Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 AUGUST 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc6shq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vvqq00lm)
US Congress' last-ditch talks on virus stimulus fail

Last-ditch negotiations at the US Congress to forge another stimulus package for the coronavirus-ravaged economy have collapsed in stalemate. Democrats and Republicans remain at odds over everything from unemployment benefits to financial aid for schools to cash injections for states' coffers. Meanwhile, President Trump has suggested he may unilaterally extend the federal enhanced unemployment benefit system. New York Times reporter Emily Badger explains why black Americans would be most hit if the programme wasn't extended. Also in the programme, we'll get the latest on President Trump's threats to companies dealing with Chinese firms WeChat and TikTok. And we'll hear from our sister programme Marketplace about how the coronavirus pandemic is shifting attitudes towards service robots.

All through the show we'll be joined by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer. Picture credit: Getty images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc6x7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhsnnz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyx8j7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjh)
Ireland's Green Machine

On Stumped this week, Alison Mitchell is back in the Old Trafford bio-bubble, as England - fresh from beating the West Indies - take on Pakistan in another three-Test series. Alison, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma will be speaking to the PCB's Chief Executive Officer Wasim Khan. And they'll be joined by Ireland's High Performance Director Richard Holdsworth after his side recorded their highest successful run chase in One Day Internationals against world champions England.

Image: Harry Tector of Ireland celebrates victory watched on by Saqib Mahmood of England during the Third One Day International between England and Ireland (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc70zz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhc)
The teenager who took on the Taliban

A teenage Afghan girl was recently celebrated as a hero, and photos of her holding an AK47 widely circulated, after she killed two Taliban fighters who attacked her home. But Firuz Rahimi of BBC Uzbek – himself from Afghanistan – shares the story behind the story, revealing the complexity of Afghan life and loyalties.

Unmasking the masks
Nasobuco, barbijo, tapabocas and mascarilla – the proliferation of words for facemasks in Latin America, with BBC Monitoring journalist Rafael Rojas in Miami.

When monuments say more than ministries
Olga Ivshina tells us about a BBC Russian investigation into what the new names being added to war memorials can reveal about military operations in the absence of government information.

Indian Matchmaking
Indian Matchmaking is a Netflix show featuring an elite matchmaker seeking suitable matches for clients in India and the US. It’s been a hit, but also controversial, as the BBC's Geeta Pandey explains.

Journey to the Carpathians
Roman Lebed of BBC Ukrainian takes us to the Carpathian Mountains, where he recently reported on devastating floods. He tells us about the people he met, now trying to rebuild their lives, and explains why the Carpathians are so close to his heart.

Image: Qamar Gul, Afghan girl holding AK47
Credit: Social media


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv7)
The American who put women's rights in the Japanese constitution

In November 1946, Emperor Hirohito proclaimed a new post-war constitution for Japan which contained clauses establishing women's rights for the first time. They were the brainchild of Beate Sirota Gordon, a young American woman working for the Allied occupying forces. Simon Watts tells her story using interviews from the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Beate Sirota Gordon in Japan in 1946 (Family Collection)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc74r3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn7)
What is Covid doing to the Amazon?

The coronavirus pandemic is having a growing impact on life in the Brazilian Amazon. Half a million indigenous people still live in often remote rainforest communities, yet many are still contracting Covid-19 and dying. The Munduruku people have already lost ten of their elders to the virus, a situation observers describe as akin to the destruction of a library or museum - so important are the ‘sábios’ - or sages - in passing on the community’s cultural heritage. The virus is also thought to have harmed anti-logging, anti-burning and anti-mining efforts around the rain-forest, with Brazil’s space agency identifying a large increase in the number of fires burning during the month of July compared to last year. This year the government has authorised the deployment of the military to combat deforestation and forest fires and also banned the setting of fires in the region for 120 days. But President Bolsonaro’s critics accuse him of underplaying the impact of coronavirus on the Amazon region and even exploiting the crisis for political gain. So is enough being done to support the country’s indigenous peoples? Will the Covid-19 speed up the clearing of the rainforest? And how is the crisis adding to the already volatile and polarised Brazilian political landscape? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss what the virus is doing to Brazil's Amazon region.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc78h7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnht0xc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyxmrm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvs2)
Did a state news agency troll its critics?

The people in charge wanted state-run news agency Notimex to become the “BBC of Mexico”. And after President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was elected in 2018, he appointed people who took on that mission. But now the agency has been rocked by allegations that it targeted online abuse at former employees and critical independent journalists.

An investigation by three organisations alleges that people among the most senior Notimex executives orchestrated the use of fake accounts to attack people they didn’t like. We find out how the trolling campaigns worked, speak to people who have been at the receiving end of the messages, and even talk to someone who admits they were told to carry out orders from the top.

Presenter: Reha Kansara
Producer: Marcos Martinez

Picture: Photo illustration of an anonymous troll
Picture credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whp)
Letter six

The dominant power in the 20th century, America’s alliances and rivalries now look so different.


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc7d7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Documentary (w3ct03ck)
The Malawi tapes

A race is on to save thousands of tapes of traditional Malawian music in danger of disintegrating in the archives of state broadcaster, Malawi Broadcasting Corporation.

The old reel-to-reel tapes date back to the 1930s, '40s, '50s and '60s and were recorded in towns and villages all over Malawi and in the MBC studios. The folk songs, traditional chants, dances and contemporary music of the time all provide a snapshot of Malawi’s social and musical history.

One of Malawi’s biggest musicians Faith Mussa – himself increasingly using traditional instruments, rhythms and harmonies in his own music - is our guide.

Waliko Makhala is a musician, ethno-musicologist and MBC journalist. He’s spearheading a digitisation project - aided by a donation of an old tape machine sitting idle in a mountain Cold War-era bunker in Norway.

The digitisation project also wants to ensure new, younger audiences get to appreciate the richness of the traditional music so Waliko also hosts a weekly radio programme.

And Faith has got together with other young musicians - in a band called Takula - and come up with their own reinterpretations of the old music.

We are in the archives to learn about Malawi’s musical heritage – including the role of migration and women. And we meet Park Town Band, a group with a fascinating 80-year history that revolves around an accordion – and which was recorded by MBC almost 50 years ago.

Presenter: Faith Mussa
Producer: Penny Dale and Rob Wilson

(Photo: Park Town Band performing the honala dance. Credit: Penny Dale)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc7hzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snw)
A veteran scientist's view on the planet's future

Lockdowns around the world has seen our energy usage plunge, but as restrictions ease will countries build back better? On Business Weekly we get the view of veteran scientist James Lovelock as he celebrates his 101st birthday. We ask him his predictions for planet earth.

We also head to Ghana, where we take a look at efforts to reinvigorate the economy by attracting disillusioned African Americans to visit and start a new life there.
Plus, if you’re missing watching you’re favourite bands, some artists are coming up with novel ways to get around bans on concerts.

(Image: A climate change protest in Washington D.C. Credit: Getty Images.).


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc7mqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pt)
Beirut seeks answers

Whole neighbourhoods in Beirut were blown away at the explosion at the port on Tuesday. With it, the blast took homes, work places and lives. As the rescue effort has now slowed, focus has turned to those who bear the responsibility for the devastation. Lizzie Porter examines the aftermath.

The rate of coronavirus infections in South Africa has been steadily climbing, nudging the country into the company of the US, Brazil, Russia and India in terms of world highs. The country has now surpassed half a million cases. But the fuller picture is one of contradiction. There is an indication that the measures to contain the virus are working, on some level. And then, as Andrew Harding has experienced, the pandemic has also exposed what definitely isn’t working in South Africa.

Iran has seen a significant surge in Covid-19 infections since mid-May, causing some restrictions to be reinstated. However, the severity of the outbreak has been difficult to assess and there are concerns that the situation has been significantly worse than the government has reported. Behind the death tolls, though, are the Iranian people and the lives lost – as Jiyar Gol is all too aware.

After weeks of lockdown, France’s roads will be clogged as the summer exodus gets underway. But, as Chris Bockman has heard, it is also an ugly reminder of another annual summer trend that the French have become known for. According to a recent campaign, they are the European champions for abandoning their pets.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Bridget Harney


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyy000)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1m)
Black Music in Europe

Before the war

Clarke Peters examines the variety of black music recorded in Europe from the late 1920s onwards - hot jazz in Weimar Berlin, calypso in Cardiff Bay and the sounds of the Beguine in Paris. He also investigates the Degenerate Music exhibition held in Dusseldorf in 1938, and hears how the rise of Hitler affected the lives of musicians like trumpeter Arthur Briggs.

(Photo: Clark Peters. Credit:: Alexandra Quinn)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc7rgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhthww)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyy3r4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl3)
United Zingdom

'Speaking Welsh is vibrant and cool'

“People have had to really fight to keep the language alive, which is why it’s vibrant now”. Zing heads to Cardiff to meet Lisa Angharad, host of possibly the first ever sex podcast in Welsh – Siarad Secs. Lisa wants to provide young Welsh speakers with frank, open discussions “in the language they have sex in, and have those chats with their mates in”. Lisa is also a singer, and says that a love of music, singing and harmonising is at the heart of Welsh identity: “If you’re happy, joyous, grieving, whatever – music is something we gravitate towards.” She's proudly Welsh, and doesn't feel "an ounce British" - she tells Zing why.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4m)
Getting down to business with Covid-19

How has business coverage on the BBC World Service tackled the unprecedented situation in the wake of Covid-19? Has it been tough enough on bankers and politicians? Listeners ask if there has been an over emphasis on western economies? We talk to the World Service’s business editor.
Plus technical gremlins for both Science in Action and The Inquiry - we find out what went wrong.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc7w6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bwrw0rp0l)
"I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’”

I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’” - Farid Noori on his dream of becoming the first mountain biker from Afghanistan to compete at an Olympics.
Farid Noori grew up as a refugee in Pakistan after his family fled the Taliban when he was just two years old. He tells us about his early life in Pakistan, his return to Afghanistan and how he’s hoping to grow the sport in his homeland. Noori recalls going to school in a Unicef tent and being able to see rocket shells and debris that were left over from the war. He remembers learning to ride a bike while waiting in line for bread and he says he hopes his own Olympic ambitions can help pave the way for other athletes from Afghanistan.

“I thought my career was over at seventeen and to have gone through this a second time is pretty brutal” – Annabelle Lindsay on the rule change that has ended her international wheelchair basketball career. Lindsay is one of a number of athletes, who have been told their disabilities no longer meet the new eligibility criteria set down by the International Paralympic Committee. She had been hoping to represent Australia at next year’s Paralympics and says the rule change could also see her lose her university scholarship in America. Lindsay took up wheelchair basketball after a serious knee-injury after a teenager ended her hopes of playing basketball.

This week saw Australian athletes past and present including – Mitchell Starc, Alyssa Healy, Julie Murray and Bronte Campbell - sleep at the Sydney Cricket Ground to raise funds for homeless young people. ‘Sports Stars Sleepout’ was organised by the Chappell Foundation and its founder – the former Australia cricketer Greg Chappell – joins us to discuss the success of the event and the inspiration behind it.

Sporting Witness remembers the late Junko Tabei, who back in 1975 became the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest. As well as being an achievement in its own right, Tabei had to defy the cultural norms in her home country of Japan where women were not expected to be world-class mountaineers.

And – with live sport continuing we found out what's happening at the second test match between England and Pakistan and we check in on the latest at the World Snooker Championship.

Photo: Farid Noori takes part in a mountain biking event (Credit: Farid Noori)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc7zz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhtrd4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyyc7d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wp8)
On The Front Line with Karachi’s Ambulance Drivers

Karachi's ambulance drivers

In Karachi, with a population of around 20 million people, ambulance drivers are on the front lines of this megacity’s shifting conflicts. Samira Shackle joins one of these drivers, Muhammad Safdar, on his relentless round of call-outs.

Safdar gets an emergency call out: a six-storey building has collapsed in Gollimore. There are many injured. Arriving at the scene, full of noise and chaos, Samira is witness to the scale of the problems Karachi is yet to overcome.

As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work.

With no state ambulance service in Pakistan, the Edhi Foundation, set up by the late Abdul Sattar Edhi in 1954, stepped in to offer services to the poor. Safdar drives one of its fleet of four hundred ambulances: rudimentary converted vans with basic emergency provision. His missions bring him to many of Karachi’s most deprived and troubled areas, revealing the complex social and economic problems at the heart of the country.

