Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 25 JULY 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qnh91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18v462fqcy)
Gold prices rise as investors look for safe haven

The price of gold rises as investors get jitters over the coronavirus pandemic and worsening US-China tensions. We also hear how rare earth minerals, key to most of our high tech products, might be caught in the geopolitics too. Brands with racially problematic histories have been called out during the Black Lives Matter protests – and an Australian cheese is now changing its name to disassociate from racist connotations. We hear why it's taken so long for the brand to drop the name from aboriginal activist Sam Cook. Plus, why there's a coin shortage in the US and why wool prices are falling around the world. We discuss all this live with Sarah Knight, station manager at ABC Radio Perth.

(Image: Gold bullion bars. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qnm15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863w7cg9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybbz9k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjf)
Ben Stokes: "The best cricketer I've played with"

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma chat to England opener Dom Sibley fresh from his maiden home Test century during England's victory over the West Indies in the second Test at Old Trafford, and pay homage to "Mr Incredible" Ben Stokes after he starred with the bat, ball, and in the field. We also reflect on the postponement of the 2020 ICC Men’s T20 World Cup in Australia and discuss the likely knock-on effect it’ll have on this year’s Indian Premier League. Plus we look at the return of cricket fans in grounds in England this weekend.

Image: England's Ben Stokes (L) and England's Dom Sibley return after lunch on the second day of the second Test cricket match between England and the West Indies at Old Trafford in Manchester, northwest England on July 17, 2020 (Photo by MICHAEL STEELE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qnqs9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh9)
The president and the hostage-taker

There's hot debate in Ukraine after President Volodymyr Zelensky helped secure the release of a busload of hostages by complying with the hostage-taker's bizarre demands. Irena Taranyuk of BBC Ukrainian has been following the story.

Birdwatching in lockdown Kathmandu
For Shreejana Shrestha of BBC Nepali, lockdown in the capital Kathmandu brought an unexpected new interest. She's become an avid birdwatcher. She tells us about the many beautiful and unusual birds she's been able to see and hear in the quieter and cleaner city.

Cathedral, museum, mosque: Hagia Sophia
The first Friday prayers have been said at Istanbul's Hagia Sophia, after a court ruling ended its museum status. It was built as a cathedral 1500 years ago, became a mosque after the Ottoman conquest, and in the 1930s became a museum. Now it's a mosque again, as BBC Turkish journalist and Istanbul resident Esra Yalcinalp reports.

Iran's defiant women singers
Women are banned from singing solo in Iran, and during the past two years at least a dozen have been sentenced to prison for singing in public. BBC World Service Women's Affairs reporter Faranak Amidi tells the story of two singers who faced prison for making music.

Notable banknotes
One side-effect of the Covid-19 pandemic has been a big increase in digital payments. Is it the start of a long goodbye to familiar banknotes? It seemed a good moment to revisit some tales of unusual and surprising banknotes we collected on the Fifth Floor a few years back.

(Photo: Hostage bus Lutsk, Ukraine. Credit: Markiian Lyseiko/EPA)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv5)
The fastest vaccine ever developed

In the 1960s five-year-old Jeryl Lynn Hilleman got ill with mumps. Her father Dr Maurice Hilleman took a swab from the back of her throat and used it to help create a vaccine for the disease - more quickly than any previous vaccine had ever been completed. During his decades long career Dr Hilleman worked on vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, hepatitis and meningitis.

Photo: Jeryl Lynn Hilleman with her sister, Kirsten, in 1966 as a doctor gave her the mumps vaccine developed by their father Maurice Hilleman. Courtesy of Merck.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qnvjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn5)
Should tax havens help pay for coronavirus?

While the coronavirus pandemic is raging around the world, discussions over rebuilding the global economy are already underway. Globally, the recovery will cost trillions of dollars. Governments and finance ministries are working around the clock to design financial packages at a time when income from tax has hit rock bottom. There's concern that many governments will have to raise taxes to cope with the shortfall in revenue. But what if they could tap a different source of funding? According to the Tax Justice Network, there are trillions of dollars' worth of cash and other assets tucked away in offshore tax havens belonging to both private individuals and large corporations. Some people are now saying that with the coronavirus crisis, governments can no longer afford to go without the vast amount of tax revenue they lose each year. So, could a small tax on that money fund the global recovery? What challenges need to be overcome to bring together governments and multiple jurisdictions to agree on a framework? Will it be possible to sift through layers of obfuscation to establish the exact amount of money that is held in tax havens – and how will diminishing their prominence change the world? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss whether tax havens should help pay for the pandemic recovery.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qnz8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863w7qpp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybcbjy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvs0)
QAnon and on and on

It’s bursting into the mainstream – a bizarre conspiracy theory that casts US President Donald Trump as its hero.

QAnon claims that the president is secretly fighting a cabal of high-placed paedophiles in Hollywood and the so-called “deep state”. But why has it had an apparent surge in popularity during the global pandemic?

Since it first emerged in an anonymous post on an online message board in 2017, QAnon has developed into a movement which is now making inroads into the American political psyche.

However, many families of QAnon followers feel they have lost their relatives to a dangerous cult. Several people have been arrested plotting attacks while seemingly under the influence of the conspiracy theory.

This week Twitter banned thousands of QAnon-themed accounts, but it’s likely that at least one adherent will enter the US Congress after elections in November.

What role might this strange belief system play in US politics?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Stephanie Hegarty

Picture caption: A man in a crowd flashes a QAnon T-shirt
Picture credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whm)
Letter four

James Naughtie reflects on the causes and consequences of the polarised politics of the United States. Looking back on 50 years of American experiences, he explores the conservative revolution that began in the 1990s, the culture wars that brought a sharp partisan tone to every public debate, and the resulting challenge to the system of government itself. A modern American revolution, played out in the years from Bill Clinton to Donald Trump.

Produced by Tara Neill and Regan Morris for BBC World Service.


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qp30p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvgz)
How are India’s lavish weddings changing under lockdown?

More than 10 million marriages take place every year in India, while the wedding industry - one of the biggest in the country - is estimated to be over $50bn in size. Multiple ceremonies, large gatherings, destination choices, designer wear - the list is endless, as families try to outdo each other in scale and extravagance.

But the coronavirus has hit the industry hard, with the government restricting the number of guests to just 50. Royal revelries have all but vanished, with masks and sanitisers becoming an essential part of the smaller, cheaper weddings.

So, in this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how India’s big, fat wedding industry is adapting in the times of social distancing.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Kaveri Vij, wedding planner; Raghav Khullar and Vandana Mirchandani, newlyweds; Saurabh Goswami, matchmaker


SAT 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybcg92)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj4)
Global Questions

Coronavirus: A different environment for the Earth?

Coronavirus has led to reduced pollution, falling carbon emissions, re-emerging wildlife: all an environmentalists dream. But will it continue and will we see long lasting environmental change? There are mountains of food going to waste, unrecyclable waste rising daily; severe cuts in agricultural and fishery export levels, while the maintenance and monitoring of natural ecosystems has been temporarily halted; and tourism activity to natural areas has ceased. So what action will and should the world take next?

Zeinab Badawi, her panel of experts and a global audience putting their questions.
Panel:-
Inger Andersen Executive Director UN Environment Programme
Lily Cole Super model, Actor, Activist and Writer, mostly recent author of Who Cares Wins: Reasons For Optimism in Our Changing World.


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qp6rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snt)
Will the EU's Covid deal heal the bloc's divisions?

After the second-longest summit in the bloc's history, EU leaders agreed a deal for a coronavirus economic recovery plan worth hundreds of billions of euros. But will it keep the so-called Frugal Four satisfied? Also - is now the time to reassess the health insurance industry in the United States? And why Kenyan farmers have been hit by a drop in Muslim pilgrim numbers for the upcoming Hajj. Presented by Lucy Burton.

(Image: President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen & European Council president Charles Michel, Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qpbhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pr)
Brazil’s legacy of racism

Stories from Brazil, Turkmenistan, Hungary and Italy.

The global anti-racism movement following the death of George Floyd has resonated in Brazil. It has a long legacy of racial inequality – Brazil was the last country in the Americas to abolish slavery – and that’s left deep scars. And even though more than half of the population now identify as black, very few hold positions of power. Our South America correspondent Katy Watson reports from Sao Paolo.

Police in Hungary are investigating the alleged suicide of a Roma rights activist and politician who died earlier this month. Laszlo Bogdan was 46 and had made a name for himself as mayor of the small village Cserdi in southern Hungary. Under his leadership, the village had become a model for others. He was also popular as Roma leader who fought for greater integration. His death has left many in the community searching for answers– as Nick Thorpe has heard.

Turkmenistan is one of the most secretive and authoritarian states in the world. And so far it has not officially registered a single case of Covid-19. That's despite high rates of coronavirus reported by all its neighbouring countries, including Iran and Afghanistan. And its leader is focused on creating a different narrative in the country: an Era of Supreme Happiness, filled with fast cars, beautiful horses and rap music written by him. He likes to be known as “the Patron.”

But despite the media black-out, independent news organisations are reporting numerous cases of people falling ill with Covid-like symptoms. There are even reports that a Turkmen official has died of the virus – but still, the country insists there are no cases. So how did the recent visit by experts from the World Health Organisation help to shed light in an information vacuum? Rayhan Demytrie reports.

Cultural events have been cancelled or put on hold around the world in 2020 because of the pandemic. The Tokyo Olympics, the Eurovision Song Contest and the Cannes film festival have all been postponed, but it’s the hundreds of thousands of local events many are missing the most. In Venice, one festival has gone ahead, albeit in a more restrained way - and, perhaps fittingly, it’s the one that celebrated the end of the plague in 1576. Julia Buckley attended the festival.

(Image: Woman at a "Black and Indigenous Lives Matter" demonstration in Manaus, Brazil. Credit: Reuters/Bruno Kelly)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybcpsb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3y)
The biggest brothel in Asia

Sonagachi in Kolkata is a hub for sex trafficking. Leena Kejriwal wants to end the exploitation of young women. “It's all happening because nobody's doing anything about it.”
Send us your stories: myindianlife@bbc.com
And let us know what you think of the podcast. #MyIndianLife


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7h)
Resolves

Caroline Hodges

Caroline Hodges, headteacher of Little Ealing Primary School in London, resolves to find ways to provide poorer families with meal support for their children through the summer holidays, since Covid-19 has revealed the difficulties they’ve faced year on year in the past.

The school has remained open to frontline worker families, and here she observes how the older and younger children adapt and play together, but the wealth divide at this large primary school is not so easily accommodated. Caroline is determined to set up a fund to support the families in need.

Caroline recalls her own tight knit community in Northern England, where she grew up in an atmosphere of certainty about the shared care and help that existed between families.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qpg82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863w86p6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybctjg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl1)
United Zingdom

'Essex has given me my ballsiness'

Zing heads to Witham to meet councillor Chelsey Jay, a self-described proud Essex girl. Chelsey was elected last year to the local town council, at the age of 28. For Chelsey, being from Essex is all about being "ballsy" and ignoring snobbish stereotypes: "You're gonna be ripped apart for being from Essex, so you might as well give it a try with a smile on your face."


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4k)
Has science coverage lost out its diversity of topics to Coronavirus?

Listeners discuss how well science coverage on the BBC World Service has tackled Covid 19 - and whether this has been to the detriment of other topics? We talk to the World Service science editor.

Plus a twist on a legendary radio format: but what is the objective of James Naughtie’s Letter to America?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qpl06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bw1bd6csx)
Major League Baseball's first female on-field coach

Alyssa Nakken on making history in Major League Baseball. San Francisco Giants assistant coach Alyssa Nakken joins us to reflect on becoming the first woman to coach on field in an MLB game. She coached first base during this week’s exhibition against the Oakland A’s and tells us she’s grateful for the opportunity but “it’s not like we won a World Series”. Nakken also says she doesn’t feel she’s looked at any differently at the club because she’s a woman. Nakken reveals her “insecurities” lie more with the fact she hasn’t had much experience of “big league level”.

The president of the NWSL expansion team set for Los Angeles in 2022 - Julie Uhrman – on the hype around her new club. Uhrman tells us about the club partnering with LA84, being inspired by the City Football Group, attracting players to Los Angeles and the fact her club will allow their players to protest about social issues. Uhrman says: “This started by having a deep interest in pay equity. When something is happening in the world that we are not pleased about they should be able to use their platform in the same way that we should be able to use our platform.”

No Olympics in Tokyo but Sumo Wrestling is back – We speak to John Gunning from the Japan Times about the return of sumo amidst the coronavirus pandemic. July’s Grand Tournament was moved from Nagoya to the capital to limit travel during the pandemic.
“It’s an understanding that is deeply bonded.” - Lisa Butler and Rachel Levey from Paradise City Dragons discuss how being part of a dragon boat crew has helped them come to terms with living with breast cancer. They tell us how the friendships formed among the crew have helped them emotionally and how the activity has helped their physical recoveries. A film about the team of cancer survivors and supporters from Western Massachusetts is in the running for an award at the PBS Short Film Festival.

The Karate champion with the world's smallest pacemaker - Mairi Kerin joins us after she was fitted with the latest version of the world's smallest pacemaker. The three-time World Championship competitor and 2020 Olympic hopeful says the vitamin pill sized device has saved her martial arts career. She had to be fitted with a pacemaker after visiting her doctor after she fainted and says she was shocked to be told she had a problem with her heart.

This week’s Sporting Witness goes back to 2010 to chart the story of the Afghanistan men's cricket team. Their journey from the refugee camps of Pakistan to the International stage is one of cricket’s most remarkable stories. Afghan batsman Raees Ahmadzai tells us all about it.


