Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkntrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18ydlxg1vh)
US presidential election: Debating the issues

In the last of our election specials, we debate the big issues with a Republican and a Democrat. William Spriggs is chief economist at the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations - a Democrat appointed to the Department of Labor by President Obama. Michael Johns is the National Tea Party movement co-founder and leader, and a former White House speechwriter for President George Bush. Sasha Twining is joined by them both throughout the programme to debate the key issues of the election, including the economy, the US-China trade war and the coronavirus pandemic.
Also in the programme, we speak to Sarah Bryner, research director at the Center for Responsive Politics in Chicago, about election fundraising and what all those dollars are spent on. And Marylouise Serrato of American Citizens Abroad tells us what US voters abroad are concerned about in the run up to polling day.

(Picture: 'Vote' badges, credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmknyhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq7pxv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5c9s3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjq)
Dean Jones - a 'shocking loss' to cricket

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma pay tribute to Dean Jones, the great Australia batsman who has died at the age of 59.

Plus, we're joined by Dhiraj Malhotra, CEO of Delhi Capitals, to discuss a controversial week in the Indian Premier League.

Australia vice-captain Rachael Haynes looks welcomes the return of women's international cricket - with fans.

And a dispute over Don Bradman's childhood cricket pitch prompts a debate over how we remember our sporting heroes.

Photo: Dean Jones (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkp27v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhl)
Music and memory

This week, the World Service marked World Alzheimer's Day with a BBC Music and Memory project, exploring the power of music to reach sufferers with the disease. It launched a website of global tracks to trigger memories, compiled with the help of the BBC's language services. Behzad Bolour compiled BBC Persian's list, his father suffered from dementia, but still sang with him. He also explores Iran’s complex relationship with music.

But what tracks does the rest of the world dance and remember to? We hear from BBC Arabic's Nahed Najjar, Adedayo Owolabi of BBC Yoruba, Kateryna Khinkulova of BBC Russian and Partha Prasad from the Indian languages hub in Delhi about some of the tracks they contributed to the world music database, and why.

The Moria camp fire: one family’s story
Talibshah Hosseini from Afghanistan had to flee with his wife and 3 children as his tent was destroyed in a huge fire at Greece’s largest migrant camp earlier this month. The overcrowded camp, on the island of Lesbos, was home to 13,000 migrants, the majority from Afghanistan. Talibshah told his story to BBC journalist Kawoon Khamoosh.

My Home Town: Feira de Santana
Camilla Costa of BBC Brasil takes us to her home town in Bahia, Brazil, to eat peanuts and sit in the hot springs with her grandmother.

Image: Elderly Indian lady listening on headphones looking at smartphone
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvg)
Bush v Gore: The 'hanging chads' US election of 2000

The US presidential election of 2000 was one of the closest and most contested in history. It was more than a month before the result was decided after a Supreme Court decision. It all came down to the vote in Florida, a 'swing-state', where irregularities and technical problems added to the confusion. In the end it's thought there were just a few hundred votes in it, but years later, the result, and the handling of the election in the state, divides opinion. Callie Shell was the official photographer for Al Gore's presidential campaign and documented the dramatic events behind closed doors in pictures. She's been telling Rebecca Kesby what it was like to be there.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkp5zz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcng)
Covid-19: What's best for the elderly?

Governments across Europe have this week introduced new measures to curb the spread of Covid-19. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control reports that over the past fortnight five countries have reported over 120 cases per 100,000 residents, including Spain, France, and the Czech Republic. But the increased restrictions on freedom of movement and congregation in many countries is sparking push-back from some, who argue that the elderly should be shielded - while the rest of society returns to some semblance of normality. It’s a suggestion British Prime Minister Boris Johnson rejected this week during an address to the nation. He said such a policy wouldn’t be ‘realistic’ - insisting widespread transmission of the virus would inevitably see infection rates rise in vulnerable communities too. But after months of effectively being locked away from the outside world, many of those who’ve been shielding from the virus are now showing signs of adverse physical and mental health problems due to isolation. So as the pandemic grinds on, are attempts to protect the elderly from exposure to the coronavirus prompting other health crises - and what can be done to keep them safe and happy? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss - what is the best approach for the elderly?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkp9r3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq8257)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5cp0h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3c)
Enissa Amani and Neeti Palta

Top German stand-up Enissa Amani and one of India’s biggest comedians, Neeti Palta, join comedy couple Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to find the funny in the world’s news.

This week, why are India and China at loggerheads over a border? And meet Harley, the Mexican pug on the frontline in the battle against Covid-19.

Get involved and tell us about the funny stories where you are. #comediansvsthenews


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkpfh7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d0bzxmsry)
US Supreme Court replacement picked

President Trump is reported to have picked his replacement for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Also, Swiss voters are being called on to decide whether to allow wolf hunting.

And we hear from a colleague of the two people attacked in front of the Charlie Hebdo building in Paris on Friday.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Lisa Millar, a journalist and broadcaster for the ABC network in Australia. She co-presents the 'News Breakfast' programme on ABC television, and Afzal Ashraf, an expert on defence, security, and international relations at the University of Nottingham here in the UK.

(Photo: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's reported pick for the US Supreme Court. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkpk7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d0bzxmxj2)
Are Sino/Australian relations damaged beyond repair?

Why some politicians in Australia think that their country's economic relationship with China has been damaged irreparably.

Also,President Trump is reported to have picked a federal judge known for her conservative religious views - as his nominee for the vacant seat on the US Supreme Court.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Lisa Millar, a journalist and broadcaster for the ABC network in Australia. She co-presents the 'News Breakfast' programme on ABC television, and Afzal Ashraf, an expert on defence, security, and international relations at the University of Nottingham here in the UK.

(Picture: The Australian flag flutters in front of the Great Hall of the People in China. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkpnzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d0bzxn186)
Trump reportedly set to pick Barrett

President Trump is reported to have picked his replacement for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Also,we hear from a colleague of the two people attacked in front of the Charlie Hebdo building in Paris yesterday.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Lisa Millar, a journalist and broadcaster for the ABC network in Australia. She co-presents the 'News Breakfast' programme on ABC television, and Afzal Ashraf, an expert on defence, security, and international relations at the University of Nottingham here in the UK.

(Picture: The flag-draped casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg under the Portico of the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, U.S. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5d17w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x64)
Mozart's Requiem

Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives. Crime writer Val McDermid recalls how this music helped her after the loss of her father. Hypnotist Athanasios Komianos recounts how the piece took him to the darker side of the spirit world. And a friend of ballet dancer Edward Stierle, Lissette Salgado-Lucas, explains how Eddie turned his struggle with HIV into a ballet inspired by Mozart's music.

Basement Jaxx used the Requiem in their live shows and on their album Scars - Felix Buxton reveals his love for Mozart and the divine nature of the Requiem.

And Mozart expert Cliff Eisen takes us inside the composer's world: how the orchestra and choir conjure visions of funerals, beauty, hellfire and the confusion of death. He recounts how Mozart was commissioned to write the piece by a nobleman who may have intended to pass off the work as his own. The stern challenge faced by people trying to complete the piece are described by composer Michael Finnissy, who himself wrote a completion of the work.

The Requiem was performed at the funerals of many heroic figures - Beethoven, Napoleon and J F Kennedy, among others. Gordana Blazinovic remembers one extraordinary performance during the horrors of the Bosnian war - a show of defiance and grief from the ruins of Sarajevo City Hall.

(Photo: The recently discovered Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart portrait, by the artist Johann Georg Edlinger. Credit: Carsten Koall/Getty Images)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkpsqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0xjp)
Coronavirus: Back to normal in Wuhan?

We hear a conversation about what life is like now in the Chinese city where Covid-19 was first detected. Officials have declared Wuhan virus-free. Lots of people have been sharing pictures from bars in the city, which suggest life has gone back to the way it was before. It's a huge contrast to much of the rest of the world, which is still dealing with high infection rates and associated restrictions. Two people who live in Wuhan tell Nuala McGovern about their newly restored freedoms. Are they confident that they've seen the back of the virus?

We also spend some time in countries at very different stages of their epidemics. There were street parties in the Czech Republic at the end of June to say "farewell" to coronavirus, including one on the famous Charles Bridge in the capital, Prague. As cases surge again, we speak to one of the organisers of that party as part of a group of Czechs, who talk about their tolerance for restrictions and how their lives have been changed.

Meanwhile, people in Panama have only just emerged from one of the strictest lockdowns in the world, which lasted many months and had one unusual feature. Men and women were allowed out of their homes on alternate days. We hear how three Panamanians feel about what they've been through and the implications for the future.

(Photo: Inside a bar in Wuhan, China, 18 September 2020. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5d500)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw2)
Girl Taken

26/09/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4v)
The rise and rise of podcasts

We’re giving the whole show over to the topic of the evolution of podcasts on the BBC World Service and how they sit alongside traditional radio.
What are the editorial criteria behind a podcast being commissioned and do they have to meet public service standards?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkpxgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bz9r76q8g)
Madison Hammond: I didn’t think I’d be the first anything in sport

Madison Hammond is the first Native American woman to sign a professional contract with an NWSL club. She joins us ahead of OL Reign’s opening game of the season and her potential debut against Utah Royals to discuss how she is hoping to inspire more Native American girls to play the sport. She also tells us about the financial barriers players from ethnic minority backgrounds can face as they try to make it in soccer and how the Black Lives Matter movement has sparked conversations with her team-mates.

“I’m sort of like the canary in the coal mine – there’s a lot less ice in the winter, everywhere I go” – Canadian ice climber Will Gadd tells us how climate change and a trip to Mount Kilimanjaro have led him to consider his future in the sport. Gadd had hoped to scale the famous Messner Route earlier this year, but he was unable to as part of it has melted away. He worries that by the time his children are his age, there won’t be enough ice left to climb on Kilimanjaro

Football journalist and Wrexham fan Bryn Law joins us to discuss Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney’s interest in buying the Welsh non-league club. Deadpool star Reynolds and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia's McElhenney are set to share their vision for Wrexham and a takeover could see around two and a half million dollars invested in the club.

Caitlin Rooskrantz tells us how she used gymnastics to channel her emotions following the death of her father when she was just eight years old. Rooskrantz will be the first black South African female gymnast to compete at an Olympic Games in Tokyo next year. She believes her achievements can open doors for the next generation of young girls coming through.

In Sporting Witness go back to the Syndey Olympics of 2000 and the famous gold medal winning performance from aboriginal runner Cathy Freeman.

Brittany Carter from ABC Grandstand joins us to reflect on Australia’s first T20 with New Zealand and we also look ahead to England’s third T20 against West Indies.

And we are live at the Amex Stadium ahead of Brighton’s game against Manchester United in the Premier League.

(Photo: Madison Hammond posing for OL Reign. Credit: Madison Hammond instagram)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkq16w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq8sn0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5ddh8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Global Questions (w3ct165b)
Global Questions

The Belarus crisis: Trouble in Putin’s backyard

The growing street protests in Belarus threaten not only President Lukashenko, the country's authoritarian leader, but also Russia's Vladimir Putin. Russia sees Belarus as a crucial buffer state against Nato and the West, and Putin also fears this kind of 'people power' could be a threat to his leadership. The growth of opposition inside Russia was highlighted by the poisoning of the leading Kremlin critic Alexi Navalny, a constant thorn in the President's side. The stakes are high for President Putin but is he really under threat - both in his back yard and his own country? And how should the West respond?

Panel:-
Jan Neutze Director of Cybersecurity Policy at Microsoft responsible for Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA).
Martha Lane Fox Co-founded Last Minute.com, Peer and expert on public service digital projects.
Presented by Zeinab Badawi.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkq4z0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6td)
Heart v technique with Norah Jones and Nitin Sawhney

An absolutely fascinating discussion this week sees Nitin Sawhney welcome Norah Jones, Anoushka Shankar and Soumik Datta to discuss the differences between being a solo artist versus being part of a band, the importance of playing with heart over technique, and how collaborating and working with different musicians changes their sound.

Nitin Sawhney grew up studying the piano, guitar, sitar and tabla. He has released scores of albums, and composed for theatre, dance, video games and cinema, including the film Mowgli for Netflix and the BBC TV series Human Planet. He’s also worked with the likes of Sir Paul McCartney, Nelson Mandela, Joss Stone, Annie Lennox, Sting, and Mira Nair.

