil partnerships for same- sex couples.

(Photo: Smoke was seen rising over Lagos on Wednesday . Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptl84c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff8mdr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3csz4pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptlcwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz549m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff8r4w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ncmf939t)
Purdue Pharma plead guilty in $8bn opioid settlement

The maker of OxyContin painkillers has reached an $8.3bn settlement and agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges to resolve a probe of its role in fuelling America's opioid crisis. Purdue Pharma will admit to enabling the supply of drugs "without legitimate medical purpose". The deal with US Department of Justice resolves some of the most serious claims against the firm. But it still faces thousands of cases brought by states and families.

Premier League football club Manchester United registered a $30m loss amid the pandemic. Kieran Maguire wrote The Price of Football and is a lecturer in sports finance at Liverpool University, and tells us what's behind the loss. Meanwhile, there is talk of Manchester United being one of the clubs in a proposed new European Super League. Tom Greatrex of the English Football Supporters Association is a member of the FA Council, which oversees the game in England, and gives us his reaction to the idea.

Also in the programme, Kolkata in India is celebrating the Hindu festival of Durga Puja. Millions of people normally go to temporary temples or pandals that are set up as the city shuts down for four days, and it's an important part of the city's economy. But as the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports, it's now at the centre of a court battle over striking a balance between saving the economy and saving lives.

PHOTO: OxyContin /Reuters



THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptlmcr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zvp5cvgn)
Purdue Pharma pleads guilty to criminal charges for opioid sales

The maker of OxyContin painkillers has reached an $8.3bn settlement and agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges to resolve a probe of its role in fuelling America's opioid crisis. Purdue Pharma will admit to enabling the supply of drugs "without legitimate medical purpose". The deal with US Department of Justice resolves some of the most serious claims against the firm. But it still faces thousands of cases brought by states and families. We hear from Pete Jackson, who got involved in advocacy after losing his daughter in 2006. He thinks that only jail time for those responsible can bring any sense of justice to bereaved families.

Also in the programme, Kolkata in India is celebrating the Hindu festival of Durga Puja. Millions of people normally go to temporary temples or pandals that are set up as the city shuts down for four days, and it's an important part of the city's economy. But as the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports, it's now at the centre of a court battle over striking a balance between saving the economy and saving lives.

Plus - we discuss Tesla's tremendous results as well as football finance. Premier League football club Manchester United registered a $30m loss in the pandemic. Kieran Maguire wrote The Price of Football and is a lecturer in sports finance at Liverpool University, and tells us what's behind the loss. Meanwhile, there is talk of Manchester United being one of the clubs in a proposed new European Super League. Tom Greatrex of the English Football Supporters Association is a member of the FA Council, which oversees the game in England, and gives us his reaction to the idea.

With guests Jodi Schneider in Hong Kong and Tony Nash in Houston

PHOTO: OxyContin/Reuters


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptlr3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz5hk0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff93d8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6lr)
The British and their fish

By the middle of the 20th century, the English town of Grimsby was the biggest fishing port in the world. When the catch was good “fishermen could live like rock stars”, says Kurt Christensen who first went to sea aged 15. He was instantly addicted to a tough and dangerous life on the waves. But from the 1970s onwards, the industry went into decline. Today it contributes just a tenth of one percent to Britain’s GDP – less than Harrods, London best known department store.
So how can such a tiny industry cause so much political havoc and threaten to scupper a post Brexit deal with Europe? Fishing communities have often blamed EU membership - and the foreign boats that have arrived as a result - for a steep fall in catches over the last half century. Many coastal towns voted overwhelmingly for Britain to leave the European Union.
Now, Grimsby’s recently-elected Conservative MP – the first non-socialist the town has sent to Westminster in nearly 100 years - has spoken of a modern fleet and fresh opportunities. For Assignment, Lucy Ash travels to Grimsby to hear how fishing towns like this, ignored for decades by London’s political elite, now hope finally to turn a corner. She explores the huge place fishing plays in the British psyche and asks if the cold, stormy seas around Britain really can make coastal communities rich once again.

