Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7wp4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18y1blnx7n)
TikTok ban in the US concerns ‘politics, not privacy’

We look at the history that led up to the US ban of Chinese-owned app TikTok . As New Zealand falls in to recession, the effect of coronavirus has shifted its economy, despite the low number of Covid-related deaths. The impact of wildfires in parts of the US will be on the mind of voters this year as they head to the polls to vote for the next US president, as climate change is partly blamed for many of the blazes. We discuss all this live with guest Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand, in Auckland.

(Image: TikTok app logo in foreground, shadowed US flag in background. Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7wsww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dgkb0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vl558)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjp)
Rhodes on cricket's fielding revolution

Reaction to Australia's thrilling victory over England in the one-day series at Old Trafford.

Former South Africa star Jonty Rhodes on the incredible advances in fielding in the Indian Premier League, which starts in Dubai this weekend.

And as women's international cricket returns, West Indies batter Hayley Matthews relives the day when she toppled Australia to win the T20 World Cup at the age of 18.

Photo: Jonty Rhodes (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7wxn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhk)
Protests against Colombia's police

A video showing the repeated tazering of a Colombian lawyer Javier Ordóñez by police as he begged for mercy, and his subsequent death from internal injuries, triggered riots in which several people died. BBC Mundo's Daniel Pardo is based in Bogota, and explains what this story reveals about Colombians relationship with law enforcement.

My Hometown: Hanoi
A return visit with Nga Pham to her hometown of Hanoi, Vietnam and a walk down the tree lined streets.

Ghana Nigeria sibling rivalry
The rivalry between Nigeria and Ghana is well known, but the two countries also share a close relationship despite not being neighbours. We bring together Nigeria’s Peter Okwoche and Mark Wilberforce from Ghana to explore how the countries see each other.

Shot by an arrow by those he protected
Rieli Franciscato was one of Brazil’s best known advocates for the rights of the indigenous peoples who live cut off from mainstream Brazilian civilisation in the Amazon. But last week he was killed by those same people he was trying to protect, as Brazilian Fernando Duarte explains.

Moscow Big Brother
Moscow prides itself on being a ‘smart city’. Free wifi all around the city, facial recognition and traffic management systems all make life easy and safe for citizens. But surveillance during Covid-19 has highlighted a darker side to the technology. Andrei Zakharov of BBC Russian explores if the smart city, can be turned into a Big Brother.

PHOTO Colombian woman protests after death of Javier Ordóñez
PHOTO CREDIT: JOAQUIN SARMIENTO/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvf)
The mothers of Argentina's disappeared

In April 1977 a group of women in Argentina held the first ever public demonstration to demand the release of thousands of opponents of the military regime. It was the start of a long campaign by the women, who became known as the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo. In 2017 Mike Lanchin spoke to Mirta Baravalle who has spent decades searching for her missing daughter and son-in-law, and for the grandchild she has never met.

(Photo: Mirta Baravalle, with the photograph of her daughter, Ana Maria. Credit: BBC)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7x1d4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnf)
Covid unemployment: A new crisis?

Millions have been left without work as the coronavirus pandemic continues to devastate economies across the globe. This week, there’s been a sharp rise in the unemployment rate in Britain. This follows recent increases in other European countries. The International Labour Organisation has warned the pandemic is having a “devastating and disproportionate” impact on youth employment. In the United States, unemployment remains above 10 percent in black and Hispanic communities. After India’s lockdown ended, many living in cities have found their old jobs gone - with former office workers, builders, drivers and factory workers left scrambling to find alternative employment. But analysts warn that the longer the crisis goes on, the more jobs simply won’t return - replaced, they say, by automation or artificial intelligence solutions that don’t get sick and don’t need to socially distance. And while this trend existed before Covid, there are signs the virus has brought forward an employment challenge many governments had hoped to address years down the line. So how can governments minimise job losses, help retrain those whose past careers have gone, and make sure younger workers are prepared for the jobs of the future - all during a time of reduced revenue from taxation and ballooning deficits? Dan Damon and a panel of experts discuss what should be done about rising unemployment in the age of Covid-19?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7x548)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dgxkd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vljdn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3b)
Bassem Youssef and Maz Jobrani

Egypt’s top satirist Bassem Youssef and acclaimed American comic Maz Jobrani join comedy duo Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to take on the world's headlines.
This week, what do immigrants in the US really think of Donald Trump? Why are Egyptian performers being censored on TikTok? And the woman bringing North and South Koreans together, in the name of love.
Get involved and tell us about the funny stories where you are.
#comediansvsthenews


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7x8wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7czzqlvn53)
US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies

We assess Justice Ginsburg's legacy and look at the politics of her succession already under way.

The Belarusian women who pull the masks off the faces of unidentified security forces who detain protesters.

And the impact of Siberia's thawing permafrost on climate change.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Michela Wrong, a journalist and author specialising in Africa, and Eric Albert, a London-based correspondent for French newspaper, Le Monde.

(Photo: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at The Women"s Conference in California in 2010. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7xdmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7czzqlvrx7)
Britain's Brexit debate

As the debate over Britain's exit from the European Union continues, we hear from a UK Member of Parliament.

US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died at the age of 87, we assess her legacy.

And the loopholes in the money transfer business in Somalia that is helping fuel in arms trade in Yemen.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Michela Wrong, a journalist and author specialising in Africa, and Eric Albert, a London-based correspondent for French newspaper, Le Monde.

(Picture: UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, during the debate on the Internal Market Bill in the House of Commons, London. Credit: PA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7xjcn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7czzqlvwnc)
The politics to succeed Ruth Bader Ginsburg

As the race is on to succeed US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who has died at the age of 87, we look at her life and legacy.

A spike in coronavirus cases in countries once known for low cases.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Michela Wrong, a journalist and author specialising in Africa, and Eric Albert, a London-based correspondent for French newspaper, Le Monde.

(Picture: Hundreds stopped by the US Supreme Court building in DC to pay their respects after the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Credit: Essdras M Suarez/ZUMA Wire/REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vlwn1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1y)
Rulebreakers

The shepherd and the settler

Muhammad is a Bedouin shepherd in a remote corner of the West Bank called Rashash. His family has been herding sheep and goats in Rashash for 30 years and in Palestine for generations. But since Israeli settlers recently moved in nearby it has become difficult for Muhammad to graze his flock undisturbed.

When producer Max Freedman visits Rashash, he sees this conflict in action. One settler tries to scatter the sheep by driving towards them in an all-terrain vehicle. Another chases after the flock on horseback. An Israeli activist tries to use his body as a human shield.

After leaving Rashash, Max sets out to understand what he saw there.


Presenter/reporter: Max Freedman
Producer: Max Freedman, Ilana Levinson, and Emily Bell
Editor: Ilana Levinson

(Photo: Palestinian shepherds and Israeli activists on a hillside. Credit: Max Freedman)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7xn3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wk0)
Coronavirus: Friendships during lockdown

Covid-19 is affecting our relationships - some are better, others are more challenging. A jewellery designer in India and a lawyer in the United States share their experiences and discover they have a lot in common when it comes to changing friendships and building your ‘Covid tribe’.

For those wishing to meet someone special, this is an especially difficult time. Three single people from Zimbabwe and the US discuss dating during a pandemic.

And an Israeli doctor airs concerns about the social effects of isolation, as the country becomes the first in the world to undergo a second national lockdown.

(Photo and Credit: Danyl Patterson)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vm0d5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl9)
United Zingdom

19/09/2020 GMT

Zing Tsjeng wonders what it means to be British. She travels around the UK to find out.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4t)
Looking back at World Service listener's recent comments

We hear how passionate you listeners are about the BBC World Service as we present a selection of recent contributions to this programme. The presenter of Hard Talk gets a gentle grilling of his own, you give us your beefs about the misuse of the English language - and one listener gives her perspective on the network as a whole.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Produced: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7xrvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3byygxfknm)
Tiara Brown: No one in my family wanted me to be a police officer

Tiara Brown joins us to discuss balancing life as a black athlete and police officer in the USA in the wake of George Floyd’s death and the shooting of Jacob Blake. The former amateur world champion boxer tells us she decided to join the police after her brother was murdered. Brown worries that police brutality is something that will never stop and she reveals she has considered leaving the force. She also gives us her thoughts on the movement to “Defund the police”, what it was like growing up with two mothers in the 1980s and her belief that women’s professional boxing will never gain true equality with the men’s ranks.

As women’s international cricket resumes this week New Zealand cricket captain - Sophie Devine - speaks to us ahead of their ODI and T20 series against Australia. Devine tells us about life in quarantine, how she’s expecting both sides to struggle initially and about her hopes of regaining the Rose Bowl for the first time in twenty years. Devine also recalls how gutted she was when the inaugural edition of The Hundred was cancelled due to the covid-19 pandemic. Devine says she is hoping to play in it in England in 2021.

With the Tour de France finishing in Paris this weekend, we catch up with Jean Luc Perez. The professor and decorated amateur cyclist has been our companion over the last few weeks and he gives us his final thoughts on how the people of France have taken to a much changed race.

Staying with cycling, we hear from amateur adventurer Otto Ecroyd after he rode from Alaska to Mexico. He tells us about encountering bears and the kindness of strangers on his trip.

In Sporting Witness, we mark twenty years since the Sydney Olympics by hearing from swimmer Susie O’Neill. We hear how carrying the hopes of her nation in the pool, weighed heavily on her shoulders.

And – we’re live at Goodison Park as Everton look to continue their strong start to the Premier League season against recently promoted West Bromwich Albion.

Photo:Tiara Brown between rounds against Vanessa Bradford at Generoso Pope Athletic Complex on October 24, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Edward Diller/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7xwm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dhn15)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vm7wf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0hyx)
The Detransitioners

He2She2He

Detransitioners are people who once identified as trans, but have returned to the gender they were assigned at birth. Some may also re-identify as non-binary or gender-fluid. There are no figures revealing how many people reverse or change their gender journeys – we only know that more people are telling their stories.

Brian Belovitch was born a boy, and then transitioned and lived for more than a decade as Natalia – a performer, club hostess and glamorous party animal. Then at a crisis point in his life he made a momentous decision – to live again as Brian.

These are not easy choices. Daniel was brought up male, then had gender reassignment surgery and became Danielle. Now he has detransitioned, married a woman, and is awaiting a complex operation to reconstruct his male genitalia.

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Presenter: Linda Pressly


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7y0c5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6tc)
Songwriting first dates with Melanie C and Nadia Rose

A stellar collection of musicians and songwriters this week, and who better to lead the discussion than somebody who has sold in excess of 85 million records? Singer, songwriter, presenter, DJ, and Spice Girl Melanie C asks the group candid questions about creativity, including the importance of dynamics in a songwriting team, what is it that informs the sound they want to make, and the thing they really love about making music.

First up Nadia Rose, a rapper from South London who’s been writing bars and performing since her school days. She’s gone on to write for Rihanna and has won a MOBO Award for the music video to huge hit Skwod. She’s also Stormzy’s cousin. Rae Morris is a singer and songwriter who released her debut single aged 20. She’s since shared stages with Lianne La Havas, Bombay Bicycle Club and George Ezra, and has worked with Lucy Rose and Clean Bandit.

And finally, Jin Jin is a platinum-selling musician, songwriter and entrepreneur who grew up around her grandfather’s reggae music store. Since then she has written with the likes of Sigala, Jax Jones, David Guetta, Clean Bandit, Little Mix, Craig David, Tinie Tempah, Raye, and Jess Glynne.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7y439)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrm9qw)
Death of US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg triggers political row

Tributes to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, however, threaten to be overshadowed by the political firestorm that her death and the resulting vacancy on the highest court in the US will set off just 46 days before the presidential election.

