Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 JULY 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gjyqkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18t1d438kf)
Washington Redskins agree to review name

The American football team has agreed to review its name under pressure from sponsors. The name has long been seen by many as offensive, so why the change now? We speak to Mary Emily O'Hara from Adweek.

Many landlords in the US temporarily suspended rent payments because of the coronavirus. But some tenants are now having to pay again, and in protest some people have started a rent strike to show solidarity with their neighbours in financial difficulty. The BBC's Samira Hussain brings us the story of one woman who has hit hard times.

Several supermarkets in the US and UK will stop selling some coconut brands after the animal welfare charity PETA claimed producers were using monkeys to pick coconuts. Dr Cary Bennet is from PETA and tells us about their investigation.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by, Clare Negus, ABC's regional editor for Western Australia, who's in Perth.

(Picture: Washington Redskins helmets. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv046jv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xwxms)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqwx3l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhjb)
Brathwaite on Weekes, Stokes and BLM

Cricket Australia chief executive Nick Hockley on how the organisation can bounce back from the financial turmoil and job cuts caused by Covid-19.

Plus, can the West Indies keep up their impressive run against England when their Test series begins in Southampton next week?

We're joined by their one-day and Twenty20 star Carlos Brathwaite, who also talks about his memories of West Indies icon Sir Everton Weekes, who has died at the age of 95.

Photo: Carlos Brathwaite (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv046nlb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh6)
Nollywood’s Coronavirus intermission

Nollywood, the Nigerian film industry, is famous for high productivity, addictive plots and glamorous premiers. Princess Abumere in BBC Lagos has been to a few premiers herself, and has been finding out how Nollywood is adapting to the Covid-19 shutdown.

Tongue Twisters revisited
Fun and epic fails from the Fifth Floor teams trying to get their tongues round some fiendish tongue twisters.

Black Lives Matter in Tunisia
“I can’t breathe” was chanted by crowds in the Tunisian capital after the killing of African-American George Floyd in the USA. It’s part of the black community’s response to racism and lack of opportunities for the minority black population of the country. Nora Fakim has been following the story for BBC Africa.

Cape Verde, or Highway 10
Cape Verde found itself in the headlines when a controversial Colombian businessman Alex Saab was detained there charged by the US with money laundering. BBC Afrique reporter, and Cape Verdean, Anne-Marie Dias Borges, sheds light on the islands' strategic position in many trans-Atlantic dealings.

Russia on a bike
BBC Russian journalist Oleg Boldyrev took a novel approach to gathering local opinions ahead of this week's Russian referendum. He got on his bike and set off on a week's odyssey along the rural byways. It was a bone shaking experience.

Photo: Actor and television presenter Ada Afoluwake Ogunkeye AKA Folu Storms
Credit: Damilola Oduolowu-BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv2)
How South Africa banned skin-lightening creams

In 1990, South Africa became the first country in the world to ban skin-lightening creams containing the chemical compound hydroquinone. For years the creams had caused an irreversible form of skin damage called ochronosis for the black and Asian South Africans using the products. Rachael Gillman has been speaking to Dr Hilary Carman, one of the activists who worked to ban the creams and Dr Ncoza Dlova who became one of the country's first black dermatologists.

Photo: A woman applying a skin-lightening cream to her face. Credit: AFP/Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv046sbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn2)
Generation Covid?

Young people may not be the most exposed to the health risks during the global coronavirus pandemic, but right around the world they will pay a high price in lost wages, opportunities and greater public debt - much of which they’ll have to service. Generations are forged through common experiences, and the bigger the shock of Covid-19 to the global economy, the greater the likelihood that it will become a defining event for Millennials, Generation Z and the next generation of young children. How will Covid-19 shape the mindset of those people just starting out in life and what can we learn from the formative events of past generations? How will gains by young people in developing countries be impacted by the pandemic? And as the virus further exposes intergenerational inequalities, could its legacy be a new conversation about how to fix them?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv046x2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xx8w5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqx8bz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvrx)
Who spread the ‘5G coronavirus’ conspiracy theory?

In April, dozens of mobile phone towers were set on fire across Britain and demonstrators took to the streets to protest the rollout of 5G. They had the bizarre and entirely false idea that phone towers were somehow causing coronavirus.

Fake news and conspiracy theories were given a huge boost by the Covid-19 pandemic, and many of the whispers coalesced around politicians, scientists, and former Microsoft chief executive Bill Gates.

They weren’t true of course, so why did people believe them? We speak to protestors who were sucked into the rabbit hole - and question one of the key players responsible for spreading the myth.

Presenters: Mike Wendling and Marianna Spring
Producer: Sam Judah

Photo caption: A mobile phone tower
Photo credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whj)
Letter one

America was so different and now feels so familiar. The journey begins in 1970. The unresolved national arguments didn’t come up like an unexpected storm. James Naughtie recalls stories about arriving in New York and President Richard Nixon.


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0470tq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvgw)
How can India manage its labour crisis?

When India implemented a strict lockdown three months ago, thousands of migrant workers walked hundreds of miles on foot to reach home, as the cities where they worked shut shop. Nearly seven million workers are estimated to have now returned to their native villages.

But this has led to a fresh crisis, as most are without any means of livelihood.

While the government has announced schemes offering at least 100 days of employment, and is trying to map workers’ skills to rural-specific jobs, most labourers say they are yet to receive any tangible benefits. Meanwhile, businesses are reopening in the cities, and facing the challenge of a missing labour pool.

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the best measures that can help India resolve its labour crisis.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Divya Varma, Centre for Migration and Labour Solutions, Aajeevika Bureau; Rituparna Chakraborty, co-founder, executive vice president, TeamLease; Maneet Gohil, co-founder, CEO, Lal10


SAT 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqxd33)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj1)
Global Questions

Culture crisis: The future of the performing arts

Some are predicting that despite the easing of the lockdown, the arts will be devastated by the financial impact of the pandemic. What will be the effect on the performing arts and on our culture after months in which the cinemas, theatres, concert halls and galleries have been shut down, with huge uncertainty about how and when they will reopen? How will this seismic shock change our culture? Will people start to consume culture increasingly in the privacy of their own homes?

Singer-songwriter KT Tunstall and the veteran jazz pianist and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador for Intercultural Dialogue, Herbie Hancock, discuss the topic with host Zeinab Badawi and a virtual audience from around the world.


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0474kv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snq)
What will it take for Facebook to ban hate speech?

Big brands are turning away from Facebook over its so-called toxic content - so how will the social network react? That’s the big question we’ll be asking on Business Weekly. We’ll also be investigating the changing face of make-up as Kim Kardashian West sells a stake in her cosmetics business to the beauty giant Coty. We’ll hear why traditional make-up brands are struggling to keep up with companies born in the age of social media and influencers.
Plus our correspondent in France heads to the sparkling shores of Brittany to see whether businesses there are ready for summer tourists - and we have an interview with British director Gurinder Chadha about her short lockdown film. Presented by Lucy Burton.

(Photo: Stop Hate for Profit campaign displayed on a smartphone, Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04789z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pn)
Dashed hope in Afghanistan

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

In Afghanistan, many dared to hope there was a possibility of peace. But sadly these hopes are being dashed as attacks on the country’s younger generation continue. The recent death of a 24-year-old human rights activist has left many shaken – as Lyse Doucet reports.

Colin Freeman reports on the Islamist militant group Boko Haram, which has operated in north-east Nigeria for years, despite the Nigerian army’s efforts to defeat them. Recently there has been a new spate of attacks, in the garrison town of Monguno, and more nearby. And now, they are targeting aid workers.

The United States has been going through turbulent times – and New York in particular. Its streets have been the backdrop for anti-racism protests, following the killing of George Floyd, and the pandemic has battered the state, taking the lives of more than 24,000 people so far. Amidst the deaths, there has also been new life. Nick Bryant’s daughter Honor was born. Becoming a father again at such an unsettled time prompted him to re-evaluate his relationship with his adopted homeland.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: An Afghan family walks at sunset in Kabul. Credit: Shah Marai/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqxmlc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3v)
Saving Nagaland

His brother died from an overdose. His dad was an alcoholic. Now Jenpu Rongmei is saving others from a similar fate. “It doesn’t matter if you’re a dropout – what matters is you are human.”
Tell us your stories about being young and Indian in the 21st Century: myindianlife@bbc.com
And let us know what you think of the podcast. #MyIndianLife


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7d)
Resolves

Anele Matshiselaa

Anele Matshiselaa, a 27-year-old wildlife resources manager coming out of lockdown in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, resolves to convince more local people to visit the wildlife parks across the country.

“Without tourists from Europe, America and Asia, we won’t be able to maintain animal safety and security” he says. “It’s time for indigenous Zimbabweans to see the zebras, lions, rhinos and elephants for themselves.” He is spurred on by seeing his friends penniless, made worse by the Covid-19 crisis, though it’s the longer term consequences of a two-year drought, which has devastated crops and livelihoods, bringing the country to its knees. “We haven’t had water to wash our hands… there are people who say they would rather die of Covid than endure this impossible life.”

His efforts to encourage locals to the wildlife parks begin at home with his family, and his method of enticement includes the possibility of seeing their ancestral totem, the elephant.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv047d23)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xxrvp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqxrbh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1p)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Teenage pilots

How does it feel to fly the plane that won the war? Two Spitfire pilots - one 18 year old from the Battle of Britain, one from today’s
RAF - compare their experiences of unparalleled ecstasy and paralysing fear.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4g)
Do fake football crowd sounds do it for you?

Live football is back on air, but for the most part, live spectators aren’t. We ask the editor of BBC World Service sport about the challenges in the wake of Covid-19. Is it better with or without fake crowd sounds?

Plus, making art accessible for disabled artists on the Cultural Frontline.

Presented by Rajan Datar.
Produced by Howard Shannon.


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv047ht7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3btyjfvxzd)
Derby day - 'The greatest flat race in the world'

We go live to Epsom in the South of England where the Derby will be held for the first time behind closed doors. Our racing commentator John Hunt will tell us about the importance of the race and we hear from jockey Oisin Murphy who has overcome many hurdles to ride in the big race today.

We speak to Lee Kershaw who is a professional Rugby League player with Wakefield in the Superleague. But, like many, with no sport to play, he’s had to look elsewhere for work, away from the sport he loves. He tells us about his struggles.

We should be at Wimbledon for middle Saturday today so we hear from Richard Lewis the Chief Executive of the All England Club about how they have been impacted by the Coronavirus and catch up with Georgian player Sofia Shapatava on how her petition to support lower league tennis players is going. Plus Rufus the hawk's handler Imogen Davis tells us how he is keeping busy and how a baby Rufus may be on the way next year.

Plus it is time to call time on the humble whistle? Across sport it marks, the beginning and the end and sometimes the illegal moments in everything from Basketball to american football. But in the age of coronavirus, does the whistle face somewhat of an existential challenge, with worries over the droplets we produce when we… blow?!! Ron Foxcroft has refereed an Olympic basketball final and is the inventor of the electronic whistle, he tells us more..

Photo: Kameko ridden Oisin Murphy approaches the finish line to win the Qipco 2000 Guineas Stakes at Newmarket Racecourse (Photo by Edward Whitaker/Pool via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv047mkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xy0by)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqxztr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0w55)
The 'grandma benches' of Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe has over 14 million people but fewer than 20 psychiatrists.

After years of economic turmoil, unemployment and HIV, mental health is a huge challenge and doctors estimate one in four Zimbabweans battles with depression or anxiety.

Lucia is one of the 700 grandmothers in the country turning the nation around. She sits on a wooden bench using a gentle form of cognitive behavioural or talking therapy with her community.

This is one of 250 Friendship Benches set up by Zimbabwean psychiatrist Dr Dixon Chibanda, who believed that after a few weeks of simple training, grandmothers could become lay health workers for their communities.

