Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 JUNE 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gj9f72)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18sp3tb3yl)
Facebook will label 'harmful' posts as Coca-Cola and Unilever join advertising boycott

Facebook has come under growing pressure to improve the moderation of users' posts. Coca-Cola and Unilever, maker of Marmite and Dove soap, have joined more than 90 other companies which have removed their adverts from the site. Arisha Hatch is from Color of Change, which campaigns for racial justice in the US. We ask her about Facebook's changed policy.
Texas and Florida have reimposed some coronavirus-related restrictions. We get the latest from reporter Andrea Perdomo in Florida.
And as the British government announces more countries that people may travel to in the summer, how will the tourism industry adapt? We hear from travel journalist Sarah Tucker.
Rob Young is joined throughout the programme by Sharon Bretkelly, presenter of the Detail podcast for Radio New Zealand, in Auckland.

(Picture: A Coca-Cola bottle. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03k7hj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m3s0y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq7lrx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhj9)
Cricket's return on Covid-19 knife edge

As 10 Pakistan players test positive for Covid-19, can their tour of England really go ahead?

Plus, the damaging effects of the coronavirus shutdown on recreational cricket in England.

And an interview with England head coach Lisa Keightley as she plots their defence of the Women's World Cup in New Zealand next year.

Photo: A cricket fan in Karachi (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03kc7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh5)
Filming from behind 5 layers

India's financial capital Mumbai is its worst affected city with 70,000 confirmed Covid-19 infections and more than 5,000 deaths. BBC Marathi's Mayuresh Konnur filmed doctors and nurses in The King Edward Memorial hospital ICU to find out how they are coping. It was a challenging story to report.

My Home Town: Eldoret
BBC Swahili’s Beryl Munoko shares memories of her home town in western Kenya.

The price of mocking Myanmar’s military
Last year members of a satirical drama group, the Peacock Generation were jailed for mocking the military, and still face additional charges. They were performing "thangyat”, a mix of poetry, dance and song traditionally used to criticise those in authority. Soe Win Than of BBC Burmese explains why this one fell foul of the government.

Salisbury poisonings remembered
A recent BBC series dramatized the nerve agent poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal in 2018. Watching it brought back memories for BBC Russian’s Olga Ivshina, one of the first journalists on the scene in Salisbury.

The political power of K-pop fans
K-pop fans have been making headlines with their political activism. They've been involved in both the Black Lives Matter campaign and President Trump's rally in Tulsa, where they registered for tickets with no intention of attending, contributing to an embarrassing number of empty seats. David Cann of BBC Korean has been looking into K-pop activism.

Image: Mayuresh Konnur wears full PPE to film in ICU Covid ward
Credit: BBC, Sharad Badhe


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv1)
Russia’s bitter taste of capitalism

Chaos and hardship hit Russia with the rapid market reforms in early 1992, just weeks after the collapse of the USSR. In 2018 Dina Newman spoke to one of the architects of this “shock therapy” - Andrei Nechaev, who was then the Minister for Economic Development.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Old women selling cigarettes on the streets of Moscow in 1992. Credit: BBC.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03kgzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn1)
How will Covid-19 change our cities?

So far, people in cities have borne the brunt of Covid-19. Coronavirus thrives when humans interact in shared spaces where infections are easily transmitted. Because of this, many column inches have been dedicated to predicting the demise of urban living and a revival of suburbs, towns and villages. But the fact remains the majority of us live in urban settings and people will need to keep seeking out the economic and social opportunities that cities provide. So, if cities are here to stay, how will coronavirus change them? Some aspects of city living that came in for criticism before the virus now seem unviable. Urban density was already a problem with so much cramped and scarce housing. Now, for many, it’s intolerable. Long commutes on dirty, crowded public transport will no longer do. Cars, roads and parking lots claiming vast outdoor areas no longer makes sense if we are to spend more time outdoors. And, in developing world cities, how much longer can poor sanitation and lack of running water be ignored when neglecting basic infrastructure will likely lead to new deadly outbreaks? Policy makers have, in the past, flirted with tackling the big problems in cities - but these problems haven’t gone away. So in the end, will the pandemic force drastic changes to urban design? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03klqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m448b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq7z09)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvrw)
The scammers promising poison on Facebook

They seem to be selling a deadly chemical, and have no qualms about offering it to people who may be at risk of suicide. But is their business what it seems - or just an elaborate scam?