Photo: Alyssa Nakken (Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qpprb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863w8g5g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybd20q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wkc)
The confined: A story of hidden children

In 1942 in Nazi occupied France Jews were hunted and those helping them could be sent to concentration camps. Despite the dangers a Catholic nun took a stand that saved the lives of 82 Jewish children.

Back then Capdenac was a small, picturesque town in the south of France, around 140 miles north of Toulouse. But it was also a strategic military location for the Germans because of its railway junction - not a place you would expect to find a group of nuns hiding Jewish children. Led by Sister Denise Bergon they hid the children for two years in the convent boarding school of Notre Dame de Massip. Out of around 15 nuns, only four knew the identities of the children taking shelter.

Three survivors talk of their unique bond with Sister Denise and how they escaped the clutches of French collaborators and an SS Division which would become notorious for its massacres in the area. Sisters Annie Beck and Helene Ulrich, and Albert Seifer speak of the confinement that changed their lives forever and the love that saved them. Later honoured as one of ‘Righteous Among the Nations’ by the Israeli Holocaust Memorial Yad Vashem Denise Bergon decided not to become a bystander.

Presenter Alice Doyard met the survivors in France and tells the story of the woman they remember forever as “Our Mother Of The War”.

Producer: Niamh Hughes
Presenter: Alice Doyard

(Photo: Annie and Helene at the Convent Gate)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qpthg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6t3)
'Synths are my best friends' with Suzanne Ciani and Marie Davidson

Legendary electronic artist Suzanne Ciani welcomes Marie Davidson, Sui Zhen, and Lorenzo Senni.

Suzanne is based in San Francisco and has been nominated for five Grammy Awards. She was the first woman to score a major Hollywood film, and was the first female voice to be used on a computer game. Marie Davidson is a French-Canadian musician, and one of the world’s most exciting electronic producers. Her most recent record, Working Class Woman, considers “the stresses and strains of operating within the spheres of dance music and club culture”. Lorenzo Senni is a Milan-based electronic music producer, composer and visual artist, and has composed for cinema and theatre. He has even created an installation designed to comfort people in the intensive care unit of a hospital. And Sui Zhen is an experimental pop and performance artist from Melbourne, Australia, whose work focuses on the intersections between human life and technology.

Joining from different timezones across the planet, they’ll dicuss what it’s like to release an album, the importance of human interactions with machines, and how they first discovered their beloved synths.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qpy7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ysnr7d3w5)
Spain seeing a surge in coronavirus infections

All nightclubs across Catalonia in north eastern Spain have been ordered to close, with a spike in coronavirus cases prompting fears of a second wave of infections in the country.

Also in the programme: A new warning here in the UK about the heightened risk of death from the virus from being obese or overweight; a crackdown on the opposition in Belarus ahead of Presidential elections; and the resignation of journalists en masse from a news website that is a rare independent voice in Hungary.

(Photo: Mask-wearing is encouraged in Barcelona as the region endures new restrictions. Credit: AFP)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qq1zq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l80wtdln1)
Tokyo 2021: the Olympics on hold

On what should have been the first weekend of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, Sportsworld takes a look at the next step for the athletes. With a year to go until Tokyo 2021, will we see the same athletes next year?

Plus, we hear the story of Jim Thorpe, the American Indian who was the star of the 1912 Olympics.

We'll be joined by our Premier League panel, Anita Assante, Benni McCarthy and José Fonte ahead of tomorrow, the last day of the 2019/20 Premier League season. With Champions League, Europa League and spots in the Premier League all to be decided, there'll be plenty to discuss ahead of the tomorrow's action.

We'll have live updates from the second day of the third test of England and the West Indies' three match series. And we'll bring you all the latest news and stories from sport around the world.

Photo credit: Olympic rings outside museum in Tokyo (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qqjz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863w99dc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybdx7m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvs0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qqnqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t2t)
Seven dead, 46 injured: One Chicago weekend

On Monday 5 August last year, the Chicago Sun Times newspaper carried this headline: “Seven deaths, 46 wounded in Chicago Weekend Shootings.” It was referring to the casualty list after one summer weekend in Chicago.

As violence flares in cities across the USA this programme reconstructs those three days in 2019. Narrated by Clarke Peters (The Wire’s Detective Lester Freamon), and with a specially composed music and sound design, this immersive documentary uses the words of the city newspaper updates on the violence, alongside eyewitness accounts and the sad personal stories of relatives and friends who lost loved ones.

This series of unconnected gun incidents in Chicago took place while America was focused on two mass shootings elsewhere that weekend - in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton Ohio.

We hear from the father of one of the men killed in a Chicago shooting, from the ER director of the hospital forced to refuse new admissions in order to deal with the victims; from an eye-witness who helped young people wounded during a drive-by at a local park; and from an anti-violence campaigner whose friend was shot dead in the middle of the day.

Yet the level of gun violence in Chicago that weekend, was not particularly unusual - and this year, the figures are only getting worse. With emotional first person recollections, the documentary recreates life in a city where gun violence has become part of everyday life.

(Photo: A memorial where 26-year-old Chantell Grant and 35-year-old Andrea Stoudemire, mothers volunteering with a group called Mothers Against Senseless Killings (MASK) were shot and killed 28 July 2019, in the South Side of Chicago, Illinois. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qqsgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk32)
Director, producer and writer Oliver Stone

This week on The Arts Hour on the BBC World Service, Nikki Bedi talks to the multiple Oscar winning director, producer and writer Oliver Stone.

Famed for the challenging films he makes, he began his Hollywood career as a screenwriter writing Scarface, which starred Al Pacino, and won his first Academy Award for the 1978 movie Midnight Express.

As a director he’s created some of the most talked about and often controversial feature films of the last fifty years as well as making political documentaries alongside them: He showed us how greed was good in Wall Street; explored politics from the very top with his presidential trilogy, JFK, Nixon and W; made a film about the ex-CIA whistleblower Edward Snowden; and examined the portrayal of violence on US TV in Natural Born Killers. Oliver also used his experience of being a Vietnam veteran in his Vietnam trilogy of films, Platoon, Born On The Fourth Of July and Heaven And Earth.

He’s just published his memoir. Called Chasing the Light, it takes us from his early life and career through to him winning the coveted Best Picture and Best Director Oscars for Platoon.

In the programme, Oliver Stone talks to Nikki about the power and responsibility he has as a filmmaker - how he gets the best performance from actors, although that did involve shouting at Tom Cruise, and why he feels he did his best shots with fifteen minutes to go. He candidly discusses his family, his intimate relationship with French mother, how his parent’s divorce fractured him and intensified a split in his nature, why his grandmother’s death renewed his passion to succeed in the film industry and the impact of having duel heritage.

He discusses the stories behind some of his most iconic films: why making Natural Born Killers made him feel free; the problems of questioning the murder of JFK; and the shame of being in the Vietnam War.

Oliver also responds to the criticism he has had over his interviews with political leaders including Russian President Vladimir Putin and addresses allegations of sexual misconduct during his career.

(Photo: Oliver Stone. Credit: Oliver Stone/Octopus Books)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qqx6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ysnr7f2v6)
Poland withdraws from convention protecting women's rights

Poland's ruling Law and Justice Party, which promotes a conservative political agenda, says it intends to begin withdrawing from a European treaty on violence against women. The treaty is the Council of Europe's Istanbul Convention and was ratified by a previous centrist government in Poland in 2015.

Also in the programme: Donovan Price, a street pastor in Chicago on working with the families of victims of violent crime, and protests continue for the third Saturday in a row in the city of Khabarovsk in Russia's Far East. People have taken to the streets demanding the reinstatement of their popular local governor, Sergei Furgal, who was arrested earlier this month on murder charges which he denies.

(Photo: Protesters hold banners reading 'Women's Strike' as they take part in protest against the Polish government plans to withdraw from the Istanbul Convention on prevention and combatting of domestic violence, in Warsaw, Poland on 24 July 2020. Credit: Wojtek Radwanski / AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qr0yr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybfd74)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qr4pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863w9x40)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybfhz8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Why Factor (w3csytz8)
Why do stories matter?

Telling stories is one of the ways we connect to one and other. Stories teach us empathy and allow us to feel what it’s like to walk in someone else’s shoes. They evolve to show us what our society considers acceptable - and what will not be forgiven. Sandra Kanthal explores why stories matter.

Guests:
David JP Philips – Communications Expert
John Yorke - Author: Into The Woods
Mirta Galesic - Professor in Human Social Dynamics, Santa Fe Institute
Jamie Tehrani, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Durham University
Elizabeth Kperrun - Founder; Zenafri Limited
Samantha Armstrong - Senior Publisher, Oxford University Press
Sandra Newman – Author: The Heavens and How Not To Write a Novel

Music Track: Make America Great Again – performed by Dave Fenley

(Photo: Woman holding an open book bursting with light. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 23:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxl)
Data in the time of cholera

Tim Harford speaks to Steven Johnson about William Farr and the birth of epidemiology in the 1800s.


(British epidemiologist William Farr circa 1865 in London.
Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 26 JULY 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qrd64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhny)
The new AI tool creating a buzz

GPT-3 is a tool whose predecessor was dubbed “too dangerous to release”. We find out why the new version is creating a hot debate in the tech world. Plus, why a popular mobile game in China has been pulled because of some morse code in a song. And many people have had to get used to videoconferencing during the past few months. Are meetings in virtual reality the next step? Please note that since this episode was recorded the Congressional hearing mentioned in the show has been postponed. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock image representing a human brain against a tech-related background, Credit: Getty Images).


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybfrgj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qrhy8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863wb8cd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybfw6n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvs0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qrmpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wkh)
The most important, least important thing

Why is watching sport so important to us as a species? And what happens when that experience is taken away from us?
Award-winning sports journalist and broadcaster Clare Balding explores why sport plays such a crucial role in shaping society, speaking to a field of global experts and elite sportspeople, including Martina Navratilova.

In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic abruptly put a stop to virtually all sporting activity across the globe – and left vast numbers of people staring into an existential void. In sport’s absence, we’ve been hungrily reliving past contests, debating hypothetical scenarios, and doing everything we can to plug the hole in our lives. The crisis has shown how our relationship with sport dominates our lives and our media, our conversations and our leisure time.

In this documentary, Clare Balding talks to figures from the worlds of anthropology, philosophy and human behaviour to try to figure out why experiencing sport is so meaningful to us, whether we’re in a crowd, or one of millions following on television and social media.

Her interviewees include the sociologists Akilah Carter-Francique, Mahfoud Amara and Ramachandra Guha; anthropologist Leila Zaki Chakravarty; and philosophers Heather Reid and Andy Martin – who unpick the myriad ways in which our love of sport is deeply embedded in human experience and history, and how our consumption of it has shaped modern society.

Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott reveals what we know about what happens in our brains as we watch sport, whilst bioethicist and technology expert Andy Miah tells Clare how cutting-edge digital advances and the new world of eSports are changing the relationship between fan and sporting event forever.

An Overcoat Media Production for BBC World Service. Produced by Steven Rajam

Photo: Liverpool fans at Anfield, Credit: Tembele Bohle, Pexels


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qrrfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybg3px)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjn)
The teenage brain

Teenagers are an alien species. Well, that’s not exactly the conclusion of Sarah-Jayne Blakemore’s research, but it’s a crude summary. Professor Blakemore, author of Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain, is a leading neuroscientist who studies the teenage brain. When humans enter adolescence their brains, as well as their bodies, go through a period of transformation. And, during this period their behaviour alters. They become more risk-taking for example, and more acutely conscious of how they’re perceived by others. Professor Blakemore even has an explanation for why they can’t get out of bed.

Presenter David Edmonds
Producer Ben Cooper

(Image: Parent and teenager, Credit: Shutterstock)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qrw5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863wbmls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybg7g1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8j)
Pedro Reyes: Destroying guns, creating art

Despite a rich tradition of art, music and food, Mexico is often depicted negatively in popular culture. Artist Pedro Reyes is using his work to challenge violent stereotypes of his country, creating intricate music boxes out of guns. Pedro Reyes tells our reporter Saskia Edwards why he’s making works of art from weapons of war.

American author Eve L Ewing explains why she’s brought the 1919 Chicago Riots to life through poetry and how those events resonate a 100 years on. She also shares what her poetry and Marvel Comic book series have in common.

We hear from Indian photographer Sohrab Hura who reflects the lives of the people of Kashmir in his photography. He speaks to reporter Cleo Roberts about how his photo collection Snow reveals what’s it’s like for those caught up in the ever-shifting politics between India and Pakistan.

Plus: Has a film, a book or a song ever changed the way you see the world? The Grammy award-winning singer and songwriter Norah Jones tells us how a master of European cinema influences her creative process.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

(Photo: Pedro Reyes. Credit: Ago Projects)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qrzxs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Assignment (w3csz6lb)
The many colours of Raqqa

The untold story of Abood Hamam, perhaps the only photojournalist to have worked under every major force in Syria's war - and lived to tell the tale. At the start of the uprising he was head of photography for the state news agency, SANA, taking official shots of President Assad and his wife Asma by day - and secretly filming opposition attacks by night. Later he defected and returned to his home town, Raqqa, where various rebel groups were competing for control. Other journalists fled when the terrorists of so-called Islamic State (IS) took over, but Abood stayed - and was asked by IS to film its victory parade. He sent pictures of life under IS to agencies all over the world - using a pseudonym. As the bombing campaign by the anti-IS coalition intensified, Abood moved away - but returned later to record the heartbreaking destruction - but also the slow return of life, and colour, to the streets. For months, he roamed through the ruins with his camera, seeing himself as ”the guardian of the city." Raqqa's future is still very uncertain, but Abood now wants everyone to see his pictures, which he posts on Facebook, and know his real name. He hopes the colours he's showing will tempt the thousands of families who've fled Raqqa to return home, and rebuild their lives, and their city.