Lucia has the time, wisdom and respect to help the people who come to her. She understands them and has direct experience of their problems.

Presenter Kim Chakanetsa hears the grandmothers are having astounding results. They have helped over 50,000 people and are breaking down the stigma around mental health. Recent clinical trials found they are more effective than conventional medical treatments.

As a result, Dixon Chibanda gets enquiries from around the world for the Friendship Bench and he’s setting them up in Malawi, Zanzibar, Kenya, Tanzania and now New York.

The World Health Organisation said more than 264 million people were suffering from depression. That was before Covid-19 brought new challenges. As people are more isolated and anxious, Dixon Chibanda explains how he is facing up to the pandemic, moving his idea online and giving the world access to a virtual Friendship Bench.

Photo: Two people talk on a 'Friendship bench' Copyright: Rainer Kwiotek


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv047r9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6t0)
The words, the rhythm, the melody with Melissa Laveaux and Angelique Kidjo

Canadian guitarist Melissa Laveaux welcomes Flavia Coelho, Maya Kamaty, and Angelique Kidjo. Melissa gets to the bottom of issues within the industry, the importance of asking questions rather than finding answers, and themes in their music that they keep returning to. All of this while being completely in awe of the legendary Angelique.

Angelique Kidjo is a four-time Grammy award-winning Beninese singer-songwriter, actor, and activist of Nigerian descent. She’s fluent in five languages, and has worked with the likes of Alicia Keys, Philip Glass, Bono, Carlos Santana, John Legend, and Herbie Hancock. Flavia Coelho is a Brazillian singer-songwriter born in Rio De Janeiro, who mixes samba, bossa nova, Brazilian rap, reggae and ragga. Her latest release, DNA, explored themes of corruption, homophobia and racism; an echo of the political difficulties in Brazil. And finally, Maya Kamaty is pioneering a new generation of the Reunion Island’s traditional song form, maloya. She is also the daughter of legendary maloya musician Gilbert Pounia, leader of the band Ziskakan.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gk05j9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzxtsh)
England eases lockdown

England has taken another significant step out of its coronavirus lockdown as pubs, restaurants and hairdressers reopen.

Also in the programme: How Covid-19 could have been avoided and how the Jewish community in Moscow is dealing with the pandemic (Photo: a group of friends give a toast in a pub with their drinks. Credit: PA Media)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv047zsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l66k8tg96)
Live Premier League commentary

Join the Sportsworld team for all the build up to the day's Premier League football, including the preview of our commentary game Manchester United against Bournemouth. We'll be joined by the panel, Jose Fonte, Anita Assante and Benni Mccarthy for all the latest on the Premier League. Commentary from Old Trafford begins at 1400 GMT.

Plus the Formula 1 is back, we'll have the latest from the Austrian Grand Prix. We'll also be finding out what's happening in the football leagues across Europe. And sport in America returns as the MLS teams prepare for a five week tournament behind closed doors at Walt Disney World in Florida. Another sport set to return in the United States is the WNBA - which will hold a smaller season in July at the IMG academy in Florida.

Photo credit: Marcus Rashford and Adam Smith during the last Premier League meeting between Bournemouth and Manchester United (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv048gs8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xyvkv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqyv1n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 James Naughtie’s Letter to America (w3ct0whj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv048ljd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvgw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 today]


SAT 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqyyss)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:32 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzf)
Race in America: My enslaved ancestors

As Americans call for change following the killing of George Floyd, three women share the history of slavery in their families and discuss its impact on society today.

Sharon Leslie Morgan in Mississippi is the founder of Our Black Ancestry Foundation, which provides resources for African American genealogical research. She's also co-written a book on the subject called Gather at the Table. Bernice Alexander Bennett is a blogger and radio host in Silverspring, Maryland. Shonda Brooks is a therapist in New Jersey.

They've been reflecting with Nuala McGovern on what they uncovered when they researched their own family trees.

Picture: Sharon Leslie Morgan
Credit: Kristin Little Photography


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv048q8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2z)
Actress Rebel Wilson

This week on The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi: actress and comedian Rebel Wilson on what makes Australian humour unique, artist Tracey Emin explains why she thrives on solitude and cellist Yo Yo Ma discusses making music for troubled times.

British actress Jodie Comer talks about the eerie experience of filming during lockdown, French author Jean-Baptiste Andrea muses on mortality and musician and DJ Don Letts explains how Jamaican culture transformed British music.

Nikki is joined by critic Tara Judah and film-maker Rubika Shah, who talks about her powerful documentary White Riot, which is about the British 1970s anti-racism movement.

Photo: Rebel Wilson. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv048v0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yrky92n0p)
Coronavirus clouds US Independence Day events

In his Independence Day message to Americans, President Trump has claimed that the US is on its way to a 'tremendous victory' over Covid-19, despite all evidence suggesting otherwise.

Also in the programme: Books by Hong Kong democracy advocates are disappearing from libraries after Beijing imposes a new national security law; and leading expert of Afghanistan Barney Rubin on whether the Taliban are really committed to peace.

(Photo: US flag. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv048yrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqzb15)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Outlook (w3cszdzy)
The mystery of Ecuador's lost mastertapes

Daniel Lofredo Rota is an Ecuadorian DJ and musician on a quest to unravel a decades-old family mystery. His eccentric grandfather has left a clue: a grimy, battered suitcase filled with old tapes. Inside are songs, secret loves, and the resurrection of a long-lost record label. This episode was first broadcast on the 21st October 2018.

A longer version of this episode is available on the Outlook podcast. And check out Daniel's Soundcloud page - Quixosis - if you want to listen to all the songs featured in this programme.

Produced & Presented by Maryam Maruf

Image: Records from the Caife catalogue
Credit: Courtesy of Daniel Lofredo Rota


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0492hx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xzg9h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqzfs9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzl)
Why do people risk death in pursuit of adventure?

What makes some people want to base jump off a building, or climb a cliff with no ropes? A thrill-seeking personality may be necessary, but is it enough to court the sort of danger that could kill? In this week's Why Factor, we explore why some people risk death in pursuit of adventure.

CONTRIBUTORS
Hazel Findlay, Professional climber.
Erik Monasterio, consultant in Forensic Psychiatry, clinical director of the regional forensic service in Canterbury New Zealand and senior clinical lecturer with the University of Otago.
Mary Philips, Professor in Psychiatry in chemical and translational science, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
Tim Woodman, Professor of Psychology, School of Sport Health and Life Sciences at Bangor University.
Roberta Mancino, BASE jumper and stunt woman.
Rob Fletcher, associate professor of sociology of development and change at Hanagen University in the Netherlands.
Steven Lyng, Professor emeritus at Carthage College and Kenosha Wisconsin.

Photo: Male climber gripping on handhold while climbing in cave
Credit: Getty Images


SAT 23:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxh)
Why Trump is wrong about the USA’s coronavirus case comeback

Are cases really rising in the US or are they just testing more? Tim Harford digs into the data behind the recent rise in coronavirus cases in the US.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer Josephine Casserly


(Long Beach, California: People stand in line at a clinic offering quick coronavirus testing for a fee. Photo: Brittany Murray/ Getty Images)



SUNDAY 05 JULY 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67xs6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnv)
Big advertisers boycott Facebook

Marketers express unease about Facebook’s handling of hate speech. Plus, how Singapore is introducing wearable dongles to help log and trace people who might have Covid-19. And the simulation company aiming to help redesign cities fit for a post-pandemic world. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: A smartphone showing the website of the “StopHateForProfit” campaign, Credit: EPA/ SASCHA STEINBACH).


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvm4h2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv049fr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xztjw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqzt0p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Trending (w3cszvrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67y0py)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx0)
Bernardine Evaristo - Girl, Woman, Other

This month, for the seventh World Book Club edition celebrating International Women writers, Harriett Gillbert is joined by the remarkable British writer Bernardine Evaristo from her home in east London to talk about her Booker-Prize-winning novel Girl, Woman, Other. Although still unable to gather an audience together in a studio, we take questions from listeners from all around the world via phonelines, tweets and emails to once again create a truly global event.

Girl, Woman, Other charts the lives and struggles of twelve very different characters. Mostly women, mostly black and British, it tells the stories of their families, friends and lovers, across the country and down the ages. A dazzling mixture of history and contemporary story-telling, Girl, Woman, Other crackles with energy and teems with life, offering an unforgettable insight into life in today’s multi-cultural Britain.

(Picture: Bernardine Evaristo. Photo credit: Jennie Scott.)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67y4g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvmhqg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjk)
Dimensions of discrimination

Do black women face more prejudice than black men or white women? The legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw introduced a new way of thinking about disadvantage in society. She called it ‘intersectionality’. It attempts to analyze how different forms of marginalisation – race, class, gender and so on – overlap. And it has been hugely influential on those academics and policy makers who deal with the nature and impact of discrimination.

Presenter: David Edmonds


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv049szp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739y05s8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qr0582)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8f)
TikTok: The app that's transforming social media

Welcome to the world of TikTok, one of the world’s fastest growing and most controversial social media platforms. The BBC’s Sophia Smith Galer speaks to the TikTok creators Melissa Ong aka @chunkysdead and Robert Tolppi about the world of elite and deep TikTok and finds there is a lot more to the platform than the dance trends and viral comedy clips that have made it so popular.

We hear from the creators of a surprising TikTok hit: an Australian drama micro-series about a woman’s struggle with infertility. Short videos of intimate, honest moments of Charlie’s IVF journey have received over 2 million TikTok views and sparked heartfelt conversations with audiences online. The creative team behind All Our Eggs discuss why they think the drama has captured the TIkTok audience’s imagination.

Meet the TikTok dance star putting his own personal twist on popular trends such as the Toosie Slide. Dancer, singer and Indigenous activist Theland Kicknosway tells us why he is using TikTok as a platform to share his culture with the world.

Presented by Tina Daheley with Sophia Smith-Galer

Photo: TikTok on a smartphone. Credit: Getty


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67ycyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Assignment (w3csz6l7)
Wuhan: City of silence

The BBC’s China correspondent, John Sudworth, travels to Wuhan – the city on the banks of the Yangtze river where Covid-19 first emerged. As the city returns to life, he examines one of the biggest questions on everyone’s mind: did the virus emerge naturally or could it have been leaked, as the US alleges, from a Wuhan lab, where work was being carried out to research bat viruses? As John and his team discover, asking questions and getting answers in Wuhan is no easy task.

Reporter: John Sudworth
Producer: Kathy Long

Photo: Two motorcyclists in Wuhan, China - June 2020 Credit: Getty Images


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvmr6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w59)
USA: A discussion about race

In this special American Impendence day program, presenter Martin Bashir brings together Ilyasah Shabbaz - the third daughter of Malcolm X, Joshua DuBois - President Obama's former spiritual advisor and Lama Rod Owens - a Buddhist Black radical thinker to discuss the nature of the Black Lives Matter movement. They discuss the objectives and methods of the movement and interrogate if the use of violence is a necessary evil in search of equality.

The three guests draw upon their own respected faith traditions as well as the experience of being African American in modern day America to share their views on how best to achieve equal rights.

Presented by Martin Bashir
Produced by Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Black Lives Matter protest, June 2020. Credit: Jo Holland/BBC)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67yhpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:32 on Saturday]


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvmvyv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 The Conversation (w3csynj6)
The beauty of ageing

How to subvert the negative stereotypes about older women? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women - both in their late 70s - to discuss how to grow older with purpose, passion, and a certain playfulness.

Chilean author Isabel Allende is one of the most acclaimed writers in the world. Her novels, which draw on her own eventful life, tell stories of love, exile and loss, and have sold more than 70 million copies and have been translated from Spanish into 42 languages. Now aged 76, she has spoken openly about how to live passionately at any age.