Producer Mike Gallagher

(Image: A trader examines a haddock at the daily Grimsby Fish Market auction. Credit: Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptlvw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszds1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptlzm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz5r18)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff9bwj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptm3c8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j7cpz)
Nigerian government responds to Lagos shootings

Amnesty international says that at least 12 people were killed by soldiers and police on Tuesday during protests in the Nigerian city of Lagos. We have the reaction of the Minister for Police Affairs.

The US Director of National Intelligence says Iran and Russia have both attempted to interfere in the forthcoming presidential election. We speak to a security analyst.

And we get an update on the Covid-19 situation in Australia.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptm73d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j7hg3)
Latest reactions to shootings at Nigeria protest

We get an update on the reactions to the shootings in Lagos on Tuesday.

The former US president, Barack Obama, has sharply criticised President Trump - we have the latest.

And we are live in the Czech Republic as it begins a second lockdown following a surge in Covid-19 cases.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptmbvj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21j7m67)
Latest on shooting of Nigerian protesters in Lagos

We're live in Nigeria for the latest reaction to the reported shooting of 12 people on Tuesday in Lagos who took part in demonstrations against police brutality.

We get an update from northern Italy which is going through a resurgence in Covid-19 cases and is reimposing restrictions.

And less than half of women in the world have a paid job, a figure which hasn't changed in 25 years, as we hear from the UN.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptmgln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl43)
How has Trump changed America’s relationship with the world?

When he was elected, President Trump promised to put ‘America First’, but how has he governed?

Charmaine Cozier looks at trade, diplomacy, defence and the environment to examine the results of four years of a very different approach to international affairs.

(Image: Donald Trump at public address, Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff9tw1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7xs)
Contact tracing apps: Worth the hype?

Why contact tracing technology has been slow to make an impact. Ed Butler speaks to Jenny Wanger from the Linux Foundation Public Health in the US where many states are only now rolling out contact tracing apps, months after many countries around the world. We hear from Colm Harte, technical director at NearForm, the company behind Ireland's app, which has been downloaded by about a quarter of the population. Chan Cheow Hoe, the chief digital technology officer for the Singapore government, talks about the success of digital contact tracing in his country. And the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones explains why contact tracing apps are no longer being seen as the silver bullet in the fight against Covid-19.

(Photo: The National Health Service contact tracing app rolled out in England and Wales. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmt)
The missing victims of apartheid

In 2005, South Africa set up the Missing Persons Task Team to trace and locate the remains of the hundreds, possibly thousands, who disappeared in "political circumstances" during the brutal years of white minority rule. Many were victims of the state security services. Some were victims of secret death squads which abducted and murdered opponents of the regime. Alex Last talks to the leader of the team, Madeleine Fullard, about her work and how the cases reveal the dark and complicated history of apartheid rule.

Photo: Madeleine Fullard, head of the National Prosecuting Authority's Missing Persons Task Team, at a gravesite in Red Hill on November 15, 2012 in Durban, South Africa. (Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptmlbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6lr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcff9ym5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszccj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptmq2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjw2)
Paul Robeson: Singer, actor and civil rights activist

The multi-talented Paul Robeson could have turned his hand to pretty much anything he set his mind to: lawyer, athlete and linguist were just some of the career paths he could have taken. But he chose to become an actor and singer, and in doing so reached into the lives of huge numbers of people as one of the most popular American entertainers of his time.

Outspoken on the issues of racism, colonialism and the rights of workers, he used his popularity to campaign against the injustice he saw in many countries across the world – not just injustice suffered by his fellow African Americans.

During the Cold War, his support for Soviet-style communism was deemed unacceptable by the American establishment, and some set out to destroy his career.

Joining Bridget Kendall to examine Paul Robeson’s life are Dr Gerald Horne, the Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston and the author of Paul Robeson: The Artist as Revolutionary; Dr Shana L Redmond, Professor of Musicology and African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the author of Everything Man: The Form and Function of Paul Robeson; and Tayo Aluko whose one-man play Call Mr Robeson has won numerous awards and toured countries around the world since its premiere in 2007.


Photo: Paul Robeson
Credit: Keystone Features/Getty Images


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5k)
Viv Anderson - first black England footballer

In November 1978, Viv Anderson became the first black footballer to play a full England international. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Anderson had to endure racial abuse from opposing fans to achieve his dream of reaching the very top of the professional game. He went on to win the European Cup twice with Nottingham Forest and to become Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Viv Anderson talks to Rebecca Kesby.

