Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 AUGUST 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nzy3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18w700s56g)
US seizes Iranian fuel bound for Venezuela

The US says it has taken control of four Iranian fuel shipments bound for Venezuela in the largest-ever seizure of its kind. About 1.1 million barrels of fuel were confiscated "with the assistance of foreign partners", according to the Justice Department. The Wall Street Journal's Benoit Faucon explains what we know so far. Also in the programme, an oil spill off Mauritius threatens one of the world's most biodiverse marine ecosystems. The BBC's Frey Lindsay looks into the long-term impact on the island. The chief executive of food delivery service Just Eat, Jitse Groen, tells us why he wants to transition those that deliver food for the firm away from being gig workers towards becoming employees on staff contracts with more benefits. Plus, we find out why Apple and Google have removed the popular game Fortnite from their smartphone app stores.

All through the show we'll be joined by Peter Ryan from the ABC in Sydney.

(Picture: The Bella tanker, one of four vessels that fuel was confiscated from. Picture credit:


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p01vp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtkt8t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8pf42)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjj)
Edwards: Missed opportunity to showcase women’s cricket

We reflect on the first Test match between England and Pakistan and discuss the remarkable comeback from England. Plus Jos Buttler said he ‘owed his team some runs’ following his wicket-keeping mistakes, so the team look at how wicket-keeping has evolved over the years.

The Women’s ODI World Cup has been postponed until 2022, so former England captain Charlotte Edwards joins us to speak about women’s cricket and the lack of it to be exact - there has been no international women’s cricket played since March..

Plus, a report has been published saying 34% of players in a host of T20 domestic leagues have experienced either late, or non-payment, problems. We speak to the head of the global players’ union.

Photo: Former England captain Charlotte Edwards during day two of the Kia Women's Test of the Women's Ashes Series between England and Australia Women in 2015 (Credit: Getty Images).


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p05lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhd)
Beirut: after the explosion

Last week's catastrophic explosion in Beirut devastated the port area and left at least 170 dead, thousands injured, and many more homeless. It's a painful time for our journalists who come from Beirut - in both BBC Arabic and BBC Monitoring. We hear the reflections of Nahed Najjar, Nisrine Hatoum, Hesham Shawish, Nidale Abou Mrad and Julien Hajj.

The dream of Gran Colombia
Gran Colombia was a vast country which included the modern nations of Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela and Colombia. It was born in 1819, the dream of Simon Bolivar, hero of the revolutionary wars that liberated Spanish America. Ana Maria Roura has been researching the history and legacy of Gran Colombia for BBC Mundo.

Pakistan's Siddi community
The Black Lives Matter movement has prompted questions in Pakistan about the Siddi, or Sheedi, community, brought there from African countries centuries ago as soldiers or slaves. Saher Baloch has reported the story for BBC Urdu.

Belarus: understanding the anger
Belarus has been gripped by protests ever since President Alexander Lukashenko declared a landslide victory in last week's election. Yana Lyushnevskaya of BBC Monitoring tells us more about the cause of the anger, and explains the long grip on power of the man widely referred to as Europe's last dictator.

Picture: Burning grain silos in the port of Beirut.
Credit: AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv8)
The invention of the modern ventilator

In August 1952, the Blegdam Hospital in the Danish capital Copenhagen was overwhelmed by hundreds of seriously ill polio patients. During the first weeks of the epidemic over 80 percent of the patients died, most within days of admission. The patients, who were mostly children, were dying of respiratory failure. Desperate for a solution an anaesthetist, Bjørn Iben, came up with a strategy that led to today’s ventilators and revolutionised medicine. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Anne Holton who was a medical student at the time of the polio epidemic and helped treat patients.

Photo A medical student in Denmark 1952 treating a polio patient in Blegdam Hospital, Copenhagen. Credit used with permission of Jørgen Viby-Mogensen.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p09by)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn8)
How democratic are American elections?

The US presidential election campaign is gathering steam, with the Democratic Party convention beginning next week. November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. The incumbent Donald Trump is pitted against the former vice president Joe Biden. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new house of representatives, and thirteen governors. More than 160,000 Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets demanding social justice. With the uncertainty of the coronavirus, there is no clear consensus on the way polling stations can ensure the safety of voters. While mass postal voting is being held up as a solution, many - including President Trump - argue that mail-in ballots will increase fraud and cause unnecessary delays. Others say various forms of voter suppression are already undermining the integrity of the vote. So as the first major election in the middle of a pandemic, how credible will the results in November be? How are allegations of voter suppression being addressed? And what will the candidates do if vote counting becomes a drawn out process? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss whether American democracy is fit to handle the events the country finds itself in.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p0f32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtl5j6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8pscg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvs3)
Trending - explaining the stories the world is sharing...


SAT 05:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whq)
Letter seven

The simmering anger that came to the boil after George Floyd's death has made itself felt so often before. In every city in America, you can’t miss it. Sometimes it cools a little, but never for long. James Naughtie asks how America can ever erase the stain of what many refer to as the country's "original sin" - the sin of slavery.


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p0jv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Documentary (w3ct0486)
The remarkable resistance of Lilo

In the heart of Hitler’s Nazi Germany, members of the Resistance worked tirelessly and at great risk to themselves to help those whose lives were threatened. Amongst them was Elisabeth Charlotte Gloeden – known as Liselotte or “Lilo” – who, along with her husband Erich, hid Jews in their home in Berlin, before arranging safe passage for them out of Germany.

Both Lilo and Erich had Jewish fathers. Hers was a prominent skin specialist and he was hounded from his job by the Nazis. Lilo’s Jewish heritage led to her being driven from the legal profession at the outbreak of war in 1939.

The couple’s efforts went undetected until 1944 when they took in General Fritz Lindemann, who was being hunted by the Gestapo for being part of the plot to assassinate Hitler. They stood trial in November 1944 before one of Germany’s most feared judges, Roland Freisler.

Fergal Keane tells the remarkable story of the couple and of others who hid and were hidden in Nazi Berlin.

(Photo: Elisabeth Charlotte Gloeden on trial for conspiracy to assassinate Hitler 20 July 1944. Credit: Ullstein bild/Getty Images)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p0nlb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snx)
The Syrian family feud which threatens the country

In this week’s programme we’ll be looking at the family rift in Syria which threatens yet more turmoil for the war-torn country. Just why is the country’s richest man defying his cousin - the President?

Is there still a free press in Hong Kong - and if not what does this mean for its status as a financial centre? That’s one of the questions we’ll be trying to answer after the media tycoon and pro-democracy advocate Jimmy Lai was arrested.

We’ll also be examining the UK’s latest GDP figures - which saw the country fall into the first recession since the financial crisis. Why has the G7 nation suffered a bigger fall than any other major economy?

Plus, we’ll be chatting to a couple of millionaires who tell us how they are far more frugal than we might imagine.

Presented by Lucy Burton.

(Image: Rami Makhlouf has posted three videos online in a month, complaining about his treatment. Credit: AFP).


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p0sbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pv)
Japan 75 years on from WW2 surrender

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of Japan’s surrender in the Second World War. A surrender which followed the utter destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the first ever use of nuclear weapons, dropped by the United States. But our correspondent Rupert Wingfield-Hayes says the decisions which followed, made by the victors, may have kept a flame of resistance alight. A flame which is growing stronger.

The house arrest of former president Alvaro Uribe in Colombia has revived the divisions wrought by decades of civil war between government forces, paramilitaries and leftist guerrillas, most prominently the FARC. Mr Uribe denies the allegations against him of witness tampering in an investigation meant to establish the extent to which the government colluded with paramilitary abuses of civilians. Mathew Charles reflects on a development which divides Colombia once more.

Greece’s economy relies heavily on tourism, accounting for around 26% of all employment. It’s no surprise that seasonal workers in this part of Europe have been hit hard by the pandemic. This week a new curfew was brought in, closing bars and restaurants early in some of the most popular destinations, including Santorini and Mykonos. Heidi Fuller-Love has heard how, for one seasonal worker in Crete, Covid-19 has made a difficult situation impossible.

For many Germans, a holiday abroad means going to one place; the Balearic Island of Majorca in Spain. But this year, many Germans were worried they wouldn’t be able to go due to coronavirus. While, as John Kampfner has found, other Germans were worried that they would.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Bridget Harney


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8q4lv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1n)
Black Music in Europe

Black music in Europe: 1939-45

Clarke looks at the music of black Europe at the time of the Second World War with recordings of Nazi propaganda jazz, underground bands in Hitler’s Germany, black American trumpet stars in occupied Paris, and Caribbean swing bands playing through the Blitz in London. He also examines the work of Nigerian composer Fela Sowande and plays extracts of his wartime broadcast for the BBC.

(Photo: Clark Peters. Credit:: Alexandra Quinn)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p0x2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtlnhq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8q8bz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl4)
United Zingdom

15/08/2020 GMT

Zing Tsjeng wonders what it means to be British. She travels around the UK to find out.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4n)
How the BBC’s damaged Beirut office kept on reporting events

The recent deadly explosion in Beirut saw the BBC’s offices suffer substantial damage and lose critical services - but staff there kept on reporting. We’re joined by the BBC’s head of the Arabic service to hear how they did it.

Plus another in our regular series How I Hear - a US listener tells us about his personal relationship with the BBC World Service and love of podcasts.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p10tq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bx44bjtmf)
Will there be any college football this fall?

We take an in-depth look at the issues surrounding the upcoming college football season after two of the game's major conferences - the Pac-12 and Big Ten - announced they won’t play this Autumn due to concerns around the Covid-19 pandemic. Super Bowl winner and former University of Notre Dame player Rocky Boiman believes the season should go ahead, telling us “If anybody is looking for a 100% safe environment in this world, anywhere, you’re not going to get it. It does not exist”. He also believes a lack of football could cost some players a shot at the NFL draft and adds he’s now resigned to all college football being cancelled in the coming weeks.

Hunter Reynolds plays for the University of Michigan and is part of the #BigTenUnited movement. He won’t be playing following the postponement of the Big Ten. He tells us some players he’s spoken to are worried their coaches may be prepared to risk putting winning above safety.

Broadcaster Mike Carlson also joins us and he believes the stand-off around the college football season could become an issue in the US Presidential campaign.

“It’s an elite, unique, group to be in” - Marcel Eckardt joins us ahead of taking charge of the World Snooker Championship final. At thirty years of age, Eckardt will be the youngest person ever to referee the most prestigious match in the sport. He’s also the first German to do it. He tells us what the occasion means to him, how he got into the sport, his love of Pool and why he turned down the chance to have his family at The Crucible Theatre for his big moment.

Broadcaster Rikki Swannell joins us with the latest from New Zealand after the final round of the regular season in Netball’s ANZ Premiership was cancelled due to concerns around Covid-19. All of this week’s games have been declared a draw. Swannell tells us how likely it is that next weekend’s finals series will be played.

This week’s Sporting Witness takes us back to the Beijing Olympics of 2008, when weightlifter Matthias Steiner created one of the most emotional moments of the games. His wife was killed in a car accident shortly before the games began and he dedicated his gold medal to her.

And – we check in on the second test between England and Pakistan at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton with World Cup winner Ebony Rainford-Brent

Photo credit: Michigan Stadium, where the University of Michigan college football team play their home matches (Getty Images).


SAT 10:59 VJ Day Silence (w3ct0x5r)
The 75th anniversary of VJ Day

A two-minute silence to mark VJ Day along with a summary of the latest World News.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtlwzz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8qhv7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1d)
Vaccines, Money And Politics

Vaccines, money and politics

Nearly every person on the planet is vulnerable to the new coronavirus, SarsCoV2. That’s why there are more than 100 projects around the world racing towards the goal of creating a safe and effective vaccine for the disease it causes, Covid19, in the next 12 to 18 months. But this is just the first part of a long and complex process, working at a pace and scale never attempted before.

In Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at the vast ecosystem needed to deliver a vaccination programme to the world in record time. This will require billions of dollars, and likely more than one successful candidate to meet the global demand. The world will need to secure supply chains in order to avoid shortages of vital supplies like medical glass. Companies will have to manufacture the most promising candidates even before they know if the vaccines will work, otherwise the process will be further delayed. Authorities across the world will have to work together to overcome the temptation for countries to keep the vaccines for themselves and allocate a fair global distribution, and then decide which sectors of the population get them first. And they’ll need a communication strategy to convince the public the vaccines are safe and effective – and to combat the antivaxx messages already gaining traction on social media. What plans are in place to make this all happen - and will they work?

Presenter/Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Photo: Coronavirus model and medical syringe are seen with "Covid-19" sign, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p189z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6t6)
The science of soundtracks with Max Richter, Hans Zimmer, Hildur Guðnadóttir and Angélica Negrón

A huge episode of Music Life this week sees one of the most versatile composers working today, Max Richter (Peaky Blinders, Black Mirror, Ad Astra, Mary Queen of Scots), ask renowned creators of music for film, TV and the stage how they got their starts in the music business, their creative processes, how they convey emotion through their work, and how it’s actually quite difficult to create something simple.