As Samira and Safdar traverse this enormous city, their experiences reveal a remarkable story of life and death in contemporary Pakistan.

Photo: Muhammad Safdar Credit: BBC


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc83q4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6t5)
Obsessed with production with Jehnny Beth and Kelly Lee Owens

Jehnny Beth, frontwoman of noise queens Savages and now a solo artist, leads the discussion with three thought-provoking and inspirational musicians.

Kelly Lee Owens is one of the most exciting DJs and electronic producers right now, a Welsh musician who’s collaborated with the likes of St. Vincent, Bjork, Jenny Hval, and Jon Hopkins. Jessy Lanza is an an electronic songwriter, producer, and vocalist from Ontario, Canada. A former music teacher, she grew up playing piano and clarinet, before going on to study jazz and eventually finding her feet in electronic music. And finally, Tei Shi is a Colombian-Canadian singer, songwriter, and record producer born in Buenos Aires, but now based in LA. She’s jokingly described her work as "mermaid music".

Together, they discuss the history of the studio gear they use, positions they record vocals in the studio, watching films to get inspiration, and the difficulties of recording animals.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc87g8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vyf2v)
Beirut explosion: Thousands take to the streets to vent anger against their leaders

Thousands of Lebanese are expected to take to the streets of Beirut today to vent their anger at the government and remember those who died in Tuesday's devastating explosion. The march -- which will also commemorate the victims -- will go from one of the worst hit districts to Martyrs' Square.

Also in the programme: Mauritius declares emergency as stranded ship leaks oil; and we ask why the Latino community in Texas is bearing the brunt of the coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: Anti-government protesters clash with Riot police during an anti-government protest in front of the Ministry of Energy at Emile Lahoud Avenue northern Beirut, Lebanon, 04 August 2020. Credit: EPA/NABIL MOUNZER.


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc8c6d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wzj)
The Bomb

In a moment of terrible inspiration, a little-known Hungarian scientist called Leo Szilard uncovers the destructive possibilities of an atomic bomb.

Fearing the Nazis would figure out how to produce the bomb first, Szilard turns to his friend Albert Einstein to help convince the US President to invest in a uranium research programme.

That programme becomes the Manhattan Project, and as America tries to end World War Two, Szilard fears his vision is about to become reality.

Recruiting other scientists from across the Manhattan Project he launches a campaign to save the world from the horror of a nuclear bomb.

A campaign that will fail on 6 August 1945, when the United States drops an atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

For Emily Strasser this is a personal story. Her grandfather worked on the Manhattan Project. All her life she has been grappling with what her grandfather was a part of, and how she is meant to feel about it today.


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc8gyj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l8rffz0lv)
The return of the Champions League

The Champions League is back, beginning with the completion of the second leg of the Round of 16 matches. Sportsworld will bring you all the reaction from Friday night's matches between Manchester City against Real Madrid and Juventus against Lyon. Plus we'll have the build up to Saturday's fixtures between Chelsea and Bayern Munich and Barcelona and Napoli.

Sportsworld also brings you the story of two women who became Olympic champions, on the eve of what should have been the Olympic closing ceremony in Tokyo.

And we'll have the latest from the golf, the cricket and the Formula 1, which celebrates it's 70 year anniversary this weekend.

Photo credit: Champions League trophy (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc8v5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhvlm1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyz6g9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvs2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc8yy1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 today]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc92p5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk34)
Ai Weiwei on his new artwork History of Bombs

This week on The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi: Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei on his installation, 'History of Bombs'; British actor and poet Jade Anouka on Her and Her, a short film made entirely in lockdown; and Irenosen Okojie, winner of the 2020 Caine Prize for African writing on her short story Grace Jones.

British actor Gemma Arterton on the UK cinema release of her film, Summerland; author Avni Doshi reflects on the difficult mother-daughter relationship in her Booker Prize nominated novel Burnt Sugar; and music from Texan soul duo Black Pumas.

Nikki's special guest is Irish Canadian novelist, playwright and screenwriter Emma Donoghue. Academy Award nominated for the film adaptation of her own bestseller, Room, she very presciently set her latest novel, The Pull Of The Stars, in the Great Flu pandemic of 1918.

(Photo: Ai Weiwei. Credit: John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc96f9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vzd1w)
Angry Beirut protesters storm government buildings

Protesters in Beirut have stormed government ministries during a fresh demonstration over Tuesday's huge explosion that left at least 158 dead.

Also on the eve of the Presidential elections in Belarus police again detain the the campaign manager of the main opposition candidate..

And could reforms to the US Postal Service affect mail-in voting in the November election?

(Photo: Dozens of protesters entered the foreign ministry in Beirut)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc9b5f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyzpft)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf03)
When trash met thrash: Paraguay's landfill musicians

The Recycled Orchestra run by Favio Chavez, began as a safe haven for kids living in the Cateura slum. It turned into a global phenomenon when it caught the attention of rock royalty and actual royalty around the world. Playing instruments made from the trash thrown away at the local landfill site, teenagers who once only knew the streets around their homes now travel across the planet performing with bands like Megadeth, Metallica and Stevie Wonder. But despite their success, they still play the same instruments made of garbage and remain in the shanty town, putting everything they make back into their community.

Archive in this programme is from the documentary Landfill Harmonic.

Presenter: Clayton Conn
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Favio Chavez
Credit: Landfill Harmonic Movie


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc9fxk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhw6bp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyzt5y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzk)
Why is it so hard to get people to pay tax?

Our attitude to taxation is determined by a wide range of factors: whether we think our neighbours are tax dodgers, how much control we have over how funds are spent and even our gender, age and religious beliefs. Nastaran Tavakoli-Far hears tales of tax avoidance by the world’s super-rich and finds out how governments around the world are using simple ‘nudge’ techniques to get people to feel positive about paying up.

Guests:
Carla Gericke, President Emeritus of the Free State Project
Brooke Harrington, Professor of Sociology, Dartmouth College
Stewart Kettle, Senior Advisor at the Behavioural Insights Team
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Associate Professor of Economics and Strategy at Saïd Business School
Benno Torgler, Professor of Economics in the School of Economics and Finance, QUT
Kelly Sarri, filmmaker

Photo: Calculating Tax
Credit: Getty Images


SAT 23:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxn)
Melting Antarctic ice

One More or Less listener has heard that if all the ice in Antarctica melted, global sea levels would rise by 70 metres. But it would take 361 billion tonnes of ice to raise the world's sea levels by just 1 millimetre.

So how much ice is in Antarctica? And in the coming years, what impact might temperature changes have on whether it remains frozen?

(Gentoo penguins on top of an iceberg at King George Island, Antarctica 2020. Credit: Alessandro Dahan/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 09 AUGUST 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc9pdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp0)
The future for TikTok in the United States

Why the popular video app faces being bought out or banned in the US. Chris Fox is joined by the BBC's North America technology reporter James Clayton to discuss the history of the app and why Donald Trump appears determined to ban it. Alex Stamos, former chief security officer at Facebook, discusses whether TikTok is really a security concern. Eva Galperin, director of cybersecurity at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, explains why banning an app is tough to do. Vishal Shah from Instagram touts his TikTok alternative 'Reels' - one of the platforms hoping to attract TikTok users.

(Photo: TikTok logo, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz01p6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc9t4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhwkl2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz05fb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvs2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc9xx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1c)
Worlds apart

The pandemic has accelerated de-globalisation. Governments worry now about the length and strength of medical supply chains and cross-border trade and travel. But globalisation has had its critics for quite a time. Nationalism has been powered in many countries by the belief that a globalised world has led to rising inequality and fewer middle income jobs in richer countries. And our global institutions - the IMF, World Bank and World Trade Organisation - are under attack too. Philip Coggan considers the long view, looking back to the last great wave of globalisation that ended abruptly with the Great War of 1914-1918.

What can we learn from history about what might happen if we turn our backs on globalisation now?

He also asks whether the winners and losers stay the same down the decades and what governments can do to mitigate globalisation’s negative impact.
Was there a golden era - after the Second World War of 1939 - 1945 for global trade and could that be re-created?
Is globalisation going sharply into reverse or is it taking on a new shape - one that impacts services, than goods? And just how dependent is global economic growth on the continuing growth of global trade?

(Photo: Globe with cracks. CreditL Getty Images)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcb1n6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz0dxl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjq)
The intelligent tree

Are trees intelligent? We think of humans as intelligent – maybe animals too. But vegetation? Well, one of the world’s leading tree researchers, Suzanne Simard, insists that trees should be seen as intelligent. They communicate with each other. They help each other. They are even able to distinguish between their offspring and stranger trees. She calls the network of tree communication the wood wide web. And she believes that her discoveries should alter our relationship to trees, woods and forests.

Presenter: David Edmonds
Producer: Ben Cooper

(Photo: US-Fall-Shenandoah, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcb5db)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhwxtg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz0jnq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8l)
What’s the future of performing arts?

This week, as part of a series of special programmes, we look to the future of the performing arts.

As many theatres around the world remain dark, closed to audiences for months and with a largely freelance community of actors, writers, directors, musicians and production crews unable to work, we talk to four global theatre makers about the impact of the pandemic on performing arts communities.

We ask what's next for theatre. Is the outlook bleak or is there cause for hope from the creativity and invention shown in lockdown? What does the future of stage performance hold?

Tina Daheley is joined by Rwandan theatre director and curator of the Ubumuntu International Arts festival, Hope Azeda, Chilean playwright and theatre director Guillermo Calderon, Indian playwright, theatre director and lecturer Abhishek Majumdar and the artistic director of the Kiln theatre in London, Indhu Rubasingham.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: The empty auditorium of the London Coliseum. Credit: Richard Baker/In Pictures via Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcb94g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Assignment (w3csz6ld)
Algeria's plague revisited

A mysterious illness appears out of nowhere. The number of cases rises exponentially, as the authorities attempt to downplay the severity of the disease. There is a shortage of medical staff, equipment and arguments about whether people should wear masks. People are forbidden to leave their homes and many are left stranded in unfamiliar places, separated from loved ones. Albert Camus’ novel The Plague set in the Algerian city of Oran under French colonial rule was published more than 70 years ago. But today it almost reads like a current news bulletin and seems more relevant than ever.

This edition of Assignment revisits Oran in the age of the coronavirus and investigates the parallels between now and then. For the time being, it seems the pandemic has achieved something the authorities have tried but failed to do for the past year – clear the streets of protesters. Lucy Ash investigates Algeria’s plague of authoritarianism and finds that the government has been using Covid-19 as an excuse to crack down harder on dissent.

Reporter: Lucy Ash
Producer: Neil Kisserli
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Man using an Algerian flag as a mask at an anti-government demonstration in Algiers on 13 March, 2020. Credit: Ryad Kramdi/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz0ndv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1b)
Will coronavirus change my faith?

Community is one of main features of religion - but coronavirus has disrupted that. Religious institutions are going through significant changes in response to the coronavirus. But what of these changes will remain and what will organised religion look like post pandemic? Could the virus change the future of worship?

Sodaba Haidare looks at how different faiths will change post pandemic and asks is there still a place for religious buildings and congregational prayer?

Produced by: Athar Ahmed and Nalini Sivathasan
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Image: Karanjee Singh prepares for his first visit to his Sikh Gurdwara since the Coronavirus meant it had to close / Credit: BBC)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcbdwl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjt)
The Beirut Explosion

Beirut has been left destroyed by this week’s massive explosion: more than a hundred are dead; thousands injured and hundreds of thousands have been left homeless. It has devastated lives, belongings, buildings, businesses… the country. Lebanon was already struggling from challenges on several fronts, including covid-19. With many questions still to be answered, it is unclear what the longer term effect of this week’s tragedy will be.

Nuala McGovern has been talking to people in Beirut. Among her conversations, she has been hearing from eye witnesses who experienced the blast, three young adults who share their fears for the future of Lebanon, and the doctor who helped a mother give birth after the hospital was badly hit by the blast.