Norah Jones is a nine-time Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter and musician. She launched her solo music career in 2002 with her debut album Come Away with Me, and since then she’s sold over 50 million records worldwide. She’s also collaborated with Herbie Hancock, Outkast, Foo Fighters, Willie Nelson, Q-Tip and former Music Life guest Robert Glasper.

Anoushka Shankar is a musician, composer and producer who began training on the sitar with her father, Ravi. She made her professional debut at the age of 13 and had made three classical solo records by the time she was twenty. She was also the first Indian musician to perform live at the Grammy Awards, and she has worked with the likes of M.I.A., Rodrigo y Gabriela, Gold Panda, Lenny Kravitz, Deva Premal, and Zakir Hussain.

And finally, Soumik Datta is a British-Indian musician and composer who specialises in the sarod. He has collaborated with Beyoncé, Joss Stone, Anoushka Shankar, the London Philharmonic Orchestra, and host Nitin Sawhney. He has also presented documentaries examining how music helps us understand India’s past and present, and was invited by Jay-Z to join him on stage for Royal Albert Hall’s first ever hip-hop concert.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkq8q4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy52dgbq)
Trump 'to pick Amy Coney Barrett' for US Supreme Court

President Trump is expected to name the conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the vacant seat on the US Supreme Court - a move likely to draw opposition from liberals worried about her stance on abortion and gun rights. We hear from a friend and colleague.
Also on the programme: Lebanon's Prime Minister designate says he's stepping down after failing to form a government; and Switzerland votes in a controversial referendum on hunting wild wolves.

(Photo: Judge Amy Coney Barrett poses in an undated photograph. Credit: Matt Cashore/Notre Dame University/Handout via REUTERS)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkqdg8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lc99ndy3l)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live commentary of Crystal Palace v Everton. Both teams have taken maximum points from their first two games of the Premier League season. We’ll have reaction to the day’s early kick-off between Brighton and Manchester United. Plus we’ll be looking ahead to the women’s FA Cup quarter-finals that get underway this weekend.

Elsewhere, we’ll bring you the latest from qualifying for the Formula 1 Sochi Grand Prix, and women’s international cricket is back after a long hiatus due to the pandemic – we’ll have reaction to the T20 matches between England and West Indies, and Australia and New Zealand.

Plus we’ll be discussing the NBA Conference finals with the LA Lakers, Denver Nuggets, Miami Heat and Boston Celtics all looking to take one step closer to the NBA Championship.

Credit: Wilfried Zaha celebrates with his team-mates after scoring for Crystal Palace against Southampton (Photo: EPA)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkqwfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq9mvx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5f7q5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3csyvnq)
The Instagram suicide network

Andrine was 17 years old when she killed herself in March 2017.

For two years her mother left Andrine’s phone untouched in a cardboard box by her front door.

But when a journalist from the Norwegian broadcaster NRK approached her Andrine’s mother plucked up the courage to take a look.

The information from Andrine’s phone uncovered a secretive international network of young women and girls who share pictures of self-harm, thoughts about killing themselves and even their suicidal attempts.

Many of those in the network have eating disorders, depression or other mental health problems. They don’t trust healthcare workers or doctors, and they communicate using private Instagram accounts.

The investigation by NRK has identified at least 15 young women and girls in the network who have taken their own lives in the last three years.

So what responsibility does social media – and Instagram in particular - bear for the deaths?

If you are affected by the issues in this programme you can find information about support organisations on the Befrienders Worldwide website. https://www.befrienders.org/

Presenter: Catrin Nye
Producer: Ed Main

(Photo: A close-up of Andrine pinned on a noticeboard. Credit: BBC)


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxw)
Caffeine and pregnancy

Do coffee and pregnancy mix? Tim Harford talks to economist Emily Oster about whether caffeine poses a risk for pregnant women.

(image: Getty creative)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkr05x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct0xk2)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Covid lessons for safe school reopening

Claudia Hammond and experts from around the world consider the evidence behind schools, colleges and coronavirus spread. Listeners from India, Cuba, Italy, Brazil, Canada, Hong Kong, France, the USA pitch their questions to the specialists.

Research so far shows a low risk of transmission but as children and young people return to classrooms across the globe, will that remain the case?

And Claudia and the team look at that vital role of “test, trace and isolate” when it comes to SARS-CoV-2, something the World Health Organisation describes as the backbone of any Covid-19 response.

Which countries are getting this right and what can others learn from the best? New research comparing six countries from Europe, Africa and Asia highlights the successes and the failures.

Plus Kat, a nurse from Kansas City, Missouri gives a first hand account of pandemic response in the USA and then, when she moved to Germany in the summer, from Stuttgart.

On the panel are Dr Regina Osih, an infectious disease and public health specialist from the Aurum Institute in South Africa who’s working on the country’s Covid response, Dr Young June Choe, paediatrician and assistant professor at Hallym University in South Korea, Gail Davey, Professor of Global Health Epidemiology at Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England, David Heymann, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine from France and Dr Margaret Harris from the WHO in Geneva.

The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Production team: Fiona Hill, Samara Linton and Maria Simons
Studio engineers: Matilda Macari and Tim Heffer
Editor: Deborah Cohen


Picture: Primary school children wearing face masks as a protective measure against the COVID-19 novel coronavirus, Credit: KIM WON JIN/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkr3y1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3c)
Actors Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter

On The Arts Hour this week: Hollywood stars Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter talk about reprising the roles of time travelling adventurers Bill and Ted in middle age; Canadian comedian Katherine Ryan on art mirroring life for her new TV show The Duchess; and Cambodian born British director Hong Khaou explains why his mother hasn’t seen his movies.

Actress Jessie Buckley talks about entering the curious world of Charlie Kaufman for her role in his latest film I’m Thinking of Ending Things; voiceover actor Nolan North tells us about playing Iron Man in the new Avengers game; and The Benin born singer and activist Angelique Kidjo covers a song by the legendary Cuban singer Celia Cruz.

Joining Nikki in the studio are actor Thomas Brodie-Sangster, star of Love, Actually and Nanny McPhee to talk about his latest Netflix drama The Queen’s Gambit, and film critic and podcaster Rhianna Dhillon.

(Picture: Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter in Bill and Ted Face the Music. Credit: Warner)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkr7p5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy52ff9r)
Madrid sees a surge in cases of Covid-19

Across Europe new infections from coronavirus are causing concern with countries like Poland and the Czech Republic experiencing spikes in cases. In Spain Madrid is seeing a surge of infections. The health minister, Salvador Illa said it was time to take control to tackle a serious health crisis. We hear from him and a reporter in Madrid.

Also on the programme: President Trump is expected to name the conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the vacant seat on the US Supreme Court - a move likely to draw opposition from liberals worried about her stance on abortion and gun rights. We hear from a friend and colleague.

And In France, President Macron is under pressure to allow interment in the Pantheon of two of France's best-loved poets, Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine. We hear from someone who signed the petition to make this happen.

(Photo: Spain's Health Minister Salvador Illa called for tougher measures in Madrid to curb the virus Credit: EPA)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkrcf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q1)
‘Death will come tomorrow’ in Yemen

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

This week, the United Nations have announced that the crucial aid it supplies to people in Yemen – whose country has been blasted into the sand by 6 years of war – has been cut. More than a third of the UN’s humanitarian efforts in the country have been reduced or shut down entirely after the organisation received only $1-billion of the $3-billion it needed to operate. Mai Noman reflects on the talent for endurance, and the balance of facing facts and keeping hope alive, that her fellow Yemenis are forced to cultivate.

Greece and Turkey have agreed to hold talks to help defuse their stand-off over disputed gas reserves near their shores. Ankara had deployed a research vessel accompanied by warships near a Greek island, and military exercises on both sides followed, giving rise to fears of war between the two long-term rivals, as Heidi Fuller Love reports from Crete.

The US President, Donald Trump, has imposed fresh sanctions on Cuba. This week he banned US citizens from bringing home rum or cigars from the island – likely to be a move designed to appeal to the Cuban-American vote in the swing state of Florida ahead of November's election. There’s no one more hostile to the Communist government back home, than Cubans who’ve settled in the US. So it may be odd to think that the communist government in Havana is suddenly embracing the dollar - that symbol of unbridled capitalism, the currency of the enemy. Will Grant explores the monetary system and finds only a few decades ago it was illegal to possess or handle the US dollar in Cuba.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Jasper Corbett

(Image: A Yemeni man walks through food items provided by a local aid group. Credit: European Photopress Agency/Yahya Arhab)


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5fqpp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Trending (w3csyvnq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 today]


SAT 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkrh5f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjqb7lk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5fvft)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0qhg)
Buddhist detox

Buddhist temple Wat Thamkrabok in Thailand has a worldwide reputation for its successful mix of ‘cold turkey’ and Buddhism in combating addiction.

The treatment begins with a sacred Buddhist vow never to use drugs again. For five days, the ‘patients’ drink a strong herbal medicine that induces vomiting. No contact with the outside world is permitted.

Through Buddhist teachings, the former addicts confront the bad habits that dominated their past lives and commit to building a life for themselves in the future that will not harm them or their loved ones.

The Wat Thamkrabok treatment programme was founded by an extraordinary characte, Luangpaw Yaai, and her two nephews in response to the Thai government’s introduction of a ban on opium possession that left tens of thousands of Thai addicts in the agony of withdrawal. A Buddhist nun, she wore the robes of a monk and had been an addict herself.

The majority of the patients are from Thailand, but drug addicts from all over the world come to Wat Thamkrabok.

Sucheera Maguire is at the temple with addicts on the Wat Thamkrabok treatment programme. She talks to those in treatment, and the monks who kicked their drug habits at the temple and then converted to the Buddhist faith.

Producer: Helen Lee
Presenter: Sucheera Maguire

(Photo: Buddha statues at Wat Thamkrabok, Thailand. Credit: BBC)



SUNDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkrqnp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sp3)
US Election: The power of the swing states

What will get the swing states swinging? That’s the question we’ll be asking on this edition of Business Weekly as we take an in-depth look at Pennsylvania, Florida, Texas and Ohio. We’ll be finding out what business leaders, activists and environmentalists in these crucial battlegrounds want from their new leader and ask whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden can deliver. We’ll hear from Puerto Ricans and Cubans in Florida who say that job security is at the forefront of their minds - so who do they trust to lead them for the next four years? Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Picture: A "Welcome to Florida" sign; Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkrvdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjqblty)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5g6p6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3csyvnq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkrz4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x8m)
What has Nobel done for the world?

Brilliance is a must to win a Nobel Prize, but is that the only requirement? What else does it take to become a laureate?
Ruth Alexander tells the stories of those who have been overlooked – in some instances, astonishingly so. Why do some countries, and some academic institutions have a bountiful number of laureates and others none at all?
She hears from the winners, woken in the early hours of the morning to hear the life-changing news and the impact that phone call can have on lives and careers.

She examines the nomination process and considers the role that geo-politics, accusations of prejudice and funding have all played during Nobel’s history. The awards were established over 100 years ago by Swedish businessman Alfred Nobel in his will – are they still fit for purpose or does the prize itself need to be reformed for the modern world?

(Photo: Esther Duflo, laureate of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences, receives a Nobel Prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden during the Nobel Prize awards ceremony 2019, Sweden. Credit: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

Presenter: Ruth Alexander


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmks2x2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5gg5g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhy)
The truth about marriage

When most couples get married they’re optimistic that their union won’t end in divorce. The statistics show this to be hopelessly naive. But we’ll be talking to a philosopher who argues that irrational optimism is…well, rational.

Picture: A broken heart
Picture Credit: Getty/Francesco Carta fotografo


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmks6n6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjqbz2b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5gkxl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0qhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmksbdb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d0bzxqpp1)
Trump Supreme Court nomination

President Trump has collected another ally in the US Supreme Court - nominating conservative judge, Amy Coney Barrett.

Six years after a massacre that convulsed Mexico, the country's president issues arrest warrants for members of the armed forces - and says sorry.

And the lessons Italy seems to have learned from being hardest-hit by the Coronavirus when it first came to Europe.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Karl Sharro, a British-Lebanese architect and satirist, and Leslie Vinjamuri, the Director of the US and Americas programme at the international affairs think tank, Chatham House.

(Picture: President Donald Trump announcing his nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmksg4g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d0bzxqtf5)
Should China's wild meat markets reopen?

The Chinese authorities are under pressure to re-open the country's wild meat trade, from breeders struggling to survive.