A Trending investigation has uncovered dozens of pages claiming to sell a highly toxic substance that, in many countries, cannot be bought without a licence.

While the substance has some industrial uses, the supposed sellers running these pages have their eyes on a different type of customer: someone looking online for a way to take their own life.

Facebook says it won’t allow content on their platform that encourages suicide – yet some of these pages have been running for several years.

Experts say they are a scam – but how exactly does it work? We went undercover to investigate the shadowy pages peddling deadly poison.

If you are affected by the issues in this programme, you can find information about support organisations on the Befrienders Worldwide website: https://www.befrienders.org/

Presenter: Marco Silva

(Photo caption: illustration of a smartphone showing a bottle of poison containing Facebook logos/ Photo credit: BBC)


SAT 05:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjj)
Inequality makes us anxious

Inequality makes people anxious. How? Well, according to Kate Pickett – co-author of The Inner Level – in unequal societies we become more conscious of our position in society, more aware of our status. That creates anxiety. And that in turn is linked to all sorts of bad outcomes, such as obesity, lower life-expectancy, and higher levels of teenage pregnancy. It’s also linked, claims Professor Pickett, to consumerism. In unequal societies, she says, we’re more likely to want the branded watch or handbag. Then, as you’ll hear, there’s the weird connection between inequality and female attraction to men….

Presented by David Edmonds
Produced by Ben Cooper

Image: John Cleese, Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett in the Class Sketch from Frost Over England, 1967 (Credit: BBC)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03kqh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Evidence (w3ct0whg)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Covid 19: vaccines and after lockdown

Claudia Hammond and a panel of international experts look at the latest research into Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which is sweeping through the world.

We look at vaccines to stop the spread of the coronavirus. And as travel opens up in many countries and visiting family and friends is allowed, how do we navigate this new world while avoiding catching the virus.

On the panel are Dr George Hu, clinical psychologist & Section Chief of Mental Health at Shanghai United Family Pudong Hospital in China, Vaccine expert - Professor Gagandeep Kang Executive Director of the Translational Health Science Technology Institute in Faridabad India, Dr Jenny Rohn is an expert in microbiology and viruses at University College London and Dr Margaret Harris, a Spokesperson at the World Health Organisation.

The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection.
Producers: Geraldine Fitzgerald and Caroline Steel
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: Young couple on date in time of virus pandemic, Credit: urbazon/Getty Images


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03kv75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snp)
Why is my manager useless?

On Business Weekly we’ll be asking why the boss is often the least skilled person in the room. Are incompetent people put into middle management to get them out of the way - or are they just more confident than their more proficient peers? We’ll also be looking at the future of meat and asking whether China will turn its back on pork and embrace plant-based alternatives. And we’ll hear from the pilots who have swapped aviation for empathy. Presented by Lucy Burton.

(Picture: Woman balancing pencil between her nose & mouth, Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03kyz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pm)
A Covid-19 spike in Germany

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

Germany was recently praised for its handling of the coronavirus outbreak and its relatively low number of deaths. Now a slaughterhouse in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia is at the centre of new cases. As Damian McGuinness reports, two districts have had to re-enter lockdown, putting the lives of more than half a million people on hold once more. So is this the start of a second wave or something to be expected as we learn to live with the virus?

The killing of George Floyd in the US has resonated strongly with indigenous Australians, who often face prejudicial policing themselves, and make up an unequal number of Australia’s prison population. Shaimaa Khalil met members of the Aboriginal community in Sydney.

Last week, Indian officials reported that at least 20 of their soldiers were killed in a clash with Chinese forces in a disputed Himalayan border area. The incident follows rising tensions over the Line of Actual Control, but is the first deadly conflict there for at least 45 years. India’s external affairs ministry accused China of breaking an agreement recently made to respect the border in Galwan Valley. Michelle Jana Chan has seen the natural wonders the area offers but says tensions threaten this once more.