PHOTO: Viv Anderson on his England debut (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptmtv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz6l85)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffb63f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqk)
One election, two farmers

Four years ago some of the biggest electoral shifts in the US were seen in the north-central state of Wisconsin. It was one of the swing states that decided that election. And it could be again. This week Emily Thomas hears the stories of two farmers who live and work in this key battleground region. Have Donald Trump's trade wars with China, Canada and Mexico been enough to challenge a traditionally Republican community? How much have Donald Trump's trade wars with China, Canada and Mexico challenged a traditionally Republican community? And has Joe Biden offered enough incentives for farmers to vote Democrat?

(Picture: Carrie Mess and Will Hsu. Credit: Will Hsu/Carrie Mess/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Carrie Mess, dairy farmer
Will Hsu, farmer and President - Hsu’s Ginseng Enterprises


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptmyl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbh)
The Guatemalan grandparents storming the disco

Guatemalan grandparents Favio "El Lobo" Vasquez and his wife Maria Moreno first met on the disco dance floor over 30 years ago. Despite being from rival dance groups they ended up falling in love and have been dancing together ever since. But earlier this year, after the death of their daughter, dance helped them in ways they could never have imagined. As they were raising their daughter's two young children and struggling to pay the bills, they decided to enter an online dance competition. They had to enter separately but Favio won and the video of him dancing went viral - it was even trending higher than Manchester United! They've been telling Outlook's Clayton Conn their story.

Ahmad Joudeh has risked everything for the love of dance - for him he says it's "dance or die". Growing up in a Palestinian family in Syria, he's braved war and death threats from the Islamic State group to pursue his dream of being a ballet dancer. In 2016 Ahmad was brought over from Syria to the Netherlands to join the Dutch National Ballet after the Artistic Director saw a film about Ahmad on TV, and he’s gone on to perform with some of the world’s most famous dancers since then. He’s also been reconciled with his father who for years disapproved of his son becoming a dancer.


Picture: Favio Vasquez and Maria Moreno
Credit: Favio Vasquez and Maria Moreno


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptn2b9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz6trf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffbflp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszccj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptn62f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bbcq0)
Thailand lifts state of emergency amid protests

Thailand has revoked an emergency decree it imposed a week ago as it tried to end months of protests against the prime minister and the monarchy. An official statement said the "violent situation" that had led to the decree had eased. A young demonstrator in Bangkok tells us the rallies will continue until the government meets protesters' demands.

Also in the programme:The former Lebanese prime minister, Saad Hariri, returns to office; and in his first major intervention in the US presidential campaign, Barack Obama has delivered a withering attack on President Trump.

(Image: Pro-democracy protesters during an anti-government protest in Bangkok. Credit: Epa/Rungroj Yongrit)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptn9tk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6lr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffbp2y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvwr6p0gnk)
Covid-19: 'unprecedented' crisis for sub-Saharan Africa

The IMF calls Covid-19 an unprecedented health and economic crisis for sub-Saharan Africa. The BBC's Andrew Walker talks us through which nations are expected to be particularly badly hit. And we hear from prominent investor Zemedeneh Negatu of Fairfax Africa Fund, who says there are many reasons for Ethiopians to feel optimistic. Also in the programme, as talks between the UK and the European Union over a future trade deal resume in London, we consider how likely it is that the two sides will reach a deal before the end of the year, with Jonathan Portes of the UK in a Changing Europe, and Roger Bootle of Capital Economics. Plus, luxury goods maker Hermes says that demand for its products is picking up again. We get reaction to the news from fashion blogger Corrie Bromfield.

(Picture: A globe centred on Africa. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptnfkp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffbsv2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptnk9t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0qvq6xcn)
Nigeria Protests: How the country's reacted

Nationwide unrest continues in Nigeria, sparked by anti-police brutality protests. The country's vice-president has promised justice for victims shot during protests against police brutality. Our reporter in Lagos gives on update on the developments, and we hear how Nigerians across the country are reacting to the demonstrations.

And with Europe experiencing record Covid-19 infections, we hear from people in the Czech republic and Belgium.

