Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y3jjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18xp28wrmt)
Oregon wildfires: Dozens of people missing in deadly blazes

Dozens of people are missing in Oregon as wildfires continue to rage across the western US state. Meanwhile, misinformation about the source of the fires has been rife on social media. Journalist Shane Burley reports from Oregon on how these rumours are impeding journalists' ability to cover the fires. Also in the programme, Rio Tinto's boss is quitting after the destruction of Aboriginal sites in Australia. Netflix co-CEO Reed Hastings checks in with our sister station Marketplace to discuss his new book.And Michael Green of the Social Progress Imperative discusses their latest survey on those quality of life factors that go beyond mere economic growth. And in the Asian community, weddings often last for several days and are well known for the sheer number of invitees, their opulence and the cost. But with coronavirus putting a stop to large gatherings, the BBC's Nisha Patel has been finding out what it means for the future of Asian weddings.

All through the programme we'll be joined by Sinead Mangan of ABC in Perth.

(Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y3n91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02pdq5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjt0kf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjn)
Bell on Ashes glory and coaching ambitions

We're joined by England batting great Ian Bell as he bows out of the game with 118 Test matches and more than 20,000 first class runs to his name.

Find out more about a new campaign in Australia that's fronting up to racism and intolerance in cricket.

Can England repeat their T20 dominance over Australia in the 50-over form?

And a life of luxury in the IPL bio-bubble.

(Photo: Ian Bell celebrates and Ashes hundred in 2013. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y3s15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhj)
Behind the camera in Belarus

During protests against the President Alexander Lukashenko, shocking footage of violent police detentions and excessive force emerged. Elizaveta Vereykina of BBC Russian was one of the people behind the camera, and tells us what it was like for her on the ground in Minsk.

Nigeria's First Lady faux pas
Posting your daughter’s wedding photos online may not sound newsworthy. But if you're Nigeria’s first lady, and they show a lavish event while the country is suffering economic hardship under Covid-19, then it is. Princess Abumere in the Lagos Bureau explains the story, and the impact Covid-19 has had on the traditional big-fat-Nigerian wedding.

India's diamond polishers
Surat in Gujarat is the world's diamond polishing hub, cutting and polishing 70% of all diamonds. But lockdown brought that industry to a halt, with many losing their jobs. BBC Indian languages journalist Nitin Srivastava spoke to some of those affected.

Ethiopians in Yemen
The Gulf states and Middle East are historically popular destinations for migrant workers from Ethiopia, and travelling through war-torn Yemen a well-established trafficking route. But since the start of the global pandemic thousands of migrants have become trapped there, unable to go back or move on. BBC Arabic's Julien Hajj has been finding out more about their plight.

Photo: Elizaveta Verykina of BBC Russian in Minsk, Belarus 2020
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvd)
Why the US rejected universal healthcare

The USA is the only rich democracy not to provide universal healthcare. After WW2 US President Harry Truman was horrified that only a fifth of all Americans could afford proper healthcare. Most middle class Americans had no private health insurance and many found medical fees unaffordable. He calculated that more than 300,000 people died every year because they couldn't pay for proper treatment. In 1945 he tried to persuade Congress to push through legislation for an insurance programme meaning all workers would pay for their healthcare through a monthly fee or tax. But the American Medical Association - representing doctors - employed a public relations firm to lobby against the move. Claire Bowes has been listening to archive material of Harry Truman and speaking to Jonathan Oberlander a Professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Photo: President Harry Truman in 1947 (courtesy of US National Archives)
Archive material: courtesy of the Harry S Truman Library


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y3ws9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnd)
When will we get a Covid-19 vaccine?

Given the continuing high cost to societies of the coronavirus pandemic in lost lives and economic hardship, dozens of potential vaccines are being developed and tested at record pace. The top US infectious diseases expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, says it’s unlikely but "not impossible" that a Covid-19 vaccine could win approval in October - an aim championed by President Trump. But there are growing concerns that the speed at which this is taking place may undercut public confidence in any vaccine produced. In the US, Democratic Vice Presidential nominee Kamala Harris says she “would not trust Donald Trump” as the sole arbiter of whether a vaccine was safe and reliable. But even if a Covid-19 vaccine is ready soon, the WHO has warned that “vaccine nationalism” - which would see richer countries buying up the bulk of supplies leaving developing nations wanting - could extend the pandemic and delay a return to global economic growth. So how quickly could a vaccine be produced and distributed? And which people in which countries will get access to it first? Dan Damon and a panel of expert guests ask - when will we get a Covid-19 vaccine?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y40jf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02pryk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjtcst)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x39)
Adeola Fayehun and Alice Fraser

Funny couple Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini are joined by Nigerian YouTube star Adeola Fayehun and Australian comedy sensation Alice Fraser to tackle the world’s headlines. This week, why is China is expelling Australian journalists? And what is life really like for wizards in New Zealand?
Get involved and tell us about the funny stories where you are.
#comediansvsthenews


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y448k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7czmg92hk8)
Afghan government and Taliban prepare to talk

An historic moment as the Afghan government and the Taliban prepare to sit down to peace talks.

Plus, how COVID-19 is affecting remote tribes in Brazil.

And wildfires rage in the US state of Oregon.

Joining Pascale Harter to discuss these and other issues are Laura Spinney, a novelist, translator and science journalist, and Matthew Green, climate correspondent for the Reuters News Agency based in London.

(Picture: A portrait of some Afghan men. Credit: BBC)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y480p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7czmg92m9d)
The Last Night of the Proms with a twist

A new multicultural approach to the BBC's Last Night of the Proms concert.

Also, how COVID-19 is affecting remote indigenous tribes in Brazil.

And a historic day for Afghanistan, as the first formal peace talks between the government and the Taliban get underway in Qatar.

Joining Pascale Harter to discuss these and other issues are Laura Spinney, a novelist, translator and science journalist, and Matthew Green, climate correspondent for the Reuters News Agency based in London.

(Picture: A previous picture of the BBC's Last Night of the Proms. Credit: PA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y4crt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7czmg92r1j)
COVID message targets UK's young

How the young in the UK are being targeted by the government's Covid-19 messaging.

Also, a historic normalisation of relations between Bahrain and Israel.

And, a historic day for Afghanistan as the first formal peace talks between the government and the Taliban get underway in Qatar - we'll hear live from the talks in the capital, Doha.

Joining Pascale Harter to discuss these and other issues are Laura Spinney, a novelist, translator and science journalist, and Matthew Green, climate correspondent for the Reuters News Agency based in London.

(Picture: People eating out on Old Compton Street in Soho, London. Credit: PA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjtr16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1s)
Black Music in Europe

The 1970s

Clarke Peters uncovers Surinamese music in the Netherlands, black flamenco in Spain and lover’s rock in London. He also delves into the story of the Cape Verdean musicians who found a home in Europe in the 1970s and used synthesisers to express their new found sense of freedom.

(Photo: Clark Peters. Credit:: Alexandra Quinn)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y4hhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjz)
Remembering those lost to Covid-19

It is six months since the outbreak of a new coronavirus was declared a global pandemic. Very few lives around the world have not been affected by Covid-19. More than 27 million people have been infected. More than 900,000 have died with the virus and the numbers increase daily. Behind every case, there is a story.

Since March, BBC OS has been hearing those stories. The programme has been bringing people together from around the world with a shared experience of living through the pandemic. It has also been collecting audio messages from friends and relatives of loved ones lost to the virus. Those messages span different continents and different languages. Each articulates the memory left by each individual; the thing that made them special. And in many cases, they highlight the shared shock and speed of their passing and the feeling of helplessness.

Presenter Nuala McGovern guides you through those messages and remembers the names and the stories of those we have lost, through the words of those who love them.

Image: Faylita Hicks and her Uncle Fudge (Credit: Linda Gamez)


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y4m82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3byl6lnf1s)
What is life like in a sporting bio-bubble?

We examine life in a sporting bio-bubble, with Eleanor Oldroyd presenting the programme from inside the England Cricket bubble at Old Trafford.

Steve Elworthy from the ECB was responsible for planning the return of international cricket in England and he tells us what kept him up at night, his belief that a World Cup could be held under the current conditions and how cricket in 2021 could look.

The NBA players Union Wellness counsellor - Keyon Dooling - has spent time in basketball’s Florida bubble. He tells us what that was like, how his players are coping psychologically with life in the bubble and the support his union and the league are offering them.

The NFL season returned this week and we hear from Kansas City Chiefs fan – Brooke Fishel – who was at Arrowhead Stadium on opening night. We’re joined by Rob Ryan, who is a former assistant head coach of the Buffalo Bills, to look ahead to the rest of the season.

Ahead of the big Premier League kick-off we speak to IBF Featherweight world champion and huge Leeds United fan Josh Warrington, Jean-Claude van Dyk from the Johannesburg Leeds supporters club and the football journalist and broadcaster Alison Bender.

Sporting Witness this week looks at the challenge known as Everesting. It sees riders go up and down their local hill until they’ve covered the equivalent to climbing the 8848 metres of the world’s highest mountain. We hear from George Mallory and Andy Van Bergen, the organisers of the Everesting club.

And with Ferrari racing in their one thousandth Grand Prix this weekend we speak to Ross Brawn. Formula 1's managing director for Motorsport led Michael Schumacher to FIVE consecutive drivers world titles in his time at the Italian team.

Photo: The international Twenty20 cricket match between England and Pakistan at Old Trafford cricket ground in Manchester, north-west England, on September 1, 2020 (Credit: Getty images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y4r06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02qhfb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjv38l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x5z)
Why India is mad for motorbikes

What is behind the deep-seated and increasing passion for motorcycling in India?The hosts of the podcast Biker Radio Rodcast, explore what drives the love for the two-wheeler. Sunny and Shandy travel from a republic day parade in Delhi to a biker festival in Goa.They meet Joshua John, an ex-pastor turned Sunday Biker; Candida Louis, an office worker who left her career in finance to become a solo adventure rider; Ashish Rao Rane, a marine engineer who became a cross country rally racer; Sanjay Tripathi, a motorcycle enthusiast, who provides the historical backdrop to this relationship.

Through the adventures of these motorcyclists, such as their mass breakfast rides, long distance tours, races against the odds, and nostalgia, we learn about how this generation are taking to motorcycling in their own unique way.

Presenter/reporters: Sunny and Shandy (Arvinder Singh and Shirshendu Banerjee)
Producer: Prabhjit Bains

(Photo: Arvinder Singh and Shirshendu Banerjee)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y4vrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6tb)
Dark places and bliss with Reuben James and Izzy Bizu

Singer, pianist and producer Reuben James started playing the piano from the age of three, so in terms of the percentages of a life spent in music he’s right at the top. In this episode of Music Life, he asks Izzy Bizu, Scribz Riley and Gracey about the best song they’ve written, what they would change if they could go back in time and alter a piece of work, and the thing that they erase the most during the writing process, be it a lyric, a subject, or a feeling.

Izzy Bizu is a British-Ethiopian singer, songwriter, and BBC Introducing Artist of the Year, who has toured with Coldplay, AlunaGeorge, and Sam Smith.

Scribz Riley is a two-time Grammy-winning producer, songwriter and artist who’s worked with the likes of Khalid, J Hus, Normani and Yxng Bane. He was also handpicked by Marvel to contribute to the Black Panther soundtrack in collaboration with Kendrick Lamar.

And finally, Gracey is a pop singer and writer who’s worked with the likes of Kylie, Pet Shop Boys and Cher. As her career took off, she lost her voice and needed surgery to fix it, but her career is now back on track.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y4zhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yw6mfv541)
Afghan peace talks with Taliban begin

The American Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, has said the Afghan peace talks taking place in Qatar could liberate the country from the shackles of dependence. Our Chief International Correspondent, Lyse Doucet, is in Doha with guests from the Afghan government negotiating team and the Taliban. And Rob Malley of the International Crisis Group and former Special Adviser to president Obama reflects on nearly the 20 years of conflict that has brought the Taliban and Afghan government to the negotiating table.

Also in the programme: Spain's plans to tax instant messaging services; and the threat from coronavirus to the indigenous communities of the Amazon.

(Photo credit: Lyse Doucet)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y537l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lbks0vmwx)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you live coverage of Crystal Palace vs. Southampton as the new Premier League season gets underway.

We'll have reaction to all the day's top flight action.

Plus we'll be looking ahead to the women's US Open final and we'll round-up the day's other sporting drama - including the second women's golf major of the year, the ANA Inspiration, qualifying for Formula One's Toscana Grand Prix and the latest from the Tour de France.

Photo: Danny Ings (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y5l73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02rbn7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjvyhh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3csyvmw)
The volunteers fighting hate on Facebook

Nina spends three hours a day on Facebook – not sharing selfies or catching up on news, but trying to make the network a nicer place.

She’s a German member of a large and growing international movement called #IAmHere. Started in Sweden in 2016, tens of thousands of volunteers in more than a dozen countries organise in closed Facebook groups.

They target popular posts, often from mainstream news organisations, which get overrun by extremism, violent threats and hate speech. Their goal is to inject balance into the conversation with facts and more moderate views.