Key workers have been expected to keep much of their working life the same throughout the coronavirus pandemic – albeit a more distanced and masked existence. They’ve worked to provide vital healthcare, make sure food has been available and many correspondents have had permission from their governments to continue reporting. Jean Mackenzie, who is normally based in Brussels, now sees airports and flying in a different light.


Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: Employees of abattoir company Toennies in quarantine at their residential homes. Credit: Ina Fassbender/AFP/via Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq8b7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3t)
The drag king

“I can be whoever I want to be.” Bidisha is a singer and she performs as a Persian prince called Badshah. “Drag is about breaking apart norms”, she says.
And we catch-up with male belly dancer, Eshan Hilal (Season 1, Episode 1).
Bidisha Mohanta and Eshan talk about sexuality and attitudes to being gay in India.
Send us your stories: myindianlife@bbc.com
Let us know what you think: #MyIndianLife
Watch our video of Eshan: https://bbc.in/2RreFqv


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7c)
Resolves

Olympic Gold Medallist Sally Gunnell

Olympic Gold medallist Sally Gunnell, renowned for her 400 metre win in Barcelona, resolves to bring about more kindness - towards herself and to others.
“I’ve had to move from being quite a selfish person as an athlete where everyone around me was thinking about what I’d had to eat, what massage I needed; everyone was running around me…and in the last few months of lockdown, I’ve been thinking about the adjustments that I needed to make to move from that and to reflect on what being kind really means”.

Gunnell shares some of her insider experience of how to make real change; the importance of a few minutes of concentration each day to allow the imagination to create the scenarios that will come about.

(Photo: Sally Gunnell of Great Britain celebrates after winning the Womens 400m Olympic Hurdles Final, 1992 . Credit: John Stillwell/ Press Association)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03l2qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m4m7v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq8fzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Trending (w3cszvrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4f)
Casting an eye to the future with Rethink

How is the BBC World Service addressing our new reality in the wake of Covid? We look at the new Rethink season casting an eye to the future.

Listeners ask why after eight years - and 400 shows - is Boston no longer Calling?

And our digital doctor is back to answer more of your online dilemmas.

Presented by Rajan Datar.
Produced by Howard Shannon.


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03l6gk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3btl842sck)
Premier League dreams come true after 30 years of waiting

Liverpool and the end of their long wait for the Premier League title - For some Liverpool fans, seeing their side end a thirty year wait to be crowned English Champions was bittersweet as they had loved ones who didn't live to see it. Mark McVeigh joins us to talk about his son Owen, who died of leukaemia at the age of eleven. Father and son travelled home and away together to watch Liverpool and there's a flag in Owen's honour on the Kop. Mark admits its been an emotional time and he also tells us about the Owen McVeigh foundation, which works with children suffering from Cancer. We're also joined by the Mayor of Liverpool - Joe Anderson - who tells us the club will have a title parade when the time is right.

Terry Willis is walking from his home in Alabama to the scene of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis for "change, justice and equality". Willis tells us what happened to Floyd could have happened to him. While, Tamara Moore, who is the only female coach of a men's college basketball team in America, was so inspired by Terry's story that she contacted the BBC World Service. She's since grown close to Terry's family and has even dubbed him the "Black Forrest Gump". They come together to chat about what needs to change in America and how sport can help lead that change.

Could Major League Soccer stars refuse to play to force social change? - Chicago Fire forward CJ Sapong joins us to talk about the recently formed Black Players Coalition of MLS. Sapong is a board member and says: "If we are using our platforms to bring awareness to these social injustices but then get on the field and continue to play, have we really provided any change?".

Sleeping in the back of a van and trying to find her form after injury - Golfer Sophie Powell joins us to discuss playing in the Rose Ladies Series. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, Powell has been sleeping on a blow up mattress in the back of a borrowed van ahead of playing at each venue. She also tells us how falling out of a moving golf buggy cost her two years of her career.

The FA Cup returns without fans - Due to the covid-19 pandemic the FA Cup will be played behind closed-doors this week. Jack Dormer and Alex Rowe had previously been to a game in every round of the competition. They started in the very first preliminary rounds, which were almost a year ago and then followed the winning team in each game until they get knocked out. They then followed the team that beat them. They tell us about their experiences and how they're getting their FA Cup fix this week.