(Photo: Woman wearing a protective face mask views the damage near the site of blast in Beirut, Lebanon August 7, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Aziz Taher)


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz0s4z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 The Conversation (p03tknqh)
Professional gamblers: Cat Hulbert and Celina Lin

Cat Hulbert started gambling for a living 40 years ago. A blackjack player in her 20s, she became so skilled at winning money from casinos, she was soon very unpopular with them all around the US. Cat took up poker in the 1980s, and was one of the first women to break into the ranks of professional card players. The Game Show Network called her "the best female gambler on earth." Now retired, Cat says she is not sure that she would legalise gambling in a state that did not have it, as it can ruin so many lives.

Celina Lin, who has been described as 'China's Queen of Poker', was born in Shanghai and moved to Australia as a child. Always a gaming enthusiast, she got into poker by accident, but quickly became a skilled online player and has been employed by the company PokerStars for the last eight years. She is now based back in China, playing high-level poker tournaments in the casino city of Macau. Celina has won the prestigious Red Dragon cup twice, and views poker not as a game but as an extremely demanding mind sport.

Image: Celina Lin (L) and Cat Hulbert (R) (Images courtesy of Celina Lin and Cat Hulbert)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcbjmq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpb)
The Senses

The senses: Vision

Vision is a complex process involving light rays, special nerve cells and electrical signals sent to the brain, which processes the information and tells us what we’re seeing. But even tiny disruptions to any part of this system can result in remarkable visual problems.

Neurologist, Dr Guy Leschziner, meets 25-year-old filmmaker Oli, who’s only recently discovered something alarming: he’s missing half his vision in one eye - probably caused by a stroke he never knew he had.

We hear from Dawn, whose eyes are working properly and yet she’s almost completely blind. Her visual problems are caused by damage to a vital nerve connecting her eyeballs and her brain.

Susan describes how her epilepsy is causing visual distortions that mean she can see through a person as if they were transparent.

And we meet Nina who’s been robbed of her sight after two separate accidents. And yet, she sees colours and terrifying images of zombie faces. She discovers she has Charles Bonnet Syndrome – visual hallucinations caused by loss of sight

Through the extraordinary experiences of these individuals, we learn how vision is not like a video camera, a straightforward process of turning light into a picture.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Dawn with her dog in the garden.Credit: BBC


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz0wx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq6)
Single parents: Cooking solo

Money, time, and healthy choices can make mealtimes a challenge for many parents, but how do things change when sole responsibility falls on one adult's shoulders? In some parts of the world single parent families are now more common than ever before, but how does being a single parent influence your relationship with food, and also your child's?

Tamasin Ford speaks to three lone-parents about their experiences: Salma Abdo, from Madrid, explains why mealtimes with her young son were the loneliest part of her day; Billy McGranaghan, founder of London charity Dads House, says he regularly had to skip meals so his child could eat; and Neferteri Plessy, who runs Single Mums Planet, in Santa Monica, California, talks about how food decisions can be tricky to negotiate with your ex.

But all three describe how, despite the challenges, food can help create unique bonds in a single parent home through cooking and eating together.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

(Picture: Neferteri Plessy, Salma Abdo, and Billy McGranaghan. Credit: BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcbncv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhxdsz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz10n7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcbs3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3r)
Will the pandemic get worse in the winter?

Winter is coming in the northern hemisphere and traditionally it is time for colds and flu.
This has raised fears that coronavirus will surge when the seasons change, possibly leading to a second wave of the disease that is even bigger than the first.
However, predicting what a Covid winter will look like is complex and uncertainty reigns - there are reasons both to be worried and to be reassured.

Contributors:
. Micaela Martinez, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University
. Katherine Wu, a health and science journalist with The New York Times
. Judit Vall, a professor in health and labour economics at the University of Barcelona
. Dominique Moisi, the author of The Geopolitics of Emotion.


(A man walks through a snowfall in Sarajevo, wearing a mask as protection against Covid-19. Credit Mustafa Ozturk / Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz14dc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszf03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcbww3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhxn97)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz184h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcc0m7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcc4cc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8w19zy)
Beirut explosion: World leaders hold aid summit

World leaders begin talks on providing emergency aid for Lebanon following Tuesday's disastrous explosion. President Macron of France will host the video conference, and President Trump has said that everyone wants to help.

Also in the programme: The grand council of elders in Afghanistan has approved the release of 400 Taliban prisoners accused of serious crimes; and we'll have a global view of electronic music through the decades.

Picture: French President Emmanuel Macron gestures as he visits the devastated site of the explosion at the port of Beirut. Credit: 07/08/2020 Reuters.


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcc83h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcccvm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvq)
The Fall of the Roman Empire

In 476, the last of the Roman emperors in the West was deposed; in 1776, historian Edward Gibbon wrote “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire”, and Rome’s fate became a major point of comparison for all empires. In Gibbon's view, instead of inquiring why the Roman empire was destroyed precisely 1300 years before, we should rather be surprised that it had subsisted so long. Ever since, there has been a fascination with what changed in Rome in 476 and why, and whether there were more significant changes earlier or later than that date and, importantly, what stayed the same.

In this edition of The Forum, Rajan Datar explores the ideas about Rome’s Fall with Sarah E. Bond, Associate Professor of History at the University of Iowa, USA; Meaghan McEvoy, Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia; and Peter Heather, Professor of Medieval History at King’s College London, UK.


(Photo: Sack of Rome by the Visigoths led by Alaric I in 410. Coloured engraving. Credit: Prisma/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcchlr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l8rfg2182)
The Return of the Indian Premier League

Sportsworld brings you all the reaction from the Champions League round of 16, Indian Premier League Cricket, latest from the Formula 1 as it celebrates it's 70 year anniversary this weekend at the British Grand Prix.

Photo credit: Mumbai Indians winning the Indian Premier League (Getty Images).


SUN 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrccmbw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvh1)
How to avoid work-from-home burnout

Many companies are offering flexible and remote work till next year, to keep employees safe. According to a recent study, job searches for work-from-home in the country have surged to a whopping 442% between the months of February and July – the highest globally.

But even as firms begin to notice the benefits of work-from-home during these challenging times, remote workers are now complaining of emotional and physical exhaustion, stress, anxiety, and in some cases, even depression.

So, how can managers and team leaders address staff woes while keeping the business functional? And what innovative ways are mental health experts advising to keep stress at bay?

We discuss what are the best measures to avoid work-from-home burnout.
Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Prabhash Bhatnagar, founder, director, Hotelogix; Subarna Ghosh, cofounder, ReRight Foundation; Dr Prerna Kohli, clinical psychologist

Photo: A software engineer works from home in India during the lockdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic

The audio for this episode was updated on 11th August 2020.


SUN 17:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz1zm8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrccr30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 18:06 The Documentary (w3ct03ck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrccvv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhym88)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz273j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x19)
The new tech Cold War

Why did the decision to let the Chinese company Huawei build the UK’s 5G telecoms network turn into one of the most difficult and consequential national security decisions of recent times? A decision which risks undermining the normally close special relationship between the US and UK? The answer is because it cuts to the heart of the greatest fear in Washington – that China is already ahead in the global competition to develop the most advanced technology.

Some people ask how we have got to a position where the West needs to even consider using Chinese tech. The answer may be because they failed to think strategically about protecting or nurturing their own technology industry over the last two decades. A free-market system has faced off against a Chinese model in which there is a clear, long-term industrial strategy to dominate certain sectors of technology, including telecoms, quantum computing and artificial intelligence. This is a rare issue where the US national security community – the so-called ‘Deep State’ – is in close alignment with President Trump.

Now the US and UK, among others, are scrambling to try to develop strategies to respond and to avoid dependence on China. But is it already too late? We hear from, among others, former Google boss Eric Schmidt, now chair of the Pentagon’s Defence Innovation Board: Nigel Inkster, former deputy head of the British Secret Service MI6: Victor Zhang, vice-president of Huawei: and Bill Evanina director of the US National Counterintelligence and Security Centre.

(Image: Global tech concept. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcczl8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6t5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcd3bd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8w28yz)
Emergency aid pledged to Lebanon

A summit to provide humanitarian relief to Lebanon in the wake of Tuesday's deadly explosion raises cash - but will it reach those in greatest need? We hear from regional expert Lina Khatib, and speak to a doctor about his harrowing experiences after the blast.

Also in the programme: an update on a critical election in Belarus; and the plight of British restaurants during the pandemic.

(Photo: Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis participates in donor teleconference on Lebanon. The conference was arranged by French President Emmanuel Macron and the UN. Credit: EPA/Greek Prime Minister"s Office/Dimitris Papamitsos)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcd72j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz2lbx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrcdbtn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhz37s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgz2q31)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]



MONDAY 10 AUGUST 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90njfl2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57q96njsxt)
Donors pledge aid for Lebanon

International donors have pledged a quarter of a billion euros in aid for Lebanon five days after the explosion which devastated a swathe of Beirut. But an online donor summit arranged by France called at the same time for reforms to be made. The blast at a warehouse holding over 2,000 tonnes of ammonium nitrate has focused local outrage on perceived government corruption and incompetence.
Clashes have broken out for a second day running in Beirut. We ask how can Lebanon get out of this crisis?

Also in the programme, what is behind Saudi Aramco's sharp fall in profits?

Plus - we hear from a "farmer influencer" and You Tube star Morgan Gold.

PHOTO: Beirut protester/EPA


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr86svg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90njkb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt39rb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr86xll)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90njp2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh56)
The first woman to climb Everest

In 1975, the Japanese mountaineer, Junko Tabei, became the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest. As well as being an achievement in its own right, Tabei had to defy the cultural norms of a country where women were not expected to be world-class mountaineers. Louise Hidalgo talks to Setsuko Kitamura, who was on Tabei’s Everest climb, and to her friend and biographer, Yumiko Hiraki.

Picture: Junko Tabei (left) with Ang Tsering standing in front of the southern wall of Mount Everest at the start of the climb that would result in the two of them reaching the summit. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90njstg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt3k7l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8752v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv60)
Does air traffic affect our weather?

Anyone else had their flight cancelled? The COVID 19 pandemic has had a huge impact on air travel – air traffic in 2020 is expected to be down 50 per cent on last year. But beyond the obvious disruption to business and people’s lives, how might the quieter skies affect our weather and climate?

One curious listener, Jeroen Wijnands, who lives next to Schiphol airport in the Netherlands, noticed how there were fewer clouds and barely any rainfall since the flights dropped off. Could airplanes affect our local weather?

Also, did we learn anything from another occasion when airplanes were grounded, during the post-9/11 shutdown? How will the current period impact our future climate?

Marnie Chesterton investigates this question and discovers some of the surprising effects that grounded aircraft are having: on cloud formation, forecasting and climate change.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton, Producer: Dom Byrne

[Photo:Commercial airplane parking at the airport. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90njxkl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcc55x9)
Hong Kong arrest pro-democracy tycoon

Mr Lai has been a prominent supporter of the pro-democracy protests that erupted in Hong Kong last year. We go live to Hong Kong.

Clashes have continued in Lebanon against the government following last Tuesday's devastating blast. We hear from the Lebanese Transparency Association about the reforms they are calling for especially ahead of the distribution of the billions of dollars in aid pledged by international donors.

And as Mauritius try to deal with an oil spill, some locals are making absorbent barriers of straw and even hair stuffed into fabric sacks in an attempt to absorb the oil. An MP joins us who's also donated her own hair to this effort.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nk19q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcc59nf)
Hong Kong arrest pro-democracy media tycoon, Jimmy Lai

We're live in Hong Kong as Jimmy Lai and at least six other people are detained. He is thought to be the most high profile person to be arrested so far under the new national security law. act.

We report from Brazil as the Covid-19 pandemic shows no sign of slowing there.

And we get an update on the murder trial beginning in Russia, involving three teenage sisters accused of killing their father.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nk51v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcc5fdk)
Jimmy Lai, Hong Kong media tycoon, is arrested

The Hong Kong pro-democracy tycoon Jimmy Lai's arrest, on suspicion of collusion with a foreign country, makes him the most high profile arrest so far under the new controversial security law. A legal expert gives an explainer.

We're live in Paris as an increase in Covid-19 cases means wearing a face mask will be compulsory in busy parts of the French capital from today.

And the World Health Organisation's Regional Director for Africa tells us about the efforts to make sure that people across Africa will have full access to any successful Covid-19 vaccine.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nk8sz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc25)
Chris Packham: 'Finding the good in the bad' of Covid-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has inflicted huge economic damage, but it has also offered the natural world a little bit of respite – room to breathe. What will come next? Will it be a return to the old ways of resource exploitation and consumption? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Chris Packham, one of the UK’s best-known naturalists and environmental campaigners. Are we humans capable of fundamentally changing our priorities?