Also aged 76, Lynne Segal is a British-based feminist academic who has grappled with the paradoxes, struggles and advantages of ageing in her book, 'Out of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Ageing'. Originally from Australia, Lynne is also a seasoned feminist and social activist and is Professor of Psychology and Gender Studies at Birkbeck College, London.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service.

Image:
(L) Lynne Segal (credit Andy Hall/Getty Images)
(R) Isabel Allende (credit Lori Barra)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67ymfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sy0)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 10. Birth of a Nation

1948. The final episode of the epic drama. With the UN voting to establish a Jewish state, Israel is born – but the new state comes under attack from its Arab neighbours. The final episode of the epic drama series.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Miriam: Shani Erez
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Ben-Gurion: Elliot Levey
Musa Alami: Sargon Yelda
Judah Magnes: Neil McCaul
The Palestinian woman: Nathalie Armin
Other parts: Heather Craney, Clive Hayward and Hasan Dixon

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvmzpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq1)
Losing your taste to coronavirus

Taste and smell loss are thought to be two of the most common symptoms of coronavirus, but some of the least understood, persisting long after the virus has gone.

Scientists all over the world are racing to find out why Covid-19 is attacking these senses, and what this might teach us about the virus and how to track it – we hear about the latest theories from Turkey-based research scientist Maria Veldhuizen from The Global Consortium for Chemosensory Research.

Meanwhile, thousands of coronavirus survivors are struggling to adapt to a life without taste and smell, including a young doctor who tested positive for the virus more than three months ago. She tells Graihagh Jackson how she’s been desperately trying to recover her sense of smell ever since, and how it has destroyed one of her great passions – food.

We hear how smell is vital to the way we perceive flavour, but that it’s also important in other ways. Dr Rachel Herz, a neuroscientist and researcher on the psychology of smell at Brown University and Boston College in the US, explains that long-term smell loss is linked to depression because of the way the sense is plugged into the part of our brain that processes emotions and memories.

But there is some hope - we speak to Chrissi Kelly, from the charity Abscent, who tells us how it’s possible to train your nose to smell again.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

Let us know what you think about the show - email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A woman staring at an apple on a plate. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04b8z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739y0nrs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qr0n7l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67yvxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3l)
What does Putin want?

President Vladimir Putin has been in power for 20 years. The Russian people have been voting on a change to the constitution that could keep him in the Kremlin until 2036. While world leaders and opponents struggle to second guess him, some objectives appear to be clear: stability at home, respect abroad and power maintained for his inner circle.

Presented by Charmaine Cozier

(President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, February 2020. Credit: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvn767)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszdzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04bjgg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739y0x81)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qr0wqv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67z3f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvngph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gk32fd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6p00qpl)
President Trump attacks 'radical left' in 4th July speech

President Trump has used his Independence Day address to renew his attack on those he says are seeking to erase American history. Also in the programme: The global reach of China's new Hong Kong security law; and we hear from an enthusiastic supporter of President Putin after he secured the possibility of another 16 years at Russia's helm.

(Photo: President Donald Trump and first Lady Melania Trump at an event on the South Lawn of the White House on July 4, 2020 in Washington, DC. Credit: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67zbxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67zgnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvk)
Valkyries: Fierce women of war

In Norse mythology, Valkyries were women who went out into battles to choose the slain warriors who deserved to be in Valhalla, Odin’s place in Asgard, to carry on fighting in preparation for the final apocalyptic confrontation of Ragnarok, between gods and giants. Fighters would see the Valkyries flying through the air or riding on horses, with shields and helmets, some saving the lives and ships of those they favoured, some causing death to those they disliked. These stories of Valkyries and Valhalla offer insights into the lives and values of the people who told them, with the possibility that human women went into battle too.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Sif Rikhardsdottir, Professor and Chair of Comparative Literature at the University of Iceland, Marianne Hem Eriksen, Associate Professor of Archaeology at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo in Norway, and Judith Jesch, Professor of Viking Studies at the University of Nottingham, in the UK.

(Picture: Illustration from The Rhinegold and the Valkyrie, 1910. Artist: Arthur Rackham Credit: Historica Graphica Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67zldm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l66k8xlpk)
Live Premier League commentary

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary from Liverpool against Aston Villa at Anfield. With Liverpool already crowned Premier League Champions the focus is on the bottom of the table to see who will be relegated.

Plus, Formula 1 is back, we'll have all the latest from the Austrian Grand Prix. And the MLB returns in America.

Photo credit: Mohamed Salah playing for Liverpool against Aston Villa the last time the two sides met in the Premier League (Getty Images).


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04chfh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739y1w72)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qr1vpw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8w)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Stanley Tucci imagines the story of modern California as a movie screenplay. In this episode, he tells the story of Leon Lewis who hunted down Nazis in LA in the '30s and '40s. With its aircraft factories and shipyards, California was a prime target for Hitler. And he remembers Silicon Valley's troubled founder, William Shockley: a genius, a hideous boss and an irredeemable racist.


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr6802d4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6t0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gk41df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yrky95jxs)
Scientists claim that coronavirus is airborne

In an open letter due to be published this week, a group of scientists call for greater acknowledgement of the role of the airborne spread of Covid-19. Nobel Laureate Mario Molina, who endorses the letter, told Newshour that he believes that aerosols play a significant role in the transmission of the virus.

Also in the programme: Who’s behind the growing list of Chechen dissident killings? And we report on US race relations during the legacy of the Obama era.

(Photo: Man with mask in Barcelona. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr6809wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xvpp4s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04czf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739y2c6l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qr2bpd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:32 today]



MONDAY 06 JULY 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2mpjw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57ngw2n1wm)
Threat of fresh sanctions for Russia as Putin basks in referendum victory

Constitutional reforms could see Russia's President remain in office until 2036. Some workers have protested, concerned about falling living standards. With coronavirus case numbers in Russia on the rise, how many frontline medical staff have died? A recent statement from a health official suggested 500 people, but this was quickly removed from online circulation. Elsewhere, Spain puts Galicia and parts of Catalonia back under lockdown after coronavirus outbreaks. Plus, with Russia already under sanctions from the UK and the US, among others along with a collapse in oil prices, we ask economist Cornelia Meyer what that means if you're doing business there. Also, European Union countries are seeing their international trade recover from the pandemic at a faster pace than in Russia.

(Picture: Election officials empty bulletins from a voting box at a polling station in Moscow, Russia. Credit: AFP)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpb1t8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2mt90)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl76kq4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpb5kd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Why Factor (w3csytzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2my14)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh51)
Greece's stunning football triumph

In July 2004, Greece pulled off one of the biggest shocks in football history by winning the European Championship with a 1-0 victory over Portugal. The Greeks had never previously scored a point in tournament football, but fought their way to the final thanks to set-pieces and a well-marshalled defence. Charlotte North talks to the Greek goal-scorer, Angelos Charisteas. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Angelos Charisteas celebraring with the Euro 2004 trophy (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2n1s8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl76t6d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpbf1n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5v)
Is barefoot running better?

Shoes are a surprisingly recent human invention. But running isn’t. That means for most of our time on the planet, we’ve run barefoot. Today, in most countries it’s rare to see people out in public without shoes, let alone running. But might our aversion to the free foot be causing us pain?

CrowdScience mega-fan Hnin is an experienced runner, she enjoys ultra-marathons back home in Australia. But about six months ago she developed extreme foot pain, the condition ‘Plantar Fasciitis’, and this has meant she had to stop doing what she loves. She reached out to CrowdScience presenter Chhavi Sachdev, to find out if barefoot running could reduce her pain and improve her performance. Simply put, is barefoot running better?

In an attempt to find Hnin some answers, Chhavi hits the ground… running. Literally throwing off her own shoes on the streets of her home city of Mumbai, India, to see how feeling the ground can change her whole gait. And with Prof. Dan Lieberman, Chhavi learns what sets the human runner apart from other species while uncovering the strange form our feet have. She speaks with the Dr Peter Francis, a researcher whose life’s work has focused on curing the pain in his own feet and learning how to help others.
But performance is also important for runners. Biomechanics and shoe expert Dr Sharon Dixon explains how modifications to the sports-shoe are helping marathon runners set records, and blade-running athlete Kiran Kanojia shows Chhavi how the technology behind her two prosthetic legs let her emulate either natural walking or natural running.
Presented by Chhavi Sachdev
Produced by Rory Galloway

(Photo: barefoot running on beach. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2n5jd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0s8fw3)
Coronavirus: Australia to close Victoria-New South Wales border

The decision follows a spike in infections in the Victorian capital, Melbourne, where nine public housing estates have been locked down.

"My body is a confederate monument" - we get a very personal perspective on the issue of confederate era statues from a black American poet.

And how drones have become the latest weapon in the fight against Covid-19 in India.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2n98j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0s8km7)
Melbourne lockdown after spike in coronavirus cases

The border between Australia's two most populous states, Victoria and New South Wales, is closed after an increase in cases.

In Mumbai in India, concerns are growing about the twin threat of rising flood waters and rising Covid-19 infections that have hit over 600,000.

As the Black Lives Matter movement becomes a defining moment of the Trump presidency, we look at race relations during the two terms of President Obama.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2nf0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0s8pcc)
Melbourne sees surge in Covid-19 cases

We speak to a resident in one of the tower blocks which have been quarantined and surrounded by police.

One of Hong Kong's pro democracy leaders tells us why he's decided to flee the territory

And a court in South Korea has refused an extradition request by the United States for a man convicted of running a child pornography site that sold videos around the world.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2njrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc20)
Ronny Tong: Has China killed Hong Kong's special status?

Residents of Hong Kong are living with a new reality - a draconian national security law made in China and imposed on the territory with no meaningful consultation. Pro-democracy activists call it the death of the 'one country, two systems' principle established 23 years ago. HARDtalk's Stephen Sackur speaks to Ronny Tong, once a pro-democracy politician, now a loyalist of the Beijing-backed Hong Kong government. Has China just killed Hong Kong's special status?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpbx15)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jh)
Africa's tech entrepreneurs

Coronavirus has brought new opportunities to Africa's tech sector, despite the devastating blow it has delivered to economies around the world.

Tamasin Ford speaks to one of Forbes Africa’s 50 most powerful women, Rebecca Enonchong, the founder and CEO of AppsTech, a global provider of digital solutions. Claud Hutchful, chief executive of Dream Oval, a technology firm in Accra, Ghana, tells us about payments app Slydepay.

Plus we hear from Moses Acquah, chief technology officer of GreenTec Capital Partners, an investment firm that supports African entrepreneurs. He’s also the founder of the networking organisation, Afrolynk.

(Picture: Woman using a tablet; Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk2)
The doctor who discovered how cholera spread

In the 1800s cholera was a mysterious disease killing millions around the world. No-one knew how to stop it till an English doctor, John Snow, began investigating the outbreak of 1854. At a time before germ theory was properly understood, many public health experts thought disease was carried on what they called "bad air". John Snow was alone in thinking cholera was spread through contaminated water and by the time of his death - in 1858 - his theories had still not been fully accepted. Claire Bowes spoke to Dr Nigel Paneth, a biographer of John Snow, about the skills he brought to the developing science of epidemiology.

Photo: Portrait of John Snow (Science Photo Library BBC)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2nnhx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpc0s9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2ns81)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpc4jf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2nx05)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl77nf9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpc88k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3cswp2k)
Parkour women: The city is my playground

Gaining freedom and strength from your everyday environment. The sport of parkour involves moving around urban obstacles as quickly as possible. Athletes run up walls, scale fences, and jump between roofs. Two female parkour enthusiasts tell Kim Chakanetsa what this sport gives them in areas where women can feel unsafe in the streets.