Also, President Trump has nominated his replacement for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg - conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Karl Sharro, a British-Lebanese architect and satirist, and Leslie Vinjamuri, the Director of the US and Americas programme at the international affairs think tank, Chatham House.

(Picture: Customers wearing face masks buy meat at a wholesale market in Beijing, China. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkskwl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d0bzxqy59)
A dissident club in Paris for refugees

We hear about the Pakistani journalists who have created a hub for dissidents and refugees in a small bar in Paris.

Also, President Trump has nominated his replacement for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg - conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Karl Sharro, a British-Lebanese architect and satirist, and Leslie Vinjamuri, the Director of the US and Americas programme at the international affairs think tank, Chatham House.

(Picture: A view of the Paris skyline. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5gy4z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqf)
Coronavirus: Obesity's defining moment?

Emily Thomas asks whether the coronavirus pandemic will turn out to be the defining moment in the fight against obesity. Will we see governments take radical action, now that the pandemic has turned the spotlight on this growing global problem? And why hasn’t the pandemic made most of us eat more healthily?

Even experts have been surprised by just how strong an impact obesity has been found to have on the risks of coronavirus. We hear from Professor Barry Popkin, of the University of North Carolina, who led a major study into the relationship between the two. He tells us he’s worried that food companies are using the pandemic to push ultra processed food on low-income populations.

Professor Corinna Hawkes, of City, University of London, explains how obesity policy became personal in the UK after Boris Johnson caught the virus.

And Jacqueline Bowman-Busato, Policy Lead for the European Association for the Study of Obesity, tells us how her own experience of living with obesity has led her to lobby for changes in how obesity is viewed and treated. She says the pandemic has provided a much needed wake up call on a neglected and misunderstood public health issue.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Fat cells, Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkspmq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5h1x3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0b)
Vietnam's first family of rock‘n’roll

In the 1960s, a bunch of musically gifted, pre-teen siblings from Saigon- now Ho Chi Minh City - put together a rock‘n’roll group. For a while the CBC Band was the biggest music act in South Vietnam, even headlining the country’s first international rock festival. They had an unlikely fan base – battle-weary US soldiers fighting in the Vietnam War. This episode was first broadcast on the 9 February 2019.

Presenter: Harry Graham
Producer: Maryam Maruf

(Photo: The CBC Band in Vietnam, courtesy of the band)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkstcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x50)
The environmental cost of recovery

A new draft law on environmental impact assessment in India has sparked a debate. Critics say it is investor-friendly and will make it easier for industrial and infrastructure projects to get clearances, which may lead to severe environmental consequences. They also blame the government for trying to rush through the crucial law during a lockdown.

India, on the other hand, is facing its worst job crisis ever. The country’s GDP contracted by nearly 24% in the first quarter of 2020. And for PM Modi’s administration, it is crucial to quickly revive the crashing economy.

So, can India balance growth with protection of its environment? Or should creating jobs get priority?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we question if the environmental cost of economic recovery is too high, and whether green jobs offer a better alternative for growth.

Presenter: Divya Arya

Contributors: Kanchi Kohli, environmental researcher, Centre for Policy Research; Ashis Dash, CEO, Sustainable Mining, FIMI; Sowmya Reddy, environmental activist, Congress lawmaker


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5h5n7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0qhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmksy3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjqcpk3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5h9dc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3csy1ql)
The Sun, Our Star

The Sun, Our Star: Space weather

At any moment, the predictions of your local weather forecaster might be suddenly superseded by space weather, a special breed of storms fomented on the Sun and launched toward Earth with potentially devastating consequences.

Most of the time, the solar wind billowing out from the Sun blows right past our planet without causing any ill effects whatsoever, but today, with our navigation and communications technology dependent on satellite based systems, a downdraft of space weather could disrupt entire countries.

Dava Sobel turns to Aditya L1, a new satellite under construction in India, to learn how many countries are developing their own eyes to watch the sun from space.

To know the Sun is an age-old dream of humankind. For centuries, astronomers contented themselves with analysing small sips of sunlight collected through specialised instruments. They chased after eclipses that exposed otherwise hidden layers of the Sun’s substance, and they launched Earth and Sun-orbiting observatories to monitor our star from space. Today, several satellites ‘watch’ our star from outer space. In August 2018, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, set off on a mission to go so far as to ‘touch the sun’ for the first time.

Our view of the sun from here is relatively murky, but it’s a trade-off we Earthlings have to accept: the protective bubble of the Earth’s magnetic sphere and atmosphere provides air to breathe and a shield against harmful radiation, but it distorts our view of the heavens. Nevertheless, astronomers have managed to piece together an understanding of the stars, and especially the Sun itself: how it’s constructed, how it behaves, how it came to be, forming from a vast cloud of cold hydrogen gas and the dust of older stars in a sparsely populated region of the Milky Way.

In five programmes, author Dava Sobel orbits the sun, getting as close as she dares, to understand the immense relationship we have with our nearest star.

Music composed by Chris O'Shaughnessy.
Producer: Jeremy Mortimer and Dakshiani Palicha

Audio for this programme was updated on 21 September 2020.

(Photo: An M9-class solar flare erupting on the Sun's northeastern hemisphere. Credit: Nasa/Solar Dynamics Observatory via AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkt1w3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct0xk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkt5m7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy52hc7t)
Azerbaijan and Armenia clash over disputed region

Civilians have been killed and injured during heavy fighting between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region. The president of the breakaway region, which is mainly inhabited by ethnic Armenians, has declared martial law. Russia has called for an immediate ceasefire.

Also in the programme: People in Switzerland are voting on whether to abandon an agreement with the European Union on the free movement of people; and the Kanneh-Masons family, one of Britain's most gifted musical siblings on creating music during lockdown.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkt9cc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmktf3h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvy)
The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

Greenwood was an African American success story: a thriving, wealthy district of Tulsa. Over the course of two days at the end of May 1921 it was the scene of looting, rioting and murder. After 18 hours the area was razed to the ground by vigilantes. One eye witness said it looked like the world was coming to an end with bullets.

Nobody to this day has been able to establish the true number of deaths. Some put the figure in the hundreds, with casualties on both sides. The community rebuilt itself however, and today it’s the focus of a multi-million dollar investment and education programme.

Joining Rajan Datar to examine the events of 1921 are Carol Anderson, the Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University and the author of White Rage; Hannibal B Johnson, lawyer and author of numerous books on the city’s history including the forthcoming Black Wall Street 100: An American City Grapples With Its Historical Racial Trauma and John W Franklin, cultural historian and former senior manager at the Smithsonian National Museum for African American History and Culture in Washington DC. He’s also the grandson of Buck Colbert Franklin, a lawyer and leading community figure who survived the massacre.

There is language in the programme which reflects the historical records and accounts recorded at the time of the events in Tulsa, which some listeners may find offensive.


(Image: The aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre at east corner of Greenwood Avenue and East Archer Street. Credit: Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmktjvm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lc99nj2hy)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live commentary from the Premier League, as Manchester City welcome Leicester City to the Etihad Stadium.

We’ll be hearing from 2020 US Open winner Dominic Thiem ahead of the French Open as the third and final Grand Slam of the year gets underway. Plus we’ll have the latest news from the WSL, European Football, NBA and WNBA .

Credit Leicester City manager Brendan Rodgers and Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola on the touchline. (Photo: AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmktx30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjqdnj4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5j8cd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Global Questions (w3ct165b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkv0v4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6td)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkv4l8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy52jb6v)
Violence Erupts In Nagorno-Karabakh

Armenia has warned there could be all-out war with Azerbaijan after the heaviest fighting for years in the disputed region of Nagorno- Karabakh. We get the latest from our correspondent in the region. Plus analysis from an expert.
Also on the programme - the French Interior Minister's claim that his country is fighting a war on terrorism. We hear from a Jewish advocacy group about concerns over anti-semitism. And we get the latest from Paris about the miserable conditions and unhappy players, at the covid-affected French Open tennis tournament.

(Photo : Map of Nagorno-Karabakh; Credit : BBC)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkv8bd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5jmls)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkvd2j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjqf4hn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5jrbx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twvzgty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57sgtkvzxj)
Donald Trump fires back at bombshell tax claims

The US President says claims he paid just $750 in federal income tax in 2016 are "fake news". Five weeks ahead of the US election, the BBC's Peter Bowes explains the significance of the story.

Sri Lanka says it is sending 21 containers of waste back to the UK after they were found to contain hazardous material. Will Nichols at Verisk Maplecroft says it's part of a wider problem.

Also, Swiss citizens have rejected a proposal to end an accord with the European Union allowing the free movement of people. We examine the significance of the vote.

Photo: US President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference on Sunday. (Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgnv3b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twvzll2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0kc06)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgnyvg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164k)
America humbled?

Katty and Carlos open the series with a bold and difficult question: has America been humbled by the Covid-19 pandemic? The US has reached the grim milestone of 200,000 coronavirus deaths and more than 6.8 million people are known to have been infected, more than in any other country. Many Americans were blindsided by how badly the country has been hit. Has this created a dent in the idea of American exceptionalism? And if so, how can the nation recover its self-confidence?

Katty and Carlos are joined by former Republican Senator Jeff Flake and New York Times Pentagon correspondent Helene Cooper.

Produced by Sandie Kanthal, Viv Jones and Maeve McGoran, with reporting from Suzanne Kianpour.


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twvzqb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5f)
Cathy Freeman

In 2000, the aboriginal runner, Cathy Freeman, became the star of the Olympic Games in Sydney. After being given the honour of lighting the Olympic cauldron, she was under huge pressure to win the 400 metres in front of her home crowd. Freeman delivered in style - and went on an emotional victory lap parading both the aboriginal and Australian flags. Presented by Simon Watts

Picture: Cathy Freeman celebrating her 400m victory in 2000, Credit: Getty Images


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twvzv2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0klhg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgp6bq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv67)
Why am I embarrassed to be naked?

Why am I embarrassed to be naked? Chumbuzzo in Zambia wonders. And what would happen if we ditched our clothes and embraced nudity? Presenter Anand Jagatia and Producer Caroline Steel spend the day naked with other naturists to see if they can shift their embarrassment.

Maybe there are good evolutionary reasons to cover up or perhaps we are contributing to inequality and negative body image by hiding our real selves? Marnie Chesterton explores different cultural attitudes to nudity and finds out about the science behind embarrassment. Clothes optional.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twvzytg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7km755)
NYT: Trump paid just $750 in income taxes

A New York Times report alleges Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income tax in 2016, the year he first ran for President.

The US, the UN and Russia all call for an immediate end to fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan amid reports of civilians being killed in the violence in Nagorno Karabakh.

And a city which had faced one of the world's toughest lockdowns, begins to ease restrictions. We head to Melbourne to hear what it's been like.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww02kl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kmbx9)
President Trump responds to report he paid only $750 in income tax

A New York Times investigation finds Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income tax in the year he was elected president - and no tax at all for 10 out of the 15 years before that.

We'll hear from Madrid as parts of the city come out of lockdown.

And fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan breaks out over a long-disputed territory.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww069q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kmgnf)
NYT: we have Trump's tax records

Newspaper says leaked documents show the President only paid $750 in tax the year he was elected.

The challenges facing the health workers of Venezuela who claim they've been forced to work without masks or gloves for weeks.

And Paris is to commemorate a black woman who was involved in a 19th century rebellion against slavery in the French Caribbean.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww0b1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2d)
Yusef Salaam: How to reform the US criminal justice system

Yusef Salaam was just 16 when he and four other black and Latino teenagers were wrongly convicted of the rape and assault of a woman jogging in New York’s Central Park. Even before their trial the then property tycoon Donald Trump took out newspaper ads calling for the death penalty. The five served out their sentences before being exonerated when another man admitted to the crime. Yusef Salaam says their case is the story of the criminal system of injustice in America. But as anti-racism protests continue, and fears of worse unrest to come, is the chance of real change even more remote than in the America of his youth?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgppb7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jw)
China to the rescue?

President Xi Jinping made a big surprise announcement on Tuesday - that China is committing to cut its net carbon emissions to zero by 2060.

But why has President Xi decided to take such a bold unilateral step? Will China's actions match his words? And how will other countries respond, not least the US?

To answer these questions, Justin Rowlatt speaks to two people who have been at the top table of international climate diplomacy. Todd Stern was US President Barack Obama's representative in the Paris Agreement negotiations. And Rachel Kyte was an advisor on sustainable development to the United Nations Secretary General.

