Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 OCTOBER 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p165673z8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18z44k0c25)
Hurricane Delta approaches US landfall

Residents in Louisiana are fleeing their homes as Hurricane Delta approaches. We'll hear the latest from Joel Cline of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Also in the programme, the Coronavirus pandemic means India is spending huge sums in support yet many citizens are borrowing. One woman tells us she has turned to money lenders to ease her financial woes, with no idea how much interest is being charged.The prestigious American university, Yale, is being sued by the Justice Department for allegedly discriminating illegally against Asian and white undergraduate applicants. We get reaction from Irene Vazquez, who is a student at Yale. And we'll hear from City University Professor Terri Watson on how Critical Race Theory, a tool for analysing systemic racism in US institutions such as universities, has become President Trump's latest target. Plus, we'll hear from Kai Ryssdal of our sister station Marketplace about how long it might take for the lights to come back on again on Broadway.

All through the show we'll be joined by Sinead Mangan of ABC in Perth.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p165677qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bt04j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwsxlzs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjs)
Secrets of the world's best umpire

Reaction to a record-equalling 21st consecutive one-day victory by Australia's remarkable women's team.

Plus, Courtney Walsh on how he plans to turn West Indies women back into world beaters themselves.

And the unexpected star of the English cricketing summer - umpire Michael Gough on how he gave up playing cricket at the age of 23 and went on to become statistically the best Test umpire in the world.

Photo: Umpire Michael Gough (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p16567cgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhn)
India's secret soldiers

This year armies from India and China clashed along the disputed border between Indian-administered Kashmir and China. A recent funeral with full military honours on the Indian side revealed an intriguing story. Nayima Tanzin was a Tibetan refugee, who his family say was serving with a covert Indian regiment, the Special Frontier Force, a force never acknowledged by Indian authorities. The BBC’s Aamir Peerzada travelled to Ladakh to find out more.

Flights to nowhere
Here’s an odd phenomenon. Airlines in South East Asia are offering “flights to nowhere” – you fly, you don’t land, you come back. So what’s going on? Hong Kong-based BBC Chinese journalist Martin Yip fills us in.

Hotels of Pyongyang
Why would South Koreans be interested in a new book showing photographs of hotel restaurants and reception areas? Because these hotels are in the North Korean capital Pyongyang. The BBC’s Julie Yoonnyung Lee tells us more about the fascination of the photographs for Koreans.

A clean sweep! The Russian cleaner who became mayor
Until recently, Marina Udgodskaya was employed to clean the mayor’s office in her small village in Russia. But a strange chain of events led her to standing for, and then winning, the local elections. BBC Russian’s Petr Kozlov went to meet her.

Maasai Ceremony
Once every 15 years, young warriors of the Maasai community of East Africa graduate to become elders. It’s a colourful, joyful ceremony, observed this year by BBC Nairobi journalist Ian Mafula.

Image: Funeral with full military honours of Tibetan refugee Nayima Tenzin in Ladakh
Credit: Nisar Hussain


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvj)
The Battle of Lewisham

In August 1977, the racist National Front organisation planned to stage a march into Lewisham in South London at a time of high racial tension in the area. The National Front activists were met by a huge counter-demonstration organised by anti-racist campaigners – in the clashes that followed, hundreds of people were arrested and injured before the National Front were forced to withdraw. The so-called Battle of Lewisham is now seen as having halted the rise of the far-right in British politics. Nacheal Catnott talks to Lez Henry, who grew up in Lewisham and witnessed the unrest. Produced by Eleanor Biggs.

PHOTO: A police officer attempts to restore order in Lewisham in 1977 (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p16567h6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnj)
India's Dalits: Fighting for justice

The alleged rape and subsequent death of a 19-year-old woman in India has again shone a spotlight on caste-based violence against the Dalit community – formerly known as “untouchables”. According to official figures, men from India's upper castes rape ten Dalit women a day. Although the northern state of Uttar Pradesh records the highest number of such cases, caste-based violence and discrimination is prevalent throughout the country and in Indian communities around the world. Dalits make up nearly twenty percent of India's population and were given equal protection under the constitution after independence from Britain. But rights groups say while many Dalits have been able to take advantage of quota systems to move up the economic ladder, violence and discrimination against the community is worsening. The current racial justice movement in the United States is inspiring Dalit activists to be move assertive in speaking up for their rights – but what gains can Dalits expect to make? What is at the core of the discrimination and prejudice against them? And why are Dalit women especially targeted for sexual violence? Ritula Shah and guests discuss the future of Dalits in India.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p16567lys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62btccx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwsxz75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3f)
Josie Long and Ari Eldjárn

Icelandic comedian Ari Eldjárn and British stand-up Josie Long join comedy couple Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to tackle the global headlines.
This week, what does it really mean to be vice-president of the United States? And exploring the mystery of a strange sound tormenting the residents of an Icelandic town.
Get involved and tell us about the funny stories where you are.
#comediansvsthenews


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p16567qpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d12jk62zm)
Armenia and Azerbaijan agree ceasefire

Armenia and Azerbaijan have agreed to a humanitarian ceasefire, after two weeks of fighting.

Also, President Trump says he is now 'medication free', as he seeks to recover from Covid-19 and get his election campaign back on track.

And how Gaza’s relative isolation has enabled it to escape the worst medical effects of coronavirus, but its extreme levels of poverty have increased.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Nathalie Tocci, director of the Institute of International Affairs in Rome, and a Special Advisor to EU High Representative and Vice President of the Commission, Josep Borrell; and Henry Chu, deputy news editor for the Los Angeles Times, based in London.

(Picture: Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov announcing the ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan. Credit: EPA)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p16567vg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d12jk66qr)
Madrid on lockdown

A two-week lockdown is imposed on the Spanish capital, Madrid, to try to control the coronavirus. Are people there experiencing pandemic fatigue?

Also, is there a future for cinemas that have been forced to close because of the virus?

And Armenia and Azerbaijan agree a humanitarian ceasefire, after two weeks of fighting over the disputed territory of Nagorno Karabakh. But can it hold?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Nathalie Tocci, director of the Institute of International Affairs in Rome, and a Special Advisor to EU High Representative and Vice President of the Commission, Josep Borrell; and Henry Chu, deputy news editor for the Los Angeles Times, based in London.

(Picture: A woman walks her dog in front of the Royal Palace in Madrid, Spain during lockdown. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p16567z65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d12jk6bgw)
Trump says he's 'medication free'

President Trump says he is now "medication free", as he seeks to recover from Covid-19 and get his election campaign back on track.

Also, after more than ten hours of talks in Moscow, Armenia and Azerbaijan have agreed to a humanitarian ceasefire, following two weeks of fighting, but can it hold?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Nathalie Tocci, director of the Institute of International Affairs in Rome, and a Special Advisor to EU High Representative and Vice President of the Commission, Josep Borrell; and Henry Chu, deputy news editor for the Los Angeles Times, based in London.

(Picture: A US Marine stands guard outside the West Wing, signifying the President is inside the White House in Washington, DC. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwsybgk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x66)
Soul Music

Peggy Lee's Is That All There Is?

Is That All There Is, the Leiber and Stoller song made famous by Peggy Lee, is based upon a short story by Thomas Mann called Disillusionmen', but those who know and love it feel it is inspirational rather than a cynical, world weary musical take on existentialism and the futility of life.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p165682y9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0xjr)
US Election: Testing positive for Covid-19

The President of the United States is recovering from Covid-19, after a week when the world watched him leaving hospital briefly in a motorcade to wave supporters and - on his return to the White House - moving his mask on a balcony. Donald Trump then told the country there was nothing to fear from the disease. So how were his words received by the Americans across the country? Nuala McGovern hears from those in California, Iowa and Alabama who were thrilled by the president's show of strength against Covid-19 and from others less enamoured by his attitude.

As well as coronavirus, race remains a divisive issue in the US. Nuala returns to Charlottesville, a city scarred by race protests, and brings together a Deacon and a student activist to get their thoughts on race in this election.

(Photo: President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses atop the Truman Balcony of the White House Credit: Erin Scott/File Photo/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwsyg6p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw4)
Girl Taken

10/10/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4x)
Putting a smile on your face in a fraught world

Life may seem rather fraught right now but the BBC World Service is trying to put a smile on your face with Comedians versus the news.
But while some listeners say it made them laugh, others have been left stony faced. We hear from the show’s two presenters.

Plus we give two listeners three minutes to ask four questions to Weekend host Julian Wor-ricker.

Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p165686pf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c018vs0h4)
'It's not about hitting new milestones as a female' – Joy Neville on making history

“I don’t see it as trying to hit new milestones as a female” – Joy Neville on making history.

The Irish referee will become the first woman to take on Television Match Official duties in a men's international game when Wales face Georgia next month. Neville tells us how she initially needed some convincing to become a referee, how other people’s doubts over whether a woman could make it as a top official have driven her on and she explains her approach to being a TMO.

Maryam Shojaei joins us one year on from three and a half thousand women attending Iran’s men’s World Cup qualifier against Cambodia in Tehran. Apart from a few exceptions, women had effectively been banned from stadiums where men were playing since just after the 1979 Islamic revolution. Shojaei ran a campaign -- first anonymously and later publicly -- that led to Iran allowing women to attend men's football matches. She gives us her memories of the day and tells us about her hopes for the future.

To celebrate Black History Month we speak to a pioneer of the American Football scene in Great Britain. Gerry Anderson played between 1984 and 2000 for clubs including the London Monarchs and London Olympians. He reflects on a career that saw him win the Eurobowl . He also tells us about the cultural differences he encountered when American players came to play in the UK – including the revelation he was asked if there would be black people in London. Anderson tells us their question was based on the fact that the Royal Family were the only English people they had ever seen on television.

The third edition of the Hindukush Mountain Bike Challenge took place in Afghanistan earlier this month. The two-day event aims to grow the Afghan domestic racing scene and empower young boys and girls. Shikeba Aryan finished third in the women's race and says she hopes her success encourages other young girls in Afghanistan to take up cycling, having overcome resistance from her own family when she started out.

In Sporting Witness we tell the story of an Ivory Coast football team which is credited with revolutionising the sport in Africa. We hear from Kolo Toure, who was one of the players on the team and later a star in the English Premier League.

And – we’re live in Paris with our tennis correspondent – Russell Fuller – ahead of the women’s singles final at the French Open.

Photo: Joy Neville (Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p16568bfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bv2vp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwsyppy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct16c7)
Dyslexia: Language and childhood

People with dyslexia around the world reveal the challenges of growing up and working with this condition. We also hear from scientists and educators working at the cutting edge of dyslexia learning and research.

Reading and writing are fundamental tools in most societies, necessary for even the most basic of tasks. For the person with dyslexia this can cause an agonising disjuncture from an early age. Many dyslexic people will recall the difficulties of decoding words, the horror of the spelling test, the forgetfulness, and the shame of struggling with things that other people find so simple.

Educators, neurologists and linguists have different approaches, but research shows that the language we learn to speak and write has an impact. In this first programme Toby Withers who is dyslexic himself, reveals the challenges of learning English, with all its inconsistent rules and odd spellings. He talks to the subject of a ground-breaking study into bilingual dyslexic children – Alex - who is dyslexic in English but not in Japanese. From Hong Kong University he discovers how dyslexia in character-based language systems is different to dyslexia in English.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p16568g5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6tg)
Floppy disks and cassette tapes with Témé Tan and Nick Hakim

Témé Tan welcomes Nick Hakim, Raquel Berrios and Ela Minus to discuss the purpose of the work they make, whether they imagine their albums as one piece or a playlist of songs, and the importance of travelling and meeting other creatives from around the world.