There’s some evidence to indicate that their efforts are starting to have an impact. We’ve been in around Europe visiting #IAmHere’s founder, Swedish journalist Mina Dennert, and several members from the German group – fittingly called #IchBinHier.

We find out how they operate – and what motivates people like Nina to spend so much time trying to chip away at such an enormous issue.

Presenter: Reha Kansara
Reporter: Jessica Bateman

Photo: German #IAmHere volunteer Nina
Photo credit: BBC


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxt)
Sex workers in the 18th century and jellyfish

Did one in five women in 18th century London made a living selling sex? And a suspicious statistic about the speed of jellyfish.

(Girls dancing for trade in Drury Lane, Westminster. Lithograph: Museum of London/Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y5pz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct0x8p)
BBC Proms 2020

Joy and sorrow: Shostakovich's Piano Concerto and Ravel's tribute to lost friends

Maurice Ravel: Le tombeau de Couperin
Dmitry Shostakovich: Concerto for piano, trumpet and strings (Piano Concerto No. 1)

Benjamin Grosvenor, piano
Jason Evans, trumpet
Philharmonia Orchestra
Paavo Järvi, conductor

In our second visit to the 2020 season of BBC Proms, London's Philharmonia Orchestra, directed by the Estonian conductor Paavo Järvi, play two contrasting works. The first is a gentle tribute to both the lost world of 18th century courtly dances and to friends of the composer, Maurice Ravel, lost in the First World War. The second is the exuberant Concerto for piano, trumpet and strings by the Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich. Two young British musicians, pianist Benjamin Grosvernor and trumpeter Jason Evans, are the soloists in the Concerto.

The French composer Maurice Ravel wrote Tombeau de Couperin, which in this context loosely translates as a Memorial to Couperin, around the time of the First World War. Francois Couperin was a leading composer of the French Baroque era of the 17th and 18th centuries and Ravel's piece originally started as a transcription of one of Couperin's dances called Forlane. That was in early 1914. Then the First World War began and things changed for music, musicians and the rest of Europe. Ravel became a truck driver at the front and the carnage he witnessed affected him deeply. So what started as a good-humoured re-working of 18th century courtly music turned into a memorial to fallen friends. For instance, the last movement of the original piano version of the Tombeau is dedicated to the musicologist Joseph de Marliave: his wife Marguerite Long gave the premiere of the piano suite in 1919. Ravel, who had unparalleled command of orchestration, later turned four of the six movements of the piano version into a symphonic work that has remained popular ever since.

Dmitry Shostakovich started his musical career as a pianist. In fact, in 1927 he was among the finalists of the Chopin piano competition in Warsaw, perhaps the most stringent of the world’s piano contests. He wrote his Concerto for piano, trumpet and strings as a vehicle to show off his pianistic skills, giving the premiere in 1933 and continuing to play it for many years afterwards. The unusual inclusion of trumpet as a second solo instrument is explained by the work's genesis: it was originally conceived as a concerto for Alexander Schmidt, the principal trumpet of the Leningrad Philharmonic, whose playing deeply impressed the composer.
The mood and form of the Concerto is far removed from the tradition of big Russian romantic concertos, such as those by Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninov. Instead, Shostakovich uses just the limited colour palette of a string orchestra and produces an ever-changing kaleidoscope of short melodies and quirky harmonies, liberally peppered with distorted quotations from other composers' works and popular tunes of the day. Shostakovich spent much of this period writing for the stage and film and also had a lot of experience of accompanying silent movies on the piano. Perhaps some of the pastiche and parody, often used in these genres, has found its way into the Concerto.

(Photo: Benjamin Grosvernor, Jason Evans, Philharmonia Orchestra and Paavo Järvi play Shostakovich at a BBC Prom at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Credit: BBC/Chris Christodoulou)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y5tqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk39)
Backstage: Celtic Connections

Celtic Connections is Europe’s largest winter music festival, with over two thousand musicians from across the world gathering for a global celebration of music. Nikki Bedi talks to some of the biggest and most exciting names who took part.
Americana star Ryan Bingham tells us about the stories he felt compelled to sing about and how he moved from riding bulls, to winning an Oscar, a Grammy and a Golden Globe for his song The Weary Kind.
Cathy Jordan, lead singer of the band Dervish, talks about the power and heritage of Irish music.
Eighth generation Sarangi player Suhail Yusuf Khan, who mixes Hindustani classical music with traditional folk, explains why the instrument works so well across continents and styles.
Singer-songwriter Valérie Ékoumè on the inspiration she finds in her Cameroon roots.
We’ll hear from British folk supremo Sam Lee on songs steeped in the ancient world and the old stories.
The festival’s Creative Producer Donald Shaw tells us what makes a Celtic connection
And The East Pointers share the importance of music to the inhabitants of Prince Edward Island in Canada’s remote North Atlantic.


(Photo: Ryan Bingham. Credit: Stephen J. Cohen/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y5ygh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yw6mfw432)
Afghan government urges ceasefire with Taliban

The Afghan government has called for a ceasefire at the start of the first direct talks with the Taliban in Qatar; the militant group is asking for patience. The US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, said both sides had a historic opportunity to overcome their divisions.

Also in the programme: Deadly wildfires continue to sweep through US West Coast states; and how Covid-19 is affecting remote indigenous tribes in Brazil.

(Photo: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the opening session of the peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban in Doha, Qatar. Credits: EPA).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y626m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pz)
India struggles to contain Covid-19

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

India is now the second worst affected country in the world by the coronavirus, having recently surpassed Brazil. The government there has committed to significantly ramping up testing but there is growing concern over large numbers of cases in smaller towns, cities and rural India where healthcare services may not be able to cope. Yogita Limaye had a brush with the virus herself but recovered quickly.

An era of Japanese politics is drawing to close with the departure of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Japan’s longest serving prime minister in modern times. Mr Abe announced he would be standing down because of serious health problems. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes examines his legacy.

Wildfires have raged through central and northern Argentina for much of this year. More than 14,000 hectares of precious grassland and vegetation have so far been lost. Natalio Cosoy has met some of the people who call the banks of the Paraná River home and have been trying to cling onto their livelihoods.

In the mid-1950s, a couple of winegrowers near the town of Agde in southern France kept chasing away German holidaymakers sunbathing naked on their property next to a sandy beach. Eventually it became too much work and they decided to rent the land out to nudists. Fast forward to today, Cap d’Agde is home to the biggest naturist resort in Europe. Chris Bockman has been finding out how the naturist and swinging community faired with coronavirus restrictions.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Jasper Corbett

(Image: Fisherwoman wearing a protective mask at a crowded Mumbai market. Credit: Reuters/Francis Mascarenhas)


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjwfh0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y65yr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02rycw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjwk74)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x60)
Father Joe

Just over a year ago, 29 year old Lyra McKee was shot dead in Northern Ireland.

The day after she was murdered, the parish priest in the part of Londonderry where she was shot was angry and deeply upset, and he spoke out against those who pulled the trigger. Father Joe Gormley knew it could be dangerous to be so vocal but nevertheless he said: "Our parish is full of so many good people and these people come into our area and use us to carry out such vile acts. How dare they. How dare they."
"They have done it in this Holy Week. They have done it in a way that is totally, totally anti-Gospel and literally anti-Christ."

Father Gormley was right. Speaking publicly took its toll. He felt at risk from groups like the New IRA and Saoradh, and fellow clergy urged him to watch it.

However Father Gormley hasn't stopped meditating on Lyra's death. Now he feels it's safer to tell the story of what it's like to serve parishioners in a housing estate which has been at the heart of the sectarian conflict for so long.

Presented by Siobhann Tighe.

(Image: Father Gormley / Credit: BBC)



SUNDAY 13 SEPTEMBER 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y6fg0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sp1)
Bringing back viruses from the dead

We hear from the industry that brings viruses back from the dead. The world of biotechnology is rapidly evolving - it recreates the stuff we can’t necessarily touch and feel, like smells and bacteria. Can it help contain future pandemics? Manuela Saragosa explores the risks and opportunities. We also head backstage at the theatre - many shows are having to come up with novel ways to perform productions, but are they able to sustain a business under social distancing rules? Rob Young speaks to the artistic director of the world famous Royal Albert Hall in London’s West End about their plans to ensure shows carry on. Presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma.

(Picture: Anonymous vial containing a clear liquid; Credit: MirageC/Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y6k64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02s9m8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjwxgj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3csyvmw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4s)
Tuning in to the future for shortwave

We answer your questions about the BBC World Service’s plans for shortwave. With many tens of millions still relying on it to listen every day, what does the future hold?

Plus: earlier this year it was “temporarily suspended” due to Covid - but now Weekend is back. We get your reaction.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y6ny8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Wise Web (w3ct0x61)
World Wise Web: Part one

Teenagers meet pioneers whose inventions shaped our digital world. In the first episode of a two-part special, we hear from Tony Fadell, one of the creators of the iPod; Professor John Goodenough, whose lithium-ion battery kick-started the digital revolution; Professor Bradford Parkinson, the leader of the team that developed GPS; computer programmer Radia Perlman, often referred to as the "mother of the internet"; Keller Rinaudo, whose company has built what it claims is the world's fastest delivery drone; and Dr Caroline Hargrove, an engineer who developed the first Formula One simulator. How did they develop their brilliant ideas, and what lessons do they have for the aspiring engineers, designers and innovators of the future?

Presenter/reporter: Anna Zanelli
Producer: Tamsin Barber
Editor: Helen Toland


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y6spd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjx4ys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl8)
United Zingdom

12/09/2020 GMT

Zing Tsjeng wonders what it means to be British. She travels around the UK to find out.


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhw)
Why do we laugh?

There are thousands of academic papers about depression. There are, in comparison, virtually none about laughter. We’ve been talking to a leading expert on laughter – who argues that we should take it more seriously.

Picture Credit: Tim Robberts/Getty


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y6xfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02snvn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjx8px)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y715n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7czmg95dgc)
More protests in Belarus planned

Belarus braces for another day of protest; and the women who prevented a police van from taking demonstrators away.

As fires in California continue to burn, a scientist tells us climate change is making such incidents more likely.

And we ask if the US film industry is coming under increasingly malign outside influence?

Joining Pascale Harter to discuss these and other issues are Alex von Tunzelmann, historian, screenwriter, and author, and Tim Marshall, a writer, broadcaster and journalist.

(Picture: Belarusian policemen detain protesters in a police van in Minsk. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y74xs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7czmg95j6h)
Coronavirus and remittances

As the coronavirus destroys jobs for workers abroad, what happens to the money they send home?

The latest on protests in Belarus, and a Belarusian poet's take on what's happening in her country.

And should authors hold on to newsworthy information for their books?

Joining Pascale Harter to discuss these and other issues are Alex von Tunzelmann, historian, screenwriter, and author, and Tim Marshall, a writer, broadcaster and journalist.

(Picture: A Nepali woman, where more than 56 percent of households receive remittances. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y78nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7czmg95mym)
The Afghan government and the Taliban set to talk

We return to Doha, in Qatar, where representatives of the Taliban fighters and the Afghan government are starting their first day of negotiation.

Also, Hollywood is often described as America's soft power, but why are some writers and producers expressing concern about China's influence in the US film industry?

Joining Pascale Harter to discuss these and other issues are Alex von Tunzelmann, historian, screenwriter, and author, and Tim Marshall, a writer, broadcaster and journalist.

(Picture: Members of the Taliban delegation attend the opening session of the peace talks in Doha, Qatar. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjxmy9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqc)
The fertiliser that blew up Beirut

Following the Beirut explosion, we’re exploring the chemical that caused the blast - ammonium nitrate. It’s something many of us will have come across before, it’s in some of our antibiotics and used to feed yeast but it’s most commonly sold as a fertiliser. Graihagh Jackson examines how this substance has changed the world - feeding millions on the one hand, and fuelling warfare, pollution and biodiversity loss on the other.

If you would like to get in touch, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Ammonium nitrate on petri dish. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y7df1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjxrpf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf08)
Why 8 of us were sealed in a glass dome

In September 1991, a crew of eight people were locked inside a giant air-tight terrarium in the Arizona desert for two years. Biosphere 2, as it was called, was filled with plants and wildlife - it was an experiment to see if humans could create similar sealed worlds on other planets. At the time it was described as revolutionary and controversial in equal measure because not long into the experiment, tensions began to simmer and oxygen began depleting. Outlook's Saskia Edwards spoke to the original crew members Mark Nelson, Sally Silverstone, Taber MacCallum and Jane Poynter about what really happened inside.

Sally Silverstone and Mark Nelson have recently re-released a book they wrote while inside the biosphere called 'Life Under Glass: The Inside Story of Biosphere 2'

Picture: The 8 original Biospherians outside part of Biosphere 2
Credit: Corbis Historical/ Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y7j55)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x4y)
How has Covid impacted India’s digital divide?

India has more than 630 million internet subscribers - that is more than the population of the US, the UK, Russia and South Africa put together. India also has among the world’s cheapest mobile data prices and affordable devices, which has drastically improved internet access in the last few years.

All of this excitement, however, has the sobering reality of India's continuing digital divide. For every Indian who has access to the internet, there is at least one who does not - and that person most likely lives in a rural area. The coronavirus pandemic and its resulting lockdowns are pushing everyone unexpectedly toward an online-only environment, and the spotlight has now shifted to rural India.