Reem El-Taweel is a parkour athlete from Egypt, living in Dubai. She says when she was living in Egypt it was tough to train because of the street harassment she faced. When she first started she was the only girl, but now more girls are getting into it. She moved to Dubai to follow her dreams and become an assistant parkour coach. She says as a hijabi athlete she is also breaking a stereotype.

Silke Sollfrank is a professional parkour athlete from Munich. Her gymnastic background allowed her to quickly develop her own playful style of movement, which has attracted a lot of attention in the parkour scene. She has more than 20k followers on Instagram and landed a spot on Netflix's intense obstacle course series Ultimate Beastmaster, where she was the last female finalist. Silke is the only female athlete in her parkour team.

Left: Reem El-Taweel (credit: Katy Vickers)
Right: Silke Sollfrank (credit: Matthias Voß)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2p0r9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd37)
A girl on the run and a girl with no name

It's Outlook's 54th year on air and to celebrate, we're letting our listeners take over today's programme.

Margo Perin is an Outlook listener with a story of her own. As a child in the USA she was constantly on the move, with a new surname and address every few years. Unsure of what her father really did for a living, her childhood was shrouded in mystery. It wasn't until she was much older that she'd come to understand her family's secrets, and why they were on the run. She spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb.

Peter van Straten is another listener who sent a remarkable story our way, this time about his friend Mandisa Gushu, who grew up in a dysfunctional home in one of the poorest parts of South Africa. Her alcoholic mother never gave her a proper name, so on her first day at school she chose the name Mandisa, which means 'make happy’. Despite her difficult start she managed to get through school and nursing college and is now working at a hospital in the UK.

We always love to receive stories from our listeners. If you have a story you want told, or know somebody else who does, email us at outlook@bbc.co.uk

Picture: Margo Perin
Credit: Margo Perin


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2p4hf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl77wxk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpchrt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2p87k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lcfw4)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2pczp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpcr82)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltwvgbc7dd)
Is the future of shipping autonomous?

Shipping has evolved a great deal over the years, so is the next move towards autonomy? Anthony van Coillie is founder of Blue Line logistics, and tells us about his firm's Zulu barges, which have the potential to be remote controlled and are already cruising. An Magrit Ryste is programme director for next generation shipping at Kongsberg, and explains why her organisation is backing a cluster of European organisations developing an Autoship programme. And shipping expert Lori Ann LaRocco considers whether the public are ready for self-driving ships. Also in the programme, following a string of accounting scandals the UK's Financial Reporting Council has ordered the big four accounting firms to ringfence their audit divisions from the rest of their businesses by 2024. We get the background from Tabby Kinder, tax and accountancy correspondent for the Financial Times, and Prem Sikka, emeritus professor of accounting at Essex University discusses the implications. Plus, as the UK government unveils a coronavirus rescue package for arts institutions across the country, Lisa Burger, joint chief executive of the National Theatre in London, tells us how much the financial lifeline means for theatres like hers.

(Picture: Prototype autonomous ship Yara Birkeland being towed. Picture credit: Yara.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2phqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpcw06)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3cswp2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2pmgy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sv8tz7zjs)
Coronavirus conversations: Long-term Covid symptoms

Many Covid-19 survivors in the UK have been getting in touch with the BBC sharing their ongoing health problems. In May, Michael and Jane Weinhaus from Missouri joined us in conversation with others who had been treated in hospital for Covid-19. We hear from them again, as they tell us how they are getting on with their recovery and the challenges they still face.

And our medical expert today is Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University. She explains some of the latest developments with the virus. As well as recovery, we discuss the possible risks posed by airborne transmission; and also the latest research around animal to human transmission.

We also focus on the situation in Turkmenistan. It's one of the few countries with no official cases of the coronavirus, although independent media say there has been a surge in acute pneumonia. A team from the World Health Organisation is due to visit there today.

(Photo: A member of the medical staff wearing full PPE treats a patient in the Covid-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas. Credit: Go Nakamura/Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2pr72)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2pvz6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl78mdb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpd77l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jldwz0vf7)
2020/07/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2pzqb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Why Factor (w3csytzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpdbzq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0t95)
The Origin of Stuff

Toilet

You may call it the toilet, the loo, the privy, the potty, the can or even the bathroom, but whatever you call it, this everyday object has its roots in Bronze Age Pakistan. It even had a seat!

But how did the toilet come to be? Given one third of the world’s population still live without one, how much is our embarrassment around toilet habits to blame? And what scientific developments are underway to help make them truly universal?

Water and Sanitation Expert, Alison Parker, from Cranfield University believes part of the solution lies in a waterless toilet which creates ash, water from the waste it receives, and the energy it needs to operate, from the waste it receives.

Even in the UK, we don’t always have access to a toilet when we need one. Over the past decade, the number of public conveniences has dropped by a half, leaving older people and the disabled, who may need easy access, unable to leave their homes. Raymond Martin, Managing Director of the British Toilet Association, hopes to stop our public conveniences going down the pan.

Also featuring resident public historian Greg Jenner.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Bathroom/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2q3gg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6ld931)
Hong Kong: Chinese ambassador warns UK over 'interference'

China has warned the UK not to interfere with Hong Kong following the imposition by Beijing of a sweeping new national security law. Ambassador Liu Xiaoming said the UK's offer of a path to citizenship for up to three million Hong Kongers amounted to "gross interference".

Also in the programme: Bolivia's health minister tests positive for COVID-19; and we hear from Daryl Davis, a black musician and activist who for decades has been befriending members of the Ku Klux Klan and getting them to quit.

Picture: Pro-democracy activists Ivan Lam, Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow arrive to the Eastern Court for hearing in Hong Kong, China July 6, 2020. Credit: REUTERS.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2q76l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpdlgz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3cswp2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2qbyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl793cv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpdq73)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gxlpf2d1)
Is the future of shipping autonomous?

Shipping has evolved a great deal over the years, so is the next move towards autonomy? Anthony van Coillie is founder of Blue Line logistics, and tells us about his firm's Zulu barges, which have the potential to be remote controlled and are already cruising. An Magrit Ryste is programme director for next generation shipping at Kongsberg, and explains why her organisation is backing a cluster of European organisations developing an Autoship programme. And shipping expert Lori Ann LaRocco considers whether the public are ready for self-driving ships. Also in the programme, following a string of accounting scandals the UK's Financial Reporting Council has ordered the big four accounting firms to ringfence their audit divisions from the rest of their businesses by 2024. We get the background from Tabby Kinder, tax and accountancy correspondent for the Financial Times, and Prem Sikka, emeritus professor of accounting at Essex University discusses the implications. Plus, as the UK government unveils a coronavirus rescue package for arts institutions across the country, Lisa Burger, joint chief executive of the National Theatre in London, tells us how much the financial lifeline means for theatres like hers.

(Picture: Prototype autonomous ship Yara Birkeland being towed. Picture credit: Yara.)



TUESDAY 07 JULY 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2qlfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18tdnfhtjw)
Tech giants stop giving Hong Kong police user data

Several countries have criticised China for imposing a new security law on Hong Kong, which they say threatens the territory's long-standing. Some of the world's largest social media and internet businesses - including Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Google and Telegram - have all said they are "pausing" co-operation with requests for user information from the Hong Kong police, until they can assess the situation. The BBC's North America Technology Correspondent, James Clayton, tells us more. Meanwhile, could self-guiding, autonomous ships be the future? And, we talk to Hollywood Reporter Contributing Editor Jonathan Handel about how streaming a production of the musical Hamilton may just have given Disney's new online service an enormous boost. We discuss the implications of all these stories, and more, with Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report, and Economist Andy Xie. (Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2qq63)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl79gm7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpf2gh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct0whs)
Unmapped world

Maps are the scaffolding of the digital age. Without them, and their associated data, a technological revolution is impossible. Vast swathes of Africa are still not mapped to a true local scale. That means governments face huge problems when tackling rapid urbanisation on this fast changing continent – they simply don’t know where people are. It also means that when outbreaks of disease occur, mapping the spread of infections is all but impossible.

Katie Prescott travels to Rwanda, to Kigali, which is rapidly changing its layout and erasing signs of the past, to the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the maps just seem to stop, and to Tanzania’s commercial hub of Dar Es Salaam, to hear how community mapping projects run by students are helping to tackle flooding, and outbreaks of cholera. If it is not possible to manage what is not measured, how can communities help themselves to gather data?

With governments intent on technology focused economies, and young populations eager to harness the commercial power of the smartphone, how does a lack of location data hamper progress? Can cheap drones help, and why have maps always been so expensive to produce?

Katie meets young Africans determined to forge new careers in new technology sectors, and African healthcare entrepreneurs distributing lifesaving blood, despite maps not even showing where the hospitals are. Maps may seem like an ancient concept, but they’re essential for Africa’s modern economies. We also ask why maps are a commercial product more so now than ever.

Image: Africa as pictured on a map (Credit: Science Photo Library)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2qty7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2qypc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl79q3h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpf9yr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct0t95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2r2fh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0scbs6)
Hong Kong: Carrie Lam warns of 'consequences' for protesters

Tik Tok pulls out of the territory - while other social media firms say they will no longer help police.

Another 'spike' in the US - but rather than a spike in infections it's a spike in shootings and deaths - we hear from Chicago.

And singing in a choir has been singled out as being a dangerous activity - but what is the evidence behind that?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2r65m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0scgjb)
Tik Tok says it will exit Hong Kong market

Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam says she will 'vigorously implement' new security law.

The fourth of July holiday weekend in the US saw a spike in violent gun crime in major cities across the country in the wake of the George Floyd killing.

And why a football club in Lesotho has become one of the few in the world to play male and female players the same wage.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2r9xr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0scl8g)
Tik Tok pulls its app from Hong Kong

Social media companies say they'll prevent police in Hong Kong using their data after it implements Beijing's new security law.

The British government introduces long awaited sanctions against human rights abusers. It includes freezing assets and a travel ban on individuals.

And as countries around the world figure out schemes to revive their economies - who'll be footing the bill?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2rfnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv19)
How to get everyone online

From balloons in the stratosphere to swarms of satellites in space, the race to get everyone online is heating up.

The internet may never be more useful than during the coronavirus outbreak. It provides us with the latest health information, educates our kids and lets us communicate with our loved ones face to face.

But only half of the world’s population is online.

Tech evangelists around the world are trying to change that. Using balloons and satellites, soon even the most remote areas on Earth will be able to log on.

But there is more to getting everyone online than the strength of the signal. People Fixing the World investigates.

Produced and presented by Tom Colls

Image: Loon


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpfsy8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89j)
How brands are born

What's the secret to coming up with a brand name?

Elizabeth Hotson goes on a mission to create a new line of mushy peas - also known as Yorkshire caviar. With their low fat, high fibre, vegan credentials, mushy peas should be a winner with health conscious millennials, but a great name is still essential to success.

We negotiate legal minefields with Kate Swaine, head of the UK trademarks, brands and designs team at law firm Gowling WLG, and get some valuable branding insights from Simon Manchipp and Laura Hussey at design agency SomeOne.

Eric Yorkston, associate professor of marketing at the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University, tells us why analysing the sounds of words can make or break a brand.

Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture: Queen Pea branding by Simon Manchipp of SomeOne)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpl)
The unlawful death of Christopher Alder

The black former soldier choked to death in handcuffs on the floor of a British police station in 1998. CCTV footage taken from the police station showed the 37 year-old father of two gasping for air as officers chatted and joked around him. It took 11 minutes for him to stop breathing. An inquest found he was unlawfully killed but no-one has been held accountable for his death. Farhana Haider speaks to Janet Alder about her long fight to get justice for her brother.