Photo: Chris Packham Credit: BBC


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr87n2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jn)
Rich and frugal?

Why do some of the super rich describe themselves as frugal? Is it something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to Dolly Parton, who despite earning millions, doesn’t particularly enjoy spending it. We also hear from Karam Hinduja, banker and scion of the billionaire Hinduja family. Tech entrepreneur, Richard Skellett tells us why he sees being wealthy as a responsibility, plus we hear from big savers, Tim Connor and Francesca Armstrong. We're also joined by Sarah Fallaw, author of The Next Millionaire Next Door, Rachel Sherman, author of Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence and Elin Helander, behavioural economist, neurologist and Chief Scientific Officer at Dreams, a money-saving app. (picture of a piggy bank via Getty Images).


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk7)
Radar and World War Two

During World War Two, British women were employed as operators of a top-secret radar system for detecting aircraft. The new technology had helped shift the balance of power in the air war with Nazi Germany. Laura Fitzpatrick talks to Margaret Faulds, who was stationed at a Royal Navy Air Station during the war.

PHOTO: Margaret Faulds in naval uniform during World War Two (Personal Collection).


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nkdk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr87rth)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nkj97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr87wkm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvs2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nkn1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt4dgh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8809r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3csvs2b)
Fighting revenge porn

Can women stop their intimate photos being published online without their consent? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women fighting back against so-called 'revenge' porn

Nyika Allen is President and CEO of the New Mexico Technology Council. In 2015, Nyika's ex-boyfriend began posting compromising photographs of her on Twitter. As they were viewed by complete strangers she was overwhelmed by shock and humiliation, but decided that she would not let him win. As well as getting the images taken down, and taking her ex to court, she successfully lobbied her state's politicians. With her help, New Mexico is now one of a growing number of US states to pass a law against revenge - or non-consensual - pornography.

Talent Jumo supports survivors of revenge porn in Zimbabwe, through her organisation Katswe Sistahood. She says the trauma of the experience is often made worse by the reaction of family who can reject their daughters for bringing shame on them. She believes society stigmatises women for this whereas men are celebrated for their virility. And bullying by ex-partners is grounded in the assumption that they won't speak out. She is helping women do just that, as well as helping to draft much-needed laws that can punish this new crime.

Image: (L) Talent Jumo. Credit: DCNGO. Courtesy of The Global Fund
Image: (R) Nyika Allen. Credit: Joel Bond


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nkrsh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3d)
The supermodel who escaped a cult

Hoyt Richards has been called the first male supermodel. In the 1980s and 90s he jet-setted around the world doing shoots for Versace and Ralph Lauren, and moving in the same circles as stars like Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington and Madonna.

But outside of working hours he was involved with a cult called Eternal Values. They believed there would be a catastrophe at the turn of the century and the group would have a crucial role to play.

This episode was first released on 29th March 2018.

Picture: Hoyt Richards.
Credit: Fabrizio Gianni.


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nkwjm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt4myr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr887t0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nl08r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk585xb)
Belarus opposition disputes leader's landslide win

Svetlana Tikhanovskaya has refused to accept President Alexander Lukashenko won 80% of the vote in Sunday's election. We speak to her about this election.

Also in the programme: There's been an angry reaction in Hong Kong following the arrest of a pro-democracy activist and media tycoon, Jimmy Lai, under the national security law imposed by China. And the American professor who says he can predict who will win the White House in November.

(Photo: Ms Tikhanovskaya says she wants the authorities to hand over power. Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nl40w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr88h98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltynsx7zfl)
Media tycoon Lai arrested under HK security law

Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai was arrested over allegations of collusion with foreign forces. BBC business reporter Andrew Wood is based there, and discusses Mr Lai's businesses and his impact on Hong Kong. And we get wider context from Allan Zeman, a property developer who is an economic adviser to the city's leader Carrie Lam, and has known Jimmy Lai for decades. Also in the programme, a thousand tonnes of oil have spilled out of a Japanese-owned ship which ran aground near Mauritius 15 days ago. Vassen Kauppay-Muthoo is an oceanologist in Mauritius who has spent the past few days on the island's beaches, and explains the implications. Plus the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson has been talking to some very wealthy people to find out whether there is something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders.

(Picture: Jimmy Lai being arrested. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nl7s0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr88m1d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3csvs2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nlcj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sx35k4qkz)
Beirut: Life after the blast

We hear a conversation between people who were made homeless by the Beirut port blast. What does life in the Lebanese capital have in store for these people? Corruption is at the heart of the anger in the demonstrations taking place in the country after the blast and we’ll try to better understand how the system and leaders have adversely affected so many lives.

We are reaching out to hear from people in Belarus after violent protests in the country. Many people are angry with the re-election of long-time leader of Alexander Luskashenko. We’ll explain some of the background to the country, if it is one that you are unfamiliar with.

And, each day, we invite a medical expert onto the show to help with the latest developments on the Coronavirus. In his latest news conference today, the head of the World Health Organisation has been talking of “green shoots of hope” in terms of the pandemic. We’ll get the thoughts of Dr Eleanor Murray, from Boston University; while also answering any audience questions about the virus.

Picture: A view of the damage done to Gemmayzeh streets, in Beirut, Lebanon Credit: EPA/WAEL HAMZEH


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nlh88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nlm0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt5cfj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr88z8s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jn77jxlgf)
2020/08/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nlqrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8930x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3csz9dt)
On the menu

Shark, bear and crocodile attacks tend to make the headlines but humans fall prey to a much wider variety of predators every year, from big cats and snakes, to wolves, hyenas and even eagles that’ve been known to snatch the odd child. The details can be grim and gory as many predators have developed specific techniques for hunting us humans down. But it was always so, as biologist Professor Adam Hart discovers. Archaeological evidence suggests early hominins in Africa were more hunted than hunter, spending much of their lives scavenging for food and fending off attacks from the likes of sabre-tooth-cats and giant hyenas. Much more recently, legends abound about some of the more infamous serial killers of the animal kingdom, such as the 'man-eaters' of Tsavo and Njombe - the latter, a pride of about 15 lions in Tanzania who, it is claimed were responsible for an astonishing 1500 deaths between 1932 and 1947.

Today, estimates and sources vary but most suggest carnivorous predators are responsible for hundreds if not thousands of human deaths every year. But how much of this is active predation and how much is mistaken identity or sheer bad luck? Adam speaks to experts in human-wildlife conflict dedicated to reducing attacks on both humans and predators in Africa and India, where the tensions between protecting agricultural interests and preserving predator habitats are most problematic. He discovers the grim reality for many poor rural populations dealing with the sharp end of living in close proximity to large carnivores and discusses the potential solutions for driving down attacks on both humans and predators that are caught up in the struggle for survival. Closer to home, Adam meets a wolf-tracker, who helps to monitor wild wolf populations that have spread up through Italy and France, attacking livestock with increasing confidence. Could humans be on the menu next?

Producer: Rami Tzabar

(Picture credit: Evgeny555/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nlvhn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk59147)
The whole of Lebanon’s government resigns

The Prime Minister, Hassan Diab, announced that the entire government had resigned during a televised address. He said corruption was rampant in the system, which they cannot confront or get rid of it. Also: a second night of protests has erupted in Belarus after Sunday’s disputed election victory for President Alexander Lukashenko, and heavy flooding is causing homes to collapse in Yemen.

(Photo: Lebanese Prime Minister Hassan Diab delivering a resignation speech Credit: EPA/DALATI NOHRA).


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nlz7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr89bj5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3csvs2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nm2zx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt5vf1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr89g89)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jqy89tf7)
Media tycoon Lai arrested under HK security law

Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai was arrested over allegations of collusion with foreign forces. BBC business reporter Andrew Wood is based there, and discusses Mr Lai's businesses and his impact on Hong Kong. And we get wider context from Allan Zeman, a property developer who is an economic adviser to the city's leader Carrie Lam, and has known Jimmy Lai for decades. Also in the programme, a thousand tonnes of oil have spilled out of a Japanese-owned ship which ran aground near Mauritius 15 days ago. Vassen Kauppay-Muthoo is an oceanologist in Mauritius who has spent the past few days on the island's beaches, and explains the implications. Plus the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson has been talking to some very wealthy people to find out whether there is something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders.

(Picture: Jimmy Lai being arrested. Picture credit: EPA.)



TUESDAY 11 AUGUST 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nmbh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18w700dkl2)
Fresh sanctions in US-China tension

China puts sanctions on US senators in response to new American sanctions on Hong Kong officials. It's the latest development in the ongoing tension between the two economic superpowers. We get analysis from sanctions expert Julia Friedlander.
Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai is arrested under its new controversial national security law. We discuss what this means for press freedom in the city.
And we hear why Indian rapper Badshah is wanted by police after his latest song Paagal was downloaded a record-breaking 75 million times in the first 24 hours after its release.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland in Washington DC and by Bloomberg Opinion columnist Nisha Gopalan in Hong Kong.

(Picture:The Chinese and American flags. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nmg79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt66nf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr89thp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1d)
Vaccines, Money And Politics

Vaccines, money and politics

Nearly every person on the planet is vulnerable to the new coronavirus, SarsCoV2. That’s why there are more than 100 projects around the world racing towards the goal of creating a safe and effective vaccine for the disease it causes, Covid19, in the next 12 to 18 months. But this is just the first part of a long and complex process, working at a pace and scale never attempted before.

In Vaccines, Money and Politics, Sandra Kanthal looks at the vast ecosystem needed to deliver a vaccination programme to the world in record time. This will require billions of dollars, and likely more than one successful candidate to meet the global demand. The world will need to secure supply chains in order to avoid shortages of vital supplies like medical glass. Companies will have to manufacture the most promising candidates even before they know if the vaccines will work, otherwise the process will be further delayed. Authorities across the world will have to work together to overcome the temptation for countries to keep the vaccines for themselves and allocate a fair global distribution, and then decide which sectors of the population get them first. And they’ll need a communication strategy to convince the public the vaccines are safe and effective – and to combat the antivaxx messages already gaining traction on social media. What plans are in place to make this all happen - and will they work?

Presenter/Producer: Sandra Kanthal

(Photo: Coronavirus model and medical syringe are seen with "Covid-19" sign, Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nmkzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nmpqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt6g4p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8b1zy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3csz9dt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nmtgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcc82td)
What next for Lebanon after government resigns

The Lebanese government's decision comes after days of demonstrations demanding an overhaul of the entire political system. We look at what effect this will have.

We report from Texas where officials suggest that more than half of those who have been killed by Covid-19 are Hispanic.

And scientists in the US have tested face masks and coverings and say that some may actually increase our risk of catching coronavirus - we find out which.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nmy6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcc86kj)
Reactions to Lebanese government's resignation

We get reactions to the resignation of the Lebanese government. Their decision followed days of protests after Tuesday’s massive explosion.

We get an update from Mogadishu after a shoot-out outside the main prison.

And we speak to the first above-the-knee double amputee to scale the Matterhorn mountain - one of the Alps most famous and sheer mountains.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nn1yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcc8b9n)
Protests continue in Lebanon

We ask what kind of government Lebanon needs now with the anger and devastation created by the massive explosion last week.

Researchers in the US have published a list of which face masks are the most and least effective at protecting us against Covid-19.

And we look into reports of a lack of oxygen in hospitals in Africa treating patients with coronavirus.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nn5q2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1g)
The tech doctors forecasting heart failure

Monitoring devices implanted in a person’s chest are helping doctors predict if something is about to go wrong with a patient’s heart. Sometimes they can tell a month in advance. It’s allowing cardiologists to adjust treatment and prevent problems before they occur.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland.


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8bjzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89p)
A family rift in Syria

Why does the President of Syria seemingly want to destroy his cousin Rami Makhlouf?

President Bashar al-Assad of Syria seems hell-bent on unseating his first cousin, and Syria's richest man, from his multi-billion dollar holdings. But Rami Makhlouf, is defying the President to his face. What's going on, what's at stake for Syria?

Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen. Plus he asks Ayman Abdel-Nour, a former economic advisor to the Syrian ruling party who knew Bashar al Assad at university, what he thinks is going on.