Also on the programme: In Belarus protesters pull down the masks of those carrying out arrests in the hope that they will one day be identified and held accountable for their actions; and condemnation from China calling out US "bullying" after the decision by the Trump administration to ban downloads of the apps, Tiktok and Wechat .

Photo: Candles are lit next to pictures of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as people mourn her death at the Supreme Court in Washington Credit: Reuters


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7y7vf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lby1bmshr)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you live coverage of Leeds United vs.Fulham as two of the three newly promoted sides face each other on the second weekend of the Premier League.

We'll have reaction to all the day's top flight action.

Plus the Indian Premier League returns along with women's international cricket. We'll be joined by special guests to discuss the first international women's cricket since the T20 World Cup. And we'll have the latest from golf's US Open and the NBA.

Photo credit: Leeds manager Marcelo Bielsa and Fulham manager Scott Parker (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7yqty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38djh82)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vn33b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3csyvnc)
The problem with the viral celery juice ‘cure’

The Medical Medium has millions of followers on social media. He claims he can help cure your chronic illness with home remedies like celery juice.

But he doesn’t have any medical qualifications. Instead, he claims he gets his medical information from communicating with spirits.

Thousands of people online say he’s helped them. But could his claims be stopping patients seeking the medical help they need. And is the rise of unqualified influencers creating distrust in real doctors?

We explore the booming celery juice trend and meet the doctor who is trying to start a counter-movement to get qualified medical professionals to use social media more effectively.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Ione Wells

(Photo Caption: Screenshot of the Medical Medium Instagram account / Photo Credit: Instagram)


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxv)
The magical maths of pool testing

Tim Harford speaks to Israeli researcher, Tomer Hertz, about how the mathematical magic of pool testing could help countries to ramp up their Covid-19 testing capacity.


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7yvl2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3cszt5z)
USA

The upcoming elections in the US are the focus for this month's World Questions.
Katty Kay in Washington D.C. chairs a lively debate with four leading US politicians from across the country to discuss the big issues: Covid-19, the wearing of masks, support for the poor, Black Lives Matter, law and order and the recent wildfires. An audience from across the US joins remotely with questions to the panel coming from around the world.

The panel:
Mayor Quinton Lucas, Kansas City
Rep. Bruce Westerman, Arkansas
Mayor Aja Brown, Compton City
Mayor Francis Suarez, Miami City

Producer: Helen Towner
Studio Managers: Lee Chaundy, Henry Dutton & Duncan Hannant

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Statue of Liberty in a medical mask. Credit: Anton Petrus/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7yzb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3b)
Actor Hilary Swank

On The Arts Hour this week: Oscar winning actor Hilary Swank talks about how she prepared for her role as an astronaut in her timely new Netflix drama Away; Writer Afua Hirsch explores the history of how the British spun an idealised stereotype about their Empire through film propaganda; and
French director Ladj Ly on Les Miserables, his Oscar-nominated depiction of the Parisian suburbs that has caught the attention of President Macron.

Singer Miley Cyrus pays homage to Billie Eilish and how young singers are inspiring a new generation with their music and activism, plus sitarist and composer Anoushka Shankar plays from her latest work Love Letters, an EP inspired by heartbreak.

Nikki Bedi’s guests this week are the godfather of computer gaming Sid Meier, who will be talking about his life in games and his most popular creation the game Civilisation, and film curator and producer Nadia Denton.

Produced for the BBC World Service by Edwina Pitman.

(Photo: Hilary Swank. Credit: Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7z32b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrn8px)
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Trump wants replacement 'without delay'

President Donald Trump says he wants a new US Supreme Court judge to be sworn in "without delay". Democratic candidate Joe Biden insists the decision on her replacement must wait until after the November election.

Also in the programme: the Slovenian cyclist Tadej Pogacar is to be crowned the Tour de France champion; and the story of a female Soviet spy in rural England.

(Photo: United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in an event at New York Law School in 2018. Photo: EPA)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7z6tg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q0)
Israel's warming relations with Arab Gulf states

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

Israel has signed a deal normalising relations with two regional neighbours, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Behind the agreement lies a strategy to try to unite against Iran. The Palestinian authorities have condemned it as a betrayal arguing it makes no progress towards the resolution of the decades-old conflict or the creation of a viable Palestinian state. Yolande Knell wonders what young people in Israel and the Gulf make of it.

Wildfires continue to rage across the West Coast of the United States. Tens of thousands of people have had to flee their homes. Some have lost everything with over two million hectares of land scorched. Our correspondent Peter Bowes knows the reality of what it’s like to be caught up in the fires.

On Lesbos, efforts have begun to move thousands of men, women and children made homeless to a new tent encampment on the Greek island. Bethany Bell has heard from refugees and migrants who have been sleeping on the streets and in olive groves since the Moria camp burnt down. On Wednesday four Afghan asylum seekers were charged with starting the fire in Moria camp.

During any other year, the Serengeti in Tanzania at this time would be in peak safari season; lodges would be fully booked and carloads of tourists would be ranging the reserve, eager to catch a glimpse of a leopard. But as Michelle Jana Chan has found, although Tanzania has officially been relatively unscathed by cases of coronavirus so far, international travel restrictions have hit the tourism industry here hard.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Jasper Corbett

(Image: Benjamin Netanyahu, Donald Trump, Abdullatif Al Zayani and Abdullah bin Zayed wave from the White House balcony after a signing ceremony for the Abraham Accords, 15 September 2020. Credit: Reuters Reuters/Tom Brenner)


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vnl2v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Documentary (w3cszz69)
Looking for love: The Zoroastrian way

The Zoroastrian community has given the world Freddie Mercury, produced some of India’s richest businessmen and practises one of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism. Yet the community faces extinction: there are less than 200,000 Zoroastrians left worldwide.

Shazneen is one of them. She is 31, lives in London and is on the lookout for someone to settle down with. The problem? Members of her small community can only marry other Zoroastrians. Marriage to a non-Zoroastrian is not traditionally allowed and unlike a lot of other faiths, conversion has always been forbidden.

Now, some young people are questioning these rules, performing their own conversion ceremonies to bring others into the Zoroastrian fold and marrying outside the religion.

But these are controversial practices and dismissed by many, like Shazneen. For her, going to the World Zoroastrian Youth Congress, held every four years, is her best chance of finding a partner from the same faith.

As well as the formalities of religious debates, hundreds of Zoroastrians will come together to spend a week in Los Angeles taking in the sun, sea and sand.

With the future of the Zoroastrian religion at stake, followers hope its younger members, like Shazneen, can emulate Freddie Mercury and find ‘somebody to love’. But will she succeed?

(Photo: Shazneen Munshi at the Zoroastrian Youth Congress)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7zbkl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dk2zq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vnptz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x63)
The lives of female Qur'an reciters

Around the world, there are differing attitudes to recitation of the Qur'an and the female voice in Islam. For some, female reciters should be restricted to female-only spaces, reciting verses in female prayer circles or Islamic lectures, for fear that the voice in public arenas with mixed audiences can bring about sin. But in many cultures it is permissible and encouraged to platform female reciters, and there is growing appetite from women online to bring more women into the field.

Nusaiba Mohammad Timol is one reciter who grew up between Saudi Arabia and the UK. Never hearing a female reciter perform publicly during her childhood, she was the first winner of Islam Channel's national Qiraat (recitation) competition in 2006 and has gone onto recite publicly as well as teach both men and women how to recite. But her reception has not been completely positive - and a record deal was scuppered when investors in Egypt said it was not appropriate to sign a woman.

We hear from Madinah Javed and Maryam Amir, two reciters across the Atlantic from each other who are using Instagram to raise awareness about female recitation and scholarship, and from some of the women that they have inspired.

Producer/presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo credit: BBC/Emily MacInnes)



SUNDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7zl1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sp2)
What's at stake in the US elections?

There are less than two months to go until the 2020 US presidential election is held in a divided America. Both main candidates and parties have framed it as something of an existential fight - so on this edition of Business Weekly we’ll be looking at the big issues framing that fight. We’ll examine the economy, immigration and healthcare and find out what a Biden presidency or a second term in office for President Trump could mean for these key policy areas.
Plus as the Zimbabwean government hands back some land to evicted farmers our reporter in Harare tells us why this is happening and how the move has been received. Plus what has Covid-19 done to the Asian wedding industry? Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Mock ballot paper and US flag, Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7zpsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dkg73)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vp22c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3csyvnc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7ztk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Wise Web (w3ct0x62)
World Wise Web: Part two

Teenagers meet pioneering inventors whose creations shaped our world, including Marty Cooper, the creator of the first mobile phone; Pixar's Danielle Feinberg, who has worked on films including Monsters Inc, Finding Nemo and The Incredibles; Professor Maja Mataric, whose robots help people including stroke survivors and autistic children; Ben Gomes, head of Search at Google; orthopaedic surgeon Professor Munjed Al Muderis, developer of innovative implants for amputees; and Dr Anita Sengupta, whose team developed the parachute which helped land Nasa's Curiosity Rover on Mars.


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7zy97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vp9km)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhx)
How to topple a dictator

Suppose a country is ruled by a dictator. Suppose many people want to topple the dictator. What’s the best way of doing it – a campaign of violence or non-violence? There’s an academic from Harvard who has the answer.

Picture: Romanian waving flag over Bucharest Square
Picture Credit: Peter Turnley/Corbis Historical/Getty


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c8021c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dktgh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vpf9r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c805sh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7czzqlyk26)
US Republicans aim to replace Ginsburg

Following the death of US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Donald Trump says he'll reveal his choice to replace her soon, and he'll name a woman. What impact will this have on the presidential race?

Also, the Syrian refugee who crossed Europe in a wheelchair. What is her life like five years on?

And a deal to give two US companies a big stake in the US arm of TikTok receives backing from the White House.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Stacy Hilliard-Cork, a US-born international development specialist who runs a consultancy firm called Taysha, and Miguel-Anxo Murado, a Spanish journalist and author.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Minnesota, USA. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c809jm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7czzqlyntb)
Spain in fear over high coronavirus levels

Fears in Spain that the coronavirus is returning to the terrible levels of earlier this year.

Also, following the death of US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Donald Trump says he'll reveal his choice to replace her this week and he'll name a woman. But what impact might this have on the presidential race?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Stacy Hilliard-Cork, a US-born international development specialist who runs a consultancy firm called Taysha, and Miguel-Anxo Murado, a Spanish journalist and author.

(Picture: People wearing protective face masks outside a restaurant in Madrid. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c80f8r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7czzqlyskg)
More protests planned in Belarus

Another day of mass protests is expected in Belarus where demonstrators have been demanding the resignation of President Alexander Lukashenko since his disputed election victory last month.

Also, the Emmy Awards for the best shows on US television over the past year are getting under way.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Stacy Hilliard-Cork, a US-born international development specialist who runs a consultancy firm called Taysha, and Miguel-Anxo Murado, a Spanish journalist and author.

(Picture: Belarus women protest against the presidential election results in Minsk. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vpsk4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqd)
The preppers and the pandemic

Preppers have been preparing for a global emergency like coronavirus for years, stocking up supplies just in case society was ever brought to a standstill. So when our food systems began to buckle under the pressure of the pandemic, were they sitting pretty, and has this much ridiculed community now been vindicated?

Emily Thomas revisits some preppers she first met three years ago to see how they’ve been coping since the crisis hit. Pete Stanford tells her he didn’t need to join the supermarket scramble for food in the first weeks of lockdown, but the crisis has made him rethink the way he preps and how much he’s willing to share. Lincoln Miles tells us he’s had a flood of new customers to his prepping shop, but that even he wasn’t prepared for the spike in demand.

And we speak to a prepping newcomer, New York Times reporter Nellie Bowles, who’s gone from ridiculing this community to believing that being prepared is the socially responsible thing to do.