Photo:Christopher Alder an ex paratrooper who died in a police station in Hull on 1 April 1998. Credit Alder family hand out.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2rkf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0whs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpfxpd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0t95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2rp54)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2rsx8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7bkbd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpg55n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbd)
Elif Shafak: Writing in lockdown

The British-Turkish writer Elif Shafak is renowned for her award-winning novels including The Forty Rules of Love and her most recent 10 Minutes 38 Seconds In This Strange World. She’s also known for being an advocate for women’s rights, LGBTQ rights and freedom of speech, which have led to her being investigated by the Turkish government. Now she’s writing a new novel and has completed a Manifesto on staying sane in an age of division which will be published later this year.

Covid-19 has meant that Elif has been experiencing what it’s like to create and write in lockdown in her London home. In conversation with Emma Kingsley, she describes her new routines, how ideas come to her and the way in which her working life has been altered by the pandemic. She also talks about the importance of using fiction as a space to ask questions about contentious issues and the role of literature as a means of keeping people connected during this new age of self-isolation.

Produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Photograph of Elif Shafak by Ferhat Elik


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2rxnd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjs)
The trailblazing nurse who began life in care

Elizabeth Anionwu spent her earliest years in a British children’s home. Her mother, a promising Cambridge University student, got pregnant by accident following a relationship with a Nigerian law student at the same university and was forced to give her baby up.

Although Elizabeth’s mother was loving and always kept in touch, Elizabeth’s childhood was unsettled. For many years she was the only mixed-race child in the children’s home, and when she left the institution, to live first with her mother and stepfather, and later with her grandparents, Elizabeth never felt wholly accepted.

Despite her academic potential, Elizabeth’s family ended her schooling at 16. She quickly found a job as a nursing assistant, and from there went on to train as a nurse. It’s a profession on which she has had a huge impact, championing the rights and care of patients with sickle cell anaemia and becoming Britain’s first sickle cell nurse specialist. Now Professor Dame Elizabeth Anionwu, she’s regarded as a pioneer in her field, but it was only later in life that she felt a true sense of belonging. A question to her mother about her father’s identity set a chain of events in motion that would lead to a treasured reunion – not just with her father, but with a wider Nigerian family who treated her from the start as one of their own.


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2s1dj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7bstn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpgdnx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0t95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2s54n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lgbs7)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2s8ws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0whs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpgn55)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwjqxjtr52)
Melbourne returns to full lockdown

Five million residents of Australia's Melbourne have to stay home as coronavirus surges. Jason Murphy is an economist and freelance journalist based in Melbourne, and tells us about the impact of the move. Meanwhile in Kenya, President Uhuru Kenyatta has announced a phased reopening of the country from Covid-19 lockdown. The BBC's Maggie Mutesi discusses the gradual easing of restrictions. Also in the programme, whilst official statistics suggest China's economy is rebounding from the country's coronavirus crisis earlier this year, our reporter visits a factory near China's eastern coast where the firm's American clients have disappeared, and the staff are barely hanging on. Plus, over the last 30 years, more than half the world's coral reefs have died. We have a report from the Great Barrier Reef off Queensland, Australia. Lauretta Burke from the World Resources Institute explains the economic effects of the decline in the world's coral reefs. And Sam Teicher, co-founder of Coral Vita describes his firm's process that involves heat and acidity in land based tanks, to grow coral with a high tolerance to climate change, at a rate 50 times faster than it grows in the wild.

(Picture: A stay at home information poster. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2sdmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpgrx9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2sjd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sv8tzbwfw)
Coronavirus conversations: Ghanaian doctors

We focus on the growing impact of the coronavirus pandemic in parts of Africa. We hear from doctors in Ghana, as well as Nigeria.

Melbourne in Australia is one city currently on high alert due to a record number of daily increases in new infections: Five million people have been ordered back into lockdown. We’ll hear about how its residents are coping.

We are watching for the test results of President Bolsonaro in Brazil. He’s had a test for the coronavirus after developing a high temperature.

Dr Isaac Bogoch from Toronto University will help us with discussions around the cost of a vaccine, the short supply of Covid-19 drugs in India, and the latest scientific advice around wearing face coverings.

(Photo: A handwashing bucket is seen at the Nima market in Accra, Ghana Picture taken April 20, 2020. Credit: Francis Kokoroko/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2sn45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2srw9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7cj9f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdph44p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jldwz3rbb)
2020/07/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2swmf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct0whs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdph7wt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz984)
Can we make the web a better space?

What is Web Science, and why does it matter?

The internet is the most complex machine built by humans but it so much more than just the engineering behind it. The internet moves the data around, but the web is the space in which we humans have experiences, think of the web as a sort of super app.

We're interested in the underlying technology, in that it facilitates the movement of data that makes the web possible. But from the human side, we're interested in our interaction with each other as made possible by the web, so how do we understand it in its totality rather than thinking about it as a collection of websites? Did the inventors of the internet foresee how it could be used now – as a force of good and change but also as a way of spreading hate and misinformation? By studying Web Science could the internet be made better for humanity in the future?

Joining us from the WebSci 2020 Conference are: “Father of the Internet” Vint Cerf, Executive Director, Web Science Institute Wendy Hall, Director of the Ada Lovelace Institute in Cambridge Carly Kind and JP Rangaswami former Chief Data Officer and Head of Innovation of Deutsche Bank Chief Scientist at BT.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary by Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

Main image credit: Getty Images


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2t0ck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lh604)
Bolsonaro tests positive for Covid-19

The Brazilian president, Jair Bolsonaro, says he has tested positive for the coronavirus. Mr Bolsonaro has repeatedly dismissed the severity of Covid-19, having previously described the virus as the sniffles, and been very publically reluctant to wear a facemask. More than 65,000 Brazilians have died having tested positive for Covid 19. There've been more than 1.6 million confirmed cases in-country.

Also in the programme: A sneak preview of Mary Trump's new book, not on sale until next week; and a Pennsylvania distillery that has been producing hand sanitizer, the head distiller's grandmother having previously used her home-distilled whiskey as a disinfectant during the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918.

(Photo: Brazilian President, Jair Bolsonaro. Credit: EPA/Joedson Alves)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2t43p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdphhd2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2t7vt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7d08y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdphm46)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gxlphz94)
Evidence emerging of airborne transmission of COVID-19

The World Health Organization has acknowledged "evidence emerging" of the airborne spread of coronavirus, after a group of scientists signed a letter urging the organization to update its guidance on the disease’s transmission. One of the signatories, Joe Allen, an Assistant Professor of Exposure Assessment Science at Harvard University in the US, explains his concerns to Rob Young.
Also in the programme, Deutsche Bank will pay a $150 million penalty to a New York regulator, mainly for failing to properly monitor its relationship with convicted child abuser Jeffrey Epstein, as Kadhim Shubber of the Financial Times explains.
And whilst official statistics suggest China's economy is rebounding from the country's coronavirus crisis earlier this year, the BBC’s Robin Brant visits a factory near China's eastern coast where the firm's American clients have disappeared, and the staff are barely hanging on.
Plus, over the last 30 years, more than half the world's coral reefs have died. The BBC’s Susannah Streeter explores the economic damage this has caused, and the efforts to revive the world’s endangered reefs.
And we’ll get the view on the day’s trading on Wall Street, from Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading.
(Picture: A London underground train with people wearing masks. Picture credit: Getty Images)



WEDNESDAY 08 JULY 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2thc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18tdnflqfz)
Coronavirus: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out

The World Health Organisation has acknowledged evidence of the airborne spread of coronavirus, after a group of scientists signed a letter urging it to update its guidance on the disease’s transmission. One of the signatories, Joseph Allen, an Assistant Professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, explains his concerns.

Also in the programme, Deutsche Bank will pay a $150 million penalty to a New York regulator, mainly for failing to properly monitor its relationship with convicted child abuser Jeffrey Epstein, as Kadhim Shubber of the Financial Times explains.

A new report from Chatham House warns malnutrition in developing economies could cost businesses in the developing world dear. And as the continuing coronavirus pandemic forces universities to stay mostly online, we look at the impact that will have.

Rob Young is joined by Sarah Birke, correspondent for the Economist in Tokyo, and political reporter Erin Delmore in New York.

(Picture: A man in the US wearing a mask. Picture credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2tm36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7dcjb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdphzcl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct0wht)
The Pandemic that Changed the World

Reasons: The pandemic that changed the world

Why did coronavirus strike so fast and so hard? There was plenty of warning that a pandemic was inevitable, but when a new virus emerged in a wet market in the Chinese city of Wuhan, the world proved powerless to prevent it spreading. The finger has been pointed in various directions: a failure by the Chinese authorities to communicate, a sluggish response from the World Health Organisation, an ignorance of history, and what Ian Goldin, professor of globalisation and development at Oxford University, has termed the ‘Butterfly Defect’ of globalisation. In this episode, Professor Goldin explores what he sees as the complacency of governments and a declining commitment to multilateralism as reasons for the new pandemic and its unprecedented economic consequences. He hears from, among others, IMF managing director Kristalina Georgieva; the man who identified the Ebola virus, Peter Piot; and the historian Margaret MacMillan.
Producer: Tim Mansel


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2tqvb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2tvlg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7dm0l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpj6vv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz984)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2tzbl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sg7p9)
WHO: Airborne transmission of Covid may be possible

We speak to one of the scientists who signed a letter to the World Health Organisation and persuaded it to change its guidance. So what difference should it make to how we should stay safe?

And the spread continues, right to the top in Brazil, as the President and renowned virus-denier Jair Bolsonaro tests positive. Will there be political implications?

And we hear about the balloons floating over Kenya giving access to 4G internet service to previously hard to reach communities.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2v32q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sgcff)
Scientists say Covid-19 can linger in the air

The World Health Organisation accepts arguments that this may be a way the virus is being transmitted, giving more support to the wearing of face masks.

Brazil's President Bolsonaro has often downplayed the risks of the new coronavirus - calling it 'the little flu'. Now he's tested positive for the disease.

And we go live to Australia where there are large queues at a busy state border before it is shut to counter the spread of Covid-19.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2v6tv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sgh5k)
Hong Kong's new 'security hotel'

New building opened which puts mainland Chinese security agents in the heart of Hong Kong for the first time.

In a few hours, Melbourne goes back into lockdown after a rise in covid cases - and it's not the only city looking at bringing back restrictions. Phoenix, Arizona, is seeing a steep rise in cases too - and some are wondering whether the lockdown was lifted too early.

Plus we head to Nigeria with a special report from one of the main hospitals in Lagos.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2vbkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3csy9fn)
Halima Aden: Challenging supermodel stereotypes

The designer catwalk and the glossy magazine cover are powerful cultural signifiers. Top models who occupy those spaces are deemed to have a look that attracts and sells. But how diverse is that look? How inclusive? Stephen Sackur interviews Halima Aden, a supermodel who challenged a host of stereotypes. She is a refugee from Somalia’s civil war; she’s Muslim and follows a modest dress code. Hers has been an extraordinary journey to international fame and fortune - how has it changed her?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpjpvc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8mt)
Rising tensions with China

Why does China seem to be upsetting countries around the world?
Beijing's recent clampdown on Hong Kong with a new security law has led many countries to condemn the Chinese leadership. It's also put more pressure on the trade war with the US. So what's in it for Beijing to apparently spur international hostility over Hong Kong and a number of other regional border conflicts? George Magnus, an economist and an associate at the China Centre at Oxford University, believes the domestic unemployment issue is a big determining factor in Beijing's thinking. Yuen Yuen Ang, a political scientist and an expert on China and emerging economies at the University of Michigan, says it's all a symptom of President Xi's and Donald Trump's insecurities at home. And Ian Bremmer the President of the risk consultancy the Eurasia Group, says despite the Chinese always having been thought of long term, strategic thinkers they are now not even thinking six months ahead.