Témé is an artist from the Democratic Republic of Congo, now based in Belgium, who mixes pop, soul, hip-hop and Afro elements in his music. Nick Hakim is a a psychedelic soul and R&B producer, singer, and songwriter based in Brooklyn, New York. He released one of the albums of the year with his second LP Will This Make Me Good, after battling grief, writer’s block, and the Coronavirus outbreak. Raquel Berrios is one half of Puerto Rican pop duo Buscabulla, who released the excellent album Regresa earlier this year. The album explores the theme of returning home after several years in New York, and finding it devastated by two hurricanes. Ela Minus is a Colombian-born, New York based-singer and producer who prefers using and building her own synths to using computers. She was also a drummer in a hardcore band before releasing her own music in 2016.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p16568kxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yxnppyrkd)
Nagorno-Karabakh: Armenia and Azerbaijan ceasefire comes into force

A ceasefire has technically come into effect in Nagorno Karabakh, but both Armenia and Azerbaijan have accused each other of early violations.

Also in the programme: President Trump says he has stopped taking medicines against Covid-19, just before he's to hold a campaign event with supporters, and what it's like to be the Finish Prime Minister for the day.

(Photo: Thousands have been displaced so far in the conflict. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p16568pny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:04 Sportsworld (w172x3ld0v8z76d)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live coverage of the women’s singles final from the French Open at Roland Garros. The BBC tennis correspondent Russell Fuller and former WTA professionals Jill Craybass and Naomi Cavaday are part the Sportsworld coverage. Plus a look ahead to Sunday’s men’s final.

As the NBA draws to a close in the Florida bubble in Points and Protests we discuss the history of protest in US Basketball. On August the 26th 2020 the sport ground to a halt in a fight for justice and equality. Like so many before they decided to make a stand. We’ll be joined by WNBA player Tierra Ruffin Pratt, former NBA player Etan Thomas and hear from Craig Hodges who won two NBA titles with the Chicago Bulls and current Atlanta Hawkes coach Lloyd Pearce.

Also this week European football from the Nations League, the latest Formula One Grand Prix in Germany plus the women’s US PGA Golf championship from Pennsylvania.

Photo: Sofia Kenin of The United States of America celebrates after winning match point during her Women's Singles semifinals match against Petra Kvitova (Credit: Getty images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p165695ng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bvy2l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwszjxv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvsc)
QAnon and the rabbit hole election

Millions of Americans are tuning into an alternative US election campaign. This one isn’t full of sobering news about the pandemic, the Supreme Court and the American economy – instead it’s filled with chatter about elite cabals, rumours and allegations of the most vile crimes.

The rabbit hole election is a subterranean campaign taking place online. And there's one conspiracy theory in particular that is spreading widely and is becoming increasingly well-known among voters: QAnon.

At its heart is the completely unfounded claim that Donald Trump is fighting a secret war against a “deep state” of satanic paedophiles. But could this unhinged idea actually have an impact on the upcoming election? We’ve been investigating.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Marianna Spring
Producer: Ant Adeane


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxy)
A short history of probability

Tim Harford speaks to Jacob Goldstein about the unholy marriage of mathematicians, gamblers, and actuaries at the dawn of modern finance.

(Blaise Pascal 1623-1662 French mathematician, physicist. Portrait by Philippe de Champaigne. Credit:Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p165699dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3cszt60)
Young Lebanon

Even before the explosion, Lebanon already suffered from decades of economic mismanagement, endemic corruption, a political system said to serve vested interests, a currency crisis and on top of all that, the global pandemic. Now the blast at the port has caused untold damage to the wealth of the nation and an entire political class stands accused of letting their country down.

When the French President visited the crisis-hit nation recently, a young volunteer, Lilian Hawila, voiced the frustration of a generation when she harangued him in the street, prompting Macron to respond “Your anger is my source of optimism”. She is one of the panel of four young Lebanese opinion-formers discussing the issues that matter most to their generation. They tackle questions raised from across the country by those under 35 in a programme hosted from Beirut by BBC Arabic correspondent, Carine Torbey.

On the panel:
Michelle Keserwany: Script writer and singer-song writer
Timour Azhari: Journalist
Lilian Hawila: Student known for confronting President Macron at the site of the blast
Marwa Osman: Academic and broadcaster

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Producers: Charlie Taylor & Helen Towner
Studio Managers: Henry Dutton & Tim Heffer

Photo: People help to clean debris after massive blasts in Beirut, Credit: Houssam Shbaro/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p16569f4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3f)
Actor Sally Hawkins

On The Arts Hour this week: Oscar-nominated actor Sally Hawkins discusses her latest film Eternal Beauty, about a woman living with schizophrenia; Nigerian author Oyinkan Braithwaite tells us about the dark humour in her novel My Sister the Serial Killer; and Indian sitar player Baruji Shrivastav on his work with Inner Vision, an ensemble of blind musicians.

Stranger Things actor Millie Bobbie Brown reveals why she took on the role of Sherlock’s sister in the film Enola Holmes; rapper and producer Chuck D reflects on the politics of rap; and Swedish singer Robyn shares her love of Prince’s seminal album Sign O’ the Times.

Nikki Bedi’s guests this week are British author and Creative Director of Aardman Studios, Finbar Hawkins, talking about his new book Witch; and journalist Saba Imtiaz who joins us from Karachi.

(Photo: Sally Hawkins. Credit: Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p16569jwv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yxnppzqjf)
President Trump holds his first public event since Covid diagnosis

Donald Trump has delivered a speech in front of cheering supporters at the White House in his first public appearance since being hospitalised. The event was officially a "peaceful protest", but looked, critics said, much like a Trump campaign rally.

Also on the programme: Reports of ceasefire violations in Nagorno Karabakh - we hear from the Armenian and Azerbaijani sides; And the teenager who became Finland's Prime Minister for a day.

(Photo: Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump rally and march around the White House. Credit: REUTERS/Ken Cedeno)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p16569nmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q3)
Has President Trump’s Covid-19 illness plagued his campaign?

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

This week Donald Trump said contracting Covid-19 was for him: “a blessing from God” and urged people not to be afraid or let it dominate daily life. But more than 200,000 people have died in the United States from the coronavirus and as the election looms closer, Anthony Zurcher assesses how voters view the president’s brush with Covid-19.

Next to the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan, that borders China’s far west. A state of emergency has just been declared, including a curfew, and troops have been ordered onto the streets to quell the unrest that erupted after a disputed parliamentary election there last weekend. As Caroline Eden reports from the capital Bishkek, there have been demonstrations and political chaos all week, with protesters angry at alleged vote buying and intimidation.

Last week marked a historic moment for Togo as the country’s first ever female Prime Minister, Victoire Tomegah Dogbé, was appointed. In neighbouring Nigeria, however, women may be questioning the rate of progress – especially if they’re single
as Olivia Ndubuisi has experienced.

There was an unexpected winner at this summer’s Tour de France when the Slovene cyclist, Tadej Pogačar from the United Arab Emirates team, donned the celebrated yellow jersey and lifted the trophy. He’s not the only non-Emirati in his victorious squad. In fact, only one member is actually from the Emirates. But the team have succeeded in inspiring an unlikely nation of cyclists, including young women, as Georgia Tolley has found in Dubai.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: US President Donald Trump pulls off his protective face mask as he poses at the White House after returning from hospitalisation. Credit: Reuters/Erin Scott)


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt00xc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Trending (w3cszvsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 today]


SAT 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p16569sd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bwjt7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt04nh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1658)
Testifying against a Neo-Nazi

On the 9th of October, 2019, Mollie S. a Baltimore native, was observing the holiest day of the Jewish calendar, Yom Kippur in the city of Halle, Germany. She decided to take a short break and go for a walk during the proceedings. Moments later a then 27 year old neo-Nazi named Stephan Balliet attempted to bomb the Synagogue and later on a Kebab Shop. Mollie returned to the Synagogue shortly after and saw a body wrapped on the street outside.

On this day, Amie Liebowitz received an unexpected text from her friend Mollie. Mollie lives in Berlin and messaged her to say that she was a victim of the attack but was okay and looked after.

Mollie and Amie kept in contact. They had always been close friends but Amie wasn't aware of the full extent to which Mollie had been affected and was diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PSTD). In August 2020, Mollie asked Amie if she would be her support person as she testifies against the neo-Nazi in Magdeburg, Germany.

From catching the train in Berlin together to the court proceedings, practicing her testimony the night before and retracing her steps in Halle, these two friends have a honest discussion about what it's like living with trauma and standing up to someone who wants to kill you because of your faith.

Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Picture: Damaged entrance door to the synagogue in Halle (Saale),Germany, July 2020 / Credit: JENS SCHLUETER/AFP via Getty Images)



SUNDAY 11 OCTOBER 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656b0wc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sp5)
Should big tech hit the reboot button?

Are big technology companies the modern version of monopolistic oil barons or simply innovative companies that provide a service to enthusiastic consumers? That's the question we'll be looking at on this edition of Business Weekly as Democratic lawmakers in the US release a report detailing uncompetitive behaviour. We also look at the allegations made by a former Facebook employee who says she feels she has blood on her hands because the company failed to adequately act on political misinformation and propaganda she reported on the site.
We head to Venice where we hear from workers in the tourism sector who are desperate for cruise ships to return; meanwhile environmental campaigners want them to stay away. We get to hear how human beings need to adapt to working in extreme heat and why musicians want the British government to support them during the pandemic.
Presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: Social network icons on phone screen, Image credit: Press Association)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656b4mh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bwx1m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt0hww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656b8cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct16l2)
Spitfire stories

In September 1940, in two factories in Southampton, one of the most iconic planes of World War Two was being painstakingly assembled, piece by piece. This sleek and beautiful fighter, with record breaking top speeds and a deadly reputation for precision, was to be Britain’s most notorious weapon against the Nazi air invasion. But, the factory making them was about to be destroyed by devastating German bombing raids.

How could the Battle of Britain be fought without the Spitfire? With the factory a smoking ruin, a plan was hatched to keep the planes coming, against some pretty extraordinary odds.

Drawing on interviews from this summer’s hit World Service podcast, Spitfire: The People’s Plane, historian Victoria Taylor tells the story of the ordinary men and women who saved the Spitfire. Bus depots, car showrooms, stately homes, a laundry and even a glove factory were all converted into secret factories that could produce the Spitfire, hidden from the bombs of the Luftwaffe. A new workforce was trained and faster, feistier planes were designed and developed, giving Britain a fighting chance to turn back the Nazi tide.

Producer: Emily Knight
Historical adviser: David Key

(Photo: A Spitfire Mk XVI from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF), RAF Coningsby, flies over Lincolnshire for the Battle of Britain 80 commemorations. Credit: MoD/PA)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656bd3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt0rd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj0)
Why do we find things disgusting?

There are some things that most of us find disgusting. But is disgust useful? Can our sense of disgust be misused? We ask an academic who describes herself as a ‘disgustologist’.

Image: A disgusted expression (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656bhvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bx890)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt0w48)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1658)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656bmm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d12jk8zwq)
Trump returns to campaigning

President Trump returns to the campaign trail after being treated for coronavirus and he makes a pitch for African American and Latino voters.

Also, the main city in Nagorno Karabakh has come under shell fire at the end of the first day of a ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

And the Scottish restaurant owner who has been honoured by the Queen for providing hundreds of free meals a day to the needy during the coronavirus pandemic.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Nitasha Kaul, a Kashmiri-British novelist and academic based in London and Michael Keating, Executive Director of European Institute of Peace in Brussels, and a former UN Envoy to Somalia.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump speaks from the Truman Balcony of the White House in Washington, DC. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656brc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d12jk93mv)
Frontline workers in UAE offered coronavirus vaccine

The United Arab Emirates offers an experimental coronavirus vaccine to its frontline health workers after a spike in cases.

Also, President Trump returns to the campaign trail after being treated for Covid-19 and he makes a pitch for Black American and Latino voters.

And a survey of attitudes towards China shows a marked negative turn in views in western countries in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Nitasha Kaul, a Kashmiri-British novelist and academic based in London and Michael Keating, Executive Director of European Institute of Peace in Brussels, and a former UN Envoy to Somalia.

(Picture: Workers wait their turn for vaccine trials at Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656bw38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d12jk97cz)
North Korea shows off missiles

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un shows off intercontinental ballistic missiles at a military parade in the capital Pyongyang, marking the seventy-fifth anniversary of the country's ruling party.