Among those answering these questions is a man who really needs no introduction, Hans Zimmer. He’s scored over 100 films so far, putting his signature sound on everything from James Bond to the Dark Knight Trilogy via Thelma & Louise. There isn’t a film that isn’t vastly improved with Hans’ work behind it. Also with Max is Icelandic composer, cellist and vocalist Hildur Guðnadóttir. She won the Academy Award for best score for the controversial film Joker, and you can also hear her music-less score in the haunting TV series Chernobyl. Puerto Rican composer and multi-instrumentalist Angélica Negrón completes the line up; she writes music for chamber ensembles, orchestras, film, theatre, robotic instruments, and even toys. This is a meeting of minds that’s not to be missed.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p1d23)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5qkpp)
Thousands gather at funeral of protester in Belarus

Massive crowds are gathering in the Belarusian capital Minsk to commemorate a man who died on Monday, and to protest the re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko. We hear from Minsk.

Also on the programme: Japan marks 75 years since the end of World War Two. We hear from a historian on the significance of the day.

And the BBC's Focus on Africa programme celebrates 60 years of broadcasting. We hear from a reporter who worked on the programme in the early days and remembers some defining moments broadcasting to Africa.

(Photo: Belarusians attend memorial ceremony for Alexander Tarakhovsky on the place of his death in Minsk, Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p1ht7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyz)
Life Changes

North Korea's celebrity defectors

According to South Korea’s Ministry of Unification, there are more than 30,000 North Korean defectors living in the South. The lack of access to North Korea makes defectors one of the few windows to what life is like in the secretive regime. As a result, the defectors and their stories have become a hugely valuable commodity in South Korea’s popular culture and media.

There are a number of popular reality TV programmes starring North Korean defectors. Hyun-joo Yu is one of the most established stars on Now on My Way to Meet You, a popular and long running variety programme. The show features emotional North Korean defectors sharing their stories and performing to dramatic music. At the same time, the South Korean celebrity guests provide commentary and sometimes jokes.

Meanwhile, on the Internet, dozens of North Korean defectors have gained popularity through live streaming, telling stories about their lives in the North on YouTube and Instagram. These defector-celebrities, like 21-year-old Nara Kang, are mostly young, attractive women. Representing a younger generation of defectors, Nara Kang is tapping into an audience with no living memory of the North.

Capitalising on their status as defectors to gain fame, these celebrities cannot move on from being defined by their past. They strive to fit into South Korean society, while emphasising their otherness to South Korean audiences.


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p1mkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l93prr56p)
Champions League, LeBron James and One Day in July

It's another week of Champions League action in Lisbon and Sportsworld will bring you all the reaction to the week's matches and build up to the remaining fixtures, with special guests.

Plus, we'll have all the latest from the live sport around the globe. Including the test match between England and Pakistan, the final weekend of the Snooker World Championships, Formula 1 qualifying and the latest on the Golf.

And, Sportsworld listeners were treated to a feast of live sport on the 14th July 2019 with the Men’s Singles Final at Wimbledon between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic and the men’s Cricket World Cup Final at Lord’s between England and New Zealand. We take a look back at an historic day of sport in a special documentary, One Day in July.

Photo credit: LeBron James taking a shot in a match between the LA Lakers and Milwaukee Bucks, 2020 (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p1zsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtmr6w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8rc24)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvs3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p23jw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 today]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p2790)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk35)
Actor Russell Crowe

In The Arts Hour this week with Nikki Bedi, Russell Crowe talks about his latest film Unhinged, his excitement at a coronation tea cup and why he’s had thirty years of self-isolating practice

Icelandic director Hlynur Pálmason discusses his approach to filmmaking for his movie A White, White Day and the importance of letting films breathe

Bollywood actor Sidharth Malhotra reveals what it takes to look the part

Author Zadie Smith tells us how lockdown made her feel ‘out of control’ and why she had to turn to writing to get her through the start of the restrictions

Australian novelist Kate Grenville explores her country’s colonial past in her new book A Room Made of Leaves

David Boanuh tells us about filming the Ghana portion of Beyoncé’s visual album Black Is King

And there’s 60’s Surf Rock Japanese style

Nikki’s guest in the studio is cultural critic Anil Sinanan

(Photo: Russell Crowe. Credit: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p2c14)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5rjnq)
Belarus protests spread

Anti-government protesters in Minsk held noisy demonstrations outside state television buildings, as unrest continues to spread across the country.

Also in the programme: It's 75 years since the Second World War ended with Japan's sudden surrender; and 60 years since the BBC began broadcasting Focus On Africa. We hear about both those anniversaries.

(Photo: Demonstrators hold their phones with flashlights on during a rally to protest outside the building of Belarusian National State TV and Radio Company in Minsk, Belarus August 15, 2020. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p2gs8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8rv1n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf04)
The boy, the wish and the nuclear weapons

In 1986 American teenager, Jeff Henigson, was diagnosed with brain cancer and given two years to live. He had just one wish: to travel to the Soviet Union, meet the country’s leader Mikhail Gorbachev and attempt to broker a nuclear peace deal. This programme was first broadcast on 7th of September 2019.

Jeff has written a book about his experience called WarHead.

Presenter: Asya Fouks
Producer: Thomas Harding Assinder

Picture: Teenager Jeff Henigson in bed after undergoing brain surgery
Credit: Jeff Henigson


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p2ljd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtnbyj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8ryss)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzh)
Confidence: Why it misleads us

From doctors to politicians to your boss, people often ask us to put our confidence in them. We’re often urged to build more confidence in ourselves. But one of the most consistent findings in psychology is that there is very little overlap between confidence and competence; how good people think they are, and how good they really are. In this edition of the Why Factor, Michael Blastland asks: why do admire confidence?

Contributors
Ed O’Brien - Associate Professor of Behaviour Science, University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Maria Konnikova, Psychologist and Author: The Confidence Game
Dr. Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, Psychologist and Author: Confidence, The Surprising Truth About How Much You Need and How To Get It.
Glen Fukushima -Senior Fellow, Center For American Progress
Dr Anne McGuinness – University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust


Photo Credit: Multiple exposure of businesswoman arms crossed / Getty Images

Film Credit: The Great Imposter Trailer 1960 / Universal Studios Home Entertainment / Director Robert Mulligan


SAT 23:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxp)
Belarus’ contested election

Autocratic leader Alexander Lukashenko claims to have won a landslide in the country’s presidential elections. But how can we know what really happened? Tim Harford delves into the numbers behind the widely questioned election result, with Dr Brian Klaas and political analyst Artyom Shraibman.


(Photo: Thousands of protesters march in Belarus over the disputed re-election.13 August 2020.Credit: Sergei Gapon/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 16 AUGUST 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p2v0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp1)
Legal victory over facial recognition

The use of facial recognition in public by a UK police force was unlawful, says the Court of Appeal. Plus how a new global policy network aims to help reign in the power of big technology firms. And China’s Xinhua dictionary gains a raft of tech terms. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of a British police officer standing in front of a crowd. Credit: Getty Images).


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8s691)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p2yrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtnq5x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8sb15)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvs3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p32hx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x2h)
Stitching souls

Deep in Alabama’s Black Belt, the village of Gee’s Bend is almost an island, cut off by a loop in the Alabama River. The ferry that linked the Bend to Camden, the local county seat, was stopped by white segregationists in 1962, and not reinstated until 2006. Once enslaved plantation workers, then sharecroppers, then struggling New Deal farmers, the people of the Bend remained largely unnoticed by mainstream history, despite Martin Luther King’s visit in 1965 a few weeks before the civil rights march on Selma.

But the women of Gee’s Bend have held on to their creative traditions, passed down from mother to daughter: spine-tingling gospel singing, and a unique style of bold, improvised quilting. Made from old clothes out of necessity for generations, used for insulation and burned to keep off mosquitoes, the quilts brought Gee’s Bend fame after they were “discovered” by an art collector in the 1990s and shown in major museums in Houston and New York.

Maria Margaronis hears the voices of this small community and takes part with her daughter in a three-day quilting workshop led by two Gee’s Bend ladies—a space of radical trust where Black and white women of all backgrounds and all ages come together to sew, laugh, sing, tell their stories and confront their challenges and griefs.


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3681)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8skjf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjr)
A future without doctors?

Can you imagine a future without doctors? We’re in the midst of a robotics and Artificial Intelligence revolution. Many jobs humans currently do will in future be carried out by machine. But what about those in the medical profession? AI will be of assistance, but surely we’ll always need surgeons, doctors, and nurses? Well, the Oxford University economist Daniel Susskind is not so sure. He believes that many of the tasks currently carried out by doctors will soon be performed by machine. So can doctors survive by reinventing themselves?

Presenter: David Edmonds
Producer: Ben Cooper

(Image: Operating theatre. Credit: Getty)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3b05)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtp2f9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8sp8k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8m)
What’s the future of film?

This week, as part of a series of special programmes, we look to the future of cinema and TV.

One of the biggest changes to our cultural landscape has been the transformation in the way so many of us watch films.

Cinemas around the world have been off limits and streaming services have never been popular. Production is being drastically reimagined to include social distancing and coronavirus prevention measures. Plus in the light of the resurgent Black Lives Matter movement calls to make the global film industry truly diverse and inclusive are growing ever louder.

We ask what’s next for film. How can cinema and the film industry be reinvented in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic?

Tina is joined by award winning American-Iranian writer director Maryam Keshavarz, Nigerian activist and documentarian Pamela Adie, Swiss choreographer and virtual reality pioneer Gilles Jobin and in London the British director Francis Annan and film critic Rhianna Dhillon.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Moviegoers begin to attend reopened cinemas. Credit: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3fr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Assignment (w3csz6lf)
Milton Nkosi: The apartheid child who changed Africa’s story

As a child of Soweto, apartheid South Africa’s most notorious black township, Milton Nkosi could easily have become an embittered adult; in June 1976 he witnessed the Soweto uprising in which white police brutally suppressed protests by black schoolchildren, leading to many deaths. Yet, as apartheid began to collapse in the early 1990s, Milton found himself drawn into TV journalism; enabling him to question his former tormentors and helping viewers around the world to see the moral case for change. So began a career that took him from translator and fixer to producer and eventually, the head of bureau for the BBC’s news operation in South Africa, where he then sought to diversify coverage of a fast-changing continent.

As Milton explains in this conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, his humble beginnings turned out to be an asset: Among his childhood neighbours in Soweto were anti-apartheid activists including Nelson Mandela’s wife and children, many of whom would become valuable contacts. However, after the transition to democracy in 1994, Milton also had to ask uncomfortable questions of some of them, as claims of corruption emerged within the ANC government. Moral dilemmas such as this defined his working life: Is it even possible to be an impartial reporter when your subject might be a close associate? For Milton, the issues need to be seen in context. As he points out: “Nobody can ever justify apartheid based on the mistakes of the post-apartheid leaders”.

Produced by Michael Gallagher
Editor Bridget Harney

Image: (Milton Nkosi) Christian Parkinson


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8st0p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1h)
Zoroastrianism and death

By day Dr Jamasp JamaspAsa, works in the UK as a cancer surgeon, but now, due to the passing of his father he has a new role, the High Priest of the Zoroastrian faith in a Mumbai Fire Temple.

Lipika Pelham meets the High Priest as Zoroastrians, or Parsees, celebrate the most auspicious days in their calendar. The “All Souls Festival” is when they believe ancestors visit them. She is curious whether his medical skills as a doctor make him a 'holy warrior', fighting to stop the work of evil, by keeping his patients alive.

Far from being just a sombre memorial of the dead, “Mukhtad” is a festive occasion. With a feast of consecrated food, flowers, and lamps that are constantly kept alight, Zoroastrians welcome the “farohars”, the spirits of dead relatives, who come to help the living to celebrate life, which is the work of God, against the evils of death.

Lipika will explore the faith’s most distinguishing feature, which is the religious duty of every Zoroastrian to prolong and focus on life, even at the time of death.

Producer and Presenter: Lipika Pelham


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3khf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjv)
Addiction during a pandemic

Covid-19 has forced social isolation upon many of us. Nuala McGovern considers alcohol and drug addiction relapse during the pandemic. We hear from two men, in Kenya and the United States, about how they have fought their addictions while under lockdown.
Nuala also talks about the importance of family in these times and hears how one man travelled more than 2,000 km across the US to play his trombone for his brother, who was recovering in a rehab centre after a fall.
She also talks about how hobbies are helping us and joins a wrestler, a dancer and a musician in conversation about social distancing.

(Photo: Hand rolled cannabis joint)


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8sxrt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 The Conversation (w3csvs2b)
Fighting revenge porn

Can women stop their intimate photos being published online without their consent? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women fighting back against so-called 'revenge' porn

Nyika Allen is President and CEO of the New Mexico Technology Council. In 2015, Nyika's ex-boyfriend began posting compromising photographs of her on Twitter. As they were viewed by complete strangers she was overwhelmed by shock and humiliation, but decided that she would not let him win. As well as getting the images taken down, and taking her ex to court, she successfully lobbied her state's politicians. With her help, New Mexico is now one of a growing number of US states to pass a law against revenge - or non-consensual - pornography.

Talent Jumo supports survivors of revenge porn in Zimbabwe, through her organisation Katswe Sistahood. She says the trauma of the experience is often made worse by the reaction of family who can reject their daughters for bringing shame on them. She believes society stigmatises women for this whereas men are celebrated for their virility. And bullying by ex-partners is grounded in the assumption that they won't speak out. She is helping women do just that, as well as helping to draft much-needed laws that can punish this new crime.