We also get details about an airstrike in Afghanistan that is said to have killed 12 children when it hit a religious school in Takhar province.

(Photo: Nigerian President Buhari meets with national security leaders in Abuja 22/10/20. Credit: Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptnp1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptnst2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz7k76)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffc52g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrvxpzs83)
2020/10/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptnxk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6lr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffc8tl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh11)
Nasa probe Osiris Rex lands on asteroid

Science in Action talks to Nasa researcher Hannah Kaplan who is part of the team for the space agency’s sampling mission to the asteroid Bennu. Mission scientists were overjoyed this week when the probe Osiris Rex momentarily touched the asteroid and sucked up some of the sand and grit on its surface. What might we learn when the sample is returned to Earth in three years' time? There is some not-such-good news about a theory about immunity to the pandemic coronavirus, and medical researchers in the UK announce the world’s first study that will deliberately infect volunteers with the novel coronavirus. The so-called challenge study is planned to begin in London in January. The purpose is to speed up the quest for effective Covid-19 vaccines but will it be safe for the participants? And there’s a new green chemistry breakthrough for tackling the world’s plastic waste crisis.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Image: Nasa probe Osiris Rex lands on asteroid. Credit Nasa)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptp19b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bc6xx)
Coronavirus: Covid cases surge across Europe

France will extend an overnight curfew to dozens more areas in a bid to slow the spread of coronavirus. Italy has seen a surge in cases in recent days.

Also in the programme: ahead of tonight's final presidential debate in the US, we hear from the man who played Mr. Trump in Hillary Clinton's debate prep back in 2016; and Lebanon has a new Prime Minister.

(Photo: French police patrol at the Tocadero square near the Eiffel tower in Paris. Credit: Reuters).


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptp51g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffcj9v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptp8sl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz816q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffcn1z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ncmfd06x)
Goldman Sachs to pay $3bn over 1MDB corruption scandal

US officials said the record settlement reflected Goldman's "central" role in a "massive corruption scheme". Goldman admitted it had fallen "short", calling it an "institutional failure". In all, the investment bank is due to pay about $5bn in penalties - about two thirds of its 2019 profits - to regulators around the world, to resolve cases that have severely tarnished the firm's reputation.

The IMF calls Covid-19 an unprecedented health and economic crisis for sub-Saharan Africa. The BBC's Andrew Walker talks us through which nations are expected to be particularly badly hit. And we hear from prominent investor Zemedeneh Negatu of Fairfax Africa Fund, who says there are many reasons for Ethiopians to feel optimistic.

Also in the programme, as talks between the UK and the European Union over a future trade deal resume in London, we consider how likely it is that the two sides will reach a deal before the end of the year, with Jonathan Portes of the UK in a Changing Europe, and Roger Bootle of Capital Economics.

Plus, luxury goods maker Hermes says that demand for its products is picking up again. We get reaction to the news from fashion blogger Corrie Bromfield.

(Picture: Goldman Sachs/Reuters)



FRIDAY 23 OCTOBER 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptpj8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zvp5grcr)
Goldman Sachs to pay $3bn over 1MDB corruption scandal

US officials said the record settlement reflected Goldman's "central" role in a "massive corruption scheme". Goldman admitted it had fallen "short", calling it an "institutional failure". In all, the investment bank is due to pay about $5bn in penalties - about two thirds of its 2019 profits - to regulators around the world, to resolve cases that have severely tarnished the firm's reputation.

Also - with the final US presidential debate just an hour away, we talk to the president of the university hosting the event.

And - Walmart - America's world's biggest retailer - has sued the US government in what's widely seen as a pre-emptive strike because it thinks the Department of Justice will come after it for the way it's been selling pharmaceutical products. We hear about the long-standing DOJ investigation of Walmart from Jesse Eisinger from Pro Publica.

Plus - where do your main street brand clothes really come from? We look into how the coronavirus is threatening hundreds of thousands of jobs in the Asia-Pacific garment trade.

With guests Mitchell Hartman in the US and Lien Hoang in Vietnam.

PHOTO: Getty Images


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptpn0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz8dg3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffd09c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3csztgq)
Anger in Nigeria and Happy Birthday Pelé!

