Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 AUGUST 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1fmww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vhgd6vzs)
Melbourne lockdown special

As the citizens of Melbourne hunker down for another lockdown, we ask how Australia's second city is dealing with renewed restrictions. We speak to the Lord Mayor of Melbourne, Sally Capp who takes us back to the beginning of the crisis, when Covid-19 first arrived in Australia. We also talk to award-winning producer/director Emma Watts, who's been working throughout the Covis-19 crisis on a documentary series called Diary from the Frontline. Plus, we hear from radio presenter Henry Wagons, musician Elissa Goodrich and DJ Miss Farina. And we're joined throughout the programme by Karen Percy, senior multi-platform journalist at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Melbourne. (Picture of Flinders Street Station by Darrian Traynor via Getty Images).


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1frn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd60j24)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n43xd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjg)
Super Broad and Super League

Alison Mitchell, Alister Nicholson and Charu Sharma reflect on the first bio-secure Test series between England and the West Indies, and pay homage to Stuart Broad after he takes his 500th Test wicket. And as one bio-bubble in Manchester finishes, another starts in Southampton ahead of the launch of the inaugural 50-over Super League. We're joined by stand-in England head coach Paul Collingwood as his World Champions take on Ireland in a three-match ODI series.

Image: England's Stuart Broad celebrates taking the wicket of West Indies' Kraigg Brathwaite, his 500th Test wicket, on the final day of the third Test cricket match (Credit: Photo by MARTIN RICKETT/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1fwd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhb)
The Kenyan clan branded 'evil'

The BBC’s Anne Soy has been to her birthplace, Kenya’s Great Rift Valley, to meet members of the Talai clan, who have been feared and shunned since colonial times. When the Talai resisted British settlers more than a century ago, they were punished and branded ‘evil’, a slur that left them impoverished and marginalised, and still persists today.

Afghan etiquette - what's in a title?
BBC Pashto's Payenda Sargand has been putting the spotlight on the importance of titles in Afghan society. Why is it more important to know a person’s title than their name, and what happens if you get it wrong? He’s been sharing his discoveries with presenter Faranak Amidi.

My Home Town: Snezhinsk, Russia
Ksenia Idrisova of BBC Russian takes us to her hometown of Snezhinsk in the Ural mountains of Russia, a town so secret in her childhood that it wasn’t even shown on maps.

Covid-19 in Bishkek
This month Kyrgyzstan experienced a surge in coronavirus cases which quickly overwhelmed the health service, and triggered an extraordinary volunteer response. BBC Kyrgyz has been reporting on their work, and living the story: several of the team also became sick despite working from home, including Almaz Tchoroev, happily back to full health now.

A diplomatic close shave
The US ambassador to South Korea, Harry Harris, recently shaved off his moustache. Quite why this made the news is explained by BBC Korean's Julie Yoonnyung Lee, and dates back to the era of Japanese colonial rule when moustaches were favoured by Japanese military leaders. So did he bow to diplomatic pressure, or was it a decision dictated by the weather, as he suggests?

Image: Members of Talai clan on tractor
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv6)
The death of Heinrich Himmler

One of Hitler's most important henchmen was caught by British troops in the chaos of post-war Germany just after WW2 had ended in Europe. A British soldier described to the BBC how the leading Nazi bit down on a cyanide capsule and died. Gordon Corera has been listening to the archive account of Himmler's death, and finding out more about the situation in Germany immediately after its surrender to the Allies.

Photo: Heinrich Himmler in 1939. Credit: Central Press/Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1g048)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn6)
Fighting fat to fight Covid-19

Experts have warned that being obese or overweight puts you at greater risk of serious illness or death from Covid-19. One study suggests the chances of dying from the coronavirus are 90% higher in those who are severely obese. This week British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced sweeping plans to shrink waistlines, saying the virus had been a “wake-up call” on an issue that threatened public health even before the pandemic. According to the World Health Organisation obesity has nearly tripled worldwide since 1975 and is becoming an increasing problem in developing economies. Meanwhile Asian and black populations have been found to have a higher risk of diabetes and heart disease, conditions exacerbated by carrying excess weight. New measures in England include a ban on ‘buy one get one free’ deals, new curbs on the advertising of junk food, and a review of labelling on food and drinks sold in shops. But how much of an impact have these policies made when introduced elsewhere? Governments are increasingly introducing taxes on foods high in sugar in the hope of changing consumer behaviour and encouraging manufacturers to make their products healthier. But do such measures work? And how important is exercise in tackling the global obesity crisis? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss whether fighting fat can help curb the coronavirus.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1g3wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd60w9j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n4h4s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvs1)
Why do some influencers back bad products?

If you're on Instagram, you'll have seen influencers promoting all sorts of products - from gadgets to clothes or food. But can you really trust their recommendations?

A BBC investigation found a number of top influencers pushing products that are fake and poor quality.

There’s no evidence to suggest these social media stars knew they were openly promoting questionable brands and companies. And yet, many customers say the only reason why they bought these products was because influencers suggested they ought to.

So should social media stars be held accountable for the promotional deals they make? We explore the dark underbelly of influencer marketing.

Presenter: Marco Silva
Reporter: Omar Mehtab
Additional production: Osman Iqbal

Picture caption: Stock photo of a social media influencer filming herself.
Picture credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whn)
Letter five

American culture is built on heroism. James Naughtie looks back at Lincoln, FDR and the Kennedys and examines what their legacies can tell us about the US election in 2020.


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1g7mj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvh0)
Caste bias in Silicon Valley: India's unwanted export

A landmark case against a tech giant in the US has made news recently. Regulators in the state of California sued IT firm Cisco for allegedly discriminating against an Indian-American employee on the basis of his caste. The company has denied the allegations.

Caste system, which is outlawed in India, is a social ranking practice, which determines the work you do, the religious practices you can follow and even the relationships you can have. Those at the bottom rung of the system are often referred to as ‘untouchables’. And with many Indians migrating to the US for better job opportunities, caste bias has become an uncomfortable reality there as well.

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we look at India’s unwanted export, and how Indians working in tech firms in the US feel discriminated against because of their caste.


Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Yashica Dutt, author - Coming out as Dalit; Thenmozhi Soundararajan, Dalit technologist, executive director, Equality Labs Dalit civil rights organization; Laurence Simon, professor of international development at Brandeis University focusing on caste and social exclusion

Photo:A protestor holds a placard in a protest against killing of Dalit low-caste youth in Nepall, June 2020 Credit: Getty Images


SAT 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n4lwx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj5)
Global Questions

Coronavirus: Will it Change Our Politics?

Has the Coronavirus crisis changed our view of politicians and what citizens now expect from them? Leaders around the world have dealt with the pandemic very differently, with some being praised for their handling of the outbreak, and some criticised. Is it time for a new social contract between people and their governments? Has there been too much division within nations, and the international community? As Covid-19 continues to rage, with persistently high death rates in many countries and leaving economic devastation in its wake, what do people now want from their leaders?


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1gccn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snv)
The Radical Plan To Tackle Mass Unemployment

It’s estimated that a quarter of a billion people could lose their jobs as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. On Business Weekly we ask whether governments need to rethink the way they deal with mass unemployment.

We also head to the salt flats of Bolivia to find out whether the untapped lithium reserves there will be a blessing or a curse for the South American country.

Plus, we’ll discover why you’ll need to bring a coat if you go out for coffee in France and find out why doctors are putting pictures of themselves in bikinis on social media.

Presented by Lucy Burton.

Photo: A man stands in front of the closed offices of the New York State Department of Labour (Credit: Getty Images).


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1gh3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9ps)
Australia’s blame game

From restrictions on hugging your grandmother or your elderly parents, for fear of infecting them, to wearing a face-mask in shops, few could have foreseen how coronavirus has turned our lives upside down. Above all, pandemics cause fear. That can breed misinformation or worsen existing divides as people look for someone to blame. In medieval Europe, Jews were often accused of starting the Black Death. Today, with coronavirus originating in China, some hold China or simply people of Chinese origin responsible for the pandemic – even in Australia, as Frances Mao reports.

We also journey to Laos, where, over a decade ago, a 46,000 year old human skull was found in a cave in the Annamite Mountains - the earliest example of modern human remains in the whole of South-eastern Asia. Archaeologists also found evidence that Laos was home to an agricultural civilisation dating back more than twenty thousand years. Now that agricultural heritage is under threat - not from the present but from the bitter harvest of the Vietnam war, as Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent reports.

And in Florida, along with Texas and Arizona, the so-called sunshine state is currently seeing one of the highest rates of Covid19 cases in the whole of the United States. But why are they struggling with it so much? Some doctors say that inconsistent messages about the virus mean residents are confused or even sceptical about the level of threat, something our correspondent Tamara Gil discovered for herself in Miami.

Finally we take you to France, where it’s sometimes said that the French first realized that they were French through their struggles with the English. After centuries of war and peace, the two nations continue to feel a certain ambivalence towards one another. The entente may be relatively cordiale these days, but fundamental differences remain in how the French and the English see, think and even speak about the world: reflected or perhaps even shaped by the very words we use. Our Paris correspondent Hugh Schofield has worked in France for almost half his life and has spent much of that time thinking about what his mother tongue and his adopted French language tell us about the way we see the world.

Contributors:
Frances Mao
Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent
Tamara Gil
Hugh Schofield

Presenter: Caroline Wyatt
Producer: Lizzy McNeill
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: A group wearing face masks in front of the Sydney Opera House. Credit Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n4vd5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3z)
My Indian Life

The Boy Who Dreamt of Space
Bollywood actress Kalki Koechlin presents tales of what it’s like to be young and Indian in the 21st Century.
“I want to be the first human on Mars,” says Gadhadar Reddy.
“If you say something audacious… then the universe finds a way to support us to make things happen.”

In the final episode of the series, Kalki speaks to tech entrepreneur Gadhadar Reddy about the unusual path he is pursuing to get to another planet.

Rather than join an existing space programme to become an astronaut, Gadhadar has taken a much more strategic approach.
He set up a company to produce the materials needed to build spacecraft capable of such a long journey – because without this, nobody is going to get to Mars.

Pretty much everyone in India’s space industry told him he was wasting his time – and yet over the past decade he’s been doing an impressive job of proving them all wrong.


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7j)
Resolves

Nino Redruello

Nino Redruello, a young chef in Madrid, resolves to support the city's recovery by cooking simple, local dishes and making them affordable and/or free to poorer communities, among which are the staff and farm workers who have supported his family restaurant business, La Ancha, for decades. His wealthier customers are all paying for the initiative.

“Madrid is on its knees; we all need to start again. Our food can at least give people nourishment and hope. Our local dishes are for the people and their families who have helped to make our restaurants successful for 100 years, and who need help now. We’re thinking about everything again, and this is how we start. We’re making healthy, affordable food, and we won’t stop.”

Photo: Nino Redruello


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1glvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd61c91)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n4z49)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl2)
United Zingdom

'British drag is slapdash and hodgepodge'

When RuPaul’s Drag Race launched in the UK last year, Zing noticed lots of fans saying the show made them feel strangely patriotic. The contestants were bawdy, slapdash, raucous, and not as earnest or polished as the queens of the original American series. This week Zing’s heading to Birmingham, home town of Drag Race star Sum Ting Wong. They discuss what makes British drag unique, compare stories of coming out to their Asian parents, and take a tour of Sum’s Brum.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4l)
The pros and cons of the immersive documentary

The immersive documentary: listeners tell us what they think of a genre without a presenter that adopts some of the techniques used in drama.
Plus the BBC’s announced record Global Audiences. But how does this kind of data benefit you?

Presented by Rajan Datar.
Produced by Howard Shannon.