(Picture: Cargo containers with US and China flags hoisted by crane hooks clash with each other; Credit: cybrain/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmrv)
Montreal's 'Night of Terror'

When Montreal's police force went on strike for one day over pay in 1969, there was looting and rioting in the streets. But the city's problems leading to the unrest had been building for more than a decade. Organised crime, militant separatists and commercial rivalries all erupted on 7th October, just as police officers decided to protest that their pay was much lower than officers in other Canadian cities. Sidney Margles was a local reporter, and described the scene, and the underlying problems, to Rebecca Kesby.

(PHOTO: The scene at the Murray Hill Limousine garage as rioting left several buses on fire and damage to property, following a police strike in Montreal. Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2vgb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct0wht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpjtlh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz984)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2vl27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2vptc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7fg7h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpk22r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8x)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Actor Stanley Tucci tells the story of Kathleen Cleaver, a leading light in the short-lived but highly influential Black Panther Party which was born in Oakland, California. And he explores the contribution of Dianne Feinstein, trailblazing Californian politician who took over as mayor of San Francisco after the murders of Harvey Milk and Mayor Moscone.

Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester
Producer: Laurence Grissell


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2vtkh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrk)
Rufus Wainwright: My music and my mother

Rufus Wainwright was once described by Elton John as 'the greatest songwriter on the planet'. He's the son of two North American folk music legends – Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle but went on to forge his own prolific career. He's got 12 albums under his belt including the Grammy-nominated Rufus Does Judy at Carnegie Hall where he sang Over the Rainbow with his mother Kate on stage, a song they’ve performed since his childhood. Rufus was especially close to his mum, early on in his songwriting career he looked to her for advice and approval, and her support helped him through a destructive crystal meth addiction. They sang together often, right up until she died from cancer in 2010.

Rufus' latest album is called Unfollow the Rules.

Picture: Rufus Wainwright with his mother Kate McGarrigle
Credit: Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2vy9m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7fpqr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpk9l0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz984)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2w21r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lk7pb)
Hong Kong security law: Beijing security office opens in Hong Kong

Beijing's new national security office in Hong Kong has been officially opened, placing mainland Chinese intelligence agents into the heart of the territory.

Also in the programme: We have a special report from Nigeria where there's a reluctance to believe that Covid-19 exists; and anger over US decision on foreign students' visas.


(Photo: The Chinese flag was raised outside the office in Causeway Bay. Credit: AFP)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2w5sw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 The Compass (w3ct0wht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpkk28)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxc5n4lyhg)
What went wrong at Wirecard?

We ask how German electronic payment firm Wirecard fell foul of a big accounting scandal. Sarah Syed is a technology reporter with Bloomberg in Berlin, and explains how Wirecard first became a player in the financial technology world. Sir Donald Brydon led a review into auditing practices for the UK, and considers the role auditing has played in this scandal. Dr Marc Liebscher of law firm Dr Spath and Partner is bringing a class action lawsuit on behalf of shareholders against the German branch of Ernst & Young, which has audited Wirecard's books for 11 years, and tells us about the case they plan to make. And Mike Navallo, justice reporter for ABS-CBN News in the Philippines discusses the billions of dollars which were supposedly held in accounts in the country, but may never have existed. Also in the programme, Google's sister company Loon has launched its first commercial service for balloons to carry internet data in Kenya. We hear about the thinking behind the scheme from Loni Prinsloo, technology reporter for Bloomberg in Johannesburg. Plus, it's regular World Business Report presenter Susannah Streeter's last day on the show, and we look back on some of the most memorable interviews from her time in the BBC Business and Economics department.

(Picture: A Wirecard building. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2w9k0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3csy9fn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpkntd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2wf94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sv8tzfsbz)
Coronavirus conversations: Turkmenistan

Turkmenistan is a country of nearly 6 million people in Central Asia, ruled by an autocratic government and difficult to access from the rest of the world. It's also one of the few countries that is yet to report a single case of Covid-19. Is that a credible claim? Reports from inside the country suggest there are indeed cases and deaths. A team of WHO experts have now arrived to investigate. We speak to the BBC correspondent following the story and also a Turkmen journalist in exile.

We hear what is happening in Serbia after protests against the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Dozens of police and protesters were hurt in riots that broke out around the National Assembly in Belgrade.

And a WHO official answers more of your questions about the pandemic - including the latest official guidance on masks and what we're learning about whether the coronavirus is "airborne".

Picture: Turkmenistan's President Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov at a parade for World Bicycle Day on June 3rd, despite the global pandemic (Igor Sasin / AFP via Getty Images)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2wk18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2wnsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7gf6j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpl11s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jldwz6n7f)
2020/07/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2wsjj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct0wht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpl4sx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc1)
Cancer deaths rise predicted after Covid-19

The fear of spreading Covid-19 infections has led many countries to enforce lockdowns – restricting people’s movement. Medical appointments and screening clinics to detect any early signs of cancer have been cancelled. New British research suggests that between 7,000 and 35,000 extra cancer deaths could result from the lack of diagnosis and treatment which patients would normally receive. Professor Richard Sullivan from Kings College London has been monitoring the global impact of lockdown on cancer services.

In Canada the Army were drafted in to support staff in care homes for elderly people – where 80% of the country’s deaths from Covid have occurred. Operation Laser is now winding down but reports published by the military have revealed poor care and low-paid staff too frightened to insist on using protective equipment to reduce their risk of catching Covid-19.

The brains of people who like to stay up late differ from those who get up early. Data from thousands of brain scans has revealed that late-night “owls” are likely to have a higher volume of grey matter in the precuneus - an area of the brain associated with social behaviour. But Brunel University’s Dr Ray Norbury says it’s not necessarily good news for the owls.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: Portrait of a contemplative senior woman with cancer. Photo credit: FatCamera/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2wx8n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6ll2x7)
US coronavirus cases exceed 3 million

The coronavirus pandemic continues to surge across the United States as thousands of new cases in Florida and Arizona push the total number of confirmed infections past 3 million.

Also in the programme: Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador makes his first foreign visit to meet President Trump at the White House; and the launch of a project to bring some remote areas of Kenya online, through the use of internet balloons.

(Photo: A sign at the entrance of Jackson Memorial Hospital during the coronavirus disease outbreak, in Miami, Florida. Credit: Reuters/Marco Bello)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2x10s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3csy9fn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpld95)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2x4rx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7gx61)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdplj19)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gxlplw67)
What went wrong at Wirecard?

We ask how German electronic payment firm Wirecard fell foul of a big accounting scandal. Sarah Syed is a technology reporter with Bloomberg in Berlin, and explains how Wirecard first became a player in the financial technology world. Sir Donald Brydon led a review into auditing practices for the UK, and considers the role auditing has played in this scandal. Dr Marc Liebscher of law firm Dr Spath and Partner is bringing a class action lawsuit on behalf of shareholders against the German branch of Ernst & Young, which has audited Wirecard's books for 11 years, and tells us about the case they plan to make. And Mike Navallo, justice reporter for ABS-CBN News in the Philippines discusses the billions of dollars which were supposedly held in accounts in the country, but may never have existed. Also in the programme, Google's sister company Loon has launched its first commercial service for balloons to carry internet data in Kenya. We hear about the thinking behind the scheme from Loni Prinsloo, technology reporter for Bloomberg in Johannesburg. Plus, it's regular World Business Report presenter Susannah Streeter's last day on the show, and we look back on some of the most memorable interviews from her time in the BBC Business and Economics department.

(Picture: A Wirecard building. Picture credit: EPA.)



THURSDAY 09 JULY 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2xd85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18tdnfpmc2)
Pressure on US schools to re-open

As President Trump pushes for US schools to re-open in August, Tawnell Hobbs, education reporter for The Wall Street Journal, explains how teachers and parents are reacting.
Meanwhile, Jason Furman, former chief economist to President Obama, weighs in on the different stimulus strategies countries have taken to get their economy going again.
Also in the programme, we ask how German electronic payment firm Wirecard fell afoul of a big accounting scandal. The BBC’s Samira Hussain reports on the rise of stay-at-home day traders during coronavirus lockdown.
And how a classic Magic Realism novel inspired modern-day Colombians to exchange letters of support, anonymously.
All through the show we’ll be joined by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC and Sushma Ramachandran, columnist for the Tribune in Delhi.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump. Picture Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2xj09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7h8ff)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdplw8p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6l8)
The missing bodies of Guayaquil

In March and April, Guayaquil in Ecuador was the epicentre of the Covid pandemic in Latin America. The city’s health services began to collapse fast – hospitals, cemeteries and morgues were overwhelmed. As the bodies of the dead were not collected, hundreds of desperate families kept the remains of their loved ones at home, or deposited them on the streets. Eventually they were picked up. But in the chaos, some corpses went missing.
For Assignment, Mike Lanchin teams up with Guayaquil journalist Blanca Moncada, to follow the story of one woman in her dramatic search for the body of her late husband.

(Image: Funeral workers with a coffin in the back of a pick-up truck outside Los Ceibos hospital in Guayaquil. Credit: Reuters/Santiago Arcos)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2xmrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2xrhk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7hhxp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpm3ry)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2xw7p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sk4ld)
Covid-19: US surpasses three million cases

The mayor of Austin Texas, Steve Adler, tells us how they are trying to cope with the spike in cases and his fear that his city's hospitals could be overwhelmed in a matter of days.

Scientists say they have new evidence of an epic Pacific voyage between the Americas and eastern Polynesia about eight hundred years ago - we speak to the lead author of the study.

And the president of the Zimbabwe Nurses’ Association (ZINA) explains why thousands of nurses and doctors are striking.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2xzzt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sk8bj)
US has over three million Covid-19 cases

There are now more than three million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the USA. The White House is calling for schools to open. We get the view of Dr Jason Bae, medical director of Prealize Health in Northern California.

We also get an update from Israel on what measures they are putting in place as cases there are on the rise.

And we have a report from Nigeria where the government has now declared zero tolerance on sexual and gender based violence.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2y3qy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0skd2n)
US has a quarter of the world's Covid-19 cases

The mayor of Austin, Texas, talks about the problems they are facing as the state reaches 10,000 daily cases.

We get the latest on the protests in Serbia against a planned return to lockdown.

And a good news story as there is evidence of a growing band of very rare Cross River gorillas living in Nigeria’s Mbe mountains, proof that the subspecies once feared to be extinct is reproducing amid protection efforts.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2y7h2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3m)
Why are Covid cases rising in the US?

Why are Covid cases dramatically increasing in some U.S. states, where rates had been low? The number of new coronavirus infections in a single day has passed fifty five thousand. Is it because of more testing, or is something else going on?


(Demonstrators outside the State Capitol in Auston.Texas protesting against Coronavirus restrictions. Credit: Gary Miller/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpmlrg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wn)
Voting amidst a pandemic

Could electronic voting help the US hold an election?

Ed Butler speaks to Nimit Sawhney founder and CEO of Voatz - a US startup that provides voting through a smartphone app, and to Priit Vinkel, the former head of the state electoral office of Estonia where 50% of citizens now cast their votes online.

J. Alex Halderman, professor of computer science at the University of Michigan explains why e-voting systems are so risky when it comes to election security. Lori Steele Contorer, former founder and CEO of e-voting company Everyone Counts, argues the case for electronic voting amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Producer: Edwin Lane

(Photo: Voters line up at polling stations in the US state of Wisconsin earlier this year; Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmmb)
The death of Frida Kahlo

The great Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo, died on July 13th 1954, at the age of 47. The art critic, Raquel Tibol, lived in Frida's house during the last year of the artist's life. In 2014 she spoke to Mike Lanchin for Witness History about the pain and torment of Kahlo's final days.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Frida Kahlo with her husband Diego Rivera in 1939. (Copyright Getty Images /Bettmann /Corbis)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2yc76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6l8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpmqhl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2ygzb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvl)
Up close with tango

Tango is easy to recognise: those daring steps, the tight hold of the dancing partners, the intense yet melancholy music dominated by the plaintive sounds of the bandoneon. But if you ask what exactly tango is and where it came from, the answer may not be so immediately clear – because it’s more than a genre of music, more than just a style of dance.
To get insights into the roots, the culture and even the magic of tango, Rajan Datar is joined by leading tango historians Maria Susana Azzi, Christine Denniston and John Turci-Escobar.