So, in this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how the pandemic is forcing a change toward digital lifestyles in the country.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Osama Manzar, founder and director, Digital Empowerment Foundation; Avipsha Thakur, founder, Bunavat; Amith Agarwal, co-founder & CEO, AgriBazaar eMandi


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjxwfk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y7mx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02tdbf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjy05p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3csy1qj)
The Sun, Our Star

The Sun, Our Star: Energy

The Sun, our star, produces its prodigious energy by a process of nuclear fusion at its core. We are unable to mimic that trick here on Earth: our nuclear reactors work by splitting atoms, not fusing them, and generate a lot of toxic waste. With a free standing solar mini grid in Kenya and the problems of the old grid system in California, Dava Sobel explores the progress being made in tapping the Sun for its inexhaustible supply of free, clean energy.

Music composed by Chris O'Shaughnessy.
Co-produced with Tom Roseingrave.

Audio for this programme was updated on 8th September 2020.

(Photo: Solar panels on the Kitonyoni grid are cleaned. Credit: BBC)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y7rnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct0x8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y7wdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yw6mfy214)
Belarus protests continue without opposition leaders

The fifth week of Sunday demonstrations are being held in Minsk despite seven of the eight opposition leaders having been detained or forced into exile. Meanwhile Russia appears to be stepping up its support of the Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenka.

Also in the programme: Opposition coalition in Mali rejects a transition charter drawn up by the military leadership; and Melbourne eases its strict lockdown.

(Photo: Belarus policemen prepare to detain participants during a rally to protest against the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, 13 September 2020. Opposition activists continue their every day protest actions, demanding new elections under international observation. Credit: EPA/STR)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y804p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 World Wise Web (w3ct0x61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y83wt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvw)
Who were the Huguenots?

The Huguenots gave the word 'refugee' to the English language - they were French protestants escaping religious persecution, who fled from France to neighbouring states between the 16th and 18th centuries. Despite their early experience of violence and religious upheaval, they are widely celebrated for their contribution as migrants, famously as silk weavers and silversmiths, traders and teachers.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the Huguenots and their global legacy are three experts: Owen Stanwood is Associate Professor of History at Boston College in the United States and is the author of 'The Global Refuge: Huguenots in an Age of Empire'; Ruth Whelan is Professor of French at Maynooth University in Ireland, where she researches the religious and intellectual culture of French Protestants between 1680 and 1730; and Kathy Chater is a London-based historian and genealogist. She’s the author of 'Tracing Your Huguenot Ancestors'.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service

Image: Engraving depicting French Huguenot refugees as they landed in Dover
Image Credit: adoc-photos / Getty Images


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y87my)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lbks0ys98)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you live coverage of Tottenham Hotspur v Everton on the opening weekend of the new Premier League season.

We'll have reaction to the day's early game between newly-promoted West Brom and Leicester City.

Plus we'll be looking ahead to the men's US Open final and we'll round-up the day's other sporting drama - including the second women's golf major of the year, the ANA Inspiration, Formula One's Toscana Grand Prix and the latest from the Tour de France.

Photo: Jose Mourinho & Carlo Ancelotti (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y8lwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02vc9g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjyz4q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1x)
Rulebreakers

Accused of hacking the Pentagon

Seven years ago in a sleepy English village a doorbell rang. In that moment, Lauri Love’s life changed completely. Lauri was arrested at the door. He was accused of hacking into US government websites and sharing employee data as part of an Anonymous protest. He faced extradition and 99 years in US jail. That extradition request was denied seven years ago, but the allegation against him still stands.

Producer Alice Homewood first met Lauri Love through friends in 2013. She got to know this big-hearted, peace-loving person who liked to wheel his sound system through the streets of Norwich sharing techno music with the world. Three months later his face was splashed across the front pages of the international press and he was labelled a dangerous criminal by the US government. Alice tries to understand how her gentle friend came to be accused of one of the biggest cyber-crimes in history.

Lauri has a vision for a better world. Through the eyes of his friends, family and autism expert professor Simon Baron Cohen, we learn what it’s like to be Lauri, living with a calling that he can’t refuse.

Two years ago Lauri learned he was safe from extradition but he is still not a free man. Today, he is in legal limbo and trying to build a life there. We follow Lauri over six months, as he starts a new job, attempts to move out of his parents’ home and deals with family illness, all with the constant threat of arrest hanging over him.

Producer/presenter: Alice Homewood.
A BBC World Service/Sundance Institute Production


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y8qmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y8vcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yw6mfz105)
Belarus protests keeps up pressure on Lukashenko

Tens of thousands have marched through the Belarus capital Minsk for a fifth Sunday running, demanding the resignation of President Alexander Lukashenko. We hear from one of the protestors.

Also on the programme: A controversial second nationwide lockdown in Israel ahead of the Jewish New Year; and the mask that's music to the ears of a world-famous conductor - who's customised a Covid accessory to improve concert hall acoustics.

(Photo: Belarusian policemen detain a participant during a rally to protest against the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, 13 September 2020. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y8z3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjzbd3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xhw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2y92vv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bbr02vv8z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tjzg47)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 14 SEPTEMBER 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7f5m8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57rr8y9ppv)
Why women are losing out during coronavirus

Why are so many women losing their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic? We hear from Karin Kimbrough, Chief Economist of Linkedin. One of the world's richest sports leagues kicked off this weekend - the English Premier League. But how much have its finances been hit by the coronavirus? And we hear about the real-life consequences of cancel culture. (Picture of a businesswoman at work via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v3jwn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7f9cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d01sj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v3nms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Documentary (w3csy5bl)
Sweeping the world

All around the world the broom is a ubiquitous object used for sweeping homes, places of work and worship. It is so ordinary, so everyday, that a huge range of idioms, traditions and beliefs in the power of sweeping have appeared. Award-winning poet, Imtiaz Dharker presents a reflective evocation in words, sound and music of the broom in many cultures.

In India, the negative energies of the house are swept away early in the morning and in Nigeria, the belief is strong that you do not sweep at night or you will sweep the wealth out of the house. In England, Bradley Nash is a “Broom-squire” whose family have been making traditional besom brooms for at least 300 years. He gathers and stores birch wood during the winter months and crafts the head and the handle in just ten minutes!

In the 15th Century the first image of women flying on brooms came from the French Alps, marking the start of the early modern European witch hunt - the means by which women were persecuted. Professor Jack Zipes talks of the German poet, Goethe’s Der Zauberlehrling or "The Sorcerer’s Apprentice" as the inspiration and source for Walt Disney’s film Fantasia with its dancing brooms.

In Han Dynasty China 2000 years ago, a small, beautifully made broom allows us a glimpse into the daily life of a soldier stationed at a border watchtower looking out over the dusty desert. And a strange broom made of puffin wings from the Faroe Islands reminds us how adaptable we are at making such a necessary object out of the materials we find around us.

Whether it is dust, spirits or the mythic power of the broom to break free and cause havoc, this programme takes a sweeping look at a never-ending story.

(Photo: Bradley Nash, besom maker. Credit: Loftus Media)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7ff3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5c)
Cycling's 'Everesting' challenge

During the Coronavirus lockdown, many cyclists have become obsessed with a challenge known as Everesting, where riders go up and down their local hill until they’ve covered the equivalent to climbing the 8848 metres of the world’s highest mountain. One early Everesting ride dates back to 1994, when it was completed on a mountain near Melbourne by George Mallory, the grandson of the famous climber of the same name. Mallory’s achievement later inspired an Australian cycling club to turn Everesting into an organised challenge, which has now been completed by thousands of amateur and professional cyclists across the world. Simon Watts talks to George Mallory and to Andy Van Bergen, the organiser of the Everesting club.

PHOTO: Chinese cyclist JJ Zhou attempts to "Everest" on Mount Everest itself (Picture: Andreas Illmer)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7fjvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d098s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v3x41)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3csz1sv)
Did cooking make us human?

Many of us enjoy cooking – but when did we switch from eating our food raw, to heating it? Listener Logan enjoys his beef burgers rare, but wants to know why he still feels compelled to grill them? Presenter Anand Jagatia travels to a remote South African cave where our ancestors first used fire at least a million years ago, which one man says could help prove when our species started cooking.

And he talks to a scientist who shows how the composition of food changes when it’s cooked, to allow us more access to give us more access to calories - and hears how a completely raw food diet could have disastrous consequences for health.

Producer: Marijke Peters
Presenter Anand Jagatia

(Image: A large pan held over an open fire. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7fnls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py1xyh)
Climate change row over fires in US

As President Trump flies to the fires zones of California we get a local picture from one small community hit by a firestorm such as has never been seen in the state.

The embattled president of Belarus flies to Russia to talk tactics after more street protests against his method of counting general election votes.

Israel becomes the first country to go back into a second lockdown after a spike in virus cases, as elsewhere in the region the pandemic in Yemen has intersected with one of the world's worst humanitarian crises.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7fsbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py21pm)
Are the US 'apocalyptic' fires climate-change related?

President Trump heads to California as devastating wildfires sweep through the state and political leaders on the Pacific coast accuse him of denying the role of climate change in the crisis.

Who will be Japan's next Prime Minister? The governing Liberal Democratic Party chooses its new leader later.

In sport: Punches at the Parc Des Prince as five red cards marr Le Classique between Paris Saint Germain and Marseille, with Brazilian superstar Neymar alleging racism after throwing a jab of his own.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7fx31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py25fr)
What part will Russia play in Belarus?

Following weeks of protests in Belarus after disputed election results the man at the centre of it all - President Alexander Lukashenko - has made it clear he's set to stay ahead of talks about to take place in Sochi with President Putin.

Tens of thousands of people have now fled their homes and 33 people have died so far as a result of the fires that have been raging for three weeks in Oregon, California and Washington.

And Japan has a new Prime Minister after the governing Liberal Democratic party met to decide a new leader following the Prime Minister's decision to step down.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2yb5l0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2b)
Douglas Ross: Can the new Scottish Conservative leader preserve the UK?

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson faces momentous challenges. The coronavirus pandemic, an economic slump and a looming moment of truth for Britain’s relations with the EU. In the midst of this turbulence the future of the United Kingdom itself looks uncertain. Polls suggest increasing numbers of Scots want out of the Union. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the new leader of the Scottish Conservative party, Douglas Ross. Are events playing into the hands of the Scottish nationalists?

(Photo: Douglas Ross, newly announced Scottish Conservative leader, talks to media in Forres, Scotland, Britain 5 August, 2020. Credit: Russell Cheyne/Reuters)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tk0jvd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jt)
US Elections: The view from Beijing

Tensions with China have simmered for the past three years ever since President Trump initiated the so-called trade war.

As Ed Butler hears from tech analyst Dan Wang, the trade war could prove a death sentence for Huawei, one of China's highest-profile firms. So what is likely to change after the US election, depending on who wins? Not much, says China analyst Rui Zhong, as Beijing's priorities under President Xi appear far more domestic. And Daniel Russel, former adviser on Asia to President Obama, agrees, saying the world looks very different from that previous administration. But Ian Bremmer, chair of the Eurasia Group, counsels that the election still has huge potential for the global balance of power.

(Picture Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkd)
Resisting 'Europe's last dictator' in Belarus

For more than 20 years, people in Belarus have been protesting against the authoritarian rule of President Alexander Lukashenko - who's been dubbed Europe's last dictator. Lukashenko came to power in a landslide election victory in 1994 but he soon changed the constitution to give himself sweeping new powers. He has remained in office ever since, winning elections which observers say are rigged. Opponents of the regime have faced harassment, violence and arrest. Some are believed to have been kidnapped and murdered by the state. Alex Last has been speaking to the exiled dissident and co-founder of the Belarus Free Theatre, Nikolai Khalezin, about the origins of the protest movement in Belarus.

Photo: A banner compares Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko to Stalin and Hitler, during a protest march in Minsk, Belarus, March 15, 2000 (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nzr2yb9b4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Documentary (w3csy5bl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pt5tk0nlj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3csz1sv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7g8bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct0x39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v4mlt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3csyvmw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7gd2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d14hp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v4rby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3r)
Writing a feminist anthem

Two women who’ve used music to empower women talk to Kim Chakanetsa about writing a song that become a rallying-cry around the world.

Madame Gandhi is a percussionist, producer and activist who has drummed for M.I.A and toured with Oprah. Her musical catalogue doubles as a manifesto for gender equality.

Sibila Sotomayor is part of LasTesis - a collective of four female artists in Chile who wrote the song, A Rapist in Your Path. Within a few weeks of its first performance it was replicated hundreds of times around the world, and videos of flashmob performances from Turkey to Venezuela have gone viral.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Sibila Sotomayor (credit: Sibila Sotomayor)
R: Madame Gandhi (credit: Djeneba Aduayom)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7ghtp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3k)
My soldier dad's goodbye tape

Tricia Davies Nearn’s father was killed in the Vietnam War when she was just two years old. Growing up without him, she knew there was something missing, even with a loving family around her. Her mother, an ardent fan of musicals, was careful never to play music from West Side Story, for example. It was only as an adult that Tricia would discover an extraordinary archive of tape recordings that would help her to understand why, and to get to know her father better.