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1gqm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bwdlpzjdr)
The NBA returns with LeBron James looking 'in his prime'

Australian ultra-marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel joins us after she swam the English Channel for the thirty second time this week. She’s aiming to break the men’s record for channel crossings, which currently stands at thirty four and received an exemption from the Australian government to travel to the UK amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

Former Orlando Magic, Miami Heat and Cleveland Cavaliers player DeAndre Liggins joins us to discuss the return of the NBA and his decision to join the London Lions. Liggins praises his friend LeBron James for speaking up on social issues and says playing in the Florida bubble makes this “the hardest championship to win”. Liggins adds that his aim now is to put British Basketball on the map.

Jamaican 1500 meters runner Aisha Praught-Leer tells us she hopes to inspire the next generation of middle-distance runners on the Island so the they can become known for more than sprinting. Praught-Leer also tells us she will be pushing to help change the International Olympic Committee’s Rule 50 – which effectively bans athletes protesting at an Olympic Games – in time for the rearranged Tokyo games. She says: “The idea of not protesting goes against the Olympic Charter”.

Olympic bronze medallist Katharine Merry joins us to reflect on the fact she should have been at the Tokyo Olympics now. Merry was due to be working as a commentator over the public address system in the stadium before the games were postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Staying with athletics – and this week’s Sporting Witness – heads back to the Moscow 1980 and the Battle of the Brits. Sebastian Coe recalls his epic battle with the country’s other middle-distance star, Steve Ovett, which captivated a global audience.

And with live sport continuing - we look ahead to the FA Cup Final by hearing from Arsenal and Chelsea fans across the globe. We also check in on the latest action at the World Snooker Championship.

Photo: LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on against the LA Clippers during the first quarter of the game at The Arena in Florida (Credit:Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1gvc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd61ls9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n56mk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wp7)
On The Front Line with Karachi’s Ambulance Drivers

Karachi's ambulance drivers

In Karachi, with a population of around 20 million people, ambulance drivers are on the front lines of this megacity’s shifting conflicts.

Samira Shackle joins one of these drivers, Muhammad Safdar, on his relentless round of call-outs. As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work.

Samira joins Safdar as he takes a young man home from hospital after undergoing a leg amputation. They head towards Lyari, on the outskirts of Karachi, which at several points in recent decades has essentially been run by gangsters. Safdar has vivid memories of gang war and street violence, in stark contrast to the situation today.

With no state ambulance service in Pakistan, the Edhi Foundation, set up by the late Abdul Sattar Edhi in 1954, stepped in to offer services to the poor. Safdar drives one of its fleet of four hundred ambulances: rudimentary converted vans with basic emergency provision. His missions bring him to many of Karachi’s most deprived and troubled areas, revealing the complex social and economic problems at the heart of the country.

As Samira and Safdar traverse this enormous city, their experiences reveal a remarkable story of life and death in contemporary Pakistan.

Photo: Muhammad Safdar Credit: Syed Hasan Haider


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1gz39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6t4)
Throwing away lyrics with Chali 2na, Omar, Skye Edwards and Rodney P

Jurassic 5 founder Chali 2na welcomes Rodney P, Skye Edwards from Morcheeba, and Omar to the show.

Ever wondered what the first step in the creative process is for musicians? What kind of obstacles do they face in achiveving success? These are just some of the questions that Chali will asking the group. Plus there’s some hilarious anecdotes and gentle ribbing along the way.

Chali 2na has one of the most distinguishable baritone voices in hip-hop. He’s an MC, graffiti artist and founding member of the collective Jurassic 5, and forms half of Ozomatli with DJ Cut Chemist. Rodney P is known as the Godfather of British hip-hop. An MC and broadcaster, he released what is widely regarded as the most important UK hip-hop album of all time with Gangsta Chronicle in 1990. Skye Edwards is known for being the lead vocalist of Morcheeba. She’s also worked with the likes of Nouvelle Vague, Grace Jones collaborator Ivor Guest, and our host, Mr Chali 2na. And finally, Omar is a soul singer, producer, multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and actor, best known for the hit There’s Nothing Like This. He’s worked with the likes of Stevie Wonder, Erykah Badu, Kele Le Roc, Lamont Dozier, Common, Estelle and Angie Stone. His father was a studio musician and drummer with Bob Marley, Horace Andy and the Rolling Stones.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1h2vf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k58h0)
Hong Kong 'seeking arrest' of fleeing activists

Police in Hong Kong are seeking the arrest of six pro-democracy activists living in exile in Western countries. We talk to one of them.

Also in the programme: the younger son of the media mogul Rupert Murdoch has resigned from the board of News Corporation saying he disagrees with some of its editorial content. And the environmental cost of the disposable protective equipment.

(Photo: Simon Cheng and Nathan Law are among those reportedly wanted under a new security law. Credit: EPA/Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1h6lk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk33)
Actor Lucy Liu

This week on The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi: actor Lucy Liu tells us about lockdown in New York, director Christopher Nolan revisits his breakthrough film Memento and artist Anish Kapoor takes us around his new outdoor sculpture exhibition.

Director Amma Asante discusses the new TV series Mrs America and we enjoy music from the cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason and singer-songwriter Jeremy Dutcher.

Joining Nikki to discuss the week’s cultural highlights are film critic MaryAnn Johanson and Man Booker prize winning author DBC Pierre, who also tells us about his new novel Meanwhile in Dopamine City.

(Photo: Lucy Liu. Credit: Gary Gershoff/Getty Images)


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1hbbp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wzh)
The Bomb

In a moment of terrible inspiration, a little-known Hungarian scientist called Leo Szilard uncovers the destructive possibilities of an atomic bomb.

Fearing the Nazis would figure out how to produce the bomb first, Szilard turns to his friend Albert Einstein to help convince the US President to invest in a uranium research programme.

That programme becomes the Manhattan Project, and as America tries to end the Second World War, Szilard fears his vision is about to become reality.

Recruiting other scientists from across the Manhattan Project he launches a campaign to save the world from the horror of a nuclear bomb.

A campaign that will fail on August 6th 1945, when the United States drops an atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

For Emily Strasser this is a personal story. Her grandfather worked on the Manhattan Project. All her life she’s been grappling with what her grandfather was a part of, and how she’s meant to feel about it today.

(Photo: Hiroshima bombing - The mushroom cloud 06/08/1945. Credit: Public domain)


SAT 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1hg2t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l8d545zr4)
Live FA Cup Final commentary

It's an all London final as Sportsworld brings you live commentary of the FA Cup final between Arsenal and Chelsea. We'll have all the build up to the match where Mikel Arteta's Arsenal will attempt to make it fourteen FA Cup trophies and Chelsea hunt for their first bit of silverware under Frank Lampard. We'll bring you all the action as it happens as well as all the reaction to the result.

Plus, we'll bring you all the latest sports news and stories from around the world, including England against Ireland in the return of one day international cricket at the Ageas Bowl. And the Formula 1 continues, this time it's the qualifying at the British Grand Prix at Silverstone.

Photo credit: Wembley, where the FA Ciup Final will be held (Getty Images)


SAT 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n69bq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:32 Trending (w3cszvs1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 20:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 today]


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1j1tg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k67g1)
Trump threatens to ban TikTok

President Trump has announced he is banning the Chinese-owned video-sharing app in the US. TikTok's owner said in response that it would give up control of the company.


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1j5kl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9ps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n6jtz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1j99q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd631qv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n6nl3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Why Factor (w3csytz9)
Cinderella

Popularly known through the1950 Disney film of the same name, Cinderella has become a childhood classic all over the world. But different versions of her story can be traced all the way from Asia to Africa and beyond. These variants provide a snapshot of the history and cultures from which they emerge, providing clues to the tale’s longevity. In this episode Sandra Kanthal asks: Why is Cinderella such a popular story to tell.

Guests:
Gessica Martini – PhD Student, Durham University
Juwen Zhang – Professor of Chinese, Willamette University
Rym Tina Ghazal – Author and Journalist
Ousseina Alidou – Professor of African Languages and Literatures, Rutgers University
Dee Dee Chainey – Author and Co-founder of Folklore Thursday

Editor: Richard Knight
Producer: Tural Ahmedzade

Photo: Cinderella About to Try on the Glass Slipper by Richard Redgrave
Credit: Historical Picture Archive/Corbis via Getty Images


SAT 23:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxm)
Covid in Africa

Do we have enough data to know what’s happening on the continent? We talk to Dr Justin Maeda from the Africa Centre for Disease Control and Ghanaian public health researcher Nana Kofi Quakyi about tracking Africa’s outbreak.

Producer: Jo Casserly

Picture: Volunteers wait to feed local people during the weekly feeding scheme at the Heritage Baptist Church in Melville on the 118 day of lockdown due to the Covid-19 Coronavirus, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2020.

Credit: EPA/KIM LUDBROOK



SUNDAY 02 AUGUST 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1jjsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnz)
Big tech facing a break-up?

The leaders of Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are grilled by US lawmakers over abuse of market power. Is more regulation or a break-up of their firms on the cards? Plus, Garmin is the latest high-profile victim of a cyberattack. And we meet the woman responsible for Google’s undersea cables. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n6x2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1jnk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd63dz7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n70th)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvs1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1js97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx1)
Helen Garner: The Spare Room

The Australian writer Helen Garner joins Harriett Gilbert as World Book Club continues its celebration of women writers.

She’ll be talking about her 2008 novel The Spare Room. It’s the story of two women: Nicola, who has cancer, and Helen who looks after her for three challenging weeks. Helen has her doubts about the unconventional clinic where Nicola has sought out treatment, but she nonetheless throws herself into the role of nurse, finding some comfort in the practical demands of the job.

Based on real events, The Spare Room is an unflinching, fierce look at friendship, illness and caring which finds humour in the darkest of places. The book is as spare and as lean as its title, yet manages to encompass big ideas about life and death.

(Image: Helen Garner. Photo credit: Darren James.)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1jx1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9ps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n789r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjp)
Consciousness: A strange theory

Human consciousness - our subjective experience - remains a mystery.

How is it that we can smell coffee and feel the touch of a flower? How does the brain produce consciousness? Well, one of the world’s top philosophers, David Chalmers, has a suggestion.

Perhaps consciousness exists everywhere, in some form; perhaps it exists in every subatomic particle – the particles that make up not just humans, but tables and chairs. It sounds completely wacky?

But Professor Chalmers explains why it’s a theory worth taking seriously.

Presenter David Edmonds
Producer Ben Cooper

(Image: Glittering Particles Credit: Shutterstock)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1k0sh)
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SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd63s6m)
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SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n7d1w)
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SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8k)
What’s the future of visual arts?

Art galleries and museums globally are struggling with the coronavirus pandemic, with some closing permanently.

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Tina Daheley hosts a discussion on what’s next for the visual arts and how artists and curators are radically re-thinking the future of the art world.

Her panel includes Israeli born artist and educator Oreet Ashery; South Sudanese artist and photographer Atong Atem; Ben Vickers, Chief Technology Officer at the Serpentine Gallery; and Tim Marlow, Director and Chief Executive of the Design Museum in London and former Artistic Director of the Royal Academy of Arts.

(Photo: A visitor at the newly reopened State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. Credit: Dimitar Dilkoff /AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1k4jm)
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SUN 06:06 Assignment (w3csz6lc)
Venezuela's 'Bay of Piglets'

A failed coup in Venezuela - a story of hubris, incompetence, and treachery… At the beginning of May, the government of Nicolas Maduro announced the armed forces had repelled an attempted landing by exiled Venezuelans on the coast north of Caracas. Some were killed, others captured. This was Operation Gideon – an incursion involving a few dozen, poorly-equipped men, and two former US Special Forces soldiers. The hair brained plan to depose Nicolas Maduro, and force a transition in Caracas was conceived by Venezuela's political opposition in neighbouring Colombia, the United States and Venezuela. Command and control of Operation Gideon allegedly lay with another former US Special Forces soldier, Jordan Goudreau. But why would men with decades of military experience between them join a plan that, from the outset, looked like a suicide mission? For Assignment, Linda Pressly goes in search of answers.