Reporter: Tim Whewell
Producer: Mohamad Chreyteh
Sound mix: James Beard
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Children running in Raqqa, 2019. Credit: Abood Hamam)


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybgc65)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0wkg)
Vipassana: 240 hours of silence

Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was taught by the Buddha more than 2,500 years ago as a universal remedy for universal ills. The practice died out in India, but survived in Burma, and is now a growing movement around the world.

To learn the technique students complete a 10-day silent retreat, which includes 10 hours of daily meditation. There is no eye contact, no communication, no exercise, no reading or writing, no technology. No distraction from the journey inwards. They must try to overcome the habit of reacting to sensation. By doing so, over 10 days students train themselves to stop reacting to the vicissitudes of life and experience the interconnectedness of all living things.

It is notoriously difficult, but what insights does it afford? What difficulties, both physical and emotional, are faced along the way? We hear the experiences of people who have made it through 240 hours of silence.

Vipassana was popularised by S.N. Goenka, who learnt the technique in Burma from his teacher, Sayagyi U Ba Khin, and in 1969 travelled to India to conduct the first Vipassana course in this tradition outside Burma. There are now around 200 Vipassana meditation centres around the world, attracting people from all walks of life. The course is free, and non-sectarian.

Producer: Eve Streeter
(Photo credit: Marc Sethi)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qs3nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjr)
Death of Elijah McClain

Elijah McClain, a 23-year-old black man, was killed after an encounter with police in Colorado last year. He had been put in a chokehold and injected with ketamine. No-one has been punished over what happened. Following the outcry over the killing of George Floyd, a petition gathered millions of signatures calling for justice for Elijah McClain. The state of Colorado has now said it is re-examining what happened. Elijah's mother, Sheneen McClain, explains what happened to her son.

And a conversation with two women - both white - with a shared experience of adopting a black child. Cath Duncan from Cape Town, South Africa and Noelle Palmer from Minnesota, USA, exchange what they have learned about racism in raising their children.

(Photo: Elijah McClain Credit: McClain family handout)


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybggy9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 The Conversation (p03ng3cs)
Astronauts: Sandra Magnus and Samantha Cristoforetti

Sandra Magnus is a US astronaut with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is now the executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Sandra always wanted to become an astronaut and has had a lifelong passion for science and exploring how the world works. On the space station she says that every day is about trouble-shooting, and sometimes it doesn't seem very organised, there is a lost and found plastic bag, "I always thought that was rather amusing because that means there were things on the station that were missing parts".

Samantha Cristoforetti made history when she became the first person to make an espresso in space. "We got to try the first freshly brewed espresso coffee in space" she says proudly. Born in Milan and raised in the province of Trentino in Itlay, Samantha speaks four languages including Russian. She has a second degree in aeronautical sciences and a masters in mechanical engineering. She is a captain in the Italian air force, a qualified jet-fighter pilot and has been an astronaut with the European Space Agency since 2009, the first Italian woman to take the role.

(Photo: Sandra Magnus: NASA, Samantha Cristoforetti: ESA-S. Corvaja)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qs7f1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 The Compass (w3ct0whw)
The Pandemic that Changed the World

Rethinking: The Pandemic that changed the world

What will the world look like post-Covid? In an age of increasingly inward focus can a spirit of multilateralism prevail to meet the challenges posed by the reconstruction of national economies as well as the needs of poorer countries and the international organisations? And does the post-Coronavirus moment provide an opportunity to think differently about other global challenges, the foremost being climate change? Will we be able to “build back better”? Ian Goldin, Oxford University’s professor of globalisation and development draws on his experience as economic advisor to Nelson Mandela and vice president at the World Bank to argue that the gravest threat to humanity in a generation could be turned into an opportunity. But the challenges are many. He discusses them with - among others - pandemic expert Larry Brilliant; Nobel Prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz; the editor of The Economist, Zanny Minton Beddoes; and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the chair of GAVI, the vaccine alliance.


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybglpf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq4)
Does comfort food really comfort us?

It’s something many of us intuitively believe - certain foods have the power to make us feel better. But what’s the science behind this, why do we crave certain dishes, and do they provide solace for everyone?

Graihagh Jackson explores what’s really happening when we turn to food for a pick-me-up: psychologist Shira Gabriel explains these foods’ links to memory and social connection; and psychiatrist Lukas Van Oudenhove reveals why so many comfort foods are high in fat or carbohydrates, and how this could be problematic in the long run.

But comfort foods aren’t always comforting - we find out why an unhappy childhood can mean they provide little or no solace. And the concept is far from universal - food writer Jenny Linford says in some food cultures the idea is irrelevant.

Plus, of all the millions of dishes out there, why do some rise to comfort food status? Food writer Kay Plunkett-Hogge explains why rice is the ultimate comfort food for many Thais.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

Let us know what you think about the show - email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A man hugging a giant ice cream. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qsc55)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863wc3l9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybgqfk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qsgx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3p)
Should Joe Biden stay in the basement?

The presidential opposition candidate Joe Biden has barely emerged from his home since America’s lockdown at the end of March. But polls suggest that the low-key strategy is working in his favour – as his rival President Donald Trump comes under increasing pressure over his handling of the coronavirus and a resurgence of racial tension.

With four months to go until the election, is staying in the basement Joe Biden’s best option? What are the risks if he does? And how could Donald Trump turn things around?

Contributors:
. Jason Zengerle, writer at large for the New York Times Magazine
. Rachel Bitecofer, Senior Fellow at the Niskanen Center and host of the Election Whisperer.
. Niambi Carter, Associate Professor of Political Science at Howard University and author of “American While Black”.
. Whit Ayres, Republican pollster at North Star Opinion Research.

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producers: Estelle Doyle and Victoria McCraven
Editor: Richard Vadon

(Image: Joe Biden at campaign event, Credit: Leah Mills/Reuters)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybgv5p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszf01)
Attila the Nun

Arlene Violet served as a nun for 23 years in the US state of Rhode Island. When she was there she realised that there were big problems locally: the mob ruled the streets and a Colombian drug cartel had moved in. Arlene thought it was her duty to fight the injustices she saw every day, so she decided to run for State Attorney General. She went on to become the first woman in that role, and she sent 18 top criminals to jail. This episode was first broadcast on 31st March 2018.

Presenter: Emily Webb

Image: rosary and bible
Credit: Don Bayley/Getty Images


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qslnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863wcc2k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybgyxt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0wkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qsqdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qsv4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2ysnr7h0s8)
Coronavirus: Major blow to Spain as UK order quarantine

New coronavirus quarantine rules have come into force in the UK, requiring travellers arriving from Spain to self-isolate for 14 days. The new coronavirus travel rule was announced on Saturday following a rise in the number of new cases in Spain this week.

Also in the programme: Calls for big corporations to take action to protect China's Uighur population; and the older gay experience - the UK's virtual silver pride festival.

(Credit: A tourist sunbathes at Es Carregador Beach in Calvia on the Spanish island of Mallorca on July, 2020. Photo:Reuters).


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qsywt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qt2my)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvn)
Tolstoy: War and Peace

'War and Peace' by the Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy charts the story of Russia during the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th century, covering the pandemonium and brutality of the battlefield, as well as the equally intense dramas and loves of several families. It is a monumental novel, tracking the fortunes of dozens of brilliantly drawn individuals, with a cast of more than six hundred characters, both historical and fictional. So why is 'War and Peace' still such a compelling masterpiece, and why did Tolstoy later disown it?

Joining Bridget Kendall are Dr Galina Alexeeva, head of Research at Yasnaya Polyana, Tolstoy’s former country estate in Russia; Andrei Zorin, Professor of Russian at Oxford University and author of a new biography of Tolstoy, and Professor Donna Orwin, author of 'Simply Tolstoy', who’s from the University of Toronto in Canada.

(Image: Anthony Hopkins as Pierre Bezukhov in the 1972 BBC 20- part dramatization of Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Credit: BBC Copyright pictures)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 Sportsworld (w172x3l80wthqns)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of West Ham against Aston Villa from the London stadium on the final day of the 2019/20 Premier League season. With relegation, Europa and Champions League spots on the line, Sportsworld will bring you all the latest news and drama of the last day of the season. And we'll be dissecting all the fallout from the results of the day.

Plus, we'll have updates from day three of the third test match between England and West Indies.

Photo credit: Tyrone Mings playing for Aston Villa the last time his side met West Ham in the Premier League (Getty Images).


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qtkmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863wdb1l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybhxwv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wkd)
Ingenious

The ginger gene and breast cancer gene

A particular version of the ginger gene MC1R underpins the fiery hair and freckled complexion of redheads, famed and feared in many cultures. But it is also linked to increased pain sensitivity and skin cancer risk. So where did it come from? And are redheads really endangered?

As far back as the 19th Century, doctors realised that some types of cancer seemed to run in families, but it was not until the last decades of the 20th Century that scientists started to pin down the genetic culprits. Faults in two of these genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, significantly increase the chances of developing breast, ovarian or prostate cancer – a fact that hit the headlines when actress Angelina Jolie announced she had had breast removal surgery to try and reduce her risk of BRCA1 related cancer. These genes and others like them are now at the cutting edge of cancer research, leading to revolutionary new treatments for cancer such as the unfortunately-named ‘PARP inhibitors’.


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qtpcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6t3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qtt3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ysnr7hzr9)
The coronavirus impact on rural India

India is fast approaching a million and a half coronavirus infections, with only the United States and Brazil with more cases. We hear from an ICU doctor in Bangalore on how the shame and uncertainty associated with the disease are making it even harder to treat patients.

Also in the programme: Hollywood actress Olivia de Havilland, who starred in Gone With the Wind, has died in Paris at the age of 104; and we hear from the Mayor of Rio Grande City in Texas on the dual threat of hurricane season and coronavirus.

(Photo: An Indian vendor selling mangoes on his hand cart walks in front of a mural in New Delhi, India. Credit: Yawar Nazir/Getty Images)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qtxvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybj947)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 United Zingdom (w3ct0wl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nx66qv1lz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b863wdt13)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pqmybjdwc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0wkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]



MONDAY 27 JULY 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0z4cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57pkp0zhq4)
First broadcast 27/07/2020 00:06 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mnhms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0z83j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5k0jn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mnmcx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Why Factor (w3csytz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0zcvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh54)
Afghanistan's cricket heroes

In 2010, Afghanistan’s national cricket team scored a historic first by qualifying for the World Twenty20 Finals in the West Indies. Started just a few years earlier, the Afghan side consisted mainly of players who’d learned the game while in refugee camps in Pakistan. Their success lifted the mood of their war-torn nation. Charlotte North talks to Afghan all-rounder, Raees Ahmadzai. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: The Afghan team preparing for a match in the West Indies (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0zhls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5k80x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mnvw5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5y)
Are some soaps better than others?

These days we’re more acquainted with soap than ever before, as we lather up to help stop the spread of coronavirus. And for CrowdScience listener Sharon, this set off a steady stream of soapy questions: how does soap actually work? How was it discovered in the first place, long before anyone knew anything about germs? Are different things used for washing around the world, and are some soaps better than others?
We set up a CrowdScience home laboratory to explore the soap making process with advice from science-based beauty blogger Dr Michelle Wong, and find out what it is about soap’s chemistry that gives it its germ-fighting superpowers. Soap has been around for at least 4000 years; we compare ancient soap making to modern methods, and hear about some of the soap alternatives used around the world, like the soap berries of India.

And as for the question of whether some soaps are better than others? We discover why antibacterial soaps aren’t necessarily a good idea, and why putting a toy inside a bar of soap might be more important than tweaking its ingredients.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton.
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service.

Image: Child with thoroughly washed hands. Credit: Getty Images.


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0zmbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqlwpm)
US leaves consulate as China deadline passes

The deadline has passed for American diplomats to quit their embassy in the Chinese city of Cheng Du. The order, made by Beijing, was in response to the US ordering the closure of China's embassy in Texas.

Since 2014 the eastern part of Ukraine has been the location of a deadly tussle between Moscow, Kiev and its Western allies over the breakaway Luhansk and Donetsk regions. Numerous ceasefires have come and gone, and over the weekend another agreement was signed.

Today a prominent opposition figure is expected to return to Tanzania, three years after surviving an assassination attempt. Tundu Lissu is one of the leading figures of the Chadema party, and has said he wants to run for President in the upcoming Tanzanian elections.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0zr31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqm0fr)
American diplomats quit Chinese embassy

The deadline has passed for American diplomats to quit their embassy in the Chinese city of Cheng Du. The order, made by Beijing, was in response to the US ordering the closure of China's embassy in Texas.

Spain is enduring a spike in numbers of confirmed coronavirus cases following the easing of restrictions, leading several European nations to impose quarantines on their citizens returning from the Iberian country.

Members of Parliament in Somalia have removed the country’s Prime Minister, Hassan Ali Khaire, from his post in a vote of no confidence over the weekend. He’s accused of failing to pave the way towards fully democratic elections.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0zvv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqm45w)
Chinese doctor believes officials ‘covered up’ scale of coronavirus

A doctor who diagnosed early coronavirus cases in China has told the BBC he believes local officials covered up the scale of the initial outbreak.