(Picture: A man with a backpack and axe in the forest. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c80k0w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9q0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vpx98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf09)
Sealed in a glass dome and running out of oxygen

When an intrepid crew of eight entered Biosphere 2, a giant air-tight greenhouse in the Arizona desert in September 1991, no one knew how it would pan out.
It was an experiment to see if humans could live in similar glass worlds on other planets. Their intention was to survive by cultivating the farmland and plant life inside to create the food and oxygen they needed, but quickly both ran dangerously low. This is the story of how original 'Biospherians' Mark Nelson, Sally Silverstone, Jane Poynter and Taber MacCallum endured what's been called one of the most audacious, unusual and controversial experiments of the last decade. Part 2/2.

Mark Nelson and Sally Silverstone have released a new edition the book they wrote whilst inside Biosphere 2 called 'Life Under Glass: Crucial Lessons in Planetary Stewardship from 2 Years in Biosphere 2'.

Presented and produced by Saskia Edwards
Additional production by Mariana Des Forges


Photo: Biosphere 2 at sunset
Credit: Joe Sohm/Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c80ns0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x4z)
How can India revive growth?

India is staring at its sharpest growth contraction on record. With more than five million Covid-19 cases so far, the country has announced a nearly 24 per cent slump in its economy in the three months to the end of June this year. Experts fear further disruptions in growth as businesses continue to bleed.

So, what is the way out of this crisis? Would a revival in growth ultimately hinge upon a recovery in the pandemic curve? And how quickly can the Narendra Modi-led government get that under control to determine India’s economic fate?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the impact of the contraction on Indian companies and consumers, and what can be done to revive India’s growth story.

Presenter: Divya Arya

Contributors: Mohit Malhotra, CEO, Dabur India; Preeti Reddy, CEO, South Asia, Kantar Insights; Gaurav Datt, deputy director, Centre of Development Economics, Monash University, Australia


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vq11d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c80sj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dljy8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vq4sj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3csy1qk)
The Sun, Our Star

The Sun, Our Star: Ancient sun

Inspired by the Chariot of the Sun, a beautiful artefact of sun worship, Dava Sobel island hops in Denmark to explore the cult of the Sun, before science, during the Nordic Bronze Age. Ancient people would not have needed an eclipse to make them see the Sun as an all-powerful force. The Sun’s life-giving light and heat inspired rituals and relics dating back to the earliest humans.

Music composed by Chris O'Shaughnessy.
Producer: Kate Bland and Kate Rea

Audio for this programme was updated on 9 September 2020.

(Photo: Chariot of the Sun. Credit: National Museum of Denmark)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c80x88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3cszt5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c8110d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrq6mz)
President Trump: Supreme Court nominee will be a woman

US President Donald Trump has said he will nominate a woman to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg next week, escalating a political row over her successor.

Ginsburg, 87, died on Friday, just weeks before the presidential election.

Also on the programme; a mass demonstration in Thailand has ended with unprecedented demands for reforms to the monarchy; and a lack of broadband internet is forcing some families in Texas to park in laybys so their children can get an education

(Photo: Vigil for late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Credit: EPA Wires)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c814rj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 World Wise Web (w3ct0x62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c818hn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvx)
Queen Tamar: The myth of a perfect ruler

Queen Tamar was one of Georgia’s most iconic and colourful rulers, a powerful medieval sovereign who controlled large parts of the Caucasus and the eastern side of the Black Sea and forged strong cultural links with both the Byzantine West and the Persian South. Her influence extended beyond the battlefield: she presided over the last phase of the Georgian ‘Golden Age’ which saw the building of classic Georgian churches and a flowering of the Arts that produced one of Georgia’s most important poets.
So who was Queen Tamar? How did she rise to power and outmanoeuvre her enemies? And why do the myths about her rule publicised by her faithful chroniclers persist till today?
Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr. Ekaterine Gedevanishvili, Senior Researcher at the National Centre for the History of Georgian Art in Tbilisi; Alexander Mikaberidze, Professor of History at Louisiana State University; Dr. Sandro Nikolaishvili, researcher at the University of Southern Denmark, who works on retracing connections between the Byzantine and Georgian worlds; and Donald Rayfield, Emeritus Professor of Russian and Georgian at Queen Mary, University of London.

(Image: Queen Tamar, detail of a mural in Vardzia monastery, Georgia, c. 12th century. Credit: G. Chubinashvili National Research Centre for Georgian Art History and Heritage Preservation, Tbilisi)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c81d7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lby1bqxx3)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you live coverage of Chelsea vs. Liverpool as the reigning Premier League champions look for their second win of the season so far.

We'll have reaction to the day's early kick offs where Southampton face Tottenham Hotspur and Newcastle United take on Brighton & Hove Albion.

Plus we'll have updates from the last round of the US Open and we'll take a look at the WNBA.

Photo credit: Mohamed Salah (Getty Images).


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c81rh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dmhx9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vr3rk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c81w79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c81zzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrr5m0)
Partial lockdown in poorer areas of Madrid

Spain's capital Madrid is one of the places worst hit by the second wave of coronavirus in Europe. So the regional government has ordered a partial lockdown in certain areas with the highest levels of Covid-19 infections. These neighbourhoods are the poorer areas of the capital, often with many immigrants. And they feel they are being unfairly targeted by the conservative regional government which is attempting to impose a form of social segregation.

Also in the programme: The President of Slovenia says the country now has two kings as Tadej Pogacar wins the Tour de France, and his compatriot Primoz Roglic finishes second in the world's greatest cycle race; and a leak of documents has revealed how British banks helped criminals and individuals subject to international sanctions move money around the world and launder it.

(Photo: Residents of Madrid's southern neighborhood of Usera protest against confinement measures imposed by Madrid's regional government only to certain districts, that the demonstrators consider as a "segregation", in Madrid, central Spain, 20 September 2020. The regional government say that the measures are necessary because of the rise of cases of coronavirus in these areas. Credit: EPA/Fernando Villar)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c823qk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vrgzy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c827gp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dmzwt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vrlr2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk6b73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57s3k82v9p)
Chinese apps get reprieve from US ban

As President Trump's deadline to ban new downloads of Chinese social media apps nears, he announces that a deal has been reached for US companies to take control of the video sharing site TikTok. Meanwhile users of the messaging service WeChat win a court injunction to halt the ban. We get the latest from Kim Lyons of the Verge. We also hear about the leak of more than 2,000 documents which seem to reveal serious failings in how the world's biggest banks deal with dirty money and Tim Alderslade, the head of Airlines UK makes a plea for an air bridge between New York and London, to save the fortunes of transatlantic airlines and airports suffering from a slump in passengers because of the pandemic.
(Image: TikTok, WeChat & Trump montage, Credit: Reuters)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4wphh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk6fz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjps6dc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4wt7m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct03nx)
Hey Sisters, Sew Sisters

Space travel is not always high-tech. When the Apollo astronauts landed on the Moon in 1969, seamstresses made their spacesuits at a company famous for stitching latex into Playtex bras.

During the Space Shuttle era, a group of 18 women were in charge of all soft goods - the fabrics for machine and hand sewing the spaceplane’s thermal blankets. These women became known as the Sew Sisters.

Presenter, artist and former Nasa astronaut Nicole Stott meets some of these ‘sew sisters’ from past and present missions and celebrates their contributions.

Their work, and that of seamstresses before them, was often a matter of life and death yet was not always taken seriously. Engineers would drop by to ask the women to hem their pants or sew their buttons on but they were doing difficult work.

They used ceramic thread to stitch fibre glass-backed quartz fabric around the edges of doors, ports and the bottom of the Space Shuttle’s three engines to provide a thermal barrier where components came together. In private the women called themselves the ‘Itch, Stitch and Bitch Club’ because the fabric was so itchy.

Hand sewing is not consigned to the past either. Recent images from Saturn were from a spacecraft with cut, stitched and fitted gold and black thermal blankets and the BepiColombo mission, currently on its way to Mercury, involves hand sewing.

(Photo: SkyLab seamstress sewing space suits for astronauts. Credit: Nasa)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk6kqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5d)
Australia's 'Madam Butterfly'

The Australian swimmer Susie O'Neill became a star of her sport despite a constant battle against nerves. At her home Olympics in Sydney in 2000, O'Neill took gold in a freestyle event but suffered an unexpected - and devastating defeat - in the 200 metres butterfly, a discipline in which she was considered virtually unbeatable. She talks about her career with Ashley Byrne.

(Photo: Susie O'Neill in action in 2000. Credit: Getty Images Sport)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk6pgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpsfwm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4x1qw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv66)
Why do we like spicy food?

Many of us willingly subject ourselves to pain and irritation by eating chilli. CrowdScience listener Tina wonders what’s driving this apparent masochism: why does ‘feeling the burn’ make so many of us feel so good?

It’s just one of several tasty questions we tuck into in this episode. Also on the menu is stew: why does it taste better the next day? Listener Helen’s local delicacy is Welsh cawl, a meat and vegetable concoction. Tradition dictates it should be eaten the day after it’s made, but is there any science behind this?

And we finish the meal with cheese. Listener Leander asks what makes some cheeses blue, some hard and crumbly, and some run all over your fridge. How is milk transformed into such radically different end products?

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Alex Lathbridge
Produced by Cathy Edwards, Marnie Chesterton and Alex Lathbridge for the BBC World Service.

[Photo:Woman eating red Chilli Pepper. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk6t6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz7v2kb)
Leaked bank documents reveal laundering of billions of dollars of illicit funds

We look into the FinCEN Files, a leak of over 2,000 documents, at the heart of which are 2,100 suspicious activity reports by some of the world's biggest banks.

We're live in Los Angeles for all the results of Emmy Awards presented to the television industry and which have been held remotely because of the pandemic.

And we go to Uganda to find out what impact the lockdown, which was one of the strictest on the African continent, has had on people's mental health.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk6xyr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz7v69g)
EU ministers to discuss Belarus

As protests continue in Belarus demanding the resignation of President Lukashenko and hundreds are arrested, EU ministers discuss the situation and also meet the opposition leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, who was forced to flee the country.

We're live in Uganda as an investigation is underway to try and find out what caused a fire at Makerere University, one of Africa's oldest and most prestigious educational institutions..

And how music therapy could ease the suffering of those with dementia.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk71pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz7vb1l)
Parts of Madrid begin new lockdown

Following a spike in Covid-19 cases, residents are banned from leaving their district other than for essential travel like work, medical care or taking children to school.

We speak to Nobel Peace Prize winner and Liberian peace activist, Leymah Roberta Gbowee who is launching today a violence-free elections campaign.

And we have all the latest from the first remotely held Emmy awards - the television industry's big night.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk75g0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc27)
Katie Hill: When a politician's nude photos are leaked

Zeinab Badawi speaks to the American politician Katie Hill. She was a star of the US mid-term elections in 2018, but barely a year after winning a Congressional seat, she resigned, after reports of an inappropriate relationship with a staff member and after nude photographs of her were published. What does her case tell us about American politics in the MeToo era?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4xjqd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jv)
Has Coronavirus killed the nightclub?

Nightclubs around the world are struggling to survive with social distancing guidelines. The social effect is palpable, especially for the younger generation who have grown up with club culture. BBC Radio 1Xtra DJ Jamz Supernova tells Ed Butler about everything she's missing from the club scene. Meanwhile, the Night-time Industries Association's Michael Kill says they and club owners are working to convince the government to help them open up. But how would that work? Lutz Leichsenring, an advocate for Berlin nightlife says any way forward will be difficult, but this crisis should be a wake up call for cities to value their nightlife more.

(Picture: A Berlin nightclub. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkf)
The Galileo project

The Galileo mission to examine the planet Jupiter had its beginnings in the 1970s. It finally came to an end on 21st September 2003. Professor Fred Taylor is one of the few scientists who worked on it from start to finish and he has been telling Dan Whitworth about some of the highs and lows of the project.