Nigerian international John Ogu calls for players to boycott matches following the protests and violence in Nigeria. And the former New York Cosmos captain Werner Roth wishes his old team mate, Pelé, a happy birthday.


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptprs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptpwj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz8myc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffd7sm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptq08c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21jb8m2)
US election: Trump and Biden clash in final live TV debate

President Trump and Joe Biden's final live TV debate has been more restrained than the first one. We get the views of a Republican and a Democrat.

We're live in Nigeria to speak to a protestor for their reaction to President Buhari's address to the nation, where he called for an end to the protests against police brutality.

And up to 12,000 seal pups have died off the coast of Namibia. A conservationist tells us what he's seen and what could have caused this high number of deaths.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptq40h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21jbdc6)
Reactions to the last US presidential TV debate

Did the presidential candidates succeed in appealing to the undecided voters in the battleground states? We get some reactions from Florida and Wisconsin.

Also we report from Belgium which is seeing the worst wave of the coronavirus in Europe.

And what has been the reaction in Nigeria to President Buhari's address to the nation, following the shooting of protesters this week?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptq7rm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wh21jbj3b)
The last TV debate in US presidential election

How did both candidates perform in this last TV debate before the election? We have all the key moments and bring you reaction.

Also we speak to a doctor in Lagos who treated some of those injured in the shooting of protestors in Nigeria on Tuesday.

And a baby gorilla at zoo in the UK has not been able to feed from his mother. His zookeeper describes how they are helping.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptqchr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxz)
Peter Frankopan: Can history offer us any lessons on the coronavirus pandemic?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Peter Frankopan, historian and author of the bestselling book The Silk Roads. There’s plentiful evidence that the coronavirus pandemic has inflicted more serious damage on the US than China. Has the impact of Covid-19 reinforced the notion that global power and influence is shifting to the East?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffdqs4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78z)
Why BP is betting against oil

Is the fossil fuel industry being too complacent about the speed at which renewable energy will disrupt their business in the next three decades?

That's the contention of Spencer Dale, chief economist at BP. In an extended interview with Justin Rowlatt, he explains the thinking behind his company's plan to cut its own oil and gas production by 40% before the end of this decade.

And it's not just about heading off the threat of catastrophic climate change. As Spencer explains, even in their business-as-usual scenario they expected an unprecedentedly fast shift towards solar, wind and biomass energy, thanks to steep learning curves and stiffening competition.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: BP logo at night; Credit: NurPhoto/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvl)
Nasa's pioneering black women

Usually it is the names of astronauts that people remember about the space race. But less celebrated are the teams of people working on how to put a rocket into orbit. only in recent years have stories come to light of the contributions of the black women involved.

Many were recruited as 'computers', meaning that they carried out complex mathematical calculations by hand, before machines were invented that could do the job.

Christine Darden started her career in the computer pool, helping the engineers work out the trajectories needed to bring the Apollo Capsule back to Earth. Finally, she broke through the hidden barriers facing women at the time, gaining a promotion to engineer.

(Photo: Dr Christine Darden at a desk in Nasa's Langley Research Center, 1973. Credit: Bob Nye/Nasa/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptqh7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpc)
Election stakes for US tech

What changes will a new Presidential term bring for the tech we use? Plus, how TikTok may be influential in the vote, despite paid political ads being banned. And what the social platforms are doing to try to stem disinformation ahead of polling day. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC reporters James Clayton, Sophia Smith Galer, and Marianna Spring. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Combination of images showing Donald Trump and Joe Biden at the first Presidential debate, Credit: Jim Watson/ Saul Loeb/ AFP/ Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffdvj8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptqm00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnl)
What next for US foreign policy?