A Carnival March will take place through central London today, by the 'Free the Vaccine Coalition', which wants any effective future Covid-19 vaccine to be available and affordable for all.

Members of Parliament in Somalia have removed the country’s Prime Minister, Hassan Ali Khaire, from his post in a vote of no confidence over the weekend. He’s accused of failing to pave the way towards fully democratic elections.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh0zzl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3csy98t)
Megan Phelps-Roper: Leaving 'America's most obnoxious hate group'

Holding placards outside the funerals of dead soldiers, celebrating the death of children after school massacres: Westboro Baptist Church has been called the "most obnoxious and rabid hate group in America". From the age of 5, Megan Phelps-Roper had stood on the picket lines, and carried those hate-filled signs. But as an adult firing off tweets to her online critics, Megan began to doubt. Shaun Ley speaks to Megan Phelps-Roper in London. Can Megan really still regard those who abused her mind, teaching her to hate and to pray for more deaths, as Mum and Dad?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mpbvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jl)
Dealing with mass unemployment

It’s estimated that the coronavirus pandemic will leave a quarter of a billion people out of work this year. Many of the jobs lost may never come back. Elisabeth Reynolds at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology says governments must take more radical action.

And with its generous benefits system and flexible jobs market, what can Denmark teach us about navigating the post-Covid jobs landscape? We ask Jacob Kirkegaard, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute.

Photo: A man stands in front of the closed offices of the New York State Department of Labour (Credit: Getty Images).


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk5)
The writer who put Latinos centre stage

The Cuban-American Dolores Prida wrote with a distinctive voice in her plays, newspaper columns and as an agony aunt in the Latina magazine. She challenged perceptions of how Latin Americans should be viewed in the US. When she died in 2013, President Obama paid tribute to her "conviction, compassion and humour." Mike Lanchin speaks to Prida's close friend, the former editor at New York's Daily News, Maite Junco.

Photo: Dolores Prida (left) with Maite Junco, Jan 2013 (courtesy of Maite Junco)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh103bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csytz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mpglt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1072k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0wjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mplby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvs0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh10btp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5l37t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mpq32)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cswp29)
Women demanding equality in sport

Is women's sport still not taken as seriously as men's? What needs to happen to achieve the same pay, prize money and media coverage as their male counterparts?  Presenter Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women about how they have fought to get equality with men in their chosen sport.  

Kathryn Bertine was a professional cyclist in the US for five years. She was shocked to discover that the average earnings of a professional female cyclist are well below the poverty line.  She was so outraged that she lobbied successfully for a women's version of the Tour de France. But Kathryn believes that this new race is 'tokenism' because it lasts for only one day. Kathryn has gone on to co-found Homestretch Foundation, a charity to support female cyclists financially as they train for events and compete. 

Hajra Khan is the Captain of the Pakistan women's national football team but says they are given less priority than the men. When she first got into football she says sportswomen were looked down on in her country. Although attitudes are slowly changing she says that there is still a huge wage gap and her club has had to train on local cricket grounds. Hajra is organising a match in Pakistan with female players from around the world to raise awareness and to get better opportunities for female footballers.

Produced by Sarah Kendal

Image: (L) Hajra Khan. Credit: Huma Akram (R) Kathryn Bertine. Credit: Tracy L. Chandler


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh10gkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd3b)
The coral crusaders: finding beauty in a murky world

Colin Foord and Jared McKay are childhood best friends with a passion for aquatic life. As a kid Colin developed a strong love of sea life and would construct his own aquariums. Later, when Jay was suffering from depression, Colin would send him equipment needed to build his own reef aquarium in his living room. Eventually they became partners in a coral business, growing home grown corals in their living rooms. Their love of coral life led them to create bespoke films, music and artwork, an eventually install Coral City Camera, a webcam streaming live from an urban coral reef in Miami which since lockdown has attracted thousands of dedicated daily viewers.

Fereshteh Khosroujerdy has always loved singing. She grew up in Iran and her parents were opposed to women singing in public. But she could never resist and would sing wherever she went, entertaining people with her voice. Fereshteh is now a professional singer and performs with Inner Vision, the UK's only blind ensemble.

Picture: Colin Foord (R) and Jared McKay (L).
Credit: Karli Evans.


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh10l9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5lbr2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mpylb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh10q22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jpwpn)
China-US tension continues

The US consulate in Chengdu closes in response to the US closing the Chinese consulate in Houston last week. Professor Zhang Weiwei from Fudan University told Newshour that China always seeks de-escalation in the bilateral relations.

Also in the programme: How the coronavirus pandemic has seen the re-emergence of deep seated social inequalities in Colombia? And 30th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act.

(Photo: US consulate in Chengdu closed. Credit: EPA/ Alex Plavevski)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh10tt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csytz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mq62l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltxy88pp6x)
UK’s Spain quarantine disrupts travel companies

Travel firms are disrupted after the UK reimposed a quarantine on travellers from Spain. Patrick Torrent is the executive director of the Catalonia Tourist Board, and tells us he thinks the British quarantine decision is unfair. Also in the programme, millions of Americans could see a dramatic cut to their unemployment benefits if the federal government doesn’t act in the next few days. The US CARES Act, whch was signed in March, gave out of work Americans an extra US $600 a week, and the BBC’s Michelle Fleury reports on the likelihood of something emerging to replace it. Meanwhile, many are worried that in the aftermath of the pandemic, their job may not exist. The BBC’s Manuela Saragosa looks to Denmark to find out if the country has a solution for those out of work that may be relevant elsewhere. Plus, a new report argues that the under-representation of women in executive roles could make firms less profitable. Lorna Fitzsimons, co-founder of The Pipeline, which carried out the research, explains why.

(Picture: Tourists on a beach in Spain. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh10ykb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3csy98t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mq9tq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cswp29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1129g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swcmxlfc9)
Coronavirus conversations: Canadian truckers

Brenda and Jeff are truckers from Canada who drive in and out of the United States for a living. Jeff is now turning down work in the US because of the severity of the coronavirus pandemic there. Brenda is still crossing the border. They've been telling us about their experiences.

We find out what our reporter saw on Somalia's only dedicated coronavirus ward. Jamal Osman has been investigating the true extent of the outbreak there for BBC Africa Eye.

And we'll get your questions answered on Covid-19 by one of our regular expert guests. Today it's Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University School of Public Health. Send your WhatsApp voice message to +447730751925 or tweet us @bbcworldservice.

Picture: The US-Canada border crossing in April at Lacolle, Quebec (REUTERS/Christinne Muschi/File Photo).


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1161l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh119sq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5m26v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mqp23)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmhpxc97r)
2020/07/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh11fjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Why Factor (w3csytz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mqst7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp4)
The Life Scientific

Brian Greene

Brian Greene studies the universe at the largest and smallest scales imaginable. When he was just twelve years old, Brian wandered round Columbia University in New York looking for someone to teach him mathematics, with a letter of recommendation from his school teacher. While his mother wanted him to make money, his father encouraged Brian to pursue his passion, which was trying to understand the nature of the universe.

He studied physics at Harvard University and won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University. While at Oxford he learnt about a bold new Theory of Everything which predicts that the universe is made not of particles but rather tiny strings which vibrate in multiple dimensions. Now a Professor at Columbia University, he has worked on string theory ever since.

He talks to Jim Al-Khalili about the rise and fall of string and superstring theory and why when he first started to think about what would happen to the universe at the end of time, he experienced a feeling of ‘hollow dread’.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh11k8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jqqxk)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh11p13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3csy98t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mr19h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cswp29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh11ss7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5mk6c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mr51m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58j0dmrj6k)
Next US stimulus package revealed

Republicans are set to unveil their proposals for a fresh round of stimulus, including $1,200 per person in direct cash payments, an extended moratorium on evictions and reduced federal unemployment benefits. Also, millions of Americans could see a dramatic cut to their unemployment benefits if the federal government doesn’t act in the next few days. Travel firms are disrupted after the UK reimposed a quarantine on travellers from Spain. Patrick Torrent is the executive director of the Catalonia Tourist Board, and tells us he thinks the British quarantine decision is unfair. Meanwhile, many are worried that in the aftermath of the pandemic, their job may not exist. The BBC’s Manuela Saragosa looks to Denmark to find out if the country has a solution for those out of work that may be relevant elsewhere. Plus, a new report argues that the under-representation of women in executive roles could make firms less profitable. Lorna Fitzsimons, co-founder of The Pipeline, which carried out the research, explains why.



TUESDAY 28 JULY 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1218h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vhgcv8cd)
New US stimulus package debated

Republicans are set to unveil their proposals for a fresh round of stimulus, including $1,200 per person in direct cash payments, an extended moratorium on evictions and reduced federal unemployment benefits. Also, millions of Americans could see a dramatic cut to their unemployment benefits if the federal government doesn’t act in the next few days.

Also in the programme - using solar power to grow opium. We hear about the new trend in Afghanistan.

Plus - we have an overview of places going through a resurgence in coronavirus infections. From Spain to Hong Kong, how are people and businesses coping with another round of lockdowns?

And - why are doctors posting bikini photos of themselves on social media?

PHOTO: Getty Images


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1250m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5mxfr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mrj90)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wp7)
On The Front Line with Karachi’s Ambulance Drivers

Karachi's ambulance drivers

In Karachi, with a population of around 20 million people, ambulance drivers are on the front lines of this megacity’s shifting conflicts.

Samira Shackle joins one of these drivers, Muhammad Safdar, on his relentless round of call-outs. As a first-responder for more than fifteen years, Safdar has witnessed Karachi wracked by gang wars, political violence and terrorism. At the height of the unrest, the number of fatalities was often overwhelming. Then a harsh crackdown by the army and the police, beginning in 2014, brought the conflict under control. Following this, Safdar and others like him have seen drastic changes in the nature of their work.

Samira joins Safdar as he takes a young man home from hospital after undergoing a leg amputation. They head towards Lyari, on the outskirts of Karachi, which at several points in recent decades has essentially been run by gangsters. Safdar has vivid memories of gang war and street violence, in stark contrast to the situation today.

With no state ambulance service in Pakistan, the Edhi Foundation, set up by the late Abdul Sattar Edhi in 1954, stepped in to offer services to the poor. Safdar drives one of its fleet of four hundred ambulances: rudimentary converted vans with basic emergency provision. His missions bring him to many of Karachi’s most deprived and troubled areas, revealing the complex social and economic problems at the heart of the country.

As Samira and Safdar traverse this enormous city, their experiences reveal a remarkable story of life and death in contemporary Pakistan.

Photo: Muhammad Safdar Credit: Syed Hasan Haider


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh128rr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh12dhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5n4y0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mrrs8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh12j80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqpslq)
Former Malaysian PM guilty of abuse of power

The former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been found guilty of abuse of power, in a case linked to a multibillion dollar corruption scandal at a state investment fund.

The whole world is waiting for a coronavirus vaccine and there are many trials taking place in different countries. However, most medical products that go into trials are not successful and only 10% get approval. So, what does that mean for the Covid-19 vaccine?

Schools in Zimbabwe were meant to be reopening today. However, this has been delayed after teaching unions protested that appropriate measures to stop the spread of Covid-19 must be in place first.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh12n04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqpxbv)
Guilty verdict for former Malaysian prime minister

The former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been found guilty of abuse of power, in a case linked to a multibillion dollar corruption scandal at a state investment fund.

France is to start building the world's largest nuclear fusion reactor today. Nuclear fusion is what powers the sun. It's been scientists' pipe dream for almost a century - safe, carbon-free and abundant fuel which produces more energy than is put in.

Hundreds of Chinese fishing vessels have been detected in the waters surrounding the Galapagos Islands, sparking fears for the region’s ecosystem and marine life.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh12rr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqq12z)
Najib Razak – former Malaysia PM – handed guilty verdict

The former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been found guilty of abuse of power, in a case linked to a multibillion dollar corruption scandal at a state investment fund.

Hundreds of Chinese fishing vessels have been detected in the waters surrounding the Galapagos Islands, sparking fears for the region’s ecosystem and marine life.

Schools in Zimbabwe were meant to be reopening today. However, this has been delayed after teaching unions protested that appropriate measures to stop the spread of Covid-19 must be in place first.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh12whd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1d)
Financing the forests

Protecting the rainforest could make people millions of dollars under a pioneering new scheme.

Bankers and conservationists have teamed up to regrow a large area of Indonesia’s jungle where endangered orangutans and tigers live.

Reporter: Jo Mathys

Image: An orangutan (Getty Images)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06ms7rs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89m)
Are companies really committed to diversity?

US companies are spending around $8 billion a year on diversity training. Neal Goodman has been running “unconscious bias” training for decades, and explains to Manuela Saragosa how it works. But Pamela Newkirk, journalist and author of 'Diversity, Inc.' says diversity training is often more about box ticking than actually getting results. And Betsy Levy Paluck of Princeton University says such training may even backfire if not done right.

(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpp)
Australia's 'Black Saturday' bushfires

The forest fires of 2019-2020 in Australia were the worst the country had ever experienced - but ten years earlier Australia had a foretaste of that disaster when 400 separate bushfires burnt their way across the state of Victoria. At the time they were the worst fires Australia had ever seen. Rachael Gillman has been speaking to one of the firefighters who battled to bring the fires under control.

Photo Credit: Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1307j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mschx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh133zn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh137qs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5p04x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06msm05)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbh)
Eric Whitacre – Creating the Virtual Choir

As Covid-19 has swept the world we’ve become used to seeing musicians in lockdown presenting videos of virtual performances. But for the Grammy-award winning American composer and conductor Eric Whitacre, the idea of a virtual choir is nothing new because he pioneered the concept over 10 years ago. His first choir of 185 singers became a global phenomenon and has been seen by millions on YouTube. More virtual choir projects followed and the choir videos have featured as installations and as part of the 2012 Olympics and the Davos World Economic Forum.