Image: (L) Talent Jumo. Credit: DCNGO. Courtesy of The Global Fund
Image: (R) Nyika Allen. Credit: Joel Bond


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3p7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpc)
The Senses

The senses: Hearing

From a whisper to the roar of thunder, every sound creates vibrations in our ears which the brain decodes, to tell us what we’re hearing. But as neurologist, Dr Guy Leschziner explains, when disruptions occur along the way, extraordinary things can happen, changing how we perceive the world.

We meet Mark, who can’t hear his friends in a noisy pub but can hear the sound of every bodily function amplified in his head.

Kelly gets spinning attacks that send her falling to the floor. The sensation lasts for hours and with every attack she loses hearing. She’s been told it’s Ménière's disease - an inner ear disorder that affects balance.

Keen bird-watcher Bill recognises his hearing loss when he can no longer pick out the call of the smallest birds, but can hear elaborate musical tunes when there’s nothing playing.

These astonishing cases show how tiny changes in our bodies can turn our understanding of the world upside down, leading us to question our own version of reality.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Kelly, who has been diagnosed with Ménière's disease Credit: BBC


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8t1hy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq7)
Meatpacking's coronavirus problem

Meatpacking plants around the world are quickly becoming hotspots for Coronavirus outbreaks. In many rural parts of the United States, meat processing factories have now become the main source of Covid-19 infections. But why are other food factories not experiencing the same problem? And why is the US so adversely affected?

Tamasin Ford takes a look at the unique conditions at meat processing factories that enable the virus to thrive and how the outbreaks have revealed some of the gruelling working conditions facing many workers around the world.

In Denmark, Europe’s largest pig processor, we explore whether artificial intelligence and the use of robots could help prevent future outbreaks, or whether it’s simply about providing better working conditions for people working in the factories.

If you'd like to get in touch with the team, please email thefoochain@bbc.co.uk.

(Picture: A man cuts meat for sausage. Credit: Lev Fedoseyev/TASS via Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3szp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtpkdt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8t582)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p3xqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3s)
Will America’s 'Big Tech' firms be reined in?

US lawmakers are deciding whether to act against the country’s powerful tech giants. Some believe the likes of Facebook, Amazon, Google and Apple are stifling competition. The companies have made huge profits during the Covid crisis and critics believe they will use this cash to buy competitors.
With Charmaine Cozier.


Clockwise from top left: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook.
Getty Images


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8t906)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszf04)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p41gy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtpsx2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8tdrb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p4572)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p48z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5tgls)
Belarus: Rival rallies in Minsk as Belarus leader fights back

Supporters of President Lukashenko are rallying in Belarus, in an attempt to counter the mass protests against his disputed re-election.
Also in the programme: Opposition activists have been demonstrating in Thailand to demand political change -- including reform of the monarchy. And how wildfires in Chile have been destroying some of the country's lush native forests.

(Photo: A pro-government demonstration in central Minsk has so far been small. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p4dqb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p4jgg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvr)
Ray Bradbury, a master of science fiction

”People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it.” Ray Bradbury has been acclaimed as the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream but, as the quote above shows, he regarded himself as the author of modern philosophical fables, rather than a sci-fi writer. In his dystopian works, such as Fahrenheit 451, he holds up a mirror to contemporary society and then transposes it into fantastical and futuristic scenarios. Bradbury was a prolific writer who tried his hand at everything from poems and novels to TV and radio scripts but it’s his early short stories which he produced in his twenties that are perhaps the most imaginative.

To mark the centenary of Bradbury’s birth, Rajan Datar is joined by three Bradbury experts to help him navigate through the author’s prodigious output:
Professor Jonathan Eller from Indiana University who is also the Director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies;
Dr. Miranda Corcoran who teaches American literature at University College Cork with particular interest in science fiction, horror and the gothic;
and Dr. Phil Nichols who combines research into Bradbury's TV and other media work with the teaching of Film and Television Production at Wolverhampton University.

(Photo: Ray Bradbury in Los Angeles, circa 1980. Credit Michael Montfort/Pix/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p4n6l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l93prv5vx)
Sports news from around the world

With the Champions League semi-final spots decided, Sportsworld brings you all the reaction to the upcoming fixtures in Lisbon. Plus we'll be talking Europa League alongside our special guests.

We'll also have the latest from the Spanish Grand Prix, the test cricket between England and Pakistan and the Golf.

Photo credit: Champions League ball on the Estadio Jose Alvalade pitch in Lisbon ahead of the Champions League match between RB Leipzig and Atletico Madrid (Getty Images).


SUN 17:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p4ryq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct0x4t)
How is Covid changing young India?

From academic success to social skills, mental health and future jobs, the coronavirus pandemic is a crisis for today’s youth. And the fallout may follow them for a much longer time than most imagine.

According to a recent study by the United Nations, the pandemic has already forced more than one in six people under the age of 29 into unemployment.

So what happens to a country like India, where half the population is under the age of 24? Is continued social isolation affecting their mental health? How are they coping with uncertainty about the future, and what are their aspirations?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how the pandemic is shaping the lives of young Indians.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Suzanne Zerin, graduate, jobseeker; Varul Mayank, entrepreneur and founder, Knocksense; Asheer Kandhari, high-school student


SUN 17:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8v473)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p4wpv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 18:06 The Documentary (w3ct0486)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p50fz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtqrw3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8vcqc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1g)
Fighting talk: How language can make us better

When we talk about cancer it’s often hard to find the right words. As we search for the perfect thing to say, we find ourselves reaching for familiar metaphors; the inspiring people fighting or battling their cancer.

Cara Hoofe is currently in remission from Stage 3 bowel cancer, she says it would be easy for her to say she’s beaten cancer. Yet she’s still uncomfortable with the terminology. If she’s won her fight, does that mean others have lost?

In this programme Cara asks experts what impact these militaristic metaphors actually have on those living with cancer, and asks current and former patients what we should talk about when we talk about cancer.

(Photo: Cancer patient laughing as she talks with a nurse. Credit: Science Photo Library)


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p5463)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6t6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p57y7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5vfkt)
Mass protest eclipses Belarus leader's rally

Estimates of the turnout in Minsk today range from 100,000 to more than 200,000. But it was, by any measure, the biggest show of opposition to a vote widely viewed as falsified. The Belarusian ambassador to Slovakia tells us there needs to be another vote - and that he expects to lose his job for speaking out.
Also - what impact is President Trump's response to the Covid crisis having on Republican voters? We hear from one swing state; and can dogs help to replant trees destroyed by wildfires in Chile?
(Photo: People attend a rally against police brutality and the results of the Belarusian presidential election in Minsk, Belarus, 16 August 2020. Credit: EPA/YAUHEN YERCHAK)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p5cpc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8vqyr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90p5hfh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtr7vm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8vvpw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]



MONDAY 17 AUGUST 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8z9l5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57qngz9yjn)
Belarus sees biggest protest rally yet

Mass protests continue in Belarus over disputed elections but President Lukashenko remains defiant and Russia offers assistance. We hear from Olga Dryndova who is editor of Belarus Analysen, at the University of Bremen, about why the majority of the population is turning against their leader, and the BBC's Kateryna Khinkulova sums up the best case scenario for Russia. Economist Michael Hughes discusses the end of the first half year in corporate earnings and we hear from Peter Bowes on the US Democratic Convention which begins on Monday, online and Jane Wakefield talks to event organisers about the challenges of taking large events digital.
(Image: Belarusian opposition supporters rally in Minsk, Credit: European Photopress Agency)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30kzyg9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8z9py1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63wgc5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l026f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8z9tp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh57)
Tears of a weightlifter

In August 2008, the weightlifter Matthias Steiner created one of the most emotional moments of the 2008 Olympics when he sank to the floor in floods of tears after winning a gold medal. Steiner had lost his wife in a car accident shortly before the games and dedicated the victory to her. He had to lift eight kilos more than his previous personal best in order to win. Matthias Steiner talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Matthias Steiner taking gold (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8z9yf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63wpvf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l09pp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv61)
What is the point of slime?

Squelching into the science of slime, Chhavi Sachdev seeks to find out why it took so long for listener Helen Tyson to remove slime from her fingers, after she picked up a tiny slug while gardening.

This unfortunate and hugely repulsive experience set Helen to wonder what it is about the structure of slug slime that makes it gloopy, so she sent Chhavi to meet with slug slime expert Professor Andrew Smith who reveals how the complex molecular structure of this pervasive fluid makes it so difficult to scrub off.

Slime is used by all sorts of creatures including the Giant African Land snail, which invaded India by hitching a ride on imported timber. But invasive species biologist Dr TV Sajeev reveals that these snails are themselves giving a lift to another meningitis-causing parasite that can infect people. Chhavi looks for these massive molluscs in her own garden in Mumbai.

Marine biologist Helen Scales describes how animals can use slime for catching food, mating, defence, or even transportation, and Chhavi speaks with Dr Adam Celiz who has been inspired by this slimy adaptability to create a tool that can provide new cells to replace damaged heart cells after a cardiac arrest.

Slugs, snails and even fish keep a variety of useful chemicals in their slime. Some make them taste bitter, and others numb the mouth of predators, but they may also prevent the animals from contracting infections. Dr Sarah Pitt has investigated these compounds in the slimy mucus of a garden snail and discovered an antibiotic that is brand new to science.

Slime is pretty disgusting, but it’s also completely fascinating.

Presented by Chhavi Sachdev
Produced by Rory Galloway

(Photo: Slugs Mating. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zb25f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmnybj4)
Further strikes expected in Belarus

More workers' strikes are due to get underway today in Belarus following Sunday's mass protest against President Alexander Lukashenko. It's estimated that at least one hundred thousand people marched through the capital, Minsk.

In the United States, the Democratic Party Convention is set to begin in Milwaukee. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are already selected as candidates for president and vice president.

Talks on the peace process in Afghanistan were expected to start in Qatar in the coming but have now been thrown into doubt. Sources in the Afghan government say the release of some Taliban prisoners is being delayed because of objections from home and abroad.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zb5xk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmnyg88)
Belarus: Strikes against President Lukashenko continue

More workers' strikes are due to get underway today in Belarus following Sunday's mass protest against President Alexander Lukashenko. It's estimated that at least one hundred thousand people marched through the capital, Minsk.

Talks on the peace process in Afghanistan were expected to start in Qatar in the coming but have now been thrown into doubt. Sources in the Afghan government say the release of some Taliban prisoners is being delayed because of objections from home and abroad.

Protests against the military's entrenched role in politics are gathering momentum in Thailand. In recent days protestors have become more outspoken on the monarchy's control over the military.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zb9np)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmnyl0d)
Strikes expected in Belarus after mass protests

More workers' strikes are due to get underway today in Belarus following Sunday's mass protest against President Alexander Lukashenko. It's estimated that at least one hundred thousand people marched through the capital, Minsk.

Talks on the peace process in Afghanistan were expected to start in Qatar in the coming but have now been thrown into doubt. Sources in the Afghan government say the release of some Taliban prisoners is being delayed because of objections from home and abroad.

Two football teams in Germany have played a match in the nude - bar their socks and boots - all in the name of art.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zbfdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc26)
Wu'er Kaixi: China's crackdown on Uighur dissent

China goes to extraordinary lengths to monitor and mould the lives of its citizens. The most extreme example can be seen in Xinjiang, home to more than 10 million muslim Uighur people; but the principle of stability through authoritarian control applies across the country. Stephen Sackur speaks to Wu'er Kaixi, a Chinese political dissident in exile since the Tiananmen uprising and himself a Uighur. Has China found a way of successfully suppressing dissent?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l0sp6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jp)
Coronavirus: A disaster for feminism?

The impact of the pandemic on gender inequality. Tamasin Ford speaks to Lauren Currie, CEO of Stride and founder of Upfront - organisations focused on getting women’s voices heard - and Gill Whitty Collins, author of Why Men Win at Work, about how the strains of the pandemic have disproportionately affected women. Saunoamaali’i Dr Karanina Sumeo, New Zealand’s equal opportunities commissioner, explains why having more women at the table when policy decisions are made is part of the solution.

(Photo: A woman works from home while caring for a child, Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk8)
Surviving Saddam

Zainab Salbi grew up in the inner social circle of the Iraqi dictator, Saddam Hussein, in the 1980s because her father worked as Saddam’s personal pilot. It was a world of apparently glamorous parties on the River Tigris, but where the slightest falling-out with the dictator could lead to execution. After years of psychological pressure, Zainab’s family got her out of Saddam’s Iraq by setting up an arranged marriage for her in the US. She tells her story to Susan Hulme.

PHOTO: Zainab Salbi as a teenager with Saddam Hussein (private collection)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zbk4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l0xfb)
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MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zbnx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l115g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvs3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zbsn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63xk2b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l14xl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cswp1y)
Women winning the Nobel Prize for Medicine

Just 12 women have won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine since it was founded in 1901. Kim Chakanetsa brings together two of these female Nobel Laureates - both extraordinary scientists from Norway and France.

Professor May-Britt Moser won the prize in 2014 for the discovery of a type of cell in the brains of rats, which helps them locate their position in space.  She won the prize jointly with her former husband Edvard, with whom she had collaborated since they were students. Now divorced, they still run a world-renowned neuroscience lab - the Kavli Institute - together in the far north of Norway, where they are pursuing research that could further our understanding and treatment of Alzheimer's in humans.