While US domestic policy has taken centre stage in the race for the White House, whichever man wins the presidency will also help define America’s place in the world for years to come. President Trump won 2016’s election, in part, on promising to reduce the number of military and diplomatic entanglements the country was involved in across the globe. In the Middle East he pulled US forces out of Syria, withdrew from the Iran nuclear deal negotiated during the Obama administration, and has strengthened ties with regional allies such as Israel, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. In Asia the US is engaged in a trade war with its single biggest trading partner - China. During his first term Donald Trump also had a frosty relationship with many of his NATO allies - and a much closer one with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin than any of his predecessors. Did those newly-defined strategic partnerships herald new achievements? Joe Biden has promised to turn back the clock on many of Mr Trump’s ‘America First’ themed policies, but which ones? And has the role the US plays on the world stage changed forever? As part of the BBC World Service's 'US Elections 2020: What the World Wants' series, Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss what's next for American foreign policy.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptqqr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz9h58)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcfff30j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptqvh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhq)
The battle for Florida’s Latino voters

Florida makes or breaks the US presidential election, and Spanish language ads have been bombarding Latino voters. BBC Monitoring journalist in Miami Luis Fajardo analyses the tactics and tunes being used by both Republicans and Democrats to swing the state.

Egypt’s septuagenarian record breaking footballer
Ezzeldin Bahader recently entered the record books as the world’s oldest professional footballer aged 74. BBC Arabic sports reporter Marwa Helmy has followed the inspiring story.

A trip to a Russian banya
Yulia James of BBC Russian shares her love of the famous Russian bath house, the banya: a place to warm up, cool down and relax with friends.

Nigeria's anti-SARS protests
Citizen protests against Nigeria’s Special Anti Robbery Squad or SARS turned violent this week, when protesters at a toll gate in the Lekke Island suburb of Lagos found themselves under fire. BBC Pidgin reporter Damilola Banjo has been covering the story since the beginning, and was there when the shooting took place.

Making a board game political
A new board game is about to hit the East Asian market. It’s called United Front: Fight Back Against China, and pits players representing Mongolia, Taiwan and Hong Kong against invading forces from China. Politically sensitive to say the least, as Lam Cho Wai of BBC Chinese explains.

Image: Poll worker at a ballot drop box in Miami Beach, Florida
Credit: EVA MARIE UZCATEGUI/AFP


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptqz7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlz9qnj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcfffbhs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptr2zj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bf8m3)
Presidential debate: Trump and Biden row over Covid-19 and racism

US President Donald Trump and his White House challenger Joe Biden clashed over Covid-19 and race while trading corruption charges in their final live TV debate.

Also in the programme: Libya's warring factions have signed an immediate, permanent ceasefire deal intended to halt nine years of civil war; and Iran confirms more than 6,000 new cases a day of Covid-19, with more than 300 people a day dying.

(Photo: Combination of images showing Donald Trump and Joe Biden. Credit: Jim Watson/ Saul Loeb/ AFP/ Getty Images).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptr6qn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcfffl01)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt7vrgqrq2)
The final US presidential debate

We analyse last night's US presidential debate from the perspective of work and money. David Taylor is with the Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Association, which represents large and small businesses in the key marginal state, and gives us his reaction. And the BBC's Samira Hussain examines the key issues facing farmers in America as they decide whether to vote for Joe Biden or Donald Trump. Also in the programme, Spencer Dale, chief economist at oil giant BP, discusses the company's plan to cut its oil and gas production by 40% by the end of this decade. Plus, the makers of Guinness have developed an alcohol-free version of the famous Irish stout. Grainne Wafer is global brand director at Guinness and tells us how it is made.

(Picture: Donald Trump and Joe Biden on the debate stage. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptrbgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcfffpr5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct16c5)
Is this Egypt’s #metoo moment?

Egypt is currently in the midst of a growing movement calling out the culture of sexual assault that’s rife in the country. A UN study showed 99.3% of Egyptian women have experienced sexual harassment or violence, and although women’s rights activists have been campaigning for years, there continues to be victim blaming surrounding women and a lack of prosecutions. However, a recent high profile case of one man who allegedly sexually assaulted and blackmailed several women was brought to the public’s attention due to an Instagram account called Assault Police which shared victim’s testimonies. It’s encouraged more women to speak out about their own experiences. And significantly, the religious authority, the Al Azhar Mosque published guidelines against assault, specifically stating what women wear is not an excuse.

Salma El-Wardany, a UK based Muslim writer and poet, was born in Egypt and wants to uncover what impact this largely online movement is having. Will it create a lasting change in Egyptian society and result in prosecutions?
Salma will talk to the key women fighting for change, and the male allies using their platform to speak out. She’ll hear from Nadeen Ashraf, the young woman behind Assault Police, and Sabah Khodir who’s offering practical support and guidance for victims. Plus she’ll speak to Omar Samra a well-known adventurer who’s encouraging men to take responsibility for their actions. She’ll hear from Human Rights Watch about their concerns over women’s rights in the country, and she’ll speak to Egyptian American journalist Mona Eltahawy about her hopes for a feminist revolution.