Also, we take a look at critical race theory in America, as Donald Trump makes a pitch for African American and Latino voters.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Nitasha Kaul, a Kashmiri-British novelist and academic based in London and Michael Keating, Executive Director of European Institute of Peace in Brussels, and a former UN Envoy to Somalia.

(Picture: North Korean rocket launcher vehicles during military parade. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt17cn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqh)
Facing fat hatred

Does it feel uncomfortable calling someone fat because we think there is something bad about fatness? And if so - does that come from a concern about health, or is it something more insidious? Emily Thomas examines how society sees fatness - exploring the idea that we live in an inherently fat-phobic world. We hear from those who say viewing fatness as a health problem alone, obscures some uncomfortable truths about poverty, racism, misogyny and ourselves. What would a less fat-phobic world look like?
(Picture: woman sitting on sofa. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the team, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Esther D. Rothblum, professor of women's studies, San Diego State University
Sonya Renee Taylor, founder, The Body is Not An Apology
Sabrina Strings, associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine
Sigrún Daníelsdóttir, project manager for mental health promotion, Iceland Directorate of Health


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656bzvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt1c3s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0d)
Why I didn’t make a sound for 12 years

Marie McCreadie moved to Australia from the UK as a young girl in the 1970s. It was the start of a new adventure for the whole family, but then one day when Marie was 13 she lost her voice, leaving her unable to make a sound for over a decade. Marie was ostracised, told she was cursed, and was put in a psychiatric unit. Then, in her twenties she discovered the surprising cause of her condition. This episode was first broadcast on 5th October 2019.

Marie has written a book about her life without speech it's called Voiceless.


Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder

Picture: Marie McCreadie as a young teenager
Credit: Marie McCreadie


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656c3lj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x52)
How can India be made safer for women?

The recent death of a young Dalit (formerly untouchable) woman, who was allegedly gang-raped and assaulted in northern India, has led to shock, outrage and protests across the country.

The case has also raised an inevitable question – how safe is India for women?

As newer generations of girls and young women go out to study and work in larger numbers than ever before, is there any sign of fewer crimes against them? Official data shows that a rape is committed every 16 minutes in the country: that’s 87 every day.

So, what can be done to check sexual violence against women? Should there be stricter law enforcement and speedier justice? Or is there a need to first tackle the deep-rooted patriarchal mindset? Can new age solutions such as online data mapping, real-time alerts or anti-rape technology offer much help?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we introspect and ask, what can India do to protect its women?

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Dr Kalpana Viswanath, co-founder, CEO, Safetipin; Dr Sunita Toor, criminologist, Sheffield Hallam University; Antika Sarkar, programme associate, Equal Community Foundation


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt1gvx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1658)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656c7bn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bxzrs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt1lm1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct165c)
Climate Wars

Climate Wars: Darfur

In a five-part series for the Compass, former Army Major Will Robson investigates how climate change is fuelling conflict across the globe, from guerrilla raids on farmer-herders in Africa to a chilling new Cold War in the Arctic. He’ll be speaking to both climate and conflict experts to unravel the complicated threads that connect climatic changes, violence, war and global insecurity.

In the first episode, he focuses on what has often described as the first climate change war – the conflict in Darfur in Western Sudan – and hears from farmers and pastoralists who have returned to their war-ravaged lands to try to rebuild among the challenges of desertification and climate change.

Image: Internally displaced Sudanese people prepare to collect water from a tap near their makeshift shelter within the Kalma camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Darfur, Sudan April 26, 2019 (Credit:Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656cc2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3cszt60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656cgtx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yxnpq1ngh)
Armenia Azerbaijan: Reports of fresh shelling dent ceasefire hopes

Armenian rocket has destroyed an apartment block in Azerbaijan's second city as the ceasefire in Nagorno-Karabakh comes under severe strain. The Azeris have also been accused shelling civilian areas.

Also in the programme: Protesters have clashed with security forces in the Belarusian capital Minsk on yet another Sunday of mass demonstrations against President Alexander Lukashenko. And the number of confirmed Covid-19 infections in India has passed seven million.

(Photo: Bombed out house. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656cll1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct16l2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656cqb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjw0)
Writer Jorge Luis Borges: Mixing the magical with the mundane

‘We accept reality so readily - perhaps because we sense that nothing is real.' A typically paradoxical quote from the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges whose works have become classics and an influence not just on many Latin American novelists but on countless authors around the world. Yet although he is one of the most analysed figures in literature, even his greatest fans struggle fully to explain his writing. So who was Jorge Luis Borges? And what is it that makes his writing so compelling?

To find out, Bridget Kendall talks to three Borges experts: Dr. Patricia Novillo-Corvalán, from the University of Kent, author of Borges and Joyce, An Infinite Conversation; Prof. Evelyn Fishburn, from University College London, author of Hidden Pleasures in Borges’s Fiction; and Edwin Williamson, Professor at Oxford University and editor of the Cambridge Companion to Jorge Luis Borges.

(Image: Jorge Luis Borges in 1973 Photo: Horacio Villalobos/Corbis via Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656cv29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ld0v92cqm)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld will bring you the closing stages of the men’s French Open final. Will Rafael Nadal be crowned the king of clay once again? We’ll also get the latest sports news from international football to the NFL. Plus we’ll tell the story of the demise and rise of LA Lakers from 2010 to 2020.

Photo: Rafael Nadal of Spain celebrates his victory against Jannik Sinner of Italy in the Quarter Finals of the singles competition on Court Philippe-Chatrier during the French Open Tennis Tournament at Roland Garros on October 6th 2020 in Paris, France. (Photo by Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656d69p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62byyqt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt2kl2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656db1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656dfsy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yxnpq2mfj)
Nagorno Karabakh: air raid sirens sound in the main city as shelling restarts

Russia and the European Union have stressed the need for Armenia and Azerbaijan to heed the ceasefire in Nagorno Karabakh, as air raid sirens sounded in the main city, Stepanakert. The Armenian authorities in Karabakh say the city is now being shelled again. Azerbaijan's president Ilham Aliyev earlier accused Armenia of a war crime after rockets destroyed housing in Azerbaijan's second city Ganja.

Also in the programme: Belarussian protestors face tougher police crackdown; a notorious Nigerian anti-robbery unit accused of human rights abuses is disbanded; and Rafael Nadal beats Novak Djokovic in straight sets to win the French Open and twenty Grand Slam victories.

(Photo: Both sides appear to be digging in for a longer conflict, which risks increased involvement by outside powers. Credit: EPA)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656dkk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt2xtg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1656dp96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bd62bzfqb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pvmwt31kl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf0d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 12 OCTOBER 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhjs1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57t6c6f946)
Aboriginal leaders testify about sacred site destruction by Rio Tinto

After the mining giant Rio Tinto blew up the Juukan George rock shelters, the Aboriginal community gets its day in front of the Australian Parliament to urge for it never to happen again - but how likely are they to listen? We hear the latest as the hearing gets set to begin.

We also find out about potentially the biggest shake up to Premier League football since its inception - and no surprises - money is at the very centre of the row.

And the entrepreneur who's trying to help dementia sufferers - one sweet treat at a time.

PHOTO: Juukan Gorge after destruction/AFP


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw05374b0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhjwsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn3n6w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0537824)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164m)
Is America’s democracy under threat?

President Trump’s hospitalisation for Covid-19 prompted many Americans to also worry about the health of the election process, and democracy itself. Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss whether American democracy is in crisis, and what its future may hold. They are joined by Julius Krein, of the journal American Affairs, and award-winning Venezuelan-American journalist Mariana Atencio. Mariana argues that America risks descending into a crisis similar to that of her native Venezuela if its democracy is not shored up and valued by its citizens. Julius outlines how the nation’s widening polarisation is damaging for its democracy.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Sandra Kanthal, Viv Jones, Iyore Odighizuwa and Maeve McGoran, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Nigel Appleton


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhk0jw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5h)
Africa's football revolution

In 1999, ASECS Mimosas, one of the biggest teams in Ivory Coast, shocked the world of African football by fielding a team of youth players in the final of the African Super Cup. The youngsters had been handpicked and trained by French coach Jean-Marc Gillou, and with their speed and tactical sophistication they inflicted a shock defeat on the Tunisian side, Esperance. The ASECS Mimosas team is credited with modernising the African game, and bringing African talent to the attention of the biggest clubs in Europe. Robert Nicholson talks to Kolo Toure, who played in that African Super Cup final and later starred for Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Kolo Toure (right) with his brother Yaya Toure in 2002 (Arsenal FC via Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhk490)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn3wq4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0537hkd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv69)
Why do planets spin?

Crowdscience solves a range of listeners’ cosmic mysteries, from the reason we only ever see one side of the moon, to why planets spin, and discover the answer can be found in the formation of the solar system. We talk to astronomer Dr Carolin Crawford to understand how stars are made, and investigate the art of astronomy with journalist Jo Marchant, hearing how the ancient Greeks came up with a zodiac long before the invention of a telescope, revealing an intimate relationship between humans and the night sky.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Marijke Peters

[Image: The Solar System. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhk814)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps65jcv)
Trump's Supreme Court candidate to face Senate questioning

Amy Coney Barrett will senators that she will judge legal cases impartially "whatever my own preferences might be".

A court in India hears about police failures in the handling of the case of a teenage rape victim. The young woman died from her injuries, but left behind video evidence naming her attacker.

And Pride House Tokyo opens - the Japanese city's first major community hub for LGBTQ people. So why is this being seen as such a landmark moment?


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhkcs8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps65n3z)
Senate to examine President Trump's Supreme Court nominee

Amy Coney Barrett vows to 'apply law as written' before her appearance in the Senate.

As India passes the point of 7 million Covid-19 infections, there is increasing strain on the country's hospitals.

And how a Nigerian artist made a prosthetic hand for his brother - after they found only white or wooden ones for sale.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhkhjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps65rw3)
Covid-19: British Prime Minister to announce tougher measures

Can a more targeted response in the UK stop the rising level of coronavirus infections and hospital admissions?

How the Czech republic has gone from being one of the more successful European nations in tackling the virus, to the one with the fastest growing outbreak.

And Judge Amy Coney Barrett will appear before the US Senate later today, as they assess her suitability to join the US Supreme Court. Despite her strong conservative views, she has pledged impartiality.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhkm8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2g)
Volodymyr Zelensky: How is Ukraine's president faring?

When Ukrainians overwhelmingly voted to make a comedian president, Europeans wondered what the punchline would be. In an exclusive interview, Stephen Sackur speaks to Volodymyr Zelensky, the comic actor who played a president on TV before getting the job in real life. He has had 18 months to make good on his promise to end corruption and find a pathway to peace with Russia. How is he doing?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0537zjx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jy)
The future of Hong Kong

Can Hong Kong retain its position as Asia's financial capital? The National Security Law passed in Hong Kong saw violent protests in the middle of 2020. The BBC’s Karishma Vaswani takes us through how businesses have changed the way they work to avoid getting in to trouble with Beijing. Edward Yau, Hong Kong’s Secretary for Commerce says the new law won’t change the basic pillars of Hong Kong’s society, and that it will continue to attract big corporate names to hold on to its place as a key financial hub. But it’s not ‘business as usual’ by any means, says Tara Joseph, the president of the American Chambers of Commerce for Hong Kong, saying the worsening relationship between the US and China, coronavirus and the new law means some business people are holding back from their usual activity. And two key business figures, Weijan Shan, CEO of private equity firm PAG, and Curtis Chin, former US Ambassador to the Asian Development Bank, try to unpick the difficulty of the ‘one country, two systems’ approach which China has historically promised in its governance over Hong Kong.

(Image: A silhouetted figure looks pensively over Hong Kong's famous Victoria Harbour and the cityscape, lit up at night time. Credit: Tse Hon Ning / Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkj)
The launch of CNN

In June 1980, US media mogul Ted Turner launched the first TV station dedicated to 24 hour news, Cable News Network or CNN. Some were sceptical that there would be enough news to stay on air, others warned that the public wouldn't be interested in news 24 hours a day. But it marked a shift in broadcast journalism and paved the way for many more rolling news stations across the world. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to Senior Executive at CNN, Rick Davis, about how 24 hour news has influenced politics and what role it has to play in holding those in power to account. Rick also takes us back behind the scenes to when he was an output producer on launch day, June 1st 1980.

