Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 JULY 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp3362c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18tdnfwf58)
Historic Supreme Court win for Native Americans

The US Supreme Court ruled on Thursday about half of Oklahoma belongs to Native Americans, in a landmark case that also quashed a child rape conviction. The justices decided 5-4 that an eastern chunk of the state, including its second-biggest city, Tulsa, should be recognised as part of a reservation. We hear from representatives of the Muscogee Creek and Cherokee Nations about the significance of this ruling. Also in the programme, Amazon has said an email sent to employees asking them to remove the video-sharing app TikTok from any mobile device that can access their company email was sent in error. The BBC's Michelle Fleury breaks down the security concerns Amazon may have about TikTok. And we have an in-depth report examining how African American-owned assets can be undervalued. Plus, a new book explores the historical relationship between McDonalds and black business owners.

All through the show we'll be joined by business journalist Peter Ryan, senior business correspondent with the ABC in Sydney.

(Picture: A representative of the Choctaw nation. Picture credit: Shutterstock)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp339th)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7p27m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpsp2w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjc)
Cricket in a bio-bubble

After a 117-day absence, live international cricket is back. Ali is in Southampton as England take on the West Indies behind closed doors. She gives us a behind-the-scenes tour of the media bio-bubble and speaks to England bowler Mark Wood. And with a decision on the Men’s T20 World Cup expected next week, Ali, Jim and Charu discuss whether the IPL should be allowed to take its place in the schedule.

Image: England cricketers wearing face masks at the Ageas Bowl. (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp33fkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh7)
Iran's female gamers

Lockdown has boosted online gaming everywhere, but when Sheida Hooshmandi of BBC Persian investigated Iran’s gaming scene she discovered a surprising number of participants are women. So what are the particular challenges for female gamers in the Islamic Republic of Iran?

ABC….
It’s as easy as ABC, but learning your alphabet is trickier in some places than others. Fifth Floor class of 2015 takes us through their ABCs.

Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine, or TCM, has seen a surge in popularity in China since the Covid-19 pandemic. Beijing recently considered making criticism of TCM a crime in the province, but this sparked a huge backlash amongst citizens. Yashan Zhao of BBC Chinese explores the differing views of TCM within China.

Singing for Oromia: Hachelu Hundessa
The killing of the Oromo singer Hachelu Hundessa in Ethiopia triggered huge ethnic unrest, killing more than 200 people. Kalkidan Yibeltal is based in Addis Ababa and explains why Hachelu meant so much to the Oromo people.

The new cyclists of Dhaka
BBC Bangla’s Rocky Shahnewaj is a keen cyclist. It’s the quickest way through Dhaka’s crowded streets, and keeps him fit. So when his social media pages started filling up with pictures of shiny new bikes in Bangladesh’s capital post coronavirus lockdown, he decided to check it out.

Image: Iranian women watching gaming on smart phone
Rights: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv3)
The 1960s report that warned the USA was racist

In the summer of 1967 more than 100 cities in America were caught up in riots. US Senator Fred Harris urged the President, Lyndon B Johnson, to investigate the causes. He set up the Kerner Commission and appointed Fred Harris as one of 11 members to find out why America was burning. The final report shocked many Americans when it blamed white racism for creating and sustaining black ghettos. It said the US was dividing into two separate and unequal societies - one black and one white. Claire Bowes has been speaking to former US Senator Fred Harris.

Photo: Members of the Kerner Commission giving final approval to the panel's report on 28th February 1968. Senator Fred R. Harris, (D-Okla.) third from left.
Credit: Bettmann/Getty


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp33k9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn3)
Lebanon on the brink

The financial crisis in Lebanon seems to have accelerated rapidly ever since the government defaulted on a ninety-billion-dollar loan in March.The currency has lost nearly eighty percent of its value pushing a large group of its population below the poverty line. A shortage of cash has led many to barter household goods for food on Facebook. Even the Lebanese army has stopped serving meat to its soldiers. And many of its citizen are seeking refuge abroad. At the heart of the crisis is the country’s banking sector. Protesters see it as the embodiment of a corrupt economic system that has enriched the elites who are now unwilling to foot their share of the bill. Now, compounded by the outbreak of the coronavirus, has Lebanon entered its most critical moment since the end of the civil war? As the country stares into the abyss will its disparate political groups be willing to come together to prevent a financial meltdown? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss what hope there is for Lebanon.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp33p1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7pfh0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpt1b8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvry)
How to talk about conspiracy theories

We’ve all been there – that awkward situation that happens over the dinner table or at a party, when someone starts talking about conspiracy theories.
With the coronavirus pandemic has come a huge wave of novel online misinformation – including some outlandish ideas and panicky people who are buying into them.
So what do you do when confronted with someone who starts spouting obvious falsehoods about “evil plots” and “deadly vaccines”?
Trending brings together a man who’s been drawn towards social media’s fringes and an expert who studies the psychology of people who believe in conspiracy theories.
What happened when they sat down for a socially distanced chat?
Plus we give some tips on how to talk to people who are edging towards the rabbit hole.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Marianna Spring

Photo caption: Woman wearing a mask looking at a computer screen
Photo credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whk)
Letter two

How two very different Presidents – Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan - shaped the image of the Oval Office. As so often in the story of leadership, one president’s failings highlight another’s strengths.

Producer: Tara Neill and Regan Morris


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp33st0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Evidence (w3ct0wlb)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Covid 19: recovery

Claudia Hammond and a panel of international experts look at the latest research into Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which is sweeping through the world.

Our panel of experts discuss how many people make full recoveries but others are finding that life hasn’t yet returned to normal months after infection. In India and Sweden, clinics are being set up to follow survivors of the virus and doctors are discovering that people are having difficulties assimilating what happened to them. And we hear about how three generations of one Spanish family all survived and how they are all recovering differently, including the 96 year old grandmother.

On the panel are Seema Shah, Professor of Medical Ethics at North Western University, Professor David Heymann, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Professor Soo Aleman from the Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden, Dr David Collier, Clinical director of the William Harvey Clinical Research Centre, Queen Mary University of London and Dr Netravathi M, Professor of Neurology at the National Institute for Mental Health and Neuroscience in Bangalore in India.

The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection.

Producers: Geraldine Fitzgerald and Caroline Steel
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: A physiotherapist takes care of a patient in rehabilitation as he recovers from an infection with the coronavirus COVID-19, Credit: Patrick/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp33xk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snr)
The fall of Wirecard - a German scandal

Its been the biggest corporate scandal of 2020 so far. Wirecard was one of Germany’s biggest companies but now finds itself embroiled in fraud and corruption claims. How did the technology star fall so quickly from grace? Fergus Nicoll investigates. The coronavirus pandemic has taken its toll on the education sector - in the United States new rules say foreign students might face deportation if their courses have gone online, throwing their lives into disarray. Rob Young hears their stories. And what’s the formula behind a winning brand? We join Elizabeth Hotson on a quest to bring out a winning range of mushy peas. Presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma.

(Image: Wirecard building in Munich)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp34198)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pp)
Australia’s second lockdown

In May, it looked like Australia’s battle with coronavirus was beginning to ease. Restrictions were lifted and there was hope the country could begin to recover from the pandemic and the job losses it brought. However, for the state of Victoria, those hopes are on hold once more. Five million people in Melbourne – Australia’s second largest city – have been barred from leaving home for six weeks following a spike in new infections, as Shaimaa Khalil reports.

Hong Kong once again finds itself at the centre of a diplomatic falling-out between the UK and China, after China imposed a controversial new security law on the former British colony. The law, which was passed last week, has been criticised internationally as a crackdown on basic freedoms. In response, the UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has pledged to offer three million Hong Kong residents the chance to settle in the UK and ultimately the chance to apply for citizenship. However, China reacted swiftly to undermine the UK’s offer and to challenge its credibility, even threatening countermeasures. But for many who were Hong Kong residents before the handover in 1997, it has offered them a way out. Grace Tsoi is amongst those facing a difficult choice.

Ever since the killing of George Floyd by a white police officer in Minnesota there’s been a spotlight on racism the US and elsewhere, with protests and support for the Black Lives Matter movement across the world. This includes South Asia, too. But the conversation around race and colour is very loaded for South Asians themselves and not just in regard to people of different ethnic backgrounds. As Karishma Vaswani has experienced often the deep divides within Asian society itself aren’t scrutinised enough.

The Balearic Islands, off eastern Spain, have long provided sun, sea and sand to tourists eager to leave their troubles behind. German, British and Scandinavian travellers have been known to turn up in their millions each year but it’s the Brits and their taste for booze that have made tourism bosses enforce a new ruling. Government chiefs in Ibiza and Majorca have imposed a 6 drink-a-day limit in all-inclusive hotels, a ban on happy hours and made it illegal to advertise pub crawls. The hope is that the Balearics can attract a different kind of holidaymaker and change the area’s reputation.
The archipelago has not been immune to coronavirus and tourism has plummeted, but as Lottie Gross has heard, that has not put the plans on hold.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: Police officers at a check point in Albury, New South Wales, speak to drivers hoping to cross the border from the state of Victoria. Credit: AAP Image/Lukas Coch via Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdptdkn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3w)
New York to Shimla

Ilma’s life was in the USA. Then a call to her mum made her decide to return home to India and find a new career - as a police officer. Ilma Afroz had attended the best universities, and was building an international career in the Big Apple, but she wanted India to benefit from her experience. “My talent, my education and my whole self is for my country,” she says.
Send us your stories: myindianlife@bbc.com
And let us know what you think #MyIndianLife


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7f)
Resolves

Juliana Engberg

International curator and festival director Juliana Engberg resolves to “continue to enable, craft, produce and exhibit work by artists so that we can all go on discovering who we are and what we care about”.

From her partial lockdown in Auckland, away from home in Australia, she is shocked and challenged by the predicament of festivals, museums and theatres, but determined to find ways for these places to continue, to operate and thrive.

“I realise why I continue to work with art, in all its forms - musical, movement, literary, visual - because it’s a means by which we step out of the commonplace into a suspended moment of encounter, so we can contemplate and release our emotions and curiosity. Art might be surprising, confusing, strange, delightful, inspire love or disgust; it helps us move through our lives in all their dark, light and unstable passages. During these dark lockdown times, it’s art that makes me completely forget I am just a lump of chemical and biological processes that could catch or infect another with Covid-19.”

Image: Juliana Engberg (Credit: Kay Campbell)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp3451d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7pxgj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdptj9s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Scramble

15th September 1940 was the moment the Germans chose to drive the Spitfire from the battlefield. The people on the ground, guiding the Spitfires - spotters, plotters and fitters- will play a vital role in a day that changed the course of World War Two.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4h)
Are the BBC’s editorial values based on impartiality outdated?

In light of Black Live Matter, has there been a clarification around impartiality? Are the BBC’s editorial values based on impartiality outdated? And how is the BBC ensuring diversity in regard to rethinking topics, story-telling and interviewees? We put listeners’ questions to the BBC’s director of News and Current Affairs Fran Unsworth.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp348sj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bv9srn2l7)
The return of international cricket and one man's road to recovery

We go live to Southampton where it is day four of the first test match between England and the West Indies. It has been four months without International cricket and we bring you the latest action from our team who are at the ground.

It’s not just listening to cricket that has made a welcome return this week, in the next few hours cricketers up and down the UK will be pulling on their whites for the first time as they are allowed to play for the first time and we hear from one of the players.

In January, Mose Masoe, a Samoan Rugby international, was playing in a pre-season friendly match for his team Hull KR and went into a tackle awkwardly. When he woke up he couldn’t feel his legs and told he would never walk again. Fast forward 6 months and he has taken his first steps. We caught up with him and his wife Carissa, who’s about to give birth to their third child.

The European PGA tour got underway this week and we hear from caddie Ollie Briggs on what it is like returning to the golf course.

A club in Lesotho has become the first top flight football club to announce equal budgets for its women’s and men’s football teams. Puky Ramokwoatsi is the manager of the women's team and shares her story of how she became involved with the club.

How will you remember this year in sport? Instead of focusing on what we’ve not seen, we meet someone who shows us what we’re missing. Laurence Griffiths is a Getty images sports photographer.