Now Eric’s just released his largest Virtual Choir project to date, which premiered on YouTube a few days ago. It features 17,572 singers from around the world performing his new piece “Sing Gently” for which he’s written the words and the music.

Eric talks to Emma Kingsley about creating this latest project, the inspirations for his other compositions, the idea of the musical “golden brick” and how his early dreams of becoming a pop star changed through singing Mozart in the college choir.


Produced by Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Photo of Eric Whitacre by Marc Royce


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh13cgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjw)
Name, shame and jail: Ghana's undercover journalist

Anas Aremeyaw Anas is very well known in Africa, even though almost no one knows what he looks like. He's a trained lawyer-turned-investigative reporter from Ghana, and a frequent presenter of the BBC's Africa Eye. In his nearly 20 years working undercover he's exposed sex trafficking rings, corrupt judges, and top football officials fixing matches. He goes deep undercover during investigations, and he's disguised himself as a psychiatric patient, a janitor in a brothel and even as a rock in a barren landscape. His work has led to numerous convictions, but his methods are sometimes dangerous and controversial. His latest investigation for BBC Africa Eye is called Corona Quacks, exposing the sale in Ghana of fake 'cures' for coronavirus.

Many American football players train hard because they love the game and want to prove themselves at the the highest level, but Ryan O'Callaghan was playing for a different reason. He was gay and desperate to hide his sexuality from everybody, and he knew the masculine world of football was the perfect place to hide. His career inadvertently took off and he joined a top tier team, the New England Patriots, but his secret was becoming unbearable. An unlikely intervention from a kind stranger turned things around. Ryan's book is called My Life on the Line.

If you are looking for support for any of the issues discussed in this programme, you can find links to useful organisations here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/actionline.

Picture: Anas Aremeyaw Anas.
Credit: BBC Africa Eye.


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh13h71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0wp4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh13lz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jsslr)
Malaysian ex-PM handed jail term

Former Malaysian Prime Minister, Najib Razak has been handed a 12-year jail term after being found guilty in the first of several multi-million dollar corruption trials.

Also in the programme: Construction of the world's largest nuclear fusion reactor has started and what do we know about how our immune systems respond to the coronavirus?

(Picture: Malaysia's former prime minister Najib Razak. Credit: MOHD RASFAN/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh13qq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mt2zp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwktqh55zl)
Coronavirus hits carmaker profitability

A slew of results reveal the challenge posed by coronavirus to carmaker profitability. Companies are scrapping models and closing plants to survive, and Patricia Calvo Lorente of the UGT workers' union in Spain tells us there's little hope that three Nissan plants scheduled for closure in northeastern Spain will remain open. And we get wider context on changes in the automotive industry from professor David Bailey at Birmingham Business School in the UK. Also in the programme, India's version of Silicon Valley, Bangalore, is facing a huge economic challenge in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. The BBC's Rahul Tandon reports that many people have lost their jobs, and with cases still rising, there are fears that the worst is yet to come. Plus, as France announces plans to ban the use of heaters on restaurant and cafe outdoor terrace areas from next year, we hear from a cafe owner who fears the potential impact on his winter turnover, and get wider context from Emma Pearson, editor of the news website The Local France.

(Picture: Workers on a Nissan production line. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh13vgf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mt6qt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh13z6k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swcmxpb8d)
Coronavirus conversations: Spanish holiday islands

The British government is now warning against non-essential travel to the whole of Spain, including the Canary and Balearic Islands, because of rising coronavirus cases. British tourists make up a large proportion of visitors. Many islanders complain that they are a long way from Spain's current coronavirus hotspots and they actually have low levels of Covid-19 at the moment. But the UK government has defended its action as "necessary". We hear the conversation on the islands and how people see the future.

A video, in which a group of doctors stand on the US Supreme Court steps and claim success in curing Covid-19 with hydroxychloroquine, has been widely shared in the past 24 hours. The drug is not a proven treatment for Covid-19. Twitter banned President Trump's son Donald Jr for 12 hours after he shared the video. We'll discuss the response to the video with our specialist reporter on disinformation and social media.

We'll get your coronavirus questions answered by one of our regular experts - today, Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto. You can send your questions via WhatsApp +447730751925 or on Twitter @bbcworldservice.

Picture: Covid cleaning at TUI BLUE Aura in Ibiza (Credit: Ben Queenborough/PinPep/TUI/PA)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh142yp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh146pt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5pz3y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mtkz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmhpxg64v)
2020/07/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh14bfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mtpqb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz987)
Tracking the trolls

How can we distinguish the online posts written by real people from those coming out of professional bot-farms intent on influencing elections? New research from Princeton University in America uses machine learning to identify malicious online trolls, even before they’ve sent a single tweet. Lead author Meysam Alizadeh explains the power of this work to protect voters in future elections.

Gesture-controlled robots
Robots can now be controlled by a simple wave of your arm. Professor Daniela Rus from MIT explains how new research has simplified robot controls by using human movement rather than complicated systems of buttons and gear-sticks. The aim is to allow anyone to pilot a robot without requiring any training.

Augmented surgery
Digital Planet’s Florian Bohr reports from Augmented World Expo USA to discover how the new field of spatial computing can be used in medicine. From doctors with x-ray spectacles to virtual reality surgery training, new visual technologies are promising a big impact on healthcare.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

(Image:Getty Images)


Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh14g62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jtmtn)
US Attorney General Defends Actions

President Trump's Attorney-General has defended his deployment of federal officers to US cities in a congressional hearing.We hear from the Mayor of Kansas city.

Also on the programme, world leaders hail a step towards a new source of energy with the creation of a nuclear fusion reactor in France. And love in the time of Coronavirus - How hard has it been for couples to stay apart? We hear from couple split between France and the United States.

(Photo : General William Barr, US Attorney General; Credit : Matt McClain/Pool via REUTERS)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh14ky6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mty6l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh14ppb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5qg3g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mv1yq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58j0dmvf3n)
Coronavirus hits carmaker profitability

A slew of results reveal the challenge posed by coronavirus to carmaker profitability. Companies are scrapping models and closing plants to survive, and Patricia Calvo Lorente of the UGT workers' union in Spain tells us there's little hope that three Nissan plants scheduled for closure in northeastern Spain will remain open. And we get wider context on changes in the automotive industry from professor David Bailey at Birmingham Business School in the UK.

Also in the programme, India's version of Silicon Valley, Bangalore, is facing a huge economic challenge in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. The BBC's Rahul Tandon reports that many people have lost their jobs, and with cases still rising, there are fears that the worst is yet to come.

And - former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been sentenced to twelve years in prison after being found guilty of several multi-billion dollar corruption charges. We'll hear more about the global web of fraud and corruption.

Plus, as France announces plans to ban the use of heaters on restaurant and cafe outdoor terrace areas from next year, we hear from a cafe owner who fears the potential impact on his winter turnover, and get wider context from Emma Pearson, editor of the news website The Local France.

(Picture: Workers on a Nissan production line. Picture credit: Reuters.)



WEDNESDAY 29 JULY 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh14y5l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vhgcy58h)
Pfizer and Moderna in late-stage coronavirus vaccine trials

Moderna has pitched virus vaccine at about $50-$60 per course. Price charged to governments would be higher than that agreed for rival jabs from Pfizer and BioNTech. A proposal by the World Health Organisation to pool intellectual property for effective Covid-19 interventions, including vaccines, has thus far garnered limited governmental support and no backing from pharmaceutical companies. Meanwhile, President Trump is planning to loan $765 million to Eastman Kodak so the company can manufacture ingredients used in pharmaceuticals rather than the digital photographic products it is known for.

Until this year Bangalore was a city on a roll. It was known as India's Silicon Valley, with heavy concentration of high-tech talent. Western companies like Rolls Royce, Cisco and Boeing all have R&D operations there. It was the home of India’s most successful IT start-ups. But coronavirus has changed all that. Jobs are being lost. The numbers of cases of Covid-19 are rising sharply, and many believe the worst is yet to come.

Also on the programme, the heads of Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google - Tim Cook, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sundar Pichai will face the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee which has been investigating the companies for antitrust or anti-competitive behaviour. What ca we expect from the process?

And - former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been sentenced to twelve years in prison after being found guilty of several multi-billion dollar corruption charges. We'll hear more about the global web of fraud and corruption.

Plus, as France announces plans to ban the use of heaters on restaurant and cafe outdoor terrace areas from next year, we hear from a cafe owner who fears the potential impact on his winter turnover, and get wider context from Emma Pearson, editor of the news website The Local France.

Presenter Jamie Robertson is joined by guests Melissa Chan in LA and David Kuo in Singapore.

PHOTO: Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh151xq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5qtbv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mvf63)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct0wp9)
The Senses

The senses: Touch

Our skin contains millions of nerve endings and touch sensors that collect information about different sensations like temperature, pressure, vibration, pain and send it to the brain for processing and reaction. But it’s when our sensory system goes wrong that we learn most about how our senses help us understand the world around us.

Neurologist Dr Guy Leschziner talks to Alison, whose delicious seafood dinner sends her nervous system haywire. Poisoned by fish contaminated with ciguatera toxin, her sense of temperature is turned upside down – so hot feels cold and the cold floor tiles burn the soles of her feet.

We hear from Dawn, whose damaged nerve triggers excruciating pain down the side of her face – illustrating how our senses can trick us about the source of our agony.

We meet Paul, who has broken every bone in his body, yet never feels a jot of pain. His rare genetic condition, congenital insensitivity to pain, means his brain never receives signals warning of damage to his flesh and bones. And whilst a pain-free life might sound appealing, we find out it has serious physical and psychological consequences.

And through Rahel we learn about a lesser-known touch sensation, called proprioception. When it is not working, it affects our co-ordination. And for Rahel, that means she struggles to stay upright when it is dark.

Produced by Sally Abrahams for the BBC World Service.


Photo: Vicki and Paul Waters Courtesy of the Waters family


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh155nv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh159dz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5r1v3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mvnpc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz987)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh15f53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqspht)
Hajj pilgrimage begins amid coronavirus restrictions

The annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia is beginning - with drastically reduced numbers because of the coronavirus pandemic. This year only around ten thousand Saudi residents will perform the five-day ritual.

The drug lord known as El Mencho, is on a list of the world's most wanted men. Now it’s emerged that he has built his own hospital in western Jalisco state to attend to the illnesses that he apparently suffers from.

Uganda’s President, Yoweri Museveni, has been officially nominated by his party, the National Resistance Movement, as its candidate for the 2021 presidential elections.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh15jx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqst7y)
Scaled back Hajj pilgrimage due to start in Saudi Arabia

The annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia is beginning - with drastically reduced numbers because of the coronavirus pandemic. This year only around ten thousand Saudi residents will perform the five day ritual.

Have the anti-Beijing protests in Hong Kong contributed to a surge in coronavirus infections?

Zimbabwe' s ruling Zanu-PF has threatened the US ambassador in Harare, Brian Nicolas, with expulsion. They allege he has been accepting monies from Washington to help fuel anti-government demonstrations within the country.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh15nnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqsy02)
Annual Hajj pilgrimage scaled back due to coronavirus

The annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia is beginning - with drastically reduced numbers because of the coronavirus pandemic. This year only around ten thousand Saudi residents will perform the five-day ritual.

The US state of Texas has been one of the worst affected by COVID 19, with a record number of deaths documented in the past week alone. At one community hospital in the state’s largest city, Houston, a new experimental treatment cocktail is claimed to be saving patients.

The drug lord known as El Mencho, is on a list of the world's most wanted men. Now it’s emerged that he has built his own hospital in western Jalisco state to attend to the illnesses that he apparently suffers from.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh15sdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6m)
Angus Deaton: The cost of the 'deaths of despair'

How do we judge the health of our economic systems? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the Nobel Prize winning economist Sir Angus Deaton who believes it’s about much more than the headline numbers on jobs and growth. He has focused on what he calls the deaths of despair – those attributed to suicide, drug and alcohol abuse – and concludes American capitalism is sick. Now, of course, coronavirus is having its own impact on mortality data. Does capitalism itself need emergency surgery?

Photo: 2015 Nobel Prize winner in Economics Angus Deaton Credit: AFP


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mw4nw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8mx)
What actually happened in Sweden?

Sweden, a nation of 10 million, has one of the highest death rates per capita in the world, far above its Scandinavian neighbours. A decision was taken early on in the coronavirus pandemic not to put Sweden into lockdown. Lena Einhorn, a Swedish virologist explains why she was opposed to that decision. The state health authority were pursuing a strategy they thought would benefit both the economy and public health, but Jacob Kirkegaard of the Peterson Institute for International Economics says that strategy didn’t do either. That said, Swedish companies, particularly those with domestic focus, have done better than expected, as Esbjörn Lundevall from the Nordic SEB bank explains.

(Picture: The Swedish flag flying in Stockholm. Picture credit: Getty Images?)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmry)
Adrift for 76 days

A remarkable story of survival. In 1982, Steven Callahan was sailing alone across the Atlantic when one night his yacht hit something in the water and began to sink. He managed to get into a life raft but no one knew he was in trouble. For the next two months he drifted 2000 miles across the ocean. How did he survive? He told his story to Alex Last.
Photo: Steve Callahan shows how he hunted fish from his life raft. © Steve Callahan


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh15x4m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct0wp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mw8f0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz987)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh160wr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh164mw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5rx20)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mwhx8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wkf)
Ingenious

The milkshake gene and the cyclops gene

The Milkshake Gene - (LCTL) Are you dairy intolerant? If so, you’re not alone – more than 90% of people in some parts of the world are unable to properly digest milk, cheese and other dairy products. Most other animals are also unable to drink milk once they leave babyhood behind. So why did some of us evolve the ability to tuck into cheese, butter and cream with a vengeance? The answer lies in the history of human evolution and the early days of farming.