Professor Françoise Barré-Sinoussi was a researcher at the Institut Pasteur in Paris in the early 1980s when a new and terrifying disease emerged - AIDS. She and her colleague very quickly identified the HIV retrovirus as the cause, and set about finding a treatment. In 2008 she was recognised by the Nobel committee for this achievement, and she says this has opened doors for her work that otherwise would have remained closed - enabling her to better advocate on behalf of the vulnerable people most affected by HIV-AIDS.

Image:
(L) Francoise Barré-Sinoussi. Credit: Institut Pasteur
(R) May-Britt Moser. Credit: TiTT Melhuus


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zbxdb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3f)
The first date that led to a dramatic mountain rescue

In 2003, Rachel Colenso and her partner went on a first date climbing Piz Badile in the Swiss Alps. What was meant to be a romantic getaway ended up being a disaster when they were engulfed in a fierce electrical storm and trapped on a narrow, icy ledge with little food and water for three days.

Sonam Wangchuk is an engineer from Ladakh, a cold desert region in the Himalayas. He builds artificial glaciers - or 'ice stupas' - that collect water during the winter and melt during the spring. It's an invention that's helping thousands of local farmers and has led to the planting of more than 5,000 trees.

Picture: Rachel Colenso
Credit: Courtesy of Rachel Colenso


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zc14g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63xskl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l1ddv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zc4wl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3th1bj5)
Workers boo Belarus president as protests spread

President Alexander Lukashenko has been heckled by workers on a visit to a factory amid growing protests against disputed elections. Russia says it is ready to provide security assistance.

Also in the programme: What will the US Democrats' virtual conference look like? And scientists believe Death Valley in eastern California, has reached possibly the hottest ever reliably recorded temperature of 54.4C – or 129.9F

(Photo:Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko delivers a speech as he visits the plant of the heavy off-road vehicles manufacturer MZKT in Minsk, Belarus on 17 August 2020. Credit: Nikolai Petrov/BelTA/Handout via Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zc8mq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l1mx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltz127141f)
Google says Australian law could threaten search

Google has attacked an Australian proposal to force technology giants to pay news outlets. Jordan Hayne is a political reporter with ABC in Canberra, and explains the rationale for the so-called News Media Bargaining Code. And Belinda Barnet, senior lecturer in media at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne tells us how the proposed law would impact search giants like Google as well as news organisations, if it goes ahead. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford considers the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on gender inequality. We hear from Dr Anthony Robotham of the University of Plymouth why he led the development of a more environmentally friendly recyclable face shield for use by workers hoping to protect themselves from contracting Covid-19. Plus as more and more companies announce they don't expect workers to return to the office until well into 2021, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan asks whether working beyond home, on beaches, say, or in the Tuscan hills, is likely to become the new normal.

(Picture: A Google logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zcdcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l1rn7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cswp1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zcj3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sxgfvxw5t)
Coronavirus conversations: US schools reopen amid protests

In the United States schools are reopening but opinion remains divided as to whether it is safe for children to return. In Arizona a public school district has been forced to cancel plans to restart in-person classes, after more than 100 teachers called in sick to protest unsafe working conditions during the coronavirus pandemic. We speak to a teacher in Arizona who took part in the 'sickout' protests; as well as hearing from parents across the country.

And the anger and protests grow in Belarus after the re-election last week of President Lukashenko. Today, a general strike is taking place. Staff at the state TV joined in, showing an empty sofa and newsroom, while playing music rather than usual news broadcast. We hear from those choosing to strike, including staff at the state TV - in a country where previously such action was likely to have been met with a violent response.

Also we take a look ahead to the Democratic National Convention which begins today in the US in its virtual, coronavirus restriction format. And we hear the thoughts of young Democrats across the country. What do they make of the Biden – Harris ticket?

(Photo: Teachers protesting against reopening of schools in Indiana, 28th July 2020. Credit: T. Jeremy Hogan/Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zcmw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zcrm7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63yj1c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l23wm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jnlhvpr28)
2020/08/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zcwcc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l27mr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp5)
The Life Scientific

Frank Kelly

Long before most of us gave air pollution a second thought, Frank Kelly was studying the impact of toxic particles on our lungs. In a pioneering set of experiments on human volunteers in northern Sweden, he proved that pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides and particulates, are harmful to our health. And he is the driving force behind an air quality monitoring system in London that is the envy of the world.

When in the late 1990s, the UK government was encouraging us all to buy diesel cars to help reduce our carbon emissions, he warned that while diesel engines might be less bad for the planet than petrol engines, they were more damaging to our health. Later Frank and his team provided evidence that the car manufacturers were not telling the truth about emissions from diesel vehicles.

As the chair of the Government Medical Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, he has worked tirelessly to try and move air pollution up the political agenda and worked closely with successive Mayors of London to improve air quality in the capital. Changing all the buses from diesel to hybrid or electric vehicles would make a huge difference, he says. But we will also need to get used to relying less on driving our cars to get us from A to B.
Presented by Jim Al-Khalili.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zd03h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3th25r2)
Workers boo Belarus president as protests spread

Protesters have gathered again in Belarus calling for President Lukashenko to resign, after the autocratic leader was earlier booed to his face by striking workers.

Also in the programme: US Democrats are set to confirm Joe Biden as their presidential candidate at a mostly virtual convention; and yhy women in Turkey are afraid that their government will pull out of the Istanbul Convention on domestic violence.

(Photo: Striking workers gathered outside the Minsk tractor factory on Monday. Credit: EPA)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zd3vm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l2h40)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cswp1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zd7lr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63z00w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l2lw4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58k36l2z12)
Google says Australian law could threaten search

Google has attacked an Australian proposal to force technology giants to pay news outlets. Jordan Hayne is a political reporter with ABC in Canberra, and explains the rationale for the so-called News Media Bargaining Code. And Belinda Barnet, senior lecturer in media at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne tells us how the proposed law would impact search giants like Google as well as news organisations, if it goes ahead. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford considers the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on gender inequality. We hear from Dr Anthony Robotham of the University of Plymouth why he led the development of a more environmentally friendly recyclable face shield for use by workers hoping to protect themselves from contracting Covid-19. Plus as more and more companies announce they don't expect workers to return to the office until well into 2021, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan asks whether working beyond home, on beaches, say, or in the Tuscan hills, is likely to become the new normal.

(Picture: A Google logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 18 AUGUST 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zdh30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18wl8b5q5x)
Democrats host first ever 'virtual convention'

Covid-19 restrictions and concerns mean that the only people attending in-person will be those necessary to orchestrating the event. Instead of 50,000 people gathering for the traditional calendar with days full of speeches, receptions and rallies, sessions will be streamed from the Democratic Party's social media channels and aired live on most US news channels. We discuss the ramifications with Simon Littlewood of AC Growth Delivered and political reporter Erin Delmore. Meanwhile, some of the richest people in Hollywood and Silicon Valley could be set to pay a state wealth tax but how much extra cash will it actually raise? And, Google has taken on the Australian authorities over a plan to make web giants pay news publishers for using their content. We'll look at what's at stake in a row that many say is unprecedented in Australia. (Picture: Kamala Harris and Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zdlv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63zc88)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l2z3j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1f)
Vaccines, Money And Politics

Vaccines, money and politics

Scientists around the world are working at pandemic speed to discover a safe and effective vaccine against the virus SarsCoV2, and the disease it causes Covid 19. But while all this research is taking place, a host of other critical elements need to be organised if we are to have any chance of successfully building an immunisation programme to reach more than seven billion people with a vaccine that will, at least initially, be in limited supply.
In part two of Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at what strategies are being put in place to transport a vaccine to countries around the world, who will be the first in those countries to get the vaccine, and, once it is available, how to convince people to take it.

Presenter/producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Photo: Coronavirus model and medical syringe are seen with "Covid-19" sign. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zdql8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zdvbd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n63zlrj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l36ls)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zdz2j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp17f7)
Top Democrats make opening pitch for Joe Biden

The former first lady of the United States Michelle Obama has launched a scathing attack on Donald Trump on the opening day of the National Democratic Convention. She accused Mr Trump of being the wrong president for the country and of being clearly in over his head.

A UN-backed court in The Hague will deliver its verdict later today (opens 1000B) on four men accused of the assassination of Lebanon's former prime minister, Rafik Hariri, in a car bomb fifteen years ago.

Opposition protesters in Belarus have held a ninth night of protests against the continued leadership of Alexander Lukashenko, saying his re-election as president with an official landslide majority was fraudulent.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zf2tn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp1c5c)
Michelle Obama urges voters to support Joe Biden

The former first lady of the United States Michelle Obama has launched a scathing attack on Donald Trump on the opening day of the National Democratic Convention. She accused Mr Trump of being the wrong president for the country and of being clearly in over his head.

Opposition protesters in Belarus have held a ninth night of protests against the continued leadership of Alexander Lukashenko, saying his re-election as president with an official landslide majority was fraudulent.

The Covid-19 virus, from what we know, has not spread as widely in Africa as in other parts of the world. There is a concern though, that with less testing taking place we simply don't know how widespread it is. The Africa Centre for Disease Control and Prevention is next week starting to implement tests in seven African countries.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zf6ks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp1gxh)
Democratic National Convention goes virtual

The former first lady of the United States Michelle Obama has launched a scathing attack on Donald Trump on the opening day of the National Democratic Convention. She accused Mr Trump of being the wrong president for the country and of being clearly in over his head.

A UN-backed court in The Hague will deliver its verdict later today (opens 1000B) on four men accused of the assassination of Lebanon's former prime minister, Rafik Hariri, in a car bomb fifteen years ago.

Opposition protesters in Belarus have held a ninth night of protests against the continued leadership of Alexander Lukashenko, saying his re-election as president with an official landslide majority was fraudulent.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zfb9x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3csz1n4)
The mums saving each other from a taboo condition

"Get rid of the girl who smells" - this is the reaction thousands of traumatised new mothers face every year. A prolonged or obstructed childbirth can lead to a condition called obstetric fistula, where women are left incontinent, continually leaking urine and faeces. Without treatment they often become socially isolated.

But in Madagascar, some women who have successfully been treated for fistula become patient ambassadors. They travel on foot to remote villages to find and help others with the same condition. They personally accompany them to clinics to get life-changing surgery and support. Afterwards, those women return to their villages and begin campaigning for other women to seek care.

Many medical organisations around the world are waking up to the power of the patient's voice - patient ambassadors can resonate with vulnerable groups in a way that other kinds of outreach can't.

Producer: Amelia Martyn-Hemphill

(Photo: Felicia - a patient ambassador in Madagascar)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l3pl9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89q)
African women and Covid

Coronavirus has impacted economies in every corner of the globe but there’s a fear it’s hitting women’s economic opportunities hardest. Tamasin Ford explores how women in Africa are affected. Lisa Kolovich is an economist at the IMF which is warning the pandemic threatens to roll back gains in women’s economic opportunities despite decades of progress. South African feminist and activist Shamillah Wilson says women’s voices are not being heard at policy level. And Tennen B Dalieh, a government worker and a feminist in Liberia says women and girls are bearing the brunt of the country's second pandemic in a decade.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmps)
The lost King of England

In 2012, archaeologists from the University of Leicester discovered the lost grave of Richard III under a car park in Leicester. Richard was the King of England more than 500 years ago and for centuries was portrayed as one of the great villains of English history. He was killed in 1485 leading his army in battle against a rival claimant to the throne, Henry Tudor. After the battle, Richard III corpse was stripped naked, paraded around down, before being hastily buried in a church within a friary in Leicester, which was later demolished. Alex Last spoke to Dr Richard Buckley who led the archaeological project to find the remains.

Photo: Remains of King Richard III being studied at The University of Leicester (BBC)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zfg21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l3tbf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zfkt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zfpk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n640fzf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l41tp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbl)
The Bold and the Beautiful: Returning to our screens

Daily television soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful has been on-air for over 30 years, won 99 Daytime Emmy Awards and broadcasts to over 100 countries across five continents, making it the ‘world’s most-watched U.S-produced daily soap.’

When coronavirus hit, filming stopped as the industry went into lockdown, but the makers are pioneering new creative ground as they go back into production in Los Angeles, and onto our television screens, at a time when Coronavirus is still rife.

Laura Hubber follows the producers, directors and actors of the daily soap, which includes a lot of intimate scenes, as they use their Hollywood creativity to get the series safely back on air.

How can they show an on-screen kiss in a world of masks and social distancing? We hear about a ‘new normal’ where actors’ real-life partners’ now work as ‘kissing doubles’, joined by a cast of mannequins, dedicated Coronavirus Coordinators, and strict new acting rules.

Presenter: Laura Hubber
Producers: Laura Hubber, Emma Wallace and Ella-mai Robey


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zft9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjz)
The detective and the diamond heist

In the late 1990s, Belgian detective Patrick Peys joined the Diamond Squad. Based in Antwerp's Diamond District, this was the world's first police unit dedicated to solving diamond crime. And soon, Patrick would face the most baffling case of his career when a group of thieves pulled off what seemed to be the perfect robbery. They broke into one of the most heavily-guarded vaults in the Diamond District and stole $100m dollars' worth of jewels. It was the biggest diamond robbery in history. No one saw the thieves coming in, or out. But what followed was a trail of strange clues leading to a mysterious criminal mastermind and a school for felons.