Picture: David Davies
Credit: Tricia Davies Nearn


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7gmkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d1czy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v4zv6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3csz1sv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7gr9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwr4xyj)
Belarus protests: Lukashenko meets Putin as unrest continues

Belarus's embattled leader, Alexander Lukashenko, has arrived in Russia's Black Sea resort of Sochi for talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Also on the programme: a report from Yemen on the fight against coronavirus in a very poor country with few doctors; and the lockdown has seen the return of frolicking pink dolphins in the waters around Hong Kong.

Picture: Russian President Vladimir Putin and Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko. Credit: Reuters.


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7gw22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Documentary (w3csy5bl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v57bg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv0h4h4qgs)
Chip designer ARM sold to Nvidia for $40bn

ARM's co-founder Herman Hauser has asked Boris Johnson to attach conditions to its sale. Dr Stephanie Hare is author of the forthcoming book Technology Ethics, and explains why the sale of the chip design firm is causing some anxiety in the UK. Also in the programme, US tech firm Oracle has confirmed that it is part of a proposal submitted to the US Treasury to work with Byte Dance, the parent company of the massively popular video sharing app TikTok. The BBC's Karishma Vaswani tells us about the background to the furore caused by President Trump's deadline for the firm to find a buyer or face a ban in the US. And the BBC's Ed Butler takes a closer look at the impact the trade war between the US and China is having on the upcoming US presidential election. Plus we have a report from Ijeoma Ndukwe exploring the challenges business owners from ethnic minority backgrounds in the UK can face when it comes to getting bank loans at affordable rates.

(Picture: Two hands hold a microchip. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7gzt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v5c2l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7h3kb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2syxj41gm5)
Coronavirus: Israel to reimpose national lockdown

We go to Israel which is set to bring in a three-week national lockdown on Friday following a rise in cases. The country is seeing about 4,000 new infections a day, and will be the first in the world to bring in a second lockdown. A doctor there tells us what he's seeing in hospitals, and we also hear from people in ultra-Orthodox communities, where many of the recent hotspots have been.

Also, astronomers have detected traces of a gas in the atmosphere of Venus that they believe could be produced by microbes in the planet's cloud - meaning there's a possibility of life. Our science correspondent tells us more.

And our health expert, Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University, answers some of the questions we've been receiving from listeners around the world about the coronavirus pandemic. If you want to ask one, send it to us on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: An Israeli man gives a swab sample at a test station in Jerusalem, Israel. Credit: EPA/Abir Sultan)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7h79g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7hc1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d23gq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v5q9z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jq1l3tbhm)
2020/09/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7hgsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Documentary (w3csy5bl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v5v23)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5s)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The growling stomach

"Why do our tummies rumble - and when they do, does it always mean we are hungry?" asks listener James, aged 12. For this series, with lockdown learning in mind, Drs Rutherford and Fry are investigating scientific mysteries for students of all ages. To get to the bottom of this noisy problem, the doctors tune in to our guts.

Geneticist Giles Yeo studies food intake and obesity. He explains the wavy workings of our digestive system, and how those audible rumbles are a sign that digestion is taking place – a phenomenon thought to be onomatopoeically named 'borborygmi' by the ancient Greeks, and explored further in the gruesome 19th century experiments of surgeon William Beaumont.

However, tuning in to the gut’s sounds can tell us more than whether we need a snack. Family doctor Margaret McCartney takes us through the process of how and why she and her medical colleagues may use a stethoscope to listen to your abdomen for both particular noises and silence.

Microbiologist Barry Marshall has taken medical listening one step further in his Noisy Guts Project. Inspired by microphones used to listen for termites hiding in walls, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist is trialling an acoustic belt, which could be worn to help diagnose and treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Presenters: Hannah Fry, Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7hljv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwr5s5f)
Belarus protests: Putin pledges $1.5bn loan at Lukashenko meeting

President Putin has offered his public backing to his Belarusian counterpart, the embattled Alexander Lukashenko. The UN's human rights chief has called for an urgent investigation into the violent suppression of protests in Belarus. We hear from a female protester - held over the weekend in prison - threatened with rape.

Also, Donald Trump tours the western US states, ravaged by wildfires, his rival Joe Biden calls him a climate arsonist. We'll hear from those caught in the destruction. And why shrunken heads may no longer have a place in one of Oxford's most famous museums.

(Photo: Alexander Lukashenko (L) met Vladimir Putin (R) for talks in Sochi. Credit: EPA)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7hq8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v62kc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cszj3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7hv13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d2lg7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v669h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lk8v6kgf)
Oracle confirms partnership with TikTok

Video sharing app TikTok's parent ByteDance has rejected an offer from Microsoft to buy the firm, amid US national security concerns. Oracle has now stepped in and has confirmed a partnership with the app. We speak to Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. And the BBC's Ed Butler takes a closer look at the impact trade between the US and China is having on the upcoming US presidential election. Plus we have a report from Ijeoma Ndukwe exploring the challenges business owners from ethnic minority backgrounds can face when it comes to getting bank loans at affordable rates. And Gary Leff, travel expert tells us about the phenomenon of flights to nowhere

(Picture: TikTok on a phone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 15 SEPTEMBER 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7j2jc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18y1bl99m8)
Oracle confirms partnership with TikTok

Video sharing app TikTok's parent ByteDance has rejected an offer from Microsoft to buy the firm, amid US national security concerns. Oracle has now stepped in and has confirmed a partnership with the app. We speak to Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. And the BBC's Ed Butler takes a closer look at the impact trade between the US and China is having on the upcoming US presidential election. Plus we have a report from Ijeoma Ndukwe exploring the challenges business owners from ethnic minority backgrounds can face when it comes to getting bank loans at affordable rates. And Gary Leff, travel expert tells us about the phenomenon of flights to nowhere. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Kimberly Adams, a host on our US sister programme, Marketplace and Simon Littlewood, an author, broadcaster based in Singapore.

(Picture: TikTok on a phone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7j68h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d2ypm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v6kjw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0hyx)
The Detransitioners

He2She2He

Detransitioners are people who once identified as trans, but have returned to the gender they were assigned at birth. Some may also re-identify as non-binary or gender-fluid. There are no figures revealing how many people reverse or change their gender journeys – we only know that more people are telling their stories.

Brian Belovitch was born a boy, and then transitioned and lived for more than a decade as Natalia – a performer, club hostess and glamorous party animal. Then at a crisis point in his life he made a momentous decision – to live again as Brian.

These are not easy choices. Daniel was brought up male, then had gender reassignment surgery and became Danielle. Now he has detransitioned, married a woman, and is awaiting a complex operation to reconstruct his male genitalia.

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Presenter: Linda Pressly


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7jb0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7jfrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d365w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v6t14)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7jkhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py4tvl)
California fires: Trump dismisses concerns over climate change

On a visit to fire-ravaged California the President says poor forest management is to blame, and tells an official that it would "start getting cooler".

Bahrain joins the United Arab emirates in officially signing peace agreements with Israel in Washington.

And astronomers have found a potential sign of life in the clouds of Venus, a planet long overlooked in the search for extraterrestrial life.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7jp80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py4ylq)
Report: Coronavirus pandemic has set back global health by two decades

We have an interview with Bill Gates who says that a vaccine for the virus could be available by the first three months of 2021.

President Trump visits California and blames the wildfires there on poor forest management NOT climate change.

And what next for Lebanon? Our correspondent goes back there as tensions still remain high.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7jt04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py52bv)
Bill Gates assesses impact of Covid-19

His foundation says the pandemic has set back global health gains by two decades.

President Trump v California's state officials: are failures in forest management or climate change behind the wildfires engulfing the region?

And the real possibility that there is some kind of life floating in the clouds around Planet Venus.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7jxr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1m)
Smartphones saving the rainforest

Old smartphones powered by solar panels are being used to catch illegal loggers in rainforests across the world.

Each year, more than 150 million mobiles are discarded in the US alone - so we’re looking at clever ways to reuse them. But should we really rethink our consumer habits and keep our phones for longer?

Produced and presented by Julie Ball.

Photo: Rainforest Connection


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v790n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89v)
US Elections: What it means for healthcare

Voters will soon decide who will be the next President of the United States, with healthcare – both the Coronavirus response and health coverage in general - being one of the most important issues. We'll hear from one American cancer survivor who lost their coverage during the crisis, and the director of a Missouri hospital on the challenges they've faced during the pandemic. Then, Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News explains the current state of US healthcare and the differences between candidates Trump and Biden on the future of it. Though Doug Badger of the Heritage Foundation cautions that those pressing for universal healthcare in the US will be under served by a Biden presidency.

(Photo: a vigil in memory of healthcare workers who have died of Covid-19 in Alhambra, California. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpx)
The Mau Mau struggle against British rule

During the 1950s in Kenya, armed rebels known as the Mau Mau fought against British rule. Thousands were taken captive and interned in camps by the British authorities. In 2011 Gitu wa Kahangeri, a Mau Mau veteran, spoke to Louise Hidalgo about his experiences.

Photo: Gitu wa Kahangeri speaking to the BBC in 2016. Credit: BBC


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7k1hd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v7drs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7k57j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7k8zn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d41ds)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v7n81)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3csz1z3)
Kadir López : Lighting up Havana

A year ago, as Cuba’s capital city Havana was celebrating its 500th birthday, one artist was making it his mission to recreate the famous neon signs that used to adorn the buildings and light up the streets and squares.

Kadir López has had his multimedia work exhibited worldwide, but over the past few years he has been driven by a passion for neon and the concept of connecting Havana’s present with its colourful past. He and his small team of skilled craftspeople remake the signs in a workshop in the centre of Havana, often in searing heat and soaring temperatures. There are specialist procedures needed for the bending of the neon and the colouring and design. Then the signs have to be carefully re-positioned on buildings, using scaffolding and cranes.

In a revised edition of a programme first broadcast in 2019, Julia Galiano-Rios watches Kadir as he brings the signs to life. She hears how the use of neon can throw new light – both physical and spiritual- on a city and finds out how Covid-19 has affected his work.

Producers: Juliana Galiano-Rios and Emma Kingsley



(Photo: Artist Kadir López, with kind permission)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7kdqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdk3)
Becoming South Africa's first black rugby captain

South African rugby star Siya Kolisi came from a poor township and tells Outlook's Mpho Lakaje about his journey from water boy to becoming the national team's first black captain and leading the Sprinboks to World Cup victory. Siya and his wife Rachel have set up a charity, The Kolisi Foundation, to help vulnerable and disadvantaged communities in South Africa.

Film-maker Tom Mustill and his friend Charlotte Kinloch were on holiday in California when they were nearly killed by a whale out at sea. Tom couldn’t stop thinking about the incident, and decided to embark on an epic odyssey to find that same whale again. He made a documentary about his experience called Humpback Whales: A Detective Story. Tom and Charlotte spoke to Outlook’s Emily Webb in 2019.


(Photo: Siya Kolisi and the Springboks team after their Rugby World Cup win. Credit: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7kjgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d48x1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v7wr9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0x5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7kn71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwr7tvm)
Will climate change be a US election issue?

As fires continue to rage across the west coast of the United States, the blazes have become a political issue with Joe Biden citing them as an example of the Trump administration failure to grapple with climate change, while President Trump has blamed poor forest management in states run by Democrats. Christine Todd Whitman, who headed the US Environmental Protection Agency in the administration of President George W. Bush, tells us why she as a Republican is voting for Joe Biden, not least for policies on climate change.

Also in the programme: Spain's left-wing coalition government has proposed legislation to redress grievances from the dictatorship of General Franco; and items belonging to legendary hip hop musicians go under the hammer at Sothebys in New York, in a first for a major auction house.

(Photo: NASA image from 9 September 2020, shows a frontal boundary which moved into the Great Basin and produced very high downslope winds along the mountains of Washington, Oregon, and California. The winds whipped up the fires, while a pyrocumulus cloud from the Bear fire in California injected smoke high into the atmosphere. The sum of these events was an extremely think blanket of smoke along the West Coast. Credit: copyright NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7krz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v847k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwnclpm77g)
ADB: developing Asian economies will contract

The Asian Development Bank expects a contraction for developing Asian economies this year. Abdul Abiad of the ADB's macroeconomic research division in Manila explains it's the first time they've seen such a widespread contraction in nearly six decades. Also in the programme, as November's US election approaches, the BBC's Ed Butler has been discovering the coronavirus pandemic, coupled with the employment crisis it has triggered, has had a huge impact on families who have lost their health insurance coverage. Plus, we explore what might happen to the unemployment picture in the UK as the end of the government's furlough scheme approaches.

(Picture: An Asian Development Bank logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7kwq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v87zp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3csz1z3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7l0gf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2syxj44cj8)
US wildfires burn millions of acres

The wildfires in California, Oregon and Washington state have destroyed thousands of homes and other properties and burned millions of acres of land. President Trump has said the fires were the result of poor forest management, not climate change. We hear from one couple in California who lost their farm.

The UAE and Bahrain are signing their historic peace deals with Israel today. We explain the significance and hear voices from the region to get a sense of the conversations taking place.

Our medical expert today answering listeners’ questions about Covid-19 is Dr Isaac Bogoch from Toronto.