Presenter / producer: Linda Pressly
Producer in Venezuela: Vanessa Silva
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Jordan Goudreau and Javier Nieto address the Venezuelan people on 3 May, 2020. Credit: Javier Nieto)


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n7ht0)
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SUN 06:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0v0h)
Burying the dead in New York City

New York funeral director Clive Anderson has been struggling to keep up the sheer volume of new Coronavirus cases coming to his small funeral home in Pelham, New York. Normally he would average four funerals a week, now he is doing six a day.
On the front line, the work has taken a toll on Clive. He broke down recently after a family called him from miles away that had lost a grandmother and none of the eleven funeral homes in their area could help them. So Clive drove for almost two hours to collect the body.
A man of strong faith, Clive only recently converted to the Catholic faith, and his baptism was scheduled for Easter. That, of course, was cancelled and over the phone, a monsignor told Clive he was now 'Baptised by desire', a term where a person can receive the fruits of baptism even if they have not had the official ceremony.
This recent conversion couldn't have come at a more appropriate time in Clive's life, for years he has been struggling with faith and religion. He grew up in a home-based religious movement which has no official name but is nicknamed the 'Two by Twos' in the south of Ireland. This controversial group has been the subject of documentaries around the world, with many calling it a cult.
After his father died when he was 15, Clive's heart was set on becoming a funeral director.
In this programme we will hear Clive talk at his home about growing up in the mysterious 'Two by Twos' and how that group shaped his view on religion and on the world. We visit his funeral home in Pelham to witness the huge number of people coming through as a result of the Coronavirus.
We take a fishing trip with Clive on a lake in upstate New York, away from his funeral home, to talk about how he copes with the very difficult work that he does, and how his newfound faith in Catholicism, has brought him strength and peace in these extraordinary times.


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1k88r)
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SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjs)
Spain's tourism industry

During a period of huge uncertainty, Spain's tourism industry suffers a setback while musicians in South Africa, Denmark and the United States share creative challenges and how they are reconnecting with audiences during the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Dario Rodriguez. Credit: Dario Rodriguez)


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n7mk4)
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SUN 07:32 The Conversation (w3cswp29)
Women demanding equality in sport

Is women's sport still not taken as seriously as men's? What needs to happen to achieve the same pay, prize money and media coverage as their male counterparts?  Presenter Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women about how they have fought to get equality with men in their chosen sport.  

Kathryn Bertine was a professional cyclist in the US for five years. She was shocked to discover that the average earnings of a professional female cyclist are well below the poverty line.  She was so outraged that she lobbied successfully for a women's version of the Tour de France. But Kathryn believes that this new race is 'tokenism' because it lasts for only one day. Kathryn has gone on to co-found Homestretch Foundation, a charity to support female cyclists financially as they train for events and compete. 

Hajra Khan is the Captain of the Pakistan women's national football team but says they are given less priority than the men. When she first got into football she says sportswomen were looked down on in her country. Although attitudes are slowly changing she says that there is still a huge wage gap and her club has had to train on local cricket grounds. Hajra is organising a match in Pakistan with female players from around the world to raise awareness and to get better opportunities for female footballers.

Produced by Sarah Kendal

Image: (L) Hajra Khan. Credit: Huma Akram (R) Kathryn Bertine. Credit: Tracy L. Chandler


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1kd0w)
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SUN 08:06 The Compass (w3ct0wp9)
The Senses

The senses: Touch

Our skin contains millions of nerve endings and touch sensors that collect information about different sensations like temperature, pressure, vibration, pain and send it to the brain for processing and reaction. But it’s when our sensory system goes wrong that we learn most about how our senses help us understand the world around us.

Neurologist Dr Guy Leschziner talks to Alison, whose delicious seafood dinner sends her nervous system haywire. Poisoned by fish contaminated with ciguatera toxin, her sense of temperature is turned upside down – so hot feels cold and the cold floor tiles burn the soles of her feet.

We hear from Dawn, whose damaged nerve triggers excruciating pain down the side of her face – illustrating how our senses can trick us about the source of our agony.

We meet Paul, who has broken every bone in his body, yet never feels a jot of pain. His rare genetic condition, congenital insensitivity to pain, means his brain never receives signals warning of damage to his flesh and bones. And whilst a pain-free life might sound appealing, we find out it has serious physical and psychological consequences.

And through Rahel we learn about a lesser-known touch sensation, called proprioception. When it is not working, it affects our co-ordination. And for Rahel, that means she struggles to stay upright when it is dark.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Vicki and Paul Waters Courtesy of the Waters family


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n7r98)
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SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq5)
Dominique Crenn: My life in five dishes

Abandoned by her biological mother at six months old, a victim of sexual harassment and discrimination in the kitchen, and a recent breast cancer survivor – Dominique Crenn has faced her fair share of battles.

The award-winning chef, author and campaigner – not to mention the first woman in the US to win three Michelin stars – tells Graihagh Jackson how sheer determination and a desire to make a difference have taken her to the top.

She discusses the five key dishes that have shaped her life, from enjoying fresh oysters in a fish market with her father at 4am, to tomatoes – the ingredient that showed her the power of food and the importance of where it comes from.

Dominique tells of her struggles in a male-dominated restaurant world, the heartache of her father’s death, and how she’s facing up to her latest challenge – Covid-19. Plus, she explains her recent decision to scrap land-based meat from all of her restaurants, and why cancer has prompted her to seek out her birth mother.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio manager: Annie Gardiner

(Picture: Dominique Crenn. Credit: Jordan Wise/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1khs0)
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SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd64864)
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SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n7w1d)
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SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1kmj4)
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SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3q)
Why isn’t the world doing more to help the Uighurs?

With an estimated million Uighurs in detention camps, China has used a variety of means to successfully stifle world criticism. They include its economic muscle, political alliances with like-minded countries and sanitized tours of the facilities for opinion formers.

With Charmaine Cozier.

(Uighur prisoners shackled and blindfolded in Xinjiang, China. Still from anonymous drone footage.)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n7zsj)
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SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszf02)
Discovering my grandfather's secret Nazi past

Growing up, Julie Lindahl felt a sense of shame hung over her family, but had no idea why. Her father’s dying words confirmed she needed answers. And so began a seven year search for information. She started at the German Federal Archives where she was handed a file that exposed her grandfather’s Nazi past. Her findings sent her on a life-changing journey to track down and make amends with people who had fallen victim to her grandfather’s brutality.

Julie has written a book about her story called The Pendulum: A Granddaughter's Search for Her Family's Forbidden Nazi Past.

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Julie Lindahl aged three with her grandfather in Brazil
Credit: Julie Lindahl


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1kr88)
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SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd64hpd)
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SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n83jn)
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SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0v0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1kw0d)
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SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1kzrj)
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SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k85d3)
Melbourne placed under night- time curfew

A state of disaster has been declared in Victoria in Australia after a spike in coronavirus infections; the city of Melbourne has been placed under night- time curfew.

Also in the programme: How Colombia's health care is at breakpoint because of Covid-19 and the first commercial manned mission to the International Space Station is on its way back to Earth.

(Photo: Melbourne's normally bustling city centre is now deserted. Credit: EPA)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1l3hn)
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SUN 14:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1l77s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvp)
Picasso, artist of reinvention

Pablo Picasso is commonly regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th Century, changing our way of seeing with his radical innovation and revolutionary approach. As pioneer of Cubism, godfather to the Surrealists, and creator of the enduring anti-war painting Guernica, he produced thousands of paintings in his lifetime, not to mention his sculptures, ceramics, stage designs, poetry and plays.

Rajan Datar discusses his life and work with curators Ann Temkin and Katharina Beisiegel, and art historian Charlie Miller.

(Photo: Pablo Picasso in 1955. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1lbzx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l8d548wn7)
Sports marketing post Covid

We look into the sponsorship of sport - specifically fast food sponsorship. Like everything in the world, the coronavirus pandemic has changed aspects of everyday life, businesses and the sports we love to watch and play. But will the coronavirus affect fast food sponsorship of sports and tournaments? Mike Williams will be joined by a range of guests to debate this topic.

Plus we round up all of the latest sporting action including the British Grand Prix, NBA and MLS quarter finals

Photo: Jason Roy of Oval Invincibles one of the eight new mens and womens teams that will be competing in new 100 ball cricket competition (Credit: Charlie Crowhurst/Getty Images for ECB)


SUN 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1lgr1)
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SUN 17:06 The World Debate (w3ct0whb)
The Engineers: Re-engineering the Future

All over the world engineers are being called on to re-purpose and solve the problems the global pandemic creates. We bring together an audience of engineers and the general public from six continents to share insights to inspire innovation worldwide.

How are engineers reinventing our world to fight the virus? What can they do to re-imagine the everyday and make life safer and easier across the globe?

Presenter Kevin Fong is joined by a panel of four leading engineers from around the world who respond to questions, comments and first-hand accounts from a global audience linked by Zoom.

The panel:
Luke Leung: Director of Sustainability at international architecture and engineering firm SOM
Linda Miller: Transport infrastructure engineer at the major engineering and construction firm Bechtel
Rebecca Shipley: Director of UCL’s Institute for Healthcare Engineering
Carlo Ratti: Director of MIT’s Senseable Lab

This is a special edition of an annual event series staged in partnership with the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851.

Sound Engineer: Lee Chaundy
Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo: Coronavirus, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1llh5)
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SUN 18:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Saturday]


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1lq79)
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SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd65gnf)
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SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n92hp)
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SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wkf)
Ingenious

The milkshake gene and the cyclops gene

The Milkshake Gene - (LCTL) Are you dairy intolerant? If so, you’re not alone – more than 90% of people in some parts of the world are unable to properly digest milk, cheese and other dairy products. Most other animals are also unable to drink milk once they leave babyhood behind. So why did some of us evolve the ability to tuck into cheese, butter and cream with a vengeance? The answer lies in the history of human evolution and the early days of farming.

The Cyclops Gene - (SHH) Building a baby is a complicated business, with thousands of genes to be turned on or off at exactly the right time and in the right place. One of them is Sonic Hedgehog – named after the computer game character – which has its genetic fingers in all kinds of developmental processes. Sonic Hedgehog helps to decide how many bits you have, where they go, and whether you’re symmetrical, so it’s not surprising that any mistakes can have potentially devastating consequences. The most severe faults lead to ‘cyclops’ foetuses, while less serious changes are responsible for extra digits – like the reputed extra finger of Anne Boleyn, or Ernest Hemingway’s notorious six-toed cats. We take a look at the mind-bogglingly intricate process of creating a body, and the key role our favourite blue hero plays in making sure everything goes to plan.


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1ltzf)
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SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6t4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1lyqk)
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SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k94c4)
Covid deaths in Latin America pass 200,000

Brazil and Mexico have reported more fatalities than any country apart from the United States.

Also in the programme: India's interior minister is hospitalized with the coronavirus; NASA astronauts aboard a SpaceX vessel return from orbit; and Melbourne imposes a curfew as residents re-enter a lockdown.

(Photo: A worker sprays to disinfect the Amazonas Theatre ahead of its reopening in Manaus, Brazil, on Sunday. Credit: Bruno Kelly/Reuters)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1m2gp)
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SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n9fr2)
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SUN 22:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1m66t)
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SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd65ymy)
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SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n9kh6)
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SUN 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0v0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]



MONDAY 03 AUGUST 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbr8z7)
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MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57pxybrn9z)
US broadens action against Chinese tech companies

ByteDance, the Chinese owner of popular social media site TikTok, is scrambling to divest itself of its American operations after President Trump called for the company to be banned over security concerns. Microsoft is the likely buyer but other Chinese companies are now in the firing line. Bloomberg's Sarah Frier has the latest. Kenyan victims of violence at a Unilever tea plantation complain to the United Nations about human rights failings, we talk to lawyer Dan Leader about why this is the last resort. We get the latest on the coronavirus lockdown in Australia and hear why working from home doesn't suit everyone.
(Image: TikTok logo, Image credit: Reuters)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyfn7m)
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MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbrdqc)
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MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhb54h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyfrzr)
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MON 02:32 The Why Factor (w3csytz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbrjgh)
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MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh55)
Coe vs Ovett

At the 1980 Olympics in Moscow, the world was gripped by the intense rivalry between the British middle-distance runners, Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett. Ovett won the 800 metres, which was Coe’s favourite distance; but just a few days later, Coe struck back by winning the 1500 metres, Ovett’s preferred event. Alex Capstick talks to Sebastian Coe, now Lord Coe, about his memories of the Moscow Games.