Plus, Li Yan of Greenpeace in China explains what to look out for next year in the country's new five-year plan as proof that Beijing is serious about tackling carbon emissions.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: China's President Xi Jinping; Credit: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkg)
The death of Gamal Abdel Nasser

The charismatic Egyptian president dominated Arab politics for almost two decades up until his death on September 28th 1970. His funeral was attended by millions of grief-stricken Egyptians. In 2010 Mike Gallagher spoke to an ordinary Egyptian who remembered his death, and its aftermath.
This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Crowds in Cairo mourning Nasser on October 1st 1970. Credit: Fred Ihrt/LightRocket via Getty Images.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww0fsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgpt2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww0kk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgpxth)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3csyvnq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww0p97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0lfqc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgq1km)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3t)
Feminism, sex and relationships

How does feminism influence our love lives? Is it possible to hold true to feminist principles of equality when dating apps reduce us to swipe-able products on a page? Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who write about sex and dating.

Priya Malik is a columnist and spoken word poet, who writes about feminism, love, sex and dating. She moved to Australia with her husband but returned home to Mumbai after her divorce and is now in a relationship which has equality at its heart.

Annie Lord is a journalist who writes about sex and relationships for British Vogue. A committed feminist she admits it can be hard to hold on to those principles of equality in the world of dating.

Image
L: Priya Malik (credit - Priya Malik)
R: Annie Lord (credit - Annie Lord)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww0t1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3m)
My ancestors were both slaves and slave owners

Malik Al Nasir was casually watching a TV documentary one day when a face jumped out at him – it was a photograph of the black Victorian football star Andrew Watson. Stunned at the close resemblance between them, he became determined to find out how they were connected. Little did he know that that journey would lead him from Liverpool to Guyana to discover how his family history was inextricably connected with the international slave trade.

Claire Belhassine’s Tunisian grandfather died when she was young. She remembers him from childhood summer holidays in Tunisia, sitting quietly in his chair, never the centre of attention. But years later, sitting in a taxi in Paris, Claire came upon her grandfather's glamorous past. This interview was first broadcast in July 2019.
 
Picture: Malik Al Nasir at the airport in Guyana in 2008
Credit: Abdul Malik Al Nasir


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww0xsh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0lp6m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgq91w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww11jm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fcq756)
Armenia and Azerbaijan fight over disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region

Armenia has accused Turkey of providing direct military support to Azerbaijan as fighting continues for a second day in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh. We hear from officials from both sides.

Also, Donald Trump paid just $750 (£580) in federal income tax both in 2016, the year he ran for the US presidency, and in his first year in the White House, the New York Times says. We speak a veteran Republican party pollster will any of his supporters care?

And the story of one black lawyer's experience of systemic racism in the British legal system.

(Photo: Armenia published photos of what it said were destroyed Azerbaijani tanks. Credit: EPA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww158r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgqjk4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv16p3q0pg)
Caesars Entertainment bids for bookmaker William Hill

British bookmaker William Hill received a takeover bid from US firm Caesars Entertainment. James Kilsby is USA vice president of Vixio GamblingCompliance, and explains how the changing regulatory picture in the US makes William Hill attractive to a US suitor. And we get wider context from Professor David Forrest of Liverpool University, who specialises in analysis of the sports and gambling industries. Also in the programme, some of the world's leading cement producers have made a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint. We find out how realistic that is from Jamie Gentoso, chief executive of US cement for LafargeHolcim, and Dinah McCloud, chief executive of the Global Cement and Concrete Association. Plus, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.

(Picture: A William Hill sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww190w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgqn98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww1ds0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2szn1rlrtv)
Coronavirus: Back to normal in Wuhan?

Covid-19 was first detected in the Chinese city of Wuhan but officials have now declared the city virus free. Pictures of people in bars and restaurants suggest life has gone back to the way it was before. It's a huge contrast to much of the rest of the world, which is still dealing with high infection rates and associated restrictions. We hear from two people who live in Wuhan about their newly restored freedoms.

Also, a long running conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region has erupted again. Our BBC regional experts discuss the background to this disputed region and what is likely to happen next.

And in India the number of people infected with the coronavirus has risen to more than six million. We hear from a doctor who treats Covid-19 patients in the country.

(Photo: Inside a bar in Wuhan, China, 18 September 2020. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww1jj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww1n88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0mdpd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgr0jn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqs3rcmq9)
2020/09/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww1s0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct164k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgr48s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5v)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The sting in the tail

"What’s the point of wasps?" asks listener Andrew, who is fed up with being pestered. For this series, with lockdown learning in mind, Drs Rutherford and Fry are investigating scientific mysteries for students of all ages. Do wasps do anything to justify their presence as a picnic menace?

Ecologist Seirian Sumner researches social wasp behaviour and champions their existence. Not only do yellow jacket wasps perform important ecological services as generalist pest controllers of aphids, caterpillars and flies in the UK, they have complex societies and may even perform pollination services, making them more like their better-loved bee cousins than many might think.

However, much remains unknown about wasps’ contribution to our ecosystem. Seirian works with entomologist Adam Hart, and together they run The Big Wasp Survey each summer, a citizen science project dedicated to find out more about UK wasp species and their populations. Prof. Hart sets up an experimental picnic with Dr Rutherford to try and attract some native wasps, and discusses why they are so maligned.

But in some parts of the world UK wasp species have become a major problem. Just after World War II, having unwittingly chosen some aircraft parts destined for New Zealand as their overwintering home, some wasp queens woke up in the city of Hamilton. With no natural predators or competitors, they quickly established a growing population. Fast forward to today, and by late summer the biomass of wasps becomes greater than all the birds, rodents and stoats in the southern island’s honeydew beech forests. Multiyear nests have been discovered that are over three metres tall and contain millions of wasps. Researcher Bob Brown is digging into wasp nests back in the UK to discover which species keep wasps in check here, and whether they might work as biological control.

This causes the doctors to ponder the problems of humans moving species around the planet. Accidental or even well-meaning introductions all too often become invasive. As climate change and urbanisation accelerate, wasps may become more helpful in some ways and more harmful in others.

Presenters: Hannah Fry, Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww1wrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fcr2d3)
Turkey calls for Armenian withdrawal from disputed Nagorno-Karabakh

The Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has called for a complete Armenian withdrawal from Nagorno-Karabakh- the Caucasus region of south-eastern Europe. He was speaking as fierce clashes continued for a second day between Turkey's ally, Azerbaijan, and local Armenian forces. Dozens of people have been killed during the latest fighting involving tanks, rockets and artillery. Also in the programme: Former Republican Presidential candidate Rick Santorum on Donald Trump's tax affairs; and we go inside the Covid ward of a Venezuelan hospital.


Photo: A still image from a video released by Azerbaijan’s Defence Ministry showing members of Azeri armed forces firing artillery during clashes between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. Credit: Defence Ministry of Azerbaijan via Reuters.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww20hn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgrcs1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww247s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0mwnx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgrhj5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58m8tgrvp3)
Caesars Entertainment bids for bookmaker William Hill

British bookmaker William Hill received a takeover bid from US firm Caesars Entertainment. James Kilsby is USA vice president of Vixio GamblingCompliance, and explains how the changing regulatory picture in the US makes William Hill attractive to a US suitor. And we get wider context from Professor David Forrest of Liverpool University, who specialises in analysis of the sports and gambling industries. Also in the programme, some of the world's leading cement producers have made a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint. We find out how realistic that is from Jamie Gentoso, chief executive of US cement for LafargeHolcim, and Dinah McCloud, chief executive of the Global Cement and Concrete Association. Plus, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.

(Picture: A William Hill sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww2cr1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18yrw6vlty)
Covid deaths approach one million

As the number of deaths from coronavirus approaches one million, we hear how countries around the world have been handling the pandemic. Also in the programme, why are some of the world's leading cement producers making a public pledge to shrink their carbon footprint? Plus, Apple and Epic Games are back in court for another face-off over the online video game, Fortnite. And, we meet the founders of London-based start-up NewFade, which is on a mission to make wigs cool, with a focus on serving young black men.

Presenter Sasha Twining is joined by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angels, and Bloomberg editor Samson Ellis in Taiwan.

Picture: A stock photo of a man wearing personal protective equipment. (Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww2hh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0n7x9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgrvrk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct16l5)
Songs of the Humpback Whale

Songs of the Humpback Whale was released in 1970 and went multi-platinum, becoming the best selling environmental album of all time. But it also became emblematic of the West’s shifting attitudes towards environmentalism, inspiring a global movement to save the whales which continues to this day.

Marking the 50th anniversary of bioacoustician Roger Payne’s unlikely smash hit, this programme considers the legacy of sounds that caught the imagination of the world.

With contributions from the world of music, science and ecology, including the folk singer Judy Collins, Greenpeace Oceans Campaigner Willie Mackenzie, Greenlandic musician Peter Tussi Motzfeldt, marine biologist and electronic musician Sara Niksic, music writer Simon Reynolds and Roger Payne himself.
Including archive courtesy of Radio Canada international
With music by Duotone.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww2m79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww2qzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0nhdk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgs37t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww2vqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kq428)
Covid-19: global death toll passes a million

We'll hear from relatives of some of the one million victims who've now died from coronavirus.

It's a conflict which threatens to drag in Russia and Turkey: we'll head to Nagorno-Karabakh, a small mountainous region at the centre of a dispute between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

And some universities in the US and UK are considering allowing Chinese students to submit their work anonymously - in order to protect them from prosecution under Hong Kong's controversial national security law.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww2zgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kq7td)
More than one million dead from coronavirus

Global deaths from Covid-19 have passed the grim milestone of one million.

Amnesty International stops work in India following a series of raids and alleged harassment of its staff. We'll hear why the government is so annoyed with the human rights group,

And a leading Pakistani novelist tells us it's time for her government to put climate change at the front and centre of its agenda.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww336t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kqckj)
WHO: 1 million Covid deaths an underestimate

Official statistics show more than a million people worldwide have now died as a result of Covid-19.

Why has a largely frozen conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan taken off again? We hear from the Azerbaijani ambassador to the UK.

And Liverpool has "set the bar" for the Premier League... that's according to Arsenal's manager Mikel Arteta, whose team lost to Liverpool last night.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww36yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1p)
Getting rid of AI bias

It’s not just search engines that are powered by artificial intelligence. From the courts to the jobs market, AI is influencing decisions that have a big impact on people’s lives.

But researchers now believe that not all people are treated equally by some algorithms. They’ve found potential bias - influenced by race, class and gender - can have an impact on the decisions that computers make.

Some programmers, computer scientists and entrepreneurs hope to fight this bias, using the technology that created it in the first place.

Produced and presented by Craig Langran

Image: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgsl7b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89x)
Facebook's face-off in Australia

Should Facebook and Google pay for news that appears on their platforms? The Australian government thinks so. It’s drafted a law that would force them to pay - and Facebook is now threatening to ban all news from its Australian site. It’s a high stakes stand-off with potential global repercussions.

Veteran local newspaper publisher Bruce Ellen tells Manuela Saragosa how his business has suffered the past decade as articles are shared online for free. Journalist Zoe Samios of the Sydney Morning Herald says the pushback from Facebook has been especially forceful, while Belinda Barnet of Swinburne University in Melbourne says she thinks they are unlikely to back down.

But consultant Hal Crawford has little sympathy for the news companies, which he says get a lot more value from social media platforms than vice versa. Plus, Peter Lewis from the Centre for Responsible Technology worries that if Facebook follows through with its threat to remove news altogether from its platform in Australia, what will fill the void?

(Image: Facebook logo seen displayed on a smartphone with 100 dollar bills in the background. Credit: Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpz)
The Mafia trial of Italy’s former Prime Minister Giulio Andreotti

Prosecutor Gian Carlo Caselli explains how leading Italian politician Giulio Andreotti was put on trial in Sicily in September 1995, accused of collusion with the Mafia. Andreotti had been prime minister seven times and journalists dubbed it the trial of the century. Bob Howard has been hearing from Gian Carlo Caselli about compelling evidence that Andreotti had met the Mafia kingpin Stefano Bontade and even knew in advance of the planned assassination of the president of the Sicilian regional government, Piersanti Matarella.