(PHOTO: Ted Turner attends official CNN Launch event at CNN Techwood Drive World Headquarters in Atlanta Georgia, June 01, 1980 (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhkr0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0538391)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhkvrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0538715)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhkzhx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn4qy1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0538bs9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3w)
Singing my way to stardom

Pop singers from Afghanistan and Northern Ireland tell Kim Chakanetsa what it's like to perform in, coach and judge major singing competitions.

Aryana Sayeed is the biggest female pop star in Afghanistan. She’s been a judge on one of the country’s biggest TV shows, Afghan Star and a coach on The Voice of Afghanistan. The multi-award winning performer was born in Kabul and raised in Switzerland, later moving to the UK. Aryana is also a women's rights activist, and wants to deliver a message of peace, love, and empowerment through her music.

Janet Devlin was a quarter-finalist in the UK singing competition The X Factor. At just 16 years old and from a small town in Northern Ireland, she didn’t love the attention that came with it and struggled against her inner critic on stage. She talks about the importance of being open about her mental health issues and addictions, and how the support of a female fanbase has brought greater confidence.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Janet Devlin (credit - Emma-Jane Lewis)
R: Aryana Sayeed (credit - Neelio Paris)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhl381)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3p)
Abducted in war, saving lives in peace

During Sierra Leone's civil war Aminata Conteh-Biger was abducted by armed rebels. After her release, she began a new life in Australia but has since returned to help the women she'd left behind, becoming a champion of maternal health in a country with one of the worst maternal and infant mortality rates in the world. She is the founder of the Aminata Maternal Foundation and has written a book about her life called Rising Heart.


Picture: Aminata Conteh-Biger
Credit: Jeremy Simons


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhl705)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn4zf9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0538l8k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhlbr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z08jcw)
US Senate starts Supreme Court confirmation hearings

The US Senate Judiciary Committee has begun a confirmation hearing for President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, in what the chairman Lindsey Graham acknowledged would be a 'long contentious week'. Also in the programme: The Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov has rejected a proposal by Azerbaijan to bring its ally Turkey into talks about the future of the disputed Nagorno Karabakh region; and Qingdao China tests all of its nine million residents after just a handful of new coronavirus infections. Photo: Amy Coney Barrett. Credit: Reuters.


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhlghf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0538trt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv1y6r89x4)
Passports for sale

There's been a rise since the pandemic of countries selling so-called 'golden' passports. Tari Best is a Nigerian businessman who tells us why he recently spent $316,000 buying Grenadian citizenship for himself and his family. Veronica Cotdemiey is chief executive of Dubai-based Citizenship Invest which helps its clients buy passports, and explains which citizenships are proving to be most popular. We hear from Les Khan, chief executive of the St Kitts and Nevis Citizenship by Investment Unit, that their programme has enabled the country to diversify its economy. And Laure Brillaud of anti-corruption campaign group Transparency International discusses the potential money laundering risk that the sale of passports can give rise to. Also in the programme, the chief executive of British Airways, Alex Cruz, has been replaced with immediate effect. Jon Arlidge of the Sunday Times newspaper follows BA closely, and tells us about the events that led to Mr Cruz's departure. Plus, Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize. We hear from Robert Wilson about the work they've done on the economics of auctions, that led to the prize.

(Picture: A Grenadian passport on a map of the world. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhll7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0538yhy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhlpzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0cld521j)
US election conversations: Race in Charlottesville

White supremacy was one of the main topics in the recent presidential debate with President Trump appearing reluctant to condemn it. We bring together two people from Charlottesville, the city that became a symbol of racial tensions when a rally by hundreds of white nationalists in 2017 descended into violence between them and counter-protesters.

And we get a sense of the proceedings on the first day of the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Amy Coney Barrett. We also speak to those who have worked with Judge Barrett, to better understand her likely impact on the US Supreme Court.

In England, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has given details of a new Covid-19 alert system, bringing with it increased restrictions for parts of the country. England is far from the only country in Europe trying to find a balance to address an increase in reported cases of coronavirus. We compare what is happening in England with the approaches in several neighbouring countries on the continent.

(Photo: White supremacists clash with counter protesters at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. Credit: REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhltqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhlygy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn5px2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw05399rb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrhncxxxz)
2020/10/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhm272)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0539fhg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct16c1)
Anatomy Of Touch

Touch hunger

Claudia Hammond explores our experience of touch hunger, and asks if we have enough touch in our lives. Covid-19 and social distancing have changed how most people feel about touch but even before the pandemic there was a concern about the decrease of touch in society. Claudia and Professor Michael Bannissy of Goldsmiths, University of London, discuss the results of the BBC Touch Test, an online questionnaire that was completed by around 40 000 people from 112 countries. Professor Tiffany Field, Director of the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami School of Medicine, and Merle Fairhurst, Professor of Biological Psychology at Bundeswehr University Munich, reveal their findings about the impact of touch hunger and how to overcome it.

John grew up during the Second World War and endured a lack of touch in his childhood. He relates how in adult life he overcame this absence of touch and why touch remains so important to him. And left isolating in London during lock down, flatmates B and Z came up with a plan to stay healthy with a 6 o’clock hug. Hugging releases a mix of anti-stress chemicals that can lower the blood pressure, decrease anxiety and help sleep.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhm5z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z09cls)
Amy Coney Barrett: Trump nominee testifies in Supreme Court hearing

US Democrats in the Senate have spelled out what they believe will be the disastrous effect on the rights of Americans if Republicans confirm President Trump's nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, to the Supreme Court. So What sort of Justice would she be and what impact could she have on the election?

Also, the British government announces a range of new coronavirus restrictions, as cases mount. But will they work?

And can Thailand reinvent tourism in the age of the virus?

(Photo: Amy Coney Barrett. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhm9qb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0539nzq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhmfgg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn65wl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw0539sqv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58n0c3b4ws)
Passports for sale

There's been a rise since the pandemic of countries selling so-called 'golden' passports. Tari Best is a Nigerian businessman who tells us why he recently spent $316,000 buying Grenadian citizenship for himself and his family. Veronica Cotdemiey is chief executive of Dubai-based Citizenship Invest which helps its clients buy passports, and explains which citizenships are proving to be most popular. We hear from Les Khan, chief executive of the St Kitts and Nevis Citizenship by Investment Unit, that their programme has enabled the country to diversify its economy. And Laure Brillaud of anti-corruption campaign group Transparency International discusses the potential money laundering risk that the sale of passports can give rise to. Also in the programme, the chief executive of British Airways, Alex Cruz, has been replaced with immediate effect. Jon Arlidge of the Sunday Times newspaper follows BA closely, and tells us about the events that led to Mr Cruz's departure. Plus, Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize. We hear from Robert Wilson about the work they've done on the economics of auctions, that led to the prize.

(Picture: A Grenadian passport on a map of the world. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 13 OCTOBER 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhmnyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zhdvdx1m)
Trump nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies in Supreme Court

The President's nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she is 'honoured and humbled' to have been chosen by Donald Trump for a place in the US's top court. After the first day of confirmation hearings, we speak to Ilya Shapiro, director at the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies' Cato Institute and author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court.
Stanford University game theorists Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson have won the 2020 Nobel Economics Prize for their work on auction theory. We speak to Robert Wilson and ask how relevant auction theory is in the world today.
And Australian scientists have discovered that the virus that causes Covid-19 can survive for up to 28 days on banknotes. Dr Debbie Eagles from the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness tells us how much of a threat this could be.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, president of AC Growth Delivered, in Singapore, and by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate, in Washington DC.

(Picture: Amy Coney Barrett; Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhmspv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn6k3z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053b4z7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct16c8)
Dyslexia: Into adulthood

Stella Sabin hears from dyslexic people across the world who reveal the challenges of growing up and working with dyslexia, and from experts at the cutting edge of dyslexia research.

Reading and writing are fundamental tools in most societies, necessary for even the most basic of tasks. For the dyslexic this can cause an agonising disjuncture from an early age. Many dyslexic people will recall the difficulties of decoding words, the horror of the spelling test, the forgetfulness, and the shame of struggling with things that other people find so simple.

Stella Sabin who has dyslexia herself, looks at the impact of the condition in adult life, and asks what difference does it make to know the name of what you are experiencing? Dyslexic people are disproportionally represented in low paying jobs and in the US and the UK 50% of the prison population are dyslexic. She visits the intelligence and security organisation GCHQ who are positively recruiting dyslexic thinkers, who are able to find unusual and imaginative solutions to complex problems…like cracking codes.

(Photo: Jumbled letters flying. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhmxfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhn163)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn6sm7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053bdgh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct16c1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhn4y7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps68f8y)
President Trump holds rally in Florida

The US President told an enthusiastic crowd in Florida that he felt 'powerful' and could 'kiss everyone' in the audience as he was now immune to the disease. We speak to a supporter and later to someone voting for Joe Biden.

A new study looks into the case of a young man who's been infected twice with Covid-19...the lead researcher tells us more.

And countries in the East Africa region have been bracing for another invasion of desert locusts. The Food and Agriculture Organisation in Nairobi explains the damage they cause and what is being done to protect crops.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhn8pc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps68k12)
President Trump is back on the campaign trail

President Trump went to the key state of Florida to hold his rally. So can he appeal again to the former Democrats who voted for him in 2016? We speak to Stephanie Muravchik, co-author of a book 'Trump’s Democrats' on first-hand research speaking and listening to those who voted Trump last time.

We go to Liverpool in England where some of the stricter restrictions will be in place this week to tackle the high numbers of Covid-19 infections.

And we speak to a member of the team treating a sea lion for epilepsy.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhndfh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps68ns6)
President Trump holds first rally since Covid-19 infection

Thousands gathered at an outdoor rally in Sanford, Florida, where a defiant President Trump made the first of four planned campaign stops over the next four days in battleground states.

Dutch museums have been told by the government to look through their collections and return any items from the country's colonial past - we hear from an expert in art restitution.

And we find out about a cheating chess player.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhnj5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1r)
How jellyfish can help us

Jellyfish blooms can cause havoc, scaring away tourists, clogging up fishing nets, and even getting stuck in power station cooling pipes.

But scientists are finding ways to use the creatures to help us solve some big problems. They think jellyfish mucus could filter microplastics from our water systems, and their collagen could help us develop new medicines. And some want to see jellyfish on our plates.

Produced and presented by Ruth Evans

Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053bwg0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89z)
Sexism in African investment

Why do female entrepreneurs in Africa not get the investment capital they need? When women are navigating the male dominated finance and start-up scene in Africa, sexism can be a daily occurence. Efe Ukala is the founder of Impact Her - an organisation to help female entrepreneurs in Africa get access to finance. She says at one meeting she went to she was the only woman in the room and when one man joined them he went round the table to introduce himself to everyone except her. Mélanie Keita is the co-founder and CEO of Melanin Capital, a financial advisory firm that connects social impact entrepreneurs in Africa with investors. She tells Tamasin Ford that on a number of occasions she has set up meetings with potential investors only for them to hit on her. Manka Angwafo, the founder and CEO of agribusiness company, Grassland Cameroon, says women just aren't listened to on the continent. And Tokunboh Ishmael is the co-founder and MD of Alithea Capital, a private equity fund management firm based in Nigeria which has set up a fund aimed at proactively seeking out female founders and diverse management teams to invest in their businesses.
(Picture credit: Getty creative)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmq1)
The end of the Lebanese Civil War

On October 13th 1990, the Syrian airforce pushed their most outspoken opponent in Lebanon, General Michel Aoun, to take refuge in the French embassy in Beirut, ending the last chapter of Lebanon's bitter 15-year civil war. Veteran Lebanese journalist Hanna Anbar told Louise Hidalgo about that day for Witness History.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Syrian soldiers celebrate in front of the presidential palace in east Beirut after capturing it from troops loyal to General Michel Aoun, October 13th 1990 (Credit: Nabil Ismail/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhnmxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053c064)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct16c1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhnrnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhnwf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn7mv4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053c7pd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbv)
Es Devlin: Artist and stage designer

Es Devlin is an artist and one of the world’s most influential stage designers - conceiving what she calls stage ‘sculptures’ with the likes of Louis Vuitton, Beyoncé, Adele, Kanye West, the Weeknd and U2, as well as designing the opening ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympics and the closing ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics.