And in Sporting Witness, we go back to 2004, when the first All Star Cheerleading world championships were held at the Disney resort in Florida. It was a big moment for a new sport which is about demanding group routines featuring coordinated tumbles and stunts rather than supporting a sports team from the sidelines. Ambrel Brannon, one of the first cheerleading world champions, tells us about a sport that’s becoming increasingly popular around the world.

Image: Liverpool fans celebrate winning their first ever Premier League title. (Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03lb6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m4vr3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq8ph2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj0)
Global Questions

Information Disorder: Who Can You Trust?

As coronavirus spread around the world so did a wave of misinformation about it. From untested home remedies to misleading videos adding confusion and concern about what can and can’t be trusted. Platforms such as Facebook and Google have, for the first time, taken a tougher stance on what is shared online. But is it up to them and are they doing enough? Political rumours, propaganda and conspiracy theories are nothing new particularly on social media – but how far does the disordering of information go in misleading the public and undermining democracy and governments?

Panel:-
Professor Rasmus Nielson, Director of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University
Jevin West, Director of the Centre For An Informed Public at the University of Washington and co-author of the book The Art of Scepticism in a Data-Driven World.

Presented by Zeinab Badawi.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03lfyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6sz)
Fascinations with the future, hosted by Rvdical the Kid

This week, Music Life brings together four of the best West African young producers and trend setters for the first time.

Rvdical the Kid is from Nigeria and Ghana, raised in Benin, before moving to Accra. In 2015 he released the genre-defining album Carte Blanche, and is due to follow it up later this year.

Joining him is Gafacci, one of the most exciting Ghanaian music producers, DJs, and songwriters right now. Club nights and publications around the world are spreading his name, so keep your ears on him. He’s worked with homegrown and international artistes such as Sarkodie, Samini, Bryte, Mina, Famous Eno, and Fever Ray.

Ria Boss is a Ghanaian-Burkinabe singer songwriter, also based in Accra. Her debut EP, Find Your Free, is a compilation of healing songs she wrote to help get her through her rough battle with depression, identity issues, and quest for self-love. She also released the #THANKGODITSRIA series in which she released 11 EPs in 11 weeks.

And finally, Keyzuz is a DJ and producer who has shaped her creative identity around being a nonconformist, an artist who pushes the boundaries of her expression both aurally and visually. She’s originally from Ghana and is now based in America.

They’ll be discussing elements that repeat in the music process, how much of the artists’ work is intentional, and how they deal with imposter syndrome (a very common syndrome amongst musicians).


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gjbw5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz8jft)
India Covid-19 cases passes half a million

India's prime minister has defended his handling of the coronavirus crisis -- as the number of confirmed cases passes half a million..

Also in the programme: How a worsening of relations with Israel is affecting the health of Palestinians; and Ireland's new government brings together two old political foes.

(Photo: Maharashtra state in India - testing centre. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03lpg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l66k854yj)
Liverpool are Premier League champions

As Liverpool win their first Premier League title for 30 years, Sportsworld gets all the reaction from around the world to their record breaking victory. We'll be chatting with the Sportsworld panel, Anita Asante, José Fonte and Benni McCarthy. Plus we'll hear from former goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar, who won the top flight title with Liverpool 30 years ago, as well as former Liverpool defender Stéphane Henchoz, about what this first title in three decades means to Liverpool.

And it's the final day of the German Bundesliga, we'll have all the updates from the last day of the season.

Plus, the FA Cup returns. We'll be discussing all the weekend's fixtures.

Photo credit: Liverpool fans celebrate their title victory outside Anfield (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03m5fl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m5pz0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq9jpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Over to You (w3cszf4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03m95q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The World Debate (w3ct0whb)
The Engineers: Re-engineering the Future

All over the world engineers are being called on to re-purpose and solve the problems the global pandemic creates. We bring together an audience of engineers and the general public from six continents to share insights to inspire innovation worldwide.

How are engineers reinventing our world to fight the virus? What can they do to re-imagine the everyday and make life safer and easier across the globe?