This episode was first broadcast on 10 March, 2019.

Image: diamonds
Credit: Olivier Polet/Corbis via Getty Images

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zfy1k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n640pgp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l499y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zg1sp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3th47f8)
Hezbollah member found guilty of Hariri assassination

The UN Special Tribunal for Lebanon, set up to investigate the assassination of former Lebanese prime minister, Rafik Hariri, has delivered its verdict. It's taken 15 years and has delivered one conviction, of a member of Hezbollah not present in court.

Also in the programme: Are young Italians responsible for a rise in coronavirus cases?

(Photo: Former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri speaks to the media after a session of the United Nations-backed Specail Tribunal for Lebanon handing down a judgement in the case of four men being tried in absentia for the 2005 Beirut bombing that killed his father, former prime minister Rafik al-Hariri and 21 other people, in Leidschendam, Netherlands on 18 August 2020. Credit: Reuters/Piroschka Van De Wouw)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zg5jt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l4jt6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwlxjfhmt3)
Belarus potash workers down tools

Six potash mines run by the state-owned Belaruskali company have stopped their operations. Henry Sanderson is metals and mining correspondent for the Financial Times, and discusses the financial implications of ongoing industrial action for Belarus's government revenues, as well as the impact it could have on global fertiliser supply. Also in the programme, in the latest round of escalating trade tensions, China is investigating whether Australia's wine producers are dumping their goods on the Chinese market. Tony Battaglene is chief executive of the industry body Australian Grape and Wine, and discusses the likely impact. We have a report examining the plight of migrant workers in the UK who have lost their jobs but don't qualify for state benefits. Plus, with night clubs remaining closed in many parts of the world as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, we explore whether virtual reality club nights might offer a suitable alternative. James Foster manages the artists Koven, who are pioneers in the technology, and tells us what attendees can expect to see and hear, and we get wider context from Anna Conrad, digital editor at GQ magazine.

(Picture: Workers at Belaruskali protest against election results. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zg98y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3csz1n4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l4nkb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zgf12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sxgfw0s2x)
Coronavirus conversations: Returning to teaching after lockdown

The new school year is starting in many countries around the world. We hear from three teachers in Israel, South Africa and Denmark about their feelings about returning to the workplace after lockdown. We'll also bring you the story of one teacher in Arizona who is so worried, that he has decided to resign from his position rather than return to teaching.

It's a time of political, economic and humanitarian crisis in Lebanon. Today the country received news that one of the four men accused of killing a former Lebanese prime minister in Beirut in 2005 has been convicted by a special UN-backed court. The killing of Rafik Hariri, one of Lebanon's most prominent Sunni Muslim politicians, caused outrage across the country.

And tensions remain high in Belarus after the disputed re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko. One teenager tells us what it's like growing up there.

Picture Credit: Instructional assistants sanitize the classroom an help students as in-person learning resumes with restrictions in place to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease at a school in Arizona. REUTERS/Cheney Orr


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zgjs6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zgnjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n641dyg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l50sq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jnlhvsmzc)
2020/08/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zgs8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l54jv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98b)
Algorithm apocalypse

The UK government used a statistical algorithm to alter children’s grades for exams missed in lockdown. But critics have argued that this algorithm, which used old data on school performance, unfairly stigmatised pupils from poorer backgrounds. Stian Westlake from Britain’s Royal Statistical Society speaks to Gareth and Bill about the challenges of creating such an algorithm and where the government went wrong.

The Language of Trolls
What is it like to work as a Twitter troll? Researcher Sergei Monakhov, from the Friedrich Schiller University in Germany, used this question to discover how the language used by trolls is different from that used by regular users. He discusses how these patterns can be used to spot troll’s social media posts much more quickly.

Saving lives with data in Africa
A digital tool-kit has been designed to help governments and health organisations in Africa tackle the spread of Covid-19. Dr. Sema Sgaier, executive director of the Surgo Foundation describes the Africa Covid-19 Community Vulnerability Index, which maps regional data on health, economic, and social robustness to find where Covid might hit hardest.

(Photo: Student protesters hold up banners. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA)

Producer: Julian Siddle


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zgx0l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3th52n5)
Mali president seized by mutinying soldiers

The president of Mali, Ibrahim Boubakar Keita has been arrested, along with his prime minister, in what appears to be a coup attempt. They're being held at a military base near the capital Bamako, where there's been recent anger at the government over army pay and the continuing conflict with jihadists. The move has been condemned by Mali's West African neighbours and the United Nations Secretary General.

And an international court has found a member of the Hezbollah militant group guilty of involvement in the assassination of Lebanon's former prime minister Rafik Hariri.

(Photo: An opposition supporter holds a sign reading "IBK (President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita), get out in Bamako. Credits: Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zh0rq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3csz1n4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l5d13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zh4hv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n641wxz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l5hs7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58k36l5vy5)
Belarus potash workers down tools

Six potash mines run by the state-owned Belaruskali company have stopped their operations. Henry Sanderson is metals and mining correspondent for the Financial Times, and discusses the financial implications of ongoing industrial action for Belarus's government revenues, as well as the impact it could have on global fertiliser supply. Also in the programme, in the latest round of escalating trade tensions, China is investigating whether Australia's wine producers are dumping their goods on the Chinese market. Tony Battalene is chief executive of the industry body Australian Grape and Wine, and discusses the likely impact. We have a report examining the plight of migrant workers in the UK who have lost their jobs but don't qualify for state benefits. Plus, with night clubs remaining closed in many parts of the world as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, we explore whether virtual reality club nights might offer a suitable alternative. James Foster manages the artists Koven, who are pioneers in the technology, and tells us what attendees can expect to see and hear, and we get wider context from Anna Conrad, digital editor at GQ magazine.

(Picture: Workers at Belaruskali protest against election results. Picture credit: Reuters.)



WEDNESDAY 19 AUGUST 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zhd03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18wl8b8m30)
World's largest retailer sees sales jump

As the world's largest retailer, Walmart records another jump in sales - we assess if the a post-corona world will be dominated by only big companies. Should we all be wearing face masks in our offices? The French Government says yes as it brings in new regulations. Cyberspace is stepping in where nightclubs are closed - but server crashes mean the experience leaves many underwhelmed. And just when you though there was no need for office space in the cities any more, Amazon expands its office space in US cities. We discuss all this live with Jeanette Rodrigues in Mumbai and Andy Uhler of Marketplace radio in Austin, Texas.

(Image: A sign hangs outside Walmart store in Chicago, Illinois. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zhhr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n64285c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l5w0m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct0wpd)
The Senses

The senses: Smell and taste

Imagine spraying yourself with a flowery fragrance but all you can smell is rotting flesh? Our senses can be surprisingly strange, especially when they malfunction due to injury, disease or genetic abnormalities. In this episode, neurologist Dr Guy Leschziner, explores two senses, smell and taste - separate yet inextricably linked.

We meet Joanne, whose sense of smell is so distorted after a heavy cold, even freshly-cut grass smells repulsive. We also hear from Walter who loves to cook and eat German cuisine but finds that pleasure is ruined when everything, even fine wine, tastes of metal.

By contrast, 15 year-old Abi’s sense of taste is working properly. She can tell if her food is sweet or salty. But Abi was born without a sense of smell (anosmia), which also means anything she eats has no flavour – because that’s created by smell and taste working together.

Loss of smell, an early symptom of coronavirus, has raised awareness of this important, yet neglected sense, often only appreciated when it’s gone. Yet so vital it’s wired directly to parts of the brain responsible for memories and emotion.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Abi in a field of yellow flowers. Credit BBC


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zhmhc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zhr7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n642hnm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l63hw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zhvzm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp44bb)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zhzqr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp482g)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zj3gw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp4ctl)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zj770)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6q)
Abdalla Hamdok: Exclusive interview with Sudan's Prime Minister

It is exactly a year since a historic power-sharing agreement was signed between the military and civilians in Sudan, after the fall of President Omar al-Bashir. In an exclusive interview, Zeinab Badawi speaks to the civilian Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, who heads a transitional government charged with steering Sudan to democratic elections in 2022. Has the euphoria that followed last year's revolution given way to harsh realities and unfulfilled expectations?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l6lhd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8n0)
Breaking the silence in Belarus

President Lukashenko has remained defiant in the face of growing protests at his disputed re-election, threatening striking workers with being fired, in a stand-off that could last a long time.

Even state broadcasters are raising their voices, as former state TV presenter Dmitry Kohno explains. Ed Butler hears from two leaders in Belarus’ burgeoning tech sector, who worry both for the sector’s continued growth, and their own safety. And economists Anders Aslund and Sergei Guriev question whether Belarus can ever compete as a market economy, or move away from its reliance on Russia.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Picture: Protesters stage a rally in Independence Square, Minsk; Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszms1)
The first modern asthma inhaler

Asthma affects more children than any other non-communicable disease - and it was a teenager who first asked her father "why can't they put my asthma medication in a spray can like hairspray?". Luckily her father ran a pharmaceutical company and got a team of scientists to work on the idea. Charlie Thiel is the one surviving member of the team. The chemist helped create a drug formulation of fine spray that reached further into the lungs than any previous treatment. Claire Bowes hears from him and his colleague Stephen Stein who has helped him document his story.

Photo: Girl using metered dose inhaler 2001 (BBC)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zjbz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l6q7j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zjgq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zjlgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n643bwj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l6yqs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1t)
Rulebreakers

How I disappear

In Japan if you want to disappear from your life you can just pick up the phone and a "night moving company" will turn you into one of the country’s "johatsu" - it literally means "evaporated people". Meet those who have chosen to disappear and the people left behind.


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zjq6j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrr)
The war story that led to our love story

Eva and Sami (not their real names) fell in love in Paris over coffee and cigarettes, but Sami could not escape the painful memories of his experiences back home during the Syrian civil war. He’d lost his brother, his home and said goodbye to his family before escaping to France. As she listened to his story, she realised that together they had to write it down. Eva has written a novel called The Stray Cats of Homs, based on Sami’s story.
 
Jon Potter was inspired by children’s TV legend Mister Rogers to make a year-long commitment to saying yes to anyone who asked him for help. Word quickly spread around his hometown of Pittsburgh and four years later, he did his biggest good deed yet – donating a kidney to a man he met over the internet. He spoke to Outlook’s Troy Holmes.
 
Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Harry Graham

Picture: Homs, Syria
Credit: Sami


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszms1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zjtyn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n643lcs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l7671)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zjyps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3th74bc)
Soldiers who ousted Mali's president promise elections

Soldiers in Mali who removed the government in a coup have said their priority is stability, not power. They've promised fresh elections in what they called a 'reasonable' time, accusing President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita of allowing Mali to sink into chaos and anarchy.

Also in the programme: We hear from the police captain in Belarus who resigned over the authorities' violent response to protests; and what measures should schools put in place to reopen safely?

(Image: A crowd of people cheer Malian army soldiers at the Independence Square after a mutiny, in Bamako, Mali August 18, 2020. Credit: REUTERS/Moussa Kalapo)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zk2fx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l7fq9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxfc818v4h)
Brexit negotiations resume in Brussels

The UK says it hopes a post-Brexit trade deal can be struck during September. The BBC's Nick Beake in Brussels explains the areas of contention that negotiators from both sides are still working on. And Adam Marshall, head of the British Chambers of Commerce tells us what UK companies hope to see in any possible deal. Also in the programme, as protests and strikes continue in Belarus following a contested election, we consider the future of the country's economy. The BBC's Samira Hussein reports from New York on the challenge of trying to open schools across the US, whilst coronavirus continues to spread. Plus, the iconic UK music brand NME has launched a new Asia-focused music website in Singapore. Iliyas Ong, head of NME Asia, discusses the thinking behind the move.

(Picture: European and British flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zk661)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l7kgf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zk9y5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sxgfw3p00)
Coronavirus conversations: The impact on school children

Children around the world are starting to return to school after months of absence because of the coronavirus pandemic. But opinion remains divided on whether it is safe for them to do so. We speak to mental health professionals from the US, Canada and Sweden about how school closures have affected children.

And we get the latest developments from Mali following yesterday's coup and the resignation of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta. We hear reaction from people in the capital Bamako, who tell us what they want to see happen next.

Also we speak to our economics reporter in the US where Apple has become the first company to be worth $2 trillion on the US stock market.

(Photo: Schoolchildren returning to school in South Africa, August 13th 2020. Credit: EPA/KIM LUDBROOK)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zkfp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszms1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zkkff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n6449vk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l7xpt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jnlhvwjwg)
2020/08/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zkp5k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l81fy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc7)
Covid immunity clues from a fishing boat in the Pacific

A Covid outbreak on board a trawler in the Pacific appears to have provided the first direct evidence that certain antibodies can provide protection from re-infection with the virus. American scientists tested for antibodies in 122 fishermen before and after their two week voyage. The three who had 'neutralising' antibodies did not get Covid-19, but three others who had produced general antibodies were infected.

We hear from the World Health Organisation about how cases are rising in India and the United States – but appear to be levelling off in South Africa.

Family doctor Ann Robinson explains how up to a third of those infected with Covid lose their sense of smell – but it’s not the same as having a blocked nose with a cold. And how American doctors believe that donated plasma transfusions can improve survival rates of those with the worst symptoms.