(Photo: A burnt farm house of Sarah Hawkins and Andy Pestana in California Credit: Sarah Hawkins)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7l46k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7l7yp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d50ct)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v8m72)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jq1l3x7dq)
2020/09/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7lcpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v8qz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98g)
AI captain to sail the Atlantic

The Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) is due to set sail this week (scheduled for Wednesday) from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts with no crew on board. The AI captain will steer the trimaran across the Atlantic with the help of servers and cloud and edge computing, gathering data on global warming, micro-plastic pollution and marine mammal conservation. If successful, it will be one of the first self-navigating, full-sized vessels to cross the Atlantic Ocean and could herald a new era of autonomous research ships. Andy Stanford-Clark, Chief Technology Officer at IBM, tells Gareth about the tech on board.


Farmbot - tech to ensure cattle have water
Crop and livestock farming uses around 70 per cent of the world’s fresh water supply, and access to water is something every farmer in the world thinks about, every single day. Is there enough of it, is there too much or too little, and are there any problems that need fixing. Those problems get even bigger for farmers who don’t live on-site, or – as is the case in Australia – an issue with a water pipe or dam might be several hours’ drive away. Robotic devices are increasingly taking the strain, even now linking to satellites to help farmers keep their livestock healthy. Corinne Podger reports.

Lie Machines
Have you ever been lured to false political messaging online or been attracted to clickbait that has directed you to a conspiracy theories or false news? How and why this happens is the subject of a book “Lie Machines: How to Save Democracy from Troll Armies, Deceitful Robots, Junk News Operations, and Political Operatives”. Its author, Philip Howard, Director of the Oxford Internet Institute in the UK explains how to take these lie machines apart.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

(Image: The Mayflower Autonomous Ship. Credit: IBM)

Studio Manager: Donald MacDonald
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7lhfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwr8p2j)
Trump hails 'dawn of new Middle East' with UAE-Bahrain-Israel deals

Representatives of the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Israel have signed an historic diplomatic agreement at the White House. We'll hear from the major players: Israelis, Gulf Arabs, Americans are proclaiming major progress; the Palestinians are left shaking their heads.

Also, how the Israeli prime minister's claims of victory at the white house may not drown out his critics at home.

Other stories: The poisoned Russian activist Alexei Navalny promises he will return home when he recovers; and why a prominent US scientific journal has for the first time decided to endorse a presidential election candidate.

(Photo: The agreements are likely to usher in new security ties in the Middle East. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7lm62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v8zgg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3csz1z3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7lqy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d5hcb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v936l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lk8v9gcj)
ADB: developing Asian economies will contract

The Asian Development Bank expects a contraction for developing Asian economies this year. Abdul Abiad of the ADB's macroeconomic research division in Manila explains it's the first time they've seen such a widespread contraction in nearly six decades. Also in the programme, as November's US election approaches, the BBC's Ed Butler has been discovering the coronavirus pandemic, coupled with the employment crisis it has triggered, has had a huge impact on families who have lost their health insurance coverage. Plus, we explore what might happen to the unemployment picture in the UK as the end of the government's furlough scheme approaches.

(Picture: An Asian Development Bank logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 16 SEPTEMBER 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7lzfg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18y1bld6jc)
UN: Businesses 'destroy' nature's systems

A report from the UN talks of the world's failure to protect biodiversity and the responsibility of businesses to do something about it. The tariffs that the Whitehouse levied on China and which started the trade war in 2018 were "inappropriate" says the World Trade Organisation – but there is not much that can be done at the moment, as the BBC’s Samira Hussain reports from New York.

Plus, as Asian economies get smaller in the coronavirus pandemic – as reported by the Asian Development Bank, we assess with experts what a contraction for the first time in 60 years really looks like. We discuss all this with guests Rhonda Vonshay sharpe, founder and president of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity, and Race, in Richmond Virginia, and Enda Curran, senior reporter, Bloomberg News in Hong Kong.

(Photo: A Thai elephant walks in the jungle in the early morning fog at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort, Thailand. Credit: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7m35l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d5vlq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v9gfz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3csy1qk)
The Sun, Our Star

The Sun, Our Star: Ancient sun

Inspired by the Chariot of the Sun, a beautiful artefact of sun worship, Dava Sobel island hops in Denmark to explore the cult of the Sun, before science, during the Nordic Bronze Age. Ancient people would not have needed an eclipse to make them see the Sun as an all-powerful force. The Sun’s life-giving light and heat inspired rituals and relics dating back to the earliest humans.

Music composed by Chris O'Shaughnessy.
Producer: Kate Bland and Kate Rea

Audio for this programme was updated on 9 September 2020.

(Photo: Chariot of the Sun. Credit: National Museum of Denmark)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7m6xq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7mbnv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d632z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2v9py7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7mgdz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py7qrp)
US wildfires cover 20,000 square km of land

California, Oregon and Washington are all affected - so could parts of the states become uninhabitable in future?

A report on the man lined-up as Japan's new Prime Minister, Yoshihide Suga, taking on the job later today.

And we hear what the Rwandan Government's case is against Paul Rusesabagina, a critic of the president who was portrayed in the Hollywood movie Hotel Rwanda.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7ml53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py7vht)
US fires: what history can teach us

We speak to a scientist who studies tree rings to find out how forests used to be managed.

India passes 5 million Covid-19 infections after a spike in cases.

And damned lies and statistics? We hear the case for taking time to study the statistics - and not accepting how politicians spin them.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7mpx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7py7z7y)
Will California fires start the next great migration?

An expert on climate migration says that millions of people may be living on uninhabitable land.

We hear about the vigorous - and early - morning routine of the man lined-up to be Japan's new Prime Minister, Yoshihide Suga.

And how you can do your bit for the environment even when you're dead - by being buried in a bio-degradable coffin.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7mtnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6v)
Rafael Grossi: Is the world's nuclear watchdog being undermined?

What is the point of the world’s nuclear watchdog the International Atomic Energy Agency? Its task is to ensure that countries intent on developing nuclear power don’t use their programmes as cover for development of weapons of mass destruction. But is the task impossible?
HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the new IAEA chief, Rafael Grossi. From the continued bitter arguments over Iran, to North Korea, and Saudi Arabia, is the IAEA another example of a global agency undermined by geopolitical division?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vb5xr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8n4)
US Elections: Immigrants welcome?

President Trump's crackdown on immigrants is popular with his core voters, but less so with corporate America.

Manuela Saragosa asks whether this nation of immigrants is about to vote to close the door to the American Dream for millions of foreigners. Among them are Indian IT workers who have been left in limbo by the sudden suspension of H-1B visas, as relayed by immigration lawyer Poorvi Chotani of LawQuest.

Theresa Cardinal Brown of the Bipartisan Policy Center says there is widespread agreement among voters that the immigration system is "broken", less so on what needs doing. Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies think tank says President Trump hasn't gone far enough. In contrast, Britta Glennon of the Wharton business school says that even the lighter restrictions under the Obama administration drove high value jobs out of the US.

(Picture: A new US citizen is sworn-in at a naturalisation ceremony in Santa Ana, California Credit: Reuters)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszms5)
The Greensboro lunch counter sit-in

Franklin McCain was one of four young black men who took a stand against racial segregation in the USA in 1960. They sat down at a "whites only" lunch counter and asked to be served. When they were asked to leave, they refused, and soon their quiet protest was attracting attention from around the country. In 2011 Franklin McCain spoke to Alan Johnston about that time.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Franklin McCain in 2010. Credit: Getty Images.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7mydh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3csy1qk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vb9nw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7n24m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Wise Web (w3ct0x61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7n5wr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d6y9w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vbk54)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1y)
Rulebreakers

The shepherd and the settler

Muhammad is a Bedouin shepherd in a remote corner of the West Bank called Rashash. His family has been herding sheep and goats in Rashash for 30 years and in Palestine for generations. But since Israeli settlers recently moved in nearby it has become difficult for Muhammad to graze his flock undisturbed.

When producer Max Freedman visits Rashash, he sees this conflict in action. One settler tries to scatter the sheep by driving towards them in an all-terrain vehicle. Another chases after the flock on horseback. An Israeli activist tries to use his body as a human shield.

After leaving Rashash, Max sets out to understand what he saw there.


Presenter/reporter: Max Freedman
Producer: Max Freedman, Ilana Levinson, and Emily Bell
Editor: Ilana Levinson

(Photo: Palestinian shepherds and Israeli activists on a hillside. Credit: Max Freedman)


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7n9mw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrw)
I bought a ghost town - then got trapped there

Brent Underwood is a young American entrepreneur who spent his life savings on the remains of an abandoned 19th century mining town in California. He was fascinated by its Wild West history, but when he got trapped there by heavy snow earlier this year, all alone, the ghostly tales about the place began to feel all too real.

Andrew Garrido was desperate to play the piano but his family couldn’t afford lessons. Andrew, undeterred, drew a keyboard on paper and taught himself to play, and he's since defied all expectations. Emily Webb went to meet him and hear his story in January this year.

Picture: Brent Underwood at Cerro Gordo
Credit: Brent Underwood


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszms5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7nfd0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d75t4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vbsnd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7nk44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrbqrq)
Belarus opposition leader regrets Putin's decision to meet with Lukashenko

In exile in Lithuania, the opposition presidential candidate - Svetlana Tikhanovskaya – tells us why she regrets President Putin's decision to meet with Alexander Lukashenko, and why it would be wiser for the Russian leader to listen to the Belarusian people.

Also in the programme: Former Colombian Senator Ingrid Betancourt, kidnapped for six years by FARC rebels, reacts to the group’s apology for those it detained, and on whether she is ready to forgive; and the former head of world athletics has been convicted by a French court of accepting bribes to cover up evidence of Russian doping.

(Photo: Belarusian opposition presidential candidate Svetlana Tikhanovskaya casts her ballot paper at a polling station during the presidential elections in Minsk, Belarus on 9 August 2020. Credit: EPA/Tatyana Zenkovich)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7nnw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3csy1qk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vc14n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxgtb9dfkv)
EU pledges further 15% greenhouse gas emissions cut

European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen delivered her first State of the Union. One eye-catching announcement was a pledge to cut Europe's greenhouse gas emissions by a further 15% by 2030. Sam Fleming is Brussels bureau chief of the Financial Times, and gives us an overview of the speech. And we get additional reaction from Bas Eickhout, a Dutch MEP who is vice-chair of the Green Grouping in the European Parliament. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa considers the role immigration policy is playing in this year's US presidential election. With the government of Zimbabwe offering to return some farms that were forcibly seized from foreign farmers, the BBC's Shingai Nyoka in Harare discusses the implications for President Emmerson Mnangagwa's predecessor Robert Mugabe's policy of land reform. Plus, on the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower of a group of puritans from England to the New World, a 21st century version of the craft is preparing to make the same journey with nobody on board. The Mayflower Autonomous Ship is the work of a consortium including IBM, whose UK chief technology officer is Andy Stanford-Clark.

(Picture: Ursula von der Leyen delivers her State of the Union speech. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7nsmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vc4ws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7nxcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2syxj478fc)
Coronavirus: India's five million cases

We return to the coronavirus situation in India, as officials say the number of confirmed cases has passed five million. The virus appears to be spreading faster than in any other country, with more than 90,000 cases per day confirmed over the five days to Tuesday. The death rate is lower than in other countries with a high number of cases, though. We'll get our correspondent to explain the numbers and hear some experiences from Indians dealing with the consequences.

We also hear from India in a conversation about friendships during the pandemic, alongside voices from the United States and South Africa. How have coronavirus restrictions and lockdowns affected your friendships? Have they changed for the better or the worse? Have friendships fizzled out or been rekindled?

Also, we'll hear views from Barbados on the decision to remove Queen Elizabeth as head of state from next year and change the system of government to a republic.

(Photo: A healthcare worker checks the temperature of a woman during a door-to-door survey for Covid-19 in the village of Khoraj in Gujarat, India Credit: Reuters / Amit Dave)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7p13n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszms5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7p4vs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d7x8x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vcj45)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jq1l4049t)
2020/09/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7p8lx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3csy1qk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vcmw9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccc)
Have we reached the peak of Wellness?

Claudia Hammond continues her look at Wellness with its complex relationship with the medical profession. It can be hard to tell if scientific-sounding claims about supplements or mindfulness classes are supported by evidence. So the Berkeley Wellness Letter – aimed at helping to prevent disease and promote health since Dale Ogar and colleagues started back in 1984 – sifts through some of those claims.

Doctors like paediatrician Paul Offit say adopting some of the 'touchy-feely' elements of Wellness could improve relationships with patients, harnessing some of its warmth and empathy. But he warns that accepting myths like taking mega-doses of Vitamin C to prevent colds is a waste of money – and may even cause harm.

Twitter’s gynaecologist Dr Jen Gunter often hears from women who feel modern medicine doesn’t cater for them – and who mistake repetition for accuracy, falling for some of the false claims made on Wellness websites.

Cosmopolitan magazine Deputy Lifestyle director Ashley Oerman has watched social media influencers come and go – and wants to guide her own readers towards Wellness backed by evidence.