Photo: West Indies players taking the knee before their Test match against England in Southampton (Credit: Getty images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp34djn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7q4ys)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdptrt1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj2)
Global Questions

Coronavirus: A step back for women?

Is the lockdown turning back the clock on women’s lives? While men have paid disproportionately with their lives during this pandemic, its women who appear to be bearing the brunt of the economic fallout of the pandemic. They are taking on a greater share of domestic work and childcare – and are more likely than men to be working in sectors that have shut down during the pandemic. The UN has described the worldwide increase in domestic abuse as a "shadow pandemic" alongside Covid-19. And yet female leaders at the helm of various nations have been commended for managing the crisis better than their male counterparts. But while resilience, pragmatism, benevolence and trust are cited as successful features of women leaders – is it also a reflection that where women are elected as leaders there is a greater presence of women in positions of power across the board? Zeinab Badawi will be joined by Alexandra Shulman former editor-in-chief of British Vogue and Tina Tchen CEO of Time’s Up and Former Chief of Staff to First Lady Michelle Obama


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp34j8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6t1)
The art of pop with Soweto Kinch, Charlotte Adigéry and Jordan Rakei

Saxophonist, MC and poet Soweto Kinch talks to Charlotte Adigéry and Jordan Rakei about pop music inspirations, writing to fit in a genre, and the role ego plays in their art.

Charlotte Adigéry is a Belgian-Caribbean musician, born and raised in Ghent to parents from Martinique and Guadeloupe, and she’s hard to define by genre. She also performs as electro-punk alter ego WWWater. When making music, Charlotte has said, “I try and make something without thinking about direction or genre or sound.”

Jordan Rakei is a New Zealand-Australian jazz, soul, R&B, and pop musician, singer, songwriter and producer. His breakthrough record came in 2017 with Wallflower, and he released the Origin LP earlier this year. He’s also worked with the likes of Disclosure, Jessie Ware, Loyle Carner and Anna Calvi.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp34n0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lttnh)
25 years since Bosnia's Srebrenica massacre

Present and past world leaders have been addressing Bosnians and dignitaries gathered at Srebrenica, as part of ceremonies marking the 25th anniversary of the massacre of about 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys.

Also in the programme: President Trump commutes sentence of Roger Stone, longtime friend and adviser; and we hear from a front-line doctor about coronavirus in Yemen.

Picture: Bosnian Muslim women mourn next to gravestones during a funeral ceremony at the Potocari Memorial Center and Cemetery, in Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 11 July 2020. Credit: EPA/FEHIM DEMIR.


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp34rs1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l79c5v9fc)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld is joined by our panelists Anita Assante, Benni Mccarthy and Jose Fonte for all the latest football news and the build up to the day's Premier League matches. We'll have live Premier League commentary from Anfield as the champions Liverpool take on Burnley.

Plus, we'll bring you the latest from the second weekend of Formula 1 racing in Austria following a dramatic start to the season last weekend. And we'll have updates from the cricket where England take on the West Indies on day four of their test.

And we'll be talking all things golf, Major League Soccer and tennis.

Photo credit: Liverpool's Sadio Mane pictured at Anfield (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp357rk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7r05p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpvm0y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp35chp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjd)
Summer with Greta

The 17-year-old campaigner Greta Thunberg tells the story of her whirlwind year, which took her across the Atlantic twice as she went to speak to the UN General Assembly. She describes seeing the grandeur and wastefulness of the US with her own eyes - and observing some of the feedback loops induced by global warming. And she expresses her frustration and despair at the lack of action by international leaders, especially of richer nations, to really tackle climate change. And she explains why she thinks the news media so often trivialise or misunderstand the issue.

This is an abridged version of the most popular radio programme in Sweden: Sommar (Summer). Over 90 minutes, famous individuals read an extended personal essay, accompanied by their choice of music. It’s said that being chosen to present Sommar is the Swedish equivalent of being knighted. One recent episode was listened to by around a third of the entire Swedish population. Greta Thunberg translated her original Swedish script into English for the programme.

Producer: Mattias Österlund
Sound engineer/technician Lisa Abrahamsson


(Greta Thunberg wearing the summer crown in Stockholm, Sweden. Credit: Mattias Ahlm / Sveriges Radio)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp35h7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk30)
Actor Parminder Nagra

This week on The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi: German director Werner Herzog reveals why his latest movie, Family Romance LLC, had to be a feature film rather than a documentary; actor Helen McCrory on stage fright; and Malian singer/songwriter Rokia Traore with a performance recorded in Bamako, especially for the BBC

Actor Himesh Patel tells us about filming The Luminaries in New Zealand and singer/songwriter Norah Jones talks about hiding behind her songs.

Joining Nikki to discuss the week’s cultural highlights are film critic Rich Cline and actor Parminder Nagra, star of ER, The Blacklist, Fortitude and Agents of SHIELD, talking about her transatlantic career.

(Photo: Parminder Nagra. Credit: Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp35lzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lvsmj)
Bosnia marks 25 years since massacre

Nine recently-identified victims of the massacre at Srebrenica have been buried during a ceremony in Bosnia marking 25 years since it took place.

Also in the programme: After large protests in Bamako, Mali’s Prime Minister, Boubou Cissé, has offered to hold talks with opposition forces; and the World Council of Churches has called on Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to reverse his decision to turn the celebrated Hagia Sophia museum back into a mosque.

(Photo: Bosnian Muslim women wearing face masks mourn in front of the casket of a newly identified victim during a burial ceremony marking the 25th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp35qr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpw30g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp35vh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7rlxb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpw6rl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzm)
Why do we care where we come from?

Most of us feel some need to know a roadmap of our past, our connections with a family tree which took root before we were born. We look for stories to tell about where we come from and seek answers in the lives of our ancestors, even in the DNA they pass on to us. In this edition of the Why Factor, Viv Jones asks why we have such a fundamental need to discover the stories of our heritage, and what they tell us about ourselves.

Contributors:
Sandy Banks, journalist
Caitriona Palmer, author of ‘An Affair With My Mother’
Fenella Cannell, Associate Professor Of Anthropology, London School of Economics
Tim Caulfield, Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy, University of Alberta
Catherine St Clair, founder of NPE Friends Fellowship

Image: Woman admiring the sunset
Credit: Getty Images


SAT 23:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxj)
Sweden’s lockdown lite

Unlike its Nordic neighbours, Sweden never imposed a lockdown to stem the spread of coronavirus. Tim Harford speaks to statistician Ola Rosling to find out what the results have been.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Jo Casserly

Picture: A woman wears a face mask at a Stockholm bus stop where a sign reminds passengers to maintain a minimum social distance. Sweden 25 June 2020. Credit: EPA/ Stina Stjernkvist.



SUNDAY 12 JULY 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp362zg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnw)
TikTok caught in US-China tussle

The hit video sharing platform quits operating in Hong Kong as the US considers a ban. Plus, is the threat from “deep fakes” overblown? And has the lockdown made video calling seem less awkward than it used to be? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Close-up of the TikTok icon on a smartphone screen. Credit: Reuters/ Dado Ruvic).


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpwg7v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp366ql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7rz4q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpwkzz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp36bgq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0whz)
The Coronavirus Front Line

The Coronavirus Frontline special

This series comes from the Bradford Royal Infirmary, in the North of England, with recordings made by Dr John Wright, who works there. He is an epidemiologist and as he helps the hospital prepare and cope with a huge influx of patients, he’s also searching for answers about Covid-19. Some of the best clues come from follow-ups on those who are still recovering from the virus and who document the on-going impact on their health as they struggle to get back to full fitness.

Medical teams are preparing to vaccinate 3,000 people in the community and logistically this raises many challenges. The partnership with local mosques and other religious and community leaders helps with plans for a wave of volunteers to attend at a stadium to be registered for the trial. In the hospital patients are still being treated on the covid wards and many are involved in trials of new treatments that will work in partnership and at earlier stages of infection.

Winifred Robinson presents these recordings in a series which charts the response of National Health Service staff and patients on the covid-19 wards.


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp36g6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpwth7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjl)
Democracy and famine

What is the cause of famine? The obvious answer is shortage of food. But, says the Nobel-prize winning economist Amartya Sen that misses a vital point. In his research on famines, he showed that there’s usually enough food to go around – it just doesn’t reach the people who need it. Often that’s because news of food scarcity hasn’t been widely publicised. In democracies people don’t starve to death, he says, because there’s always pressure on the politicians to alleviate suffering.

Presenter David Edmonds
Producer Ben Cooper

(Image: Bengal Famine, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp36kyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7sbd3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpwy7c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8g)
Rebeca Omordia: African classical music pioneer

Name the first classical music composer that comes to mind and it’s likely to be one of the big European names like Bach, Brahms or Beethoven. Nigerian-Romanian pianist Rebeca Omordia grew up playing this music until she decided to explore her heritage and look deeper into African classical music. She tells the Cultural Frontline about the music she discovered along the way and what she’s doing to bring composers such as Ayo Bankole and and Christian Onyeji to a wider audience.

We go behind the scenes of the new opera, Osman Bey and the Snails. Its composer Nigel Osbourne tells Tina how the work was created by artists to raise awareness of the case of the Turkish political prisoner, Osman Kavala.

Has a book, a film or a piece of music ever changed the way you see the world? The drummer and composer Stewart Copeland shares his love for the work of Jimi Hendrix.

When the Liceu Opera Barcelona opened its doors after many months of lockdown, they did so with an unusual new performance devised by the artist Eugenio Ampudia. Instead of playing to an audience, the Liceu String Quartet performed to an audience of 2,292 plants in a “Concert for the Biocene”. Víctor Garcia de Gomar, the Liceu’s Artistic Director, tells us why.

Presented by Tina Daheley

Photo: Rebeca Omordia.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp36pq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvgx)
How can India beat colourism?

“I was told I would look pretty if my skin were lighter.” “My parents constantly worry how they’ll find me a good husband, as I am very dark complexioned.” “I am the fairest in my family… so obviously, more privileged!”

For most Indian women, these are day-to-day conversations in a society where lighter skin tone is considered beautiful, even superior. But in recent weeks, in response to the conversations taking place around the #BlackLivesMatter campaign, several companies have come forward to drop words such as 'white', 'fairer', or 'lighter' from their skin-lightening products.

But will it have any significant impact on the deep-rooted colourism that is part of the Indian culture? And would Indian brands be more inclusive?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the best ways to beat colourism in India.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Nandita Das, Bollywood actor and director; Karishma Kewalramani, founder and CEO, FAE Beauty; Harish Bijoor, brand and business strategy consultant


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpx1zh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0whx)
The pastor and the prime minister

When Gábor Iványi was a young Protestant minister back in the 1970s standing up to Hungary’s totalitarian Communist regime he promised to stop shaving as a sign of protest. Communism is long gone in Hungary but Ivanyi’s beard keeps getting longer. He fought the Communists side by side with the student leader Victor Orban. He supported Orban and even accompanied him spiritually. Ivanyi is godfather to Orban’s first two children and performed the religious wedding ceremony for Orban.

But now Ivanyi has become the prime minister’s most redoubtable opponent. For Ivanyi and some other young Hungarian Christians, Orban’s Christianity means no more than ‘white Christian Europe’. Orban has taken away the state subsidy to Ivanyi’s church. The Methodist, who runs a shelter for the homeless, gypsies and migrants, was refused access to refugees when he tried to bring them food.

Other Christians publicly criticise Hungary’s interpretation of Christianity. Lutheran blogger Dóra Laborczih edits an independent blog called Christian Culture which attacks the intrusion of right-wing populism into Hungary’s religious life.

Through Ivanyi and Dora we hear how Christians in Hungary are divided on issues such as immigration and we hear from Christians who support Orban and his policies.

John Laurenson travels to Hungary where a bearded pastor with a house full of refugees and a prime minister who has just won his third consecutive general election victory are at war over the meaning of Christianity.