And Alison van Diggelen reports on how horses on ranches in California are helping people with anxiety and depression – following an improvement in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder when equine therapy was used on military personnel.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: The Echizen Maru fishing trawler. Photo credit: Alexis Delelisi/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zksxp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3th7zk8)
Belarus unrest: Lukashenko tries to reassert control

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko says he has given orders to end the unrest in the capital Minsk.

Also in the programme: The military in Mali promises elections after ousting President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta; and a new documentary tells the untold story of how MI6 helped to bring down Iranian democracy in 1953.

(Photo: Belarusian President-elect Alexander Lukashenko chairs the Security Council meeting in Minsk, Belarus, 19 August 2020. Credit: EPA).


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zkxnt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l88y6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zl1dy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n644sv2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l8dpb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58k36l8rv8)
Brexit negotiations resume in Brussels

The UK says it hopes a post-Brexit trade deal can be struck during September. The BBC's Nick Beake in Brussels explains the areas of contention that negotiators from both sides are still working on. And Adam Marshall, head of the British Chambers of Commerce tells us what UK companies hope to see in any possible deal. Also in the programme, as protests and strikes continue in Belarus following a contested election, we consider the future of the country's economy. The BBC's Samira Hussein reports from New York on the challenge of trying to open schools across the US, whilst coronavirus continues to spread. Plus, the iconic UK music brand NME has launched a new Asia-focused music website in Singapore. Iliyas Ong, head of NME Asia, discusses the thinking behind the move.

(Picture: European and British flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 20 AUGUST 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zl8x6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18wl8bcj03)
Apple passes $2tn amidst global downturn

Tech giant Apple becomes the first US company to be valued at $2 trillion – we ask how it managed to grow, when many of world’s economies have slowed down during the global pandemic. In Brussels, European Union leaders met to discuss the thorny issue of what to do about Belarus, as they come under pressure not to endorse recent election results over the country’s controversial leadership. And we ask if Kamala Harris, who is addressing the Democratic conference, will inspire a new generation of female leaders. We discuss all this with guests Alison Van Diggelen, host of ‘Fresh Dialogues’ in Silicon Valley, and Jodi Schneider from Bloomberg News in Hong Kong

(Image: The Apple logo seen on a cellphone with USD banknote in the background. Photo by Guillaume Payen/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zldnb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n64552g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l8rxq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6lg)
Barbara Demick: True stories from North Korea

North Korea and Tibet are two of the most tightly-controlled societies on earth, and as a consequence their peoples are often misunderstood by the world’s media, caricatured respectively as aggressive communists and spiritual hermits. But Barbara Demick, former Los Angeles Times correspondent in Seoul and Beijing, confesses that she likes a challenge, and so set out to build a more nuanced picture of individuals’ real lives in both places. Moreover, she did this with minimal location reporting; indeed in the case of North Korea, she never visited the city she wrote about at all. Using an almost forensic level of investigation, Demick conducted lengthy and highly detailed interviews with people who had left both places, cross-referencing testimonies and drawing on additional research to corroborate their accounts. She then used the resulting material to inform a vivid, factual storytelling style that she calls narrative non-fiction. As she explains in conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, it is a difficult process, but one that yields fascinating insight into places whose repressive leaders would rather we knew far less about.

Producer: Michael Gallagher
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Soldiers at a military parade in North Korea. Credit: EPA/How Hwee Young)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zljdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszms1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zln4l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n645dkq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l90dz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zlrwq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp717f)
Kamala Harris attacks Trump 'failure of leadership'

The Democratic Party has gathered online to hear Kamala Harris accept the party nomination to run for the vice presidency.
The European Union is upping the diplomatic pressure on President Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus, moving to impose sanctions.
In the Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte has always pursued a tough law and order agenda, and now he is seeking to re-impose the death penalty.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zlwmv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp74zk)
Barack Obama savagely attacks his successor Donald Trump

Barack Obama - addressing the Democratic National Convention - has called on people to vote in the November elections for Joe Biden - accusing Donald Trump of treating the US presidency as though it were nothing but a reality show.

As Lebanon continues to deal with the massive explosion which devastated its capital we hear from a hospital that is struggling to cope.

And as western society is increasingly finding room for non-binary genders, we look at the ancient societies which long ago recognised diverse sexualities.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zm0cz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp78qp)
Harris becomes first black female VP nominee

At the Democratic Party national convention Kamala Harris has formally accepted the party's nomination for the vice presidency of the US.

Amid the continuing political crisis in Belarus - we'll hear from inside and outside the country as opposition to President Alexander Lukashenko grows.

South Korea has recorded the largest numbers of Covid-19 infections since March - we'll consider if it can shut the spike down as it has done in the past.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zm443)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3t)
How close are we to a vaccine for Covid-19?

Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now in development. Most vaccines take years of testing and additional time to produce at scale, but scientists are hoping to develop a coronavirus vaccine at record speed. Several potential vaccines are now in the final phase of testing but it could still be months before we discover if they are safe and can effectively prevent people from being infected.

If a vaccine can be found, there are concerns about how the world will manufacture enough. There may be challenges in storing it at the right temperature and transporting it safely around the world. Plus, rich countries might hoard supplies. Although hopes are high it is entirely possible that a safe and effective vaccine is a long way off, or never discovered. Experts warn that ‘waiting for a vaccine syndrome’ could be distracting us from finding other solutions for controlling the spread of Covid-19.

Presenter: Tanya Beckett

(A scientist works on an experimental coronavirus vaccine at a laboratory in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Credit: Juan Mabromata/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l9hdh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wv)
Sudan: Dealing with Covid and Sanctions

Efforts to get healthcare and support materials into Sudan to assist their battle against Coroniavirus are being impeded by sanctions on the country. Although many sanctions have been lifted, Sudan is still listed as a state sponsor of terrorism by the United States, meaning many companies are barred from dealing with the country. Dr Husain Abuakar, head of the emergency department at Omdurman Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, tells us how they've had to make do without vital medical equipment, and his concerns about a second wave. Meanwhile, Dr Sara Abdelgalil of the Sudanese Doctors Union explains how difficult it is for her and other diaspora Sudanese healthcare workers to support their colleagues in Sudan, financially as well as in terms of information-sharing. And Madeleine Crowther from the UK-based charity Waging Peace explains how Sudan ended up on the state sponsor of terrorism list to begin with and why it might soon be off it.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: A man wearing a face mask in Khartoum. Picture credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmj)
The Guatemalan syphilis scandal

A team of American doctors, led by the distinguished physician Dr John Cutler, carried out secretive STD tests in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948. The doctors experimented on more than one thousand prisoners, sex workers, mental institution inmates and soldiers, injecting them without their consent with syphilis and gonorrhea. In some cases the victims were provided with penicillin to combat the diseases; in many others they weren't given anything. Mike Lanchin speaks to Susan Reverby, a medical historian, who discovered the original documents from the greusome experiments and helped get a public apology for the victims from the Obama administration in October 2010.

Photo: A doctor examines the injection site of a female psychiatric patient in Guatemala who was exposed to syphilis, cerca 1948 (from the papers of John Cutler/the National Archives and Records Administration)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zm7w7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6lg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l9m4m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zmcmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvs)
Secrets of the Great Pyramid

The Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt is one of the greatest wonders of the ancient world. It is the largest pyramid ever built and even today, with advanced satellite and thermal imaging and other high tech science, we don’t know everything about the pyramid- exactly what’s inside or how it was built. To explore the history of The Great Pyramid - also known as the Pyramid of Khufu, after the Pharaoh who commissioned it as his tomb - Rajan Datar is joined by Salima Ikram, Distinguished University Professor and Egyptology Unit Head at the American University in Cairo, space archaeologist Sarah Parcak, a National Geographic fellow and Professor at Birmingham University Alabama in the USA, and Professor Joyce Tyldesley, an archaeologist and Egyptologist from the University of Manchester in the UK.

Photo: The Pyramids at Giza (Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh58)
Chak de India!

In August 2002, the Indian women’s field hockey team won an unlikely gold medal against the favourites, England, at the Commonwealth Games in Manchester. The players had struggled to be taken seriously in a country that prioritises men’s sport, but they fought their way past New Zealand and South Africa to reach a final that turned on a dramatic refereeing decision. The women’s story later inspired the hit Bollywood film, Chak De India (or Come On, India!), which is credited with improving attitudes to women’s sport in India. Tom Roseingrave talks to the Indian goal-keeper, Helen Mary Innocent. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: The Indian players celebrating with one of their coaches, Gurdial Bhangu (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zmhch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n6467sm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30l9vmw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq8)
Food media's moment of reckoning?

When a misguided halloween costume resurfaced on social media in June - no one could have predicted the events that ensued. It ignited a twitter storm about racism in food writing and led ultimately to the resignation of two food editors at major US publications. Graihagh Jackson hears from the whistleblower at the centre of the controversy and from critics of mainstream food media, who say myopic, white-washed and problematic representations of food are all-too-common. We hear from people trying to change the status quo and ask if this is the moment of reckoning the industry needs.

If you would like to get in touch please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Letters on a chopping board. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zmm3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdb6)
My life in the eye of the storm

Born during a hurricane, Russel L. Honoré grew up as a black man in Louisiana during segregation, but he found his calling in the military. He rose through the ranks to become a Lieutenant General, and when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005 he was the man in charge of the joint military and civilian relief effort. Having seen the power and devastation caused by nature during his career, in his retirement he formed a ‘Green Army’ of environmental campaigners in his home state.

Minh Thu and Truc Nhu are two Vietnamese women who took part in a TV show called The Bachelor, where a group of contestants compete for the attention of a single man. Instead of falling in love with him, Minh Thu and Truc Nhu fell in love with each other and their story went viral in Vietnam, where homosexuality is still a taboo.
 
Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: June Christie
 
(Photo: Russel Honoré. Credit: Robert Sullivan/Getty Images)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zmqvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n646h8w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lb344)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zmvlw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3thb17g)
Alexei Navalny: Russian opposition leader 'poisoned'

Doctors in Russia say they're fighting to save a prominent opponent of President Putin, Alexei Navalny, who is unconscious in hospital after a suspected poisoning.

Also in the programme: Barack Obama breaks with convention at the Democratic party convention by launching a withering attack on his successor. And the former King of Spain, his mistress and the mystery of a multi-million dollar gift, we have an exclusive interview.

(Photo: Alexei Navalny. Credit: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zmzc0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6lg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lbbmd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvsgsv0460)
Washington asks UN to reimpose Iran sanctions

The US is asking the United Nations to reimpose international sanctions on Iran. Jamal Abdi is the president of the National American Iranian Council, which represents people of Iranian heritage living in the US, and tells us what impact the lifting of UN sanctions on Iran more than four years ago has had on the country and its people. And we get the perspective of Amir Nikkah, chief executive of an Iranian export management company called IranMedium. Also in the programme, international sanctions have also had a big impact on the northeast African nation of Sudan in recent years. Though many sanctions have been lifted, those which remain are hampering efforts to get healthcare and support materials into the country to help in the battle against coronavirus, as the BBC's Tamasin Ford explains. Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba has seen its revenues increase by more than a third in the last three months, compared to a year ago. Daniel Cotton is a Hong Kong-based e-commerce analyst, and discusses how the company makes its money. Plus, as end of school exams have been a challenging issue in many countries because of the coronavirus pandemic, we consider the value or otherwise of good grades with 28-year-old Urenna Okonkwo, who runs a digital fashion business called Cashmere.

(Picture: US and Iranian flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zn334)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lbgcj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zn6v8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sxgfw6kx3)
Coronavirus conversations: The impact on children with special needs

As part of our series looking at education during the coronavirus pandemic, we speak to parents of children with special needs. Unathi in South Africa and Jamie in the US tell us about the unique challenges their families have faced during this period.

And we get reaction in Iraq to the killing of Riham Yaqoob, a doctor and female political activist who was shot dead in the city of Basra by unidentified assailants on Wednesday. It is the third such attack in a week.

Also former Trump adviser Steve Bannon has been arrested and charged with fraud over a fundraising campaign to build a wall on the US-Mexico border. Our reporter in Washington brings us the latest developments.

(Photo: Unathi. Credit: Unathi)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8znbld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zngbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n6476rn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lbtlx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jnlhvzfsk)
2020/08/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8znl2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6lg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lbyc1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0r)
Trouble in Greenland

Has the loss from Greenland’s vast ice sheet reached a tipping point? According to glaciologist Michalea King, the rate at which its ice flows into the sea stepped up about 15 years ago. The process of glacial retreat is outpacing the accumulation snow and ice in Greenland’s interior and the loss of Greenland’s ice to the Ocean is set to continue for many years to come.

An international study of past climate changes during the last ice age reveals how fast changes to weather patterns and climate states can reverberate around the world. During the last ice age, when temperatures rose suddenly in Greenland a series of changes to the climate in Europe and the monsoons in Asia and South America occurred almost simultaneously - within decades of each other. Climate scientists Eric Wolff and Ellen Corrick have discovered this through studies of stalagmites from caves around the world. It’s a demonstration of how rapidly and dramatically the Earth’s atmospheric system can change when it’s perturbed.

Was the hottest temperature ever on Earth recorded last weekend? A weather station in Death Valley in California recorded a temperature of 54.4 degrees C. Roland Pease discusses the controversy with extreme weather historian Christopher Burt.