PHOTO: Sebastian Coe win the Olympic 1500 metres in 1980 (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbrn6m)
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MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhbdmr)
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MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyg0h0)
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MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5z)
Why do conspiracy theories exist?

Listener Avalon from Australia wants to know why people use conspiracy theories to explain shocking events. Are we more likely to believe conspiracy theories in times of adversity? What purpose do conspiracy theories serve in society?

Marnie Chesterton speaks to the scientists to explain their popularity, even in the face of seemingly irrefutable evidence.
Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

Image: All-seeing eye of God inside triangle pyramid. Credit: paseven, Getty Images


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbrryr)
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MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231d19g)
US expert: coronavirus "extraordinarily widespread"

We get a vivid picture from an emergency room in Atlanta Georgia - and head to Australia's front line against Covid

The head of NASA says a new era of human space flight is beginning, after the safe return of the first commercial manned mission to the International Space Station.

And the Japanese octogenarians who've become fashion icons modelling abandoned clothing online.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbrwpw)
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MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231d51l)
Coronavirus: Iran cover up revealed by whistleblower

Investigation by BBC Persian finds number of actual deaths is nearly triple what Iran's government has claimed.

Whilst the number of cases of Covid-19 climbs in India, Mumbai's Dharavi slum draws praise from the World Health organisation... so what's it doing right?

And a successful landing for two NASA astronauts... after a journey made possible because of a privately owned space craft.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbs0g0)
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MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231d8sq)
BBC investigation finds higher Covid death rates in Iran

Documents provided by a whistle-blower suggest there have been three times as many deaths as previously announced by the government.

We go to Australia, where an early success against Covid-19 is now a distant memory. A number of areas of the country are back into lockdown.

And Mexico's most wanted man - nicknamed "el Marro" (the Sledgehammer) - has been captured by security forces shortly after releasing a bizarre, tearful video.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbs464)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3csy98y)
Malcolm Gladwell: Should we trust strangers?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Malcolm Gladwell, the Canadian author who has been described as America’s most famous intellectual. His latest book, Talking to Strangers, challenges the assumptions we make about trust and truth. But how far can we trust Malcolm Gladwell?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyghgj)
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MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jm)
"Gaia Hypothesis" creator celebrates 101 years

Veteran environmentalist James Lovelock reflects on his career and the planet's future, as he turns 101 years old. The independent scientist, Wollaston medal recipient and inventor of the Gaia Hypothesis sits down with the BBC’s Chief Environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt to talk about his humble upbringing between the two World Wars, his inventions that helped propel the green movement, as well as his thoughts on the over-specialisation of the university system, and the future of human life on Earth.

(Picture: James Lovelock. Picture Credit: BBC)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk6)
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor

On 7 December 1941, Japan launched a surprise strike on the American naval base, Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii. Thousands of American servicemen were killed or injured in the attack, which severely damaged the US Pacific Fleet. The next day, President Franklin Roosevelt declared war on Japan and America entered World War II. Adolph Kuhn was a US Navy mechanic stationed at Pearl Harbor when the bombs began to fall.

Photo: The USS Arizona sinking at Pearl Harbor. (Credit: Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbs7y8)
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MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csytz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgygm6n)
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MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbscpd)
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MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgygqys)
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MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvs1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbshfj)
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MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhc7vn)
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MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgygvpx)
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MON 11:32 The Conversation (p03tknqh)
Professional gamblers: Cat Hulbert and Celina Lin

Cat Hulbert started gambling for a living 40 years ago. A blackjack player in her 20s, she became so skilled at winning money from casinos, she was soon very unpopular with them all around the US. Cat took up poker in the 1980s, and was one of the first women to break into the ranks of professional card players. The Game Show Network called her "the best female gambler on earth." Now retired, Cat says she is not sure that she would legalise gambling in a state that did not have it, as it can ruin so many lives.

Celina Lin, who has been described as 'China's Queen of Poker', was born in Shanghai and moved to Australia as a child. Always a gaming enthusiast, she got into poker by accident, but quickly became a skilled online player and has been employed by the company PokerStars for the last eight years. She is now based back in China, playing high-level poker tournaments in the casino city of Macau. Celina has won the prestigious Red Dragon cup twice, and views poker not as a game but as an extremely demanding mind sport.

Image: Celina Lin (L) and Cat Hulbert (R) (Images courtesy of Celina Lin and Cat Hulbert)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbsm5n)
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MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3c)
The 25 day sit-in that changed history

When Judy Heumann was growing up in the 1950s, expectations for someone like her were low. Her disability wasn't her main problem, it was other people's prejudices. Judy Heumann was the first person in a wheelchair to become a teacher in New York, and she went on to dedicate her life to fighting discrimination. In April 1977, she helped orchestrate the longest ever occupation of a federal building in the history of the US. As a result of that, important regulations were brought in which made it both illegal and costly to discriminate against disabled people in many areas. And those regulations paved the way for further victories. Her book is called Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of a Disability Rights Activist.

Picture: Judy Heumann.
Credit: Rick Guidotti/Positive Exposure.


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbsqxs)
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MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhchbx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyh365)
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MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbsvnx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vh19h)
Philippines to reimpose stricter coronavirus lockdown as cases spike

The president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, has promised to hire ten thousand more medical workers to cope with a spike in coronavirus cases. It follows warnings that the health system is at risk of collapse.

Also in the programme: We'll get the latest on Covid-19 from Iran and hear about the story of two young men who were part of the mass migration in India to get home quickly for lock down.

And the Nobel Peace Prize winner and prominent Northern Ireland politician John Hume has died aged 83.

(Photo: Philippines' president Rodrigo Duterte. Credit: EPA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbszf1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csytz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyhbpf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlty9jlgttr)
HSBC profits slump

HSBC plans to speed up job cuts after profits plunged as it set aside $13bn for bad loans. We hear how the bank also finds itself caught between China and the West, from fund manager and analyst, Alpesh Patel. Also in the programme, the veteran environmentalist James Lovelock, inventor of the Gaia hypothesis, which suggests the earth and its organisms behave as a single entity, discusses his long and varied career. Plus, whether you're planning to take a holiday at home or overseas this summer, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores the significance of bringing along a good book.

(Picture: An HSBC building. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbt355)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3csy98y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyhgfk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (p03tknqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbt6x9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swqx7ckz4)
Genoa bridge reopens

The Italian city of Genoa unveils the new Genoa San Giorgio Bridge that replaces the Morandi Bridge that collapsed in 2018, killing 43 people. We speak to relatives of those killed - some of whom have criticised the “celebration” surrounding the inauguration of the new bridge.

And an investigation by the BBC's Persian Service has discovered that the number of deaths from coronavirus in Iran is nearly triple what Iran's government claims. We speak to one of the reporters behind the investigation.

Also we hear from people in the state of Victoria in Australia, which is facing tough new lockdown restrictions following a surge in coronavirus cases.

(Photo: The new Giorgio Bridge in Genoa, August 3, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Flavio Lo Scalzo)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbtbnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbtgdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhd6tp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyhtny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmvz74fvl)
2020/08/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbtl4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Why Factor (w3csytz9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyhyf2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3csz9ds)
Human Genome Project's 20th Anniversary

Adam Rutherford celebrates the 20th anniversary of one of the most ambitious and revolutionary scientific endeavours of all time - the Human Genome Project.

Its scope and scale was breath-taking, set up to read every one of the 3 billion nucleotides, or letters of genetic information, contained within the DNA in every cell of the human body. It took seven years, hundreds of scientists, cost almost $3 billion and, amazingly, came in under budget and on time.

Adam reflects back on that momentous time with Ewan Birney, Director of the European Bio-informatics Institute, part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. Twenty years ago, he was a PhD student working on the project, in the months leading up to the first draft.

The Human Genome Project underpins many branches of science, from human evolution and synthetic biology to forensic genetics and ancestry testing. But a key motivation for the project was to alleviate human suffering. While the ‘cures’, hyped by the media back in 2000, were not realistic our understanding of disease has been revolutionised.

Adam talks to Cancer Research UK Scientist, Dr Serena Nik-Zainal, from Cambridge University, who explains why the sequencing of the human genome has been so crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. The Human Genome Project is also playing a crucial role in the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr Kenneth Baillie has been treating critically ill patients at Edinburgh’s Royal Infirmary since the pandemic started. As the Lead on GenOMICC, a global collaboration on genetics and critical illness, he has joined forces with Genomics England and the NHS, to pinpoint genetic signals in these patients to help identify the best treatments.

Producers: Beth Eastwood & Fiona Roberts

Picture: DNA Genetic Code Colorful Genome, Credit: ktsimage/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbtpwt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vhwjd)
John Hume: Nobel Peace Prize winner dies aged 83

The Nobel Peace Prize winner and prominent Northern Ireland politician John Hume has died aged 83. One of the highest-profile politicians in Northern Ireland for more than 30 years, he helped create the climate that brought an end to the Troubles. Mr Hume played a major role in the peace talks, which led to the Good Friday Agreement in 1998.

Also in the programme: The former King of Spain, Juan Carlos, has said he has decided to leave the country just weeks after he was linked to an investigation into alleged corruption; and the love story that exposed state-sponsored doping in Russia.

(Image: John Hume. Credit: Niall Carson/PA Wire)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbttmy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3csy98y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyj5xb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (p03tknqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbtyd2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhdpt6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyj9ng)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jcnyjntd)
Coronavirus hits cruise lines again

Norwegian shipping company Hurtigruten temporarily suspends cruises after 41 passengers and crew test positive for Covid 19. We talk to Stewart Chiron, The Cruise Guy about how the industry can come back after the pandemic. Also in the programme, the US interests of social media company TikTok look set to be bought by Microsoft. Georgia Wells, tech reporter from the Wall Street Journal gives us the latest. The veteran environmentalist James Lovelock, inventor of the Gaia hypothesis, discusses his long and varied career. Plus, whether you're planning to take a holiday at home or overseas this summer, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores the significance of bringing along a good book.

(Picture: Hurtigruten ship. Picture credit: Reuters)



TUESDAY 04 AUGUST 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbv5wb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vvqpmdz7)
Coronavirus hits cruise lines again

Norwegian shipping company Hurtigruten temporarily suspends cruises after 41 passengers and crew test positive for Covid 19. We talk to Stewart Chiron, The Cruise Guy, about how the industry can come back after the pandemic. Also in the programme, the US interests of social media company TikTok look set to be bought by Microsoft. Georgia Wells, tech reporter from the Wall Street Journal gives us the latest. We hear from one of the world's most eminent environmental scientists, James Lovelock, and we celebrate the life and work of Bill English an early computing pioneer, who invented the computer mouse.
Joining us for live discussion throughout the programme are Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angeles and Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist from Delhi.
(Image: Hurtigruten cruise ship, Image credit: Reuters)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbv9mg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhf21l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyjnwv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wp8)
On The Front Line with Karachi’s Ambulance Drivers

Karachi's ambulance drivers

In Karachi, with a population of around 20 million people, ambulance drivers are on the front lines of this megacity’s shifting conflicts. Samira Shackle joins one of these drivers, Muhammad Safdar, on his relentless round of call-outs.

Safdar gets an emergency call out: a six-storey building has collapsed in Gollimore. There are many injured. Arriving at the scene, full of noise and chaos, Samira is witness to the scale of the problems Karachi is yet to overcome.