Image: Viktor Orban (Credit: Zoltan Mathe/EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp36tg7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzg)
Black America speaks

We listen in to four black-owned radio stations in the United States to find out how they're covering the killing of George Floyd and the waves of protest since. From Philadelphia, Houston, Los Angeles and Chicago, we hear discussions on preparing young people for encounters with police, on access to finance and housing and on black identity and activism.

We also bring the hosts together, in conversation with Chloe Tilley, to find out what it means to be behind the mic on a black-owned station. How is it different to working elsewhere in the US media?

Picture: 14-year-old Dre Barnes taking part in the conversation on KCOH in Houston, Texas.
Credit: KCOH


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp36y6c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 The Compass (w3ct0wht)
The Pandemic that Changed the World

Reasons: The pandemic that changed the world

Why did coronavirus strike so fast and so hard? There was plenty of warning that a pandemic was inevitable, but when a new virus emerged in a wet market in the Chinese city of Wuhan, the world proved powerless to prevent it spreading. The finger has been pointed in various directions: a failure by the Chinese authorities to communicate, a sluggish response from the World Health Organisation, an ignorance of history, and what Ian Goldin, professor of globalisation and development at Oxford University, has termed the ‘Butterfly Defect’ of globalisation. In this episode, Professor Goldin explores what he sees as the complacency of governments and a declining commitment to multilateralism as reasons for the new pandemic and its unprecedented economic consequences. He hears from, among others, IMF managing director Kristalina Georgieva; the man who identified the Ebola virus, Peter Piot; and the historian Margaret MacMillan.
Producer: Tim Mansel


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpx9gr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq2)
Jacques Pépin: My life in five dishes

Jacques Pépin is a household name across much of the US. He shot to fame starring alongside Julia Child on TV cookery shows in the 1990s, has written more than 30 books, and picked up multiple awards.

He tells Graihagh Jackson about his precarious childhood dodging bombs in wartime France and the near-fatal car crash that ended his restaurant career, but set him on a path towards celebrity.

Plus, the 84-year-old explains why he’s still sharing his cooking and recipes with the world through the coronavirus lockdown.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

Let us know what you think about the show - email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Jacques Pépin. Credit: Tom Hopkins/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp371yh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7stcm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpxf6w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp375pm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3m)
Why are Covid cases rising in the US?

Why are Covid cases dramatically increasing in some U.S. states, where rates had been low? The number of new coronavirus infections in a single day has passed fifty five thousand. Is it because of more testing, or is something else going on?


(Demonstrators outside the State Capitol in Auston.Texas protesting against Coronavirus restrictions. Credit: Gary Miller/Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpxjz0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszdzz)
Greg Louganis: the Death-Defying Diver

Blood, gold and secrets at the Olympic pool.

Greg Louganis is one of the most celebrated divers in the US, and a record-breaking athlete. But Greg is also famous for one of the biggest shocks in Olympic history – cutting his head on a diving board, and the revelations that followed. This episode was first broadcast 17th November 2018.

A longer version of this story is available as a podcast.

Presenter: Sofia Bettiza
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Greg Louganis
Credit: Getty Images


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp379fr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7t1vw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpxnq4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0whx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp37f5w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp37jy0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lxqkl)
Mali's president dissolves constitutional court amid unrest

The president of Mali, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, has offered further concessions to a growing opposition movement. He announced the dissolution of the constitutional court in an attempt to calm unrest. Protesters have been calling for the president to resign over his handling of Mali's long-running jihadist conflict, an economic crisis and disputed elections.

Also in the programme: President Trump has for the first time been seen wearing a face mask in public; and is Russia experiencing a flurry of spy mania?

(Image: Mali President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita. Credit: Ludovic Marin /Pool via Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp37np4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0whz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp37sf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Evidence (w3ct0wlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp37x5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l79c5yftq)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you all the reaction to the Premier League's early games, as well as the build up to our commentary game. It's the North London derby, Tottenham Hotspur against Arsenal from the London stadium.

Plus we'll have the latest from other sports around the world, from cricket to UFC to Formula 1.

Photo credit: Alexandre Lacazette of Arsenal up against Harry Winks of Tottenham last time the two teams faced each other in the Premier League.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp388ds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7v0tx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpymp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8x)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Actor Stanley Tucci tells the story of Kathleen Cleaver, a leading light in the short-lived but highly influential Black Panther Party which was born in Oakland, California. And he explores the contribution of Dianne Feinstein, trailblazing Californian politician who took over as mayor of San Francisco after the murders of Harvey Milk and Mayor Moscone.

Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester
Producer: Laurence Grissell


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp38d4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6t1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp38hx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lypjm)
Coronavirus: Texas is seeing a surge in coronavirus cases

For months, Texas was doing well. Cases were low and the economy had just reopened. Now, it's one of the most recent coronavirus hotspots in the United States, seeing upwards of 6,000 new cases every day and hospitals are reaching capacity. On Sunday, Florida registered a state record of 15,299 new coronavirus cases in 24 hours. Arizona and California also continue to see a rising cases.

Also in the programme: Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda holds a slim lead in the country's presidential election, according to an exit poll; and we hear from an opposition leader in Mali who demands that the President, Ibrahim Boubakar Keita, resign.

(Photo: Local residents hold signs in protest of closed beaches on the 4th of July amid the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease in Texas. Credit: Reuters).


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp38mn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpyzxk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp38rd9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7vhtf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpz3np)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0whx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]



MONDAY 13 JULY 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtyddv4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57nv4df6hg)
500,000 cast 'protest' vote against new Hong Kong security law

500,000 Hong Kong citizens have queued to cast ballots over the weekend in what the Chinese-ruled city's opposition camp says is a symbolic protest vote against tough national security laws directly imposed by Beijing. We hear from the BBC's Danny Vincent. China releases second quarter growth figures this week; independent economist Michael Hughes tells us what to expect. Leaders of the 27 EU nations meet virtually on Friday to discuss plans to inject hundreds of billions of dollars into economies ravaged by the coronavirus pandemic; we hear from Maria Demertzis, deputy director of the Bruegel think tank in Brussels. Plus, Hannah Deacon, a medical cannabis campaigner says that the coronavirus pandemic could be opportunity for the industry to grow in the UK. And in Wales, churches and chapels will start to reopen from Monday. But there will be one thing missing for people sitting in the pews: a choir; we hear from Delyth Morgans Phillips a member of the Corisma choir in South Wales. Picture of a volunteer holding the QR code to download the voter app to vote at the pan-democrat primaries in Whampoa in Hong Kong, China, photo by Marc Fernandes/NurPhoto via Getty Images.


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p036f3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtyddywv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvjzq9z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p03b57)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydf2mz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvl)
Up close with tango

Tango is easy to recognise: those daring steps, the tight hold of the dancing partners, the intense yet melancholy music dominated by the plaintive sounds of the bandoneon. But if you ask what exactly tango is and where it came from, the answer may not be so immediately clear – because it’s more than a genre of music, more than just a style of dance.
To get insights into the roots, the culture and even the magic of tango, Rajan Datar is joined by leading tango historians Maria Susana Azzi, Christine Denniston and John Turci-Escobar.

Photo: Argentine dancers on stage at the World Tango Championships in 2014 (Getty Images)


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh52)
Andre Agassi

In July 1992, Andre Agassi became a tennis superstar when he won the Wimbledon men’s title at the age of 21. But beneath the showman image, Agassi was in private turmoil – in pain from a back problem, depressed and secretly hating his sport. Later in his career, Agassi would even smoke crystal meth. Simon Watts tells his story using BBC archive interviews.

PHOTO: Andre Agassi in action at Wimbledon (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydf6d3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvjzyt7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p03knh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5w)
Could earthworms help transform the future of farming?

Worms are not the cutest of creatures. They’re slimy, often associated with death and tend to bring on feelings of disgust in many of us. But listener Dinesh thinks they’re underrated and wants to know whether earthworms could be the key to our planet’s future agricultural success? He’s an organic farmer in India’s Tamil Nadu province who grows these annelids to add to the soil, and he wants Crowdscience to find out exactly what they’re doing.

Anand Jagatia dons his gardening gloves and digs the dirt on these remarkable creatures, discovering how they can help improve soil quality, prevent fields from becoming waterlogged, and improve microbial numbers, all of which has the potential to increase crop yield.

But he also investigates the so-called ‘earthworm dilemma’ and the idea that in some parts of the world, boreal forest worms are releasing carbon back into the atmosphere, which could have dangerous consequences for climate change.

(Photo:


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydfb47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z931lgy)
Poland's presidential election very close

Poland's presidential election voters turn out in force to deliver the narrowest of margins according to exit polls.

Opposition voices in Hong Kong say they're planning to take on the new security law.

And in Mali some opposition politicians remain under arrest, as concessions offered by President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta are rejected.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydffwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z931q72)
Poland's incumbent Andrzej Duda leads poll narrowly

Poland's President is projected to have won a narrow victory in the country's election - the latest exit poll gives Andrzej Duda a two per cent lead over his socially liberal rival in the closest presidential election since the fall of communism

In Hong Kong pro-democracy voters have been out in force - so many votes to count that they've postponed announcing results until at least Tuesday.

And why is the United Arab Emirates sending a space mission to Mars?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydfkmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z931tz6)
Poland's divided electorate awaits key presidential result

Early polls in the Polish parliamentary election shows the incumbent, Andrez Duda, of the ruling Law and Justice party, leading by two per cent. We'll look at just how divided society there is.

It's claimed that the coronavirus pandemic has led to a 20 per cent reduction in health and social services for women and children worldwide.

And we hear from the British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason - who won worldwide fame after he played at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle - about his experience in lockdown.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydfpcm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
Jane Goodall: A life with chimpanzees

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the world-famous conservation activist Jane Goodall. She has made a unique contribution to humankind’s understanding of our closest living animal relatives, the primates, and in particular the chimpanzee. Dr Goodall was in her twenties when she began her meticulous observation of chimp behaviour deep in Africa. Now she’s 86, and still campaigning to protect the natural world. Can the primates and so many other species be saved from mass extinction?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p041n0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jj)
Why do we ignore catastrophic risk?

Covid-19 is showing up a general failure by most of the world's governments to prepare for the worst.

Manuela Saragosa speaks to Dr Sylvie Briand at the World Health Organization, whose job is to get the world ready for new infectious outbreaks like coronavirus. What was it like for her exhortations to fall on deaf ears up until this year? How prepared was the WHO itself, and does she fear the consequences if the multilateral organisation is defunded?

Meanwhile, author and risk consultant David Ropeik explains why human nature makes us so bad at taking action to ward of disasters that happen once in a blue moon. And Jens Orback, head of the Global Challenges Foundation, says pandemics are only one of a host of terrifying cataclysms that we disregard at our peril.

(Picture: Asteroid striking the Earth; Credit: puchan/Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk3)
The fight for women's prayer rights in Israel

In 1988, a group of Jewish feminists demanded the right to pray as freely as Jewish men at one of Judaism’s holiest sites. They called themselves the ‘Women of the Wall’. The organisation is made up of every Jewish denomination including reform, conservative and orthodox Jews. Its focus is one of the holiest sites in Judaism - the Western Wall in Jerusalem.
Rachael Gillman has been speaking to Anat Hoffman, one of the founding members of 'Women of the Wall'.

(Photo: Members of 'Women of the Wall' praying at the Western Wall in Jerusalem, holding their prayer shawls. Getty Images.)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydft3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p045d4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydfxvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydg1m0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk0t14)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p04dwd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3csvs1y)
Negotiating peace

What happens when women try to hammer out a peace deal? How does it differ from the way men do it? According to the United Nations, fewer than 3% of signatories to peace agreements are women. We meet two women who hope to change that. They made history in Northern Ireland and in Colombia by bringing the gender issue to the forefront of the peace process.

Monica McWilliams is a Northern Irish peace negotiator who played a key role in the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, which brought an end to the Troubles. Monica co-founded the Northern Ireland Women's Coalition in order to get female representatives at the negotiating table. She was subsequently involved in the implementation of the agreement as head of the country's Human Rights Commission. She now advises women around the world on how to negotiate peace deals in countries such as Syria and Myanmar.