Photo: The Galileo Jupiter probe being tested before launch. Credit:Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk7964)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct03nx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4xngj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk7dy8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4xs6n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3csyvnc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk7jpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpt93j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4xwys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3s)
Women fighting abuse under lockdown

As the coronavirus pandemic spread across the globe, victims of domestic violence found themselves facing a double threat - that of a deadly virus outside and abuse at home. Distress calls to domestic violence hotlines have soared - leaving charities overwhelmed and struggling to meet demand.

Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women supporting domestic abuse survivors.

Hospitalised by a former partner twice before being able to leave, Marica Phipps set up Battered Not Broken, a US charity providing education, support and resources for victims of domestic abuse.

Tamara White is an Area Manager for Hestia, a charity that supports adults and children in times of crisis. It is one of the largest providers of domestic abuse refuges in London and South East England.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Tamara White
R: Marica Phipps


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk7nfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3l)
Documenting my cellmates' names in blood and rust

Mansour Omari spent nearly a year in a Syrian government prison in 2012. We hear his account of life in an underground cell and how, against the odds, he managed to smuggle out the names of his fellow cellmates to their loved ones - by writing them down, using chicken bones and blood on a piece of cloth. This story was first broadcast on 20th March 2017.

Richard L. Spencer was in US soul group The Winstons. They unknowingly created one of the most famous drum breaks in the world. The Amen Break is a 6-second drum solo first featured on an obscure 1960s track called Amen Brother but has now been sampled in songs by artists including Amy Winehouse, Oasis, David Bowie and the Prodigy. This story was first broadcast on 27th June 2017.

Image: Mansour Omari's list of names
Credit: Mansour Omari


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk7s5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjptjls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4y4g1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk7wxs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy51y2kc)
Madrid enters partial lockdown as Covid-19 cases climb

Residents of some areas of the Spanish capital face new restrictions on movement and gatherings, as Covid-19 cases rise.

Also in the programme: an exclusive interview with Ruth Bader Ginsberg's granddaughter, discussing the life and legacy of the late Supreme Court Justice; and leaked documents reveal how illegal money flows through the world's biggest banks

(Pciture: Sevilla fans take coronavirus disease (COVID-19) tests before travelling to watch the European Super Cup. Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk80nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct03nx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4ycy9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv0vdsxw2m)
New European coronavirus restrictions

More than 800,000 Madrid residents were ordered to stay at home as Covid-19 cases rise. A number of European governments are considering stricter enforcement measures as they try to contain the pandemic, and a bar owner in Madrid tells us how the new restrictions are likely to affect his business. Also in the programme, leaked documents involving about $2tn of transactions have revealed how some of the world's biggest banks have allowed criminals to move money around the world. One of the cases shows that the United Arab Emirates' central bank failed to act on warnings about a local firm which was helping Iran to evade sanctions. Simon Cox, investigations editor for BBC Arabic brings us the details. Farmers in India are protesting a controversial set of new agriculture laws passed by the country's parliament. The BBC's Arunodhay Mukharji explains why the farmers think the new laws will make them substantially worse off. Plus, we have a report examining the impact the coronavirus pandemic is having on nightclubs around the world.

(Picture: Police conducting traffic checks in Madrid. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk84f1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4yhpf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8855)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sz8sftm70)
Wildfire smoke and pregnancy

In Australia, doctors have expressed their concern about the impact of wildfires' smoke on newborns. As fires in the US continue, we hear the experience of one couple from Los Angeles, who have just celebrated the birth of a new baby. We also consider the level of risk with a doctor from Kansas City who has been looking into it.

Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University is our medical expert today to help with questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you want to ask one, send it to us on WhatsApp +447730 751925. We get her thoughts on the effectiveness of lockdowns, as many countries move to increasing and reinstating restrictions.

The FinCEN files are a leak of secret files that reveal suspicious activity involving criminals allegedly using banks to move trillions of dollars around the world. The files are the latest in a series that have expose secret deals, money laundering and financial crime. We explain what has been found.

(Photo: The Golden Gate bridge surrounded by smoke from the California wildfires in San Francisco. Credit: Stephen Lam/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8cx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8hnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpv82k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4yvxt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqdvflh3g)
2020/09/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8mdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct03nx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4yzny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5t)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The seeded cloud

"Could you make a machine to make it rain in minutes?" asks listener Alexander from Hampshire, aged 12. For this series, with lockdown learning in mind, Drs Rutherford and Fry are investigating scientific mysteries for students of all ages. Rutherford and Fry dive into the clouded story of weather modification.

First, we need to decide where and when we might deploy any rain machine. Liz Bentley, Chief Executive of the Royal Meteorological society, takes us through the science, maths and art of predicting the weather. Hannah heads down to the BBC Weather Centre to meet meteorologist Helen Willetts, who takes us through the highs and lows of forecasting.

And then for the technology itself. Mark Miodownik, scientist and author of Liquid: The Delightful and Dangerous Substances The Flow Through Our Lives, reveals that a technique called cloud seeding has almost certainly been tried in different places around the world for decades. But, whilst it’s supposed to induce showers and even clear the way for sunny spells, the results aren’t always reliable. And even if we can make it rain, Liz explains why messing with the weather may be at our peril.

Presenters: Hannah Fry, Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8r4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy51yxs8)
UK' could hit 50,000 COVID-19 cases a day without action'

The UK could see 50,000 new coronavirus cases a day by mid-October without further action, the government's chief scientific adviser has warned. Sir Patrick Vallance said that would be expected to lead to about "200-plus deaths per day" a month after that.

Also on the programme: a BBC investigation finds that the Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich controls companies which have donated one hundred million dollars to an Israeli settler organisation; and the grand daughter of the late US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, tells us about her grandmother's last wishes.

(Photo: An ambulance drives past a sign displaying a Covid-19 helpline in London, UK, 15 September 2020. Credit: . EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8vwt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4z756)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk8zmy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpvr22)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4zbxb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lxk4zq28)
New European coronavirus restrictions

More than 800,000 Madrid residents were ordered to stay at home as Covid-19 cases rise. A number of European governments are considering stricter enforcement measures as they try to contain the pandemic, and a bar owner in Madrid tells us how the new restrictions are likely to affect his business. Also in the programme, leaked documents involving about $2tn of transactions have revealed how some of the world's biggest banks have allowed criminals to move money around the world. One of the cases shows that the United Arab Emirates' central bank failed to act on warnings about a local firm which was helping Iran to evade sanctions. Simon Cox, investigations editor for BBC Arabic brings us the details. Farmers in India are protesting a controversial set of new agriculture laws passed by the country's parliament. The BBC's Arunodhay Mukharji explains why the farmers think the new laws will make them substantially worse off. Plus, we have a report examining the impact the coronavirus pandemic is having on nightclubs around the world.

(Picture: Police conducting traffic checks in Madrid. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9746)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18ydlx2g73)
US presidential election: Focus on Pennsylvania

This week we're looking at the key states in the US election, starting with Pennsylvania. Our live guests include Kimberly Adams, radio correspondent and host of Marketplace on American Public Media, Dr Caprice Roberts, visiting Professor of Law at George Washington University, Salena Zito, reporter for the Washington Examiner in Pittsburgh and Jenice Armstrong from the Philadelphia Inquirer.
Erin Delmore brings us a report on Pennsylvania's steel industry, and how it's faring since President Trump put tariffs on Chinese imports. And we hear how the coronavirus pandemic has affected filming in one of America's most popular locations - Philadelphia.

(Picture: Actor Sheryl Lee Ralph wearing a "VOTE" mask. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9bwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpw39g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4zq4q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0hyy)
The Detransitioners

She2He2She

Nele and Ellie are detransitioners too. In their early 20s, they were brought up as girls, and began to identify as transmen in their teens. To present as more masculine, both took testosterone and had their breasts removed in double mastectomy surgery. Connecting online, these two young women are now supporting each other to re-identify as female.

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Presenter: Linda Pressly


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9gmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9lcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpwbsq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc4zymz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9q3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz7xzgf)
US Covid-19 deaths near 200,000

The US is close to a grim milestone with the number of deaths from coronavirus approaching 200,000 - can the authorities there turn the tide?

A BBC investigation finds that Russian oligarch and owner of Chelsea football club, Roman Abramovich, controls companies that have donated millions of dollars to a controversial settler organisation in Israel.

And why has Arctic ice shrunk to the second lowest level on record this month and what does that mean for the environment?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9tvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz7y36k)
Covid-19: Britain expected to tighten rules

The UK government is expected to announce new restrictions in order to slow the rate of Covid-19 cases, including shutting bars and restaurants early. We speak to a pub owner.

A recent trial has found that the lives of men with prostate cancer can be extended using a drug called Olaparib that treats breast and ovarian cancer, as we hear from the lead scientist.

And we go to South Africa where 500 pupils have been quarantined after a Covid-19 outbreak at their school.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmk9ylz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz7y6yp)
UK: new measures expected to tackle rising Covid-19 cases

Britain will impose tighter coronavirus restrictions later today as it becomes the latest European nation to face rising infection rates.

What is it like to be gay in Poland where right across the country people have declared LGBTQ-free zones? We speak to one man about the challenges he faces.

And we're in Italy where easing coronavirus restrictions means small numbers of fans are going to be allowed to attend live football matches for the first time in months.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkb2c3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1n)
How to prevent drowning

We hear how AI lifeguards are helping to spot danger on Israel’s beaches, while on Lake Victoria special forecasts for fishermen are saving hundreds of lives. Meanwhile in Bangladesh, community creches and bamboo swimming stages are reducing deaths among children – the group at highest risk of drowning. It’s estimated that 320,000 people around the world die in the water each year.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates

Photo: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc50fmh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89w)
Craft beer in a pandemic

Brewing, like many industries, has had to adapt during the coronavirus pandemic. And whilst this can be a logistical nightmare, the current crisis might also present some new opportunities. Elizabeth Hotson talks to beer writer, Pete Brown about the impact so far of coronavirus on craft beer. We take a socially distanced trip to East London to hear from Jon Swain, co-founder of Hackney Brewery and then cross over to Maryland in the US where Julie Verratti from Denizens Brewing explains how an aluminium can shortage is making it tough to ship her products. And in Mexico City, Jessica Martinez from Cerveceria Malteza explains how lockdown gave an unexpected boost to craft beer. (Picture of beer cans by Elizabeth Hotson).


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpy)
How Liberia wrote off its debts

How the Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf negotiated to write off billions of dollars of debt, accumulated over two decades of civil war. Coming to power in 2006, Johnson Sirleaf had to govern the West African country with little tax revenue and owing large sums to countries and institutions it could never hope to pay back. After four years of intensive negotiations and even support from the Irish rock star Bono, in 2010 the World Bank and International Monetary Fund announced they would forgive 4.6 billion dollars of the country’s debt. Bob Howard speaks to former president Johnson Sirleaf about the long road to debt forgiveness.

Photo: Ellen John Sirleaf. Credit: Olivier Poulet/Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkb637)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc50kcm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkb9vc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkbflh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpx60m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc50svw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yp)
Bicycles of the future

From Picasso to Ai Weiwei, from Iris Murdoch to HG Wells, cycling has long been the inspiration for artists and creative minds. Yet the fundamental design of a bicycle has remained unchanged for over a hundred years and the material of choice to build the frames is usually metal or carbon.

Top endurance cyclist Lee Craigie travels to Denmark to meet cutting edge bicycle designers Paul Harder Cohen and Mette Walsted, who are taking a very different approach and crafting bikes from a material that’s been around for millions of years: wood. Paul and Mette take Lee through their creative process in their buzzing dockside studio workshop in Copenhagen, as they design and construct their bike frames from Danish ash. Each bike takes over two months to make and each one is unique thanks to the organic nature of the wood they are crafted from.