As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work.

With no state ambulance service in Pakistan, the Edhi Foundation, set up by the late Abdul Sattar Edhi in 1954, stepped in to offer services to the poor. Safdar drives one of its fleet of four hundred ambulances: rudimentary converted vans with basic emergency provision. His missions bring him to many of Karachi’s most deprived and troubled areas, revealing the complex social and economic problems at the heart of the country.

As Samira and Safdar traverse this enormous city, their experiences reveal a remarkable story of life and death in contemporary Pakistan.

Photo: Muhammad Safdar Credit: BBC


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbvfcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbvk3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhf9jv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyjxd3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3csz9ds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbvnvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231gy6k)
Peru enlists Venezuelan doctors to fight Covid

Peru, with the second-highest rate of infection in the whole of South America, enlists thousands of Venezuelan health workers in the fight against covid-19. .

We'll hear about a major study on what effect closing and reopening schools actually has on the spread of the virus.

And a heartbreaking report from the jade mines of Myanmar on how poverty drives young men to risk their lives in the deadly hunt for the precious mineral.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbvslz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231h1yp)
Could India overtake the US and Brazil for Covid cases?

The World Health Organisation warns that coronavirus is circulating 'intensely' in India with more than 50,000 confirmed cases every day.

The Peruvian President signs a decree to allow thousands of qualified medical workers from Venezuela to help the country fight the pandemic..

And we'll hear from a 28-year-old who has become the first Covid-19 patient in the United States to receive a lung transplant.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbvxc3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231h5pt)
Covid-19: how can schools reopen safely?

A new study published in the Lancet finds low transmission rates between students in Australia.

A Covid vaccine is still months or years away - but doctors are already fighting the misinformation surrounding it - we talk to one of them.

And an insight into going on holiday in the midst of a pandemic - don't forget to pack your masks.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbw137)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1f)
Prison Voicemail: Messages from behind bars

The Prison Voicemail app connects inmates and their families, helping them stay in touch throughout a sentence.

We hear a mum and daughter using the messages to rebuild their relationship, and find out how it helps children who are separated from their dad.

Producer/ reporter Ruth Evans


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgykdcm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89n)
Will live streaming gigs save the music industry?

Musicians tell us how they are finding innovative ways to get around the pandemic and perform live to their fans.

It's a very real problem - the BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz tells Ed Butler of the frustrations of performers like Beverley Knight (pictured) having to perform to half-empty auditoriums in order to ensure social distancing.

Two singer-songwriters tell us the novel methods they've taken up during lockdown. Dent May describes his first live-stream performance from his own home, while Laura Marling put on a live staged performance for a limited ticketed online audience. The brainchild behind Laura's, music promoter Ric Salmon of Drift Live, says he thinks the concept will prove more than just a quick fix for Covid-19.

(Picture: Beverley Knight performing to a live audience at the London Palladium; Credit: Andy Paradise/BBC)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpq)
The internment of Japanese Americans

Thousands of Japanese Americans were sent to prison camps after the USA entered World War Two following the bombing of Pearl Harbour. Whole families found themselves housed in barracks behind barbed wire fences. Former Star Trek actor, George Takei, was just a child when he was locked up in one of the camps. In 2010 he spoke to Lucy Williamson about his experiences there.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Japanese American children on their way to internment camps. Credit: Dorothea Lange/Hulton Archive/Getty Images.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbw4vc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgykj3r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3csz9ds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbw8lh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbwdbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhg4rr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgykrm0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbj)
Mira Nair: The making of A Suitable Boy

Mira Nair is one of the world’s great film directors. Born in India, but now a self-called ‘global citizen’, she has spent over 30 years making her mark, from Hollywood to Bollywood, and from the fun and laughter of Monsoon Wedding to the sharp politics of The Reluctant Fundamentalist.

In the Studio joins Mira on location in the ancient city of Maheshwar, for her biggest and most ambitious project to date - a six-part television series for the BBC, based on Vikram Seth’s epic novel, A Suitable Boy.

The novel encompasses many of the film-maker’s favoured topics - family conflict, the portrayal of India, love, humour, beauty and politics. So when she heard it was being made into a TV series she says, “I threw my sari into the ring…It was something I had to do with every fibre of my creative journey. “

Mira Nair talks exclusively to Ravinder Bawa about her own creative journey - from small town girl, to world famous director – and shows how some of the most evocative and dynamic scenes are put together, with the film crew she uses in almost every film she makes.

Presenter: Ravinder Bawa
Producers: Mohini Patel and Sara Jane Hall
Executive producer: Ella-mai Robey


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbwj2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjx)
The tycoon who became 'Mr Toilet'

Jack Sim is a Singaporean multi-millionaire tycoon with an unusual nickname: Mr Toilet.
His obsession with toilets has had him mingling with presidents, A-list celebrities, he's even had a resolution passed at the UN. After growing up without a working toilet in Singapore he's now on a global mission to make sure others don't go through the same.

When filmmaker Ray Klonsky was a teenager he received a letter from David McCallum, an inmate at a New York prison who was already more than 10 years into his sentence for a murder he said he did not commit. The pair became penpals and after a while, Ray and his father Ken started searching for evidence that could prove their new friend's innocence. Outlook's Saskia Edwards hears a remarkable story of chance encounters and a fight for justice with the help of world-famous boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter.

Picture: Jack Sim aka Mr Toilet
Credit: Jim Orca


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbwmtw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhgd80)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyl038)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3csz9ds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbwrl0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vky6l)
Coronavirus: Millions return to lockdown in Philippines

Tens of millions of people in the Philippines are back in lockdown, after doctors warned a surge in new coronavirus cases could push the healthcare system to collapse.

Also in the programme: A strict lockdown with large on the spot fines for breaking it, comes into force in Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria; and ahead of the election in Belarus this weekend, we will speak to a prominent opposition figure.

(Photo: Residents of Manila can only step out for essentials. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbwwb4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyl7lj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwl5zsyblf)
BP halves dividend after huge losses

BP has halved its dividend and posted a $6.7bn quarterly loss in the wake of coronavirus. The energy giant said it plans to increase its clean energy spending, and Gordon Ballard, director of the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers discusses what such a move would mean for its members. And we get reaction from Charlie Kronick, senior climate finance adviser for Greenpeace UK. Also in the programme, the chief executive of drinks giant Diageo, Ivan Menezes, tells us the pandemic has hit its business by more than $1.5bn. The European Commission has announced it will investigate Google's attempt to buy fitness tracker firm Fitbit, and we hear the background from Ross Sleight, chief strategy officer at global digital agency Somo. Plus, as musicians around the world struggle thanks to the cancellation of tours and gigs, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on innovative solutions that some have come up with.

(Picture: A BP logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbx028)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgylcbn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbx3td)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swqx7ggw7)
Explosion in Beirut

Buildings have been destroyed in Lebanon's capital after a large explosion. Social media images show a large plume of smoke above the city. We speak to people who witnessed what happened.

Tens of millions of people in the Philippines are back in lockdown, after doctors warned a surge in new coronavirus cases could push the healthcare system to collapse. The country only just emerged a strict lockdown in June. We bring together people in the country to hear how they feel about going back into lockdown.

And US President Donald Trump has said that he will ban the Chinese-owned TikTok app after US officials and politicians raised concerns that data collected by the app may end up being passed to the Chinese government. We speak to two TikTok stars to hear what they think.

Photo: Smoke rises in Beirut, Lebanon (REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbx7kj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbxc9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhh3qs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgylql1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmvz77brp)
2020/08/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbxh1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgylvb5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz988)
Why India can’t work from home

India came last out of 42 countries in a recent study of remote-working readiness. Bhaskar Chakravorti, Dean of Global Business for The Fletcher School at Tufts University, explains what his research means for the 1.3 billion people living in India, and what the future holds for the second largest internet market in the world.

Saving lives with a hologram heart
A holographic visualisation has been proven to help heart-surgeons operating on children. Jennifer Silva, an associate professor of Paediatric Surgery, and her husband Jon Silva, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, used a Microsoft HoloLens headset to give surgeons real-time information about the electrical signals passing through a patient’s hearts during surgery.

Mapping earthquakes with localised EDGE computing
Observing natural phenomena like earthquakes and volcanoes relies on data from the earth’s satellite network. As the volume of this satellite data grows it becomes harder for scientists to get it back to Earth. EDGE computing offers a solution. The opposite of cloud computing, it keeps data near the source by processing it on-site and only sending back relevant or interesting information. Digital Planet reporter Hannah Fisher finds out more.



(Image: Getty Images)


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.



Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbxlsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vlsfh)
Huge explosion rocks Beirut

The blast was so big that it was felt for kilometres around. It is not yet clear what the cause is but the interior minister said ammonium nitrate had been among the materials stored. Also: the award-winning Zimbabwean novelist Tsitsi Dangarembga describes her experience of being detained after anti-corruption protests; and the man who discovered he was the son of Pablo Escobar.

(Photo: People stand at a damaged area near the site of an explosion at the Beirut Port in Lebanon Credit: EPA/WAEL HAMZEH)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbxqk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgym2tf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbxv95)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhhlq9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgym6kk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jcnymkqh)
Beirut blast: Dozens dead and thousands injured, health minister says

A large blast in the Lebanese capital, Beirut, has killed at least 27 people and injured more than 2,500 others, the health minister says. The BBC's Hashem Shawish explains what we know about the explosion so far. Also in the programme, Argentina has struck a debt agreement with creditors, after agreeing the terms of a restructuring deal. Dr Juan Grigera, lecturer in Political Economy at Kings College London, explains the significance of the deal. Plus, as musicians around the world struggle thanks to the cancellation of tours and gigs, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on innovative solutions that some have come up with. And we'll have a regular look at the US markets with Jo Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey.

(Picture: The aftermath of the explosion at Beirut's port. Picture credit: Reuters.)



WEDNESDAY 05 AUGUST 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrby2sf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vvqpq9wb)
Chaos and destruction in Beirut

A large blast in the Lebanese capital, Beirut, has killed at least 70 people and injured more than 4,000 others, the health minister says. The BBC's Hashem Shawish explains what we know about the explosion so far. Also in the programme, Argentina has struck a debt agreement with creditors, after agreeing the terms of a restructuring deal. Dr Juan Grigera, lecturer in Political Economy at Kings College London, explains the significance of the deal. Interpol have released a warning about cyber-crime during the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, as musicians around the world struggle thanks to the cancellation of tours and gigs, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on innovative solutions that some have come up with.

All through the show we will be joined by Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus and member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, from Tokyo and Allison Schrager, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, in New York.

(Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrby6jk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhhyyp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgymksy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct0wpb)
The Senses

The senses: Vision

Vision is a complex process involving light rays, special nerve cells and electrical signals sent to the brain, which processes the information and tells us what we’re seeing. But even tiny disruptions to any part of this system can result in remarkable visual problems.

Neurologist, Dr Guy Leschziner, meets 25-year-old filmmaker Oli, who’s only recently discovered something alarming: he’s missing half his vision in one eye - probably caused by a stroke he never knew he had.

We hear from Dawn, whose eyes are working properly and yet she’s almost completely blind. Her visual problems are caused by damage to a vital nerve connecting her eyeballs and her brain.

Susan describes how her epilepsy is causing visual distortions that mean she can see through a person as if they were transparent.

And we meet Nina who’s been robbed of her sight after two separate accidents. And yet, she sees colours and terrifying images of zombie faces. She discovers she has Charles Bonnet Syndrome – visual hallucinations caused by loss of sight

Through the extraordinary experiences of these individuals, we learn how vision is not like a video camera, a straightforward process of turning light into a picture.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Dawn with her dog in the garden.Credit: BBC


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbyb8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbyg0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhj6fy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgymt96)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz988)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbykry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231kv3n)
Lebanon in mourning after massive Beirut blast

Explosion in the port are of the city leaves at least 78 people dead.