Her striking creations are equally well-known in the world of opera and theatre, from Bizet’s Carmen to Pinter’s Betrayal, all of which she does alongside her own solo work as an artist.

From her studio in London, Es Devlin talks to Ella-mai Robey about her work and creative process.

Presented by Ella-mai Robey
Produced by Hannah Robins and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhp054)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdk7)
The black reverend who bought a Ku Klux Klan shop

In 1996, an African American reverend called David Kennedy faced one of his biggest fights. A new shop had sprung up in Laurens, his small town in South Carolina, selling white supremacist memorabilia and housing a Ku Klux Klan museum. It was called the Redneck Shop, and Reverend Kennedy knew he had to stand up to the racist owners. At first he simply stood outside in protest, but later he was able to start changing the mind of one of the managers, Mike, having helped him in a time of need. The two men became close, and through their friendship the reverend ultimately gained control of the white supremacist shop. Reverend Kennedy spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb.

Min Kym was once the owner of a 300-year-old Stradivarius violin, one of the most valuable instruments in the world. Min was a young professional musician, and her violin was incredibly precious to her, so when it was stolen at a London train station she was devastated. For a year she didn’t play at all. Then, shortly before lockdown, Min commissioned a new violin, a replica of her teacher's violin, crafted by expert builders. Emily joined her as she played the instrument for the first time.


Picture: Reverend David Kennedy
Credit: The Echo Project


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhp3x8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn7wbd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053ch5n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct16c1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhp7nd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0cf8z)
Czech Republic: from model Covid-19 response to Europe's new virus hotspot

New restrictions on schools, restaurants and bars as the Czech Republic records both the highest and the fastest-growing daily number of new Covid-19 cases per capita in Europe. The Czech Health Minister Roman Prymula tells us "it’s a real fight to keep more people alive".

Also in the programme: a US doctor who travelled to Nagorno-Karabakh tells us the fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan has to stop; and a fifth case of Covid-19 reinfection raises more questions about the idea of herd immunity.

(Photo: A man walks on the Charles Bridge early morning in Prague, Czech Republic. Credit: EPA/Martin Divisek.)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhpcdj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053cqnx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwptnyqtnt)
Solar power could be 'king'

The International Energy Agency says solar power could become a leading power source. Tim Gould co-wrote the IEA's World Energy Outlook and tells us the transition could take some years, but solar power is cheaper than new coal or gas-fired power stations in most countries. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford meets several female African entrepreneurs to find out about their experience of sexism in the male dominated finance and startup scene on the continent. Plus, as Apple launches its latest batch of smartphones, we find out from Andrei Frumusanu of hardware magazine Anandtech, about the "five nanometre process" technology underpinning the company's new microchips in the devices, which enables 171 million transistors to be laid out in just one square millimetre.

(Picture: Solar panels in a field. Picture credit: Getty Creative.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhph4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053cvf1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhplws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0cld7yym)
US election conversations: Jobs and coronavirus

We hear from two people who lost their jobs in the hospitality industry in the United States during the pandemic. Jack, a cook in California, has been on government support before taking a job as a dishwasher. Susana, a single mother from Massachusetts, "feels embarrassed” about having to ask for help.

Dr Isaac Bogoch from Toronto University will join us to help understand the day’s developments with Covid-19. We’ll ask about the news that Johnson & Johnson has paused its Covid-19 vaccine trial because of “an unexplained illness” in a participant and also about reports that for the first time a patient has died from reinfection with Covid-19.

And, there’s been extensive debate on Indian social media about a jewellery advertisement in which a Muslim mother-in-law hosts a bridal shower for her Hindu daughter-in-law. The advert has since been pulled from Indian networks. We hear how tensions between two religious groups affect everyday life in the country.

(Photo: People wait in a block-long line to pick up food at the Masbia of Flatbush food pantry in Brooklyn, New York, USA, 30 April 2020. Credit: JUSTIN LANE/EPA)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhpqmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhpvd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn8lt5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053d6nf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrhnd0tv2)
2020/10/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhpz45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct16c8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053dbdk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98l)
Predicting US elections results every hour

Can political forecasting be quicker? That’s a question posed by Thomas Miller from Northwestern University, who has created a model that simulates a million hypothetical US presidential election results every hour. The model does not use traditional data sources like polling surveys but betting data.

Recycling Solar lamps in Zambia
We hear from SolarAid who have started a repair, refurbishment and recycling project for their solar lights in Zambia. Some electronics built to serve the world’s poorest, are also built to be incredibly challenging to repair, which adds to an increasing amount of e-waste generated - a record of 53.6 million metric tonnes of e-waste was generated worldwide in 2019. SolarAid have developed a manual, an app, are training technicians and opening workshops to encourage people to have their lamps repaired.

The Rising Sea Symphony
How do you create a new music masterpiece during a pandemic – using technology in ways not used before. A new BBC Radio 3 commission (due to be broadcast on Sunday 18th October), entitled The Rising Sea Symphony, by composer Kieran Brunt, has been recorded by BBC Philharmonic players in isolation, individually, and then “painfully” pasted together to create the full orchestral sound over the last few months. The piece is inspired by the increasing dangers of the climate change crisis and mixes orchestral parts, vocals, electronics, and spoken contributions from inhabitants of different parts of the world which are being affected by sea level rising. We speak to the composer and to Studio Manager Donald MacDonald who faced the challenge of mixing the piece.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

(Image: Getty Images)

Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhq2w9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0d8hw)
Afghanistan: Families flee fresh fighting in Helmand

Thousands of families are fleeing their homes as heavy fighting between government forces and the Taliban rages in Afghanistan's Helmand province.

Also in the programme: Protests in Nigeria against police brutality; and does it matter who's been elected on to the UN Human Rights Council?

(Photo: Afghans flee their villages as fighting intensifies between Taliban militants and security forces. Credit: EPA)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhq6mf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053dkwt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhqbck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn92sp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053dpmy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58n0c3f1sw)
Solar power could be 'king'

The International Energy Agency says solar power could become a leading power source. Tim Gould co-wrote the IEA's World Energy Outlook and tells us the transition could take some years, but solar power is cheaper than new coal or gas-fired power stations in most countries. The WTO says the US has given illegal subsidies to the aircraft maker Boeing; we hear from Edward Alden, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford meets several female African entrepreneurs to find out about their experience of sexism in the male dominated finance and startup scene on the continent. How will the news that Christiano Ronaldo has coronavirus, affect the world of football? We ask Kieran Maguire, Football finance expert at Liverpool University. Plus, Brian Dorst from Themis Trading in New Jersey brings us the latest from the financial markets. (Picture: Solar panels in a field. Picture credit: Getty Creative.)



WEDNESDAY 14 OCTOBER 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhqkvt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zhdvhsyq)
US faces tariffs over Boeing subsidies

The WTO says the US has given illegal subsidies to the aircraft maker Boeing, permitting the EU to place tariffs on US goods; we hear from Edward Alden, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. As Apple unveils its new iphone, we talk Shara Tibken, Senior reporter at C-NET News. The International Energy Agency says solar power could become a leading power source - Tim Gould co-wrote the IEA's World Energy Outlook and tells us the transition could take some years, but solar power is cheaper than new coal or gas-fired power stations in most countries. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford meets several female African entrepreneurs to find out about their experience of sexism in the male dominated finance and startup scene on the continent. Plus, how will the news that Christiano Ronaldo has coronavirus, affect the world of football? We ask Kieran Maguire, Football finance expert at Liverpool University. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Nicole Childers, Executive Producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angeles and Rebecca Jones from Bloomberg in Melbourne. (Picture of Boeing 737-800 via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhqply)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn9g12)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053f1wb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct165d)
Climate Wars

Climate Wars: Water conflicts

India and Pakistan are on the front line of climate change and are two of the most water-stressed countries in the world. Drought has already caused violent clashes, deadly protests and a spate of farmer suicides. Now tensions between the two nations have been ratcheted up by an acrimonious dispute over a proposed dam on the River Indus.

Will Robson looks at how these conflicts over mankind’s most precious resource threaten the stability of the whole region. He starts at the local and interprovincial level, where the absence of formal dispute resolution mechanisms has led to an escalating threat of violence. He will also explore the geopolitical tensions surrounding the Indus River that runs from China through India and Pakistan, and at how climate change is threatening to derail historical treaties between these nuclear armed states.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhqtc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhqy36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbn9pjb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053f9cl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhr1vb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6cb61)
Tighter Covid-19 restrictions in several European countries

Many countries across Europe are experiencing a rise in coronavirus cases and are dealing with the balancing act of protecting people's health, and the health service, along with keeping the economy going. We report from Spain where local lockdowns have been met with resistance.

We go to Port Harcourt in Nigeria, one of cities where protests have taken place this week against the controversial Special Anti Robbery Squad, which has now been disbanded after an outcry over human rights abuses.

And we speak to the brother of Eritrean poet Amanuel Asrat who has not been seen or heard from since his arrest 19 years ago.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhr5lg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6cfy5)
New local and national lockdowns across Europe

Governments in many European countries are again bringing in measures to try and control spikes in Covid-19 cases. We hear from the UK and Germany.

We speak to a young man from Cameroon who started out in poverty and went on to study at Harvard.

And we find out more about the bar-tailed godwit who has made what's thought to be the longest journey by a bird - all the way from Alaska to New Zealand.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhr9bl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6ckp9)
European countries renew Covid-19 restrictions

A rise in coronavirus cases has meant countries are introducing new restrictions. We hear the latest from Russia and the Netherlands.

We speak to the brother of Eritrean poet Amanuel Asrat, who's not been heard from since his arrest in 2001.

And we find out more about the auction of the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhrf2q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6z)
Rob Schenck: Can Trump still count on the religious right?

We cannot know the contents of Donald Trump’s soul, but its fair to say his personal behaviour doesn't point to deeply held Christian belief. And yet the evangelical Christian right is a key pillar of his support base. Could that change in November’s election? Stephen Sackur speaks to Rob Schenck, an influential evangelical pastor and long-time anti-abortion activist who broke with fellow social conservatives over gun control. Can Donald Trump still count on the loyalty of the religious right?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053fsc3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8n8)
Over 50 and out of work

What's it like for older people losing their job during the Covid pandemic?

Tamasin Ford speaks to 59 year old lighting crew chief Michael Heggett. He's worked on events like Princess Diana’s funeral, the London’s Olympic games and Nelson Mandela’s 70th birthday concert. He had a fantastic career until Covid hit and he lost all his work. He fears he might never be employed again. Patrick Button, an assistant economics professor at Tulane University in the USA says his research shows that older workers are being disproportionately impacted by Covid. And Yvonne Sonsino from Mercer, a global human resources firm, says that the long term outcomes for older people are not good, particularly for their pensions?

(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszms9)
The last of the Kazakh herders

Many of the nomadic herders in Kazakhstan left the USSR and moved to China in the 1920s. They feared being forced into collective farms by the Soviet state. Then in the 1950s many of them moved back again. Monica Whitlock has been listening to the story of Nazylkhan, a Kazakh herder and matriarch of a huge extended family, who lived through those epic journeys and who died in 2018.

Photo: members of Nazylkhan's extended family, and friends. Credit: BBC.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhrjtv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct165d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053fx37)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhrnkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct16l2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhrsb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnbjr7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053g4lh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x67)
Soul Music

The Star-Spangled Banner

America's national anthem was written by a lawyer, Francis Scott Key, after watching the British navy bombing Fort McHenry in 1814. It was set to an English social men's club song and recognized as the national anthem in 1889. Notoriously difficult to sing, and traditionally played at public sports events and orchestral concerts, the anthem has inspired emotion and attracted controversy.