(Picture: Syrian businessman Rami Makhlouf; Credit: Louai Beshara/Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpr)
Bremen’s Elephant Statue

Amid the ongoing debate about how to handle historical monuments which commemorate colonialism and slavery, Witness History hears the story of a giant statue of an elephant in the German city of Bremen.

The port city had played a significant role in Germany's colonial past, and after Germany lost its territories in Africa following the First World War the statue was built there in memory of the period.

But in the 1980s, a group of anti-apartheid activists campaigned to raise awareness of Germany's colonial history - and to rededicate the elephant statue.

Lucy Burns speaks to Professor Manfred Hinz, who was part of the campaign.

Photo: Shutterstock - the anti-colonial elephant monument in Bremen, 08/07/2020


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nn9g6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8bnql)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3csz9dt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nnf6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nnjyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt79cl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8bx6v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3csz1y8)
David McLay Kidd – Golf course designer

In an episode first broadcast in April 2019, Ashley Ahearn visits the rugged wilderness of North America’s Pacific North West to take a walk with David McLay Kidd: golf course designer, storyteller, and sculptor of landscapes in their wildest form.

David is a revolutionary in the field of golf design: an artist who dared to shun the manicured parkland and neatly-trimmed grass of the typical American golf course to bring the sport right back to its roots.

His designs work in harmony with nature – creating symphonies of wind, sand, and raw coastal landscapes familiar from his Scottish homeland. It’s all about the thrill of adventure – a visceral experience that plunges the player deep into the essence of a place - involving them in a challenge that walks a tightrope between intoxicating…and maddening.

“I’m a sculptor on a big scale”, David says. He’s also part landscape architect, part visual artist, part project manager and chief engineer…and above all, a storyteller.

Bandon Dunes is the course that made David McLay Kidd’s name more than two decades ago, and it’s there that Ashley finds him as he prepares to make alterations in advance of the US Amateur Championships in 2020.

As David takes us through his creative process – in both his wild outdoor “studio”, plotting bulldozers with his head greenkeeper, sketching with pencil and paper in hand indoors – it becomes clear that the relationship between golf course design and the natural environment is more complex and symbiotic than one might have ever imagined.

Produced by Steven Rajam for Tandem Productions.

(Image: Golf course designer, storyteller, and sculptor David McLay Kidd, with kind permission)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nnnpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjy)
Conjoined twins can now look into each other’s eyes

Ervina and Prefina Bangalo were born in Mbaïki, in the Central African Republic, with the back of their heads joined together. Their chances of surviving were incredibly low. By chance, Italian doctor Mariella Enoc was visiting the paediatric ward they were in. She immediately fell in love with the babies and decided to take them and their mum, Ermine Nzotto, to the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital in Vatican City, where pioneering neurosurgeon Dr Carlo Efisio Marras and a team of 30 doctors and nurses were able to separate them. It took almost two years and three surgeries to complete the separation. In June 2020 the children were finally able to look into each other’s eyes.

One day, German artist Bartholomäus Traubeck was looking at the rings on a tree that had been sliced through, and noticed they looked like the patterns on a vinyl disc. So he devised a record player that can translate wood into music. His project is called Years.

Former NASA scientist Robert J. Lang is one of the world’s foremost origami artist. Along with a team in Japan, he pioneered a system that took origami from 30 folds to hundreds of possibilities. One of his creations took seven years to complete.

Picture: Ervina and Prefina Bangalo with their mum Ermine Nzotto.
Credit: Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital.


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nnsfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt7jvv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8c4q3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3csz9dt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nnx5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5c2tf)
Opposition leader flees Belarus 'for sake of her children'

Belarus' leading opposition politician who is at the heart of the disputed election result on Sunday, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, has chosen to leave the country and is now in neighbouring Lithuania. We hear from Lithuania's foreign minister.
Also on the programme: President Putin says Russia has developed a Coronavirus vaccine but how viable is it? And one day after Hong Kong police arrest the media tycoon, Jimmy Lai, sales and shares in his Apple Daily newspaper have rocketed.

(Photo: Svetlana Tikhanovskaya talks to the media a day after the presidential elections in Minsk, Belarus, 10 August 2020. Credit: EPA/TATYANA ZENKOVICH)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90np0xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8cd6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwlk83qh68)
Belarus's economic woes

Protests after a disputed election in Belarus come against a backdrop of economic woes. An opposition news website claims a general strike has started in protest at the election result, and Katsiaryna Shmatsina of the Belarusian Institute for Strategic Studies tells us if she's seen any evidence of such a strike in Minsk today. And we find out how the country's economy has developed since the fall of the Soviet Union, from Chris Weafer, chief executive of the economic consultancy Macro Advisory. Also in the programme, critics of make-up brands around the world say they don't cater enough for darker skin tones, and if they do, the products are often more expensive and harder to get hold of. Ruby Hammer is a make-up artist and adviser to the British Beauty Council, and discusses why cosmetic brands don't make more darker skin tones. And we get wider context from Padma Lakshmi, an Indian model living in the United States, and Lorraine Candy, editor of the Sunday Times Style Magazine. Plus, the live music industry has been devastated by the pandemic. But the UK's first socially-distant concert takes place today, at Newcastle Racecourse in north-east England, and Ali O'Reilly from concert organiser Virgin Money explains how it works.

(Picture: A protest in Minsk, Belarus. Picture credit: EPA.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90np4p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8chyh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3csz1y8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90np8f7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sx35k7mh2)
Belarus opposition leader flees country

Belarus's main opposition leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya says she took a "very difficult decision" to leave the country, after disputing an election result she claimed was rigged. Poll results gave President Alexander Lukashenko 80% of the vote, but there have been numerous claims of fraud. We speak to anti-government protesters following a second night of violent clashes between demonstrators and police.

Also we return to Beirut in Lebanon where more than 300,000 people were made homeless by last week's explosion at the port. We hear from one woman who has lost her home. And our correspondent tells us how the city is trying to rebuild itself whilst also coming to terms with the trauma so many are feeling.

And we speak to shrimp farmers in Ecuador - an industry which depends on exports to China, and has been hugely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Protesters in Minsk, Belarus August 11, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Vasily Fedosenko)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90npd5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nphxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt88bm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8cw5w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jn77k0hcj)
2020/08/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90npmnm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8czy0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz989)
A year without internet in Kashmir

Jammu and Kashmir have faced an unprecedented communication blockade, with no or slow internet for 12 months. We hear voices from the region on what the impact has been on life there, with insight from technology lawyer and online freedoms activist Mishi Choudhary.

Whiteness in AI
Portrayals of artificial intelligence – from the faces of robots to the voices of virtual assistants – is overwhelmingly white and removes people of colour from the way humanity thinks about its technology-enhanced future. That’s according to a new paper by Dr. Kanta Dihal, researcher at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge, which suggests that current stereotypical representations of AI risk creating a “racially homogenous” tech workforce, building machines with bias baked into their algorithms.

Hurricane Radio in the British Virgin Islands
In 2017 Hurricane Irma caused catastrophic damage across the Caribbean. One of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes on record, 180mph winds battered the British Virgin Islands leaving a mammoth task for local search and rescue crews. Digital Planet reporter Jason Hosken investigates how, three years on, the territory now has emergency communication networks in place thanks to some pretty rudimentary broadcast technology.

The programme is presenter by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary by Angelica Mari

(Image: Getty Images)

Producer: Jackie Margerum
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nprdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5cy1b)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90npw4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8d7f8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3csz1y8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90npzx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt8rb4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8dc5d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jqy8dqbb)
Belarus's economic woes

Protests after a disputed election in Belarus come against a backdrop of economic woes. An opposition news website claims a general strike has started in protest at the election result, and Katsiaryna Shmatsina of the Belarusian Institute for Strategic Studies tells us if she's seen any evidence of such a strike in Minsk today. And we find out how the country's economy has developed since the fall of the Soviet Union, from Chris Weafer, chief executive of the economic consultancy Macro Advisory. Also in the programme, critics of make-up brands around the world say they don't cater enough for darker skin tones, and if they do, the products are often more expensive and harder to get hold of. Ruby Hammer is a make-up artist and adviser to the British Beauty Council, and discusses why cosmetic brands don't make more darker skin tones. And we get wider context from Padma Lakshmi, an Indian model living in the United States, and Lorraine Candy, editor of the Sunday Times Style Magazine. Plus, the live music industry has been devastated by the pandemic. But the UK's first socially-distant concert takes place today, at Newcastle Racecourse in north-east England, and Ali O'Reilly from concert organiser Virgin Money explains how it works.

(Picture: A protest in Minsk, Belarus. Picture credit: EPA.)



WEDNESDAY 12 AUGUST 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nq7d8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18w700hgh5)
US election new entry: Kamala Harris

After weeks of speculation, Joe Biden has picked his running mate for his presidential campaign - Kamala Harris. After 100 days of covid-transmission-free days, we'll hear what went wrong in New Zealand as it sees its first case in a long time. And the BBC's Vishala Sri-Pathma asks why women of colour are telling the beauty industry to shape up. We discuss all this with guests Nicole Childers, in LA, and executive producer on Marketplace on American national radio Los Angeles and Madhavan Narayanan, the journalist and writer from First Post in India, in Delhi

(Image: Sen. Kamala Harris in Washington, DC. Harris is the first African-American woman to announce a run for the White House in 2020. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nqc4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt93kj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8dqds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct0wpc)
The Senses

The senses: Hearing

From a whisper to the roar of thunder, every sound creates vibrations in our ears which the brain decodes, to tell us what we’re hearing. But as neurologist, Dr Guy Leschziner explains, when disruptions occur along the way, extraordinary things can happen, changing how we perceive the world.

We meet Mark, who can’t hear his friends in a noisy pub but can hear the sound of every bodily function amplified in his head.

Kelly gets spinning attacks that send her falling to the floor. The sensation lasts for hours and with every attack she loses hearing. She’s been told it’s Ménière's disease - an inner ear disorder that affects balance.

Keen bird-watcher Bill recognises his hearing loss when he can no longer pick out the call of the smallest birds, but can hear elaborate musical tunes when there’s nothing playing.

These astonishing cases show how tiny changes in our bodies can turn our understanding of the world upside down, leading us to question our own version of reality.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Kelly, who has been diagnosed with Ménière's disease Credit: BBC


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nqgwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nqlmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xt9c1s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8dyx1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz989)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nqqcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccbzqh)
Joe Biden chooses Senator Kamala Harris as running mate

It's the first time in US history that a presidential candidate has chosen a black woman to run as their Vice President.

We'll have the latest from Belarus -- the main opposition leader fled to Lithuania for her own safety but the demonstrations over Sunday's disputed election continue.

And it's been called one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the 20th century -- we'll speak to the author of a new book on the mysterious death in 1961 of United Nations Secretary General Dag Hammarskjöld.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nqv3x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccc3gm)
History made as Kamala Harris chosen as Joe Biden's running mate

The California Senator is the first black woman ever to be chosen to run on a presidential ticket.

We'll have the latest from Belarus where demonstrations continue into a third night after Sunday's disputed election.

And coronavirus is back in New Zealand - after more than a hundred days without a local infection. Its largest city is in lockdown.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nqyw1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccc76r)
Biden chooses Kamala Harris as running mate

The California Senator is the first black woman chosen to run as VP.

The main opposition leader in Belurus has fled to Lithuania for her own safety but the demonstrations over Sunday's disputed election continue.

And why a record number of migrants are risking their lives trying to cross the English Channel to get to the UK.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nr2m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6p)
Raoul Nehme: Can Lebanon be saved from collapse?

After the unimaginable horror of the mega blast which devastated Beirut the people of Lebanon are now forced to live with a zombie government - dead in all but name, not yet replaced. Stephen Sackur speaks to Raoul Nehme, still Lebanon's Minister of Economy and Trade until a new government can be formed. The outgoing Prime Minister blamed the catastrophic situation on deep rooted corruption. Is Lebanon a country beyond rescue?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8ffwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8mz)
US evictions crisis?

Millions of Americans face loss of benefits and eviction, threatening to push the US into a deepening recession, after Congress failed to extend the Cares Act.

Ed Butler speaks to Maryland resident Sifu about her eviction by an aggressive landlord, while Alieza Durana of the Eviction Lab at Princeton University explains the broader impact of the lapsing legislation on tenants throughout the country.