Hilde Salvesen was part of Norwegian team which facilitated the recent peace negotiations in Colombia between the government and Farc rebels - the first of its kind to include a gender subcommittee to address the needs of women in the peace process. Hilde developed her strong understanding of Latin America when she travelled there as a student, and witnessed conflict first-hand in Guatemala and El Salvador. She currently works at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, part of the University of Oslo.

(L) Image and credit: Monica McWilliams
(R) Image: Hilde Salvesen. Credit: uio


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydg5c4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd38)
The unmaking of a boy soldier

Ishmael Beah was just a boy when war reached his village in Sierra Leone and he was forced to flee. In the chaos, he was separated from his family. He ended up with a group of other children at what they thought was the safety of an army base. But instead he was taught to become a hardened killer and sent out to fight. Nearly three years went by before he was finally rescued by child protection specialists from Unicef but he was so brainwashed that he didn't want to leave. It took months of careful rehabiliation and the support of a very special woman to break through his defences.

In 1996, at the age of just 16, he gave a speech at the UN in New York where he spoke out about his experiences. His testimony formed part of a pivotal report about the impact of armed conflict on children. A decade later, he would become the first Unicef Advocate for Children Affected by War. Today he is a bestselling author, who has just written his second novel, Little Family. He is also married, with three children of his own.

Presented by Jo Fidgen.

This interview contains disturbing descriptions of violence.

Photo: Ishmael Beah
Credit: Priscillia Kounkou Hoveyda


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydg938)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk11jd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p04ncn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydgdvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gx4lgz)
Poland's conservative President Duda re-elected

It’s Poland's slimmest presidential election victory since the end of communism in 1989. Mr Duda’s win is expected to lead to further strained relations with the EU and continued opposition to abortion and gay rights.

Also in the programme: South Africa has introduced new restrictions to curb the spread of Covid-19, and how one of Italy’s most powerful organised crime groups infiltrated hospitals to launder money during the pandemic.

(Photo: Polish President Andrzej Duda with his wife and supporters. Credit: Maja Hitij/ Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydgjlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p04wvx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltx6qn4d07)
South Africa faces coronavirus 'storm'

South Africa has reintroduced some restrictions as coronavirus cases continue to rise. The BBC's Matthew Davies discusses the health impact of the pandemic so far. With a ban on the sale of alcohol up and running again, Wendy Pienaar, chair of the industry organisation the Craft Brewers Association of South Africa tells us about the severe toll the restrictions have had on the beer and wine sector. And we get reaction to the latest changes from John Steenhuisen, leader of the official opposition Democratic Alliance in South Africa’s parliament. Also in the programme, the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports from the US on how some community banks in the country have stepped in to help struggling businesses with loans, where bigger banks have been slower to act. Plus our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan considers the concerns of those working in the service sector about the future of tips, given that in the drive to reduce the spread of coronavirus, payments in cash are being discouraged, or even in many places banned outright.

(Picture: A shuttered South African liquor store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydgnbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p050m1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3csvs1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydgs2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2svn39144m)
Coronavirus conversations: Musicians

We speak to musicians in Denmark, the USA and South Africa about the impact of lockdown on their lives and work. How have they been performing under lockdown? How do they feel about working in front of a live audience again?

We talk about South Africa's decision to reimpose a ban on alcohol sales to take pressure off the health system. And we hear voices from Florida after a record number of coronavirus cases were recorded - more than 15,000 in a day.

Also, the NFL team in Washington DC has announced it will "retire" the word "Redskins" from its team name. It's considered offensive by many Native Americans and the decision comes as part of the wave of reflection on race and identity following the killing of George Floyd. We hear different views from the fans on the decision and what should come next.

Picture: American musician Michaela Anne (Credit: BBC)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydgwtx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydh0l1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk1s05)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p05cvf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jls58t012)
2020/07/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydh4b5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p05hlk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0why)
The Origin of Stuff

Bed

After a long journey, there’s nothing nicer for Katy than climbing into her own bed. It’s often the first major purchase we make when we grow up and leave home.

Its significance was not lost on our ancestors. The bed was often the place where societal attitudes to sleep, superstition, sex, and status were played out, sometimes in dramatic form.

So where did the bed come from, and what can this everyday object tell us about ourselves?

A sleeper in early modern times believed that sleep was akin to death, with the devil waiting to pounce after darkness. So bed-time rituals were performed at the bedside and wolves’ teeth were often hung around the sleeper’s neck. Iron daggers were dangled over the cradles of infants at night to prevent them from being changed into demon babies.

While we may have outgrown a fear of the devil, sleep expert and neuroscientist Prof Russell Foster fears the modern-day obsession that’s disrupting our sleep – our mobile devices. His advice? Prepare your bed for a good night’s sleep and defend it with a passion.

Also featuring resident public historian Greg Jenner, and Prof Sasha Handley, expert on Early Modern History and sleep during this time.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.

Picture: Bed, Credit: Igor Vershinsky/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydh829)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gx5fpw)
WHO says nations 'heading in wrong direction' with Covid-19

The World Health Organisation has warned that the coronavirus pandemic will get far worse if governments don't stick to basic healthcare precautions.

Also in the programme: Washington Redskins to drop controversial team name following review; and an argument against driverless cars.

(Photo: WHO officials said it was "unrealistic" to expect a vaccine to be found any time soon. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydhctf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p05r2t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3csvs1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydhhkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk27zp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p05vty)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58h8w066zw)
South Africa faces coronavirus 'storm'

South Africa has reintroduced some restrictions as coronavirus cases continue to rise. The BBC's Matthew Davies discusses the health impact of the pandemic so far. With a ban on the sale of alcohol up and running again, Wendy Pienaar, chair of the industry organisation the Craft Brewers Association of South Africa tells us about the severe toll the restrictions have had on the beer and wine sector. And we get reaction to the latest changes from John Steenhuisen, leader of the official opposition Democratic Alliance in South Africa’s parliament. Also in the programme, the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports from the US on how some community banks in the country have stepped in to help struggling businesses with loans, where bigger banks have been slower to act. Plus our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan considers the concerns of those working in the service sector about the future of tips, given that in the drive to reduce the spread of coronavirus, payments in cash are being discouraged, or even in many places banned outright.

(Picture: A shuttered South African liquor store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 14 JULY 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydhr1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18trxr8z4q)
California Governor reverses state's re-openings

As the World Health Organisation says 'too many countries are headed in the wrong direction', California's governor, Gavin Newsom has announced a sweeping rollback of the state's reopening - including a statewide closure of all bars. Staying in the US, NFL team, The Washington Redskins has confirmed that it will change its name and logo; we hear more from the Washington Post's Les Carpenter. The BBC's Rob Young reports on the growing coronavirus crisis in South Africa. Meanwhile a group of millionaires has signed a letter asking the U.S. and other countries to raise taxes on the rich "immediately" and "permanently" to pay for aid needed to help poorer citizens get through the coronavirus pandemic; we hear from signatory, Morris Pearl, a former BlackRock managing director. And we're joined throughout the programme by Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus and Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network. And from the US, we speak to Peter Morici, an economist at the University of Maryland. (Picture of California Governor Gavin Newsom by Agustin Paullier via Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydhvsy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk2m72)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0672b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0wjl)
DNA and me

Want to know who you really are? Take an at-home DNA test, just like over 26 million others have around the globe. But the question is: why?

For many, it’s just a bit of fun; for others it might be for medical insight. But for everyone, it promises to tell you who you really are – and for many, those results might come as a surprise. For BBC reporter Sophia Smith Galer and her father, an innocent at-home kit led to a series of shocking discoveries about their family.

From discovering her true biological grandfather to a superstar relative, understanding their family background won’t ever be the same again. With so many stories like theirs emerging around the globe, are at-home DNA test kits now the ultimate palm-reader, setting the paths for our future and sense of sef? Do we assume too much of what is still early science – and how much is our identity, really, controlled by our genes anyway?

Sophia explores what this new scientific determination offers, and what other stories that are emerging around the world like her and her father’s tell us about how we build a sense of identity today in 2020.

Presenter/producer: Sophia Smith-Galer

(Photo: Sophia Smith-Galer. Credit: Lai Jones)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydhzk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydj396)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk2vqb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p06gkl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0why)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydj71b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z934hd1)
Covid restrictions return to California

After months of being seen as a model of virus suppression, California's seeing a huge surge in cases of Covid-19.

Two police officers in Brazil are sacked after a video emerged with echoes of the George Floyd video.

And the extraordinary journey of a little Syrian girl who managed to leave a refugee camp to come to the UK


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydjbsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z934m45)
California: opened up and now closing back down

The Governor of California orders restaurants, bars, entertainment venues, zoos and museums to shut amid a spike in coronavirus cases.

Rising fatalities in Lebanon down to recent protests and traffic lights that aren't working which has seen deaths from accidents soar by 120 per cent, we'll explain why the two are connected.

And your name is Mohamed, but your employers like to call you Antoine - the story of a French man who has decided to sue his company for racial discrimination.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydjgjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z934qw9)
Sweeping restrictions have been re-introduced in California

Another set of lockdown measures are imposed in California after a spike in new infections - did the authorities ease restrictions much too soon?

Also why face coverings will be compulsory in England for all shops from next week, amid criticism of the government for putting out a confused message.

And protests in Bulgaria over several days as the government is accused of operating a mafia model of governance that's benefitting wealthy individuals.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydjl8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1b)
New uses for old solutions

Two life-saving apps have been adapted to fix problems caused by the Covid-19 pandemic - hear how ideas we’ve visited before have developed and grown.

One of them has been helping ambulance drivers find their way to field hospitals; the other has been finding volunteers to run errands for people who are vulnerable.

Presenter: Daniel Gordon
Reporters: Ruth Evans, Nick Holland and Richard Kenny
Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p06yk3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89k)
Venture capital's diversity problem

Will the Black Lives Matter movement bring change to an industry accused of being too white?

Nick Kelly, a black entrepreneur who runs Axela Ltd, says venture capital funds would only consider a certain kind of business idea from black entrepreneurs. He didn't raise any money from them when he went asking yet his business is now worth around $10 million.

Kenny Alegbe of HomeHero, another black entrepreneur says he only got investment from VC funds when he looked outside of the usual set of funds. Plus Manuela Saragosa speaks to Tracy Gray who runs the 22 Fund. She is a rarity in the VC community. She is female and a black investor, and says there has been no change in the VC world for the 20 years that she's worked in it.

(Picture: Black businesswoman looking at male colleagues whispering; Credit: XiXinXing/Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpm)
How Club Med changed holidays

Holidaymakers arrived at the first Club Med resort on the Spanish island of Majorca in summer 1950. The French company - full name Club Méditerranée - was founded to offer a new kind of post-war holiday by Belgian water polo player Gérard Blitz, who believed that "the time to be happy is now". The facilities were initially rudimentary, with guests sleeping in huts and sharing tables at meals - but the all-inclusive holiday model they pioneered soon spread all over the world.

Lucy Burns speaks to Pierre-Xavier Bécret, whose parents worked on that first Majorca holiday and went on to be involved with Club Med for many years.

Picture: postcard image of the Club Med resort in Corfu, 1970s (Editions Intercolor, with thanks to www.collierbar.fr)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydjq0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p07297)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0why)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydjtrz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydjyj3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk3py7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p079sh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbf)
Operation Night Watch

This week our guest is a Dutch icon - The Night Watch.

This masterpiece by Rembrandt is nearly 400 years old and sits centre stage at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, where more than 2 million visitors come to see it every year. So when it became clear the painting needed a serious makeover, taking years to complete, the idea of removing it from display was rejected. Instead the museum’s Director, Taco Dibbits, decided to make Operation Night Watch accessible to all, by building a specially-constructed glass chamber for restorers, scientists and conservators to work under the public's watchful eye; both in the museum and online.

Anik See follows Taco and his team during this key phase of Operation Night Watch, diving into state-of-the-art imaging techniques and discovering the masterpiece’s secrets and storied past, to find out why this painting remains so important to us.