The Cyclops Gene - (SHH) Building a baby is a complicated business, with thousands of genes to be turned on or off at exactly the right time and in the right place. One of them is Sonic Hedgehog – named after the computer game character – which has its genetic fingers in all kinds of developmental processes. Sonic Hedgehog helps to decide how many bits you have, where they go, and whether you’re symmetrical, so it’s not surprising that any mistakes can have potentially devastating consequences. The most severe faults lead to ‘cyclops’ foetuses, while less serious changes are responsible for extra digits – like the reputed extra finger of Anne Boleyn, or Ernest Hemingway’s notorious six-toed cats. We take a look at the mind-bogglingly intricate process of creating a body, and the key role our favourite blue hero plays in making sure everything goes to plan.


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh168d0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrn)
23 years longing to find my mum

When war broke out in Somalia in the 1990s, Omar Mohamed’s dad was killed and he was separated from his mum. Omar, who was only four at that time, picked up his disabled younger brother Hassan and started running. The brothers eventually ended up in Kenya’s vast Dadaab refugee camp - the biggest refugee camp in Africa. For years, they never stopped looking for their mother. Until one day, rumours spread around the camp that a woman was looking for them. Could this stranger be Omar and Hassan’s mum? 
 
Omar's extraordinary story has been turned into a graphic novel co-written by Victoria Jamieson, and illustrated by Victoria Jamieson and Iman Geddy. It’s called When stars are scattered. Omar has set up his own charity called Refugee Strong.
 
Picture: Omar Mohamed.
Credit: Patrick Blain.


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh16d44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5s4k8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mwrdj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz987)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh16hw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jwphv)
Anthony Fauci calls for depoliticisation of coronavirus fight

The top US infectious diseases expert says the height of a pandemic is not the time to be distracted by political infighting. Dr. Anthony Fauci told Newshour that the disease is ‘our common enemy’.

Also in the programme: Hong Kong's leader introduces new coronavirus restrictions, warning the territory is on the verge of a large-scale outbreak; and how coronavirus sweeps through the Amazon river community.

(Photo: Anthony Fauci speaks to a Senate committee in Washington, DC, in June. Credit: EPA/Al Drago/POOL)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh16mmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct0wp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mwzws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxd8g2yd9z)
Turkey imposes new social media restrictions

Turkish MPs have imposed new rules on how social media firms can operate in the country. The likes of Twitter and Facebook must ensure they have local representatives in Turkey, and comply with court orders to remove content deemed offensive. Ece Goksedef of the BBC's Turkish service tells us what's behind the latest move, and Istanbul-based lawyer and free speech campaigner Veysel Ok says he's worried freedom of expression is being eroded in his country. Also in the programme, German MPs are hearing from two senior government ministers about what they knew and when about links between collapsed payments firm Wirecard and the country's government. Whilst the hearing itself is in private, Olaf Storbeck of the Financial Times in Frankfurt explains the background. In the US around $8bn is spent annually on courses for employees focused on diversity and unconscious bias issues. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa has been finding out whether that is money well spent. Plus, music streaming service Spotify has reported a rise in subscribers as more people listened to music during the pandemic, but a fall in advertising revenue, leading to an overall loss for the second quarter of the year. Music business journalist Eamonn Forde brings us the details.


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh16rcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mx3mx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh16w3n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swcmxs75h)
Coronavirus conversations: Hobbies on hold

We continue to bring together people with shared experiences of the coronavirus pandemic. Today we hear from a wrestler, a dancer, a musician and a singer who all have had to think of new ways to get back into their hobbies during the pandemic.

We also focus on concerns over a possible resurgence of the coronavirus across Europe and hear from Spain, Germany, Belgium and the Czech Republic where new virus spikes have been reported. And with lots of talk about "second waves", "spikes" and "hotspots", we get our health expert to explain the language they are using to talk about the virus. And, Dr Maria Sundaram from Toronto University will talk through the other latest information on the pandemic.

Also today: US Congress hearing with the CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google and the question whether the tech giants abuse their power to stifile competition.

(Photo: Faith Hatch Credit: Annette Hatch)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh16zvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh173lx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5sw11)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mxgw9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmhpxk31y)
2020/07/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh177c1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct0wp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mxlmf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc4)
Covid testing cuts Apache death rate

It’s six months since the World Health Organisation declared the Covid-19 outbreak to be a public health emergency of international concern. There are now a quarter of a million new confirmed cases every day and the total now stands at more than 16.5 million. We hear from the WHO’s Dr Margaret Harris about how cases are still rising fast in the United States, Brazil and India – and that even where there has been a drop in cases, testing and tracing should still continue in case of a spike in the number of infections.

The White Mountain Apache community in rural Arizona saw its first case of Covid on 1st April. Dr Ryan Close explains how 'test, track and trace' has resulted in 25% fewer deaths in tribal members than in other parts of the state, even though indigenous populations often have poorer health outcomes.

In the Chilean capital Santiago many neighbourhoods have been in quarantine since mid-March, making it one of the longest lockdowns of the whole pandemic. Restrictions are now easing in some places, but many of the 16% of the population who have disabilities feel they have been overlooked during lockdown.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: A sign warns against the Covid-19 virus near the Navajo Indian nation town of Tuba City, Arizona. Photo credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh17c35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jxjqr)
Tech bosses grilled by US lawmakers

The heads of some of the world's biggest tech companies have appeared before Washington lawmakers to defend their firms against claims they abuse their power to quash competitors. Also on the programme: Seven babies are stillborn in a single night at a Zimbabwe hospital amid a strike by nurses; and the top US infectious diseases expert, Anthony Fauci, tells us now is not the time for political infighting.

(Photo: The logos of Amazon Apple Facebook and Google. Credit: REUTERS/File Photos)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh17gv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mxv3p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh17llf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5tc0k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mxyvt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58j0dmyb0r)
US tech giants grilled by Congress

The bosses of four of America's largest tech firms are testifying remotely to Congress. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Alphabet's Sundar Pichai and Apple's Tim Cook are all taking part. They face questions from the House Judiciary Committee on whether their firms have become too dominant.

Turkish MPs have imposed new rules on how social media firms can operate in the country. The likes of Twitter and Facebook must ensure they have local representatives in Turkey, and comply with court orders to remove content deemed offensive. Ece Goksedef of the BBC's Turkish service tells us what's behind the latest move, and Istanbul-based lawyer and free speech campaigner Veysel Ok says he's worried freedom of expression is being eroded in his country.

Also in the programme, German MPs are hearing from two senior government ministers about what they knew and when about links between collapsed payments firm Wirecard and the country's government. Whilst the hearing itself is in private, Olaf Storbeck of the Financial Times in Frankfurt explains the background.

Plus, music streaming service Spotify has reported a rise in subscribers as more people listened to music during the pandemic, but a fall in advertising revenue, leading to an overall loss for the second quarter of the year. Music business journalist Eamonn Forde brings us the details.



THURSDAY 30 JULY 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh17v2p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18np5p1hz0)
US tech giants in Congress showdown

The bosses of four of America's largest tech firms testified remotely to Congress. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Alphabet's Sundar Pichai and Apple's Tim Cook all took part.They faced questions from the House Judiciary Committee on whether their firms have become too dominant. But we hear it is not just an issue in the tech industry. Writer and journalist David Dayen tells us that the US has "cradle to the grave monopoly problem"

Also in the programme, we look into why have some French winemakers turned to making hand sanitisers.

Plus - we ask how useful are training courses that focus on diversity and unconscious bias.

And why is the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking creating such a storm?

PHOTO: The committee's chair, Congressman Cicilline/US Congress

Presenter Sasha Twining is joined by guests Ralph Silva in Canada and Sushma Ramachandran in India


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh17ytt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5tq7y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06myb36)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6lc)
Venezuela's 'Bay of Piglets'

A failed coup in Venezuela - a story of hubris, incompetence, and treachery… At the beginning of May, the government of Nicolas Maduro announced the armed forces had repelled an attempted landing by exiled Venezuelans on the coast north of Caracas. Some were killed, others captured. This was Operation Gideon – an incursion involving a few dozen, poorly-equipped men, and two former US Special Forces soldiers. The hair brained plan to depose Nicolas Maduro, and force a transition in Caracas was conceived by Venezuela's political opposition in neighbouring Colombia, the United States and Venezuela. Command and control of Operation Gideon allegedly lay with another former US Special Forces soldier, Jordan Goudreau. But why would men with decades of military experience between them join a plan that, from the outset, looked like a suicide mission? For Assignment, Linda Pressly goes in search of answers.

Presenter / producer: Linda Pressly
Producer in Venezuela: Vanessa Silva
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Jordan Goudreau and Javier Nieto address the Venezuelan people on 3 May, 2020. Credit: Javier Nieto)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh182ky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh186b2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5tyr6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06myklg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh18b26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqwldx)
Covid-19: US record surge in cases

The US has now reached the world record total of 150 thousand deaths, while Texas has its own grim record with 302 daily fatalities. With hospitals running out of intensive care beds and ventilators, the medical situation appears dire, as we hear from a hospital doctor in San Antonio, Texas.

NASA is launching an explorer to Mars - we find out more from the principal investigator for the cameras on the Perseverance Rover, Jim Bell.

And we speak to the highest ranked African junior tennis player, 17-year-old South African Khololwam Montsi, about the challenges he has faced and his plans.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh18ftb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqwq51)
US reaches record numbers of Covid-19

One of the US states which has also seen high numbers of cases is Texas and it now has its own grim record with 302 daily fatalities. We get the reaction of James White, a Republican and a member of the Texas house of representatives.

We get an update on the situation across Europe as some countries see a rise in Covid-19 which could lead to further lockdowns.

And we speak to the 17-year-old South African Khololwam Montsi who's the highest ranked African junior tennis player.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh18kkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqwtx5)
Covid-19: European travel uncertainty

We speak to an aviation analyst about the solutions being proposed by the travel industry and governments in order to manage the rise in Covid-19 cases in parts of Europe.

In Pakistan the number of new cases is falling but what has it been like for medical workers? We hear from a doctor in Karachi.

And the late US civil rights activist and congressman, John Lewis, will be laid to rest later today in a private ceremony in Atlanta. The film director Dawn Porter who made a documentary on the life of Mr Lewis, pays tribute to him.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh18p9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3q)
Why isn’t the world doing more to help the Uighurs?

With an estimated million Uighurs in detention camps, China has used a variety of means to successfully stifle world criticism. They include its economic muscle, political alliances with like-minded countries and sanitized tours of the facilities for opinion formers.

With Charmaine Cozier.

(Uighur prisoners shackled and blindfolded in Xinjiang, China. Still from anonymous drone footage.)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mz1kz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wr)
Bolivia's lithium bonanza

The Salar de Uyuni is a stunning pristine salt flat high in the Andes - it is also the world's biggest lithium deposit, worth many billions of dollars.

Ed Butler asks whether this as yet untapped resource will prove a blessing or a curse for the people of Bolivia. It has already played a role in the political instability that brought down the country's long-time socialist president, Evo Morales, last year.

Daniela Sanchez-Lopez, an expert in the geopolitics of clean energy at Cambridge University and herself Bolivian, explains how the exploding demand for lithium batteries for electric vehicles and renewable energy storage, means that many powerful nations have their eyes on the salt flat.

Among them is Germany. Ed speaks to Wolfgang Schmutz, founder of ACI Group, the clean energy company that had won a contract to develop the lithium deposit, before being dumped during the political unrest last year. We also hear from Gunnar Valda, head of the Bolivian state lithium company YLB.

(Picture: Woman standing on the Salar de Uyuni; Credit: hadynyah/Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmf)
Benidorm and the birth of package tourism

The Spanish town of Benidorm is now one of the world's most popular holiday resorts - receiving more than 10 million visitors a year. The hotels and skyscrapers are the vision of Benidorm's mayor in the 1950s and 60s, Pedro Zaragoza. Zaragoza personally convinced Spain's dictator, General Franco, to allow more tourism - and to allow sunbathers to wear the bikini. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Pedro Zaragoza, as recorded by Radio Elche Cadena Ser shortly before his death.

PHOTO: A busy day in Benidorm (Reuters)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh18t1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6lc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mz5b3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh18xsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvp)
Picasso, artist of reinvention

Pablo Picasso is commonly regarded as one of the most influential artists of the 20th Century, changing our way of seeing with his radical innovation and revolutionary approach. As pioneer of Cubism, godfather to the Surrealists, and creator of the enduring anti-war painting Guernica, he produced thousands of paintings in his lifetime, not to mention his sculptures, ceramics, stage designs, poetry and plays.

Rajan Datar discusses his life and work with curators Ann Temkin and Katharina Beisiegel, and art historian Charlie Miller.

(Photo: Pablo Picasso in 1955. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh55)
Coe vs Ovett

At the 1980 Olympics in Moscow, the world was gripped by the intense rivalry between the British middle-distance runners, Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett. Ovett won the 800 metres, which was Coe’s favourite distance; but just a few days later, Coe struck back by winning the 1500 metres, Ovett’s preferred event. Alex Capstick talks to Sebastian Coe, now Lord Coe, about his memories of the Moscow Games.