The journalist Barbara Ehrenreich’s latest book reflects on how for many older, wealthy Americans Wellness is all about spending money to show you that you love yourself - part of a bid to outwit death itself.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Image: A young woman choosing a health supplement. Photo credit: Tashi Delek/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7pdc1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrckzm)
Venezuela: UN investigators accuse authorities of torture and killings

United Nations investigators have accused the Venezuelan government of committing systematic violations - amounting to crimes against humanity - in order to suppress political opposition. A report published today details extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearance and torture.

Also on the programme; we learn more about Yoshihide Suga, Japan’s new prime minister; and we get reaction to Colombia's former Farc rebels apologising for war crimes.

(Picture: Venezuelan flag; Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7pj35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vcwck)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7pmv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d8d8f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vd03p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lk8vdc8m)
EU pledges further 15% greenhouse gas emissions cut

European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen delivered her first State of the Union. One eye-catching announcement was a pledge to cut Europe's greenhouse gas emissions by a further 15% by 2030. Sam Fleming is Brussels bureau chief of the Financial Times, and gives us an overview of the speech. And we get additional reaction from Bas Eickhout, a Dutch MEP who is vice-chair of the Green Grouping in the European Parliament. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa considers the role immigration policy is playing in this year's US presidential election. With the government of Zimbabwe offering to return some farms that were forcibly seized from foreign farmers, the BBC's Shingai Nyoka in Harare discusses the implications for President Emmerson Mnangagwa's predecessor Robert Mugabe's policy of land reform. Plus, on the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower of a group of puritans from England to the New World, a 21st century version of the craft is preparing to make the same journey with nobody on board. The Mayflower Autonomous Ship is the work of a consortium including IBM, whose UK chief technology officer is Andy Stanford-Clark.

(Picture: Ursula von der Leyen delivers her State of the Union speech. Picture credit: Reuters.)



THURSDAY 17 SEPTEMBER 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7pwbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18y1blh3fg)
Boeing's culture of 'concealment' led to fatal crashes

A report from the US shows the plane firm's secrecy led to the fatal 737 Max plane crashes. Plus, the Federal Reserve keeps interest rates unchanged, which should help recovery as stock markets like subdued news and minimal changes, says Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in the US. Plus, we hear from the dad who is taking YouTube Kids to court over its use of childrens' data - we speak with the BBC's Zoe Thomas for an overview, and parent Duncan McCann in the UK who is bringing the case, plus we hear YouTube's statement on the issue. Plus, more on the fact that the World Trade Organisation said that US tariffs on China were in 'breach' of regulations. We discuss all this with guests Alison Van Diggelen, Host of Fresh Dialogues based in Silicon Valley, and Andy Xie, a reporter in China.

(Image: Boeing Unveils Is First 737 MAX 7 Passenger. Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7q02p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d8rht)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vdcc2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6ll)
The trouble with Dutch cows

The Netherlands - small and overcrowded - is facing fundamental questions about how to use its land, following a historic court judgment forcing the state to take more urgent action to limit nitrogen emissions. Dutch nitrogen emissions - damaging the climate and biodiversity - are the highest in Europe per capita. And though traffic and building are also partly to blame, farmers say the government is principally looking to agriculture to make the necessary reductions. They've staged a series of protests - what they call a farmers' uprising - in response to a suggestion from a leading politician that the number of farm animals in the country should be cut by half. This is meant to bring down levels of ammonia, a nitrogen compound produced by dung and urine. The proposal comes even though their cows, pigs and chickens have helped make the tiny Netherlands into the world's second biggest exporter of food. Farmers think they're being sacrificed so that the construction industry, also responsible for some nitrogen pollution, can have free rein to keep building, as the country's population, boosted by immigration, grows relentlessly. What do the Dutch want most - cows or houses? Will there be any room in the future for the ever-shrinking patches of nature? And in a hungry world, shouldn't the country concentrate on one of the things it's best at - feeding people? Tim Whewell travels through a country that must make big choices, quickly.

(image: Dutch dairy farmer Erik Luiten feeds a new calf. Credit: Tim Whewell/BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7q3tt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszms5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7q7ky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d9002)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vdlvb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7qcb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7pybmns)
President Trump: coronavirus vaccine will be ready in 'weeks'

But the President is contradicted by his top disease control official who says it's more likely to happen later in 2021

Alabama, Florida and Mississippi are all in state of emergency - we ll have the latest on the tropical storm Sally.

And we speak to the Ethiopian-American author of the Shadow King, Maaza Mengiste, as her book is short-listed for the most prestigious literary prize here in the UK.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7qh26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7pybrdx)
How close is the US to a coronavirus vaccine?

President Trump says it could come in weeks... but disease control officials say it's more likely to be later next year

Wildfires in the Amazon region are spiralling out of control - can anything be done to stop people starting them?

And why hair product manufacturers are at the centre of a row over racism in South Africa.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7qltb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7pybw51)
Covid-19 vaccine: how close is it?

President Trump disagrees with his medical advisers saying he thinks it'll come in weeks - but scientists put it firmly into next year.

We have a report from Italy on a coronavirus testing regime at airports designed to help passengers as well as the airline industry.

And justice at last for witches? We talk to the lawyer who's fighting to right the wrongs against women burnt at the stake hundreds of years ago.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7qqkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3y)
Can the world stop online fraud?

Online fraud takes many forms, from deceptive e-mails and websites which trick us into paying money to the wrong bank account, to romance scams and malicious software copying our bank and credit card details.

It's regarded by criminals as a highly lucrative and relatively low risk crime, so why is it so easy for fraudsters to manipulate our personal data and steal our money, what can be done to end online fraud?

Charmaine Cozier talks to some of those trying to disrupt the scammers and protect the public.

Guests:
Rachel Tobac, Ethical Hacker CEO of SocialProof Security
Muhammad Imran, Criminal Intelligence Officer, Interpol Financial Crimes Unit
Stéphane Konan, Cyber Security Consultant & African Government Advisor
Tamlyn Edmonds, Fraud Prosecutor, Edmonds Marshall McMahon


(Laptop owned by an online romance scammer, Accra, Ghana. Credit: Per-Anders Pettersson / Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vf2tv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wz)
US Elections: The end of Reaganomics?

Will the elections usher in a sea-change in economic thinking, after 40 years dominated by small government conservatism?

Manuela Saragosa speaks to one small government conservative - Ramesh Ponnuru of the American Enterprise Institute - who says people like him no longer have a home in either of the main political parties. Economist James Galbraith says the scale of the economic challenge posed by the pandemic could compel a much greater role for the Federal government in reviving and restructuring the economy.

But could this election prove as significant as the victory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his economic New Deal in 1932 - assuming that President Trump even loses? Political scientist Julia Azari says despite Joe Biden's reputation as an unassuming moderate party stalwart, there are parallels with his illustrious Democratic predecessor.

(Picture: A poster of a Ronald Reagan commemorative postage stamp on display as people pass by; Credit: Stephen Osman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmn)
Tank Man

A photo of a man confronting a tank in Tiananmen Square in Beijing caught the world's imagination. Carrying two plastic shopping bags, unarmed and alone, he seemed to embody the protest movement crushed by the Chinese authorities in 1989. Stuart Franklin was one of the photographers who captured the image of Tank Man - he has been speaking to David Edmonds for Witness History.

Photo: Tank Man on Tiananmen Square, June 4th 1989. Credit: Stuart Franklin/Magnum.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7qv9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6ll)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vf6kz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszccc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7qz1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvx)
Queen Tamar: The myth of a perfect ruler

Queen Tamar was one of Georgia’s most iconic and colourful rulers, a powerful medieval sovereign who controlled large parts of the Caucasus and the eastern side of the Black Sea and forged strong cultural links with both the Byzantine West and the Persian South. Her influence extended beyond the battlefield: she presided over the last phase of the Georgian ‘Golden Age’ which saw the building of classic Georgian churches and a flowering of the Arts that produced one of Georgia’s most important poets.
So who was Queen Tamar? How did she rise to power and outmanoeuvre her enemies? And why do the myths about her rule publicised by her faithful chroniclers persist till today?
Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr. Ekaterine Gedevanishvili, Senior Researcher at the National Centre for the History of Georgian Art in Tbilisi; Alexander Mikaberidze, Professor of History at Louisiana State University; Dr. Sandro Nikolaishvili, researcher at the University of Southern Denmark, who works on retracing connections between the Byzantine and Georgian worlds; and Donald Rayfield, Emeritus Professor of Russian and Georgian at Queen Mary, University of London.

(Image: Queen Tamar, detail of a mural in Vardzia monastery, Georgia, c. 12th century. Credit: G. Chubinashvili National Research Centre for Georgian Art History and Heritage Preservation, Tbilisi)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5d)
Australia's 'Madam Butterfly'

The Australian swimmer Susie O'Neill became a star of her sport despite a constant battle against nerves. At her home Olympics in Sydney in 2000, O'Neill took gold in a freestyle event but suffered an unexpected - and devastating defeat - in the 200 metres butterfly, a discipline in which she was considered virtually unbeatable. She talks about her career with Ashley Byrne.

(Photo: Susie O'Neill in action in 2000. Credit: Getty Images Sport)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7r2sv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38d9v6z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vfg27)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqd)
The preppers and the pandemic

Preppers have been preparing for a global emergency like coronavirus for years, stocking up supplies just in case society was ever brought to a standstill. So when our food systems began to buckle under the pressure of the pandemic, were they sitting pretty, and has this much ridiculed community now been vindicated?

Emily Thomas revisits some preppers she first met three years ago to see how they’ve been coping since the crisis hit. Pete Stanford tells her he didn’t need to join the supermarket scramble for food in the first weeks of lockdown, but the crisis has made him rethink the way he preps and how much he’s willing to share. Lincoln Miles tells us he’s had a flood of new customers to his prepping shop, but that even he wasn’t prepared for the spike in demand.

And we speak to a prepping newcomer, New York Times reporter Nellie Bowles, who’s gone from ridiculing this community to believing that being prepared is the socially responsible thing to do.

(Picture: A man with a backpack and axe in the forest. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7r6jz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbb)
My father and our time machine

Artist Maleonn spent his childhood in the back of a theatre, watching his parents at work. Maleonn’s mother was an actress, and his father directed “very noisy” and “incredibly colourful” Beijing opera performances. Though his father was keen, Maleonn was determined not to follow in his directorial footsteps and instead chased his passion for art. But when his father began to lose his memory in 2014, Maleonn decided to create a play just for him, he called it Papa’s Time Machine. Maleonn wanted to give his father the gift that he had always dreamed of - but it was a race against time.

Born under apartheid and in poverty, South African composer Lebo M grew up loving music and became a performer at a young age. His talent took him on a tumultuous journey from Soweto to Hollywood. As he worked on the music for Disney's hit animation The Lion King and as apartheid came to an end in South Africa, the story of those lions fighting for their kingdom took on a whole new relevance to him.


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7rb93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38db2q7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vfpkh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszccc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7rg17)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrfmnt)
Greece moves migrants to a new camp after fire

Migrants and refugees from the Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos are being relocated by police to a new tent city nearby. The original camp was destroyed in a fire last week. Officials said several thousand people had voluntarily moved into Kara Tepe facily after being tested for coronavirus. But some are reluctant to go, hoping to gain asylum elsewhere in Europe.

Also, Could Italy's new Covid-free flights and its airport testing be the way to avoid the mass quarantine of Britain and others - and to lure passengers back on board?

And, Alexei Navalny's aides say 'nerve agent' found on bottle in hotel room.

Photo: Migrants have been sleeping rough for a week since the Moria blaze. Credit: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7rksc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6ll)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vfy1r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvtxw33qmc)
Will a coronavirus vaccine reach the developing world?

The charity Oxfam warns that developing countries may miss out on any coronavirus vaccine. We get the perspective of Winnie Byanyima, executive director of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, and we get reaction from Thomas Cueni, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. Also in the programme, continuing our series looking at key issues at stake in the US election, we explore why despite huge job losses because of the pandemic, the economy doesn't seem to be a top priority for American voters. Plus, as a show for fashion brand Burberry kicks off London Fashion Week, we find out how the event has been adapted for the coronavirus era, from Gabriele Dirvanauskas of the fashion business website Drapers.

(Picture: A syringe. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7rpjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vg1sw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7rt8m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2syxj4b5bg)
Greece opens new refugee camp after Lesbos fire

Migrants who lived in the Moria camp in Greece last week are gradually moving to a new tent encampment nearby on the island of Lesbos. Many refugees are reluctant to go to the new Kara Tepe camp. We hear from a reporter on the ground and a refugee.

Also, we return to our conversations with people sharing experiences about the coronavirus pandemic. Today we hear from three women who run small businesses in South Africa - a country that had one of the strictest lockdowns in the world.

And hundreds of Jewish pilgrims are stranded on the border between Ukraine and Belarus, trying to make an annual pilgrimage to the tomb of the founder of their movement. But Ukraine has closed its borders to foreigners to limit Covid-19. We hear from one stranded pilgrim.

(Photo:Migrants have been sleeping rough for a week since the Moria blaze. Credit: Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7ry0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7s1rw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dbt60)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vgf18)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jq1l4316x)
2020/09/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7s5j0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6ll)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vgjsd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0w)
Malaria resistance breakthrough

Some East Africans have a genetic mutation which gives them resistance to Malaria. Investigations into how it works have produced a surprising finding. As researcher Silvia Kariuki explains it’s all to do with the surface tension of the red blood cells.