Photo: Argentine dancers on stage at the World Tango Championships in 2014 (Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh52)
Andre Agassi

In July 1992, Andre Agassi became a tennis superstar when he won the Wimbledon men’s title at the age of 21. But beneath the showman image, Agassi was in private turmoil – in pain from a back problem, depressed and secretly hating his sport. Later in his career, Agassi would even smoke crystal meth. Simon Watts tells his story using BBC archive interviews.

PHOTO: Andre Agassi in action at Wimbledon (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2ylqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7jc4l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpmyzv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq2)
Jacques Pépin: My life in five dishes

Jacques Pépin is a household name across much of the US. He shot to fame starring alongside Julia Child on TV cookery shows in the 1990s, has written more than 30 books, and picked up multiple awards.

He tells Graihagh Jackson about his precarious childhood dodging bombs in wartime France and the near-fatal car crash that ended his restaurant career, but set him on a path towards celebrity.

Plus, the 84-year-old explains why he’s still sharing his cooking and recipes with the world through the coronavirus lockdown.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

Let us know what you think about the show - email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Jacques Pépin. Credit: Tom Hopkins/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2yqgl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdb0)
The literary heroes that helped me cope as a carer

Sam Mills is a British writer who has always turned to fictional characters for answers in her life. Whether that was Roald Dahl's Matilda when she was younger or Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway as an adult, they've always been the language she's used to interpret her situation.

As a child, Sam didn't understand why her dad would disappear for long stretches of time so she'd tell her classmates he'd been abducted by a gang and was being held hostage. These were stories inspired by some of her favourite authors. When she was 14 years old she found out what was really happening, her father had schizophrenia.

Sam's favourite storybooks continued to help her to process the world and when she became her father's primary carer, they became a lifeline.

Sam has written a book about her experience called Fragments of My Father.

Picture: Pages of a book
Credit: BBC


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2yv6q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7jlmv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpn6h3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2yyyv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6ln4lf)
China warns Australia over Hong Kong interference

China criticises Australia’s move to suspend its extradition treaty with Hong Kong in response to Beijing's imposition of a controversial national security law. Newshour examines the diplomatic fallout with Geoff Raby, a former Australian ambassador to China.

Also in the programme: Serbia backtracks on lockdown amid protests; and searching for the dead in Ecuador's biggest city Guayaquil.

(Photo: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Credit: David Gray/Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2z2pz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6l8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpnfzc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvq95yb7jz)
'UK faces mobile blackouts if Huawei ban rushed'

UK phone companies warned of mobile blackouts if a possible ban on Huawei is rushed. British parliamentarians were taking evidence from network operators as well as network technology manufacturer Huawei, and BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones brings us the details. Meanwhile, Emily Taylor, editor of the London-based Journal of Cyber Policy considers the implications for Huawei's business around the world. Also in the programme, voters in Singapore head to the polls on Friday for what's being called the 'pandemic election'. The government there has unveiled four big-spending budgets to cushion the impact, but as the BBC's Sharanjit Leyl reports, not everyone is confident that it will work. Plus we hear from some African technology entrepreneurs how their sector has actually been boosted by coronavirus, as they were able to provide vital virtual services to people who were suddenly unable to leave their homes.

(Picture: A Huawei logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2z6g3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpnkqh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2zb67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sv8tzjp82)
Coronavirus conversations: Jobless in Argentina

As Covid-19 leads Argentina into another economic crisis, we speak to two friends in their early 20s in Buenos Aires state about their struggle to find work. What sort of future do they see?

Also, we hear how Covid-19 is adding to the layers of desperation in Yemen - a country already hit by a humanitarian crisis from war and hunger. We hear how even buying a face mask is beyond the budget of most people.

The Italian city of Bergamo was once the epicentre of Italy's coronavirus outbreak - which at the time was the worst in the world. But now the hospital which dealt with many of the patients no longer has any Covid-19 patients in its intensive care unit for the first time in 137 days. We speak to the doctor in charge.

Picture: A demonstrator holds a placard that reads "their richness is our poverty", during a protest to demand resources for the vulnerable in Buenos Aires in May (REUTERS / Agustin Marcarian / File Photo)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2zfyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2zkph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7kb3m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpnxyw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jldwz9k4j)
2020/07/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2zpfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6l8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpp1q0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0k)
Rwanda’s game changing coronavirus test

African scientists have developed a reliable, quick and cheap testing method which could be used by worldwide as the basis for mass testing programmes.

The method, which produces highly accurate results, is built around mathematical algorithms developed at the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Kigali. We speak to Neil Turok who founded the institute, Leon Mutesa Professor of human genetics on the government coronavirus task force, and Wilfred Ndifon, the mathematical biologist who devised the algorithm.

The virus is mutating as it spreads, but what does this mean? There is particular concern over changes to the spike protein, part of the virus needed to enter human cells. Jeremy Luban has been analysing this mechanism. So far he says ongoing genetic changes seem unlikely to impact on the effectiveness of treatments for Covid -19.

And Heatwaves are increasing, particularly in tropical regions, that’s the finding of a new analysis by climate scientist Sarah Perkins – Kirkpatrick.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle

Main image: People stand in white circles drawn on the ground to adhere to social distancing in Kigali, Rwanda, on May 4, 2020, Photo by Simon Wohlfahrt / AFP via Getty Images


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2zt5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lnztb)
Trump taxes: Supreme Court says prosecutors can see records

The US Supreme Court has ruled that President Trump's financial records can be examined by prosecutors in New York. In a related case, the court ruled that this information did not have to be shared with Congress.

Also in the programme: the Egyptian government changes the law to protect women in sex abuse cases, and the hospital that bore the brunt of Italy's virus outbreak has no more Covid patients in intensive care.

(Picture: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about today's Supreme Court rulings. Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp2zxxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpp968)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp301p0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7kt34)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdppdyd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gxlpps3b)
What next for President Trump's tax returns?

The US Supreme Court has ruled that President Trump's financial records can be examined by prosecutors in New York. In a related case, the court ruled that this information did not have to be shared with Congress. Law professor and host of the "Passing Judgement" podcast Jessica Levinson explains the significance of these rulings. Also in the programme, voters in Singapore head to the polls on Friday for what's being called the 'pandemic' election. The government there has unveiled four big-spending budgets to cushion the impact, but as the BBC's Sharanjit Leyl reports, not everyone is confident that it will work. Plus we hear from some African technology entrepreneurs how their sector has actually been boosted by the pandemic, as they were able to provide vital virtual services to people who were suddenly unable to leave their homes.

(Picture: The US Supreme Court building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 10 JULY 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp30958)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18tdnfsj85)
Will President Trump have to give up his tax returns?

The US Supreme Court has ruled that President Trump's financial records can be examined by prosecutors in New York. In a related case, the court ruled that this information did not have to be shared with Congress. Law professor and host of the "Passing Judgement" podcast Jessica Levinson explains the significance of these rulings. Also in the programme, pop music expert Charlie Harding discusses what we’ve been listening to during the pandemic, and what it says about how we collectively get through crises. We speak to two parents working from home on the challenges of changing career paths while stuck at home with the kids. The BBC's Sharanjit Leyl reports on Singapore’s 'pandemic' election. And we hear from some African technology entrepreneurs how their sector has actually been boosted by the pandemic.

(Picture: The US Supreme Court building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp30dxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7l5bj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpps5s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0whx)
The pastor and the prime minister

When Gábor Iványi was a young Protestant minister back in the 1970s standing up to Hungary’s totalitarian Communist regime he promised to stop shaving as a sign of protest. Communism is long gone in Hungary but Ivanyi’s beard keeps getting longer. He fought the Communists side by side with the student leader Victor Orban. He supported Orban and even accompanied him spiritually. Ivanyi is godfather to Orban’s first two children and performed the religious wedding ceremony for Orban.

But now Ivanyi has become the prime minister’s most redoubtable opponent. For Ivanyi and some other young Hungarian Christians, Orban’s Christianity means no more than ‘white Christian Europe’. Orban has taken away the state subsidy to Ivanyi’s church. The Methodist, who runs a shelter for the homeless, gypsies and migrants, was refused access to refugees when he tried to bring them food.

Other Christians publicly criticise Hungary’s interpretation of Christianity. Lutheran blogger Dóra Laborczih edits an independent blog called Christian Culture which attacks the intrusion of right-wing populism into Hungary’s religious life.

Through Ivanyi and Dora we hear how Christians in Hungary are divided on issues such as immigration and we hear from Christians who support Orban and his policies.

John Laurenson travels to Hungary where a bearded pastor with a house full of refugees and a prime minister who has just won his third consecutive general election victory are at war over the meaning of Christianity.

Image: Viktor Orban (Credit: Zoltan Mathe/EPA)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp30jnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp30ndn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7ldts)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpq0p1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp30s4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sn1hh)
Ruling on President Trump's taxes

President Trump has come under fire in the past for not making his tax returns public like his predecessors. The Supreme Court has now ruled that prosecutors in New York can have access to them, so what could that mean?

The coronavirus pandemic is gaining momentum in Africa, as we hear from John Nkengason, the director of the Africa Centre for Disease Control and Prevention.

And we speak to the man calling himself the grim reaper whose mission is to tour Florida's beaches to warn people about Covid-19.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp30wwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sn57m)
Philippines and the future of its top broadcaster

The commercial broadcaster ABS-CBN in the Philippines was ordered to close while its 25-year franchise renewal application is pending in Congress, in what is being seen as the latest attack on press freedom in the country. The committee has now started voting, we have the latest.

We're live in Singapore which is holding elections on who will form the country's next government.

And we enter the world of the new social distanced world of 'online comedy nights' where comics do routines from living rooms, kitchens, and even garden sheds.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp310n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w9m0sn8zr)
Philippines decides future of top broadcaster

Politicians in the Philippines are deciding whether to grant a new 25 year licence to ABS-CBN, which has been critical of President Rodrigo Duterte.

The killing in Ethiopia of the prominent Oromo singer Hachalu Hundesa has sparked weeks of protest, with dozens killed and thousands arrested. We have an explainer on the Oromo people, the country's largest ethnic group.

And if the lockdown has made you rethink your home environment, listen to the Prime Minister of Barbados who's offering visitors a chance to 'work at home' there instead.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp314d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxh)
Danny Danon: What will Israel do in the West Bank?

Just days ago, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict appeared to be on the brink of an historic shift. Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu seemed intent on annexing a major chunk of the occupied West Bank. Palestinians and many beyond the region warned of dire consequences. But so far it hasn’t happened. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the outgoing Israeli ambassador to the United Nations, Danny Danon. Has Prime Minister Netanyahu blinked in the face of international condemnation?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpqhnk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78h)
Trump's tax returns

The US Supreme Court has ruled that the US President's taxes cannot be withheld from a grand jury investigation - but what does it mean for his bid to keep his finances private and to get himself re-elected in November?

Ed Butler asks John Coffee, professor of law at New York's Columbia Law school, which legal team and which political party should be celebrating more over this complicated ruling.