Presented by Anik See

Produced by Anik See and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image: Copyright: The Rijksmuseum


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydk287)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjt)
Chimps taught me how to be a mother

60 years ago this week a young British woman called Jane Goodall entered the Gombe Stream National Park on the shores of Lake Tanganyika - where she made a discovery that changed our understanding of what it is to be human. She'd gone there to observe chimpanzees, our close relatives. But we didn't know just how much we have in common until Jane had studied them. Now 86, Dame Jane Goodall is still devoted to chimps, and campaigns for a more enlightened attitude towards them. She spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen in 2016.

There used to be half a million northern woolly spider monkeys in Brazil, but today just 900 are left. Reporter Gibby Zobel travelled to a nature reserve in the state of Minas Gerais to find out more about the monkeys, and the man who devoted his life to protecting them.

King Louie is the cartoon orangutan from Disney's 1967 film, The Jungle Book. His signature tune - I Wanna Be Like You - was written by brothers Robert and Richard M. Sherman. Outlook's Maryam Maruf spoke to Richard about the most celebrated songs he wrote with his brother.

Image: Dr.Jane Goodall with orphan chimpanzee Uruhara at the Sweetwaters Sanctuary in Kenya
Credit: Michael Neugebauer


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydk60c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk3yfh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p07k8r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0why)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydk9rh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gx7hd2)
UK bans Huawei 5G equipment after December

The move represents a major U-turn on Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s previous decision to allow Huawei to play a part in the UK’s 5G infrastructure. Also: hundreds of thousands of people in Hong Kong turn out to vote in unofficial primary elections, and some of America’s wealthiest people have asked to pay more taxes.

(Photo: Huawei headquarters in Reading, England Credit: Reuters/Matthew Childs)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydkfhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p07ss0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwk35vlwrx)
Huawei's 5G kit must be removed from UK by 2027

The UK's mobile providers have been told to remove Huawei kit from 5G networks by 2027. Dominique Lazanski is a cybersecurity consultant, and explains what about the Chinese telecom giant's equipment gives rise to the UK government's concerns. Nick Xenophon used to be an Australian senator, now runs a law firm that represents Huawei, and makes the case for the firm's technology. And we explore whether the move marks the creation of a digital iron curtain with Lord Jim O'Neill, who was a government minister in the UK Treasury when the UK and China had what was then called a 'golden era' of friendship. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines whether in the wake of the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, the venture capital industry has a diversity problem. Plus, Billboard, which runs the music chart in the US, says it's changing how it compiles its list to address concerns that the chart is being undermined by so-called 'bundling practices'. Martin Talbot is chief executive of the Official Charts Company in the UK, which does not allow bundling, and explains how it works..

(Picture: A Huawei logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydkk7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p07xj4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydknzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2svn39411q)
Coronavirus Conversations: Doctors in South Africa

South Africa has become the country worst-hit by coronavirus in Africa, recording its highest-ever single-day increase in cases. The government has brought in tougher restrictions in order to stop the spread of the virus. This includes a night-time curfew and the mandatory wearing of masks outdoors, as well as a ban on the sale of alcohol - the second in just a few months. We speak to doctors in South Africa working on the frontline treating Covid-19 patients.

Also, infectious disease physician Dr Isaac Bogoch joins us to answer questions about the pandemic, including on whether countries could see a wave of cases during winter.

And we go to Brazil, where footage of a policeman standing on a black woman's neck has emerged. Our correspondent in Sao Paulo tells us more.

(Photo: Dr Sanelisiwe Balfour in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: Dr Sanelisiwe Balfour)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydksr0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydkxh4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk4nx8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p088rj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jls58wwy5)
2020/07/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydl178)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p08dhn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz985)
Ethiopia’s continuing online censorship

The internet shutdown in Ethiopia has been in place for 2 weeks now.
The Ethiopian Government cut internet connectivity following protests over the killing of singer and activist Hachalu Hundessa. The civil society group NetBlocks monitors connectivity around the world. Their Executive Director Alp Toker explains how by controlling mobile telecoms Ethiopian authorities are able to keep a tight grip on internet access.

Researchers at Queen Mary University looked at the network traffic data generated by internet-connected home security cameras. Their work flagged up that hackers can get information about your daily routine without looking at any video content from the cameras. Dr Gareth Tyson, lead author of the study, explains how the rate at which cameras upload internet data can predict whether a house is occupied or not.


BBC series Springwatch has been using automated wildlife cameras to record animals in areas of interest, such as Woodpecker nests across the UK. They have been training machine learning systems to only recognise when an activity is happening with a particular animal. Gareth speaks to senior BBC Research engineer, Robert Dawes to find out more.


(Image:Getty Images)


Producer: Julian Siddle


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydl4zd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gx8blz)
Huawei: Britain’s ban resets relations with China

UK operators won’t be allowed to buy new hardware from Huawei from the end of the year and all existing equipment is to be stripped out by 2027. It follows sanctions imposed by Washington, which claims the firm poses a national security threat - something Huawei denies.

Also on the programme: Ghislaine Maxwell, the the British socialite and ex-girlfriend of the late convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein appears at a bail hearing via video link; healthcare professionals discuss telemedicine and we ask whether no-show diners could send the restaurant industry over the edge.

(Picture: A Huawei sign is seen on its store near a traffic light in Beijing, China July 14, 2020. Credit: REUTERS)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydl8qj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p08mzx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydldgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk54ws)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p08rr1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58h8w093wz)
Huawei's 5G kit must be removed from UK by 2027

The UK's mobile providers have been told to remove Huawei kit from 5G networks by 2027. Dominique Lazanski is a cybersecurity consultant, and explains what about the Chinese telecom giant's equipment gives rise to the UK government's concerns. Nick Xenophon used to be an Australian senator, now runs a law firm that represents Huawei, and makes the case for the firm's technology. And we explore whether the move marks the creation of a digital iron curtain with Lord Jim O'Neill, who was a government minister in the UK Treasury when the UK and China had what was then called a 'golden era' of friendship. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines whether in the wake of the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, the venture capital industry has a diversity problem. Plus, Billboard, which runs the music chart in the US, says it's changing how it compiles its list to address concerns that the chart is being undermined by so-called 'bundling' practices. Martin Talbot is chief executive of the Official Charts Company in the UK, which does not allow bundling, and explains how it works.

(Picture: A Huawei logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 15 JULY 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydlmyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18trxrcw1t)
Huawei's 5G kit to be removed from UK

The UK has become the latest country to ban Huawei technology from its 5G mobile phone networks. We assess the reasons behind the decision and ask whether they stack up; with contributions from the BBC's Michelle Fluery and Victor Gao, a guest professor at Soochow University law school and interpreter to the former Chinese President Deng Xiaoping. We talk microplastics with Andreas Stohl, Professor of Meterology at the University of Vienna, plus we hear from the BBC's Theo Leggett about a last minute £1.2bn rescue deal for Virgin Atlantic. Manuela Saragosa asks why black entrepreneurs face steep barriers to entry when it comes to venture capital funding. And Billboard, which runs the music chart in the US, says it's changing how it compiles its list; we hear from Martin Talbot, chief executive of the Official Charts Company in the UK. And we're joined throughout the programme by Varshini Prakesh, co-founder and executive director of the Sunrise Movement in Boston, Massachusetts and in Taipei, Samson Ellis from Bloomberg news. (Picture: A Huawei logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydlrq1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk5j45)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p093zf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct0whv)
The Pandemic that Changed the World

Remedies: The pandemic that changed the world

How should governments respond to the pandemic? The Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc both to health systems and economies. Above all it has served to expose inequalities both within nations and between them. Hardest hit are countries in the developing world, where government finances do not permit the level of support to citizens or the private sector that has been provided by richer governments. Ian Goldin, professor of globalisation and development at Oxford University, sees the crisis as marking a turning point in relations between the state and the private sector. Even so, he asks whether governments are doing enough to address the economic impact of the pandemic and the resulting inequalities. He hears powerful testimony from his guests who include the economist Joseph Stiglitz, novelist and activist Arundhati Roy, Achim Steiner, the head of the United Nations Development Programme, and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the chair of GAVI, the vaccine alliance.
Producer: Tim Mansel


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydlwg5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydm069)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk5rmf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p09cgp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz985)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydm3yf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z937d94)
US imposes new tariffs on Hong Kong

President Trump signs an order to end preferential treatment for Hong Kong, adopting an increasingly tough stance on China.

Ghislaine Maxwell, the British socialite and ex-girlfriend of the late US convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, has been denied bail in a high-profile sex case.

As Hong Kong toughens restrictions on social movements because of spike of Covid cases, Euro Disney re-opens in France.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydm7pk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z937j18)
President Trump has cut Hong Kong's trade privileges

President Trump has ended the prospect of any warming of relations with China by dismissing the prospects of an immediate resumption of trade talks with Beijing and cutting Hong Kong's preferential trade status.

A BBC investigation reveals chronic failures in the health system of South Africa’s Eastern Cape province, hard hit by Covid-19.

A new study predicts that the world's population won't rise as fast as previously forecast.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydmcfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z937msd)
US ends Hong Kong's preferential trade treatment

The US President, Donald Trump, has signed an order to end preferential treatment for Hong Kong ending decades of favourable business deals and following a new security law imposed by China on the territory.

Ghislaine Maxwell, the British socialite, has been denied bail in a case against her and her alleged involvement with the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Another Indian city goes into lockdown because Covid-19, this time it's Bengaluru the IT hub of the country.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydmh5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6k)
Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Nathan Law

The international outcry prompted by Beijing’s imposition of a new national security law in Hong Kong has been long and loud – but will it make any difference? Inside the territory protests have been muted and the main pro-democracy activist movement has disbanded itself. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the co-founders of that movement, Nathan Law. He’s now in self-imposed exile – is China’s Hong Kong strategy working?

Photo: Nathan Law Credit: EPA


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p09vg6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8mv)
Homeworking's winners and losers

The economic impact of the working-from-home revolution. Edwin Lane speaks to remote tech worker Heather May about why she's swapped the office and the big city for rural Alabama, and to Aaron Bolzle, executive director of Tulsa Remote - a programme to attract remote workers from around the US to Tulsa, Oklahoma. Manuela Saragosa hears from Stanford University economist Nicholas Bloom about why a boom in working from home during the coronavirus pandemic could increase inequality, and digital economy researcher Sarah Bana tells us why some countries are better than others at home working.

(Photo: A woman works on laptop at home, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmrw)
Returning Ethiopia's looted history

The Stele of Axum, a 4th century Ethiopian treasure, was finally returned by Italy in 2005. It had been taken from the ancient town of Axum in northern Ethiopia by invading Italian fascist forces in 1937. The huge 24 metre tall stele was originally erected to mark the site of a royal tomb during the Kingdom of Axum. The Axumites were a powerful and sophisticated civilisation which emerged in northern Ethiopia more than 2000 years ago. Alex Last spoke to Ethiopian archaeologist Tekle Hagos of Addis Ababa University about the return of the great monument.

Photo: The Stele of Axum , now re-erected back in Axum, northern Ethiopia.(Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydmlxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct0whv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p09z6b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz985)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydmqp2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0whz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydmvf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk6lvb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0b6pl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8y)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Actor Stanley Tucci tells the story of Ice-T, the original gangster rapper and his controversial hit Cop Killer which epitomised the turbulence of 1990s LA. And he explores the contribution of Jerry Brown, California's longest-serving governor. In a wide-ranging interview, Brown shares his thoughts on California's past and future.

Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester
Producer: Laurence Grissell


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydmz5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrl)
The day the music stopped

Violin virtuoso Min Kym was at the height of her career when she became the victim of a crime that made headlines around the world. She was a child prodigy whose family moved from South Korea to London to help her to develop her talent. Then, at 21, she met the love of her life: a Stradivarius violin. She would joke that she was 99 per cent violin and one per cent human. But then her violin was stolen. Jo Fidgen first spoke to Min in 2017. It’s been a long journey to find a new soulmate but next week she picks up her brand new, specially commissioned, violin that she has watched grow from a piece of wood. She is hoping it will be the new perfect partner.