SARS-CoV- 2 can pass from people in the very early stages of Covid -19, before they show symptoms. New research shows identifying cases at this early stage is crucial to controlling the pandemic. And yet most testing regimes require symptoms to show before testing. Luca Ferretti did this latest analysis.

And how about getting up close with virus? That’s what Camille Ehre has done, using an electron microscope to produce remarkable pictures of the virus as it attacks lung tissue.

Carl Wunsch tells us of a technique he developed in the 1970s to measure changes in global ocean temperatures using sound waves. Revisiting this method may give us insight into the impact of climate change on the deep ocean.


(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7s984)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrggwq)
WHO warns about 'serious' rise in coronavirus cases in Europe

The Europe director of the WHO has said the rise in coronavirus cases in Europe is "a very serious situation". Dr Hans Kluge said it should be a "wake-up call" for governments.

Also, a senior Greek official says the new migrant camp on the island of Lesbos, which replaces one that burnt down, is a big improvement.

And, the wildfires in Siberia that are releasing record amounts of greenhouse gases.

(Picture: A man wearing a face mask in Marseille; Credit: Nicolas Tucat/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7sf08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vgs8n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7sjrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dc95j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vgx0s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lk8vh85q)
Will a coronavirus vaccine reach the developing world?

The charity Oxfam warns that developing countries may miss out on any coronavirus vaccine. We get the perspective of Winnie Byanyima, executive director of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, and we get reaction from Thomas Cueni, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. Also in the programme, continuing our series looking at key issues at stake in the US election, we explore why despite huge job losses because of the pandemic, the economy doesn't seem to be a top priority for American voters. Plus, as a show for fashion brand Burberry kicks off London Fashion Week, we find out how the event has been adapted for the coronavirus era, from Gabriele Dirvanauskas of the fashion business website Drapers.

(Picture: A syringe. Picture credit: Reuters.)



FRIDAY 18 SEPTEMBER 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7ss7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18y1bll0bk)
Global rollout of Covid-19 vaccine may be 'massively unequal'

Poorer countries may not see the vaccine reach them as fast as richer countries, say experts. We speak to one doctor in India, at the centre of record-breaking coronavirus cases. Plus, wildfires continue to burn across America's west coast, with smoke reaching as far as Europe. Plus, Amazon's voice assistant, Alexa, will soon have a new voice - India film megastar, Amitabh Bachchan. We discuss all this live with guests Paddy Hirsch, editor of the NPR podcast 'The Indicator' from Planet Money and Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper.

(Image: Capped vials from a Covid-19 vaccine lab in Oxford are pictured during filling and packaging. Photo by VINCENZO PINTO/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7swzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dcndx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vh885)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3csztgk)
Andriy Shevchenko and trouble in Dresden

The former AC Milan and Chelsea player Andriy Shevchenko looks back on his career. And Dynamo Dresden's Chris Löwe joins us after his team's match against Hamburg made headlines around the world, when Hamburg's Toni Leistner confronted a fan.


Picture: Andriy Shevchenko of AC Milan in action during a UEFA Cup match betweenMilan and FC Zurich in 2008. (Etsuo Hara/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7t0qx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7t4h1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dcwx5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vhhrf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7t875)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7pyfjkw)
Coronavirus: 30 million cases worldwide

We hear from Israel which goes back into lockdown today - in a move widely criticised by opponents of Prime Minister Netanyahu.

The FBI Director tells the US Congress that Russia is actively interfering in November's elections by denigrating Democratic party candidate Joe Biden.

And how a video of a man beating his wife is forcing people in China to confront domestic violence.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7tcz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7pyfnb0)
New milestone of 30 million coronavirus cases worldwide

France is one of the countries battling a new increase in positive results... the cities of Nice and Lyon have been given 24 hours to enforce drastic measures to halt the spread.

We've heard about wildfires in California and the Amazon but what about the ones raging across parts of Siberia...we've got a special report from the Arctic Circle.

And the amazing story of how two families were at the heart of a secret underground railway network that helped thousands of slaves escape the US for Mexico.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7thqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wf7pyfs24)
30 million Covid-19 cases confirmed globally

So what will the next six months hold in terms of coronavirus numbers?

Why the small European country of Slovenia has gone cycling crazy - as one of its own looks set to win the Tour de France.

And in business, the Cambridge economists who say, worryingly, that bribery can be profitable.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7tmgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxt)
Thomas Chatterton Williams: Race, identity and power

Not just in the United States, but across the world the Black Lives Matter movement has prompted debate about race, identity and power. It is a campaign predicated on ideas about what it means to be black and white; but what if those very terms are themselves part of the problem? Stephen Sackur speaks to Thomas Chatterton Williams, a mixed-race American writer and self-declared ex-black man, whose ideas present a challenge to so-called 'woke' culture. How much room is there right now for respectful, thoughtful debate?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vhzqy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78t)
US Elections: California burning

The West Coast wildfires have lifted climate change to the top of the campaign agenda, but will it actually shift any votes? It highlights one of sharpest policy contrasts between the two presidential candidates - with Donald Trump questioning whether global warming is even a threat, while Joe Biden has a detailed $2.5 trillion plan to decarbonise the economy.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to David Banks, a former energy advisor to both President Trump and George W Bush, as well as Cheryl LaFleur, who served as an energy regulator under Barack Obama. Plus the BBC's North America correspondent Anthony Zurcher discusses electoral calculations behind each candidate's stance.

(Picture: A firefighter watches the fire burning in Monrovia, California; Credit: Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvf)
The mothers of Argentina's disappeared

In April 1977 a group of women in Argentina held the first ever public demonstration to demand the release of thousands of opponents of the military regime. It was the start of a long campaign by the women, who became known as the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo. In 2017 Mike Lanchin spoke to Mirta Baravalle who has spent decades searching for her missing daughter and son-in-law, and for the grandchild she has never met.

(Photo: Mirta Baravalle, with the photograph of her daughter, Ana Maria. Credit: BBC)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7tr6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp6)
The TikTok saga hots up

After shunning Microsoft, will a deal with Oracle work? The BBC's Asia business correspondent Karishma Vaswani joins Rory Cellan-Jones and Jane Wakefield in the tent to discuss what the US and China want out of a deal for TikTok. Plus: An earthquake in the computer chip industry - why selling chip designer Arm to US firm Nvidia is proving controversial. And as Facebook launches a new VR headset and PlayStation and Xbox go head to head, what is the future of gaming? Keza MacDonald, the Guardian's video games editor, discusses.

(Photo: TikTok logo displayed on a phone screen, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vj3h2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7tvyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnf)
Covid unemployment: A new crisis?

Millions have been left without work as the coronavirus pandemic continues to devastate economies across the globe. This week, there’s been a sharp rise in the unemployment rate in Britain. This follows recent increases in other European countries. The International Labour Organisation has warned the pandemic is having a “devastating and disproportionate” impact on youth employment. In the United States, unemployment remains above 10 percent in black and Hispanic communities. After India’s lockdown ended, many living in cities have found their old jobs gone - with former office workers, builders, drivers and factory workers left scrambling to find alternative employment. But analysts warn that the longer the crisis goes on, the more jobs simply won’t return - replaced, they say, by automation or artificial intelligence solutions that don’t get sick and don’t need to socially distance. And while this trend existed before Covid, there are signs the virus has brought forward an employment challenge many governments had hoped to address years down the line. So how can governments minimise job losses, help retrain those whose past careers have gone, and make sure younger workers are prepared for the jobs of the future - all during a time of reduced revenue from taxation and ballooning deficits? Dan Damon and a panel of experts discuss what should be done about rising unemployment in the age of Covid-19?


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7tzpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38ddr42)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vjbzb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7v3g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhk)
Protests against Colombia's police

A video showing the repeated tazering of a Colombian lawyer Javier Ordóñez by police as he begged for mercy, and his subsequent death from internal injuries, triggered riots in which several people died. BBC Mundo's Daniel Pardo is based in Bogota, and explains what this story reveals about Colombians relationship with law enforcement.

My Hometown: Hanoi
A return visit with Nga Pham to her hometown of Hanoi, Vietnam and a walk down the tree lined streets.

Ghana Nigeria sibling rivalry
The rivalry between Nigeria and Ghana is well known, but the two countries also share a close relationship despite not being neighbours. We bring together Nigeria’s Peter Okwoche and Mark Wilberforce from Ghana to explore how the countries see each other.

Shot by an arrow by those he protected
Rieli Franciscato was one of Brazil’s best known advocates for the rights of the indigenous peoples who live cut off from mainstream Brazilian civilisation in the Amazon. But last week he was killed by those same people he was trying to protect, as Brazilian Fernando Duarte explains.

Moscow Big Brother
Moscow prides itself on being a ‘smart city’. Free wifi all around the city, facial recognition and traffic management systems all make life easy and safe for citizens. But surveillance during Covid-19 has highlighted a darker side to the technology. Andrei Zakharov of BBC Russian explores if the smart city, can be turned into a Big Brother.

PHOTO Colombian woman protests after death of Javier Ordóñez
PHOTO CREDIT: JOAQUIN SARMIENTO/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7v766)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38ddzmb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vjlgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7vbyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrjjkx)
Israel marks Jewish New Year with Second lockdown

As the number of confirmed Covid cases around the world passes the thirty million mark, we will hear how some governments are once again tightening restrictions -- a second lockdown in Israel, and new measures under consideration in Spain, as hospital admissions start to rise.

Also, today the Belarus opposition figure Svetlana Tikhanovskaya appears before the United Nations to call for a re-run of last month's disputed election.

And, TikTok and WeChat will be banned in the US from Sunday, unless President Trump agrees to a last-minute deal..

(Photo: Israel emerged from its first strict lockdown in May. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7vgpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vjtyv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt61dwv0nw)
US ready to ban TikTok and WeChat on Sunday

TikTok and WeChat face a US install ban on Sunday, unless President Trump approves a deal. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman talks us through the latest moves in a long-running source of tension between Washington and Beijing.
Also in the programme, continuing our series looking at key issues ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt asks whether environmental issues will have much of an impact on how people choose to cast their vote.
Plus, we find out why this year's Indian Premier League cricket season is being played in the United Arab Emirates.

(Picture: WeChat and TikTok logos with Chinese and US flags. Picture credit: Reuters.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7vlfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vjypz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x63)
The lives of female Qur'an reciters

Around the world, there are differing attitudes to recitation of the Qur'an and the female voice in Islam. For some, female reciters should be restricted to female-only spaces, reciting verses in female prayer circles or Islamic lectures, for fear that the voice in public arenas with mixed audiences can bring about sin. But in many cultures it is permissible and encouraged to platform female reciters, and there is growing appetite from women online to bring more women into the field.

Nusaiba Mohammad Timol is one reciter who grew up between Saudi Arabia and the UK. Never hearing a female reciter perform publicly during her childhood, she was the first winner of Islam Channel's national Qiraat (recitation) competition in 2006 and has gone onto recite publicly as well as teach both men and women how to recite. But her reception has not been completely positive - and a record deal was scuppered when investors in Egypt said it was not appropriate to sign a woman.

We hear from Madinah Javed and Maryam Amir, two reciters across the Atlantic from each other who are using Instagram to raise awareness about female recitation and scholarship, and from some of the women that they have inspired.

Producer/presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

(Photo credit: BBC/Emily MacInnes)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7vq5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2syxj4f27k)
Coronavirus: Jewish New Year

One of the biggest days in the calendar for Jewish families, the Jewish New Year is being marked as Israel re-imposes nationwide lockdown. The country has currently one of the highest Covid-19 infection rates in the world. We speak to an Israeli family as they prepare for their traditional meal.

And Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Univercity answers listeners’ questions and explains the latest Covid-19 developments. We discuss the tension that can happen between government and scientists as we seek solutions to the pandemic, and also the effectiveness of vitamin D.

And we continue to receive messages and hear from women in Pakistan as the debate continues about the latest rape case. Two young woman share their experiences of personal safety.

(Photo: Israelis shop at the market before the second nationwide lockdown starts. Credit: Amir Cohen/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7vtxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7vynz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dfq33)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vk9yc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jq1l45y40)
2020/09/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7w2f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vkfph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv66)
Why do we like spicy food?

Many of us willingly subject ourselves to pain and irritation by eating chilli. CrowdScience listener Tina wonders what’s driving this apparent masochism: why does ‘feeling the burn’ make so many of us feel so good?

It’s just one of several tasty questions we tuck into in this episode. Also on the menu is stew: why does it taste better the next day? Listener Helen’s local delicacy is Welsh cawl, a meat and vegetable concoction. Tradition dictates it should be eaten the day after it’s made, but is there any science behind this?

And we finish the meal with cheese. Listener Leander asks what makes some cheeses blue, some hard and crumbly, and some run all over your fridge. How is milk transformed into such radically different end products?

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Alex Lathbridge
Produced by Cathy Edwards, Marnie Chesterton and Alex Lathbridge for the BBC World Service.