Producer: Miriam Williamson

(Picture: Egyptian women hold signs during a protest against sexual harassment in Cairo, Egypt, June 2014 / Credit: Ahmed Ismail/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptrg6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0qvq9t8r)
Abortion law in Poland

In Poland, police have used pepper spray against hundreds of people protesting against the country's top court ruling that makes abortions in cases of foetal defects unconstitutional. We get reaction from Polish women.

We have an update from Nigeria, following the shooting of protesters this week. One of the main groups behind the movement against police brutality, the feminist coalition, has encouraged young Nigerians to stay at home and follow curfews. We’ll ask whether this marks the end of a wave of protests.

Today’s medical expert to discuss the day’s developments with Covid-19 is Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University. We get her thoughts on the decision by US regulators to give full approval for the antiviral drug remdesivir to treat Covid-19 patients in hospitals.

And, as part of the BBC’s “US Election 2020: What the World wants”, we’ve been getting questions and messages from around the world about the United States and November’s election. BBC Presenter and co-host of “Americast” podcast, Emily Maitlis, joins us to answer some of the questions and to discuss the key moments from last night’s presidential debate.

(Photo: People block a street near the house of Law and Justice leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski during a protest against imposing further restrictions on abortion law in Warsaw Credit: Jedrzej Nowicki/Agencja Gazeta via REUTERS)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptrkz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptrpq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzbg49)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffg1zk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrvxq2p56)
2020/10/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptrtg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffg5qp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6c)
Am I related to a virus?

All living things are related to each other, from elephants to algae, e-coli to humans like us. Within our cells we hold genetic information in the form of DNA or RNA. But despite viruses sharing these molecules, many scientists don't consider them to be 'life'.
Viruses cannot reproduce on their own, but some can insert their DNA into a host to pass genes sideways through the branching tree of life. As a result, viruses’ relationship with life is.... complex.

Two of our listeners had viruses on the mind, so they sent in the same question to CrowdScience. Senan from Singapore and Melvin from South Africa want to know how viruses began to see if this can tell us whether they shared a common ancestor with humans.

To dig into this complexity Marnie Chesterton speaks with an expert on Koala genetics – Dr Rachael Tarlinton. Koalas are in the middle of tackling a retroviruses, a type of virus that plants DNA into our cells as a reproduction strategy. Her research could reveal why humans life has so much viral DNA within our genomes.

Marnie speaks with a computational biologist Professor Gustavo Caetano-Anolles, who has found a new way to trace the family tree for billions of years using proteins common to all life on earth, and speaks with Professor Chantal Abergel who paints a picture of how viruses went from being the losers of evolution, to being highly successful parasites of cells.

If you have a question for CrowdScience, please email: crowdscience@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Rory Galloway
Presented by Marnie Chesterton

Contributors:
Dr Chelsey Spriggs - Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan in the USA
Dr Rachael Tarlinton - Associate Professor at the University of Nottingham in the UK
Professor Gustavo Caetano-Anolles - The University of Illinois in Urbana Champagne, USA
Professor Chantal Abergel - Aix Marseille Université in France
Graeme Dick - Head Keeper, Longleat Zoo and Safari Park, UK


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xptry6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yyd7bg3v0)
The agreement on a permanent ceasefire between military leaders from Libya's government, and those from opposition forces led by General Khalifa Haftar, was brokered by the UN.

Also in the programme: Sudan becomes the third Arab country in two months to normalise relations with Israel; and the French government puts 46 million people under nigh time curfew.

(Photo: Representatives of the Libyan military government and Libya's opposition forces, shaking hands in Geneva. Credit: EPA).