Photo: Giulio Andreotti in 1983. Credit: Mondadori Portfolio/Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww3bq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct16l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgspzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww3gg6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww3l6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0pbmg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgsygq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbs)
Juan Gabriel Vásquez: Literature in the centre of my life

The Colombian novelist and journalist Juan Gabriel Vásquez is widely regarded as one of the most important Latin American writers today – known for his novels published in 28 languages, including the award-winning The Sound Of Things Falling, The Shape of the Ruins, and five other works of fiction, plus stories, literary essays, and political commentary.

Born outside the capital city of Bogotá and having lived there as a student, Vásquez says it's a place that helped shaped his creative life and consciousness as a writer. After 16 years in Paris and Spain, he returned to Colombia to live and write. Now, as he embarks on his latest novel due to be published in December, Natalia Guerrero talks to Vasquez in Bogotá to find out how he works on his books.

As he writes he describes his creative process from thought to page and start to finish. We hear how Bogotá has influenced his writing as "a life calling" with "literature in the centre of my life"; and how he keeps to a daily writing routine – including wearing noise-cancelling headphones so that he can have the silence he needs to create his work.

And there are the very intimate moments of writing the final words and sharing his new book with its very first reader - his wife.

Reporter: Natalia Guerrero
Producers: Natalia Guerrero, Emma Wallace and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service


Photograph of Juan Gabriel Vásquez by Diana Matar


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww3pyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdk5)
Surviving a chemical attack by a doomsday cult

When Atsushi Sakahara boarded a crowded train on the Tokyo subway in 1995, he found himself in the middle of a targeted chemical attack. He tells Emily Webb how years later he went looking for answers from a notorious doomsday cult, which led to an unlikely friendship. Atsushi has directed a documentary about his journey called Me and The Cult Leader.

Jóhanna Bergmann Þorvaldsdóttir has made it her life's mission to make sure Icelandic goats aren't wiped out. Outlook's Saskia Edwards went to meet her. This interview was first broadcast in October 2017.

In Febuary 2020, George Hood broke a Guinness World Record for holding a plank pose for over eight hours. It was his way to pay tribute to the fellow soldiers he served alongside in Afghanistan.

Picture: Atsushi Sakahara and Hiroshi Araki
Credit: Nori Matsui 2020 Good People Inc.


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww3tpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0pl3q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgt5yz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww3yfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fct429)
Armenia PM: We are under "existential threat”

Intense battles between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh show no sign of abating three days after a fresh outbreak of hostilities. We speak to the Prime Minister of Armenia, Nikol Pashinyan.

Also in the programme: UN says most countries are failing women and girls with response to coronavirus; and why has Japan declared war on the fax machine and where else is it alive and kicking!

(Photo: The self-proclaimed authorities in Nagorno-Karabakh say their military has destroyed hundreds of enemy troops. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww425v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct16l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgtfg7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwp34b5jg4)
Kenya eases coronavirus restrictions

Six months after their introduction, Kenya is easing strict coronavirus restrictions. The BBC's Ferdinand Omondi in Nairobi tells us about the economic impact of the coronavirus curbs. And Magdalene Wambui, owner of bar Ibiza Club, which is reopening, discusses how life has been for her and her employees over the past few months. Also in the programme, Epic Games, developer of Fortnite, is facing off in court against Apple over the fees the iPhone maker charges to app developers to appear in its app store. Nicole Carpenter from the games website Polygon has been watching the virtual hearing, and we get wider context on the fees charged by various app stores from Rupantar Guha, technology analyst at Global Data in Hyderabad. The BBC's Justin Rowlatt considers how seriously we should take Chinese president Xi Jinping's pledge to cut China's net carbon emissions to zero by 2060. Plus, with so many people around the world working from home during the pandemic, we hear about the growth in companies using software to monitor their employees' online activities, to ensure they are actually doing useful work.

(Picture: A traffic jam in Nairobi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww45xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgtk6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww49p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2szn1rpnqy)
US election conversations: American families

We’re taking time to talk about the US presidential election, as Donald Trump and Joe Biden prepare to face-off in the first of three prime time presidential debates. Ahead of the debate we hear from two families in Idaho and South Carolina, who discuss their lives under President Trump and what they want from the next US president.

Also, the number of people who have died with Covid-19 worldwide has passed one million. We take an in-depth look at the figures and talk through some of the latest coronavirus stories with our health expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch.

And a 19-year-old Dalit woman has died after she was allegedly gang raped by four upper-caste men in India. Our reporter explains the story and the outrage it has caused in the country.

(Photo: Workers put the finishing touches on the debate stage that will host the first of three presidential debates between US President Donald J. Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden at Case Western Reserve University"s Samson Pavilion in Cleveland, Ohio, USA, 28 September 2020. Credit: EPA/Jim Lo Scalzo)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww4ff7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww4k5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0q9lh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgtxfr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqs3rgjmd)
2020/09/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww4nxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct16l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgv15w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98j)
Mapping Covid-19 to your phone

Google maps has a new feature - COVID19 maps. You can now filter onto your chosen area the current Covid-19 case rates. Launched in more than 200 countries the mapping feature could help people decide if they feel it is safe to travel to new areas – but as is often the case with new tech when it is launched it is not as informative as you may have hoped…yet. Charlotte Jee, MIT Technology review reporter, gives us a rundown of what’s good and what’s not so good about the new feature.

The ethics of digital communication
Can you remember the early days of the internet – how it was going to improve freedom of expression because of this amazing fast connectivity that we had never had before? Well obviously things haven’t quite panned out that way, says Prof (Baroness) Onora O’Neill form Cambridge Uni. In fact it’s done the opp as well as damaged our right to privacy. She speaks to Gareth about what can be done to reverse some of this damage.

Hack a Sat
Florian Blor reports from the first ever satellite hacking competition at DEF CON - the world's largest, longest continuously run underground hacking conference. The idea was to hack into a satellite, change it’s orientation in orbit and point it at the moon and take a photo. It wasn’t a real satellite in space but an earthbound stand in and part of hackasat – a cybersecurity completion aimed at ultimately protecting satellites from a cyberattack.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

(Image: Getty images)

Studio Manager: Sarah Hockley
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww4snm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fctz96)
Turkey denies shooting down Armenian fighter jet

Armenia says one of its fighter jets was shot down by a Turkish jet in what would be a major escalation of the conflict over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region. Turkey, which is backing Azerbaijan in the conflict, has denied the claim. The Armenian prime minister, Nikol Pashinyan, tells us that his country's existence is under threat as fighting continues.

Also in the programme: The human rights group, Amnesty International, says it has been forced to stop work in India following a government campaign of harassment; and what lessons does history hold for Donald Trump and Joe Biden ahead of the first presidential debate?

(Image: A still image taken from a handout video footage by the Armenian Defense Ministry shows destruction of allegedly Azerbaijani combat positions. Credit: Epa/Armenian Defence Ministry)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww4xdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgv8p4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww514w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0qsl0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgvdf8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58m8tgvrl6)
Kenya eases coronavirus restrictions

Six months after their introduction, Kenya is easing strict coronavirus restrictions. The BBC's Ferdinand Omondi in Nairobi tells us about the economic impact of the coronavirus curbs. And Magdalene Wambui, owner of bar Ibiza Club, which is reopening, discusses how life has been for her and her employees over the past few months. Also in the programme, Epic Games, developer of Fortnite, is facing off in court against Apple over the fees the iPhone maker charges to app developers to appear in its app store. Nicole Carpenter from the games website Polygon has been watching the virtual hearing, and we get wider context on the fees charged by various app stores from Rupantar Guha, technology analyst at Global Data in Hyderabad. The BBC's Justin Rowlatt considers how seriously we should take Chinese president Xi Jinping's pledge to cut China's net carbon emissions to zero by 2060. Plus, with so many people around the world working from home during the pandemic, we hear about the growth in companies using software to monitor their employees' online activities, to ensure they are actually doing useful work.

(Picture: A traffic jam in Nairobi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww58n4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18yrw6yhr1)
Countdown to the first US presidential debate

Donald Trump and Joe Biden will shortly face each other in the first presidential debate. But will it make a difference in the race for the White House? We hear from Statehouse Bureau chief Karen Keslar in Ohio, and Peter Spiegel, US Managing Editor of the Financial Times. We get reaction after Disney announced it will lay off around 28,000 employees in its theme parks division. The BBC's chief environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt has been examining China's recent commitment to be carbon neutral by 2060. Fashion label Fred Perry has withdrawn a black and yellow polo shirt from sale after it became associated with a far right group - the Proud Boys - in the US. Cynthia Miller-Idriss, scholar of extremism and youth radicalisation, explains that this is not a new phenomenon. And with millions working from home because of the pandemic, companies are using software to monitor their employees. The BBC's Lora Jones explains the kind of snooping they've been doing.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Yumiko Murakami from the OECD, in Tokyo and Dante Disparte of the Risk Cooperative, in Washington DC.

(Photo: Joe Biden and Donald Trump. Credit: BBC.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww5dd8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0r4td)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgvrnn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3csy1qm)
The Sun, Our Star

The Sun, Our Star: Health and beauty

The Sun’s light defines what we mean by day and night, how we tell time and how we apportion our time, both consciously and unconsciously. The turning of the Earth that wheels us in and out of the Sun every 24 hours seeps into every aspect of our biology. In the final programme, Dava Sobel recalls the 25 days she spent as a human subject in a study of circadian rhythm. The lab was housed at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, NY, but it could have been anywhere, sealed and self-contained as it was. We’ll hear what happens when you are light deprived.

To know the Sun is an age-old dream of humankind. For centuries, astronomers contented themselves with analysing small sips of sunlight collected through specialised instruments. They chased after eclipses that exposed otherwise hidden layers of the Sun’s substance, and they launched Earth and Sun-orbiting observatories to monitor our star from space. Today, several satellites ‘watch’ our star from outer space. In August 2018, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, set off on a mission to go so far as to ‘touch the sun’ for the first time.

Our view of the sun from here is relatively murky, but it’s a trade-off we Earthlings have to accept: the protective bubble of the Earth’s magnetic sphere and atmosphere provides air to breathe and a shield against harmful radiation, but it distorts our view of the heavens. Nevertheless, astronomers have managed to piece together an understanding of the stars, and especially the Sun itself: how it’s constructed, how it behaves, how it came to be, forming from a vast cloud of cold hydrogen gas and the dust of older stars in a sparsely populated region of the Milky Way.

In five programmes, author Dava Sobel orbits the sun, getting as close as she dares, to understand the immense relationship we have with our nearest star.

Music composed by Chris O'Shaughnessy.
Producer: Kate Bland
A Cast Iron Radio production for the BBC World Service.

Audio for this programme was updated on 29 September 2020.

Image: Tacita Dean, Eclipse (still from Antigone, 2017)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww5j4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww5mwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0rd9n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgw04x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww5rmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kt0zc)
Donald Trump and Joe Biden clash at debate in Ohio

President Donald Trump and his challenger Joe Biden have fiercely clashed in one of the most chaotic and rancorous White House debates in years. In a duel disrupted by angry shouting and name calling, they fought over the pandemic, violence at protests, the economy and even their families.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww5wcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kt4qh)
'Chaotic' first debate between Biden and Trump

President Donald Trump and his challenger Joe Biden have fiercely clashed in one of the most chaotic and rancorous White House debates in years. In a duel disrupted by angry shouting and name calling, they fought over the pandemic, violence at protests, the economy and even their families.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww603x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kt8gm)
Trump and Biden face off in Ohio

President Donald Trump and his challenger Joe Biden have fiercely clashed in one of the most chaotic and rancorous White House debates in years.

In a duel disrupted by angry shouting and name calling, they fought over the pandemic, violence at protests, the economy and even their families.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww63w1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6x)
Paolo Gentiloni: Can Europe's economy recover?

The economic fallout of Covid-19 has been tough, and with new waves of the virus appearing, restrictions on economic activity are being reimposed in many countries. Zeinab Badawi speaks to Paolo Gentiloni, the European Commissioner for the Economy. How confident is he that the world's second-largest economy can make a recovery?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgwh4f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8n6)
The company that invented the future

Simulmatics Corporation pioneered data analytics in the 1960s - raising the same qualms then as fake news and social media manipulation do today.

Manuela Saragosa speaks to historian Jill Lepore, whose book "If Then: How Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future" charts the company's rise, and its role in helping John F Kennedy get elected US President in 1960.