As well as getting involved in the creation of a new bicycle, Lee finds out about ways that form and function intersect, and hops into the saddle to reflect on how this design gives a highly distinctive feeling of interaction between rider and machine.

Produced by Alex Anderson. A Tandem Production for the BBC World Service.

(Image: Bike designers Mette Walsted and Paul Harder Cohen, with kind permission)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkbkbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdk4)
How the tigress of basketball fought back

Malebogo Molefhe is a trailblazing basketball player from Botswana. The only girl in a game played by boys, she was called the 'tigress' and rose to be captain of her country's first ever women's national basketball team. But off the court she was controlled and abused by her partner, culminating in a brutal attack where he shot her eight times, leaving both her legs paralysed. Traumatised and with life-changing injuries, Malebogo fought to reclaim her life - and to find a way back to basketball. If you’ve been affected by any of the issues in this episode, you can find details of organisations offering information and support at BBC Action Line: www.bbc.co.uk/actionline.

Elvis Otieno - otherwise known as Sir Elvis - is one of the pioneers of country music, Kenyan-style. Influenced by his American counterparts, he's busy bringing songs of heartbreak and longing to the bars of Nairobi. This interview was first broadcast in 2015.

Picture: Malebogo Molefhe, bottom left
Credit: Courtesy of Malebogo Molefhe


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkbp2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpxfhw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc511c4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkbstw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy520zgg)
China critic jailed

Ren Zhiqiang called President Xi Jinping a 'clown' for how the corona virus was handled in China. He was found guilty of bribery and misappropriating millions of dollars in public funds and sentenced to 18 years in prison.

Also in the programme: the faultline dividing Republicans and Democrats as President Trump prepares to nominate a new Supreme Court judge; and are plastic face shields effective against the corona virus?

(Photo: Ren Zhiqiang; Credit: European Photopress Agency)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkbxl0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc518vd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwnqw0dcv9)
UK restricts hospitality to combat coronavirus

UK prime minister Boris Johnson has announced new measures to tackle coronavirus. With new rules compelling the closure of bars and restaurants at 10pm, we ask Kate Nicholls, chief executive of the industry body UK Hospitality how the sector will cope. And Kim Sneppen, professor of biocomplexity at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen tells us how Denmark is handling a recent rise in coronavirus infections. Also in the programme, we're focusing this week on issues affecting voters in key battleground states ahead of November's US presidential election. Today, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been hearing how economic arguments could play on voters' minds in Pennsylvania. Plus, following India's ban of the popular Chinese social media app TikTok earlier this year, homegrown Indian competitors are filling the void. Chingari has managed to attract 30 million users to its platform in just three months, and we hear more from its founder, Sumit Ghosh.

(Picture: A waitress takes an order in London. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkc1b4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc51dlj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkc528)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sz8sfxj43)
Coronavirus restrictions in Europe

The British prime minister, Boris Johnson, has outlined a new set of measures aimed at curbing a resurgence of the coronavirus in England. He has introduced a 10 pm curfew for pubs and restaurants, and has paused plans to allow trials next month for the public to attend sports events. We look at the broader picture in Europe as governments attempt to halt the rise of cases in the continent.

We also go to Latin America, the world's worst-hit region with more than 8.7 million cases and 322,000 deaths. We look at the outbreaks in Colombia, Argentina and Mexico.

Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto helps to explain some other developments with the virus.

We hear about the rescue effort in Australia where volunteers are trying to save some 180 whales stranded in a remote bay there.

(Photo: People wearing protective face masks walk in a busy street in Paris Credit: Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkc8td)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkcdkj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpy4zn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc51rtx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqdvfpd0k)
2020/09/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkcj9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc51wl1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98h)
Keeping the structure of the internet safe

The Internet Society has created a way of checking how new regulations could harm the structure of the internet. As the internet doesn’t respect borders, what happens in one country can impact the internet in another. The internet can sustain one or two attacks but many at the same time could even bring it down. Until now there has been no way of predicting how such changes could affect the internet’s architecture. The new toolkit also identifies the critical properties that must be protected to enable the Internet to reach its full potential.

EEG that works with Black African American hair
Measuring brain activity can be done using Electroencephalograms, or EEGs. These rely on a number of electrodes being attached to the scalp and the tests are used to diagnose diseases like epilepsy. However if the electrodes are not attached to the scalp properly then getting accurate readings is very hard. This is a problem for people with thick and very curly hair – with some patients having to shave their hair for the test. Now Arnelle Etienne, a student at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, has designed electrodes that suit her hair type – she is African American and hopes her design will significantly improve test results for patients like her.

Buddy PKGE – tech to monitor animal vital signs
Harrison Lewis reports on a device capable of measuring animal vital signs that is being adapted to save human lives. The non-invasive tech could help sniffer dogs find people following natural disasters, alerting the handler as soon as dog detects a human heartbeat.


The programme is presenter by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.


(Image: Getty Images)

Studio Manager: Sarah Hockley
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkcn1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy521tpc)
UK imposes new rules to combat Covid-19 rise

The British prime minister, Boris Johnson, has used a national television address to call for a 'spirit of togetherness', urging people to observe the new rules he’s bringing in to combat the rapid rise in coronavirus infections. In England, rules on face coverings have been expanded and the number of people allowed at weddings has been halved.

Also on the programme: Republicans in the US now have the numbers to get President Trump's Supreme Court pick in place before the election - from a Democratic congressman, a call for wholesale reform; and NASA says it has a detailed plan to send astronauts back to the moon by 2024.

(Photo: A sign warning of rising Covid-19 cases in London after Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a range of new restrictions to combat the coronavirus outbreak. Credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkcrsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc52429)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkcwk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpymz5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc527tf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lxk52lzc)
UK restricts hospitality to combat coronavirus

UK prime minister Boris Johnson has announced new measures to tackle coronavirus. With new rules compelling the closure of bars and restaurants at 10pm, we ask Kate Nicholls, chief executive of the industry body UK Hospitality how the sector will cope. And Kim Sneppen, professor of biocomplexity at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen tells us how Denmark is handling a recent rise in coronavirus infections. Also in the programme, we're focusing this week on issues affecting voters in key battleground states ahead of November's US presidential election. Today, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been hearing how economic arguments could play on voters' minds in Pennsylvania. Plus, following India's ban of the popular Chinese social media app TikTok earlier this year, homegrown Indian competitors are filling the void. Chingari has managed to attract 30 million users to its platform in just three months, and we hear more from its founder, Sumit Ghosh.

(Picture: A waitress takes an order in London. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkd419)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18ydlx5c46)
US presidential election: Focus on Florida

In this edition we look at the issues affecting voters in the key state of Florida - in the second of our US election specials. Mary Ellen Klas, Tallahassee bureau chief for the Miami Herald, gives us an overview of the main issues. Fergus Nicoll will be joined by live guests including Dr Sharon Austin, professor of political science at the University of Florida, and Laura Geselbracht, senior climate scientist at the Nature Conservancy in Fort Lauderdale.
Also in the programme we consider how agricultural tariffs, imposed by President Trump in his trade battle with China, may have impacted the vote amongst American farmers in Florida in a report from journalist Heather van Blokland.
And we hear from Betty Riddle, whose right to vote was taken away last year after Amendment 4 was changed. It was passed in 2018 and gave back voting rights to those convicted of felony. Desmond Meade of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition tells us why Amendment 4 was passed.

(Picture: A "Welcome to Florida" sign; Credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkd7sf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpz06k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc52m1t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3csy1ql)
The Sun, Our Star

The Sun, Our Star: Space weather

At any moment, the predictions of your local weather forecaster might be suddenly superseded by space weather, a special breed of storms fomented on the Sun and launched toward Earth with potentially devastating consequences.

Most of the time, the solar wind billowing out from the Sun blows right past our planet without causing any ill effects whatsoever, but today, with our navigation and communications technology dependent on satellite based systems, a downdraft of space weather could disrupt entire countries.

Dava Sobel turns to Aditya L1, a new satellite under construction in India, to learn how many countries are developing their own eyes to watch the sun from space.

To know the Sun is an age-old dream of humankind. For centuries, astronomers contented themselves with analysing small sips of sunlight collected through specialised instruments. They chased after eclipses that exposed otherwise hidden layers of the Sun’s substance, and they launched Earth and Sun-orbiting observatories to monitor our star from space. Today, several satellites ‘watch’ our star from outer space. In August 2018, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, set off on a mission to go so far as to ‘touch the sun’ for the first time.

Our view of the sun from here is relatively murky, but it’s a trade-off we Earthlings have to accept: the protective bubble of the Earth’s magnetic sphere and atmosphere provides air to breathe and a shield against harmful radiation, but it distorts our view of the heavens. Nevertheless, astronomers have managed to piece together an understanding of the stars, and especially the Sun itself: how it’s constructed, how it behaves, how it came to be, forming from a vast cloud of cold hydrogen gas and the dust of older stars in a sparsely populated region of the Milky Way.

In five programmes, author Dava Sobel orbits the sun, getting as close as she dares, to understand the immense relationship we have with our nearest star.

Music composed by Chris O'Shaughnessy.
Producer: Jeremy Mortimer and Dakshiani Palicha

Audio for this programme was updated on 21 September 2020.

(Photo: An M9-class solar flare erupting on the Sun's northeastern hemisphere. Credit: Nasa/Solar Dynamics Observatory via AFP/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkdcjk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkdh8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjpz7pt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc52vk2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkdm0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz80wcj)
US record over 200,000 Covid-19 deaths

President Donald Trump said the new death toll was a "horrible thing" and claimed China "should have stopped" the virus. We hear from a doctor who'd predicted this number would be reached by November if masks were not used universally.

Turkey's restrictions to slow the virus means the wedding industry worth over $12 billion is being badly affected as we hear from the man who runs Turkey's biggest wedding planning website.

And we find out about the high tech city that the singer Akon has started building in Senegal, complete with its own currency the Akoin.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkdqry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz8103n)
Africa Covid-19: why are levels relatively low?

We speak to the Director of Africa Centres for Diseases Control and Prevention, John Nkengasong, about the latest coronavirus situation across the continent.

We get an update on the hundreds of whales that are stranded off Tasmania in what's become the biggest beaching in Australia's recent history.

And we have a report from the island of Lesbos in Greece to hear how the more than ten thousand refugees and migrants are managing two weeks on from the fire that destroyed the Moria camp.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkdvj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz813vs)
The debate over lockdown vs economy

As the UK bring in new restrictions to try and control the rise in Covid-19 cases, an economist and a public health expert debate the pros and cons of the measures countries are taking.

The Prime Minister of Norway will be telling us about going green - her vision for how the oil-rich country can turn towards renewable energy.

And we'll speak to the surfer who lost his board off Hawaii only for it to be found more than two years later, thousands of kilometres away on the other side of the ocean in the Philippines.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkdz86)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6w)
Leonid Volkov: What next for Russia's opposition?

As soon as he emerged from his coma Alexey Navalny, the Russian opposition leader apparently poisoned by novichok nerve agent, expressed his determination to return to Moscow. But what future is there for an anti-Putin political movement in a country where dissent is all too often seriously bad for your health? Stephen Sackur speaks to Leonid Volkov, opposition politician and chief of staff to Mr Navalny. Is there any weakening of the Kremlin’s grip on power?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc53bjl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8n5)
Why is fashion still not sustainable?

Making designer fashion more sustainable has been a cause célèbre for decades, so why hasn’t it happened yet? At the close of London Fashion Week, and just before the beginning of Paris, Tamasin Ford has been looking into why the industry hasn’t made the changes it needs. Kevin Bailey of the VF Corporation, one of the largest apparel and footwear retailers, says the industry has made great strides, while Roger Lee, of TAL apparel in Hong Kong, says a vague standards system for what counts as “sustainable” makes further progress difficult. But Christina Dean, founder of the Redress sustainable fashion awards as well as the upcycled fashion brand, the R-Collective, says companies could have already done a lot more to use re- and up-cycled materials in their new lines.