Kashmir is in lockdown as it braces for protests one year after government revoked its special status.

And a first hand account by a Uighur of his detention by the Chinese authorities.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbypj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231kyvs)
Smoke still rising after Beirut blast

We'll go live to the Lebanese capital to speak to someone who lived through the civil war there - but says she's never seen anything like this.

The Indian prime minister prepares to take a step that will underline - perhaps even heighten - religious tensions there.

And 75 years on from the first explosion of the atom bomb in Hiroshima, survivors say the lessons of that key moment in history are being forgotten.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbyt86)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231l2lx)
Lebanon Blast: scores killed and thousands injured

The government says the blast was caused by explosives stored for years at the city's port

Kashmir is in lockdown, braced for protests one year after the Indian government revoked its special status......we'll hear from Srinagar.

And contrary to popular belief, the latest research suggests dementia rates in the US and Europe are falling, not rising.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbyy0b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6n)
Sir Jeremy Farrar: 'I do believe there will be a vaccine' in 2020 and 2021

Amid the talk of spikes and second waves one thing is clear – people predicting an early end to the coronavirus pandemic are indulging in wishful thinking. Can we find a way of living with Covid-19 that respects the science while mitigating the damage being done to our economic and social lives? Stephen Sackur speaks to Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust and a key scientific adviser to the UK government. How dangerous is the moment we’re in?

(Photo: Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyn98q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8my)
Evading sanctions

How easy is it to get around sanctions? The US has for some years used financial sanctions to target those it blames for corruption or supporting terrorism. But do these measures work? We hear the latest evidence that it may be quite easy to get round sanctions and asset freezes.

(Picture: Suitcase full of cash; Credit: seyfettinozel/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmrz)
The battle of Midway

On 4th June 1942, aircraft carriers of the Japanese and American fleets fought a huge naval battle near Midway Atoll in the Pacific. The outcome marked a turning point in the war. Using archive recordings we hear from American and Japanese airmen who flew in combat that day.

Photo: (Original Caption) This official United States Navy photo shows the American aircraft carrier Yorktown, already listing badly to port, as she received a direct hit from a Japanese bomber in the Battle of Midway Island, June 4th 1942. The black puffs in the photo are exploding U.S. antiaircraft shells. (Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbz1rg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgynf0v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz988)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbz5hl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbz97q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhk1nv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgynnj3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x19)
The new tech Cold War

Why did the decision to let the Chinese company Huawei build the UK’s 5G telecoms network turn into one of the most difficult and consequential national security decisions of recent times? A decision which risks undermining the normally close special relationship between the US and UK? The answer is because it cuts to the heart of the greatest fear in Washington – that China is already ahead in the global competition to develop the most advanced technology.

Some people ask how we have got to a position where the West needs to even consider using Chinese tech. The answer may be because they failed to think strategically about protecting or nurturing their own technology industry over the last two decades. A free-market system has faced off against a Chinese model in which there is a clear, long-term industrial strategy to dominate certain sectors of technology, including telecoms, quantum computing and artificial intelligence. This is a rare issue where the US national security community – the so-called ‘Deep State’ – is in close alignment with President Trump.

Now the US and UK, among others, are scrambling to try to develop strategies to respond and to avoid dependence on China. But is it already too late? We hear from, among others, former Google boss Eric Schmidt, now chair of the Pentagon’s Defence Innovation Board: Nigel Inkster, former deputy head of the British Secret Service MI6: Victor Zhang, vice-president of Huawei: and Bill Evanina director of the US National Counterintelligence and Security Centre.

(Image: Global tech concept. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbzdzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrp)
I found my son 32 years after he was kidnapped

In 1988 Li Jingzhi’s 2-year-old son was abducted from a hotel lobby in China and disappeared without a trace. She never stopped looking for him, appearing on numerous Chinese television shows and distributing more than 100,000 flyers. Through her many years of searching she was able to help reunite many other parents with their missing children. Then this year, after 32 years she was finally reunited with her son.

Presenter: Emily Webb

Picture: Mao Yin reuniting with his mother Li Jingzhi
Credit: Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmrz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbzjqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhk953)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgynx0c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz988)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbznh3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vnv3p)
Beirut explosion: Frantic search for survivors of deadly blast

Health and rescue workers are struggling to deal with the aftermath of the massive explosion in Beirut on Tuesday, which all but flattened part of the Lebanese capital's port. The Red Cross is co-ordinating with the Lebanese health ministry to set up new morgues. Rescue workers are continuing to try to find survivors.
We hear from the Red Cross and Lebanon's minister of economy.

Also in the programme: A leading Democrat on President Trump's suggestion that November's election could be delayed; and the Indian prime minister Narendra Modi lays the foundation stone of a new Hindu temple at a disputed religious site at Ayodhya.

(Photo: The port area was largely flattened. Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbzs77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyp4hm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxdmqdqjxt)
Lebanon's economy challenged by explosion

Amid damage and loss of life, Tuesday's explosion puts Lebanon's economy under more pressure. Nadine Majzoub of the Honest Truth Media Hub in Beirut tells us about the likely implications. Also in the programme, Sweden was conspicuous in the pandemic by not imposing a lockdown, and its economic growth figures for the second quarter of the year have now been published. Gabriel Mellqvist of the financial daily Dagens Industri tells us how the country performed compared to its southern European neighbours. And we consider Sweden's economic outlook, with Anna Stellinger, deputy director general of the Confederation of Swedish Enterprise. Plus, the recent Black Lives Matter protests, sparked by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May, have reinvigorated efforts to attract disillusioned African Americans to visit and build a new life in Ghana. Ghanaian filmmaker Kuukua Eshun moved to the United States as a teenager, but returned a couple of years ago, and says that after experiencing racism for the first time in the US, she has no regrets. And Professor Joseph Teye, director of the Centre for Migration Studies at the University of Accra considers whether Ghana's economy is likely to attract more people to do the same.

(Picture: Beirut's destroyed port. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrbzwzc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyp87r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc00qh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swqx7kcsb)
Beirut blast: Rescuers search for survivors

We dedicate the programme to the explosion in the port area of the capital Beirut in Lebanon. Rescuers are still searching for survivors; at least 100 people died in the blast and thousands were injured.

We explain what is known so far about the cause of the explosion and reach out to people in the city who have been affected. One of them is Pascal, whose wife was injured in the explosion and had to have five surgical procedures on her face after glass flew into it. He describes the situation in the hospital last night as chaotic with "blood everywhere and people screaming and crying".

We also bring together a group of people living in and around Beirut to hear how the past 24 hours have been for them. And we get BBC experts to help answer questions by our listeners around the world about the explosion, and about Lebanon, the country that continues to grapple with economic and political crisis.

(Photo: Members of Turkey"s Humanitarian Relief Foundation (IHH) help local medics to carry a casualty at the site of Tuesday"s blast in Beirut"s port area. Credit: Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc04gm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmrz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc086r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhl0mw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgypmh4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmvz7b7ns)
2020/08/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc0cyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct0wpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgypr78)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc5)
Choirs and Covid

Choirs have been at the centre of several outbreaks of coronavirus, in Berlin and Washington for example. After the Amsterdam Mixed Choir in the Netherlands performed Bach's St John Passion in March, 102 out of the 130 choristers became ill, several needed intensive care and one died. We tend to assume it's the singing itself that's the problem, but do we know that for sure? Margaret McCartney explores that question with Professor Jackie Cassell, a specialist in sexually transmitted infections and public health, and keen singer.

Deaths from Covid among children are extremely rare, but the numbers in Indonesia have been higher than in other countries. More than a hundred children have died. Callistasia Wijaya from the BBC Indonesia Service tells Claudia why some children seem to be a risk.

BBC Medical Correspondent James Gallagher joins Claudia to discuss the global picture of the pandemic this week, including the number of cases in Iran, Mexico and US. James also talks about the Russian vaccine, faster testing for the virus and looking for it in sewage.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Main Image: People singing in a Choir. Credit: Getty Images


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc0hq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vppbl)
Port officials placed under house arrest after Beirut explosion

The Lebanese government has decided to place a number of officials working at Beirut’s port under house arrest while investigations continue. At least 135 people are now dead with around 5,000 injured. Also: Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has laid the foundation for a Hindu temple in the northern city of Ayodhya; and why Mississippi could become the worst Covid hotspot in the US.

(Photo: A member of the security forces walks along a smashed-up street near the site of Tuesday’s blast in Lebanon Credit: Reuters/Aziz Taher/File Photo)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc0mg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgypzqj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0x19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc0r68)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhlhmd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyq3gn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jcnyqgml)
Lebanon's economy challenged by explosion

Amid damage and loss of life, Tuesday's explosion puts Lebanon's economy under more pressure. Nadine Majzoub of the Honest Truth Media Hub in Beirut tells us about the likely implications. Also in the programme, the recent Black Lives Matter protests, sparked by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May, have reinvigorated efforts to attract disillusioned African Americans to visit and build a new life in Ghana. And we'll have a regular look at the US markets with Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors. Plus, the long-awaited new instalment of the Twilight book series is published, awakening fans' nostalgia for the billion-dollar vampire franchise. Boston Globe arts critic Meredith Goldstein takes us through the anticipation, and tells us if the wait was worth it.

(Picture: Beirut's destroyed port. Picture credit: EPA.)



THURSDAY 06 AUGUST 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc0zpj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vvqpt6sf)
Can Beirut recover?

Amid damage and loss of life, Tuesday's explosion puts Lebanon's economy under more pressure. Nizar Ghanem, a resident of Beirut, explains what the government needs to do to get the country back on track. Also in the programme, the recent Black Lives Matter protests, sparked by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May, have reinvigorated efforts to attract disillusioned African Americans to visit and build a new life in Ghana. Plus, the long-awaited new instalment of the Twilight book series is published, awakening fans' nostalgia for the billion-dollar vampire franchise. Boston Globe arts critic Meredith Goldstein takes us through the anticipation, and tells us if the wait was worth it.

All through the programme we’ll joined by political journalist Erin Delmore in New York, and Bloomberg columnist Shuli Ren in Hong Kong.

(Picture: Beirut's destroyed port. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc13fn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhlvvs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyqgq1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6ld)
Algeria's plague revisited

A mysterious illness appears out of nowhere. The number of cases rises exponentially, as the authorities attempt to downplay the severity of the disease. There is a shortage of medical staff, equipment and arguments about whether people should wear masks. People are forbidden to leave their homes and many are left stranded in unfamiliar places, separated from loved ones. Albert Camus’ novel The Plague set in the Algerian city of Oran under French colonial rule was published more than 70 years ago. But today it almost reads like a current news bulletin and seems more relevant than ever.

This edition of Assignment revisits Oran in the age of the coronavirus and investigates the parallels between now and then. For the time being, it seems the pandemic has achieved something the authorities have tried but failed to do for the past year – clear the streets of protesters. Lucy Ash investigates Algeria’s plague of authoritarianism and finds that the government has been using Covid-19 as an excuse to crack down harder on dissent.

Reporter: Lucy Ash
Producer: Neil Kisserli
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Man using an Algerian flag as a mask at an anti-government demonstration in Algiers on 13 March, 2020. Credit: Ryad Kramdi/AFP/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc175s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmrz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc1bxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhm3c1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyqq69)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc1gp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231nr0r)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc1lf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231nvrw)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc1q59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231nzj0)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc1txf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3r)
Will the pandemic get worse in the winter?

Winter is coming in the northern hemisphere and traditionally it is time for colds and flu.
This has raised fears that coronavirus will surge when the seasons change, possibly leading to a second wave of the disease that is even bigger than the first.
However, predicting what a Covid winter will look like is complex and uncertainty reigns - there are reasons both to be worried and to be reassured.

Contributors:
. Micaela Martinez, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University
. Katherine Wu, a health and science journalist with The New York Times
. Judit Vall, a professor in health and labour economics at the University of Barcelona
. Dominique Moisi, the author of The Geopolitics of Emotion.