PHOTO: Sebastian Coe win the Olympic 1500 metres in 1980 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh191jz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5vsz3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mzdtc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq5)
Dominique Crenn: My life in five dishes

Abandoned by her biological mother at six months old, a victim of sexual harassment and discrimination in the kitchen, and a recent breast cancer survivor – Dominique Crenn has faced her fair share of battles.

The award-winning chef, author and campaigner – not to mention the first woman in the US to win three Michelin stars – tells Graihagh Jackson how sheer determination and a desire to make a difference have taken her to the top.

She discusses the five key dishes that have shaped her life, from enjoying fresh oysters in a fish market with her father at 4am, to tomatoes – the ingredient that showed her the power of food and the importance of where it comes from.

Dominique tells of her struggles in a male-dominated restaurant world, the heartache of her father’s death, and how she’s facing up to her latest challenge – Covid-19. Plus, she explains her recent decision to scrap land-based meat from all of her restaurants, and why cancer has prompted her to seek out her birth mother.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio manager: Annie Gardiner

(Picture: Dominique Crenn. Credit: Jordan Wise/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19593)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdb3)
The stolen Picasso and the forest quest

A few years ago, writer Mira Feticu received an anonymous letter with instructions on how to find a stolen Picasso, buried under a tree in a Romanian forest. The painting, the Tête d'Arlequin or Harlequin Head, had been stolen in 2012 from the Rotterdam's Kunsthal museum. Within days, Mira had found the spot where the artwork was supposed to be hidden. But a shock was in store.
 
Maria Konnikova is a science writer and psychologist. In 2015, she experienced a series of misfortunes and wanted to learn more about the role that luck, skill and chance play in people's lives. So she decided to learn how to play poker. And after a year, she went from being someone who didn't even know how many playing cards were in a deck, to becoming a highly rated champion. She's written a book about this experience and it's called The Biggest Bluff: how I learned to pay attention, master myself and win. 
 
Picture: Pablo Picasso's Harlequin Head.
Credit: The Triton Collection Foundation.


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19917)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5w1gc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mzn9m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19dsc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10jzldy)
Hong Kong bars 12 opposition candidates from election

The authorities in Hong Kong have barred 12 prominent opposition candidates from standing in Legislative Council elections due to be held in September.

Also in the programme: NASA has launched its latest mission to Mars from Cape Canaveral; and why lead poisoning is a threat to one-third of the world's children.

Picture: Legislative election candidates disqualified in Hong Kong 30/07/2020. Credit: EPA/JEROME FAVRE.


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19jjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6lc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06mzwsw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvrczwnpch)
US economy suffers sharpest contraction in decades

Official data shows the US economy contracted by 9.5% between April and June. It's the worst performance since the country started keeping records in 1947, and the BBC's Samira Hussein in New York brings us the details. Meanwhile emergency financial support for the unemployed in the US is due to end this week, unless Congress comes up with a new package of measures. Professor Tara Sinclair of George Washington University explains whether a deal seems feasible. Also in the programme, as the world's biggest brewer AB InBev reports that sales fell by nearly a third in the month of April, we get more details from the firm's chief financial officer, Fernando Tennenbaum. Plus, in spite of the pandemic, the world's biggest food maker, Nestle, has said that sales of premium pet food continued to rise during lockdowns. We talk to Bernard Meunier, Nestle Purina PetCare chief executive for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

(Picture: A closed shop in California. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19n8m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n00k0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19s0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swcmxw42l)
Coronavirus conversations: Dealing with addiction

We've been bringing you the stories of how people around the world are being affected by the coronavirus pandemic and today we'll bring you stories of how people with addictions have been coping during this crisis. James from Kenya was addicted to khat, a plant that people chew which acts as a stimulant - he tells us about how lockdown helped him beat his addiction.

Also, we continue to focus on restrictions many countries are now re-imposing because of new virus spikes. We speak to a psychologist about people will cope in a second wave and go to Hong Kong and Belgium to hear the reaction to renewed lockdown restrictions.

And, we'll bring some of the live proceedings of the funeral service for civil rights icon John Lewis.

(Photo: James Maingi Gathatwa. Credit: James Maingi Gathatwa)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh19wrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1b0j0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5wry4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n0csd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmhpxmzz1)
2020/07/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1b484)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6lc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n0hjj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0n)
NASA rover heads for Mars ancient lake

NASA launches its new robotic mission to Mars. The rover, Perseverance, will land in a 50 kilometre wide crater which looks like it was filled by a lake about 4 billion years ago – the time when life on Earth was getting started. Mission scientist Melissa Rice explains why this is one of the most promising places on Mars to continue the search for past life on the red planet.

Japanese and US scientists have revived microbes that have been buried at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean for 100 million years. Sampled from compacted mud 70 metres below the seafloor and beneath 6 kilometre of water, Yuki Morono and Steve D’Hondt admit they struggle to understand how the bacteria have survived for so long.

Science in Action celebrates the little unknown oceanographer Marie Tharp who in the late 1950s discovered the mid-Atlantic ridge which helped to launch the plate tectonics revolution in earth sciences. It would be Tharp’s 100th birthday this week.

New research this week suggests that coronaviruses capable of infecting humans have been in bats for 40 to 70 years, and that there may be numerous and as yet undetected viruses like the Covid-19 virus in bat populations with the potential to cause future pandemics. Their message is that we should be sampling and testing wild bat colonies much more extensively than currently. Their findings provide further evidence against the unfounded claim that the Covid-19 virus originated from the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China. Roland Pease talks to Dr Maciej Boni at Pennsylvania State University.

(Image: NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. Credit: Illustration provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS)

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1b808)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k0fmv)
Coronavirus: US economy sees sharpest contraction in decades

The US economy shrank at an annualised rate of 32.9% between April and June as the country grappled with lockdowns and spending cutbacks during the pandemic.

Also in the programme: Albuquerque’s Democratic Mayor,Tim Keller, tells us why he wants to stop the deployment of federal forces in his city; and the rise of new Covid-19 cases in Europe makes some countries re-establish new restrictions.

(Photo: Food banks have seen a surge in demand. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1bcrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n0r0s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1bhhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5x7xn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n0vrx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58j0dn16xv)
US economy suffers sharpest contraction in decades

Official data shows the US economy contracted by 9.5% between April and June. It's the worst performance since the country started keeping records in 1947, and the BBC's Samira Hussein in New York brings us the details. Meanwhile emergency financial support for the unemployed in the US is due to end this week, unless Congress comes up with a new package of measures. Professor Tara Sinclair of George Washington University explains whether a deal seems feasible. Also in the programme, as the world's biggest brewer AB InBev reports that sales fell by nearly a third in the month of April, we get more details from the firm's chief financial officer, Fernando Tennenbaum. Plus, we hear why the Saudi bid to buy Newcastle United football club has fallen through.
(Picture: A closed shop in California. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 31 JULY 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1bqzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18vhgd3z2p)
US economy suffers sharpest contraction in decades

Official data shows that the world's biggest economy contracted by 9.5% in three months. That's worse than at any point since the US government started keeping quarterly records in 1947. We hear from Professor Tara Sinclair, an economist at George Washington University. Black Lives Matter protests have added to a continuing backlash against brands selling skin-whitening creams in South Asia; Nikhil Inamdar reports from Mumbai on an industry under threat. We talk to listener, Elizabeth Pendleton, in Colorado Springs about the unemployment picture in Colorado. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on the world’s biggest lithium deposit; it's in Bolivia and is worth billions of dollars to a world scrambling to reduce its reliance on carbon. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Tony Nash, co-founder and Chief Economist at Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas and from Lahore in Pakistan, Mehmal Safraz, co-founder of The Current PK. (Picture: A closed shop in California. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1bvqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5xm51)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n1709)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0v0h)
Burying the dead in New York City

New York funeral director Clive Anderson has been struggling to keep up the sheer volume of new Coronavirus cases coming to his small funeral home in Pelham, New York. Normally he would average four funerals a week, now he is doing six a day.
On the front line, the work has taken a toll on Clive. He broke down recently after a family called him from miles away that had lost a grandmother and none of the eleven funeral homes in their area could help them. So Clive drove for almost two hours to collect the body.
A man of strong faith, Clive only recently converted to the Catholic faith, and his baptism was scheduled for Easter. That, of course, was cancelled and over the phone, a monsignor told Clive he was now 'Baptised by desire', a term where a person can receive the fruits of baptism even if they have not had the official ceremony.
This recent conversion couldn't have come at a more appropriate time in Clive's life, for years he has been struggling with faith and religion. He grew up in a home-based religious movement which has no official name but is nicknamed the 'Two by Twos' in the south of Ireland. This controversial group has been the subject of documentaries around the world, with many calling it a cult.
After his father died when he was 15, Clive's heart was set on becoming a funeral director.
In this programme we will hear Clive talk at his home about growing up in the mysterious 'Two by Twos' and how that group shaped his view on religion and on the world. We visit his funeral home in Pelham to witness the huge number of people coming through as a result of the Coronavirus.
We take a fishing trip with Clive on a lake in upstate New York, away from his funeral home, to talk about how he copes with the very difficult work that he does, and how his newfound faith in Catholicism, has brought him strength and peace in these extraordinary times.


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1bzh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1c375)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5xvn9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n1ghk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1c6z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqzhb0)
Australia's Covid-19 spike

Taskforces have been sent to the Australian state of Victoria to deal with a rise in coronavirus cases in care homes - we get the latest from the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation.

We hear from a man in Texas who was one of the many who believed at first Covid-19 wasn't real, until he and most of his family became infected, and he ended up seriously ill.

And we're live in Zimbabwe where large nationwide anti-government protests have been called demanding that the President steps down over claims of corruption.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1cbqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqzm24)
Hong Kong election controversy

Twelve prominent opposition politicians have been barred from running in Hong Kong's Legislative elections - we speak to Alvin Yeung a legislator and leader of the Hong Kong Civic Party.

The rise in coronavirus cases in India is being compounded by misinformation and the stigmatisation the disease generates, as we hear from a hospital doctor there.

And a hashtag has gone viral on Croatian social media.as part of a campaign to highlight abuse towards women at the hands of men in public spaces, on public transport or at work We speak to a women's rights activist.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1cggk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wbptqzqt8)
Hong Kong bars some election candidates

Twelve candidates have been barred from Hong Kong’s forthcoming legislative elections, we have an update as there are reports they may be postponed.

What is it like to be a hospital doctor in Texas where there are such high numbers of Covid-19 patients?

And we speak to the midwife who has launched a campaign to commemorate the slave mothers in the US who were experimented upon by a surgeon in the name of gynaecological research in the 19th century.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1cl6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxl)
Leader of Ireland's Sinn Fein party Mary Lou McDonald

Last February the talk in Ireland was of a political earthquake. The nationalist party Sinn Féin won the most votes in the general election and promised to smash the status quo. Well, so much for that. Ireland’s two old established political parties instead formed a grand coalition and are steering the country through the Covid-19 crisis and Brexit. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Mary Lou McDonald, the leader of Sinn Féin. Has her party missed its moment?

Photo: Mary Lou McDonald Credit: PA


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n1yh2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78l)
Homeworking: Is it messing with your head?

Working from home could outlast the pandemic. But workers' experiences with homeworking in lockdown are not all positive. Manuela Saragosa speaks to some office workers who've struggled to adapt to home life, and to Dr Zofia Bajorek, research fellow at the Institute for Employment Studies in the UK, who's been surveying workers on the pressures they've faced in lockdown. Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at Manchester Business School, explains why face-to-face contact is so important for innovation in the workplace, and why flexible working with a mix of office and home will ultimately make us all happier.

(Photo: A woman works from home, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv6)
The death of Heinrich Himmler

One of Hitler's most important henchmen was caught by British troops in the chaos of post-war Germany just after WW2 had ended in Europe. A British soldier described to the BBC how the leading Nazi bit down on a cyanide capsule and died. Gordon Corera has been listening to the archive account of Himmler's death, and finding out more about the situation in Germany immediately after its surrender to the Allies.

Photo: Heinrich Himmler in 1939. Credit: Central Press/Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1cpyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnz)
Big tech facing a break-up?

The leaders of Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are grilled by US lawmakers over abuse of market power. Is more regulation or a break-up of their firms on the cards? Plus, Garmin is the latest high-profile victim of a cyberattack. And we meet the woman responsible for Google’s undersea cables. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n2276)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1ctpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn6)
Fighting fat to fight Covid-19

Experts have warned that being obese or overweight puts you at greater risk of serious illness or death from Covid-19. One study suggests the chances of dying from the coronavirus are 90% higher in those who are severely obese. This week British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced sweeping plans to shrink waistlines, saying the virus had been a “wake-up call” on an issue that threatened public health even before the pandemic. According to the World Health Organisation obesity has nearly tripled worldwide since 1975 and is becoming an increasing problem in developing economies. Meanwhile Asian and black populations have been found to have a higher risk of diabetes and heart disease, conditions exacerbated by carrying excess weight. New measures in England include a ban on ‘buy one get one free’ deals, new curbs on the advertising of junk food, and a review of labelling on food and drinks sold in shops. But how much of an impact have these policies made when introduced elsewhere? Governments are increasingly introducing taxes on foods high in sugar in the hope of changing consumer behaviour and encouraging manufacturers to make their products healthier. But do such measures work? And how important is exercise in tackling the global obesity crisis? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss whether fighting fat can help curb the coronavirus.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1cyg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5ypw6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n29qg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztgb)
The return of Ricky van Wolfswinkel and the misunderstood Nicolas Anelka

Dutch striker Ricky van Wolfswinkel discusses his return to football after brain surgery. And the former France and Real Madrid player Nicolas Anelka looks back on his career.