At the heart of their work was using mainframe computers - a novelty at the time - to crunch polling, census and electoral data on voters in order to figure out the best targeted messages for their candidate to voice. It foreshadows the far more sophisticated modern use of data to target voters on social media. So what lessons from history are there for us today?

(Picture: Two men work at a console in a Univac computer room in 1960; Credit: H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszms7)
The founding of Google

The world's most popular search engine was launched in September 1998 by two PHD students from Stanford University in California. Larry Page and Sergey Brin had an idea that would revolutionise the internet and create one of the world's most valuable companies. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Tamara Munzner a computer scientist who was at Stanford with the two founders of Google.

Photo Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, 2003. Credit Getty.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww67m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3csy1qm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgwlwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww6cc9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww6h3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0s7jk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgwvct)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x65)
The Boxer - Simon & Garfunkel

Seamus McDonagh is a former boxer. He describes the tumultuous time he had during and after his famous fight with Evander Holyfield in 1990. He also explains why he identifies closely with the lyrics of The Boxer.

Julie Nimoy is the daughter of Leonard Nimoy and co-producer of the film Remembering Leonard Nimoy, which tells the life story of this much loved actor, most famous for playing Mr Spock in Star Trek. The Boxer was his favourite song and Julie describes exactly what it meant to him both throughout his life, and in its closing moments.

Gary Edward Jones is a singer-songwriter who for years rejected comparisons made of him to Paul Simon. Eventually, he embraced the likeness and his life changed after developing a show called Something About Simon - The Paul Simon Story.

Dave Mason is an amateur guitarist who has found deep meaning in The Boxer; meaning that has changed and grown as he has.


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww6lvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdry)
A star in her teens, a star in her seventies

Bettye Lavette was a 16-year-old growing up in Detroit when she had her first hit, My Man, in 1962. In 2009 she performed at President Obama's inauguration celebration and called it "the greatest day of my life." But the path from that first hit to the recognition she now enjoys around the world has not been smooth. She talks to Emily Webb about how she spent the intervening years "working, not waiting," and kept her faith that the phone would always ring.

Picture: Betty Lavette performs during the Robert Johnson At 100 Centennial celebration at The Apollo Theater on March 6, 2012 in New York City
Credit: Getty Images / FilmMagic / D Dipasupil


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszms7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww6qlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0sh0t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgx2w2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww6vbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fcx0zd)
US presidential debate: Trump and Biden trade insults in chaotic wrangle

Also in the programme: A Syrian militant says to the BBC that he is being paid U$2,000 to fight for Azerbaijan; and the European Union launches a report criticising Hungary and Poland for changes to those countries' judiciaries and infringing media freedoms

(Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden participate in their first 2020 presidential campaign debate. Credit: Reuters).


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww6z2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3csy1qm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgxbcb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxhjvxyqsj)
How dieselgate changed Volkswagen

As the first dieselgate trials get underway we examine the scandal's impact on Volkswagen. The former chief executive of its subsidiary Audi faces trial in Germany, and denies any wrongdoing. Jack Ewing of the New York Times in Frankfurt wrote Faster, Higher, Farther: How One of the World's Largest Automakers Committed a Massive Fraud, and reminds us how the story emerged. Ferdinand Dudenhoffer of the Centre for Automotive Research in Duisberg tells us boardroom culture at Volkswagen has now seen a major shift. VW is now focusing on electric vehicle technology, and Peter Carlson, chief executive of Swedish battery manufacturer Northvolt explains how the two firms are collaborating. And EU environment commissioner Virginijus Sinkevicius, discusses how the threat of punishment over emissions standards is impacting carmakers' behaviour. Also in the programme, US presidential candidates Donald Trump and Joe Biden have held their first head-to-head debate ahead of November's election. We ask Alex Flint, executive director of the Alliance for Market Solutions in Washington, how much we learned about the two candidates' future stance on the economy and the environment. Plus, on International Podcast Day, we look at the future of the rapidly developing audio medium with New York-based Zibby Owens, who presents her own podcast interviewing authors about their books.

(Picture: A Volkswagen logo on a wheel. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww72v2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgxg3g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww76l6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2szn1rskn1)
US Election: Watching the debate

As Americans watched the first TV debate between President Trump and Democrat challenger Joe Biden, we had families send us audio messages with their instant reaction as they were viewing the live exchanges. What did they learn from what they saw? We also talk to long-time political journalists about what sort of character Americans look for when they're choosing a president - and whether the Trump era has shifted those attitudes.

We get your questions answered on the big issues of the day on the coronavirus pandemic with Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Basel. As more commentary on Sweden's coronavirus response is written and discussed, we talk about how well the Swedes have really done and whether their strategy can be applied elsewhere in the world. Send us a voice message on WhatsApp with your question to +447730751925.

We're also continuing to track the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh. If you're new to the story and know nothing about the area, we'll explain the basics, including how larger neighbours like Russia and Turkey fit in to the picture.

Picture: Women for Trump cheer for the president at a debate watch party in the City of Industry, California (REUTERS/Mike Blake)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww7bbb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszms7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww7g2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0t6hl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgxtbv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqs3rkfjh)
2020/09/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww7ktl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3csy1qm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgxy2z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccf)
How long should Covid quarantine last?

This week Belgium is shortening the quarantine period for people who’ve been in contact with someone who’s tested positive for Covid-19 to a week – to see if it helps everyone stick to the rules. Fourteen days is recommended by the World Health Organization but Professor Steven van Gucht who is head virologist at the National Institute of Public Health in Belgium says the risk of missing a few positive cases is relatively low. Evidence indicates that if a test is done after a week, 88% of positive cases of Covid are detected – compared with 96% if you test after two weeks.

One million people have now died of Covid-19 and cases continue to rise in Europe. In better news the WHO has announced the rollout of 120 million rapid diagnostic tests in low-income countries where it’s hard to get a test.

Boston University’s professor of Global Epidemiology Matt Fox explains about promising research into the Mediterranean diet and about surgery for a type of snoring that causes sleep deprivation.

We also hear from a former Afghan refugee - now working as a doctor in the UK – who’s passing on advice about treating coronavirus via text to doctors in his home country.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: A teenage girl in a mask showing a 'stay home' message written on her hand. Photo credit: Ti-ja/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww7pkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fcxw69)
Trump-Biden: White supremacy row flares after chaotic debate

The organisation that oversees US presidential debates says it will take steps to ensure no repetition of Tuesday's angry and disorderly encounter between Donald Trump and his challenger, Joe Biden.

Also in the programme: Russia has offered to mediate in the conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia; the UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, has called on countries to start using money from their own national response to the pandemic to help fund a global vaccine plan.

Picture: U.S. President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden participate in their first 2020 presidential campaign debate in Cleveland 30/09/2020. Credit: Reuters.


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww7t9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgy5l7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww7y1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0tph3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgy9bc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58m8tgynh9)
How dieselgate changed Volkswagen

As the first dieselgate trials get underway we examine the scandal's impact on Volkswagen. The former chief executive of its subsidiary Audi faces trial in Germany, and denies any wrongdoing. Jack Ewing of the New York Times in Frankfurt wrote Faster, Higher, Farther: How One of the World's Largest Automakers Committed a Massive Fraud, and reminds us how the story emerged. Ferdinand Dudenhoffer of the Centre for Automotive Research in Duisberg tells us boardroom culture at Volkswagen has now seen a major shift. VW is now focusing on electric vehicle technology, and Peter Carlson, chief executive of Swedish battery manufacturer Northvolt explains how the two firms are collaborating. And EU environment commissioner Virginijus Sinkevicius, discusses how the threat of punishment over emissions standards is impacting carmakers' behaviour. Also in the programme, Peter Speigel, US Managing Editor of the Financial Times, gives us his opinion on the 90 minute shouting match that was the first US presidential debate. And Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors analyses the markets' reaction. Plus, the Bank of England's Chief Economist, Andy Haldane has blamed the media for emphasising the bad news about the pandemic and has called for more optimism. We ask Tali Sharot, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and author of The Optimism Bias, whether being optimistic can make a difference.

(Picture: A Volkswagen logo on a wheel. Picture credit: Reuters.)

(Picture: A Volkswagen logo on a wheel. Picture credit: Reuters.)



THURSDAY 01 OCTOBER 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww85k7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18yrw71dn4)
What to make of the first presidential debate?

Having witnessed last night's 90 minute shouting match, Peter Spiegel, US Managing Editor of the Financial Times discusses the potential impact on the race for the White House and the debates to come. Due to the pandemic lockdown in India, many big budget films, production companies and cinemas have been looking at an uncertain future. But the government has announced that movie theatres will be allowed to run at 50% seating capacity. Sentil Kumar, founder of Qube Cinemas, a digital cinema technology company based in Chennai is feeling hopeful after a tough 6 months. As the first dieselgate trials get underway we have a special report on the scandal's impact on Volkswagen. Plus, the Bank of England's Chief Economist, Andy Haldane has blamed the media for emphasising the bad news about the coronavirus pandemic and has called for more optimism. We ask Tali Sharot, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and author of The Optimism Bias, whether being optimistic can make a difference.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: communications advisor Ralph Silva, in Toronto and Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai.

(Photo: President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden at the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww899c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0v1qh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgynkr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6ln)
Portland, prisons and white supremacy - part one

Portland Oregon has a reputation as one of the United States’ most liberal and tolerant cities. Since the death of George Floyd, it has been at the forefront of protests and violence as anti-racist demonstrators and far right groups have battled with each other and with the police. Yet these tensions are nothing new.

In 2016, the killing of a young black man sparked a national debate about white supremacy. Nineteen-year-old Larnell Bruce died after a white man called Russell Courtier deliberately drove his car at him. A trial for murder and a hate crime followed, and exposed a culture of white supremacy in Oregon, rooted in the state’s history and thriving today despite its easy-going image. Mobeen Azhar follows the trial of Russell Courtier and investigates how the prison system has become a recruitment ground for racist gangs.

Mobeen reveals the disturbing details of what happened to Larnell Bruce when he encountered Russell Courtier outside a convenience store in one of Portland’s most deprived neighbourhoods. Then, as the murder trial gets underway, we learn that Russell Courtier had once joined a white supremacist gang and continued to bear its insignia on his clothes, and tattooed on his body. However, new evidence emerges to suggest that the case might not be as straightforward as it first appeared.

(Photo: Prisoner being escorted by guards. Credit: BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww8f1h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszms7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww8jsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0v96r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgyx20)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww8njr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kwxwg)
Facebook bans some election adverts

Facebook says it is banning, with immediate effect, adverts that seek to delegitimise the outcome of elections, including calling a method of voting inherently fraudulent or corrupt. A presidential historian and author of a book on voter suppression in the US gives his reaction.

The wildfires in California are devastating parts of the Napa Valley. We speak to the owner of one of the famed major wineries Castello di Amorosa, which has been lost to the flames.

And France's highest court has ruled that Felicien Kabuga, who's accused of being the mastermind of the genocide in Rwanda, will have to stand trial at the Arusha tribunal in Tanzania. We get the reaction of group representing survivors.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww8s8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kx1ml)
Latest on the fighting in Nagorno Karabakh

There are more than 100 confirmed deaths among civilians and combatants in Nagorno Karabakh in the fighting between Azeri forces and Armenian separatists. We get the view of Azerbaijan's Ambassador to the United States.

We report from Italy where the number of Covid-19 cases is considerably lower than others in Europe.

And we speak to the head of Nigeria’s task force on Covid-19 as the country announces the development of a rapid result test.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww8x10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kx5cq)
Some election adverts banned on Facebook

Facebook says it is banning, with immediate effect, adverts that seek to delegitimise the outcome of elections, including calling a method of voting inherently fraudulent or corrupt.

The lead author of a study into the effect the return to school and colleges has had on the spread of Covid-19 tells us what they have found.

And we speak to the director of the Auschwitz Memorial in Poland about the response to this letter to the Nigerian president, calling on him to pardon a thirteen year old boy who is serving a ten year jail sentence.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww90s4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl40)
Is Kanye West really running for US President?

In July, billionaire musician Kanye West announces on Twitter that he’s standing as a candidate in November’s US presidential election. After a scramble to meet the registration deadlines, his name is on the ballot in fewer than 20 states. His manifesto is confusing, his motive unclear.

In the past, Kanye West has been a vocal supporter of president Donald Trump. And it seems his campaign is being run largely by those with close ties to the Republican party. The Democrats say his entry in the race as an independent third party candidate is a dirty trick by Republicans. Others claim it’s simply a publicity stunt to promote his new album.