(A man walks through a snowfall in Sarajevo, wearing a mask as protection against Covid-19. Credit Mustafa Ozturk / Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyr65t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7ws)
Trump's climate rollback

Environmental regulations are being systematically weakened and repealed by the US government.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to someone trying to keep track of it all - Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School. He also hears from Maria Caffrey, a climate scientist who lost her job at the US National Park Service after blowing the whistle about how her research was being suppressed - and she says she is not the only one.

Climate sceptic Myron Ebell of the Competitive Enterprise Institute explains why the environmental rollback is good news for the US economy, while climate futurist Alex Steffen says humanity will be the living with the consequences of Trump's delay of climate action for generations to come.

With Democratic challenger Joe Biden having unveiled an unprecedentedly ambitious climate plan, it means there is all to play for in the November Presidential elections.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Donald Trump holds up a "Trump Digs Coal" sign at an event in Huntington, West Virginia; Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmg)
The atomic bombs dropped on Japan

The USA dropped its first atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima on August 6th 1945. Three days later a second atomic bomb was detonated over Nagasaki. The explosion was bigger than the blast at Hiroshima and killed 70,000 people. Louise Hidalgo introduces recordings from the BBC archive.

(Photo: Mushroom cloud in the sky. Credit: US Air Force/Press Association)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc1ynk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6ld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyr9xy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc22dp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvq)
The Fall of the Roman Empire

In 476, the last of the Roman emperors in the West was deposed; in 1776, historian Edward Gibbon wrote “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire”, and Rome’s fate became a major point of comparison for all empires. In Gibbon's view, instead of inquiring why the Roman empire was destroyed precisely 1300 years before, we should rather be surprised that it had subsisted so long. Ever since, there has been a fascination with what changed in Rome in 476 and why, and whether there were more significant changes earlier or later than that date and, importantly, what stayed the same.

In this edition of The Forum, Rajan Datar explores the ideas about Rome’s Fall with Sarah E. Bond, Associate Professor of History at the University of Iowa, USA; Meaghan McEvoy, Lecturer in Byzantine Studies at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia; and Peter Heather, Professor of Medieval History at King’s College London, UK.


(Photo: Sack of Rome by the Visigoths led by Alaric I in 410. Coloured engraving. Credit: Prisma/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh56)
The first woman to climb Everest

In 1975, the Japanese mountaineer, Junko Tabei, became the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest. As well as being an achievement in its own right, Tabei had to defy the cultural norms of a country where women were not expected to be world-class mountaineers. Louise Hidalgo talks to Setsuko Kitamura, who was on Tabei’s Everest climb, and to her friend and biographer, Yumiko Hiraki.

Picture: Junko Tabei (left) with Ang Tsering standing in front of the southern wall of Mount Everest at the start of the climb that would result in the two of them reaching the summit. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc264t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhmyky)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyrkf6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq6)
Single parents: Cooking solo

Money, time, and healthy choices can make mealtimes a challenge for many parents, but how do things change when sole responsibility falls on one adult's shoulders? In some parts of the world single parent families are now more common than ever before, but how does being a single parent influence your relationship with food, and also your child's?

Tamasin Ford speaks to three lone-parents about their experiences: Salma Abdo, from Madrid, explains why mealtimes with her young son were the loneliest part of her day; Billy McGranaghan, founder of London charity Dads House, says he regularly had to skip meals so his child could eat; and Neferteri Plessy, who runs Single Mums Planet, in Santa Monica, California, talks about how food decisions can be tricky to negotiate with your ex.

But all three describe how, despite the challenges, food can help create unique bonds in a single parent home through cooking and eating together.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

(Picture: Neferteri Plessy, Salma Abdo, and Billy McGranaghan. Credit: BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc29wy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdb4)
Fosse and Verdon: The legacy of a dancing family

Nicole Fosse is the daughter of two American dance superstars – Bob Fosse and Gwen Verdon. Their legendary collaboration led to the reinvention of the modern musical, and huge stage and screen successes like Chicago and Cabaret. They were one of the most influential couples in show business and their style has inspired even Beyonce and RuPaul. The Fosse-Verdon relationship was remarkable but, as Nicole recalls, life was not always as smooth as her parents’ celebrated choreography.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

(Photo: Bob Fosse, Nicole Fosse and Gwen Verdon. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc2fn2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhn626)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyrsxg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc2kd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vrr0s)
State of emergency in Beirut

A state of emergency has been declared in Beirut after Tuesday's devastating blast. We get the latest from the city, speaking to a doctor in one of its hospitals and taking a walk around the ruined streets.

Also in the programme: on the 75th anniversary of the nuclear bombing that destroyed Hiroshima, we hear from one of its survivors, Keiko Ogura. And a look at the dilemmas faced by the big social media companies over freedom of speech and politics.

(Photo: A man takes photographs at the site of Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area. Credit: REUTERS/Aziz Taher)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc2p4b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6ld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgys1dq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvrr86ftzb)
Beirut reconstruction could cost up to $15bn

The governor of Beirut has estimated reconstruction of the city could cost up to $15bn. Dr Zahira Harb of London's City University was injured in Tuesday's blast, and tells us the people of the city are deeply fed up with their political leaders. And we hear about concerns over food imports to Lebanon given the destruction of the port, from Hani Bohsali, owner and chief executive of Bohsali Foods, who also heads the Syndicate of Food and Drink Importers. Also in the programme, an in-depth look at how coronavirus is impacting Africa. Dr Mary Stephen is from WHO Africa, from Brazzaville in the Congo. Kogmotso Phatsima of educational and flying academy Dare to Dream discusses the impact on tourism in Botswana. And Bismarck Rewane, economist and member of company boards, including at First City Monument Bank and Guinness Nigeria, tells us about how the pandemic is affecting Nigerian firms and families.

(Picture: Beirut's destroyed port area. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc2swg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgys54v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc2xml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swqx7n8pf)
Beirut blast: The story of a street

Armenia is a street of apartments, bars and restaurants that begins a short walk away from the Port of Beirut and the site of Tuesday's explosion. After a viral tweet showed pictures of the severe damage to the street, alongside the rapid clean-up, we bring people together to talk about what they went through and how, as a community, they're trying to recover.

Also, we hear the story of a baby delivered in a Beirut hospital, just after the explosion had shattered the windows and thrown medical staff to the floor. Dr Stephanie Yacoub tells us how she and her team helped mum Emanuelle give birth to baby George.

And with coronavirus cases around the one million mark in Africa, we speak to a Zimbabwean doctor who tells us why so many medical staff are on strike as the virus spreads.

Picture: Armenia street in Beirut (Nadia Hardman / Twitter)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc31cq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc353v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhnxjz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgysjd7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmvz7f4kw)
2020/08/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc38vz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6ld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgysn4c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0p)
Counting the heat health threat from climate change

If the world does not curb its greenhouse gas emissions, by the end of this century, the number of people dying annually because of extreme heat will be greater than the current global death toll from infectious diseases - that’s all infectiousness diseases, from malaria to diarrhoeal diseases to HIV. This is the grim assessment of climate researchers and economists of the Climate Impact Lab in the largest global study to date of health and financial impacts of temperature-related deaths. Roland Pease talks to Solomon Hsiang of the University of California, Berkeley.

UK ecologists have new insights about how diseases jump the species barrier from wildlife to humans. With a global survey of land use and biodiversity, they’ve discovered that when natural habitats are converted to farmland or urbanised, the animal species that survive the change in greatest number are those species which carry viruses and bacteria with the potential to spread to us. This is particularly the case, says Rory Gibb of the University College London, with disease-carrying rodent species, bats and birds.

Do past infections by mild cold coronaviruses prepare the immune systems of some people for infection by SARS-CoV-2? Could immune memory T cells made in response to these cold viruses lessen the severity of Covid-19? Alessandro Sette and Daniela Weiskopf of the La Jolla Institute for Immunology lead the team which published the latest contributions to these questions.


Anglerfish are perhaps the weirdest inhabitants of the deep sea. Their sex lives are particularly strange because finding partners in the dark expanse of the ocean abyss is hard. Females are much bigger than males. When a male finds a female, he latches on her body with his teeth and over a couple of weeks, their flesh fuses so he is permanently attached. Her blood supplies him with all the food and oxygen he needs and he becomes an ever present supply of sperm whenever she produces eggs. But this fusion should be impossible. The female’s immune system should be rejecting her partner like a mismatched organ transplant. German scientists have now discovered that these fish do this by giving up the production of antibodies and immune T cells – essential for fighting infections in all other animals including us. It was a shocking discovery for Prof Thomas Boehm at the Max Planck Institute in Freiburg.


(Image: Relatives of heatstroke victims, their heads covered with wet towels, wait outside a hospital during a heatwave in Karachi. .Credit: Rizwan Tabassum/AFP via Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc3dm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vsl7p)
President Macron of France visits the Beirut explosion site

He said that he had heard the anger on the streets of Beirut, where crowds had welcomed him, chanting slogans denouncing Lebanon's politicians, whom they blame for the disaster.

Also on the programme the Attorney General of New York state has sued to dissolve the National Rifle Association following an investigation into "fraud and abuse." The NRA deny all charges. And we hear a rare voice from Kyrgyzstan describing the Covid 19 situation in that region.

(Picture: President Macron of France mobbed by residents of Beirut. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc3jc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyswmm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc3n3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhpdjh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyt0cr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jcnytcjp)
Beirut reconstruction could cost up to $15bn

The governor of Beirut has estimated reconstruction of the city could cost up to $15bn. Dr Zahira Harb of London's City University was injured in Tuesday's blast, and tells us the people of the city are deeply fed up with their political leaders. And we hear about concerns over food imports to Lebanon given the destruction of the port, from Hani Bohsali, owner and chief executive of Bohsali Foods, who also heads the Syndicate of Food and Drink Importers. Also in the programme, an in-depth look at how coronavirus is impacting Africa. Dr Mary Stephen is from WHO Africa, from Brazzaville in the Congo. Kogmotso Phatsima of educational and flying academy Dare to Dream discusses the impact on tourism in Botswana. And Bismarck Rewane, economist and member of company boards, including at First City Monument Bank and Guinness Nigeria, tells us about how the pandemic is affecting Nigerian firms and families.

(Picture: Beirut's destroyed port area. Picture credit: Reuters.)



FRIDAY 07 AUGUST 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc3wlm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vvqpx3pj)
New York's Attorney General takes aim at the NRA

New York's attorney general has announced a lawsuit aimed at dissolving the powerful National Rifle Association over alleged financial mismanagement. Robert Spitzer, Political Science professor at SUNY Cortland and author of The Politics of Gun Control, explains the allegations and how the notorious gun lobby’s political influence has waned. We’ll also have the latest on the continuing impact on Lebanese politics of Tuesday’s blast in Beirut. Also in the programme, the Danish publishing rights company KODA alleges Google are beginning to remove Danish music from the country’s version of YouTube.

All through the show we’ll be joined by Lori Ann LaRocco of CNBC in New York and Andy Xie an independent economist based in Shanghai.

(Picture: New York Attorney General Letitia James. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc40br)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhprrw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgytcm4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x1b)
Will coronavirus change my faith?

Community is one of main features of religion - but coronavirus has disrupted that. Religious institutions are going through significant changes in response to the coronavirus. But what of these changes will remain and what will organised religion look like post pandemic? Could the virus change the future of worship?

Sodaba Haidare looks at how different faiths will change post pandemic and asks is there still a place for religious buildings and congregational prayer?

Produced by: Athar Ahmed and Nalini Sivathasan
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Image: Karanjee Singh prepares for his first visit to his Sikh Gurdwara since the Coronavirus meant it had to close / Credit: BBC)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc442w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc47v0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhq084)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgytm3d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc4cl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231rmxv)
Anti-government protests in Beirut

Many Lebanese blame the political elite’s negligence and corruption for Tuesday’s blast. We’re live in Beirut to speak to an activist about the latest situation in the capital and government accountability.