Presenter Kevin Fong is joined by a panel of four leading engineers from around the world who respond to questions, comments and first-hand accounts from a global audience linked by Zoom.

The panel:
Luke Leung: Director of Sustainability at international architecture and engineering firm SOM
Linda Miller: Transport infrastructure engineer at the major engineering and construction firm Bechtel
Rebecca Shipley: Director of UCL’s Institute for Healthcare Engineering
Carlo Ratti: Director of MIT’s Senseable Lab

This is a special edition of an annual event series staged in partnership with the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851.

Sound Engineer: Lee Chaundy
Producer: Charlie Taylor

(Photo: Coronavirus, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03mdxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2y)
Actor, writer and director, Michaela Coel

This week on The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi: actor, writer and director Michaela Coel on the effects of social media on the millennial generation; Armando Iannuccci, director of The Personal History of David Copperfield, on colour blind casting; plus Bollywood journalists Nayandeep Rakshit and Justin Rao, and You Tuber Prajakta Koli, on power shifts in the world of Hindi film publicity.

American actor and activist Rose McGowan reveals the tactics she used to campaign for change in Hollywood and Afro R&B Fusion singer Rebecca Winter talks about making connections with influential people and with African music.

Joining Nikki to discuss the week’s cultural highlights are film critic Rhianna Dhillon and Kevin Kwan, creator of the `Crazy Rich Asians` trilogy, whose new novel is called Sex and Vanity

(Photo: Michaela Coel. Credit: BBC/Various Artists Ltd and FALKNA/Natalie Seery)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03mjnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz9hdv)
Florida sees new record in COVID-19 infections

Florida has recorded almost 10,000 new COVID-19 cases – a new record for the US state – as an increasing number of states count the human cost of trying to reopen their economies in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. The mayor of Miami, Francis Suarez, says people must now wear masks.


Also in the programme: the opposition candidate in Malawi's presidential election is on course for a strong victory, a year after massive fraud denied him a win in the original vote; and record high temperatures in the Arctic Circle.

Photo: A couple embrace each other as they walk on Ocean Drive in Miami Beach, Florida. Young adults in Florida are fuelling fears of a dangerous rise in COVID-19 infections Credit: CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03mnf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqb0ph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Outlook (w3cszdzx)
Husband for Hire

Would you hire someone to impersonate one of your relatives? Yuichi Ishii is a former actor who runs Family Romance, a 'family rental' business in Japan. He pretends to be people's fathers, husbands and ex-lovers. Over nine years, he's played spouse to a hundred women and organised 8,000 fake weddings. But, it's an ethical minefield when you're living a lie. This programme was first broadcast on 11th August 2018.

Image: Japanese anime fan poses with his virtual reality wife
Credit: Getty Images

Presenter: Saskia Edwards
Producer: Maryam Maruf


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ms57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6csb2gfh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqb4fm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70r)
Last call

After almost eight years on the air, and more than 400 episodes, this is the final episode of Boston Calling with Marco Werman. We have three unforgettable stories that touch on some of the central themes of the program: justice and race, the environment and immigration. We have some heartfelt messages to share from some of our fans from around the globe, and also Marco’s parting words to the loyal listeners of Boston Calling.
Image: Host Marco Werman high-fives a fourth-grader at Curtis Guild Elementary School in east Boston (Credit: Steven Davy/The World)



SUNDAY 28 JUNE 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr678gw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnt)
Apple ditches Intel chips

The tech giant tells developers future Macs will use Apple-designed chips as found in the iPad and iPhone. Plus, as shops reopen after lockdowns, how can tech make physical shopping safer and more pleasant? And CEO of Slack, Stewart Butterfield, talks to us about communication between businesses, and how President Trump’s ban on work visas will hurt Silicon Valley. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Apple CEO Tim Cook gives the keynote address at the 2020 Worldwide Developers’ Conference WWDC, Credit: EPA/ BROOKS KRAFT/ APPLE).