Michael Strain of the American Enterprise Institute think tank gives his free-market take on the effectiveness of the Cares Act and President Trump’s intervention to keep some level of benefits going. Plus Moody's chief economist Mark Zandi says the political deadlock in Washington risks economic depression.

(Picture: Banners against eviction in Washington DC; Credit: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszms0)
Beirut's Hotel War

At the start of the Lebanese Civil War in 1975, Beirut’s luxury hotel district was turned into a battlefield, with rival groups of gunmen holed up in some of the most expensive accommodation in the Middle East. In 2014, William Kremer spoke to two former employees of the Holiday Inn about what came to be known as the Battle of the Hotels.

Photo: The ruins of the Holiday Inn. (Credit: Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nr6c9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8fkmp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz989)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nrb3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0x1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nrfvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtb68p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8ft3y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1g)
Fighting talk: How language can make us better

When we talk about cancer it’s often hard to find the right words. As we search for the perfect thing to say, we find ourselves reaching for familiar metaphors; the inspiring people fighting or battling their cancer.

Cara Hoofe is currently in remission from Stage 3 bowel cancer, she says it would be easy for her to say she’s beaten cancer. Yet she’s still uncomfortable with the terminology. If she’s won her fight, does that mean others have lost?

In this programme Cara asks experts what impact these militaristic metaphors actually have on those living with cancer, and asks current and former patients what we should talk about when we talk about cancer.

(Photo: Cancer patient laughing as she talks with a nurse. Credit: Science Photo Library)


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nrklp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrq)
The barber saving lives one haircut at a time

When British barber Tom Chapman got his first hairdressing job his manager congratulated him and said "be prepared to be a psychiatrist and a therapist as well as a hairdresser". These words stuck with him when he lost a good friend to suicide. Tom decided to use his barber's chair to get men to open up about their problems. He set up the Lions Barbers Collective, which runs Barber Talk training for barbers all over the world.

American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker, also known as Mrs Comet, once held the record for discovering the most comets. And when she looks to space it has an even deeper meaning for her, as her husband was the only person to be 'buried' on the moon. Saskia Edwards hears her story.

He may have to train in hotel swimming pools and in the sea, but Hollingsword Wolul from Vanuatu tells reporter Aaron Kearney how he is hoping to become the first swimmer to represent his country at the Olympics.

Picture: Tom Chapman
Credit: Tom Chapman


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszms0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nrpbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtbfry)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8g1m6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz989)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nrt2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5fzqj)
Hong Kong pro-democracy media tycoon released from detention

We speak to Jimmy Lai, the Hong Kong media tycoon and pro-democracy activist, the day after his release from detention under the city's new security law.

Also in the programme: The US Senator Kamala Harris - the daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants - has been chosen by Joe Biden to be his vice-presidential running mate. British archaeologists have discovered bone tools used by an early human population about half a million years ago.

(Photo: Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai leaves a police station, surrounded by photographers, after being released on bail. Credit: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nrxv2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8g93g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxdzzqhpjn)
UK in recession for first time in 11 years

The UK has suffered its biggest slump on record, under "unprecedented" conditions. We find out how business is going from Sarah Davis, director of a wedding venue, and Rob Brown, managing director of a company exporting specialist industrial lubricants to more than 90 countries. And we get wider context from Simon French, chief economist at Panmure Gordon. Also in the programme, millions of Americans face loss of benefits and eviction, after Congress failed to extend the CARES Act. The economic and human repercussions could be devastating, as the BBC's Ed Butler reports. Plus, adverts that track consumer behaviour through mobile phones could soon be coming to a billboard in Europe near you, as William Eccleshare, chief executive of advertising company Clear Channel, explains.

(Picture: A closing down sign. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ns1l6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8gdvl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ns5bb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sx35kbjd5)
Kamala Harris: How much does her heritage matter?

News that Joe Biden has picked Kamala Harris as his vice-presidential candidate has generated a big conversation about Harris's ancestry and identity. She's the daughter of an Indian-born mother and Jamaican-born father and has been described as black, African-American, American-Indian and biracial. But how do people who share Harris' identity feel about her nomination? We speak to people across the world to find out.

Also, in Lebanon anger against the government and wider political system continues after last week's explosion. Over 200 people were killed and hundreds of thousands left homeless. We speak to one man who has been on the frontline of the protests.

And we will continue to follow the oil spill off the coast of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. Thousands of volunteers are taking part in the clean-up operation whilst authorities attempt to pump the remaining oil from the ship. We hear from one of the volunteers.

(Photo: Vice-presidential candidate Kamala Harris with her running mate Joe Biden. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ns92g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszms0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nsdtl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtc57q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8gs2z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jn77k3d8m)
2020/08/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nsjkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8gwv3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc6)
Women’s reproductive rights threatened by Covid

The Covid-19 pandemic is threatening to undermine 20 years of progress in improving women’s reproductive health and rights around the world, according to the Guttmacher Institute in New York. The Institute’s president Herminia Palacio explains the threats to Claudia Hammond, and also the benefits to female and child health of expanding the provision of modern contraception methods to the millions of women whose needs are currently not met.

The BBC News Global Health Correspondent Naomi Grimley updates Claudia on the latest figures and developments in the coronavirus pandemic.

Marijke Peters reports on the London medical student Malone Mukwende who is campaigning to improve the UK medical profession’s knowledge and appreciation of how different conditions manifest differently between different ethnic groups. It began when he found that his medical text books only described the appearance of skin diseases on white skin.

Claudia’s guest this week is Boston University epidemiologist Professor Matthew Fox who talks about a rare epidemiological study on the risks of catching the coronavirus on flights, how the pandemic may undermine malaria control in sub Saharan Africa and a drug that may prevent influenza spreading in families.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
Editor: Deborah Cohen

(Picture: A doctor shows women an IUD while educating them about their reproductive health and family planning options at a mobile clinic in Besakoa, Madagascar. Photo credit: Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nsn9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5gtyf)
Kamala Harris joins Joe Biden in Delaware

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and Kamala Harris made their first joint appearance as running mates in Delaware. Mr Biden formally introduced Ms Harris as his choice for vice-president. Also: Islamists militants in Mozambique with links to so-called Islamic State have seized control of an important port city in the north of the country, and there’s been widespread condemnation in India after the physical attack on three journalists.

(Democratic presidential candidate Biden and vice presidential candidate Harris hold first joint campaign appearance as a ticket in Wilmington, Delaware Credit: Reuters/Carlos Barria)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nss1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8h4bc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nswt3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtcn77)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8h82h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jqy8hm7f)
UK in recession for first time in 11 years

The UK has suffered its biggest slump on record, under "unprecedented" conditions. We find out how business is going from Sarah Davis, director of a wedding venue, and Rob Brown, managing director of a company exporting specialist industrial lubricants to more than 90 countries. And we get wider context from Simon French, chief economist at Panmure Gordon. Also in the programme, millions of Americans face loss of benefits and eviction, after Congress failed to extend the CARES Act. The economic and human repercussions could be devastating, as the BBC's Ed Butler reports. Plus, adverts that track consumer behaviour through mobile phones could soon be coming to a billboard in Europe near you, as William Eccleshare, chief executive of advertising company Clear Channel, explains.

(Picture: A closing down sign. Picture credit: EPA.)



THURSDAY 13 AUGUST 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nt49c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18w700lcd8)
UK in recession

The UK officially enters recession: shrinking by over 20% , one of the biggest slumps among advanced economies. We hear about smart adverts that know when you’re approaching, as the next frontier in consumer technology evolves. We also discuss the Republican supporter of the QAnon conspiracy theory who is poised to be elected to congress in November. We discuss all this with broadcasting analyst Ralph Silva, who is based in Toronto, and writer and consultant Rachel Cartland, who is based in Hong Kong.

(Image: Cash is pictured with a purse in England. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nt81h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtd0gm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8hm9w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6lf)
Milton Nkosi: The apartheid child who changed Africa’s story

As a child of Soweto, apartheid South Africa’s most notorious black township, Milton Nkosi could easily have become an embittered adult; in June 1976 he witnessed the Soweto uprising in which white police brutally suppressed protests by black schoolchildren, leading to many deaths. Yet, as apartheid began to collapse in the early 1990s, Milton found himself drawn into TV journalism; enabling him to question his former tormentors and helping viewers around the world to see the moral case for change. So began a career that took him from translator and fixer to producer and eventually, the head of bureau for the BBC’s news operation in South Africa, where he then sought to diversify coverage of a fast-changing continent.

As Milton explains in this conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, his humble beginnings turned out to be an asset: Among his childhood neighbours in Soweto were anti-apartheid activists including Nelson Mandela’s wife and children, many of whom would become valuable contacts. However, after the transition to democracy in 1994, Milton also had to ask uncomfortable questions of some of them, as claims of corruption emerged within the ANC government. Moral dilemmas such as this defined his working life: Is it even possible to be an impartial reporter when your subject might be a close associate? For Milton, the issues need to be seen in context. As he points out: “Nobody can ever justify apartheid based on the mistakes of the post-apartheid leaders”.

Produced by Michael Gallagher
Editor Bridget Harney

Image: (Milton Nkosi) Christian Parkinson


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ntcsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszms0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nthjr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtd7yw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8hvt4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ntm8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccfwml)
India records 46,000 deaths

With many doctors dying, we look at the impact on the medical profession.

In the US, Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden and his newly appointed running mate Kamala Harris, have addressed their first rally.

And a report on the women and children stuck in IS camps in Syria, where conditions are said to be appalling.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ntr10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccg0cq)
Covid-19: India becomes fourth worst affected country

46,000 people have now died of coronavirus in India - but is the worst over?

In Belarus, people detained for protesting against the disputed election are paraded on state TV.

And we hear from the couples who are trying reunite despite borders which have been closed because of Covid-19.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ntvs4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccg43v)
India now has fourth most Covid-19 deaths globally

46,000 India people have now died of the disease, including hundreds of health workers.

Officials in New Zealand are scrambling to find the source of 14 new Covid 19 cases after 100 days of the country being virus-free.

And we go to Beirut to try and assess the economic damage following last week's blast at the port. The President says it's an estimated fifteen billion dollars.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ntzj8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3s)
Will America’s 'Big Tech' firms be reined in?

US lawmakers are deciding whether to act against the country’s powerful tech giants. Some believe the likes of Facebook, Amazon, Google and Apple are stifling competition. The companies have made huge profits during the Covid crisis and critics believe they will use this cash to buy competitors.
With Charmaine Cozier.


Clockwise from top left: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook.
Getty Images


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8jbsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wt)
Does online networking work?

Conferences during Covid-19: Jane Wakefield explores the challenges that big international events have faced this year in moving events online.

She speaks to Paddy Cosgrave, chief executive of the giant technology event Web Summit, and Chris Anderson from TED. Plus social scientist Elizabeth Dunn explains why there is true “magic” in meeting face-to-face.

Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture: Woman on a laptop with a headache; Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmh)
Scoring a victory for women's rights in Turkey

In 2004 feminist campaigners in Turkey forced a radical change in the law on crimes against women. The overhaul of the country's 80-year-old penal code meant a redefinition of crimes such as rape and sexual assault; references to chastity, honour and virginity were also removed from the legislation. It was a major victory for a group of women who had been pressing for reform for years and was also one of the conditions for Turkey's accession talks with the European Union. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to Pinar Ilkkaracan, who led the successful campaign for legal change.

(PHOTO: TARIK TINAZAY/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nv38d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6lf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8jgjs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nv70j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvr)
Ray Bradbury, a master of science fiction

”People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it.” Ray Bradbury has been acclaimed as the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream but, as the quote above shows, he regarded himself as the author of modern philosophical fables, rather than a sci-fi writer. In his dystopian works, such as Fahrenheit 451, he holds up a mirror to contemporary society and then transposes it into fantastical and futuristic scenarios. Bradbury was a prolific writer who tried his hand at everything from poems and novels to TV and radio scripts but it’s his early short stories which he produced in his twenties that are perhaps the most imaginative.

To mark the centenary of Bradbury’s birth, Rajan Datar is joined by three Bradbury experts to help him navigate through the author’s prodigious output:
Professor Jonathan Eller from Indiana University who is also the Director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies;
Dr. Miranda Corcoran who teaches American literature at University College Cork with particular interest in science fiction, horror and the gothic;
and Dr. Phil Nichols who combines research into Bradbury's TV and other media work with the teaching of Film and Television Production at Wolverhampton University.