President Trump has signed an executive order banning the Chinese-owned video sharing app, TikTok, in forty-five days' time – what’s been the reaction?

And we speak to the National Coordinator of the Young Muslim Association in Nigeria as worshippers return to mosques in Lagos, following an easing of Covid-19 restrictions. The city has nearly 45,000 confirmed cases.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc4hb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231rrnz)
Beirut blast: growing anger against government

We speak to Robert Fadal, who is so angry after Tuesday’s devastating blast that he has just quit the government.

There’s a call for the government in Malawi to do more to help prevent the spread of Covid-19 in prisons.

And we speak to Daniel Smith who is a living son of an enslaved Black man in the United States.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc4m2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wc231rwf3)
Beirut blast investigation under scrutiny

A former prime minister of Lebanon gives his reaction to Tuesday’s horrific blast and to the questions being asked over how this could have happened.

The Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka talks about his support for the detained Nigerian humanist Mubarak Bala who has marked a 100 days in detention.

And the president of Ivory Coast, Alassane Ouattara, has announced his candidacy for October’s presidential election, we speak to the Secretary General of the Presidency.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc4qtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxm)
In-depth, hard-hitting interviews with newsworthy personalities.


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyv32x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78m)
Paid not to work: Burden or opportunity?

In order to try and stem a wave of coronavirus-induced unemployment, governments around the world introduced job retention schemes. Many of these are being rolled back or withdrawn and Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the interventions got people out the habit of work or opened up new opportunities. We speak to three workers placed on furlough - gardening enthusiast, Carol Peett; single parent, Naomi Empowers and keen baker, Chinelo Awa. Plus New York law firm partner, Greg Rinckey tells us about some of the unexpected consequences of the CARES act in the US and Sarah Damaske, Associate Professor of Sociology at Penn State University, tells us that furlough wasn’t necessarily a chance to relax.

(Photo: Naomi Empowers, with kind permission)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv7)
The American who put women's rights in the Japanese constitution

In November 1946, Emperor Hirohito proclaimed a new post-war constitution for Japan which contained clauses establishing women's rights for the first time. They were the brainchild of Beate Sirota Gordon, a young American woman working for the Allied occupying forces. Simon Watts tells her story using interviews from the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Beate Sirota Gordon in Japan in 1946 (Family Collection)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc4vkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp0)
The future for TikTok in the United States

Why the popular video app faces being bought out or banned in the US. Chris Fox is joined by the BBC's North America technology reporter James Clayton to discuss the history of the app and why Donald Trump appears determined to ban it. Alex Stamos, former chief security officer at Facebook, discusses whether TikTok is really a security concern. Eva Galperin, director of cybersecurity at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, explains why banning an app is tough to do. Vishal Shah from Instagram touts his TikTok alternative 'Reels' - one of the platforms hoping to attract TikTok users.

(Photo: TikTok logo, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyv6v1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc4z9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn7)
What is Covid doing to the Amazon?

The coronavirus pandemic is having a growing impact on life in the Brazilian Amazon. Half a million indigenous people still live in often remote rainforest communities, yet many are still contracting Covid-19 and dying. The Munduruku people have already lost ten of their elders to the virus, a situation observers describe as akin to the destruction of a library or museum - so important are the ‘sábios’ - or sages - in passing on the community’s cultural heritage. The virus is also thought to have harmed anti-logging, anti-burning and anti-mining efforts around the rain-forest, with Brazil’s space agency identifying a large increase in the number of fires burning during the month of July compared to last year. This year the government has authorised the deployment of the military to combat deforestation and forest fires and also banned the setting of fires in the region for 120 days. But President Bolsonaro’s critics accuse him of underplaying the impact of coronavirus on the Amazon region and even exploiting the crisis for political gain. So is enough being done to support the country’s indigenous peoples? Will the Covid-19 speed up the clearing of the rainforest? And how is the crisis adding to the already volatile and polarised Brazilian political landscape? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss what the virus is doing to Brazil's Amazon region.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc531x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhqvh1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyvgb9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgc)
Five minutes from Death. A Footballer in Beirut

Lebanon international Edmond Chehade tells us how he was caught in the blast that rocked Beirut. We also hear from his team-mate Omar Buigel. Also on the show, Tony Dorigo recalls stories from his Torino days.

Picture: The Lebanese flag sits on the rubble in Beirut, in the aftermath of a massive explosion in the city. (PATRICK BAZ/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc56t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhc)
The teenager who took on the Taliban

A teenage Afghan girl was recently celebrated as a hero, and photos of her holding an AK47 widely circulated, after she killed two Taliban fighters who attacked her home. But Firuz Rahimi of BBC Uzbek – himself from Afghanistan – shares the story behind the story, revealing the complexity of Afghan life and loyalties.

Unmasking the masks
Nasobuco, barbijo, tapabocas and mascarilla – the proliferation of words for facemasks in Latin America, with BBC Monitoring journalist Rafael Rojas in Miami.

When monuments say more than ministries
Olga Ivshina tells us about a BBC Russian investigation into what the new names being added to war memorials can reveal about military operations in the absence of government information.

Indian Matchmaking
Indian Matchmaking is a Netflix show featuring an elite matchmaker seeking suitable matches for clients in India and the US. It’s been a hit, but also controversial, as the BBC's Geeta Pandey explains.

Journey to the Carpathians
Roman Lebed of BBC Ukrainian takes us to the Carpathian Mountains, where he recently reported on devastating floods. He tells us about the people he met, now trying to rebuild their lives, and explains why the Carpathians are so close to his heart.

Image: Qamar Gul, Afghan girl holding AK47
Credit: Social media


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc5bk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhr2z9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyvptk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc5g99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vvmxw)
Public anger in Lebanon

Lebanese political class accused over Tuesday's catastrophic explosion. We hear from a government minister who resigned this week, and a prominent member of Lebanon's civil society.

Also in the programme: President Trump bans US companies from doing business with Chinese social media giants; and an interview with the first black male photographer to shoot the cover of Vogue magazine.

(Photo: The search for missing people after the Beirut port explosions. Credit: EPA/WAEL HAMZEH)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc5l1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyvy9t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt3vt0540v)
TikTok threatens legal action against Trump US ban

President Trump is targeting China's WeChat and TikTok, citing national security concerns. Paul Mozer of the New York Times in Taipei explains why American companies have been given 45 days notice to wind up any business they have with the Chinese social media apps. We take a look at the US jobs market, as the latest monthly figures are published, and the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether job retention schemes that have been introduced around the world offering generous welfare payments have made some people think twice about heading back to the office. We have a report from India, a year on from the country removing special status from Indian-administered Kashmir, examining whether economic promises made at the time have been fulfilled. Plus, Riley Andersen, co-founder of Umami Games, which is a player in the new world of so-called hyper casual gaming, discusses the firm's biggest hits so far. And we get wider context on the sector from Tim Bradshaw, global technology correspondent for the Financial Times.

(Picture: WeChat and TikTok icons on a smartphone. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc5psk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgyw21y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztgc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc5tjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swqx7r5lj)
Beirut blast: Anti-government protests

On Thursday Lebanese security forces fired teargas at demonstrators in Beirut, as rage over the country’s leadership grew following a massive explosion that laid waste to large parts of the capital on Tuesday. The blast killed at least 149 people and injured about 5,000 others. With further anti-government demonstrations planned for Saturday, we speak to protesters in Beirut.

And we hear from a young woman in Beirut who was making of making a TikTok video when the blast occurred. The video has since been viewed more than 25 million times.

Also, following President Donald Trump's order for American firms to stop doing business with the Chinese app TikTok, we speak to TikTok content creators in the US.

(Photo: Protesters clash with riot police in Beirut, 04 August 2020. Credit: EPA/NABIL MOUNZER)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc5y8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc620y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhrtg2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgywf9b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmvz7j1gz)
2020/08/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc65s2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhp0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgywk1g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv60)
Does air traffic affect our weather?

Anyone else had their flight cancelled? The COVID 19 pandemic has had a huge impact on air travel – air traffic in 2020 is expected to be down 50 per cent on last year. But beyond the obvious disruption to business and people’s lives, how might the quieter skies affect our weather and climate?

One curious listener, Jeroen Wijnands, who lives next to Schiphol airport in the Netherlands, noticed how there were fewer clouds and barely any rainfall since the flights dropped off. Could airplanes affect our local weather?

Also, did we learn anything from another occasion when airplanes were grounded, during the post-9/11 shutdown? How will the current period impact our future climate?

Marnie Chesterton investigates this question and discovers some of the surprising effects that grounded aircraft are having: on cloud formation, forecasting and climate change.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton, Producer: Dom Byrne

[Photo:Commercial airplane parking at the airport. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc69j6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ytd8vwh4s)
Air India jet breaks in two in Kerala killing 16

An Air India Express plane with 191 people on board has crashed at an airport in the southern state of Kerala, killing at least 16 people.

Also in the programme: The Lebanese Shia movement, Hezbollah, has denied any link to Tuesday's deadly blast at the seaport in Beirut; and the United States Treasury is placing sanctions on Hong Kong's Chief Executive, Carrie Lam, and ten other senior officials.


(Photo: The aircraft skidded off the runway at Calicut airport, breaking into two pieces. Credit: KAVIYOOR SANTOSH BNI)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc6f8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgywsjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxxrc6k0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8xnhs9fl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5prcgywx8v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58jcnyx8fs)
TikTok threatens legal action against Trump US ban

President Trump is targeting China's WeChat and TikTok, citing national security concerns. Paul Mozer of the New York Times in Taipei explains why American companies have been given 45 days notice to wind up any business they have with the Chinese social media apps. We take a look at the US jobs market, as the latest monthly figures are published, and New York Times reporter Emily Badger explains why the end of the federal enhanced unemployment benefit system disproportionately hits black Americans. We have a report from India, a year on from the country removing special status from Indian-administered Kashmir, examining whether economic promises made at the time have been fulfilled. And we'll hear from our sister programme Marketplace about how the coronavirus pandemic is shifting attitudes towards service robots.

(Picture: WeChat and TikTok icons on a smartphone. Picture credit: EPA.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 06:06 SUN (w3csz6lc)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6ld)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6ld)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6ld)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6ld)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n43xd)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n4h4s)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n4lwx)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n4vd5)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n4z49)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n56mk)

BBC News Summary 20:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n69bq)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n6jtz)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pr06n6nl3)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n6x2c)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n70th)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n789r)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n7d1w)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n7ht0)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n7mk4)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n7r98)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n7w1d)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n7zsj)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n83jn)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n92hp)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n9fr2)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pr06n9kh6)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5prcgyfn7m)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5prcgyfrzr)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5prcgyg0h0)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jm)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18vhgd6vzs)

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Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snv)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz988)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3csz9ds)

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From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9ps)

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From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9ps)

Global Questions 06:32 SAT (w3ct0wj5)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3csy98y)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3csy98y)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3csy98y)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc5)

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Heart and Soul 06:32 SUN (w3ct0v0h)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0v0h)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SUN (w3ct0v0h)

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In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbj)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbj)

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James Naughtie’s Letter to America 05:50 SAT (w3ct0whn)

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Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3z)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3z)

More or Less 23:50 SAT (w3ct0pxm)

More or Less 02:50 MON (w3ct0pxm)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxm)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6t4)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wc231d19g)

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Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2ytd8vh19h)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4l)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4l)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1f)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jmvz74fvl)

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Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh55)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bwdlpzjdr)

Sportsworld 16:06 SAT (w172x3l8d545zr4)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l8d548wn7)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjg)

Tech Tent 01:06 SUN (w3cszhnz)

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The Compass 08:06 SUN (w3ct0wp9)

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The Conversation 07:32 SUN (w3cswp29)

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The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8k)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq5)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvp)

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The Inquiry 10:06 SUN (w3cszl3q)

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