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtyv4d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03n4dm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m6ny1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqbhp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1n)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Faster and higher

It wasn’t just Spitfire production that needed to escape the bombs; the designers of the plane also need to find a safe place to improve the Spitfire to deal with Germany’s latest fighter developments.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr678qc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w3h)
Coronavirus: The economic shock

In a few short months the, Covid-19 virus has turned the world upside down. Alongside the tragedy of hundreds of thousands of deaths, the world is now bracing itself for a brutal economic impact. Globalisation enables unprecedented worldwide growth, and has lifted millions of out of poverty. It has created a network of economic relationships which enable economic co-operation on a scale never before possible. But in the midst of the punishing realities of the coronavirus crisis, we find that social, political and economic systems do not always work as intended. Hard-wired interdependency looks like chronic vulnerability, and when push comes to shove, nations look after themselves. But is this what is needed?

Whether it is components for manufacturing, our food and medical supplies, or the contents of our shop shelves and our fridges, we depend on complex global economic relationships which now look shakier than ever.

The BBC’s business editor Simon Jack talks to some of the world’s most influential economic and business thinkers - global innovators - on how they think the Covid crisis is changing the worldwide business and economic landscape, and what they think the world might be like when the crisis is over.

Producer: Kirsty MacKenzie

Image: People wearing masks as they head to work in Beijing's central business district (Credit: Thomas Peter/Reuters)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr678v3d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtz6cs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03nhn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m715f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqbvxd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8d)
Sharona Franklin: Making art accessible for all

Sharona Franklin’s jelly sculptures may look delicious but they are grand artworks that she makes to tackle her experience of the world as a disabled person. Confronting the fragility of the human body, and the complicated relationship she has with biopharmaceuticals and medicines, her work is made from her small home in Vancouver, where she feels safe to explore, make and rest her body as much as she needs - essential for her health, but all too often ignored by arts institutions. She talks to the Cultural Frontline about her work, and some of the barriers she faces as a disabled artist.

From his studio in Lagos Nigeria, renowned singer-songwriter and UNICEF ambassador Cobhams Asuquo tells us how his blindness contributes to his heightened sense of musicality, and how he overcame widespread prejudices in the music industry to become a household name.

Can we make arts truly accessible for all? As much of the world faced lockdown as a result of Covid 19 and people began to talk about the difficulties of not being able to visit museums, theatres and exhibitions, many disabled people have taken this moment to highlight that they have never been able to access these spaces due to their needs being continually ignored. Two disabled artists, Bella Milroy and Diana Niepce, talk to the Cultural Frontline about their experiences of inaccessibility in the arts world, and what needs to change.

Performing Ben E. King’s iconic song Stand by Me, a group of disabled artists from 15 countries have come together virtually to record a music video as part of the True Colours Festival. Raising awareness of how disabled people have been affected by the pandemic, we hear from two performers in Singapore and Australia about why they want to be involved.

Presented by Kat Hawkins

(Photo: Sharona Franklin)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr6792ln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0j)
Why do we need to talk about men?

Many men believe their gender is under siege from a welter of criticism about male attitudes and behaviours. Not everyone accepts the idea of a masculinity crisis, but this programme looks at the concept of the “man box” – a set of attitudes and assumptions which many males struggle to deal with. Artist Grayson Perry joins the discussion.

Presenter: Michael Blastland
Producer: Anna Meisel
Editor: Andy Smith


(Photo: James Mace, Barber. Credit: Ian Burt)


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtzfw1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 06:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxg)
A new Covid-19 drug and a second wave

The steroid Dexamethasone has been hailed a “major breakthrough” in the treatment of Covid-19. But what does the data say? Plus, why haven’t mass protests led to a second wave?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producers: Ruth Alexander and Kate Lamble

(close-up of a bottle and tablets of Dexamethasone June 16, 2020 London UK / Credit:John Phillips/Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr6796bs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzd)
Coronavirus Conversations: What next?

As part of the BBC's Rethink series, we are asking people to share their thoughts about how Covid-19 might change the world. We hear from listeners and health experts in Ghana, the US, Canada, China, Switzerland and Italy about life in a post-pandemic world.