(Photo: Ray Bradbury in Los Angeles, circa 1980. Credit Michael Montfort/Pix/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh57)
Tears of a weightlifter

In August 2008, the weightlifter Matthias Steiner created one of the most emotional moments of the 2008 Olympics when he sank to the floor in floods of tears after winning a gold medal. Steiner had lost his wife in a car accident shortly before the games and dedicated the victory to her. He had to lift eight kilos more than his previous personal best in order to win. Matthias Steiner talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Matthias Steiner taking gold (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nvbrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtf35s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8jq11)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq7)
Meatpacking's coronavirus problem

Meatpacking plants around the world are quickly becoming hotspots for Coronavirus outbreaks. In many rural parts of the United States, meat processing factories have now become the main source of Covid-19 infections. But why are other food factories not experiencing the same problem? And why is the US so adversely affected?

Tamasin Ford takes a look at the unique conditions at meat processing factories that enable the virus to thrive and how the outbreaks have revealed some of the gruelling working conditions facing many workers around the world.

In Denmark, Europe’s largest pig processor, we explore whether artificial intelligence and the use of robots could help prevent future outbreaks, or whether it’s simply about providing better working conditions for people working in the factories.

If you'd like to get in touch with the team, please email thefoochain@bbc.co.uk.

(Picture: A man cuts meat for sausage. Credit: Lev Fedoseyev/TASS via Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nvghs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdb5)
The narcotics cop and a daughter hooked on heroin

Kevin Simmers devoted his life to the war on drugs as a narcotics officer in Maryland in the US. He spent years sending dealers and users to prison. But when his own teenage daughter got addicted to heroin, he faced a heart-breaking dilemma. He tells Outlook's Jo Fidgen his story and how last year he opened a rehab facility - named Brooke's House after his daughter - to help young women caught up in the opiate crisis.

The Recycled Orchestra run by Favio Chavez, began as a safe haven for kids living in Paraguay's Cateura slum. Playing instruments made from the trash thrown away at the local landfill site, teenagers who once only knew the streets around their homes now travel across the world performing with bands like Megadeth, Metallica and Stevie Wonder. Outlook's Clayton Conn reports.

Picture: Kevin Simmers with his daughter Brooke
Credit: Courtesy of Kevin Simmers


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nvl7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtfbp1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8jyj9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nvq01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5jwmm)
Detained in Belarus

Natalia Denisova, a lawyer in Belarus, speaks about her detention after Sunday's election. Meanwhile, protests opposing the re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko have continued in the capital, Minsk. Protestors allege there was widespread vote-rigging after Mr Lukashenko won 80% of Sunday's vote.

Also in the programme: Coronavirus deaths rise sharply in India; and has the pandemic curbed China's appetite for eating exotic wildlife?

(Picture: People take part in a demonstration in Minsk, Belarus. Credit: REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nvtr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6lf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8k60k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvs3jj6zl5)
US holds off on tariff hike in EU Airbus fight

The US will keep tariffs on $7.5bn worth of items including French cheese and whiskies. Giorgio Leali is trade reporter for Politico Europe, and has been following the dispute. And Alice O'Donovan is from Eucolait, which represents many of Europe's dairy companies, and describes the impact on Irish butter producers. Also in the programme, tourism businesses have written to the leaders of the G7 largest industrialised economies to ask for international co-operation to save the industry. Tom Jenkins is from the European Tour Operators Association, and tells us how much bookings are down by. The conference industry has also been heavily hit by the coronavirus pandemic, and the BBC's Jane Wakefield explores whether the idea of virtual conferences will offer a lifeline to the sector. Plus, with theatre on Broadway in New York shut down until 2021, we hear about the implications for the performers, set designers, stage managers and others who contribute to live productions.

(Picture: French camembert cheese. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nvyh9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8k9rp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nw27f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sx35kff98)
Coronavirus conversations: Covid-19 'long-haulers'

We hear a conversation between people who are yet to fully recover after having Covid-19. Months later they are still suffering debilitating symptoms due to the virus. They are known as Covid 'long-haulers'.

India now has the fourth-highest number of deaths as a result of Covid-19, according to official data. The country has recorded more than 47,000 fatalities. We hear from a doctor working with patients in Mumbai on the challenges he faces in trying to contain the virus.

And protests are continuing for a fifth day in Belarus against the disputed re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko. We hear the latest amid the violent crackdown by the security forces.

(Photo: Freya Sawbridge Credit: Andrew Dickie)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nw5zk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nw9qp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtg24t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8kp02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jn77k695q)
2020/08/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nwfgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6lf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8ksr6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0q)
Putin’s Covid-19 vaccine

Russia’s President Putin announced the registration of a vaccine for coronavirus. This was reported with widespread alarm amid concerns over safety, but as BBC Russian Service’s Sergei Goryashko, tells us the announcement was a political move to capture the headlines.

Investigations by Alexandra Reynolds and Hooman Poor at New York’s Mount Sinai Medical Centre have revealed why some Covid 19 patients have low oxygen levels, but don’t have breathing difficulties. The answer came when looking for signs of stroke in the brain.

Nisreen Alwan, a specialist in public health at Southampton University is concerned about the quality of life of people who have had a Covid -19 infection. Being classed as recovered is not enough she says and we need to look more at recurring health problems associated with the disease.

And Cardiff University’s Haley Gomez has news of a tantalising discovery. The detection of a neutron star hidden in a dust cloud for more than 30 years.

(Image:President Putin. Credit: Reuters)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nwk6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5kqvj)
UAE to become first Gulf state to recognise Israel

The United Arab Emirates is to become the first Gulf state to recognise Israel in return for the Jewish state's agreeing to freeze its plans to annex much of the occupied West Bank. Bahrain has indicated it may follow suit. The UAE becomes only the third Arab country to recognise Israel after Egypt and Jordan.

Also in the programme: Lebanon's cabinet declares a two-week state of emergency in Beirut and hands control of security in the capital to the military; and workers at some state-owned factories walking out in Belarus as protests continue at the disputed re-election of President Alexander Lukashenko.

(Photo: US President Donald Trump announces a peace agreement to establish diplomatic ties between Israel and the UAE at the White House on 13 August 2020. Credit: EPA/Doug Mills)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nwnz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8l17g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nwsq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtgk4b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8l4zl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jqy8lj4j)
US holds off on tariff hike in EU Airbus fight

The US will keep tariffs on $7.5bn worth of items including French cheese and whiskies. Giorgio Leali is trade reporter for Politico Europe, and has been following the dispute. And Alice O'Donovan is from Eucolait, which represents many of Europe's dairy companies, and describes the impact on Irish butter producers. Also in the programme, tourism businesses have written to the leaders of the G7 largest industrialised economies to ask for international co-operation to save the industry. Tom Jenkins is from the European Tour Operators Association, and tells us how much bookings are down by. The conference industry has also been heavily hit by the coronavirus pandemic, and the BBC's Jane Wakefield explores whether the idea of virtual conferences will offer a lifeline to the sector. Plus, with theatre on Broadway in New York shut down until 2021, we hear about the implications for the performers, set designers, stage managers and others who contribute to live productions.

(Picture: French camembert cheese. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 14 AUGUST 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nx16g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18w700p89c)
US unemployment hits parents hardest

We asses why having kids means you are more likely to be jobless during the pandemic in the United States. The British government puts in place new quarantine rules for people coming into the country from a number of countries, including France and the Netherlands. And we will be talking about 'mansplaining': why is it still such a problem? Rahul Tandon is joined by Kimberly Adams - correspondent for Marketplace in Washington, and Jyoti Malhotra Editor, National & Strategic Affairs, The Print website.

(Image: A man wipes his eyes as he uses a computer to fill out paperwork for unemployment insurance. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nx4yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtgxcq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8lj6z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1h)
Zoroastrianism and death

By day Dr Jamasp JamaspAsa, works in the UK as a cancer surgeon, but now, due to the passing of his father he has a new role, the High Priest of the Zoroastrian faith in a Mumbai Fire Temple.

Lipika Pelham meets the High Priest as Zoroastrians, or Parsees, celebrate the most auspicious days in their calendar. The “All Souls Festival” is when they believe ancestors visit them. She is curious whether his medical skills as a doctor make him a 'holy warrior', fighting to stop the work of evil, by keeping his patients alive.

Far from being just a sombre memorial of the dead, “Mukhtad” is a festive occasion. With a feast of consecrated food, flowers, and lamps that are constantly kept alight, Zoroastrians welcome the “farohars”, the spirits of dead relatives, who come to help the living to celebrate life, which is the work of God, against the evils of death.

Lipika will explore the faith’s most distinguishing feature, which is the religious duty of every Zoroastrian to prolong and focus on life, even at the time of death.

Producer and Presenter: Lipika Pelham


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nx8pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nxdfv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xth4vz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8lrq7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nxj5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccjsjp)
Israel and UAE strike historic peace deal

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu calls it a historic day- but was does it really mean?

In Belarus, as the President clings to power...we hear of reports of mass detentions and beatings.

And the Hong Kong media tycoon, Jimmy Lai, has warned the territory cannot survive as a financial centre without the rule of law.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nxmy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfccjx8t)
President Trump announces historic Israel/UAE deal

The UAE will become only the third Arab country to normalise diplomatic relations with Israel.

In Belarus there are numerous accounts of people being beaten up on the streets and in the police stations. We hear from one family in Minsk who faced a harrowing experience.

And as Mexico passes half a million cases of coronavirus, we hear from an infectious diseases doctor there about how all sections of society are affected.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nxrp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wcfcck10y)
Who gains most from Israel/UAE deal?

President Trump announced the surprise deal normalising relations in the Oval Office.

In Belarus they've been releasing people detained in election protests. We hear from a 16 year old who says he was held overnight and beaten by the security forces - and to an MEP about what happens next.

And we meet a couple left homeless by last week's devastating explosion in Beirut.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nxwfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxn)
Nikol Pashinyan: Peace for Armenia and Azerbaijan?

One of the worlds most strategically sensitive conflict zones heated up dramatically last month when Armenian and Azerbaijani forces engaged in fighting which cost 17 lives. It is the latest twist in the long struggle over the disputed territory of Nagorno Karabakh and it prompted warnings from Moscow and Washington. Stephen Sackur speaks to Armenia’s Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan. He swept to power promising reform, so how come Armenia seems preoccupied with fighting old battles?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8m7pr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78n)
Destruction and corruption in Beirut

The businesses hoping to rebuild after Beirut's port explosion. Tamasin Ford speaks to Aline Kamakian, whose restaurant and office were both destroyed in the disaster, and to Joumana Saddi Chaya, managing partner at PSLab, a design company, who was also caught in the blast. Julien Courson, head of the Lebanese Transparency Association, explains why corruption remains such a persistent problem in Lebanese life and business, before and after the disaster. The BBC's diplomatic correspondent Paul Adams tells us the strange tale of the ship that delivered the explosive cargo to Beirut's port, and the failures that allowed it to stay there for so long.

Producer: Edwin Lane

(Photo: Smoke rises above wrecked buildings at Beirut's port a day after the devastating explosion. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv8)
The invention of the modern ventilator

In August 1952, the Blegdam Hospital in the Danish capital Copenhagen was overwhelmed by hundreds of seriously ill polio patients. During the first weeks of the epidemic over 80 percent of the patients died, most within days of admission. The patients, who were mostly children, were dying of respiratory failure. Desperate for a solution an anaesthetist, Bjørn Iben, came up with a strategy that led to today’s ventilators and revolutionised medicine. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Anne Holton who was a medical student at the time of the polio epidemic and helped treat patients.

Photo A medical student in Denmark 1952 treating a polio patient in Blegdam Hospital, Copenhagen. Credit used with permission of Jørgen Viby-Mogensen.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ny05h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp1)
Legal victory over facial recognition

The use of facial recognition in public by a UK police force was unlawful, says the Court of Appeal. Plus how a new global policy network aims to help reign in the power of big technology firms. And China’s Xinhua dictionary gains a raft of tech terms. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of a British police officer standing in front of a crowd. Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8mcfw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ny3xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn8)
How democratic are American elections?