But, in battleground states, where every vote counts, could his celebrity status have a significant impact on the election result?

How seriously should we take Kanye West’s run for president? Kavita Puri finds out from our expert witnesses, who include professors of African-American studies at US universities, a Washington-based politics reporter and a Democratic pollster and strategist.


(Kanye West at the 2020 Vanity Fair Oscar Party, Beverly Hills, California. Photo: Rich Fury/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgzd1j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7xp)
Trump's taxes

What can the New York Times' revelations can tell us about the President's financial affairs?

President Trump paid only $750 in tax federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017, and paid none in 10 of the past 15 years. That's according to an investigation by The New York Times earlier this week. The President says its all fake news. He's for years refused to publish his income tax returns. David Cay Johnstone, an investigative journalist and editor with DCReport.org, says the Times revelations show why he's keeping them hidden.

Adam Davidson who's written extensively on the President's business ties, says the only way to join up the dots since the death of his father, who was continuously propping up the President's finances, and the end of his lucrative appearances on the reality TV show, The Apprentice, is to work out who's bankrolling Trump's businesses.

But Dan Alexander, writer for Forbes magazine and author of White House Inc: How Donald Trump turned the Presidency into a Business, says that the President does have more assets than debts but he could come across conflicts of interest when he tries to re-finance these debts.

(Image: Novelty US dollar bills printed with Donald Trump's image on. Credit: Joel Forrest / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmq)
Operation Breakthrough: Fighting to save three whales

Three Californian gray whales got caught in ice off Alaska in October 1988. Indigenous people, environmentalists, oil companies and even the Soviet Navy joined forces to try to free them. Rich Preston has been hearing from Cindy Lowri who was working for Greenpeace and who joined the battle to save the whales.

Photo: Local indigenous children watch a gray whale nosing up through the ice. (Credit: Taro Yamasaki/The LIFE Images Collection via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww94j8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6ln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgzhsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszccf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww988d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvz)
Elizabeth Fry: 'The angel of prisons'

Life behind bars in English prisons in the early nineteenth century was, to put it mildly, grim. Prisons at the time were often damp, dirty and over-crowded. Common punishments included shipping convicts to colonies like Australia - and many crimes carried the death penalty. And the poor suffered most of all, because they couldn’t buy privileges like extra food rations. Into all this walked a woman known as the "angel of prisons", Elizabeth Fry. She was one of the major driving forces behind a new way of thinking about prisons – one that stressed that improving conditions for prisoners and treating them with humanity would lead to better outcomes and lower re-offending rates. A Christian philanthropist from a large Quaker family, her ideas were taken up across much of Europe, and she became something of a celebrity in Victorian England.

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss her work and legacy are:

Averil Douglas Opperman, author of a biography of Elizabeth Fry called 'While It Is Yet Day'; Criminal barrister, Harry Potter, author of 'Shades of the Prison House – A History of Incarceration in the British Isles'; And Rosalind Crone, historian and author of 'The Guide to the Criminal Prisons of Nineteenth-Century England'.

Produced by Jo Impey for the World Service.

Image: Painting by Jerry Barrett depicting Elizabeth Fry reading to prisoners at Newgate, 1816
Image credit: Henry Guttmann / Hulton Archive / Getty Images


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5g)
South Africa's black rowing hero

At the 2012 Olympic Games in London, Sizwe Ndlovu became the first black African to win a gold medal in rowing. Ndlovu grew up in a township in South Africa but then won a scholarship to a predominantly white high school where he embraced the sport as a way of dealing with his new environment. Ndlovu was part of the South African lightweight coxless four team in London, who clinched their victory with virtually the last stroke of the race. He talks to Darin Graham.

PHOTO: Sizwe Ndlovu celebrating victory (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww9d0j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0w4fn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgzr8x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqg)
Plundering the planet under cover of coronavirus

Some thought Covid-19 would give our planet a breather while many of our movements and industries were restricted, but there are worrying signs that in some parts of the world exactly the opposite is happening.

Emily Thomas finds out how the pandemic has left many people hungry, desperate, and turning to rainforests and wild animals to feed themselves, whilst for others there's growing evidence the virus could be providing cover to make profit at the planet’s expense.

We hear allegations of illegal slashing and burning of an Indonesian rainforest to make way for a palm oil plantation and ask Nestle, the world’s biggest food company, what it’s doing to make sure its products are deforestation free. The head of the UN’s Environment Programme explains why it’s more vital than ever for countries to put environmental protection at the heart of their economic recovery plans, and a conservation worker in Kenya shares fears that decades of animal and environmental preservation work is in danger of being undone.

Contributors:
Michael O'Brien-Onyeka, senior vice president for the Africa field division at Conservation International;
Farwiza Farhan, founder of HAkA;
Benjamin Ware, head of responsible sourcing, Nestlé;
Inger Andersen, executive director of the United Nations Environment Programme

(Picture: Giraffe at Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww9hrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbd)
'This is what a barrister looks like'

Alexandra Wilson is a young black British barrister - and as a result sometimes gets mistaken for the defendant in court. Growing up in Essex she never imagined herself becoming a lawyer, but the murder of a close family friend inspired her career. She studied at Oxford University and was eventually awarded a Queen’s Scholarship, given to students who show exceptional promise at the Bar. She tells Emily Webb why she's fighting to create a more diverse legal profession.

Picture: Alexandra Wilson
Credit: Laurie Lewis


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww9mhs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0wcxx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mgzzs5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszccf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww9r7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fczxwh)
EU takes legal action against UK over Brexit

The European Commission begins legal proceedings against the United Kingdom for planning to breach the terms of its Brexit agreement. We hear from an expert on EU law.

Also in the programme: Leading Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny blames President Vladimir Putin for his poisoning. And how did Italy manage to get from one of the highest rates of Covid-19 infection in Europe to one of the lowest?

Picture: EU Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announces start of legal proceedings. Credit: Thierry Monasse/Getty Images


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww9w01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6ln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh078f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvvndqp0v1)
Cocoa producing nations add price premium

Ivory Coast and Ghana have added a premium to the cocoa price to boost farmers' incomes. The countries produce around two thirds of the world's cocoa, and Michel Arrion, executive director at the International Cocoa Organisation in Abidjan explains how the so-called Living Income Differential is expected to work. Becky Forecast of the Fair Trade Foundation tells us it's too early to tell whether the change will increase the price of chocolate for consumers. We get reaction to the move from big food manufacturers like Mondelez and Nestle. And Ivorian cocoa farmer Kohi Amie discusses the impact the cocoa premium will have on his life. Also in the programme, California has passed a law mandating public companies headquartered in the state to have at least one board member from an underrepresented community by the end of 2021, with a further increase the following year. We examine the significance of the new law with Nicole Childers, executive producer of the business radio show Marketplace Morning Report. Plus, as indoor dining is allowed at New York City's restaurants at 25% capacity, we hear how some establishments think the rules may make it impossible to stay afloat.

(Picture: A cocoa pod. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0tww9zr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh0c0k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwb3h9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2szn1rwgk4)
Coronavirus conversations: Students in quarantine

Universities around the world are struggling with coronavirus outbreaks on campus. Students are being told to stay in their accommodation and self-isolate. We get the views of two students - one in the UK and one in Switzerland - about how they are coping in quarantine.

Our medical expert, to explain the day’s coronavirus developments, is Dr Maria Sundaram from Toronto. We discuss the latest on the search for a vaccine, and a research suggesting that people who have a certain gene inherited from Neanderthals are more at risk from Covid-19.

There is anger in India over the alleged rape and death of two Dalit women in the state of Uttar Pradesh. We learn more about the discrimination faced by the Dalit community, considered to be at the bottom of India's caste system. And we hear personal perspectives by Indian women about safety and what they think should be done to stop the violence against women.

(Photo: Karl, a first-year student at the University of Glasgow Credit: Karl)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwb77f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwbbzk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0x3dp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh0q7y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqs3rnbfl)
2020/10/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwbgqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6ln)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh0v02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0y)
Are children the biggest Covid-19 spreaders?

An analysis of Covid-19 data from South India shows children more than any other group are transmitting the virus both to other children and adults, Epidemiologist Ramanan Laxminarayan tell us the data also shows the situations in which the virus is most likely to spread, public transport is of particular concern.

The WHO has launched an initiative to roll out rapid testing, particularly to countries that don’t have access to lab based tests, Catharina Boehme who leads one of the WHO’s partner organisation in the project tells us the test, which looks similar to home pregnancy tests should give results within fifteen minutes.

Andrea Crisanti led a ground-breaking testing initiative in Italy which eliminated Covid-19 in a small town in a matter of weeks. We look to the lessons learned.

And in California residents have been in a kind of self- enforced lockdown, not because of Covid – 19 but due to wildfires fires. Molly Bentley from the Seti Institute podcast ‘ Big Picture Science’ tells us about how the fires have created an atmosphere of toxic smoke, even in the cities.




(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwblgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fd0s3d)
Russia, US and France call for ceasefire in Nagorno-Karabakh

Armenia and Azerbaijan continue to clash in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Can Russia, the US and France, co-chairs of the long-running peace process, help to calm the conflict? We speak to a French politician, and hear a view from Russia.

Also in the programme: a professional soccer team in America walks off the pitch in protest at an alleged homophobic insult, and the British Poet Laureate, Simon Armitage, reads his new poem about one of the unexpected upsides of the coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: The remains of a rocket shell near a graveyard at the town of Ivanyan (Khojaly) in the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Credit: Reuters.


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwbq6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh12hb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwbtz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0xld6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh167g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58m8th1kdd)
Cocoa producing nations add price premium

Ivory Coast and Ghana have added a premium to the cocoa price to boost farmers' incomes. The countries produce around two thirds of the world's cocoa, and Michel Arrion, executive director at the International Cocoa Organisation in Abidjan explains how the so-called Living Income Differential is expected to work. Becky Forecast of the Fair Trade Foundation tells us it's too early to tell whether the change will increase the price of chocolate for consumers. We get reaction to the move from big food manufacturers like Mondelez and Nestle. And Ivorian cocoa farmer Kohi Amie discusses the impact the cocoa premium will have on his life. Also in the programme, California has passed a law mandating public companies headquartered in the state to have at least one board member from an underrepresented community by the end of 2021, with a further increase the following year. We examine the significance of the new law with Nicole Childers, executive producer of the business radio show Marketplace Morning Report. Plus, Google has launched Google News Showcase. The tech giant will pay news publishers “to create and curate high-quality content” for Google News. We hear from Jeff Elgie, CEO of Village Media, a Canadian online news publisher that has signed up.

(Picture: A cocoa pod. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 02 OCTOBER 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwc2gb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18yrw749k7)
Google launches News Showcase

Google today launched Google News Showcase. The tech giant will pay news publishers “to create and curate high-quality content” for Google News. We hear from Jeff Elgie, CEO of Village Media, a Canadian online news publisher that has signed up. Soft drink giant PepsiCo says it's considering making alcoholic beverages - a day after arch rival Coca-Cola said it would do the same. Jennifer Maloney of the Wall Street Journal explains why the companies are looking at alcohol. California has passed a law mandating public companies headquartered in the state to have at least one board member from an underrepresented community by the end of 2021, with a further increase the following year. We get reaction from the Latino Corporate Directors Association. Ivory Coast and Ghana have added a premium to the cocoa price to boost farmers' incomes. In a special report we hear how the Living Income Differential is expected to work. And a number of universities in the UK have recently paid influencers to promote degrees at their institutions. Influencers who haven't actually been to those universities. We here from Grace Bee - one of the influencers who was paid by one of those universities.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Erin Delmore, a political journalist in New York and Madhavan Narayanan, a journalist and columnist in New Delhi.


(Photo: Google News and Google logos. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwc66g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0xyml)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh1kgv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3csztgm)
Delight for Ferencváros

We hear the unbridled excitement of forward Tokmac Nguen about the prospect of making his debut in the UEFA Champions League. He plays for Hungary's Ferencvaros who have qualified for the group stage for the first time in 25 years. We also meet the first man from the Faroe Islands to play in Germany's top division, and pay tribute to German female referee Bibiana Steinhaus who retired this week.

Picture: Tokmac Nguen of Ferencvaros celebrates with teammates after scoring against Celtic (Mark Runnacles/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwc9yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwcfpq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0y63v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh1sz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwckfv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kztsk)
President Trump is in quarantine

President Trump and his wife Melania are in self-isolation after one of his closest aides, Hope Hicks, tested positive for coronavirus. They are both waiting for their test results. We have the latest.