We hear from Dr John Carlos who along with Dr Tommie Smith, raised their fists on the Olympic podium in the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 as the anthem was played; Jose Feliciano who sang the anthem at the 1968 World series and provoked criticism; Conrad Netting IV who discovered the truth about his fighter pilot father's history which led him to a cemetery in Normandy; writer Crista Cloutier who associated it with Obama's election; members of the Coldstream Guards band who played the anthem at the changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace the day after 9/11 and Leon Hendrix, Jimi's brother, who was in the army at the time of Woodstock, and was put on 'potato peeling duty' because of the 'dishonourable' version his brother had played.


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhrx27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszds0)
Farming and Phil Collins taught me about love

Simon Dawson was on a wayward path after a difficult childhood. He says his mother would tell him directly that she didn't love him. Things were at their lowest when their family house burnt down and Simon was blamed for it. Unsure of love, he turned to music for answers. But the real lessons came later in life when he set up a farm and the animals he cared for showed him what true guardianship and acceptance means. Simon now believes his mother suffered from postnatal depression and was never given the support she needed. He tells Emily Webb how he turned things around and learned to love.
Simon's book is called The Boy Without Love.

Ugandan gospel singer Sandra Suubi was spotted at high school, when she sang to a group of friends during playtime and her performance drew a huge audience. She went on to win a national TV contest and became known as the pop star who collects trash. That's because she turns plastic waste into elaborate set pieces, costumes and even musical instruments for her performances and music videos. She spoke to Outlook's Troy Holmes about turning cups into couture.

Robert Bezeau follows a similar path. He is the mind behind the Plastic Bottle Village in Panama. He's collected millions of discarded bottles and repurposed them into buildings, houses and even a grand castle complete with turrets, battlements and facades. He spoke to Outlook in 2016 about his mission to clean up the planet.


If anything in this programme has affected you, you can find links to helpful organisations at bbc.com/actionline.


Picture: Simon Dawson on his farm in Exmoor
Credit: Courtesy of Simon Dawson


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszms9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhs0tc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnbs7h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053gd2r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhs4kh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0gb62)
New rules in European countries to fight a second surge of Covid-19

Bars and restaurants shut in the Netherlands and parts of Spain as virus cases rise. In the Netherlands there's a high rate of infection - almost 44,000 confirmed cases in the past week.

Also in the programme: Mass protests in Nigeria against a notorious police unit - the Special Anti-Robbery Squad or SARS; and a rare first edition of Shakespeare's plays goes under the hammer at Christie's auction house in New York.

(Photo: A coronavirus test underway. Credit: EPA)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhs89m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct165d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053gml0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxj8dkj106)
China's first special economic zone turns 40

President Xi has marked Shenzhen's 40th birthday as China's first special economic zone. Duncan Turner runs a venture capital business in the region and explains the significance of the designation. And we get wider context from Jeff Black, bureau chief for Bloomberg in Hong Kong. Also in the programme, Kampala-based journalist Charles Bwogi tells us how the government of Uganda has managed to actually increase revenues during the pandemic, partly through the country's 'over the top' tax, which is a charge on social media use. Entrepreneurship and setting up a new company is normally associated with risk-loving youth, but the BBC's Dougal Shaw has been to meet some older people who have taken the plunge and started their own companies in recent months. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Alison Green offers tips on how to keep virtual work meetings productive and professional.

(Picture: Shenzhen's skyline. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhsd1r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053grb4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhshsw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0cldbvvq)
Coronavirus conversations: The impact on relationships

We continue to hear how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting people's lives around the world. Today we look at the strains placed on romantic relationships and we speak to three women in different countries, whose relationships have been negatively impacted.

Also we hear from black women in America, who are discussing Megan Thee Stallion’s opinion piece in the New York Times. The pop star wrote about how “black women are constantly disrespected and disregarded in so many areas of life”.

And as new partial lockdown measures are introduced in many European countries, we get then latest coronavirus headlines from our European correspondent.

(Photo: Andrea Karr. Credit:Jenna Marie Wakani)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhsmk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszds0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszms9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhsr94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnchq8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053h3kj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrhnd3qr5)
2020/10/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhsw18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct165d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053h79n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcch)
Have you ever hugged your doctor?

This week Claudia Hammond looks at the role of touch in health care, revealing some of the results of the Touch Test, an online study commissioned by Wellcome Collection in collaboration with the BBC.

Doctors often need to physically examine patients – but many consultations are now online. Family doctors Margaret McCartney and Ann Robinson explain how important touch is in the consulting room.

One of the experts behind the Touch Test, Greenwich University’s Dr Natalie Bowling explains how men said they found touch helped them to communicate better with their doctor. And Deborah Bowman who’s professor of Bioethics at St George’s University in London reflects on how she helps trainee doctors to respect their patients’ dignity by practising on each other.

Can touch play a role in talking therapies? Or is hugging a distressed client too risky, following #metoo?

And we hear from Anne Townsend who has lost her sense of touch as a side effect of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Reflexology – where the feet are gently massaged – has helped to relieve some of her symptoms like pain and breathlessness – and she is looking forward to the birth of her first great grandson later this month.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: A health worker and patient share a hug. Photo credit: Sanjeri/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhszsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0h5dz)
Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict: Armenia suffers significant casualties

The prime minister of Armenia, Nikol Pashinyan, has admitted that his forces have suffered significant casualties in the battle with Azerbaijan for the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. In a televised address, Mr Pashinyan said the situation was difficult, but Armenian forces were still in general control. We hear from Armenia's deputy defence minister, Gabriel Balayan.

Also, We'll hear from the hospital in Helmand, caught in the middle of the surge in fighting between the Taliban and the Afghan army.

And France to impose night-time curfew to battle second wave of coronavirus.

(Photo: Ganja, Azerbaijan after a huge explosion: Civilians are suffering on both sides. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfht3jj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053hgsx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfht78n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnczps)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053hlk1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58n0c3hypz)
China's first special economic zone turns 40

President Xi has marked Shenzhen's 40th birthday as China's first special economic zone. Duncan Turner runs a venture capital business in the region and explains the significance of the designation. And we get wider context from Jeff Black, bureau chief for Bloomberg in Hong Kong. Also in the programme, the G20 group of rich nations hopes that temporarily suspending debt payments by poor countries will help those nations divert resources to dealing with the health and economic consequences of coronavirus - we hear from the BBC's Andrew Walker and Sarah Clifton of the Jubilee Debt Campaign.
Entrepreneurship and setting up a new company is normally associated with risk-loving youth, but the BBC's Dougal Shaw has been to meet some older people who have taken the plunge and started their own companies in recent months. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Alison Green offers tips on how to keep virtual work meetings productive and professional.

(Picture: Shenzhen's skyline. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 15 OCTOBER 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhtgrx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zhdvlpvt)
G20 suspends poorer countries' debt payments

The G20 group of rich nations hopes that temporarily suspending debt payments from poor countries will help those nations divert resources to dealing with the health and economic consequences of coronavirus - we hear from the BBC's Andrew Walker and Sarah Clifton of the Jubilee Debt Campaign. The Democrats and Republicans, along with their supporters, are spending far more money on this election than on any other in US history - we get the details from Sarah Brymer at the Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks money in US politics. The coronavirus pandemic has upended many people's work lives and the future of entire businesses are in doubt. Yet a global survey of 20,000 people suggests the average worker is happier now than a year ago. The survey was carried out by WorkL and we hear from its founder, Lord Price, who is also the chairman of Fair Trade UK. Entrepreneurship and setting up a new company is normally associated with risk-loving youth, but the BBC's Dougal Shaw has been to meet some older people who have taken the plunge and started their own companies in recent months. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Alison Green offers tips on how to keep virtual work meetings productive and professional. And we're joined throughout the programme by Erin Delmore in New York and Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi. (Picture of US dollars via Getty Images).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhtlj1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbndby5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053hysf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6lq)
Reza's story

Said Reza Adib was a TV journalist in Afghanistan. In 2016, about to break a story about the sexual abuse of children by Afghan men in authority, he received a threat to his life. Reza fled across the border to Iran. But journalism was in his blood, and in Iran he began to investigate sensitive stories related to the war in Syria. When Iranian authorities confiscated his laptop, he knew his life was again in danger. That same day, with his wife and two small children, he began a perilous journey to safety in Finland – an odyssey that would last four years. The family would survive shooting on the Turkish border, a voyage across the Aegean Sea on an overcrowded makeshift vessel with fake lifejackets, and then the nightmare of refugee camps in Greece. It was here that Chloe Hadjimatheou met Reza, and for Assignment she tells the story of a remarkable journalist who’s continued to ply his trade - in spite of the odds stacked against him.

Producer: Linda Pressly

(Image: Said Reza Adib. Credit: Sayed Ahmadzia Ebrahimi)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhtq85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszds0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszms9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhtv09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbndlff)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053j68p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhtyrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6g734)
Anti-government protests in Thailand

The Thai security forces have broken up a big anti-government protest in the capital Bangkok after the authorities issued an emergency decree in the early hours of the morning.

Iran is suffering a third wave of the coronavirus infection.

And in New Zealand the Prime Minister who faced crises ranging from a terrorist massacre, a volcanic eruption to the Covid19 pandemic campaigns for re-election.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhv2hk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6gbv8)
Covid-19: night curfews for nine French cities

Paris and eight other French cities are now under curfew by President Macron in a bid to break the rising infection rate of Covid-19.

In the US the decision by the White House to adopt a herd immunity policy is being soundly condemned by a group of eighty international scientists.

The management agency of the popular Korean pop band, BTS, has made its stock market debut - with share prices doubling in minutes.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhv67p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6ggld)
Big protest broken up in Thailand

The Thai security forces have broken up a big anti-government protest in the capital Bangkok after the authorities issued an emergency decree.

Today - 15th October - is deadline day for the Brexit talks at least according the British Prime Minister - so in the absence of a deal, what's going to happen next?

Early voting in the US presidential elections well underway - amid continuing complaints of voter suppression.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhv9zt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl42)
Should we learn to live with Covid?

As new students start at universities in many countries around the world, governments are grappling with how to contain a second wave of Coronavirus. Already many universities have put lectures online and students are being told to stay in their rooms. But is this fair? Covid-19 is a deadly virus but not so much for the young. Can or should we keep the world locked down until there’s a vaccine or cure? Or, Tanya Beckett asks: should we learn to live with Covid?


(Students wait to start their entrance exams outside the University of Madrid, Spain. Credit: Eduardo Parra/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053jp86)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7xr)
Africa's animation scene: Ready for takeoff

It’s been a tough year for much of the entertainment industry, with the pandemic causing production to be halted on all but a few projects. Filming bubbles and closed sets have been costly and time consuming. But one sector is booming – animation – especially in Africa. We hear from animators and producers across the continent about why demand for their work has never been higher. Vivienne Nunis speaks to Chris Morgan of Fundi Films, which recently produced the animation series My Better World. She's also joined by award-winning Kenyan animator and artist Ng’endo Muki and Nick Wilson, founder of the African Animation Network. Self-taught Nigerian animator Ridwan Moshood tells us how his passion for the craft took him from watching video tutorials in the internet cafes of Lagos to his own production company.

(Picture credit: A still from the animated series My Better World. Picture Credit: My Better World/Chris Morgan)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmms)
The US Voting Rights Act of 1965

Although African Americans were guaranteed the right to vote by the constitution, many in the south were being denied that right. During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s black voting rights activists had been beaten and killed but it was events in Selma Alabama in 1965 that outraged many Americans. In March 1965 hundreds of peaceful protesters were brutally beaten by Alabama state troops as they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge.
The bloodshed in Selma prompted President Lyndon B Johnson to push for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant pieces of legislation ever passed by Congress. The landmark Act was brought in to tackle racial discrimination during elections and to guarantee the rights of African Americans to vote. Farhana Haider has been listening to the archive.

Photo President Lyndon Johnson hands a souvenir pen to the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr after signing the Voting Rights Bill at the US Capital, Washington DC, August 1965. Credit Getty Images.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhvfqy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6lq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053jt0b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhvkh2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjw1)
Telling the time: From sundials to satnav

Many of us can find the time of day quickly and accurately but where did the idea of time keeping originate and how did our ancestors manage without the instant access we take for granted today?