(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszms6)
When Nelson Mandela went to Detroit

Just months after his release from prison in 1990 the South African freedom fighter Nelson Mandela toured the USA. One of the eight cities he went to visit was Detroit. Benita Barden has been speaking to Reverend Wendell Anthony who was one of the people who welcomed him to the city.

Photo: Nelson Mandela and Rev Wendell Anthony in 1990. Courtesy of Rev Wendell Anthony.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkf30b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3csy1ql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc53g8q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkf6rg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Wise Web (w3ct0x62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkfbhl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq02xq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc53prz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x64)
Mozart's Requiem

Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives. Crime writer Val McDermid recalls how this music helped her after the loss of her father. Hypnotist Athanasios Komianos recounts how the piece took him to the darker side of the spirit world. And a friend of ballet dancer Edward Stierle, Lissette Salgado-Lucas, explains how Eddie turned his struggle with HIV into a ballet inspired by Mozart's music.

Basement Jaxx used the Requiem in their live shows and on their album Scars - Felix Buxton reveals his love for Mozart and the divine nature of the Requiem.

And Mozart expert Cliff Eisen takes us inside the composer's world: how the orchestra and choir conjure visions of funerals, beauty, hellfire and the confusion of death. He recounts how Mozart was commissioned to write the piece by a nobleman who may have intended to pass off the work as his own. The stern challenge faced by people trying to complete the piece are described by composer Michael Finnissy, who himself wrote a completion of the work.

The Requiem was performed at the funerals of many heroic figures - Beethoven, Napoleon and J F Kennedy, among others. Gordana Blazinovic remembers one extraordinary performance during the horrors of the Bosnian war - a show of defiance and grief from the ruins of Sarajevo City Hall.

(Photo: The recently discovered Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart portrait, by the artist Johann Georg Edlinger. Credit: Carsten Koall/Getty Images)


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkfg7q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrx)
Life without parole: Our fight for freedom

Brittany K. Barnett, an African American lawyer, grew up in the shadow of the US war on drugs in the 1980s. Like many others in her community in rural east Texas, Brittany’s mother was addicted to crack cocaine, and when Brittany was 22 years old, her mother was sentenced to eight years in prison.
 
In 1986, a new drug law was passed which created mandatory minimum sentences for drug possession, even for first-time, non-violent offenders.  The Anti-Drug Abuse Act also meant that sentences for the cheaper and more accessible crack cocaine were far harsher than those for offences involving powdered cocaine. It was when she was in law school, studying corporate law that Brittany discovered that this sentencing disparity disproportionately affected poor Americans, many of whom were black.
 
During her research she came across Sharanda Jones, a young African American woman who had grown up an hour away from Brittany. Sharanda had been given a life sentence without parole, which she was serving alongside her quadriplegic mother, for conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine. Brittany became obsessed with Sharanda's case and made her a promise: “I will get you out...Even if I have to take this case all the way to the White House." Brittany K. Barnett has written a book called A Knock at Midnight about her life and work. 

 
Picture: Brittany K. Barnett and Sharanda Jones in 2009
Credit: Courtesy of Brittany K. Barnett


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszms6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkfkzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq0bdz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc53y87)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkfpqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy523wck)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkfth3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3csy1ql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc545rh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxh5lm5l5p)
ILO: global jobs picture deteriorating

The International Labour Organisation says the impact of Covid-19 on jobs is worsening. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us details of their latest research. Also in the programme, continuing our series examining issues affecting voters in key swing states ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been taking a closer look at Florida. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how the pandemic is forcing breweries to adapt.

(Picture: A jobs protest in Washington DC. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkfy77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc549hm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkg1zc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sz8sg0f16)
Tasmania's race to save the whales

About 380 whales have died in what is suspected to be Australia's largest stranding on record. Rescuers in Tasmania are trying to free many more. We hear from someone involved in that operation.

Also, we return to our conversations with people sharing experiences about the coronavirus pandemic. Today, we hear from three people in the Czech Republic, where only weeks ago some were celebrating and bidding farewell to the pandemic. It now has one of the highest rates of infections in Europe.

And we speak to people paying their respects to the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She is lying in repose today and tomorrow at the U.S. Supreme Court and is the first woman in US history to have been granted this honour.

(Photo: Rescue efforts to save whales stranded on a sandbar take place at Macquarie Harbour, near Strahan, Tasmania, Australia, September 22, 2020. Credit: AAP Image/The Advocate Pool, Brodie Weeding via REUTERS)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkg5qh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszms6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkg9gm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq11wr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc54nr0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqdvfs8xn)
2020/09/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkgf6r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3csy1ql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc54sh4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccd)
The latest on global Coronavirus cases

This week as cases of Covid-19 continue to rise in the Americas and Europe we have some better news about how countries are signing up to help vaccinate everyone in the world once a vaccine is found to be safe and effective.

Covid-19 is a respiratory virus – which seemed to chiefly damage the lungs of the worst-affected patients. We hear how doctors treating them were astonished at how sticky their blood became, sometimes creating blood clots all over their bodies. Treating them with blood-thinning drugs like heparin makes sense but it’s a balancing act which current trials in the UK should help to clarify – as well as possibly lead to new treatments.

Most people who smoke want to give up. In some parts of the world like the UK products such as e-cigarettes – which contain nicotine but no tobacco - are recommended to help smokers quit. These vapes aren’t the same as heated tobacco products even though they look similar. And doctors writing in the British Medical Journal this week say they’re worried that a new ruling in the US has made things even more confusing for consumers who want to know which is the healthier option.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: Microscopic view of virus cells. Photo credit: Panorama Images/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkgjyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy524qlg)
Europe migration: EU plans mandatory pact to 'rebuild trust'

The European Union has called for a compulsory system where member states would either agree to take in asylum seekers or take charge of sending back those refused asylum.

Also in the programme: One of three officers involved in the shooting dead of black woman Breonna Taylor, a black woman, is to be indicted, but not directly for her killing; and Putin critic Alexei Navalny has been discharged from the Berlin hospital where he was treated for Novichok nerve agent poisoning.

(Photo: European Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson in a conference on the 23rd of September in Brussels. Credit: Reuters).


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkgnq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc550zd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkgsg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq1jw8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc554qj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lxk55hwg)
ILO: global jobs picture deteriorating

The International Labour Organisation says the impact of Covid-19 on jobs is worsening. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us details of their latest research. Also in the programme, continuing our series examining issues affecting voters in key swing states ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been taking a closer look at Florida. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how the pandemic is forcing breweries to adapt.

(Picture: A jobs protest in Washington DC. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkh0yd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18ydlx8819)
US presidential election: Focus on Texas

In the third of our US election specials we are talking Texas. Rahul Tandon is joined live by Dr Rebecca Deen, an associate professor of political science at University of Texas, and Andy Uhler, a Texas based reporter for our sister programme Marketplace.

The state is getting younger and more of those people are from the Hispanic community. We speak to first time voters to hear what issues concern them most ahead of the vote in November. The oil industry is a huge employer in the state and has had a rough time of late. How do Texans want their next president to help spring the important industry back to life?

We all know that Texans are a determined lot. So when one astronaut realised he was going to be in space during a presidential election, he was determined to vote. Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao was the first American to vote in a presidential election from space. We find out how he did it.

(Picture: Texas 'Lone Star' flag on side on bar; Credit: Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkh4pj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq1x3n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc55hyx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6lm)
Poland's gay pride and prejudice

A number of small towns in Poland have been campaigning against what they call 'homosexual ideology'. Local authorities in the provinces have passed resolutions against perceived threats such as sex education and gay rights. LGBT activists complain that they are stoking homophobia and effectively declaring ‘gay-free zones’. Both sides argue that they are protecting the universal values of free speech and justice. But the row has attracted international condemnation. The European Union has withheld funds to six of the towns involved, and some of their twinning partners in Europe have broken off ties. Meanwhile, politicians within Poland’s conservative ruling coalition stand accused of exploiting the divisions to further a reactionary social agenda.

Presenter: Lucy Ash
Producer: Mike Gallagher

(Image: A woman wears a rainbow face mask at a pro-LGBT demonstration in Poland. Credit: European Photopress Agency/Andrzej Grygiel Poland Out)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkh8fn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszms6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkhd5s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq24lx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc55rg5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkhhxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz83s8m)
US protests at decision over Breonna Taylor killing

Two police officers have been shot in the American city of Louisville during protests against the decision not to prosecute the police officers who killed a young black woman in her home.

Update on the whales still stranded off Tasmanian waters. Many have died, others are still being rescued.

and Volkswagen has agreed to pay $6m in compensation for the persecution of former employees in Brazil during two decades of military rule.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkhmp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz83x0r)
Street protests at decision over Breonna Taylor killing

Two Kentucky police officers have been shot in Louisville during protests sparked by the lack of charges against the police officers who killed Breonna Taylor.

With more than 30million around the world who have contracted the corona virus and nearly a million deaths globally, there's now another major concern.. Seasonal flu.. As winter sets in across many parts of the world, what challenges does this pose for medics?

Government officials and business people in Kenya face prosecution for fraud over the purchase of protective equipment during the coronavirus pandemic.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkhrf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz840rw)
Anger at lack of charges over Breonna Taylor killing

Two police officers have been shot in the American city of Louisville during protests sparked by the lack of charges against the police officers who killed Breonna Taylor. She is one of the higest profile killings in the US at the hands of law enforcement officers, and a rallying cry for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Can a contact tracing app, already in use in many countries, help the UK stem the new tide of covid cases?


and the artist who's working on world's biggest painting in Dubai - it's the size of two football fields


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkhw59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3z)
Will the US presidential debates change the course of the election?

On the 29th September the two US presidential candidates Donald Trump and Joe Biden will take part in the first of three 90-minute live televised debates ahead of the presidential election in November.

Tanya Beckett asks can the debates affect the outcome of the election?



(Composite image of Joe Biden (Credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters) and Donald Trump (Credit: John G Mabanglo/EPA)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc567fp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7xn)
Venture capital in Africa

Funding for African tech start-ups is booming. But only if you’re not African. Odunayo Eweniyi, is the co-founder of the first online savings and investment app in West Africa, Piggyvest. She tells Tamasin Ford about how hard it was to convince Western based Venture Capitalists to invest in them. Jesse Ghansah, the Ghanaian Founder of the Fintech company, Swipe says as an African founder he’s still judged differently. Iyinolowa Aboyeji, who’s from Nigeria, set up a financing initiative called the Fund for Africa’s Future. He says rather than looking at the problem of foreign founders in Africa receiving more investment than African founders, people need to look at why it’s happening. And Adaeze Sokan, also based in, Nigeria, is the Director of Design and Strategy at Ventures Platform which is a funding initiative focused on Africa. She says that more start-up money needs to be aimed at women.


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmp)
Blackwater killed my son

On 16 September 2007 private security guards employed by the American firm Blackwater opened fire on civilians in Baghdad's Nisour Square. Seventeen Iraqis were killed, and another 20 injured. The Blackwater guards, who were escorting a convoy from the American embassy, claimed that they had come under attack from insurgents, but eye-witnesses and Iraqi offficials quickly dismissed that version of events. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to Mohammed Kinani who was driving through the area at the time, and whose 9-year-old son Ali, was shot dead by the Americans.

Photo: An Iraqi looks at a burnt car on the site where Blackwater guards opened fire on civilians in Baghdad on 16 September 2007 (Credit ALI YUSSEF/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkhzxf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6lm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc56c5t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszccd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkj3nk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvy)
The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

Greenwood was an African American success story: a thriving, wealthy district of Tulsa. Over the course of two days at the end of May 1921 it was the scene of looting, rioting and murder. After 18 hours the area was razed to the ground by vigilantes. One eye witness said it looked like the world was coming to an end with bullets.