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpts1yk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffgf6y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1xpts5pp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdxlzby3t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pwcffgjz2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ncmfgx40)
The final US presidential debate

We analyse last night's US presidential debate from the perspective of work and money. David Taylor is with the Pennsylvania Manufacturers' Association, which represents large and small businesses in the key marginal state, and gives us his reaction. And the BBC's Samira Hussain examines the key issues facing farmers in America as they decide whether to vote for Joe Biden or Donald Trump. Also in the programme, Spencer Dale, chief economist at oil giant BP, discusses the company's plan to cut its oil and gas production by 40% by the end of this decade. Plus, the makers of Guinness have developed an alcohol-free version of the famous Irish stout. Grainne Wafer is global brand director at Guinness and tells us how it is made.

(Picture: Donald Trump and Joe Biden on the debate stage. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6lr)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6lr)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6lr)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6lr)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pw053prlm)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pw053q3v0)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pw053qh2d)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pw053qltj)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pw053qv9s)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pw053rpjp)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pw053s5j6)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pw053s98b)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pw053snhq)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pw053swzz)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct0xjs)

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BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t0qvq40gk)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t0qvq6xcn)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jz)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8b0)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8n9)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7xs)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78z)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18zhdvshp0)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18zvp561ng)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18zvp58ykk)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18zvp5cvgn)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18zvp5grcr)

Business Weekly 01:06 SUN (w3ct0sp6)

Comedians Vs. The News 05:32 SAT (w3ct0x3g)

Comedians Vs. The News 22:06 SUN (w3ct0x3g)

Comedians Vs. The News 10:06 MON (w3ct0x3g)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv6b)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv6b)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv6b)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv6c)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98m)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz98m)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz98m)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz98m)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct16c2)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct16c2)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct16c2)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct16c2)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9q4)

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From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9q4)

Girl Taken 09:32 SAT (w3ct0xw5)

Girl Taken 04:32 SUN (w3ct0xw5)

Girl Taken 22:32 SUN (w3ct0xw5)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc1z)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc1z)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3cszc1z)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc70)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc70)

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HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxz)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszccj)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszccj)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszccj)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszccj)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SAT (w3ct1659)

Heart and Soul 05:32 SUN (w3ct1659)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct1659)

Heart and Soul 16:32 FRI (w3ct16c5)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbw)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbw)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbw)

More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pxz)

More or Less 22:50 SAT (w3ct0pxz)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxz)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6th)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6th)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wh21hynzp)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wh21hysqt)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wh21hyxgy)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wh21j1kws)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wh21j1pmx)

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Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wh21j4lk0)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wh21j4q94)

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Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wh21jb8m2)

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Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2yy0z0qx57)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2yy0z0rw48)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2yy0z0tt2b)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2yy0z0vs1c)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2yyd7b1nzq)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2yyd7b2j6m)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2yyd7b4kwt)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2yyd7b5f3q)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2yyd7b7gsx)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2yyd7b8b0t)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172x2yyd7bbcq0)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2yyd7bc6xx)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2yyd7bf8m3)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2yyd7bg3v0)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3cszf0f)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3cszf0f)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd3q)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd3q)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3cszd3q)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3cszdk8)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3cszdk8)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3cszdk8)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3cszds1)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3cszds1)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3cszds1)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdbh)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3cszdbh)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdbh)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4y)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4y)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1s)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1s)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh11)

Science in Action 04:32 FRI (w3cszh11)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh11)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh11)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jrvxpq2jt)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jrvxpszfx)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jrvxpwwc0)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jrvxpzs83)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jrvxq2p56)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh5j)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh5k)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3c0dk5k52z)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3ldd3lrcy3)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3ldd3lvjbg)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjt)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhpc)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhpc)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3cszhpc)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk3g)

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The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3ct0xj1)

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The Big Idea 22:50 SUN (w3ct0xj1)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct165d)

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The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct165f)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3cszj3x)

The Conversation 16:32 MON (w3cszj3x)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3cszj3x)

The Documentary 08:32 SAT (w3ct0x67)

The Documentary 11:32 SAT (w3ct16c8)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct1643)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct1643)

The Documentary 19:32 SUN (w3ct0x67)

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The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct16c4)

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The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3csz4pt)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjhp)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjqj)

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The Food Chain 16:32 THU (w3cszjqk)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3cszjqk)

The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjw1)

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The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl43)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172x7bdkbnl4rc)

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When Katty Met Carlos 02:32 MON (w3ct164n)

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