The number of forest fires in the Amazon basin and the Pantanal has increased sharply in September compared to the same period last year. We speak to an environmentalist who says the situation is critical.

And an MP in Malawi tell us why parliamentarians decided to return thousands of condoms that had been donated to them.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwcp5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7kzyjp)
President Trump has Covid-19

The US President and the First Lady both have coronavirus. They were tested after one of his closest aides, Hope Hicks, tested positive for Covid-19.

We go to India where there have been protests following the death of two women after they were allegedly gang raped in separate attacks. We speak to a lawyer and co-founder of the Criminal Justice and Police Accountability Project.

And we speak to a doctor in northern Nigeria about a Meningitis outbreak which has killed over 260 people so far this year.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwcsy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wfz7l028t)
President Trump and First Lady have Covid-19

The US President and his wife, Melania Trump, have both tested positive for coronavirus. We have the latest.

The formal negotiations between the European Union and the UK on the issue of Brexit conclude today, we bring you an update.

And what makes sprinters run fast? Scientists here in the UK say they have found out part of the answer - we find out what that is.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwcxp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxw)
Leroy Logan: How easy is it to root out discrimination dressed in a police uniform?

The sense of systemic racial injustice in policing that has fuelled the Black Lives Matter movement is shared far beyond the shores of the United States. In Britain it is two decades since a top level inquiry into London's police force found it to be institutionally racist - how much has really changed? Stephen Sackur speaks to Leroy Logan was one of London's top black policemen until his retirement seven years ago. How easy is it to root out discrimination dressed in a police uniform?

(Photo: Leroy Logan, former superintendent, Metropolitan Police)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh28ym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78w)
Final countdown for a Brexit trade deal

Why state aid may be the sticking point for a Brexit trade deal

(Image: Two boxing gloves punching each other, one with the UK flag, one with the EU flag. Credit: Getty Images Stock)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvh)
The house by the lake

A summer house built by a lake outside Berlin in the 1920s reflects much of Germany's 20th century history. Its first owners fled the Nazis. The Berlin Wall was built through its garden. Then after the reunification of Germany it was recognised as a historic monument and made into an education and reconciliation centre. Alex Stanger has been speaking to Thomas Harding whose great grandfather built the house, and who has written a children's book about its changing place in the world.

Photo: The Alexander Haus today. Credit: André Wagner


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwd1fc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp8)
A Pixel for the times

Google pushes affordability and 5G for its flagship Pixel 5 mobile handset. But can it compete in a crowded middle-market? Plus, has quantum computing reached a point at which it is genuinely useful for businesses? And the push-back against China-led plans to replace the internet’s underlying protocols. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Press photo of a woman using the Pixel 5 smartphone, Credit: Google).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh2dpr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwd55h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnh)
Turkey flexes on the world stage

The conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia has taken on a new dimension with the alleged involvement of the Turkish military. Armenia says one of its fighter jets was shot down by a Turkish aircraft over the disputed central Asian region of Nagorno-Karabakh. In the summer, France accused the Turkish navy of confronting one of its frigates in pursuit of a vessel suspected of taking arms to Libya. Meanwhile Turkey's understanding with Russia and Iran over the war in Syria has strained its ties with Washington, as well as several Gulf countries. So do these events suggest that Ankara is becoming more assertive in its foreign policy? Or is this the reaction of a country that finds itself isolated and is being forced to act in order to preserve its interests? Does Turkey still see a future in NATO? And what is the long term vision of president Erdogan; are his critics right to accuse him of trying to return the country to its Ottoman past?


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwd8xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0z1br)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh2n60)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwddnr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhm)
The battle over Nagorno-Karabakh

As fighting flares again over the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh, we ask why it's so hard to resolve this conflict, and why a chunk of Armenian-controlled territory came to be inside Azerbaijan in the first place. BBC Russian editor Famil Ismailov is originally from Azerbaijan, and has followed this story for decades.

Pot plants and plant influencers in Indonesia
Houseplants have become a trend among urban Indonesians keen to ease the boredom of lockdown. There’s an industry of plant “influencers” and experts to feed the fascination, shared by BBC Indonesian’s Astudestra Ajengrastri.

The fund-raising campaigns to free captured IS families
Stories are emerging of donation campaigns by so-called Islamic State and Al Qaeda aimed at freeing the wives and children of IS fighters from detention camps in Syria. Abdirahim Saeed of BBC Monitoring tells us what he’s discovered from jihadist social media groups, which are raising funds to smuggle the women out.

Water tensions on the Nile
Ethiopia’s project to create the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance dam on the Blue Nile has fuelled political tensions with Egypt and Sudan. But it’s not just politicians who are affected. Reem Fatthelbab of BBC Arabic spoke to an Ethiopian living in Cairo, and an Egyptian based in Ethiopia, about their concerns.

Brazil meets Ghana
Sonny Nkansa, a Fifth Floor listener with roots in Ghana, explains why the latest in our My Home Town series - from Feira de Santana in Brazil's Bahia state - took him straight home to his small village in Ghana's Volta region.

Picture: Elderly woman in Nagorno Karabakh
Credit: European Photopress Agency


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwdjdw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt0z8v0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh2wp8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwdn50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fd2tsl)
Covid: Donald Trump and Melania test positive

President Trump is quarantined in the White House after testing positive for coronavirus. So how will Donald Trump’s covid-19 infection affect the election?

Also in the programme: Armenia has said Azeri forces have shelled the capital of Nagorno-Karabakh, wounding civilians and damaging buildings. And the criminals turning to music in one of Scotland's toughest jails.

(Photo: Donald Trump and Melania Trump. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwdrx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh345j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt6ryjd9wk)
President Trump tests positive for coronavirus

We gauge financial market reaction to the news US president Donald Trump has coronavirus. And Daniel Lippman, reporter at US news website Politico in Washington tells us how the development might impact the run-up to next month's presidential election. Also in the programme, from 2024 onwards, contenders for best picture at the Oscars will have to meet new rules designed to broaden the backgrounds of the people who worked on it, on both sides of the lens. Clayton Davis is film awards editor of the US entertainment website Variety, and discusses whether loopholes in the new rules may mean very little changes as a result. Maggie Hennenfeld is associate professor of film and media at the University of Minnesota and offers her suggestions on how to boost diversity in the movie industry. Malika James is a black makeup artist working in Los Angeles, and describes her experience of discrimination in Hollywood. And Star Trek First Frontier actress April Billingsley explains why she welcomes the new Oscar diversity rules. Plus, as the Chinese holiday season known as Golden Week continues, we hear how the pandemic has impacted the tradition from Iris Ouyang, who is a reporter with the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong.

(Picture: Donald Trump boards Air Force One on October 1st. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwdwn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh37xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1657)
The US Elections: A Faith Perspective

Religiosity has always been a key factor of who takes charge in the White House. US presidents have been invoking faith and God ever since George Washington expressed his “fervent pleas to this Almighty Being who rules the universe” in his 1789 inaugural address.

This year, more than ever eyes are on who the religious voting banks will decide as their candidate of choice for the upcoming Presidential election. Does Trump remain the choice of evangelicals or has some of his statements and behaviour proved a turn off? And will Biden’s Catholic faith help him or do his liberal values on topics such as abortion put him out of favour.

In the programme journalist Colm Flynn speaks to religious people across the United States to get a sense of the role faith will play in determining who will become the next President of the United States.

Presenter & Producer: Colm Flynn
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Image: US President Donald Trump holds up a Bible outside of St John's Episcopal church across Lafayette Park in Washington, DC on June 1, 2020 / Credit: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwf0dd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2szn1rzcg7)
President Trump and First Lady in quarantine

We bring reaction and developments to the news that President Trump and his wife have tested positive for coronavirus. Journalists who cover the President and Capitol Hill will guide us through the political implications. We also monitor the discussions on social media and in particular any misinformation and conspiracies that are being shared.

Our medical expert to discuss the day’s developments with Covid-19 is Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University. She explains what a positive test might mean for the President and his wife.

We also bring together Republicans and Democrats in Texas, Georgia and Florida to share experiences of the pandemic. They talk about about how their lives have been impacted and how they think the President has handled the coronavirus crisis.

(Photo: President Donald Trump waves to reporters as he departs with first lady Melania Trump for campaign travel to participate in his first presidential debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Cleveland, 29th Sept 2020 Credit: Leah Millis/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwf44j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwf7wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt1009s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh3m51)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqs3rr7bp)
2020/10/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwfcms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh3qx5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv68)
What makes stuff sticky?

What makes things sticky? Listener Mitch from the USA began wondering while he was taking down some very sticky wallpaper. Our world would quite literally fall apart without adhesives. They are almost everywhere – in our buildings, in our cars and in our smartphones. But how do they hold things together?

To find out, presenter Marnie Chesterton visits a luthier, Anette Fajardo, who uses animal glues every day in her job making violins. These glues have been used since the ancient Egyptians –but adhesives are much older than that. Marnie speaks to archaeologist Dr Geeske Langejans from Delft University of Technology about prehistoric glues made from birch bark, dated to 200,000 years ago. She goes to see a chemist, Prof Steven Abbott, who helps her understand why anything actually sticks to anything else. And she speaks to physicist Dr Ivan Vera-Marun at the University of Manchester, about the nanotechnologists using adhesion at tiny scales to make materials of the future.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Anand Jagatia for BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwfhcx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yx9fd3p0h)
US election campaign shaken by Trump's Covid diagnosis

Donald and Melania Trump are in quarantine after testing positive for coronavirus. We ask what impact this may have on President Trump's reelection campaign, and find out about the constitutional implications.

Also in the programme: tapes of grand jury deliberations in the case of Breonna Taylor, the young black American killed during a police operation in Kentucky, are made public; and 'Criminal Records', a new music label for former prisoners.

Picture: U.S. President Donald Trump on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington. Credit: REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwfm41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh3zdf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0twwfqw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bctt10h99)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pv8mh434k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58m8th4g9h)
Trump moving to hospital

President Trump is being moved to hospital after being diagnosed with coronavirus, out of an "abundance of caution" according to the White House. We speak to Jenna Johnson, The Washington Post's National Political Correspondent. Meanwhile, the rate of unemployment in the US has fallen to 7.9%. But the jobless rate in the world's biggest economy is much higher than it was before the pandemic struck. We speak to Loretta Mester chair of the Cleveland Federal Reserve and member of the Federal Open Markets Committee, which sets interest rates in the US. And Chris Low of FTN Financial in New York gives us the market reaction to today's news. Also in the programme, from 2024 onwards, contenders for best picture at the Oscars will have to meet new rules designed to broaden the backgrounds of the people who worked on it, on both sides of the lens. Clayton Davis is film awards editor of the US entertainment website Variety, and discusses whether loopholes in the new rules may mean very little changes as a result. Maggie Hennenfeld is associate professor of film and media at the University of Minnesota and offers her suggestions on how to boost diversity in the movie industry. Malika James is a black makeup artist working in Los Angeles, and describes her experience of discrimination in Hollywood. And Star Trek First Frontier actress April Billingsley explains why she welcomes the new Oscar diversity rules.

(Picture: Donald Trump boards Air Force One on October 1st. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5ptxc5c9s3)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p0gmkntrl)

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BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p0tww85k7)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct0xjp)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jw)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18ydlxg1vh)

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Business Weekly 01:06 SUN (w3ct0sp3)

Comedians Vs. The News 05:32 SAT (w3ct0x3c)

Comedians Vs. The News 22:06 SUN (w3ct0x3c)

Comedians Vs. The News 10:06 MON (w3ct0x3c)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv67)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98j)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0x5v)

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From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9q1)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9q1)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9q1)

Girl Taken 09:32 SAT (w3ct0xw2)

Girl Taken 04:32 SUN (w3ct0xw2)

Girl Taken 22:32 SUN (w3ct0xw2)

Global Questions 11:32 SAT (w3ct165b)

Global Questions 19:32 SUN (w3ct165b)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2d)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc2d)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszccf)

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Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszccf)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszccf)

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Heart and Soul 16:32 FRI (w3ct1657)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbs)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbs)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbs)

More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pxw)

More or Less 22:50 SAT (w3ct0pxw)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxw)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6td)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6td)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jqs3rcmq9)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjqf)

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