The US presidential election campaign is gathering steam, with the Democratic Party convention beginning next week. November's election in the United States will be taking place at a time when the country is going through unprecedented social and economic upheavals. The incumbent Donald Trump is pitted against the former vice president Joe Biden. It is not just the presidency that's at stake, voters will be electing a third of the senate, an entirely new house of representatives, and thirteen governors. More than 160,000 Americans have lost their lives to the Covid-19 pandemic. The economy is in recession. Thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets demanding social justice. With the uncertainty of the coronavirus, there is no clear consensus on the way polling stations can ensure the safety of voters. While mass postal voting is being held up as a solution, many - including President Trump - argue that mail-in ballots will increase fraud and cause unnecessary delays. Others say various forms of voter suppression are already undermining the integrity of the vote. So as the first major election in the middle of a pandemic, how credible will the results in November be? How are allegations of voter suppression being addressed? And what will the candidates do if vote counting becomes a drawn out process? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss whether American democracy is fit to handle the events the country finds itself in.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90ny7nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtj02w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8mly4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgd)
How to run a football club during a pandemic

Lille owner Gerard Lopez gives an insight into the challenges of running a football club and outlines his vision for how to compete with Europe's biggest teams. We also hear from a history-making African coach, as he prepares his team for the European Champions League. Presented by John Bennett, Pat Nevin and Alicia Ferguson.

Picture: The owner of Lille Gerard Lopez during a team presentation prior to a pre-season friendly in France (Photo by Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nycdw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhd)
Beirut: after the explosion

Last week's catastrophic explosion in Beirut devastated the port area and left at least 170 dead, thousands injured, and many more homeless. It's a painful time for our journalists who come from Beirut - in both BBC Arabic and BBC Monitoring. We hear the reflections of Nahed Najjar, Nisrine Hatoum, Hesham Shawish, Nidale Abou Mrad and Julien Hajj.

The dream of Gran Colombia
Gran Colombia was a vast country which included the modern nations of Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela and Colombia. It was born in 1819, the dream of Simon Bolivar, hero of the revolutionary wars that liberated Spanish America. Ana Maria Roura has been researching the history and legacy of Gran Colombia for BBC Mundo.

Pakistan's Siddi community
The Black Lives Matter movement has prompted questions in Pakistan about the Siddi, or Sheedi, community, brought there from African countries centuries ago as soldiers or slaves. Saher Baloch has reported the story for BBC Urdu.

Belarus: understanding the anger
Belarus has been gripped by protests ever since President Alexander Lukashenko declared a landslide victory in last week's election. Yana Lyushnevskaya of BBC Monitoring tells us more about the cause of the anger, and explains the long grip on power of the man widely referred to as Europe's last dictator.

Picture: Burning grain silos in the port of Beirut.
Credit: AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nyh50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtj7l4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8mvfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nylx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5msjq)
Afghan government releases Taliban prisoners

Four hundred Taliban prisoners have been released to meet conditions for peace talks. How dangerous are these men? And does peace now have a chance. We hear from the experts.

Also in the programme: the maker of the cult online game Fortnite sues Apple for alleged unfair practices; and more than a week after the devastating blast in Beirut, a look at the city's scarred architectural heritage.

(Photo: Taliban prisoners released from Kabul jail. Credit: EPA/Afghanistan National Security Council handout)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nyqn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8n2xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt4729y8mp)
Oil tanker pollution threatens Mauritius

An oil spill off Mauritius threatens one of the world's most biodiverse marine ecosystems. Happy Khambule is Greenpeace Africa's Climate and Energy Campaign Manager, and discusses the implications. Bloomberg's oil analyst Julian Lee explains why the MV Wakashio was so close to Mauritius in the first place. And Navin Ramgoolam, current opposition leader and former prime minister of Mauritius gives us his reaction. Also in the programme, the chief executive of food delivery service Just Eat, Jitse Groen, tells us why he wants to transition those that deliver food for the firm away from being gig workers towards becoming employees on staff contracts with more benefits. We hear from the BBC's Arunoday Mukharji in Delhi why new rules mean electric cars can now be sold without batteries, which could slash the cost by up to a third. Plus, we find out why Apple and Google have removed the popular game Fortnite from their smartphone app stores, from Shona Ghosh, UK technology editor of Business Insider.

(Picture: An oil spill by the MV Wakashio. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nyvdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8n6ns)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztgd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nyz4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sx35kjb6c)
Belarus protests: Thousands gather in the capital

Thousands of protesters have gathered in the centre of the Belarusian capital Minsk to demand the resignation of President Alexander Lukashenko -- five days after his disputed re-election. We spek to our reporter about the claims of protesters being abused in prisons. We also hear from protesters and play a conversation from one Belarusian family.

We have received a lot of reaction after the conversation we had with three Covid-19 “long haulers”. They spoke of the debilitating symptoms they are experiencing after recovering from Covid-19. We have an expert to help with questions and concerns some listeners have sent us.

(Photo: Belarusians attend a rally in Minsk, Belarus, 14 August 2020. Credit: YAUHEN YERCHAK/EPA)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nz2wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nz6ms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtjz1x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8nkx5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jn77k962t)
2020/08/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nzbcx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8npn9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv61)
What is the point of slime?

Squelching into the science of slime, Chhavi Sachdev seeks to find out why it took so long for listener Helen Tyson to remove slime from her fingers, after she picked up a tiny slug while gardening.

This unfortunate and hugely repulsive experience set Helen to wonder what it is about the structure of slug slime that makes it gloopy, so she sent Chhavi to meet with slug slime expert Professor Andrew Smith who reveals how the complex molecular structure of this pervasive fluid makes it so difficult to scrub off.

Slime is used by all sorts of creatures including the Giant African Land snail, which invaded India by hitching a ride on imported timber. But invasive species biologist Dr TV Sajeev reveals that these snails are themselves giving a lift to another meningitis-causing parasite that can infect people. Chhavi looks for these massive molluscs in her own garden in Mumbai.

Marine biologist Helen Scales describes how animals can use slime for catching food, mating, defence, or even transportation, and Chhavi speaks with Dr Adam Celiz who has been inspired by this slimy adaptability to create a tool that can provide new cells to replace damaged heart cells after a cardiac arrest.

Slugs, snails and even fish keep a variety of useful chemicals in their slime. Some make them taste bitter, and others numb the mouth of predators, but they may also prevent the animals from contracting infections. Dr Sarah Pitt has investigated these compounds in the slimy mucus of a garden snail and discovered an antibiotic that is brand new to science.

Slime is pretty disgusting, but it’s also completely fascinating.

Presented by Chhavi Sachdev
Produced by Rory Galloway

(Photo: Slugs Mating. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nzg41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytrk5nmrm)
Weekend of protests begins across Belarus

President Alexander Lukashenko faces growing defiance from the Belarussian people six days after the presidential vote. The opposition leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya calls for peaceful rallies across the country, after she was forced to leave for Lithuania in the wake of a disputed election.

Also on the programme: We go to Japan on the 75 year anniversary of the end of the second world war; and we hear from two survivors of the Beirut explosion which killed more than 170 people.

(Image: A demonstrator holds the historical white-red-white flag of Belarus during an opposition demonstration to protest against police violence and to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on 14 August 2020. Credit: Reuters/Fedosenko)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nzkw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8ny4k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5ny90nzpm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b98xtkg1f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prqr8p1wp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jqy8pf1m)
Oil tanker pollution threatens Mauritius

An oil spill off Mauritius threatens one of the world's most biodiverse marine ecosystems. Happy Khambule is Greenpeace Africa's Climate and Energy Campaign Manager, and discusses the implications. Bloomberg's oil analyst Julian Lee explains why the MV Wakashio was so close to Mauritius in the first place. And Navin Ramgoolam, current opposition leader and former prime minister of Mauritius gives us his reaction. Also in the programme, the chief executive of food delivery service Just Eat, Jitse Groen, tells us why he wants to transition those that deliver food for the firm away from being gig workers towards becoming employees on staff contracts with more benefits. We hear from the BBC's Arunoday Mukharji in Delhi why new rules mean electric cars can now be sold without batteries, which could slash the cost by up to a third. Plus, we find out why Apple and Google have removed the popular game Fortnite from their smartphone app stores, from Shona Ghosh, UK technology editor of Business Insider.

(Picture: An oil spill by the MV Wakashio. Picture credit: EPA.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 06:06 SUN (w3csz6ld)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6lf)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6lf)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6lf)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6lf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyx8j7)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyxmrm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyy000)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyy3r4)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyyc7d)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyz6g9)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyzpft)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5prcgyzt5y)

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BBC OS Conversations 07:06 SUN (w3ct0wjt)

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BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2sx35k4qkz)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jn)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89p)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8mz)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wt)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78n)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18vvqq00lm)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18w700dkl2)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18w700hgh5)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18w700lcd8)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18w700p89c)

Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snw)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv60)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv60)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv60)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv61)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz989)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz989)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz989)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz989)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3csz9dt)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3csz9dt)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3csz9dt)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3csz9dt)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pt)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pt)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pt)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc25)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc25)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3cszc25)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6p)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6p)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3cszc6p)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxn)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxn)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc6)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcc6)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcc6)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcc6)

Heart and Soul 06:32 SUN (w3ct0x1b)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0x1b)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SUN (w3ct0x1b)

Heart and Soul 02:32 FRI (w3ct0x1h)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3csz1y8)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3csz1y8)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3csz1y8)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 05:50 SAT (w3ct0whp)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 18:50 SAT (w3ct0whp)

More or Less 23:50 SAT (w3ct0pxn)

More or Less 02:50 MON (w3ct0pxn)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxn)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6t5)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6t5)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wcfcc55x9)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wcfcc59nf)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wcfcc5fdk)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wcfcc82td)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wcfcc86kj)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172x2wcfcc8b9n)

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Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wcfccc3gm)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wcfccc76r)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2wcfccfwml)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wcfccg0cq)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wcfccg43v)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wcfccjsjp)

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Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2ytd8vyf2v)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2ytd8vzd1w)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2ytd8w19zy)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2ytd8w28yz)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2ytrk585xb)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2ytrk59147)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2ytrk5c2tf)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2ytrk5cy1b)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2ytrk5fzqj)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2ytrk5gtyf)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2ytrk5nmrm)

Outlook 22:32 SAT (w3cszf03)

Outlook 10:32 SUN (w3cszf03)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd3d)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd3d)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3cszd3d)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3cszdjy)

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Outlook 12:06 WED (w3cszdrq)

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Outlook 03:06 THU (w3cszdrq)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdb5)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3cszdb5)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdb5)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4m)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4m)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1g)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1g)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3cszv1g)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0q)

Science in Action 04:32 FRI (w3cszh0q)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0q)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh0q)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jn77jxlgf)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jn77k0hcj)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jn77k3d8m)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jn77k695q)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jn77k962t)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh56)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh57)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bwrw0rp0l)

Sportsworld 15:06 SAT (w172x3l8rffz0lv)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l8rfg2182)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjh)

Tech Tent 01:06 SUN (w3cszhp0)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhp1)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhp1)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3cszhp1)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk34)

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The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3csxfjq)

The Big Idea 15:50 SUN (w3csxfjq)

The Big Idea 22:50 SUN (w3csxfjq)

The Compass 08:06 SUN (w3ct0wpb)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct0wpc)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct0wpc)

The Compass 15:06 WED (w3ct0wpc)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct0wpc)

The Conversation 07:32 SUN (p03tknqh)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3csvs2b)

The Conversation 16:32 MON (w3csvs2b)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3csvs2b)

The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8l)

The Cultural Frontline 09:32 SUN (w3cszj8l)

The Cultural Frontline 22:06 SUN (w3cszj8l)

The Documentary 06:06 SAT (w3ct03ck)

The Documentary 08:32 SAT (w3ct0x1m)

The Documentary 11:32 SAT (w3ct0wp8)

The Documentary 14:06 SAT (w3ct0wzj)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct0wzj)

The Documentary 01:32 SUN (w3ct0x1m)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct0x1c)

The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct0wzj)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct0x1c)

The Documentary 17:32 SUN (w3ct0x1m)

The Documentary 18:06 SUN (w3ct03ck)

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The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct0x1d)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct0x1d)

The Documentary 15:06 TUE (w3ct0x1d)

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The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct0x1g)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjhc)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq6)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3cszjq7)

The Food Chain 16:32 THU (w3cszjq7)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3cszjq7)

The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvq)

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