Photo: Min Kym with her Stradivarius violin
Credit: Toby Jacobs/courtesy of Min Kym


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydn2xg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk6vbl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0bg5v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz985)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydn6nl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gxbd95)
China vows to retaliate after Trump's Hong Kong move

China has vowed to retaliate after the US ended Hong Kong's preferential trade status and imposed sanctions on officials who crack down on rights. We'll look at the face-off between the world's two super powers.

Also in the programme: revelations from South Africa that Covid-19 is resulting in a serious collapse of the healthcare system, and a look at the long term impact of the virus on the body and the mind.

(Picture: U.S. President Donald Trump attends a news conference in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S. Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydnbdq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct0whv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0bpp3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxcjxgd339)
Apple has $15bn Irish tax bill overturned

The EU's second highest court says Apple will not have to pay a record sum in back taxes. Both the tech giant and Ireland which was to receive the payment have welcomed the news, and we find out why from Neale Richmond, Member of the Irish Parliament for the governing Fine Gael party. And we hear more on the implications for global tax policy from Tove Ryding, tax co-ordinator at the European Network on Debt and Development. Also in the programme, the BBC's Faarea Masud reports on the significant financial implications for Saudi Arabia that this year's Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca has been scaled back to just 10,000 attendees, when normally around two million people would make the journey. Plus, as gyms, indoor swimming pools and leisure centres in England prepare to reopen next week, the BBC's Sarah Corker reports on the precautions being undertaken, and concerns among the businesses involved that they may never be profitable again.

(Picture: An Apple sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydng4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0btf7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydnkwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2svn396xyt)
Why we're having fewer babies

Researchers from the University of Washington have forecast a "jaw-dropping" impact on society from the crash in children being born by the end of this century. They expect the global population to peak in the 2060s, before declining again. Some countries are likely to lose more than half their current population. We explain the key points and hear from young women in Nigeria and Belgium talk about what shapes their ideas about whether they might have children in future.

Also, one of our regular experts answers the latest questions on the coronavirus pandemic. Dr Maria Sundaram talks about when it's accurate to talk about second - or even third - "waves" of the virus, what we can learn about decisions to reopen schools and what we should take away from the "early promise" reported in one of the potential vaccine trials.

Picture: A three-day-old baby on a maternity ward in the UK (Credit: BBC)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydnpn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydntd7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk7ktc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0c5nm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jls58zsv8)
2020/07/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydny4c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct0whv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0c9dr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc2)
Incredible tale of Covid family survival in Spain

We hear how three generations of one Spanish family all survived Covid infections - including a 96 year old grandmother. 27-year-old Pau from Barcelona fell ill 3 months ago and he, his mother, father and grandmother all ended up in hospital - with only the cat left at home. The experience has had a huge impact on all of them and their recovery is slow.

People are admitted to hospital with Covid mainly because they have difficulty breathing – and oxygen can help. But in many hospitals in low and middle income countries, oxygen is in short supply. The Queen Elizabeth Central hospital in Malawi’s second city Blantyre, has just opened its own oxygen concentration plant which can produce a million litres a day.
We hear from a doctor about the obstacles they overcame to install the oxygen plant.

During the Cold War a non-toxic antiseptic was developed to clean Soviet spacecraft. These days Miramistin is only used in some parts of Russia and Ukraine. A partnership between scientists in Manchester and Kiev could help to focus efforts on promoting research into the substance which can be used on surfaces and directly on skin to combat bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

Main Image: A coronavirus (Covid 19) patient is seen at the COVID-19 IFEMA Hospital on April 23, 2020 in Madrid, Spain. Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydp1wh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gxc7j2)
Global crash in fertility predicted

A new report says there will be a global crash in the number of children being born by the end of the century. The number of people on the planet is expected to peak at just under 10 billion by 2064, before falling to fewer than nine billion by 2100.

Also in the programme: A court rules Apple does have to pay back taxes in Ireland; and we hear from a NASA engineer on his prison sentence in Turkey.

(Picture: Newborn baby. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydp5mm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0cjx0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydp9cr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk81sw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0cnn4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58h8w0d0t2)
Apple has $15bn Irish tax bill overturned

The EU's second highest court says Apple will not have to pay a record sum in back taxes. Both the tech giant and Ireland which was to receive the payment have welcomed the news, and we find out why from Neale Richmond, Member of the Irish Parliament for the governing Fine Gael party. And we hear more on the implications for global tax policy from Tove Ryding, tax co-ordinator at the European Network on Debt and Development. Also in the programme, the BBC's Faarea Masud reports on the significant financial implications for Saudi Arabia that this year's Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca has been scaled back to just 10,000 attendees, when normally around two million people would make the journey. Plus, as gyms, indoor swimming pools and leisure centres in England prepare to reopen next week, the BBC's Sarah Corker reports on the precautions being undertaken, and concerns among the businesses involved that they may never be profitable again.

(Picture: An Apple sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 16 JULY 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydpjw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18trxrgryx)
Bitcoin scam promoted from hacked Twitter accounts

Global business figures have had their Twitter accounts hacked - including Elon Musk and Apple - to tweet a Bitcoin scam; millions of are followers told to ignore it - we speak to tech expert Dan Ackerman to find out more. The Hajj pilgrimage starts at the end of this month, but this year, numbers have been cut from 2 million, to just 1000 pilgrims - the BBC's Faarea Masud speaks to tour operators and farmers whose businesses have gone bust as a result, and financiers from Saudi Arabia, to assess how the Kingdom is handling the challenge. Plus, we'll hear how gyms and fitness centers are trying to survive post covid restrictions. Finally we look at what happens when disposing of Covid-19 waste in India, where rubbish collectors are complaining of being put at high risk due to the lack of a safe disposal system. We speak about all this with guests Ralph Silva, a writer and broadcaster in Toronto and Editor of National & Strategic Affairs at ThePrint, Jyoti Malhotra, who joins us from Delhi.

(Image: A padlock appears next to the Twitter logo. Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydpnm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk8f18)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0d0wj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6l9)
What the sediment revealed in Lebanon

The discovery of a mysterious delivery of defective, sediment-heavy fuel intended to generate electricity in Lebanon has sparked a huge scandal in the country. More than two dozen people, including senior officials, have been charged with various alleged crimes including bribery, fraud, money-laundering and forging documents. Lebanon has already been in uproar since last autumn, with hundreds of thousands of people involved in street protests demanding the overthrow of the entire political elite – and now the country’s suffering its worst economic crisis in decades. The national currency has collapsed and more than a third of the workforce is unemployed. Electricity shortages – long a problem in Lebanon - have become still more acute, with whole towns plunged into darkness for long periods – and the row over the suspect oil delivery has exacerbated the problem. Now the investigation into the tainted fuel has raised questions about the original deal to import heavy fuel oil – and Lebanese hope it will eventually help explain why they’ve suffered black-outs for so long. Did officials try to cover up the presence of sediment in the shipment? How did the original much-criticised 2005 fuel contract come about? And what do the revelations tell us about the shadowy world of oil trading that the world relies on? Reporters Tim Whewell and Mohamad Chreyteh investigate.

(Image: Zouk power station, Lebanon – where the tainted fuel shipment was first discovered. Credit: Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydpsc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydpx3d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk8njj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0d8cs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcc2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydq0vj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z93b967)
Huge Twitter hack targets high profile US accounts

Fake tweets sent from the accounts of Apple, Barack Obama, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Kanye West, and Joe Biden amongst others.

A BBC investigation finds that the health care system in South Africa's Eastern Cape province is crumbling under the strain of Covid pandemic.

And has the Philippine leader put his public approval rating to the test by closing down the country's largest broadcaster?


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydq4ln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z93bdyc)
Soaring temperatures in Siberia

Siberia is currently experiencing a record-breaking heatwave, with temperatures exceeding 38 degrees centigrade.

Ahead of a ceremony by King Felipe to honour those who died of Covid19 in Spain, we hear about a region that is still battling the pandemic.

And a university in Kenya begins mass production of ventilators and nasal swabs to help meet the shortage in the country’s health sector.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydq8bs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z93bjph)
High profile US Twitter accounts hacked

It's a bad day for Bill Gates, Elon Musk and Barack Obama... but it's even worse for Twitter.

The Lebanese economy is on its knees, political unrest is rife and now a scandal involving tainted fuel is adding to the country's many problems - is bribery at the heart of it?

And a study suggests even mild obesity is a risk factor when it comes to covid-19.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydqd2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3n)
Is China versus India the most important rivalry of the 21st Century?

The recent border clash between China and India is seen as a watershed moment in the two nuclear nations’ relationship. How will its repercussions affect Asia, and the rest of the world?

Contributors:
. Chris Dougherty - a senior fellow with the Defence Programme at the Centre for New American Securities.
. Ananth Krishnan – a correspondent for the Hindu newspaper. And the author of “India’s China Challenge”
. Tanvi Madan – a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy programme at the Brookings Institution.
. Yu Jie - a Senior Research Fellow on China at Chatham House.


Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Series Producer: Estelle Doyle

(Chinese President Leader Xi Jinping with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the 2017 BRICS Summit. Photo: Kenzaburo Fukuhara/Getty images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0drc9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wp)
China's plan to redesign the internet

Huawei's expulsion from the UK's 5G network is the latest development in a growing US-China cyber cold war - but Beijing has bigger plans afoot.

Cyber-security consultant Dominique Lazanski explains how the Chinese authorities are proposing to replace the data protocols that underpin the current flexible, open internet with ones that would enable national governments to exert much greater top-down control within their borders.

Meanwhile US President Trump continues to focus his ire on telecoms equipment maker Huawei, and major Chinese tech firms. Laurence Knight gets the latest from the BBC's Asia business correspondent Karishma Vaswani. Plus, Justin Sherman of the Atlantic Council think tank in Washington DC fears that if the US doesn't start working with other democracies, then the free, open internet we have grown up with may struggle to survive.

(Picture: Abstract Globe With Glowing Networks; Credit: imaginima/Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmc)
The scandal of Liverpool's missing Chinese sailors

During World War Two, thousands of Chinese sailors and engineers served in the British Merchant Navy, keeping supplies flowing into the port of Liverpool and risking their lives in crossings of the Atlantic. Many settled in the port city and started families with local women but, after fighting ended in 1945, the British authorities began forcing them to leave. Simon Watts talks to Yvonne Foley, whose Chinese father was pressured to return to Shanghai, never to be seen again.

PHOTO: Chinese sailors in Liverpool in 1942 (Getty Images).


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydqhv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6l9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0dw3f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydqml5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvm)
Chaucer, father of English poetry

Geoffrey Chaucer has been called the father of English poetry and the greatest poet in English before Shakespeare. He is best known for The Canterbury Tales, stories told by a band of pilgrims on their way from London to the shrine of Thomas Becket who was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral two centuries before. Chaucer’s was an age of plague, war and revolt and his pilgrims bring insight into the life and values of those tumultuous times, from the bawdy Miller and the earthy Wife of Bath to the corrupt Pardoner and the Knight whose chivalry was increasingly out of step with the times.

Bridget Kendall explores the range of Chaucer’s world with Emily Steiner, Professor of English at University of Pennsylvania; Mary Flannery, Professor of Medieval English Studies at Bern University; and Anthony Bale, Professor of Medieval Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London.

(Image: Portrait of Geoffrey Chaucer based on a 19th century engraving by James Thomson Credit: Stock Montage/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh53)
Beckham in Hollywood

In July 2007, David Beckham, then one of the most famous footballers in the world, made his debut for Major League Soccer team, LA Galaxy. The star-studded game attracted Hollywood royalty and huge media attention from around the world. Beckham would eventually win two MLS titles with LA Galaxy and he’s credited with raising the profile of his sport in America. Ian Williams talks to the man who signed Beckham, LA Galaxy president Alexi Lalas.

PHOTO: David Beckham's presentation for LA Galaxy in 2007 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydqrb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk9hrf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0f3lp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3csyp1f)
Asma Khan: My life in five dishes

When Asma Khan was born it was said her mother cried, but not tears of joy. As a second daughter born in 1960s India, Asma felt she was a disappointment, even a burden, because she could not inherit and would cost her family a fortune in dowries. But she went on to defy those low expectations and open one of London’s most sought-after restaurants.