From ancient shadow and water clocks to the latest super accurate optical clocks, Bridget Kendal explores time keeping with the Curator of the Royal Observatory in London, Dr Louise Devoy; the Director of the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford, Dr Silke Ackermann; and watch and clock expert Grégory Gardinetti from the Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie in Geneva.

Photo: World Clocks (Credit: EyeWire, Inc.)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5j)
Surfing the world's biggest waves

The story of how the legendary surfer, Garrett McNamara, pioneered riding the colossal 100ft waves at Nazaré on the Portuguese coast. At Nazaré in 2011 he broke the world record for the biggest wave ever surfed, officially judged to be 78ft (23.8m). Nazaré has since become a centre of big wave surfing. Garrett McNamara spoke to Alex Last about how he first came to surf Nazaré and why he risks his life to ride giant waves.

Photo: Garrett McNamara riding his record breaking wave at Nazaré in November 2011 - recognised at the 2012 WSL Big Wave Awards (Credit:WSL/Ribiero)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhvp76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnffnb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053k1hl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqj)
How does food make a president?

Presidential campaigns are all about connecting with voters, and Donald Trump and Joe Biden have both been using food to do it.

Emily Thomas hears how they’ve targeted food brands, food media and even food influencers to help bolster their image, promote their policies, and reach new audiences.

But the deep cultural connections that come with food can make it a risky policy - eating the wrong thing or in the wrong way on the campaign trail can have a devastating impact.

And, entertaining though all of this might be, does it detract from the serious food issues that affect the lives of every American, and the fact that actual food policies are rarely discussed?

Contributors:

Emily Contois, assistant professor of media studies at the University of Tulsa
Jeremy Jacobowitz, @brunchboys
Jayson Lusk, distinguished professor and head of the agricultural economics department at Purdue University

(Picture: Fries being dropped into a ballot box. Credit: Getty Images/Katie Horwich/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhvszb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbg)
The actor who’s been saying the same lines for 32 years

Groundhog Day... deja vu... are phrases that tend to have negative connotations. Repetition is often equated with monotony. Not so for Catherine Russell. She holds the world record for the most theatre performances in the same role and she wouldn't have it any other way. For the past 32 years she has been playing the role of Margaret Thorne Brent - a psychiatrist who might also be a cold-blooded killer in the long running off-Broadway play Perfect Crime.

Just two months after Cristina Zamora had given birth to her baby daughter in 1974, she was taken by Augusto Pinochet's security forces and thrown in jail where she found a creative way to cope. Embroidery, knitting clothes and stitching tiny love letters helped political prisoners like Cristina to survive. Afterwards, Cristina didn't discuss her nightmarish experience but over 40 years later when her daughter, Jimena Pardo, saw the prison crafts in an exhibition, Jimena plucked up the courage to ask her mother about her early life. Determined that the horrors of the dictatorship should not be forgotten, Jimena set up a sewing project called Bordando por la Memoria (Embroidering Memory).


(Photo: Catherine Russell in Perfect Crime. Credit: Shir Stein)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhvxqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnfp4l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053k8zv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhw1gl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0k735)
Thai Protestors Detained

Thousands of people marching through the streets of the capital, Bangkok call for greater democracy: reforms to curb the power of the pro-military government and the king in Thailand.
Also on the programme, we report on voter suppression in the US state of Georgia. And African Jazz in the time of Covid - Despite strict measures, audiences in the south of France get some musical respite

(Photo: Protestors & Police Clash in Bangkok; Credit: Reuters/Jorge Silva)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhw56q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6lq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053kjh3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvwcyc7b1q)
New coronavirus restrictions in Europe

A second wave of coronavirus in Europe brings a new wave of restrictions to contain it. France, Germany, Spain, the UK and the Netherlands are among the countries now tightening rules designed to keep people apart, and we find out more about the likely impact on the hospitality sector of a new 9pm to 6am curfew in a number of French cities, from Lionel van den Haute, who manages the Radisson Hotel in Marseille. Also in the programme, voters in New Zealand head to the polls this weekend. Prime minister Jacinda Ardern's Labour Party is comfortably ahead in the polls, and Jennifer Curtin, professor of political science at Auckland University explains how much the country's economy has been hit by the pandemic. But whilst Ms Ardern is a popular leader, not everyone has been delighted by her response to coronavirus, including Shelley Sefton, owner of the Christchurch restaurant Diner 66, who tells us why. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on a burgeoning animation industry on the African continent. Plus, shares in the management company Big Hit, which is behind the hugely popular Korean boy band BTS, made their debut in Seoul today. The BBC's Karishma Vaswani reports on the hype that saw shares initially jump by 30% in early trading, before falling back.

(Picture: A quiet restaurant terrace in Paris. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhw8yv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053kn77)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhwdpz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0cldfrrt)
US election conversations: Flight attendants

Thousands of airline workers in the US have lost their jobs or been furloughed because of the coronavirus pandemic. An economic relief plan to help the airline industry stalled in Congress, leading American carriers to let thousands of their employees go. We'll speak to three flight attendants who have lost their jobs, to hear about their last flights, what they are doing now, and how their situation will impact on their election voting choice.

Also, in Thailand protesters have taken to the streets again in the Thai capital Bangkok, defying a ban on gatherings and sweep of arrests of key protest leaders. We'll go live to Bangkok to learn about what's happening, and hear from people who have been protesting.

And, every day on OS we are joined by a health expert to discuss stories and issues surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic. Today we are joined by Dr Emma Hodcroft, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Basel in Switzerland. We'll talk about herd immunity, travel bubbles and 'long Covid'.

(Photo: Flight attendant Breaunna Ross. Credit: Breaunna Ross)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhwjg3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhwn67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbngdmc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053l0gm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrhnd6mn8)
2020/10/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhwryc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6lq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053l46r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh10)
Covid-19 mortality

Why is there such a range in the number of deaths from Covid -19 between countries? A study of the data across 21 industrialised countries reveals a wide discrepancy. Preparedness and the point at which countries went into lockdown were key factors says epidemiologist Jonny Pearson- Stuttard

Recurring illnesses which show up sometimes months after a Covid -19 infections are being more commonly reported. The Uk’s National Institute for Health research has launched a major initiative to better understand this long term effect of the disease, Candace Imison tells us more.

And another reported case of Covid 19 reinfection raises questions about widely held beliefs on immunity. Microbiologist Sarah Pitt helps us separate the science from the fiction.

We also take a look at a black hole as it swallows up a star or at least at what’s detectable. Katy Alexander has trained radio telescopes at this distant event.


(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhwwph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0l2b2)
Trump campaigns in key states

Donald Trump visits North Carolina before flying off to a town hall meeting in Florida. The Democrats' vice-presidential candidate, Kamala Harris, suspended in-person campaigning in North Carolina after her communications director and a flight crew member tested positive for Covid-19.

Also, anti-government protesters, some also calling for curbs on the power of the king, have dispersed in the Thai capital, Bangkok.

And we hear from one of the Nigerians calling for the reform of the police service.

(Photo: Supporters wait for the arrival of President Donald Trump at rally in Greenville, North Carolina. Credit: Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhx0fm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053lcq0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhx45r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbngwlw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053lhg4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58n0c3lvm2)
Twitter in free speech storm

Twitter temporarily prevented the official Trump campaign from tweeting and has been accused of interfering in the election. So what caused the row and could there be consequences for the way social media companies are regulated? We hear from Rebecca Klar, a tech policy reporter at the political website The Hill. A second wave of coronavirus in Europe brings a new wave of restrictions to contain it. France, Germany, Spain, the UK and the Netherlands are among the countries now tightening rules designed to keep people apart, and we find out more about the likely impact on the hospitality sector of a new 9pm to 6am curfew in a number of French cities, from Lionel van den Haute, who manages the Radisson Hotel in Marseille. Also in the programme, voters in New Zealand head to the polls this weekend. Prime minister Jacinda Ardern's Labour Party is comfortably ahead in the polls, and Jennifer Curtin, professor of political science at Auckland University explains how much the country's economy has been hit by the pandemic. But whilst Ms Ardern is a popular leader, not everyone has been delighted by her response to coronavirus, including Shelley Sefton, owner of the Christchurch restaurant Diner 66, who tells us why. And the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on a burgeoning animation industry on the African continent. (Picture of Twitter logo with United States of America flag in the background by Budrul Chukrut via Getty Images).



FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhxcp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18zhdvplrx)
Twitter in free speech storm

Twitter temporarily prevented the official Trump campaign from tweeting and has been accused of interfering in the election. So what caused the row and could there be consequences for the way social media companies are regulated? We hear from Rebecca Klar, a tech policy reporter at the political website The Hill.

Thousands of young people in Thailand have defied the authorities by gathering in the streets and calling for change in some of the biggest pro-democracy protests the country has seen in years; we hear from Josh Kurlantzick, senior fellow for South-east Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. And as Donald Trump and Joe Biden compete for TV audiences in duelling town halls, we get the latest from Mary Ellen Klas, Miami Herald Tallahassee Bureau Chief and Katie Myer, a political reporter for WHYY public radio in Philadelphia.

The business behind the global pop sensation BTS has listed on the stock market; we consider if Big Hit Entertainment will prove to be a one-hit wonder. Plus we are joined throughout the programme by Paddy Hirsch, the editor of NPR podcast the Indicator from Planet Money from Los Angeles. And in Tokyo, we speak to Yoko Ishakura, professor emeritus at Hitotsubashi University.

(Photo: Twitter logo with United States of America flag in the background. Credit: Budrul Chukrut/Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhxhf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnh7v8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053lvpj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3csztgp)
Arsene Wenger, Andre Ayew and what if?

Arsene Wenger discusses his love affair with Arsenal FC. And we report from the international friendly between Ghana and Qatar, hearing from Andre Ayew and Hassan Al-Haydos.

Picture: Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger walks across the pitch ahead of the Premier League match between Huddersfield Town and Arsenal in 2018 (Chris Brunskill Ltd/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhxm58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhxqxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnhhbj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053m35s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhxvnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6k407)
President Trump and Joe Biden hold separate town hall meetings

President Trump and his challenger Joe Biden have been fielding questions on key election issues like the coronavirus pandemic and taxes.

In Thailand, tens of thousands of pro-democracy protesters continue to take to the streets in mass defiance of a government decree banning demonstrations.

And we go to Jordan where despite one of the strictest lockdowns, coronavirus is resurgent there.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhxzdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6k7rc)
Trump and Biden face-off in separate town hall meetings

Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden have faced voters – but not each other – at duelling town hall-style events.
With coronavirus resurgent throughout Europe, the Czech Republic has seen infections make a seven-fold increase.
In Afghanistan a new wave of violence threatens to disrupt peace talks.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhy34s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wgps6kchh)
Coronavirus: a key focus in latest US election events

They were meant to be debating on the same stage but in the end the two US presidential candidates did their duelling at simultaneous town-hall style events on TV.

One of the drugs President Trump took as his Covid-19 treatment has been shown in trials to have no effect.

And in Kyrgyzstan a man in jail a week ago has now declared himself president.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhy6wx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxy)
Jim O'Neill: Is this a time for governments to be bold?

In every crisis there is opportunity. It is a mantra beloved by business schools and political strategists, but should it offer us comfort as Covid-19 continues to ravage the global economy? Stephen Sackur speaks to Jim O’Neill, former chief economist at Goldman Sachs, erstwhile advisor to the British Government and champion of big measures to revive growth. Is this really the time to be bold?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053ml59)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78y)
Brexit - ready or not

As talks between the EU and the UK enter their final stretch, what sort of Brexit are businesses preparing for? Manuela Saragosa speaks to Chayenne Wiskerke of the Dutch onion growing company Wiskerke Onions which exports to the UK. She also speaks to Martin Bysh the founder of Huboo, a UK fulfilment company which works mostly with the e-commerce industry and exports all over the world. They tell her how they've been coping with the years of uncertainty around the Brexit negotiations.
(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvk)
Saddam Hussein's big movie project

In 1980 the Iraqi strongman, Saddam Hussein, tried to launch his country's entry into the world of movie making. He spent millions of dollars on an epic movie called Clash of Loyalties, filmed almost entirely on location in Iraq, and staring some of Britain's leading actors , including Oliver Reed, Helen Ryan and James Bolam. But soon after shooting of the film began, war erupted between Iraq and neighbouring Iran. Mike Lanchin speaks to the film's Iraqi-born British producer Lateif Jorephani and the Iraqi actor, Fatima al Rubai, about the ambitious project.