Andrea Dupree of Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics reveals the latest on the giant star Betelgeuse which to everyone’s amazement dimmed dramatically at the beginning of the year. At the time some people wondered whether it was about to explode as a supernova but Andrea’s new findings suggest an event at the star which is almost as extraordinary.

(Image: Masses of ice break off from the edge of a glacier. Credit: Press Association)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8znpts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3thbwgc)
US set to reimpose sanctions on Iran

The US is to controversially initiate a process at the UN Security Council to reinstate international sanctions on Iran lifted under a 2015 nuclear deal. The US itself stopped complying with the accord two years ago, when President Donald Trump abandoned it. We hear from then White House National Security Adviser, John Bolton.

Also on the programme: An ally of opposition leader Alexei Navalny speaks of his own suspected poisoning; and two Malians give us their account of the state of their country following the removal of the president by the military.

(Image: President Donald J. Trump holds up a presidential memorandum he just signed to pull out of Iran nuclear deal at the White House in Washington DC on 8 May 2018. Credit: EPA / Reynolds)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zntkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lc5v9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8znyb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n647pr5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lc9lf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58k36lcnrc)
Washington asks UN to reimpose Iran sanctions

The US is asking the United Nations to reimpose international sanctions on Iran. Jamal Abdi is the president of the National American Iranian Council, which represents people of Iranian heritage living in the US, and tells us what impact the lifting of UN sanctions on Iran more than four years ago has had on the country and its people. And we get the perspective of Amir Nikkah, chief executive of an Iranian export management company called IranMedium. Also in the programme, international sanctions have also had a big impact on the northeast African nation of Sudan in recent years. Though many sanctions have been lifted, those which remain are hampering efforts to get healthcare and support materials into the country to help in the battle against coronavirus, as the BBC's Tamasin Ford explains. Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba has seen its revenues increase by more than a third in the last three months, compared to a year ago. Daniel Cotton is a Hong Kong-based e-commerce analyst, and discusses how the company makes its money. Plus, as end of school exams have been a challenging issue in many countries because of the coronavirus pandemic, we consider the value or otherwise of good grades with 28-year-old Urenna Okonkwo, who runs a digital fashion business called Cashmere.

(Picture: US and Iranian flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 21 AUGUST 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zp5t9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18wl8bgdx6)
Biden's moment

Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, makes his case to become the next president of the US in a live streamed event from a virtual democratic convention; what can we expect and how succesful has the convention been in firing up voters? Business and superstition has a surprisingly interlinked history, as we learn why people are so scared that the ravens may fly away from the famous Tower of London. Ride-hailing apps Lyft and Uber win a last minute reprieve from the California state government, which wants the firms to classify drivers as employees – giving them more rights - the companies had threatened to pull out of the state. We discuss all this live with Erin Delmore, a political reporter from New York and Sushma Ramachandran, business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper in New Delhi.

(Image: Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden.Photo by Tom Brenner/Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zp9kf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n6481zk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lcntt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1l)
Will God protect me?

What does it mean to ask "God to keep you safe" in the time of a pandemic? What is the meaning and scope of divine protection?

The belief in divine protection is a significant feature of the Christian response to the pandemic particularly within some of the African and Caribbean Churches in the UK. On the one hand, all churches offered prayers for divine protection over individuals and the nation. On the other, some Christian groups, went further than offering prayers and promoting the sale of special protection kits, "guaranteed to ward off Corona Virus." Tragically, some believers in Britain, believing God is protecting them, didn't seek medical help when they were sick and passed away.

In this programme, Professor Robert Beckford sets out to discover the meaning of 'divine protection' within his own Pentecostal Christian tradition.

Producer: Rajeev Gupta


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zpf9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zpk1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n6489gt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lcxb2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zpnst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmp9y4j)
Joe Biden vows to lead USA out of 'its season of darkness'

Joe Biden has drawn the Democratic Party convention to a close with a speech that launches him and Kamala Harris onto the campaign trail for the President and Vice-President of the United States.

Lebanon has just returned to lockdown in an attempt to reverse a spike in coronavirus infections, we ask what this means for an already devastated nation.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny remains gravely ill - but an air ambulance has left Berlin to bring him to Germany.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zpsjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmpb1wn)
Biden calls on America to choose hope over fear

Joe Biden has accepted the nomination to challenge Donald Trump as the Democratic Presidential candidate in a speech emphasising a message of hope.

A plane has left Germany for Siberia with hopes to collect Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny who's critically ill and in a coma after what suspected to be toxic poisoning.

In Pakistan, initial fears that the country’s overcrowded cities would see high numbers of coronavirus deaths don’t appear to have materialised. It’s left public health experts surprised.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zpx92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcsmpb5ms)
It's official: Biden vs Trump on November 3

Joe Biden has accepted the Democratic nomination for the White House, promising to restore hope and light to America after what he called the darkness of the Trump presidency.

Russian doctors say the opposition leader Alexei Navalny is too ill to be flown to Germany for treatment following his alleged poisoning.

The June 5 movement which has been the most vocal in opposition to Ibrahim Boubacar Keita – the former president of Mali, ousted by rebel members of the military - is holding a rally to mark his departure despite international criticism of the coup.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zq116)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxp)
Kishore Mahbubani: Has Covid-19 weakened the West?

Increasing tensions between the US and China have plunged relations to the lowest level for decades. This comes at a time when the world is facing its worst recession in living memory due to the coronavirus. Could this lead to a reshaping of the global order? Zeinab Badawi speaks to former Singaporean diplomat Kishore Mahbubani, who believes that Covid-19 has fundamentally weakened the west. Is he right that this is now Asia's century?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30ldd9l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78p)
Will TikTok find a US buyer?

President Trump has given the Chinese-owned video-sharing app TikTok a deadline to sell off its US operations, or else he will have it shut down in the country. Microsoft and Oracle have been rumoured to be interested.

Russell Brandom of tech site The Verge tells Ed Butler that the extent of what's on offer is over-hyped. But Jason Davis, associate professor of entrepreneurship at Insead says a US-only version of the app would still have considerable merit. In any case, Sandra Wachter, associate professor at the Oxford Internet Institute, says the threat President Trump thinks TikTok represents won't go away simply by shaving off its US operations.

Producer: Edwin Lane

(Picture Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv9)
The siege at Ruby Ridge

Randy Weaver was a white separatist in Idaho in the north-west United States who was wanted by the government on firearms charges. When government agents approached his remote cabin on Ruby Ridge in August 1992, it was the start of an eleven day siege involving hundreds of police officers – which ended with the deaths of Weaver’s wife and teenage son, along with a US marshal. The incident would become a touchstone for the far right and a rallying cry for the American militia movement. Lucy Burns speaks to journalist Bill Morlin, who covered the siege for the Spokesman-Review newspaper. Picture: Randy Weaver (C) shows a model of his Ruby Ridge, Idaho cabin to US Senator Arlen Specter, R-PA, during Senate hearings investigating the events surrounding the 1992 standoff with federal agents (PAMELA PRICE/AFP via Getty Images).


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zq4sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp2)
Students marked down by algorithm

How students in England took to the streets to challenge their exam grades. Plus, the battle between Epic Games, the company behind Fortnite, and Apple moves up a level. And we ask a commercial pilot how the latest Microsoft Flight Simulator compares to real flying. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Jane Wakefield and David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: A-Level students protest outside 10 Downing St. in London over their automated exam grades, Credit: EPA).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30ldj1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zq8jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn9)
India's Covid-19 challenge

India has entered a dangerous new phase of the pandemic. The country’s infection rate is the third-highest in the world. It also has the fourth-highest death toll. Testing is a shambles, and infections are moving into rural areas where healthcare is sorely lacking. Late in March, all of India's 1.3 billion people were told to stay at home while the government bought itself time to prepare for the pandemic. But instead of confining people where they were, the lockdown resulted in one of the biggest peace time migrations of people. Instead of helping to defeat the virus, it has created economic hardship for many. So why did Prime Minister Narendra Modi act so fast and can India now get the virus under control and the economy back on track? Mr Modi’s Hindu nationalist government is still popular with many Indians, but his critics say he's using the coronavirus as a cover for the consolidation of power. Are they right? And will it accelerate a Hindu nationalist vision for the country that risks more religious unrest? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of commentators.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zqd8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n6494pq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30ldrjz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgf)
Looking ahead to the UEFA Champions League final

Mani Djazmi, Pat Nevin and Heather O'Reilly preview the UEFA Champions League final between Paris Saint Germain and Bayern Munich. We also hear from the former Stuttgart and RB Leipzig coach Alex Zorniger who discusses the unstoppable rise of German coaches.

Picture: Robert Lewandowski of Bayern Munich celebrates after scoring his team's third goal against Olympique Lyonnais (Franck Fife/Pool via Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zqj0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhf)
Breaking taboos in Iran

The taboo of domestic violence in Iran is being tackled by a podcaster who calls herself Maryam. She tells the story of her own abusive marriage, and is joined in each podcast by other women who share their experiences. Nooshin of BBC Monitoring explains why this taboo persists in her home country.

From the streets of Belarus to Franco’s Spain: the story of a song
The anthem being sung by protesters on the streets of Belarus has a story that starts in 1960s Spain, during the regime of General Franco. It was written by a Catalan singer-songwriter and is a call for unity of action to achieve freedom. Since then it has had several new lives in different countries, where many are unaware of its origins. BBC Mundo’s Enric Botella, who’s from Catalonia, tells the story.

Changing attitudes to dogs in Egypt
The Grand Mufti of Egypt recently sparked controversy by announcing that dogs are not 'impure', in the religious context. It is a widely held belief throughout much of the Islamic world that dogs are unclean. Sally Nabil of BBC Arabic describes attitudes to dogs in Egypt.

Nubia and her children
Before the coronavirus lockdown in Colombia, Nubia Gaona was struggling to bring up her two sons as a widow in the impoverished countryside. But the family have turned around their fortunes and become famous in Colombia – by putting their lives on YouTube. The BBC’s Daniel Pardo, who's based in the capital Bogota, has been to meet them.

My Hometown: Dar es Salaam
Another chance to visit hometown Dar es Salaam in the company of Zuhura Yunus of BBC Swahili, as she sneaks out of school and goes dancing.

Picture: Iranian women in Tehran
Credit: ATTA KENARE/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zqmrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n649d5z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lf017)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zqrhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3thdy4k)
Joe Biden formally accepts Democratic nomination

The Democratic White House nominee Joe Biden gave an impassioned speech on the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention. Mr Biden took aim at President Trump who he said had unleashed "too much anger, too much fear, too much division". Also: German doctors have been allowed to see Alexei Navalny, the Russian opposition activist who's in a coma after a suspected poisoning; and how seaweed could reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

(Photo: Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden accepts the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zqw83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lf7jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt4lbmqf7j)
Turkey announces record gas find

Turkey's President Erdogan has announced the country's biggest ever natural gas discovery. Gulmira Rzayeva of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies tells us about the significance of the find. And we consider why international investors have been deserting Turkey recently, and whether this discovery might persuade them to return, with Sinan Ulgen, chairman of the Edam Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies in Istanbul. Also in the programme, as Europe ramps up plans to make more electric cars, we hear about the companies bringing battery production closer to home. Peter Carlsson of Northvolt discusses a battery plant his firm is building in northern Sweden. We hear about a new lithium ore mine being built in Serbia from Bold Bataar, chief executive for energy and minerals at mining giant Rio Tinto. And Frederic Simon, who covers energy and the environment for news agency Euractiv, tells us about an environmental and labour standards certification scheme for raw materials that is coming soon. Plus, as pop star Taylor Swift donates $30,000 to aspiring student Vitoria Mario, who has been fundraising to help pay for her university education, we hear her reaction.

(Picture: Recep Tayyip Erdogan announces the gas find. Picture credit: Turkish Presidency Handout.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zr007)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lfc8m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztgf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zr3rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sxgfw9gt6)
Coronavirus conversations: Exams during the pandemic

We continue to look at the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on education. In many countries there is controversy around exams and exam results. We bring together students in the UK, Nigeria and India to share their experiences.

And after the acceptance speech by the Democratic White House nominee Joe Biden, we explore how his message was received, particularly among those undecided voters or Republicans who are wondering whether to back President Trump a second time.

We have been reaching out to women in Iraq, after the shooting dead of female activist Riham Yaqoob. Many were too afraid to speak to us publicly; the few who did described the fear for their safety. We get more details from our regional experts about the situation in the country.

(Photo: Simran Chhabra. Credit: Simran Chhabra)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zr7hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zrc7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n64b3nr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lfqj0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jnlhw2bpn)
2020/08/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zrgzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lfv84)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv62)
What’s the yeast doing inside my bread?

If you’re one of the millions of people who used lockdown to try something new like baking sourdough bread, you may well be wondering what’s happening chemically inside your loaf, especially if the end result keeps changing. Well, you’re not alone. Listeners Soheil and Sean are both keen bakers but want to know more about the thing that makes bread rise: yeast. What is yeast? Where does it come from and can you catch it? And how hard is it to ‘make’ yourself? Soon after lockdown took effect, commercial supplies of the stuff disappeared from supermarket shelves across the globe.