Asma tells us how she could barely boil an egg when she first got married and moved to England, about the intense loneliness she felt so far from home, and how the smell of paratha convinced her that the only way to recover was to learn how to cook.

The Darjeeling Express founder describes the restaurant’s humble beginnings as a supper club in her London flat, why it has always had an all-female kitchen, and her plans to use food to empower female refugees and prostitutes.

This programme was first broadcast in January 2020.

Let us know what you think about the show - email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Asma Khan with a pakora and chutney. Credit: BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydqw2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdb1)
Why I talk to warlords

Priscillia Kounkou Hoveyda’s office is a war zone, she goes to meet warlords and military commanders to persuade them to release the children in their ranks and in their prisons. It’s not always just the military leaders who need convincing, she tells Jo Fidgen that sometimes the children are too afraid to leave. So Priscillia often shares her own story of growing up as a Congolese Iranian during the violence of the Iran-Iraq war.

Priscillia is a human rights lawyer and the co-founder of the Collective for Black Iranians, a not-for-profit organisation with the mission to represent Black and Afro-Iranians' voices within the Iranian diaspora.

Picture: Priscillia Kounkou Hoveyda at work
Credit: Priscillia Kounkou Hoveyda


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydqztk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvk9r7p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0fc2y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydr3kp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gxf968)
Spain holds memorial for Covid-19 victims

Also in the programme: Shamima Begum, former member of the Islamic State group, wins the right to return to the UK from Northern Syria to fight for her citizenship. And we’ll hear about the space mission that has captured the closest ever images of the sun.

(Photo: Wreath laying ceremony held at Plaza de la Armeria courtyard in the Royal Palace to attend the state tribute to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) victims and people working on the front line in the fight against the pandemic, in Madrid, Spain, 16 July 2020. EPA/RODRIGO JIMENEZ POOL)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydr79t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6l9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0fll6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvqng83d4t)
Tackling the world's plastic waste problem

China's decision to ban imports of waste plastic caused a problem for other Asian nations. Heng Kiah Chun of Greenpeace says the recent quadrupling from the European Union to Malaysia of shipments of plastic nominally for recycling has led to the illegal dumping of waste in the country, with much of it getting burned. Ioannis Bakas is a waste prevention expert at the European Environment Agency, and explains why countries like Malaysia end up as dumping grounds for waste from wealthier nations. And Sarah Robinson, who is in charge of waste management on the Channel island of Guernsey, tells us how it has achieved one of the highest recycling rates in the world, whilst not sending its waste very far. Also in the programme, a major agreement governing the transfer of EU citizens' data to the United States has been struck down by the European Court of Justice. Technology analyst Stephanie Hare discusses the implications, and we get reaction from Christian Borggreen, vice-president of the Computer and Communications Industry Association, which represents the likes of Facebook and Google. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw reports on how in the coronavirus era, video CV's for recruitment have become a popular way for people to try and stand out from the crowd.

(Picture: Plastic waste being collected from a river in Kuala Lumpur. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydrc1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0fqbb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3csyp1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydrgt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2svn399tvx)
Coronavirus conversations: Colombia's red flags

Colombia has just started a two week extension of its national lockdown in response to the coronavirus pandemic. But that means more time without much-needed income in working class neighbourhoods. Some people have started hanging red flags outside their homes to show their desperation and ask the government for help. We speak to four Colombian women about the country's challenges.

Also, we cover the developing story of allegations that a group of hackers, linked to the Russian intelligence services, has targeted organisations working on a Covid-19 vaccine. We get some background on the group from BBC Russian - and hear what the Russian authorities are saying in response.

As ever, we get your coronavirus questions answered and talk through the latest news with our regular experts. Today, molecular epidemiologist Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Basel is joined by someone working on one of the vaccine trials. Vaccinologist Dr Evan Anderson from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, is also happy to answer any questions you might have. WhatsApp: +447730751925 or Twitter @BBCOS.

Picture: Red flags in the La Perseverancia neighbourhood in Bogota, Colombia (Credit: Claudia Bonilla)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydrlk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydrq9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkbgqg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0g2kq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jls592prc)
2020/07/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydrv1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6l9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0g69v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0l)
How long do Covid-19 antibodies last?

Science in Action looks at some of the latest research on the response of our immune system to infection by the coronavirus. Researchers at Kings College London find that protective antibodies appear to fade away after about three months following infection whereas a team at the Karolinska Institute has discovered that although antibodies may decline, other important players called T cells in our defences do not. Doctors Katie Doores and Marcus Buggert talk about the implications of these discoveries for the quest for a vaccine against the coronavirus.

Roland Pease also talks to Dr Barney Graham of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the United States about the results from the Phase 1 trial of a novel type of vaccine against the virus. NIAID have partnered with biotech company Moderna to produce the first mRNA vaccine in the Institute’s pandemic preparedness program.

Biologist Dr Sonja Wild tells Roland about the remarkable fishing strategy devised by dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia. They chase fish into the empty shell of giant sea snails, then take the shells to the surface and tip the fish into their mouths. Dr Wild’s 7 years of research has revealed how the dolphins have learned to do this.


(Image: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


Correction: The audio of this edition has been edited since its initial broadcast. This was to correct an error in Barney Graham’s interview. The phase 3 of the Moderna mRNA vaccine trial is scheduled to begin on 27 July, not 27 January as originally broadcast.


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydrysl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gxg4f5)
Russian spies 'target' coronavirus research

The US, Canada and Britain have accused Russian security services of mounting a campaign of cyber attacks against organisations trying to develop a coronavirus vaccine. The Kremlin denied the allegations.

Also in the programme: As coronavirus cases surge in Mexico, we ask the mayor of the capital if the city has been reopened too soon; and Armenia and Azerbaijan accuse each other of breaking a fragile ceasefire after renewed fighting.

(Image: Illustration of the UK National Cyber Security Centre's advisory. Source: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtyds2jq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0gft3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3csyp1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtyds68v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkbypz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0gkk7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58h8w0gxq5)
Tackling the world's plastic waste problem

China's decision to ban imports of waste plastic caused a problem for other Asian nations. Heng Kiah Chun of Greenpeace says the recent quadrupling from the European Union to Malaysia of shipments of plastic nominally for recycling has led to the illegal dumping of waste in the country, with much of it getting burned. Ioannis Bakas is a waste prevention expert at the European Environment Agency, and explains why countries like Malaysia end up as dumping grounds for waste from wealthier nations. And Sarah Robinson, who is in charge of waste management on the Channel island of Guernsey, tells us how it has achieved one of the highest recycling rates in the world, whilst not sending its waste very far. Also in the programme, a major agreement governing the transfer of EU citizens' data to the United States has been struck down by the European Court of Justice. Technology analyst Stephanie Hare discusses the implications, and we get reaction from Christian Borggreen, vice-president of the Computer and Communications Industry Association, which represents the likes of Facebook and Google. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw reports on how in the coronavirus era, video CV's for recruitment have become a popular way for people to try and stand out from the crowd.

(Picture: Plastic waste being collected from a river in Kuala Lumpur. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 17 JULY 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydsfs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18trxrknw0)
Netflix adds 26 million new users during lockdown

The coronavirus pandemic has been good to Netflix – the streaming company says it’s added over 26 million new subscribers. Entertainment expert and entrepreneur Melissa Rowley tells us why traditional TV networks should be afraid – very afraid. We look at the differing attitudes to wearing a facemask to protect against Covid-19, including polarised opinion between US and Japan. Travel, meanwhile, has changed, as the ‘staycation’ becomes popular during global travel restrictions. And China becomes one of the first countries to return to economic growth after the coronavirus. Finally, the rise of video CVs to get work is getting a boost from an entrepreneur who wants people to be able to make videos on apps on their phone, for a more personal touch. We discuss all this live with guests Mitchell Hartman of the Marketplace programme on American Public Media in Portland, Oregon and Stefanie Yuen Thio - Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law –in Singapore.

(Image: Logo of Netflix is displayed on a laptop screen. Photo by Esra Hacioglu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydskj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkc9yc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0gxsm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x18)
The Divinity of Haile Selassie

How did the Ethiopian King, Haile Selassie - who lived a life of luxury whilst his country suffered a deep famine - become the god for the Rastafari community? To millions he was a leader, to many others he was an oppressor, but to a small worldwide community known as the Rastafari he is divine and the reincarnation of Jesus Christ. Now, 70 years after Haile Selassie was crowned as leader of Ethiopia, Dr Robert Beckford explores the religious, political and social dynamic that propelled a whole community to worship Selassie as a living god.

He investigates the controversy in Ethiopia about Salassie’s godly status leading to recent destruction of a monuments of him and as the Rastafari community grapples with falling numbers, Beckford meets the man trying to re-energise the religion and campaigning to have Selassie made a saint in the Ethiopian Church.

But for many Rastafarians, bestowing sainthood on their spiritual leader won’t change anything. He is, to them, simply the messiah. But how did this adoration come to be?

Image: His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia (Credit: BBC)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydsp8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydst0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkckfm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0h58w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydsxrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z93f63b)
US disease expert: young people spreading Covid-19

Dr Anthony Fauci says young people need to stop going out to crowded places.

Brazil passes the two million mark for coronavirus cases - we get the latest from a medical expert in the country.

And how a six year old girl was inspired by her mum to launch a magazine for black children kids in the UK.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydt1hr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z93f9vg)
EU leaders discuss coronavirus fund

Discussions to take place today over setting up a 750 billion euro fund to help recovery in the eurozone.

There's a growing sense of frustration in Brazil as the country reaches 2 million Covid-19 cases.

We get reaction from Moscow after the US, UK and Canada accuse Russian spies of trying to steal coronavirus vaccine research.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydt57w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9z93ffll)
Coronavirus landmarks in Brazil and India

Brazil hits two million cases and now India has recorded a million people infected. We hear about the situation in one Delhi hospital.

Merkel and Macron meet... in masks. EU leaders gather face to face to thrash out a Covid recovery deal.

And we'll talk to a man who's come up with a way to stop the virus being transmitted through hard surfaces like door handles or phones.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydt900)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxj)
Husam Zomlot: How could Palestine respond to annexation?

It’s not clear when, or even if, Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is going to deliver on his promise to annex a large chunk of the occupied West Bank. It’s even less clear what the Palestinian strategy will be if it happens. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the Palestinian ambassador in London, Husam Zomlot. With the conflict at a turning point, does the Palestinian leadership have the vision, imagination and credibility to mount an effective response?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0hn8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78j)
Fixing world trade

Trade wars have blighted the global economy in the last four years. What will it take to restore order?

Much will depend on who takes over the leadership of the World Trade Organisation, the institution tasked with guiding and policing the rules-based global trading system. There are eight official candidates for the WTO top job.

We speak to Mexico’s candidate, Jesus Seade, about how - and what - needs fixing, with commentary from the BBC’s economics correspondent Andrew Walker.

(Photo: WTO director general candidate Jesus Seade; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv4)
South Korea's 1980s prison camps

A so-called Social Purification project led to thousands of ordinary citizens being imprisoned under the military government in South Korea in the 1980s. Under the pretence of clearing the streets of vagrants and undesirables, people were sent to camps disguised as 'social welfare centres' where many of them suffered torture, forced labour, and physical and sexual abuse. Bugyeong Jung has been speaking to Seung-woo Choi who was taken to a centre in the port city of Busan when he was just 13 years old.

Photo: Seung-woo Choi talking to reporters outside South Korea's National Assembly. Credit BBC.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydtdr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnx)
The great Twitter hack

Hackers take over accounts belonging to famous names including Joe Biden and Barack Obama after breaching Twitter’s security. Plus, the UK bans telecoms firms from buying new equipment from the Chinese giant Huawei. And we find out about robots with a sensitive touch. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Jane Wakefield and Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: A night shot of the Twitter HQ in San Francisco, Credit: JOSH EDELSON/ AFP/ Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0hs0j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydtjh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn4)
Is the WHO fit for purpose?