Plus, New York Times investigative journalist Susanne Craig tells us what is already known about Mr Trump's tax affairs and the source of his wealth. And tax journalist David Cay Johnston explains why Mr Trump's finances were so little investigated before he became president.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump in the cabinet room of the White House; Credit: EPA/Samuel Corum)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv3)
The 1960s report that warned the USA was racist

In the summer of 1967 more than 100 cities in America were caught up in riots. US Senator Fred Harris urged the President, Lyndon B Johnson, to investigate the causes. He set up the Kerner Commission and appointed Fred Harris as one of 11 members to find out why America was burning. The final report shocked many Americans when it blamed white racism for creating and sustaining black ghettos. It said the US was dividing into two separate and unequal societies - one black and one white. Claire Bowes has been speaking to former US Senator Fred Harris.

Photo: Members of the Kerner Commission giving final approval to the panel's report on 28th February 1968. Senator Fred R. Harris, (D-Okla.) third from left.
Credit: Bettmann/Getty


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31849)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnw)
TikTok caught in US-China tussle

The hit video sharing platform quits operating in Hong Kong as the US considers a ban. Plus, is the threat from “deep fakes” overblown? And has the lockdown made video calling seem less awkward than it used to be? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Close-up of the TikTok icon on a smartphone screen. Credit: Reuters/ Dado Ruvic).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpqmdp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31cwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn3)
Lebanon on the brink

The financial crisis in Lebanon seems to have accelerated rapidly ever since the government defaulted on a ninety-billion-dollar loan in March.The currency has lost nearly eighty percent of its value pushing a large group of its population below the poverty line. A shortage of cash has led many to barter household goods for food on Facebook. Even the Lebanese army has stopped serving meat to its soldiers. And many of its citizen are seeking refuge abroad. At the heart of the crisis is the country’s banking sector. Protesters see it as the embodiment of a corrupt economic system that has enriched the elites who are now unwilling to foot their share of the bill. Now, compounded by the outbreak of the coronavirus, has Lebanon entered its most critical moment since the end of the civil war? As the country stares into the abyss will its disparate political groups be willing to come together to prevent a financial meltdown? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss what hope there is for Lebanon.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31hmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7m81p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpqvwy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztg7)
MLS is back, chaos in Melbourne and an unstoppable Faroese

D.C. United coach Ben Olsen talks about the return of soccer in the USA. Melbourne City's French midfielder Florin Berenguer discusses his club's efforts to get out of Melbourne before shutdown. And we hear from a 61 year old footballer from the Faroe Islands.


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31mcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh7)
Iran's female gamers

Lockdown has boosted online gaming everywhere, but when Sheida Hooshmandi of BBC Persian investigated Iran’s gaming scene she discovered a surprising number of participants are women. So what are the particular challenges for female gamers in the Islamic Republic of Iran?

ABC….
It’s as easy as ABC, but learning your alphabet is trickier in some places than others. Fifth Floor class of 2015 takes us through their ABCs.

Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine, or TCM, has seen a surge in popularity in China since the Covid-19 pandemic. Beijing recently considered making criticism of TCM a crime in the province, but this sparked a huge backlash amongst citizens. Yashan Zhao of BBC Chinese explores the differing views of TCM within China.

Singing for Oromia: Hachelu Hundessa
The killing of the Oromo singer Hachelu Hundessa in Ethiopia triggered huge ethnic unrest, killing more than 200 people. Kalkidan Yibeltal is based in Addis Ababa and explains why Hachelu meant so much to the Oromo people.

The new cyclists of Dhaka
BBC Bangla’s Rocky Shahnewaj is a keen cyclist. It’s the quickest way through Dhaka’s crowded streets, and keeps him fit. So when his social media pages started filling up with pictures of shiny new bikes in Bangladesh’s capital post coronavirus lockdown, he decided to check it out.

Image: Iranian women watching gaming on smart phone
Rights: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31r3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7mhjy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdpr3d6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31vvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lr1hj)
Explosions cut power in Iran

There have been a string of fires and explosions at sensitive locations in Iran recently. The site of the latest explosion in western Tehran has not yet been identified but there have been reported power cuts in the capital. Also: the top broadcaster in the Philippines has been refused a new licence after being forced off air in May, and Kazakhstan has become the first place to reimpose nationwide restrictions following a rise in covid cases.

(Photo: 08/07/2020 Maxar Technologies: Close-up satellite image shows Maxar imagery of the Natanz enrichment facility in Iran, July 8th 2020, that provide a clear visual of the extent of the recent explosion and fire that destroyed a building in the complex. A fire that broke out on Thursday (02/07/2020) at the key Iranian nuclear facility has caused "significant damage", a spokesman for Iran's nuclear energy body has said. He said the cause of the blaze at the Natanz enrichment site had been determined, but gave no details. The spokesman added that the destroyed machinery would eventually be replaced by more advanced equipment. The fire hit a centrifuge assembly workshop. Some Iranian officials have blamed possible cyber-sabotage. Credit: Maxar Technologies)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp31zm2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdprbwg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt2dqr1jlh)
Economic discrimination and African American poverty

We have an in-depth report examining how African American-owned assets can be undervalued. Brian Rice bought several buildings in Ensley in Birmingham, Alabama, but tells us he was refused credit to redevelop the property. Andre Perry is author of Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America's Black Cities, and argues that deliberate devaluation of black assets is a major factor holding those communities back. And Sekou Kaalund, head of bank JP Morgan Chase's Advancing Black Pathways programme explains how the bank hopes it may be able to help improve the situation. Also in the programme, the countries of the European Union are struggling to agree on how to pay for a plan to limit the economic damage caused by coronavirus. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker brings us the details of the disagreement, and Anne Mulder, member of parliament for the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy in the Netherlands discusses his country's reticence to get on board with the proposed bailout. Nominations closed this week for the next head of the World Trade Organisation, and one candidate, Kenyan lawyer and politician Amina Mohamed, tells us what attracted her to the job. Plus, as Barbados reopens to international travel this weekend, the prime minister of the island nation Mia Amor Mottley explains why they have chosen to offer international visitors the chance to work remotely from the island for up to a year.

(Picture: A mural in downtown Ensley, in Birmingham, Alabama. Picture credit: Brian Rice.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp323c6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdprgml)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp3273b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2sv8tzml55)
Coronavirus conversations: Mexican cartels

There are 280,000 coronavirus cases in Mexico - and counting. The economic shutdown to try to stop the spread has meant many people have been unable to work. We speak to the BBC's Anne Laurent, who has been looking at how the country's powerful drug cartels have been stepping in - using the pandemic to try to win support from the poor.

Also, we get your coronavirus questions answered by Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University - including the reports of an "unknown pneumonia" in Kazakhstan. Is it comparable to Covid-19 and a cause for concern?

Our Black America Speaks series on OS listened in to black-owned radio stations across the United States to find out how they were covering the killing of George Floyd and the wave of protests since. On today's edition we bring together four of the hosts from the programmes we heard. Dominique Di Prima from KJLH in Los Angeles, Perri Small from WVON in Chicago, Jerri Beasley from KCOH in Houston and Solomon Jones from WURD in Philadelphia talk about what it means to be part of a black-owned station.

Picture: A member of the Sinaloa cartel gives out supplies to people in Mexico (Credit: BBC)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp32bvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp32gll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7n70q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdprtvz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jldwzdg1m)
2020/07/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp32lbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdprym3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5w)
Could earthworms help transform the future of farming?

Worms are not the cutest of creatures. They’re slimy, often associated with death and tend to bring on feelings of disgust in many of us. But listener Dinesh thinks they’re underrated and wants to know whether earthworms could be the key to our planet’s future agricultural success? He’s an organic farmer in India’s Tamil Nadu province who grows these annelids to add to the soil, and he wants Crowdscience to find out exactly what they’re doing.

Anand Jagatia dons his gardening gloves and digs the dirt on these remarkable creatures, discovering how they can help improve soil quality, prevent fields from becoming waterlogged, and improve microbial numbers, all of which has the potential to increase crop yield.

But he also investigates the so-called ‘earthworm dilemma’ and the idea that in some parts of the world, boreal forest worms are releasing carbon back into the atmosphere, which could have dangerous consequences for climate change.

(Photo:


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp32q2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yry6lrwqf)
There have been strong reactions both inside Turkey and internationally over the decision by President Erdogan to turn one of the world's most famous buildings, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, back into a mosque.

Also in the programme: Serbia's prime minister speaks to us about the decision to abandon a weekend coronavirus curfew in Belgrade, and a controversial new flood barrier for Venice.

(Picture: supporters of Erdogan pray as they celebrate Turkey's decision that the 1,500 year old Unesco World Heritage site Hagia Sophia can be converted into a mosque. Credit: EPA/Erdem Sahin)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp32ttz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdps63c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nwgp32yl3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b7gl7nq07)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5ppxdps9vh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gxlpsp0f)
Economic discrimination and African American poverty

We have an in-depth report examining how African American-owned assets can be undervalued. Brian Rice bought several buildings in Ensley in Birmingham, Alabama, but tells us he was refused credit to redevelop the property. Andre Perry is author of Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America's Black Cities, and argues that deliberate devaluation of black assets is a major factor holding those communities back. And Sekou Kaalund, head of bank JP Morgan Chase's Advancing Black Pathways programme explains how the bank hopes it may be able to help improve the situation. Also in the programme, the countries of the European Union are struggling to agree on how to pay for a plan to limit the economic damage caused by coronavirus. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker brings us the details of the disagreement, and Anne Mulder, member of parliament for the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy in the Netherlands discusses his country's reticence to get on board with the proposed bailout. Nominations closed this week for the next head of the World Trade Organisation, and one candidate, Kenyan lawyer and politician Amina Mohamed, tells us what attracted her to the job. Plus, as Barbados reopens to international travel this weekend, the prime minister of the island nation Mia Amor Mottley explains why they have chosen to offer international visitors the chance to work remotely from the island for up to a year.

(Picture: A mural in downtown Ensley, in Birmingham, Alabama. Picture credit: Brian Rice.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 06:06 SUN (w3csz6l7)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6l8)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6l8)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6l8)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6l8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqwx3l)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqx8bz)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqxd33)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqxmlc)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqxrbh)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqxztr)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqyv1n)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqyyss)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqzb15)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqzfs9)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvm4h2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qqzt0p)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvmhqg)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qr0582)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvmr6q)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvmvyv)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvmzpz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qr0n7l)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvn767)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qr0wqv)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvngph)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qr1vpw)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xvpp4s)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qr2bpd)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpb1t8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpb5kd)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpbf1n)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpbx15)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpc0s9)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpc4jf)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpc88k)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpchrt)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5ppxdpcr82)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jh)

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Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18tdnfpmc2)

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Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snq)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv5v)

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CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv5v)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz984)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0t95)

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From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pn)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pn)

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From Our Own Correspondent 12:06 SUN (w3csz9pn)

Global Questions 06:32 SAT (w3ct0wj1)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc20)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc20)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc1)

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Heart and Soul 06:32 SUN (w3ct0w59)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0w59)

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In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbd)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbd)

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James Naughtie’s Letter to America 05:50 SAT (w3ct0whj)

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Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3v)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3v)

Miriam and Youssef 08:06 SUN (w3ct0sy0)

More or Less 23:50 SAT (w3ct0pxh)

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More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pxh)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6t0)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2w9m0s8fw3)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4g)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0k)

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Spitfire: The People’s Plane 09:32 SAT (w3ct0t1p)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 04:32 SUN (w3ct0t1p)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 22:32 SUN (w3ct0t1p)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jldwz0vf7)

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Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh51)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3btyjfvxzd)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3l66k8tg96)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l66k8xlpk)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhjb)

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The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3csxfjk)

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The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct0wht)

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The Conversation 07:32 SUN (w3csynj6)

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The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8f)

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The Documentary 11:32 SAT (w3ct0w55)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq1)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvk)

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