Picture: Ricky van Wolfswinkel of FC Basel celebrates victory against Vitesse Arnhem (Laurens Lindhout/Soccrates/Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1d266)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhb)
The Kenyan clan branded 'evil'

The BBC’s Anne Soy has been to her birthplace, Kenya’s Great Rift Valley, to meet members of the Talai clan, who have been feared and shunned since colonial times. When the Talai resisted British settlers more than a century ago, they were punished and branded ‘evil’, a slur that left them impoverished and marginalised, and still persists today.

Afghan etiquette - what's in a title?
BBC Pashto's Payenda Sargand has been putting the spotlight on the importance of titles in Afghan society. Why is it more important to know a person’s title than their name, and what happens if you get it wrong? He’s been sharing his discoveries with presenter Faranak Amidi.

My Home Town: Snezhinsk, Russia
Ksenia Idrisova of BBC Russian takes us to her hometown of Snezhinsk in the Ural mountains of Russia, a town so secret in her childhood that it wasn’t even shown on maps.

Covid-19 in Bishkek
This month Kyrgyzstan experienced a surge in coronavirus cases which quickly overwhelmed the health service, and triggered an extraordinary volunteer response. BBC Kyrgyz has been reporting on their work, and living the story: several of the team also became sick despite working from home, including Almaz Tchoroev, happily back to full health now.

A diplomatic close shave
The US ambassador to South Korea, Harry Harris, recently shaved off his moustache. Quite why this made the news is explained by BBC Korean's Julie Yoonnyung Lee, and dates back to the era of Japanese colonial rule when moustaches were favoured by Japanese military leaders. So did he bow to diplomatic pressure, or was it a decision dictated by the weather, as he suggests?

Image: Members of Talai clan on tractor
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1d5yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5yycg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n2k6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1d9pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k2hb1)
Hong Kong elections postponed

The Hong Kong government says September's legislative elections have been postponed due to concern over a spike in coronavirus cases. The vote would have been the first to be held since the Beijing government imposed a controversial new security law on the territory.

Also in the programme: The impact of Covid-19 on the Eurozone; and how a Ugandan music video is raising money for rural communities.

(Picture: Hong Kong Chief Executive, Carrie Lam announced the postponement of elections. Credit: EPA/JEROME FAVRE)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1dffl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n2spz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt3hjpczf0)
Eurozone suffers deepest contraction on record

Spain, France and Italy suffer double-digit falls in economic output due to the pandemic. We get the picture from Italy, where the economy contracted 12.4% between April and June, from Silvia Sciorilli Borrelli, Milan correspondent for the Financial Times. And Luca Leoni, who runs two hotels in Lombardy, in northern Italy, tells us what it's like to run a business in the current climate. Also in the programme, as International Airlines Group, which owns British Airways and Spain's Iberia reveals a $4.5bn loss in the first six months of the year, its chief executive Willie Walsh discusses the magnitude of the crisis facing aviation. With the British government announcing a delay of at least two weeks to the reopening of ice rinks, bowling alleys and indoor performance venues, we find out about the impact from Simon Cooke, who runs one of London's most famous music venues, Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club. Plus, we hear about a row that has broken out between the grape growers of France's Champagne region, and the companies that buy the crop, from Thibaut Le Mailloux, of the official Champagne Committee.

(Picture: A waiter serving at a Paris restaurant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1dk5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n2xg3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztgb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1dnxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2swcmxz0zp)
Coronavirus conversations: Dealing with addiction

Six months on from the moment the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a global health emergency, we look at the main developments and figures from around the world. We go to China, where the virus first emerged, and where new cases have now been reported for the eighth day in a row.

Also, we look at the economic impact of the pandemic, particularly in Europe. Spain is facing its worst recession in modern times, Italy has reported a drop in GDP and France's economy has also taken a hit. We speak to people across the continent who have lost their jobs as a result of Covid-19.

And we continue hearing from people who have struggled with addiction during lockdown. Brenden in the US says his drug problem spiralled out of control due to the isolation, but that he managed to get the support he needed.

(Photo: Close up of a man hand rolling a cannabis joint. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1dsnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1dxf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd5znv7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n38ph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jmhpxqww4)
2020/07/31 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1f157)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n3dfm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5z)
Why do conspiracy theories exist?

Listener Avalon from Australia wants to know why people use conspiracy theories to explain shocking events. Are we more likely to believe conspiracy theories in times of adversity? What purpose do conspiracy theories serve in society?

Marnie Chesterton speaks to the scientists to explain their popularity, even in the face of seemingly irrefutable evidence.
Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

Image: All-seeing eye of God inside triangle pyramid. Credit: paseven, Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1f4xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yt10k3bjy)
Eurozone suffers deepest contraction on record

New data shows the deep damage the coronavirus pandemic has done to the Eeurozone. Its economy shrank by a record 12.1% in the second quarter, with all member states registering falls. Spain was the worst affected. Its gross domestic product contracted by almost 20%.

Also in the programme: Sir Alan Parker, the acclaimed British director of such films as Fame, Evita and Bugsy Malone, has died aged 76; and award-winning Zimbabwean author Tsitsi Dangarembga, a nominee for this year's Booker Prize, has been arrested in the country's capital, Harare, during an anti-government protest.

(Photo: Spain's economy has been ravaged by the virus. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1f8nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n3mxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztgb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nxkh1fddm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b8kd604tr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pr06n3rp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58j0dn43ty)
Eurozone suffers deepest contraction on record

Spain, France and Italy suffer double-digit falls in economic output due to the pandemic. We get the picture from Italy, where the economy contracted 12.4% between April and June, from Silvia Sciorilli Borrelli, Milan correspondent for the Financial Times. And Luca Leoni, who runs two hotels in Lombardy, in northern Italy, tells us what it's like to run a business in the current climate. Also in the programme, as International Airlines Group, which owns British Airways and Spain's Iberia reveals a $4.5bn loss in the first six months of the year, its chief executive Willie Walsh discusses the magnitude of the crisis facing aviation. Plus, we hear about a row that has broken out between the grape growers of France's Champagne region, and the companies that buy the crop, from Thibaut Le Mailloux, of the official Champagne Committee.

(Picture: A waiter serving at a Paris restaurant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 06:06 SUN (w3csz6lb)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6lc)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6lc)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6lc)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6lc)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybbz9k)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybcbjy)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybcg92)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybcpsb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybctjg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybd20q)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybdx7m)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybfd74)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pqmybfhz8)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybfrgj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybfw6n)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybg3px)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybg7g1)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybgc65)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybggy9)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybglpf)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybgqfk)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybgv5p)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybgyxt)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybhxwv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybj947)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pqmybjdwc)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5pr06mnhms)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5pr06mnmcx)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5pr06mnvw5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5pr06mpbvp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5pr06mpglt)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5pr06mplby)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5pr06mpq32)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5pr06mpylb)

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BBC News Summary 16:30 MON (w172x5pr06mq9tq)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5pr06mqp23)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5pr06mqst7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5pr06mr19h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5pr06mr51m)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mrj90)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mrrs8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5pr06ms7rs)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mschx)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5pr06msm05)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mt2zp)

BBC News Summary 16:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mt6qt)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mtkz6)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mtpqb)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mty6l)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5pr06mv1yq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5pr06mvf63)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5pr06mvnpc)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5pr06mw4nw)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5pr06mw8f0)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5pr06mwhx8)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5pr06mwrdj)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5pr06mwzws)

BBC News Summary 16:30 WED (w172x5pr06mx3mx)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5pr06mxgw9)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5pr06mxlmf)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5pr06mxv3p)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5pr06mxyvt)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5pr06myb36)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5pr06myklg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5pr06mz1kz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5pr06mz5b3)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5pr06mzdtc)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5pr06mzn9m)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5pr06mzwsw)

BBC News Summary 16:30 THU (w172x5pr06n00k0)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5pr06n0csd)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5pr06n0hjj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5pr06n0r0s)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5pr06n0vrx)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n1709)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n1ghk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n1yh2)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n2276)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n29qg)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n2k6q)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n2spz)

BBC News Summary 16:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n2xg3)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n38ph)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n3dfm)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n3mxw)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5pr06n3rp0)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qnh91)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qnm15)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qnqs9)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qnvjf)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qnz8k)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qp30p)

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BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qpbhy)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qpg82)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qpl06)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qpprb)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qpthg)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qpy7l)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qq1zq)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qqjz7)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qqnqc)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qqsgh)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qqx6m)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qr0yr)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5nx66qr4pw)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qrd64)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qrhy8)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qrmpd)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qrrfj)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qrw5n)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qrzxs)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qs3nx)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qs7f1)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qsc55)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qsgx9)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qslnf)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qsqdk)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qsv4p)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qsywt)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qt2my)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qtkmg)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qtpcl)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qtt3q)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qtxvv)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5nx66qv1lz)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0z4cd)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0z83j)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0zcvn)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0zhls)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0zmbx)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0zr31)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0zvv5)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5nxkh0zzl9)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5nxkh103bf)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5nxkh1072k)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5nxkh10btp)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5nxkh10gkt)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5nxkh10l9y)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5nxkh10q22)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5nxkh10tt6)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5nxkh10ykb)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5nxkh1129g)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5nxkh1161l)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5nxkh119sq)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5nxkh11fjv)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5nxkh11k8z)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5nxkh11p13)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5nxkh11ss7)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh1218h)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh1250m)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh128rr)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh12dhw)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh12j80)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh12n04)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh12rr8)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh12whd)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh1307j)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh133zn)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh137qs)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh13cgx)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh13h71)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh13lz5)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh13qq9)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh13vgf)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh13z6k)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh142yp)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh146pt)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh14bfy)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh14g62)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh14ky6)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5nxkh14ppb)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5nxkh14y5l)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5nxkh151xq)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5nxkh155nv)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5nxkh159dz)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5nxkh15f53)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5nxkh15jx7)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5nxkh15nnc)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5nxkh15sdh)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5nxkh15x4m)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5nxkh160wr)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5nxkh164mw)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5nxkh168d0)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5nxkh16d44)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5nxkh16hw8)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5nxkh16mmd)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5nxkh16rcj)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5nxkh16w3n)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5nxkh16zvs)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5nxkh173lx)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5nxkh177c1)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5nxkh17c35)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5nxkh17gv9)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5nxkh17llf)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5nxkh17v2p)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5nxkh17ytt)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5nxkh182ky)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5nxkh186b2)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5nxkh18b26)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5nxkh18ftb)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5nxkh18kkg)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5nxkh18p9l)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5nxkh18t1q)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5nxkh18xsv)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5nxkh191jz)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19593)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19917)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19dsc)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19jjh)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19n8m)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19s0r)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5nxkh19wrw)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5nxkh1b0j0)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5nxkh1b484)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5nxkh1b808)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5nxkh1bcrd)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5nxkh1bhhj)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1bqzs)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1bvqx)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1bzh1)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1c375)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1c6z9)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1cbqf)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1cggk)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1cl6p)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1cpyt)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1ctpy)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1cyg2)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1d266)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1d5yb)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1d9pg)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1dffl)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1dk5q)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1dnxv)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1dsnz)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1dxf3)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1f157)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1f4xc)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1f8nh)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5nxkh1fddm)

BBC OS Conversations 07:06 SUN (w3ct0wjr)

BBC OS Conversations 10:06 MON (w3ct0wjr)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2swcmxlfc9)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2swcmxpb8d)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2swcmxs75h)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2swcmxw42l)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2swcmxz0zp)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jl)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89m)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8mx)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wr)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78l)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18v462fqcy)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18vhgcv8cd)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18vhgcy58h)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18np5p1hz0)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18vhgd3z2p)

Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snt)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv5y)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv5y)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv5y)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv5z)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz987)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz987)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz987)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz987)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0wp4)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct0wp4)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0wp4)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0wp4)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pr)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pr)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pr)

Global Questions 06:32 SAT (w3ct0wj4)

Global Questions 22:32 SAT (w3ct0wj4)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3csy98t)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3csy98t)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3csy98t)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6m)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6m)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3cszc6m)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxl)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxl)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3cszbxl)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc4)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcc4)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcc4)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcc4)

Heart and Soul 06:32 SUN (w3ct0wkg)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0wkg)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SUN (w3ct0wkg)

Heart and Soul 02:32 FRI (w3ct0v0h)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbh)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbh)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbh)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 05:50 SAT (w3ct0whm)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 18:50 SAT (w3ct0whm)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3y)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3y)

More or Less 23:50 SAT (w3ct0pxl)

More or Less 02:50 MON (w3ct0pxl)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxl)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6t3)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6t3)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wbptqlwpm)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wbptqm0fr)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wbptqm45w)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wbptqpslq)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wbptqpxbv)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172x2wbptqq12z)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172x2wbptqspht)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wbptqst7y)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wbptqsy02)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2wbptqwldx)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wbptqwq51)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wbptqwtx5)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wbptqzhb0)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2wbptqzm24)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2wbptqzqt8)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2ysnr7d3w5)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2ysnr7f2v6)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2ysnr7h0s8)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2ysnr7hzr9)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2yt10k3bjy)

Outlook 10:32 SUN (w3cszf01)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd3b)

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Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdb3)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4k)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4k)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1d)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1d)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jmhpxc97r)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bw1bd6csx)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjf)

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The Conversation 07:32 SUN (p03ng3cs)

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The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8j)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq4)

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The Why Factor 23:32 SAT (w3csytz8)

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