(Photo Matilda Agamu in Ghana. Credit: Matilda Agamu)


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtzkm5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 Global Questions (w3ct0wj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr679b2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxz)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 9. Death of a Village

The epic drama series continues. 1948. Miriam and Youssef try to hold on to their ideals of peace as violence erupts following the UN vote for the partition of Palestine, and Deir Yassin comes under attack.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST
Miriam: Shani Erez
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Zahra: Lara Sawalha
Musa Alami: Sargon Yelda
Mohammed: Ramzi Dehani
The Haganath Major: Clive Hayward
Other parts: Hasan Dixon, Steve Waters and members of the cast

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtzpc9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq0)
Is lockdown good news for fish?

The fishing industry has been brought to its knees in some countries, with Covid-19 forcing fishing to stop.
Graihagh Jackson asks if the global slowdown could present an opportunity for beleaguered fish stocks to flourish once more and what would it mean for the fishing industry.

If you would like to get in touch please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

(Picture: Fisherman holds fish on trawler. Credit: Chris Furlong/Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03nzmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m7j4y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqcbwx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr679kl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 BBC OS (w172x2th8k49jjz)
BBC OS Conversations: Women rethinking the world

The impact of the coronavirus pandemic and the race protests continues to be felt globally. Nuala McGovern will be hosting a conversation with young women around the world about how they see their lives changing during this time.

The conversation will be responding to comments and analysis resulting from a 24-hour global discussion, being hosted this weekend by the Women of the World Foundation. There is concern the impact worldwide of Covid 19 is leaving many women in a worse situation. Many are facing greater challenges with their careers, well-being, caring responsibilities and some with their personal safety. The concern has prompted a global conversation about where women find themselves in the new world that we are living in.

(Photo: Basi Letebele and her daughter in Pretoria, South Africa. Credit: Basi Letebele)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03p73s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m7rn6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqcld5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w56)
The paddle-out

The sight of dozens of surfers circled together and floating beyond the breakwater will always mean one thing - that another surfer has died. A paddle-out is a way of honouring someone who’s had a love for the ocean. It’s a practice which has become entwined with surf’s cherished culture.

On the coast of Cornwall we meet a gathering of surfers who have come to pay homage to their friend Riccardo, who has recently died from cancer. We join them as they prepare to paddle out with flowers around their necks. They join hands in the water and share stories, memories and songs.

Big wave rider Clyde Aikau, brother to legendary surfer Eddie Aikau, describes the first ever paddle out in 1978, when his brother was lost at sea and drowned. After Eddie died, thousands of people gathered to paddle out from his favourite surf spot at Waimea Bay to celebrate him. It was a defining moment, and surfers around the world still paddle out to mark the anniversary of Eddie’s death each year.

In Cape Town, we also hear the voice of Mikhail Thompson, a surfer and mentor who has administered a number of paddle-out ceremonies during his lifetime. He describes the profoundly spiritual experience of surfing waves, and how losing someone from the close-knit surfer community leaves a void. And we hear him reflect on a special moment in the paddle-out ceremony, when the whole party erupts in hoots and cheers, splashing the water and throwing flowers into the air.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon

Image: Riccardo (Credit: Salvador) and Eddie Aikau (Courtesy of the Eddie Aikau Foundation, Credit: David Bettencourt)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr679t2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The World Debate (w3ct0whb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gjfs2q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzcfbx)
Lazarus Chakwera sworn in as Malawi president after historic win

The new president of Malawi, Lazarus Chakwera, says his victory in a re-run poll meant that justice, democracy and the will of the people have been respected. Malawians, he said, had set an example to the world.

Also in the programme: The case of George Floyd prompts demands in India for action over police brutality there; and one of Italy's greatest collections of Renaissance masterpieces ventures onto TikTok.

(Photo: Lazarus Chakwera's political fortunes were revived by a court ruling that annulled last year's flawed election. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67b1kp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67b59t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Evidence (w3ct0whg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67b91y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l66k889bw)
Live FA Cup commentary

The FA Cup is back and Sportsworld will bring you live commentary of Leicester City against Chelsea. Plus, we'll have all the updates from the early game between Sheffield United and Arsenal and build up to the late kick off between Newcastle United and Manchester City.

The 2023 Women's World Cup will take place in Australia and New Zealand, we'll be finding out more about how the bid was won and what we can expect from the tournament. And F1 is set to return next weekend in Austria, we'll be finding out the latest on how it will proceed.