More than six months after the outbreak of the coronavirus, a team from the World Health Organization will - for the first time - be given access to physical samples of the virus inside China. It’s an important moment for the WHO, which has been accused of providing patchy scientific advice and reacting too slowly to the threats posed by the virus. There has been an especially critical reaction from the agency’s biggest donor, the United States. Donald Trump has begun the process of withdrawing the US from the WHO, accusing it of being under the 'total control' of China and of 'misleading the world' about the coronavirus. The WHO chief said the organisation needs to reflect on its role during the pandemic and has launched an independent evaluation. So are the criticisms fair? And what difference will investigations inside China make now? Is the organisation still fulfilling its mandate? How has it changed through the years and crucially, does it need the United States to survive? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss whether the World Health Organization is fit for purpose.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydtn7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkddnj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0j0hs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztg8)
Jay Bothroyd, the J-League and playing with Gaddafi

Footballer Jay Bothroyd tells stories from his time in Italy and Japan. Coach Carrie Taylor tells us why she quit San Diego Loyal after just two games. And Chris Hughton pays tribute to his former manager Jack Charlton.

Picture: Jay Bothroyd of Consadole Sapporo paying against Kawasaki Frontale (Masashi Hara/Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydtrzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh8)
Risking death for a fragment of jade

The world’s largest jade mines are in Myanmar. It’s an industry worth an estimated $30 billion a year for the mine owners. But it's a hazardous living for the hundreds of thousands who scavenge through mountains of rubble in search of fragments of jade. Earlier this month 172 died when one of those piles collapsed. A BBC Burmese team visited the area last weekend - their editor in London, Soe Win Than, shares their findings.

Ertugrul: the Turkish conquest of Pakistan
It’s a story of strength, courage, and the foundation of a great empire. The Turkish TV series Ertugrul is set eight centuries ago, its hero is a tribal leader whose son Osman founded the Ottoman Empire. It’s gripped audiences in Turkey and beyond, and a version dubbed into Urdu is a hit in Pakistan. Aliya Nazki of BBC Urdu is a fan.

My home town: Khartoum, Sudan
Mohanad Hashim remembers the streets and bridges of his childhood in Khartoum, and the military coup of 1985.

Sudan’s social reforms
After more than 30 years of Islamist rule, Sudan has outlined wide-reaching reforms. Non-Muslims will be allowed to drink alcohol; the apostasy law, public flogging and FGM will be banned. As Mohanad Hashim leaves the BBC to return to Sudan to work as a journalist, he shares his impressions on the announcements.

“I am not sick, I am gay”
In many countries around the world, homosexuality is seen as a disorder to be cured. For BBC Arabic, Jordanian journalist Areej spoke to two anonymous survivors of ‘gay conversion therapy’ about their experiences for her documentary.



Image: Scavengers pick through precarious cliffs of discarded rubble for jade fragments
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydtwqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkdn4s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0j801)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0x18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydv0gs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gxj63c)
Coronavirus: India's Covid-19 cases surge past one million

India's active cases account for about a third of its total tally as it has been reporting a high recovery rate and a low death rate from the virus but deaths have been rising.

Also in the programme: we ask an expert what proportion of the population needs to contract Covid-19 to develop so-called 'herd immunity'; and we hear from the government in Ethiopia on the rising tension over the huge dam the country is building across the Blue Nile.

(Photo: Indian health workers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) arrive at a residential building in Mumbai, India. Credit: EPA).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydv46x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0jhh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt2s01tp6b)
British Airways retires entire 747 fleet

British Airways is retiring all of its Boeing 747s as it suffers from the travel downturn. The airline had the largest fleet of jumbo jets in the world, and the BBC's Theo Leggett discusses whether the plane had come to the end of its natural life. And we get a sense of why the plane is considered iconic from retired 747 pilot Gavin Dobson. Also in the programme, EU leaders have been meeting to try and reach an agreement on a coronavirus economic recovery programme, as well as the bloc's overall budget for the next seven years. Sam Fleming is Brussels bureau chief at the Financial Times, and takes us through the political and economic sticking points. As the coronavirus outbreak continues to disrupt the way many of us work, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines the advantages and disadvantages of working from home. Plus, with companies having to spend large sums on personal protective equipment to minimise the spread of Covid-19 in workplaces, we talk to Gary Peeling, who runs Where The Trade Buys, which is normally a printing company, but switched to making PPE for key workers and businesses when the pandemic struck.

(Picture: A British Airways Boeing 747 in flight. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydv7z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0jm7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydvcq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2svn39dqs0)
Coronavirus conversations: India and Brazil

We bring together two countries where confirmed cases have passed significant milestones. In India, the number of cases officially counted has passed the one million mark. In Brazil, they are now beyond two million cases. We hear accounts from doctors in each country about how they see the outbreak and what happens next.

We find out why protesters have been on the streets of Detroit, Michigan, in support of a teenage girl known as "Grace" - reportedly jailed for violating her probation when she didn't complete her online schoolwork during the coronavirus lockdown.

We get your coronavirus questions answered by Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University and get some advice on how to understand the statistics from our BBC News expert.

Picture: A health worker takes a swab sample from a man to test for coronavirus at a testing centre in Chennai (Credit: ARUN SANKAR/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydvhg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydvm6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkfcmk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0jzgt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jls595lng)
2020/07/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydvqyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0k36y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5x)
How is human sound affecting sealife?

Think of the oceans and an empty and peaceful expanse relatively untouched by humankind might come to mind. But is this peace an illusion? CrowdScience listener Dani wants to know if the noise of shipping and other human activity on the oceans is impacting on sea life.

To find out, Marnie Chesterton takes a deep dive to learn how marine animals have evolved to use sound; from navigating their environments to finding a mate or hiding from prey. She then speaks to a scientist who is using acoustic observatories to track the many ways human activity - like sonar and shipping - can interfere.

Marnie virtually visits a German lab which tests the ears of beached whales, dolphins and seals from around the world to try and ascertain whether they suffered hearing damage, and what might have caused it. What other smaller creatures are negatively impacted by underwater noise? Marnie learns that acoustic trauma is more widespread than first thought.

As human life continues to expand along ocean waters, what is being done to reduce the impact of sound? Marnie meets some of the designers at the forefront of naval architecture to see how ship design, from propellers to air bubbles and even wind powered vessels can contribute to reducing the racket in the oceans.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton.
Produced by Melanie Brown for the BBC World Service.

Main Image: The front of a humpback whale underneath the sea in Shetland Islands, Scotland, December 2016. Credit: Richard Shucksmith / Barcroft Im / Barcroft Media via Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydvvpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2ys9gxk1b8)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydvzft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0kbq6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwtydw35y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7tvkfvm2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pq8p0kggb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58h8w0ktm8)
British Airways retires entire 747 fleet

British Airways is retiring all of its Boeing 747s as it suffers from the travel downturn. The airline had the largest fleet of jumbo jets in the world, and the BBC's Theo Leggett discusses whether the plane had come to the end of its natural life. And we get a sense of why the plane is considered iconic from retired 747 pilot Gavin Dobson. Also in the programme, EU leaders have been meeting to try and reach an agreement on a coronavirus economic recovery programme, as well as the bloc's overall budget for the next seven years. Sam Fleming is Brussels bureau chief at the Financial Times, and takes us through the political and economic sticking points. As the coronavirus outbreak continues to disrupt the way many of us work, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines the advantages and disadvantages of working from home. Plus, with companies having to spend large sums on personal protective equipment to minimise the spread of Covid-19 in workplaces, we talk to Gary Peeling, who runs Where The Trade Buys, which is normally a printing company, but switched to making PPE for key workers and businesses when the pandemic struck.

(Picture: A British Airways Boeing 747 in flight. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6l9)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6l9)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6l9)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6l9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdpsp2w)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdpt1b8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdptdkn)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdptj9s)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdptrt1)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdpvm0y)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdpw30g)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5ppxdpw6rl)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpwg7v)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpwkzz)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpwth7)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpwy7c)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpx1zh)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpx9gr)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpxf6w)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpxjz0)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpxnq4)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpymp5)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpyzxk)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5ppxdpz3np)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5pq8p036f3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5pq8p03b57)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5pq8p03knh)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5pq8p041n0)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5pq8p045d4)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5pq8p04dwd)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5pq8p04ncn)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5pq8p04wvx)

BBC News Summary 16:30 MON (w172x5pq8p050m1)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5pq8p05cvf)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5pq8p05hlk)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5pq8p05r2t)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5pq8p05vty)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p0672b)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p06gkl)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p06yk3)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p07297)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p079sh)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p07k8r)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5pq8p07ss0)

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BBC OS Conversations 07:06 SUN (w3ct0vzg)

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BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2svn39144m)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2svn39411q)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2svn396xyt)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2svn399tvx)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jj)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89k)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8mv)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wp)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78j)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18tdnfwf58)

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Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18trxrcw1t)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18trxrgryx)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18trxrknw0)

Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snr)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv5w)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv5w)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv5w)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv5x)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz985)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz985)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz985)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz985)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0why)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct0why)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0why)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0why)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pp)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pp)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pp)

Global Questions 11:32 SAT (w3ct0wj2)

Global Questions 22:32 SAT (w3ct0wj2)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc21)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc21)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3cszc21)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6k)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6k)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3cszc6k)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxj)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxj)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3cszbxj)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc2)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcc2)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcc2)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcc2)

Heart and Soul 06:32 SUN (w3ct0whx)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0whx)

Heart and Soul 23:32 SUN (w3ct0whx)

Heart and Soul 02:32 FRI (w3ct0x18)

Heart and Soul 13:32 FRI (w3ct0x18)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbf)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbf)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbf)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 05:50 SAT (w3ct0whk)

James Naughtie’s Letter to America 18:50 SAT (w3ct0whk)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3w)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3w)

More or Less 23:50 SAT (w3ct0pxj)

More or Less 02:50 MON (w3ct0pxj)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6t1)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6t1)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2w9z931lgy)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2w9z931q72)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2w9z931tz6)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2w9z934hd1)

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Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2yry6lttnh)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2yry6lvsmj)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2yry6lxqkl)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2yry6lypjm)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2ys9gx4lgz)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2ys9gx5fpw)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2ys9gx7hd2)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2ys9gx8blz)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2ys9gxbd95)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2ys9gxc7j2)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172x2ys9gxf968)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2ys9gxg4f5)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2ys9gxj63c)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2ys9gxk1b8)

Outlook 10:32 SUN (w3cszdzz)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd38)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd38)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdb1)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3cszdb1)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdb1)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4h)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4h)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv1b)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv1b)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3cszv1b)

Resolves 08:50 SAT (w3ct0v7f)

Resolves 01:50 SUN (w3ct0v7f)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0l)

Science in Action 04:32 FRI (w3cszh0l)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0l)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 09:32 SAT (w3ct0t1q)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 04:32 SUN (w3ct0t1q)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 22:32 SUN (w3ct0t1q)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jls58t012)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jls58wwy5)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jls58zsv8)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jls592prc)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jls595lng)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh52)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh53)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bv9srn2l7)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3l79c5v9fc)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l79c5yftq)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjc)

Tech Tent 01:06 SUN (w3cszhnw)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhnx)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhnx)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk30)

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The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3csxfjl)

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The Compass 08:06 SUN (w3ct0wht)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3csvs1y)

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The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3csvs1y)

The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8g)

The Cultural Frontline 09:32 SUN (w3cszj8g)

The Cultural Frontline 22:06 SUN (w3cszj8g)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct0wjd)

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The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct0wjd)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct0whz)

The Documentary 19:32 SUN (w3ct0t8x)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct0wjl)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct0wjl)

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The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct0t8y)

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The Evidence 06:06 SAT (w3ct0wlb)

The Evidence 15:06 SUN (w3ct0wlb)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjh7)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq2)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3csyp1f)

The Food Chain 16:32 THU (w3csyp1f)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3csyp1f)

The Forum 03:06 MON (w3cszjvl)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3cszjvm)

The Inquiry 10:06 SUN (w3cszl3m)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172x7b7gl7p27m)

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