The shortage also affected brewers the world over. A big fan of yeast in most of its forms, Marnie Chesterton took on the challenge of creating her own. She talks to the brewers who hunt rare strains to create the perfect beer, and hears from the biologist who says these amazing microbes, used for thousands of years, could be used to make food production more sustainable. And she discovers how this simple ingredient could be instrumental in the fight against climate change.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service.


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zrlqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yv3thfscg)
Alexei Navalny allowed to fly to Germany

Russian dissident Alexei Navalny is granted permission to fly to Germany for suspected poisoning treatment. The Putin critic fell into a coma after being taken ill on a plane. The doctors, in the Siberian city of Omsk, had earlier insisted he was too ill to be moved but, following pressure from his wife, Yulia, Mr Navalny was granted permission to fly abroad for treatment.

Also in the programme:

A ceasefire agreement is announced in Libya after more than a year of fighting between the UN-backed government in Tripoli and the forces commanded by General Khalifa Haftar.

And the Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has announced a major gas discovery in the Black Sea.

Picture: An ambulance aircraft descends before landing in Omsk. Credit: Reuters/Vadim Nezdatny


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zrqh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lg2rd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nyn8zrv74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b9n64bln8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ps30lg6hj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58k36lgkng)
Turkey announces record gas find

Turkey's President Erdogan has announced the country's biggest ever natural gas discovery. Gulmira Rzayeva of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies tells us about the significance of the find. And we consider why international investors have been deserting Turkey recently, and whether this discovery might persuade them to return, with Sinan Ulgen, chairman of the Edam Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies in Istanbul. Also in the programme, as Europe ramps up plans to make more electric cars, we hear about the companies bringing battery production closer to home. Peter Carlsson of Northvolt discusses a battery plant his firm is building in northern Sweden. We hear about a new lithium ore mine being built in Serbia from Bold Bataar, chief executive for energy and minerals at mining giant Rio Tinto. And Frederic Simon, who covers energy and the environment for news agency Euractiv, tells us about an environmental and labour standards certification scheme for raw materials that is coming soon. Plus, as pop star Taylor Swift donates $30,000 to aspiring student Vitoria Mario, who has been fundraising to help pay for her university education, we hear her reaction.

(Picture: Recep Tayyip Erdogan announces the gas find. Picture credit: Turkish Presidency Handout.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 06:06 SUN (w3csz6lf)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6lg)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6lg)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6lg)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6lg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8pf42)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8pscg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8q4lv)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8q8bz)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8qhv7)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8rc24)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8rv1n)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5prqr8ryss)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8s691)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8sb15)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8skjf)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8sp8k)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8st0p)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8sxrt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8t1hy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8t582)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8t906)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8tdrb)

BBC News Summary 17:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8v473)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8vcqc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8vqyr)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5prqr8vvpw)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5ps30kzyg9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5ps30l026f)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5ps30l09pp)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5ps30l0sp6)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5ps30l0xfb)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5ps30l115g)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5ps30l14xl)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5ps30l1ddv)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5ps30l1mx3)

BBC News Summary 16:30 MON (w172x5ps30l1rn7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5ps30l23wm)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5ps30l27mr)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5ps30l2h40)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5ps30l2lw4)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l2z3j)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l36ls)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l3pl9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l3tbf)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l41tp)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l499y)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l4jt6)

BBC News Summary 16:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l4nkb)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l50sq)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l54jv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l5d13)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5ps30l5hs7)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5ps30l5w0m)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5ps30l63hw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5ps30l6lhd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5ps30l6q7j)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5ps30l6yqs)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5ps30l7671)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5ps30l7fq9)

BBC News Summary 16:30 WED (w172x5ps30l7kgf)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5ps30l7xpt)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5ps30l81fy)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5ps30l88y6)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5ps30l8dpb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5ps30l8rxq)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5ps30l90dz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5ps30l9hdh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5ps30l9m4m)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5ps30l9vmw)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5ps30lb344)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5ps30lbbmd)

BBC News Summary 16:30 THU (w172x5ps30lbgcj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5ps30lbtlx)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5ps30lbyc1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5ps30lc5v9)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5ps30lc9lf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lcntt)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lcxb2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5ps30ldd9l)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5ps30ldj1q)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5ps30ldrjz)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lf017)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lf7jh)

BBC News Summary 16:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lfc8m)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lfqj0)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lfv84)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lg2rd)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5ps30lg6hj)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5ny90nzy3k)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p01vp)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p05lt)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p09by)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p0f32)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p0jv6)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p0nlb)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p0sbg)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p0x2l)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p10tq)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p189z)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p1d23)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p1ht7)

BBC News 15:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p1mkc)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p1zsr)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p23jw)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p2790)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p2c14)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p2gs8)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5ny90p2ljd)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p2v0n)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p2yrs)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p32hx)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3681)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3b05)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3fr9)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3khf)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3p7k)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3szp)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p3xqt)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p41gy)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p4572)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p48z6)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p4dqb)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p4jgg)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p4n6l)

BBC News 17:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p4ryq)

BBC News 18:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p4wpv)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p50fz)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p5463)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p57y7)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p5cpc)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5ny90p5hfh)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5nyn8z9l5x)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5nyn8z9py1)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5nyn8z9tp5)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5nyn8z9yf9)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zb25f)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zb5xk)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zb9np)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zbfdt)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zbk4y)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zbnx2)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zbsn6)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zbxdb)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zc14g)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zc4wl)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zc8mq)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zcdcv)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zcj3z)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zcmw3)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zcrm7)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zcwcc)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zd03h)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zd3vm)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5nyn8zd7lr)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zdh30)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zdlv4)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zdql8)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zdvbd)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zdz2j)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zf2tn)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zf6ks)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zfb9x)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zfg21)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zfkt5)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zfpk9)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zft9f)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zfy1k)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zg1sp)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zg5jt)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zg98y)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zgf12)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zgjs6)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zgnjb)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zgs8g)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zgx0l)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zh0rq)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5nyn8zh4hv)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zhd03)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zhhr7)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zhmhc)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zhr7h)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zhvzm)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zhzqr)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zj3gw)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zj770)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zjbz4)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zjgq8)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zjlgd)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zjq6j)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zjtyn)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zjyps)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zk2fx)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zk661)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zk9y5)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zkfp9)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zkkff)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zkp5k)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zksxp)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zkxnt)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5nyn8zl1dy)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zl8x6)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zldnb)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zljdg)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zln4l)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zlrwq)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zlwmv)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zm0cz)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zm443)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zm7w7)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zmcmc)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zmhch)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zmm3m)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zmqvr)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zmvlw)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zmzc0)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zn334)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zn6v8)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5nyn8znbld)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zngbj)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5nyn8znl2n)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5nyn8znpts)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5nyn8zntkx)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5nyn8znyb1)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zp5t9)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zp9kf)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zpf9k)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zpk1p)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zpnst)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zpsjy)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zpx92)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zq116)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zq4sb)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zq8jg)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zqd8l)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zqj0q)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zqmrv)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zqrhz)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zqw83)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zr007)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zr3rc)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zr7hh)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zrc7m)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zrgzr)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zrlqw)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zrqh0)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5nyn8zrv74)

BBC OS Conversations 07:06 SUN (w3ct0wjv)

BBC OS Conversations 10:06 MON (w3ct0wjv)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2sxgfvxw5t)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2sxgfw0s2x)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2sxgfw3p00)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2sxgfw6kx3)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2sxgfw9gt6)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jp)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89q)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8n0)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wv)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78p)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18w700s56g)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18wl8b5q5x)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18wl8b8m30)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18wl8bcj03)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18wl8bgdx6)

Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snx)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv61)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv61)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv61)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv62)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98b)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz98b)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz98b)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz98b)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0wp5)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct0wp5)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0wp5)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0wp5)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pv)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pv)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pv)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc26)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc26)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3cszc26)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6q)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6q)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3cszc6q)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxp)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxp)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3cszbxp)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc7)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcc7)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcc7)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcc7)

Heart and Soul 06:32 SUN (w3ct0x1h)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0x1h)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SUN (w3ct0x1h)

Heart and Soul 02:32 FRI (w3ct0x1l)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbl)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbl)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbl)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 05:50 SAT (w3ct0whq)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 18:50 SAT (w3ct0whq)

More or Less 23:50 SAT (w3ct0pxp)

More or Less 02:50 MON (w3ct0pxp)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxp)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6t6)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6t6)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wcsmnybj4)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wcsmnyg88)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wcsmnyl0d)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wcsmp17f7)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wcsmp1c5c)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172x2wcsmp1gxh)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172x2wcsmp44bb)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wcsmp482g)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wcsmp4ctl)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2wcsmp717f)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wcsmp74zk)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wcsmp78qp)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wcsmp9y4j)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2wcsmpb1wn)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2wcsmpb5ms)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2ytrk5qkpp)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2ytrk5rjnq)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2ytrk5tgls)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2ytrk5vfkt)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2yv3th1bj5)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2yv3th25r2)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2yv3th47f8)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2yv3th52n5)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2yv3th74bc)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2yv3th7zk8)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172x2yv3thb17g)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2yv3thbwgc)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2yv3thdy4k)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2yv3thfscg)

Outlook 22:32 SAT (w3cszf04)

Outlook 10:32 SUN (w3cszf04)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd3f)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd3f)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3cszd3f)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3cszdjz)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3cszdjz)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3cszdjz)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3cszdrr)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3cszdrr)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3cszdrr)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdb6)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3cszdb6)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdb6)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4n)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4n)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3csz1n4)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3csz1n4)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3csz1n4)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0r)

Science in Action 04:32 FRI (w3cszh0r)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0r)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh0r)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jnlhvpr28)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jnlhvsmzc)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jnlhvwjwg)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jnlhvzfsk)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jnlhw2bpn)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh57)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh58)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bx44bjtmf)

Sportsworld 15:06 SAT (w172x3l93prr56p)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l93prv5vx)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjj)

Tech Tent 01:06 SUN (w3cszhp1)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhp2)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhp2)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3cszhp2)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk35)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3cszk35)

The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3csxfjr)

The Big Idea 15:50 SUN (w3csxfjr)

The Big Idea 22:50 SUN (w3csxfjr)

The Compass 08:06 SUN (w3ct0wpc)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct0wpd)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct0wpd)

The Compass 15:06 WED (w3ct0wpd)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct0wpd)

The Conversation 07:32 SUN (w3csvs2b)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3cswp1y)

The Conversation 16:32 MON (w3cswp1y)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3cswp1y)

The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8m)

The Cultural Frontline 09:32 SUN (w3cszj8m)

The Cultural Frontline 22:06 SUN (w3cszj8m)

The Documentary 06:06 SAT (w3ct0486)

The Documentary 08:32 SAT (w3ct0x1n)

The Documentary 11:32 SAT (w3ct0x1d)

The Documentary 14:06 SAT (w3ct0hyz)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct0hyz)

The Documentary 01:32 SUN (w3ct0x1n)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct0x2h)

The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct0hyz)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct0x2h)

The Documentary 17:32 SUN (w3ct0x1n)

The Documentary 18:06 SUN (w3ct0486)

The Documentary 19:32 SUN (w3ct0x1g)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct0x1f)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct0x1f)

The Documentary 15:06 TUE (w3ct0x1f)

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The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct0x2h)

The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct0x1t)

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The Documentary 22:32 WED (w3ct0x1t)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjhd)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3cszjhf)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq7)

The Food Chain 01:32 MON (w3cszjq7)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3cszjq8)

The Food Chain 16:32 THU (w3cszjq8)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3cszjq8)

The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvr)

The Forum 03:06 MON (w3cszjvr)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3cszjvs)

The Inquiry 10:06 SUN (w3cszl3s)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl3t)

The Inquiry 16:06 THU (w3cszl3t)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172x7b98xtkt8t)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172x7b98xtl5j6)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172x7b98xtnq5x)

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The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172x7b98xtqrw3)

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The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172x7b9n63wgc5)

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The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172x7b9n63xk2b)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172x7b9n63xskl)

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The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172x7b9n64552g)

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The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172x7b9n6481zk)

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The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172x7b9n649d5z)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172x7b9n64b3nr)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172x7b9n64bln8)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3cszcn8)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3cszcn9)

The Why Factor 23:32 SAT (w3csytzh)

The Why Factor 02:32 MON (w3csytzh)

The Why Factor 09:06 MON (w3csytzh)

The Why Factor 15:06 MON (w3csytzh)

The Why Factor 20:06 MON (w3csytzh)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3cszvs3)

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Trending 02:32 SUN (w3cszvs3)

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United Zingdom 09:32 SAT (w3ct0wl4)

United Zingdom 04:32 SUN (w3ct0wl4)

United Zingdom 22:32 SUN (w3ct0wl4)

VJ Day Silence 10:59 SAT (w3ct0x5r)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmv8)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3cszmk8)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3cszmk8)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3cszmk8)

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Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3cszmv9)

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WorklifeIndia 17:06 SUN (w3ct0x4t)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57qngz9yjn)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xltz127141f)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172x58k36l2z12)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172xlwlxjfhmt3)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172x58k36l5vy5)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172xlxfc818v4h)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172x58k36l8rv8)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172xlvsgsv0460)

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World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172xlt4lbmqf7j)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172x58k36lgkng)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3csztgf)

World Football 16:32 FRI (w3csztgf)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3csztgf)