Nobody to this day has been able to establish the true number of deaths. Some put the figure in the hundreds, with casualties on both sides. The community rebuilt itself however, and today it’s the focus of a multi-million dollar investment and education programme.

Joining Rajan Datar to examine the events of 1921 are Carol Anderson, the Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University and the author of White Rage; Hannibal B Johnson, lawyer and author of numerous books on the city’s history including the forthcoming Black Wall Street 100: An American City Grapples With Its Historical Racial Trauma and John W Franklin, cultural historian and former senior manager at the Smithsonian National Museum for African American History and Culture in Washington DC. He’s also the grandson of Buck Colbert Franklin, a lawyer and leading community figure who survived the massacre.

There is language in the programme which reflects the historical records and accounts recorded at the time of the events in Tulsa, which some listeners may find offensive.


(Image: The aftermath of the Tulsa Race Massacre at east corner of Greenwood Avenue and East Archer Street. Credit: Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5f)
Cathy Freeman

In 2000, the aboriginal runner, Cathy Freeman, became the star of the Olympic Games in Sydney. After being given the honour of lighting the Olympic cauldron, she was under huge pressure to win the 400 metres in front of her home crowd. Freeman delivered in style - and went on an emotional victory lap parading both the aboriginal and Australian flags. Presented by Simon Watts

Picture: Cathy Freeman celebrating her 400m victory in 2000, Credit: Getty Images


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkj7dp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq2ztt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc56lp2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqf)
Coronavirus: Obesity's defining moment?

Emily Thomas asks whether the coronavirus pandemic will turn out to be the defining moment in the fight against obesity. Will we see governments take radical action, now that the pandemic has turned the spotlight on this growing global problem? And why hasn’t the pandemic made most of us eat more healthily?

Even experts have been surprised by just how strong an impact obesity has been found to have on the risks of coronavirus. We hear from Professor Barry Popkin, of the University of North Carolina, who led a major study into the relationship between the two. He tells us he’s worried that food companies are using the pandemic to push ultra processed food on low-income populations.

Professor Corinna Hawkes, of City, University of London, explains how obesity policy became personal in the UK after Boris Johnson caught the virus.

And Jacqueline Bowman-Busato, Policy Lead for the European Association for the Study of Obesity, tells us how her own experience of living with obesity has led her to lobby for changes in how obesity is viewed and treated. She says the pandemic has provided a much needed wake up call on a neglected and misunderstood public health issue.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Fat cells, Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkjc4t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbc)
Life without parole: A call from the president

Brittany K. Barnett was just 25 when she discovered the case of Sharanda Jones, an African American woman who was sentenced to life without parole for a first time drug offence. Spurred on by her own family history – her mother was an addict and had served time in prison – Brittany swore she would free Sharanda. Brittany was still just a law student but she persevered for years taking their fight to the highest office, all the way to the White House. They tell Anu Anand how after 16 years of waiting, Sharanda finally received the call that would grant her freedom. Together they have founded the Buried Alive Project, which provides free legal support for people serving life sentences in federal prison and Brittany has written a book called A Knock at Midnight about her life and work.

Riyad Aljoboury is a primary school teacher from Iraq. Riyad spent most of his life under the rule of Saddam Hussein, he knew very little about the outside world and spoke no English. When American forces entered Iraq in 2003 they were the first westerners Riyad had ever met and they had a profound impact of his life. Riyad spoke to Anu Anand in March 2017.

Picture: Brittany K. Barnett and Sharanda Jones
Credit: Courtesy of Brittany K. Barnett


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkjgwy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq37b2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc56v5b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszccd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkjln2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy526s8n)
Two police officers shot during Breonna Taylor protests

Ms Taylor, 26, a black hospital worker, was shot six times as three officers raided her home on 13 March. A grand jury in the city of Louisville returned only one minor charge against one of the officers, for shots which hit a neighbouring apartment.

Also on the programme: The British finance minister announces a new support scheme for businesses and workers to help them survive the enduring impact of the coronavirus pandemic; the British newspaper editor Harold Evans, has died aged 92. We'll hear how he helped expose the scandal of Thalidomide children in the early 1960s; and why is a Hollywood star thinking of buying a Welsh lower league soccer club?

(Picture: Kentucky State Police clear protestors from Jefferson Square Park in Louisville, Kentucky, USA Credit: EPA/Mark Lyons)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkjqd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6lm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc572nl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvv94dww76)
Coronavirus: Israel tightens second lockdown to avoid 'abyss'

Israel is tightening its second nationwide coronavirus lockdown as case counts rise. Mehul Srivastava is Israel bureau chief for the Financial Times in Jerusalem, and explains the government's latest moves. And we hear how Israel's businesses could be impacted from Uriel Lynn, president of the Federation of Israeli Chambers of Commerce. Also in the programme, all this week we've been examining issues affecting voters in key US battleground states ahead of November's presidential election. Today Rahul Tandon finds out what is at the front of people's minds in Texas. Plus, research from Cranfield University warns once again that the boardrooms of the UK's biggest firms don't look much like the UK itself, when it comes to female representation. Professor Susan Vinnicombe is founding director of the Cranfield International Centre for Women Leaders, and discusses the findings of the 15th edition of its Female FTSE Board Report.

(Picture: A sculpture in Tel Aviv encouraging Israelis to wear masks. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkjv4b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc576dq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkjywg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sz8sg39y9)
Protests after Breonna Taylor ruling

There have been angry protests across the United States following a decision not to prosecute the police who killed Breonna Taylor, a twenty- six year old black woman. She was shot dead when officers raided her apartment in Louisville in March. Protests have taken place there and demonstrators have marched in other US cities, including Los Angeles, Atlanta, New York, Philadelphia and Washington. We hear from people on the ground in Louisville.

Also, we hear from our reporter in Kenya on a corruption story: Kenyan government officials and business leaders face prosecution over the alleged theft of millions of dollars meant for Covid medical supplies.

And it's national heritage day in South Africa and people are celebrating by taking part in the Jerusalema dance challenge. We'll hear from some of them.

(Photo: Large scale protests taking place in the US calling for justice over Breonna Taylor’s death. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkk2ml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkk6cq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq3ysv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc57kn3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqdvfw5tr)
2020/09/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkkb3v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6lm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc57pd7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0x)
Why Covid -19 vaccines may not stop transmission

While vaccines against Covid -19 are being developed at unprecedented speed, none of them have been tested to see if they can actually stop transmission of the virus. They are designed to stop those who are vaccinated from developing Covid -19 disease, but not becoming infected.

This says Virologist Malik Peiris from Hong Kong University means while vaccinated people themselves may be protected they might also spread the virus.

Cells produced in the bone marrow may be responsible for an extreme immune response to Covid 19 in some people. Immunologist Lizzie Mann from Manchester University says this finding may help predict who will develop serious disease symptoms, and also provide a target for future treatments.

Extreme ice melt in the Arctic this summer may have a long term impact on the region says glaciologist Julienne Stroeve. She spent the winter in the Arctic and tells us about the environment she encountered.

And climate change is also impacting the tropics, research in Gabon from Ecologists Emma Bush and Robin Whytock shows a reduction of the amount of fruit available which is now impacting the health of forest elephants.





(Image Credit: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkkfvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy527mhk)
Coronavirus: EU urges immediate action to counter second wave

The European health commissioner, Stella Kyriakides, said some member states already had more Covid-19 cases than during the peak of the pandemic in Spring.

Also in the programme: Senior US Republicans issue reassurances that there will be a peaceful transition of power if Donald Trump loses November's presidential election; and the sniffer dogs of Finland hunt a new scent: COVID-19.

(Photo: European Commissioner for Health Stella Kyriakides puts her face mask on during a news conference. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkkkm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc57xwh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkkpc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq4fsc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc581mm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lxk58dsk)
Coronavirus: Israel tightens second lockdown to avoid 'abyss'

Israel is tightening its second nationwide coronavirus lockdown as case counts rise. Mehul Srivastava is Israel bureau chief for the Financial Times in Jerusalem, and explains the government's latest moves. And we hear how Israel's businesses could be impacted from Uriel Lynn, president of the Federation of Israeli Chambers of Commerce. Also in the programme, all this week we've been examining issues affecting voters in key US battleground states ahead of November's presidential election. Today Rahul Tandon finds out what is at the front of people's minds in Texas. Plus, research from Cranfield University warns once again that the boardrooms of the UK's biggest firms don't look much like the UK itself, when it comes to female representation. Professor Susan Vinnicombe is founding director of the Cranfield International Centre for Women Leaders, and discusses the findings of the 15th edition of its Female FTSE Board Report.

(Picture: A sculpture in Tel Aviv encouraging Israelis to wear masks. Picture credit: EPA.)



FRIDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkkxvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18ydlxc4yd)
US presidential election: Focus on Ohio

We hear from Republican and Democrat supporters in the Buckeye State, land of industry and agriculture, in the fourth of our US election specials. Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Karen Keslar, bureau chief at the Statehouse News Bureau in Columbus, to discuss issues affecting the state, including farming, education and the environment.
Local reporter Andy Chow of Ohio Public Radio guides us through the economic issues affecting Ohio and its voters, and we hear from a teacher in Cleveland how she thinks Republican governor Mike DeWine responded to the coronavirus pandemic.
We also speak to the chair of Ohio's Democratic Party, David Pepper, and farmer Paul Kalmbach, who voted for President Trump in 2016.

(Picture: The state of Ohio on a map. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkl1lm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq4t0r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc58dw0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3csztgl)
Anger and heartbreak for Al Hilal

Al Hilal coach Răzvan Lucescu expresses his anger following his team's expulsion from the AFC Champions League. Al Hilal were unable to field a team after Covid-19 swept through the squad.

Picture: Al Hilal's players are pictured ahead of the AFC Champions League match against UAE's Shabab Al-Ahli. The match was called off after the Saudi team failed to field the minimum required 13 players. (KARIM JAAFAR/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkl5br)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkl92w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq51j0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc58nc8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkldv0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz86p5q)
2nd night of US protests over Breonna Taylor killing

There's been a second night of protests in the US town of Louisville in Kentucky, following a decision not to prosecute officers who killed the African American woman, Breonna Taylor. Her death has become a rallying cry for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Scientists say the effects of climate change have made California more exposed to wildfire than ever before.

And dogs are being trained to sniff out Covid at an airport in Finland.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkljl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz86sxv)
US protests continue over Breonna Taylor killing

There's been a second night of protests in the US town of Louisville in Kentucky, following a decision not to prosecute officers who killed the African American woman, Breonna Taylor. Her death has become a rallying cry for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Pakistan's first nationwide polio vaccination campaign is underway since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Workers are battling the virus and local conspiracy theories.

And new analysis released by conservationists confirms cause for alarm in the Galapagos Islands, where it found that a massive Chinese fishing fleet was working in an unregulated way.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmklnb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wflz86xnz)
California faces greater risk of wildfires than ever before

New research says climate change has made California more vulnerable to wildfire than ever before. Scientists say it magnified the blazes that have torn through the American West this year.

Dogs are being trained to sniff out Covid-19 at an airport in Finland.