Photo Credit: Jorephani Productions


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhybn1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpb)
iPhone 12 goes 5G

Apple pushes 5G as a key selling point of its new iPhone 12. But is it useful anywhere right now? We get the view from South Korea, where 5G has been available for 18 months, and from Ghana where the previous 4G network is just rolling out. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Illustration of the iPhone 12, Credit: Apple/ EPA).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053mpxf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhygd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnk)
How dangerous is North Korea?

This week North Korea celebrated 75 years of communism with a military parade at which it unveiled an giant intercontinental missile. The heavily choreographed event featured all the pomp and circumstance the world has come to expect from North Korea's mass human performances. It also contained a surprisingly emotional speech from Chairman Kim Jong-Un, who at times wept as he spoke about the country's struggles. The country’s first military parade in two years signalled a shift back to the more aggressive stance it used to adopt before the now stalled nuclear talks with the Trump administration. So is there any hope that temporary thaw created enduring opportunities for engagement with the rest of the world - or are we seeing a return to past behaviour? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss - how dangerous is North Korea?


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhyl49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnjbkf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053mydp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhypwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhp)
How an election kicked off a Kyrgyz crisis

It’s less than a fortnight since elections in Kyrgyzstan triggered mass protests. Since then the prime minister has resigned, the president too, and a man who was in prison then is now prime minister and self-declared acting president. BBC Kyrgyz Editor Gulnara Kasmambet shares the view from Bishkek.

My Home Town: Byblos
In our series My Home Town, we revisit Byblos in Lebanon with Janay Boulos of BBC Arabic.

Giving Afghan mothers a name
Afghan women recently won a major victory; after a 3 year campaign mothers' names can now be recorded alongside fathers' on children's ID cards. Mahjooba Nowrouzi of BBC Afghan explains why this change is so significant.

BBC Persian reports the US election debates
Iranians are following the US presidential election closely, with the candidates taking opposite positions on US sanctions. BBC Persian’s Siavash Ardalan and Nicholas Niksadat talk about the challenges of simultaneously interpreting the raucous, and occasionally rude, first presidential debate.

In praise of mahjong
The tile-based game has been played in China for centuries, but what’s the appeal? It's a question we posed to our BBC Chinese colleagues and mahjong aficionados, Howard Zhang and Suping.
Image: A rally in Bishkek in support of the former Kyrgyz president
Credit: EPA/IGOR KOVALENKO


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhytmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnjl1p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053n5wy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhyycp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0n408)
Brexit: UK must 'get ready' for no EU trade deal, says British Prime Minister

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said the country must prepare for a "no deal" trade relationship with the European Union at the end of the year.
Also in the programme: The UN special envoy for Afghanistan has warned than rising violence is threatening to disrupt progress in peace talks with the Taliban. And the number of Coronavirus cases in Europe continue to rise, with more than thirty-thousand new cases reported in France.

(Photo: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Credit: EPA)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhz23t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053nfd6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt7hh4ym37)
Campaign finance in the spotlight

Astonishing sums are being spent in the US election, so we drill down into the figures. Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, talks us through how much campaigns are spending. In Germany spending on elections is a fraction of that in the US, and with greater oversight, as Tanit Koch, managing director at news channel n-tv, explains. We hear about strict new electoral spending rules in South Africa from Dr Magnus Ohman, specialist in African political finance at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems. And following a boost in political donations for the last Australian elections we ask Danielle Wood from the Grattan Institute in Melbourne whether it is inevitable that political campaign financing around the world is going to become more Americanised. Also in the programme, UK prime minister Boris Johnson has said the country must "get ready" for no EU trade deal by the end of the year. David Herzenhorn is bureau chief for Politico in Brussels and tells us why a deal is still proving so hard to reach. Plus, the Israeli parliament has approved a US-brokered agreement between the United Arab Emirates and Israel, and earlier this week the first cargo ship to sail under its terms docked at the Israeli port of Haifa, having travelled from Dubai. We find out why relations between the sides are warming now, from Bernard Avishai, professor of political economy at Dartmouth College in the United States.

(Picture: A vote badge on 100 dollar bills. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhz5vy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053nk4b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1659)
Russia's persecuted Jehovah’s Witnesses

There are hundreds of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia who are being prosecuted for their faith. Some of them say they have been tortured and their testimonies were never investigated. Others have to hide their prayers as they fear the secret services are spying on them through undercover agents.

The wave of arrests started in 2017 after the Russian Supreme Court declared Jehovah’s Witnesses organisation as extremist and banned all Jehovah’s Witnesses registered groups throughout the country.

Jehovah’s Witnesses renounce violence and do not possess arms, yet criminal cases against them claim they possess extremist materials and peaceful worship has been raided by armed police.

This programme will follow some of the most dramatic stories told by Jehovah’s Witnesses under prosecution and their family members. Among them is the story of imprisoned man Feliks as told by his wife Zhenya. Upon arrival to his colony Feliks had suffered such an atrocious beating that he spent months recovering in a prison hospital. In May this year he was stripped of his Russian citizenship and became the first Jehovah’s Witness forced into statelessness. We will also hear from Jehovah’s Witnesses who aren’t prosecuted but live in constant expectation of being disturbed by police.

All of them will share how their faiths help them to survive those dark days and how they continue to worship despite being scared and intimidated.

Presenter: Anastasia Gulubeva
Producer: Tatyana Movshevich

(Picture: Feliks Makhammadiev /Credit: jw-russia.org)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhz9m2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t0cldjnnx)
Billie Eilish: Why does body shaming continue?

We speak to parents and their children about the conversations they have about body shaming after Billie Eilish was criticised for her appearance. A photo of the pop star without her usual trademark baggy clothes was shared online and a very small number of people were critical of her, with one Twitter user posting: “In 10 months Billie Eilish has developed a mid-30’s wine mom body.”

Also, we get an update from Nigeria on protests taking place over police brutality. The Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) has been widely accused of extortion, torture and extra-judicial killings and was disbanded, but protesters want further reforms.

And we continue to bring you stories about how people are being affected by the coronavirus pandemic, as we discuss relationships. We hear from a man in Australia whose relationship ended during lockdown.


(Photo: Billie Eilish poses with awards at the the 2020 Billboard Music Awards. Credit: Todd Williamson/NBC/Handout via Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhzfc6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhzk3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnk9jg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053nxcq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jrhnd9jkc)
2020/10/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhznvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053p13v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6b)
Why do I blush?

Curious CrowdScience listeners have suddenly been struck by the oddity of their behaviours. Elise ponders why she blushes. Thankfully, listener David is a vascular surgeon and knows a thing or two about blushing, as he performs operations on people debilitated by constant red-dening. He has some answers for us, but asks why did blushing evolve?

In the past, red cheeks have been linked to necrophilia, repressed cannibalism, and even a de-sire for men to experience menstruation! Thankfully, research has come a long way since then, as blushing experts Peter de Jong and Corine Dijk explain.

Scientists believe that it evolved as a nonverbal signal to show someone you’re sorry or that you care about what they think. This would have important for our survival in the group, en-suring we didn’t get into a fight or get kicked out the group.

Anand Jagatia gets to grips with blushing and other bodily behaviours – including a question from Thai listener Nitcha who wonders why we yawn as well as a question from Mohamed in Ghana and Biana in Trinidad and Tobago who both asked why people scratch their heads when they think. To answer these questions, Anand’s joined by yawning researcher Andrew Gallup and Sophie Scott as well as body language expert Blanca Cobb.
Produced by Graihagh Jackson for the BBC World Service.


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhzsll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yy0z0nz75)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfhzxbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053p8m3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p1kfj012v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bdkbnkshz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pw053pdc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58n0c3prj5)
Campaign finance in the spotlight

Astonishing sums are being spent in the US election, so we drill down into the figures. Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the Center for Responsive Politics, talks us through how much campaigns are spending. In Germany spending on elections is a fraction of that in the US, and with greater oversight, as Tanit Koch, managing director at news channel n-tv, explains. We hear about strict new electoral spending rules in South Africa from Dr Magnus Ohman, specialist in African political finance at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems. And following a boost in political donations for the last Australian elections we ask Danielle Wood from the Grattan Institute in Melbourne whether it is inevitable that political campaign financing around the world is going to become more Americanised. Also in the programme, UK prime minister Boris Johnson has said the country must "get ready" for no EU trade deal by the end of the year. David Herzenhorn is bureau chief for Politico in Brussels and tells us why a deal is still proving so hard to reach. Plus, the Israeli parliament has approved a US-brokered agreement between the United Arab Emirates and Israel, and earlier this week the first cargo ship to sail under its terms docked at the Israeli port of Haifa, having travelled from Dubai. We find out why relations between the sides are warming now, from Bernard Avishai, professor of political economy at Dartmouth College in the United States.

(Picture: A vote badge on 100 dollar bills. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6lq)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6lq)

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Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6lq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pvmwsxlzs)

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BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p1kfhtgrx)

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BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5p1kfhvp76)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct0xjr)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t0cld521j)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jy)

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Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8n8)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18z44k0c25)

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Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18zhdvlpvt)

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Business Weekly 01:06 SUN (w3ct0sp5)

Comedians Vs. The News 05:32 SAT (w3ct0x3f)

Comedians Vs. The News 22:06 SUN (w3ct0x3f)

Comedians Vs. The News 10:06 MON (w3ct0x3f)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv69)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv69)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv69)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98l)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz98l)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz98l)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz98l)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct16c1)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct16c1)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct16c1)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct16c1)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9q3)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9q3)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9q3)

Girl Taken 09:32 SAT (w3ct0xw4)

Girl Taken 04:32 SUN (w3ct0xw4)

Girl Taken 22:32 SUN (w3ct0xw4)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2g)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc2g)

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HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxy)

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HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3cszbxy)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcch)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcch)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcch)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcch)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SAT (w3ct1658)

Heart and Soul 05:32 SUN (w3ct1658)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct1658)

Heart and Soul 16:32 FRI (w3ct1659)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbv)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbv)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbv)

More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pxy)

More or Less 22:50 SAT (w3ct0pxy)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxy)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6tg)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6tg)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wgps65jcv)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wgps65n3z)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3cszf0d)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdbg)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4x)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4x)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1r)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1r)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3cszv1r)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh10)

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Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh10)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jrhncxxxz)

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Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh5h)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh5j)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3c018vs0h4)

Sportsworld 14:04 SAT (w172x3ld0v8z76d)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3ld0v92cqm)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjs)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhpb)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhpb)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3cszhpb)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk3f)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3cszk3f)

The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3ct0xj0)

The Big Idea 15:50 SUN (w3ct0xj0)

The Big Idea 22:50 SUN (w3ct0xj0)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct165c)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct165d)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct165d)

The Compass 15:06 WED (w3ct165d)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3cszj3w)

The Conversation 16:32 MON (w3cszj3w)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3cszj3w)

The Documentary 08:32 SAT (w3ct0x66)

The Documentary 11:32 SAT (w3ct16c7)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct16l2)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct16l2)

The Documentary 19:32 SUN (w3ct0x66)

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The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct16c8)

The Documentary 15:06 TUE (w3ct16c8)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct16c8)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjqh)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjw0)

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The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl42)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3cszcnj)

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Trending 18:32 SAT (w3cszvsc)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7d12jk62zm)

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When Katty Met Carlos 02:32 MON (w3ct164m)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmvj)

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WorklifeIndia 10:06 SUN (w3ct0x52)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57t6c6f946)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3csztgp)

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