[Photo:Woman eating red Chilli Pepper. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7w657)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ywkwrkcst)
US to prevent TikTok and WeChat downloads from Sunday

From Sunday the US Department of Commerce will prevent people in the United States from downloading the messaging and video-sharing apps through any app store on any platform, but people will still be able to use TikTok until 12 November, when it could also be fully banned, unless a sale of its US operations is agreed.

Also in the programme: Israel begins a second national lockdown to curtail the spread of the coronavirus, and Winston Groom, the author of Forrest Gump, has died.

( Photo: The TikTok logo pictured outside the company’s U.S. head office in Culver City, California. Credit: Reuters/Mike Blake)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7w9xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vkp5r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p03c7wfnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bc38dg62m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ptk2vksxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58lk8vl52t)
US ready to ban TikTok and WeChat on Sunday

TikTok and WeChat face a US install ban on Sunday, unless President Trump approves a deal. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman talks us through the latest moves in a long-running source of tension between Washington and Beijing. Also in the programme, continuing our series looking at key issues ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt asks whether environmental issues will have much of an impact on how people choose to cast their vote. We find out why this year's Indian Premier League cricket season is being played in the United Arab Emirates. Plus, we hear how rock and roll legend Jon Bon Jovi has been helping out at a local food bank.

(Picture: WeChat and TikTok logos with Chinese and US flags. Picture credit: Reuters.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6ll)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6ll)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6ll)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6ll)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjt0kf)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjtcst)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjtr16)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjv38l)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjvyhh)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjwfh0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pt5tjwk74)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjwxgj)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjx4ys)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjx8px)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjxmy9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjxrpf)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjxwfk)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjy05p)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjyz4q)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjzbd3)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pt5tjzg47)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v3jwn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v3nms)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v3x41)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5pt5tk0jvd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5pt5tk0nlj)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v4mlt)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v4rby)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v4zv6)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v57bg)

BBC News Summary 16:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v5c2l)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v5q9z)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v5v23)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v62kc)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5ptk2v669h)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v6kjw)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v6t14)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v790n)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v7drs)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v7n81)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v7wr9)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v847k)

BBC News Summary 16:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v87zp)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v8m72)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v8qz6)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v8zgg)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5ptk2v936l)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5ptk2v9gfz)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5ptk2v9py7)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vb5xr)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vb9nw)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vbk54)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vbsnd)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vc14n)

BBC News Summary 16:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vc4ws)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vcj45)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vcmw9)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vcwck)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5ptk2vd03p)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vdcc2)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vdlvb)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vf2tv)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vf6kz)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vfg27)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vfpkh)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vfy1r)

BBC News Summary 16:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vg1sw)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vgf18)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vgjsd)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vgs8n)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5ptk2vgx0s)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vh885)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vhhrf)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vhzqy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vj3h2)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vjbzb)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vjlgl)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vjtyv)

BBC News Summary 16:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vjypz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vk9yc)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vkfph)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vkp5r)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5ptk2vksxw)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y3jjx)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y3n91)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y3s15)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y3ws9)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y40jf)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y448k)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y480p)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y4crt)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y4hhy)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y4m82)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y4r06)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y4vrb)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y4zhg)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y537l)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y5l73)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y5pz7)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y5tqc)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y5ygh)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y626m)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5nzr2y65yr)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y6fg0)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y6k64)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y6ny8)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y6spd)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y6xfj)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y715n)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y74xs)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y78nx)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y7df1)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y7j55)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y7mx9)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y7rnf)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y7wdk)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y804p)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y83wt)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y87my)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y8lwb)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y8qmg)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y8vcl)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y8z3q)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5nzr2y92vv)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5p03c7f5m8)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5p03c7f9cd)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5p03c7ff3j)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5p03c7fjvn)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5p03c7fnls)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5p03c7fsbx)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5p03c7fx31)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5nzr2yb5l0)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5nzr2yb9b4)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p03c7g8bf)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p03c7gd2k)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5p03c7ghtp)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5p03c7gmkt)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5p03c7gr9y)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5p03c7gw22)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p03c7gzt6)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5p03c7h3kb)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5p03c7h79g)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5p03c7hc1l)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5p03c7hgsq)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5p03c7hljv)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5p03c7hq8z)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p03c7hv13)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7j2jc)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7j68h)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7jb0m)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7jfrr)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7jkhw)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7jp80)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7jt04)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7jxr8)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7k1hd)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7k57j)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7k8zn)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7kdqs)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7kjgx)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7kn71)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7krz5)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7kwq9)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7l0gf)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7l46k)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7l7yp)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7lcpt)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7lhfy)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7lm62)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p03c7lqy6)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p03c7lzfg)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p03c7m35l)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5p03c7m6xq)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5p03c7mbnv)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5p03c7mgdz)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5p03c7ml53)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5p03c7mpx7)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5p03c7mtnc)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5p03c7mydh)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5p03c7n24m)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5p03c7n5wr)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5p03c7n9mw)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5p03c7nfd0)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5p03c7nk44)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5p03c7nnw8)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5p03c7nsmd)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5p03c7nxcj)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5p03c7p13n)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5p03c7p4vs)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5p03c7p8lx)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p03c7pdc1)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p03c7pj35)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p03c7pmv9)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p03c7pwbk)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p03c7q02p)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p03c7q3tt)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5p03c7q7ky)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5p03c7qcb2)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5p03c7qh26)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5p03c7qltb)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5p03c7qqkg)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5p03c7qv9l)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5p03c7qz1q)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5p03c7r2sv)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5p03c7r6jz)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5p03c7rb93)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5p03c7rg17)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5p03c7rksc)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5p03c7rpjh)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5p03c7rt8m)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5p03c7ry0r)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5p03c7s1rw)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5p03c7s5j0)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5p03c7s984)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5p03c7sf08)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5p03c7sjrd)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7ss7n)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7swzs)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7t0qx)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7t4h1)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7t875)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7tcz9)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7thqf)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7tmgk)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7tr6p)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7tvyt)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7tzpy)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7v3g2)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7v766)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7vbyb)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7vgpg)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7vlfl)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7vq5q)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7vtxv)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7vynz)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7w2f3)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7w657)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7w9xc)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p03c7wfnh)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct0wjz)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2syxj41gm5)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2syxj44cj8)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2syxj478fc)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2syxj4b5bg)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2syxj4f27k)

BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct0x8p)

BBC Proms on the World Service 12:06 SUN (w3ct0x8p)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jt)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89v)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8n4)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wz)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78t)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18xp28wrmt)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18y1bl99m8)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18y1bld6jc)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18y1blh3fg)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18y1bll0bk)

Business Weekly 01:06 SUN (w3ct0sp1)

Comedians Vs. The News 05:32 SAT (w3ct0x39)

Comedians Vs. The News 22:06 SUN (w3ct0x39)

Comedians Vs. The News 10:06 MON (w3ct0x39)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3csz1sv)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3csz1sv)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3csz1sv)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv66)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98g)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz98g)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz98g)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz98g)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0x5s)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct0x5s)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0x5s)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0x5s)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pz)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pz)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9pz)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2b)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc2b)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3cszc2b)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6v)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6v)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3cszc6v)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxt)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxt)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3cszbxt)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszccc)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszccc)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszccc)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszccc)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SAT (w3ct0x60)

Heart and Soul 05:32 SUN (w3ct0x60)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct0x60)

Heart and Soul 16:32 FRI (w3ct0x63)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3csz1z3)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3csz1z3)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3csz1z3)

More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pxt)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxt)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6tb)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6tb)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wf7py1xyh)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wf7py21pm)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wf7py25fr)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wf7py4tvl)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wf7py4ylq)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172x2wf7py52bv)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172x2wf7py7qrp)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wf7py7vht)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wf7py7z7y)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2wf7pybmns)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wf7pybrdx)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wf7pybw51)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wf7pyfjkw)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2wf7pyfnb0)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2wf7pyfs24)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2yw6mfv541)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2yw6mfw432)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2yw6mfy214)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2yw6mfz105)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2ywkwr4xyj)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2ywkwr5s5f)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2ywkwr7tvm)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2ywkwr8p2j)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2ywkwrbqrq)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2ywkwrckzm)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172x2ywkwrfmnt)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2ywkwrggwq)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2ywkwrjjkx)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2ywkwrkcst)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3cszf08)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3cszf08)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd3k)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd3k)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3cszd3k)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3cszdk3)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3cszdk3)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3cszdk3)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3cszdrw)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3cszdrw)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3cszdrw)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdbb)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3cszdbb)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdbb)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4s)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1m)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1m)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3cszv1m)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0w)

Science in Action 04:32 FRI (w3cszh0w)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0w)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh0w)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jq1l3tbhm)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jq1l3x7dq)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jq1l4049t)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jq1l4316x)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jq1l45y40)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh5c)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh5d)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3byl6lnf1s)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lbks0vmwx)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3lbks0ys98)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjn)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhp6)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhp6)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3cszhp6)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk39)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3cszk39)

The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3ct0xhw)

The Big Idea 15:50 SUN (w3ct0xhw)

The Big Idea 22:50 SUN (w3ct0xhw)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3csy1qj)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3csy1qk)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3csy1qk)

The Compass 15:06 WED (w3csy1qk)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3csy1qk)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3cszj3r)

The Conversation 16:32 MON (w3cszj3r)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3cszj3r)

The Documentary 08:32 SAT (w3ct0x1s)

The Documentary 11:32 SAT (w3ct0x5z)

The Documentary 22:32 SAT (w3ct0x1s)

The Documentary 19:32 SUN (w3ct0x1x)

The Documentary 02:32 MON (w3csy5bl)

The Documentary 09:06 MON (w3csy5bl)

The Documentary 15:06 MON (w3csy5bl)

The Documentary 20:06 MON (w3csy5bl)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct0hyx)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct0hyx)

The Documentary 15:06 TUE (w3ct0hyx)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct0hyx)

The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct0x1y)

The Documentary 16:32 WED (w3ct0x1y)

The Documentary 22:32 WED (w3ct0x1y)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjhj)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3cszjhk)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3cszjhk)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjqc)

The Food Chain 01:32 MON (w3cszjqc)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3cszjqd)

The Food Chain 16:32 THU (w3cszjqd)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3cszjqd)

The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvw)

The Forum 03:06 MON (w3cszjvw)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3cszjvx)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl3y)

The Inquiry 16:06 THU (w3cszl3y)

The Inquiry 22:06 THU (w3cszl3y)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172x7bbr02pdq5)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172x7bbr02pryk)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172x7bbr02qhfb)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172x7bbr02rbn7)

The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172x7bbr02rycw)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172x7bbr02s9m8)

The Newsroom 05:06 SUN (w172x7bbr02snvn)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172x7bbr02tdbf)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172x7bbr02vc9g)

The Newsroom 23:06 SUN (w172x7bbr02vv8z)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172x7bc38d01sj)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172x7bc38d098s)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172x7bc38d14hp)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172x7bc38d1czy)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172x7bc38d23gq)

The Newsroom 23:06 MON (w172x7bc38d2lg7)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172x7bc38d2ypm)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172x7bc38d365w)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172x7bc38d41ds)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172x7bc38d48x1)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172x7bc38d50ct)

The Newsroom 23:06 TUE (w172x7bc38d5hcb)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172x7bc38d5vlq)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172x7bc38d632z)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172x7bc38d6y9w)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172x7bc38d75t4)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172x7bc38d7x8x)

The Newsroom 23:06 WED (w172x7bc38d8d8f)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172x7bc38d8rht)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172x7bc38d9002)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172x7bc38d9v6z)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172x7bc38db2q7)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172x7bc38dbt60)

The Newsroom 23:06 THU (w172x7bc38dc95j)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172x7bc38dcndx)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172x7bc38dcwx5)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172x7bc38ddr42)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172x7bc38ddzmb)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172x7bc38dfq33)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172x7bc38dg62m)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3cszcnd)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3cszcnf)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3csyvmw)

Trending 02:32 SUN (w3csyvmw)

Trending 10:32 MON (w3csyvmw)

United Zingdom 04:32 SUN (w3ct0wl8)

United Zingdom 22:32 SUN (w3ct0wl8)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7czmg92hk8)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172x7czmg92m9d)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172x7czmg92r1j)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172x7czmg95dgc)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172x7czmg95j6h)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172x7czmg95mym)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmvd)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3cszmkd)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3cszmkd)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3cszmkd)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3cszmkd)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3cszmpx)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3cszmpx)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3cszmpx)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3cszmpx)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3cszms5)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3cszms5)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3cszms5)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3cszms5)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3cszmmn)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3cszmmn)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3cszmmn)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3cszmmn)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3cszmvf)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3cszmvf)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3cszmvf)

WorklifeIndia 10:06 SUN (w3ct0x4y)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57rr8y9ppv)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlv0h4h4qgs)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172x58lk8v6kgf)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172xlwnclpm77g)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172x58lk8v9gcj)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172xlxgtb9dfkv)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172x58lk8vdc8m)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172xlvtxw33qmc)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172x58lk8vh85q)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172xlt61dwv0nw)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172x58lk8vl52t)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3csztgk)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3csztgk)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3csztgk)

World Wise Web 03:06 SUN (w3ct0x61)

World Wise Web 14:06 SUN (w3ct0x61)

World Wise Web 10:06 WED (w3ct0x61)