And students are returning to university, with many finding themselves constrained by Coronavirus rules. What can universities do to make sure that students stay safe, but also get to experience the freedoms of university life?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkls2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
Jane Goodall: A life with chimpanzees

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the world-famous conservation activist Jane Goodall. She has made a unique contribution to humankind’s understanding of our closest living animal relatives, the primates, and in particular the chimpanzee. Dr Goodall was in her twenties when she began her meticulous observation of chimp behaviour deep in Africa. Now she’s 86, and still campaigning to protect the natural world. Can the primates and so many other species be saved from mass extinction?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc594bs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78v)
London's dirty financial secrets

How some of the world's biggest banks are helping criminals launder money through the UK capital. The BBC's Andy Verity describes what a major new leak of documents tells us about the flows of dirty money through financial centres. Dr Susan Hawley from the charity Spotlight on Corruption tells us why banks and regulators aren't doing enough to stop it, and Tom Burgis, author of a new book Kleptopia: How Dirty Money is Conquering the World, explains why money laundering is a threat to democracy and freedom.

(Photo: London's financial district, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvg)
Bush v Gore: The 'hanging chads' US election of 2000

The US presidential election of 2000 was one of the closest and most contested in history. It was more than a month before the result was decided after a Supreme Court decision. It all came down to the vote in Florida, a 'swing-state', where irregularities and technical problems added to the confusion. In the end it's thought there were just a few hundred votes in it, but years later, the result, and the handling of the election in the state, divides opinion. Callie Shell was the official photographer for Al Gore's presidential campaign and documented the dramatic events behind closed doors in pictures. She's been telling Rebecca Kesby what it was like to be there.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmklwtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp7)
How misinformation spreads

Rory Cellan-Jones examines how misinformation spreads across online platforms. Plus, why Tesla’s Elon Musk is promising a $25,000 fully autonomous electric car. And former Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, co-chair of Facebook’s new oversight board, on how the body will handle controversies relating to the US election. With BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Anti coronavirus-lockdown protest in Trafalgar Square, London, August 2020. Credit: Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5982x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkm0kn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcng)
Covid-19: What's best for the elderly?

Governments across Europe have this week introduced new measures to curb the spread of Covid-19. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control reports that over the past fortnight five countries have reported over 120 cases per 100,000 residents, including Spain, France, and the Czech Republic. But the increased restrictions on freedom of movement and congregation in many countries is sparking push-back from some, who argue that the elderly should be shielded - while the rest of society returns to some semblance of normality. It’s a suggestion British Prime Minister Boris Johnson rejected this week during an address to the nation. He said such a policy wouldn’t be ‘realistic’ - insisting widespread transmission of the virus would inevitably see infection rates rise in vulnerable communities too. But after months of effectively being locked away from the outside world, many of those who’ve been shielding from the virus are now showing signs of adverse physical and mental health problems due to isolation. So as the pandemic grinds on, are attempts to protect the elderly from exposure to the coronavirus prompting other health crises - and what can be done to keep them safe and happy? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss - what is the best approach for the elderly?


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkm49s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq5wqx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc59hl5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkm81x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhl)
Music and memory

This week, the World Service marked World Alzheimer's Day with a BBC Music and Memory project, exploring the power of music to reach sufferers with the disease. It launched a website of global tracks to trigger memories, compiled with the help of the BBC's language services. Behzad Bolour compiled BBC Persian's list, his father suffered from dementia, but still sang with him. He also explores Iran’s complex relationship with music.

But what tracks does the rest of the world dance and remember to? We hear from BBC Arabic's Nahed Najjar, Adedayo Owolabi of BBC Yoruba, Kateryna Khinkulova of BBC Russian and Partha Prasad from the Indian languages hub in Delhi about some of the tracks they contributed to the world music database, and why.

The Moria camp fire: one family’s story
Talibshah Hosseini from Afghanistan had to flee with his wife and 3 children as his tent was destroyed in a huge fire at Greece’s largest migrant camp earlier this month. The overcrowded camp, on the island of Lesbos, was home to 13,000 migrants, the majority from Afghanistan. Talibshah told his story to BBC journalist Kawoon Khamoosh.

My Home Town: Feira de Santana
Camilla Costa of BBC Brasil takes us to her home town in Bahia, Brazil, to eat peanuts and sit in the hot springs with her grandmother.

Image: Elderly Indian lady listening on headphones looking at smartphone
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkmct1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq6475)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc59r2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkmhk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy529p5r)
What now for the family of Breonna Taylor?

Another night of anti-racism protests in Louisville, Kentucky - so what now for the family of Breonna Taylor, the African-American woman shot by police there in March? We'll speak to the family's lawyer.

Also in the programme: a rare apology from North Korea for the killing of a South Korean official; and more than one hundred whales rescued in Australia.

(Photo: A protestor sings at a memorial for Breonna Taylor in Jefferson Square Park in Louisville, Kentucky, USA, 24 September 2020. Credit: EPA/Mark Lyons)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkmm99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc59zkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt6dp6m58q)
Coronavirus: Rio 2021 carnival postponed indefinitely

Rio de Janeiro's carnival parade, due next February, has been postponed indefinitely. Tony Goes is entertainment reporter for the Brazilian national newspaper Folha, and tells us how Rio's economy is likely to be hit. Also in the programme, the Nigerian government has announced plans for a 280km cross-border train into neighbouring Niger. With a price tag of $1.9bn, the BBC's Ishaq Khalid in Abuja explains what's behind the move. Concluding our tour of key swing states ahead of November's US presidential election, we find out what economic issues are at the front of voters' minds in Ohio. Plus, what will the future of cinema look like once the coronavirus pandemic is under control? We get the perspective of Phil de Semlyen, global film editor of Time Out magazine.

(Picture: A scene from Rio's carnival in 2020. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkmr1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5b39t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0qhg)
Buddhist detox

Buddhist temple Wat Thamkrabok in Thailand has a worldwide reputation for its successful mix of ‘cold turkey’ and Buddhism in combating addiction.

The treatment begins with a sacred Buddhist vow never to use drugs again. For five days, the ‘patients’ drink a strong herbal medicine that induces vomiting. No contact with the outside world is permitted.

Through Buddhist teachings, the former addicts confront the bad habits that dominated their past lives and commit to building a life for themselves in the future that will not harm them or their loved ones.

The Wat Thamkrabok treatment programme was founded by an extraordinary characte, Luangpaw Yaai, and her two nephews in response to the Thai government’s introduction of a ban on opium possession that left tens of thousands of Thai addicts in the agony of withdrawal. A Buddhist nun, she wore the robes of a monk and had been an addict herself.

The majority of the patients are from Thailand, but drug addicts from all over the world come to Wat Thamkrabok.

Sucheera Maguire is at the temple with addicts on the Wat Thamkrabok treatment programme. She talks to those in treatment, and the monks who kicked their drug habits at the temple and then converted to the Buddhist faith.

Producer: Helen Lee
Presenter: Sucheera Maguire

(Photo: Buddha statues at Wat Thamkrabok, Thailand. Credit: BBC)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkmvsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sz8sg66vd)
Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in state

As Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg becomes the first woman to lie in state at the US capitol, we hear a conversation about her life and legacy from the next generation of American women entering the legal profession. How were they inspired by RBG? Are there differences in how the class of 2020 sees the ongoing fight for equality?

We'll hear some of the discontent and protest around coronavirus restrictions in Europe. Bar and restaurant owners in Marseille are furious at being told to close by the government in Paris, as France's case count accelerates. Celebrities in the Netherlands who declared themselves unwilling to follow the rules any longer faced a public backlash and many felt the need to backtrack. And can strict restrictions be counterproductive? That's one question we'll put to epidemiologist Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University, who will also answer some of your latest queries.

We wrap up Nate Hegyi's election journey - by bicycle - through the mountain states of the American west. If you've been listening for the past several Fridays, you will have heard Nate bring us voices we don't often hear from rural Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and Colorado. We've listened to views on the presidential vote to come and how it feels to be American at the moment. Nate is a reporter with the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration of public radio stations across America's Rocky Mountain West. He's finished the trip, so we'll get him to reflect on what he heard. With questions being raised by President Trump about the electoral process, do the voters he's met have confidence in it?

Image: Flowers, candles and an image left in memory of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the court building in Washington DC (EPA / Michael Reynolds)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkmzjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkn38t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq6vpy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5bgk6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jqdvfz2qv)
2020/09/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkn70y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5bl9b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv67)
Why am I embarrassed to be naked?

Why am I embarrassed to be naked? Chumbuzzo in Zambia wonders. And what would happen if we ditched our clothes and embraced nudity? Presenter Anand Jagatia and Producer Caroline Steel spend the day naked with other naturists to see if they can shift their embarrassment.

Maybe there are good evolutionary reasons to cover up or perhaps we are contributing to inequality and negative body image by hiding our real selves? Marnie Chesterton explores different cultural attitudes to nudity and finds out about the science behind embarrassment. Clothes optional.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmknbs2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywy52bjdn)
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg honoured

For the first time in US history, a woman lain in state in the Capitol in Washington DC. The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was honoured in a private ceremony attended by family members and invited guests.

Also, French police have arrested seven people suspected of involvement in an attack near former offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris.

And, European Commission to challenge Apple tax bill verdict.

(Photo: The family watched as Ginsburg's coffin arrived at the US Capitol. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmkngj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5btsl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p0gmknl8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bcgjq7bpg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptxc5byjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lxk5c9pn)
Coronavirus: Rio 2021 carnival postponed indefinitely

Rio de Janeiro's carnival parade, due next February, has been postponed indefinitely. Tony Goes is entertainment reporter for the Brazilian national newspaper Folha, and tells us how Rio's economy is likely to be hit. Also in the programme, the Nigerian government has announced plans for a 280km cross-border train into neighbouring Niger. With a price tag of $1.9bn, the BBC's Ishaq Khalid in Abuja explains what's behind the move. Concluding our tour of key swing states ahead of November's US presidential election, we find out what economic issues are at the front of voters' minds in Ohio. Plus, what will the future of cinema look like once the coronavirus pandemic is under control? We get the perspective of Phil de Semlyen, global film editor of Time Out magazine.

(Picture: A scene from Rio's carnival in 2020. Picture credit: EPA.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6lm)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6lm)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6lm)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6lm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vl558)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vljdn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vlwn1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vm0d5)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vm7wf)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vn33b)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vnl2v)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5ptk2vnptz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vp22c)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vp9km)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vpf9r)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vpsk4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vpx98)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vq11d)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vq4sj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vr3rk)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vrgzy)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5ptk2vrlr2)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4wphh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4wt7m)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4x1qw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4xjqd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4xngj)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4xs6n)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4xwys)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4y4g1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4ycy9)

BBC News Summary 16:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4yhpf)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4yvxt)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4yzny)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4z756)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5ptxc4zbxb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc4zq4q)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc4zymz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc50fmh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc50kcm)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc50svw)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc511c4)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc518vd)

BBC News Summary 16:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc51dlj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc51rtx)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc51wl1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc52429)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5ptxc527tf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5ptxc52m1t)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5ptxc52vk2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5ptxc53bjl)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct0wk0)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jv)

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Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8n5)

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Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78v)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18y1blnx7n)

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Business Weekly 01:06 SUN (w3ct0sp2)

Comedians Vs. The News 05:32 SAT (w3ct0x3b)

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CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv66)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98h)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0x5t)

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Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0x5t)

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From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9q0)

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From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9q0)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc27)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszccd)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszccd)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszccd)

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Heart and Soul 23:32 SAT (w3ct0x63)

Heart and Soul 05:32 SUN (w3ct0x63)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct0x63)

Heart and Soul 16:32 FRI (w3ct0qhg)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3csz1yp)

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More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pxv)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxv)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6tc)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wflz7v2kb)

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Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2ywkwrn8px)

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Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2ywkwrr5m0)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2ywy51y2kc)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2ywy51yxs8)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2ywy520zgg)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2ywy521tpc)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdbc)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4t)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4t)

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People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1n)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jqdvflh3g)

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Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh5d)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3byygxfknm)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lby1bmshr)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3lby1bqxx3)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjp)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk3b)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3cszj3s)

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The Documentary 08:32 SAT (w3ct0x1y)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjqd)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvx)

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