Photo credit: Leicester City boss Brendan Rodgers and Chelsea manager Frank Lampard during the last meeting of the two teams (Getty Images).


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03q62t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m8qm7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqdkc6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8v)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Actor Stanley Tucci imagines the story of modern California as a movie screenplay, tracing the dramatic history of the state from Hollywood to Silicon Valley.
In this episode, he tells the story of celebrity revivalist preacher Aimee Semple McPherson who vanished one day in 1926. And he remembers Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American to win an Oscar in 1940, criticised by civil rights groups for her role in Gone With The Wind.

Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester
Producer: Laurence Grissell


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67bs1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6sz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gjgr1r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzdd9y)
Arizona doctor: "Everyone's feeling exhausted"

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases around the world has passed the milestone of 10 million, according to Johns Hopkins University in the US. Infections continue to rise in several southern and western states in the US, mostly those that had eased restrictions. An ER doctor in Arizona tells us hospitals are struggling to cope with the surge of patients.

Also in the programme: The huge cloud of dust being blown across the Atlantic from the Sahara; and the new president of Malawi, Lazarus Chakwera, tell us justice and democracy have prevailed after he defeated the incumbent in a re-run election.

(Image: A doctor performs a test for coronavirus in Tolleson, Arizona. Credit: REUTERS/Courtney Pedroza)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr67c0jq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xv1ct3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03qp2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6csb5cbl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqf1bq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]



MONDAY 29 JUNE 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03qxkl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57n3lrvx8s)
Egypt: Coronavirus and coffee

Coffee bean imports have grown threefold since the Arab spring in 2011 as young and aspirational Egyptians embrace artisanal and speciality coffee - and a devalued currency has made instant coffee products less affordable. Our reporter Mohamed El Aassar has been finding out more from local baristas and roasters. Also France and the US report surges in their numbers of new confirmed coronavirus cases. We speak to Margot Haddad, Paris-based news anchor, on how the pandemic may have affected turnout in the country's second round of local elections. And Michael Hughes explains which countries might replace China in the world's supply chain.


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqf8tz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03r19q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xff39)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqfdl3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5t)
What’s the point of blood types?

If you put one person’s blood into another person , sometimes it’s fine and sometimes it’s a death sentence.

French physician Jean-Baptiste Denis discovered this when he performed the first blood transfusion back in 1667. He put the blood of a lamb into a 15-year boy. The teenager survived but Denis’s third attempt killed the patient and led to a murder charge.

In 1900, Austrian doctor Karl Landsteiner discovered the reason for this lottery – blood types. The red blood cells in our bodies are decorated with different marker molecules called antigens. These define us as A, B, AB or O blood type. And this is just one of 38 different systems for classifying our blood. CrowdScience listeners have discovered that we aren’t the only animal with blood types and want to know more.

Dogs have 12 different blood groups, so how do they cope when they need a transfusion? CrowdScience meets some very good dogs who donate a pint to the pet blood bank in return for a toy and a treat. Each pint saving up to 4 other dogs’ lives.

We also hear how examining our blood types can tell us more about our links to our ape-like cousins and how the human species spread around the world. And what about the future of blood types – can we use science, and animal blood to get around the problems of transfusions?

Producer and Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Photo: Red Blood Cells. Credit: Getty Images


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03r51v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvj)
Silk routes: 2000 years of trading

China, Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, Uzbekistan and India: if you went to any of these places a thousand years ago, you would find goods and produce from the others. But how did they get there and why? This week’s Forum explores the ancient pattern of trading networks which criss-crossed the plains, deserts and mountains of China, Central Asia and points further West, and which encouraged not just the exchange of commodities such as silk, paper and horses but ideas and people too.
Bridget Kendall talks to Valerie Hansen, professor of history at Yale University who has a particular interest in trade and exchanges across Eurasia; historian Dr. Susan Whitfield, former curator of the Central Asian collections at the British Library in London; and Tamara Chin, professor of comparative literature at Brown University whose work focuses on ancient China.

(Photo: A man rides a horse at Band-e-Amir lake, central Afghanistan, on a former Silk Route that once linked China with Central Asia and beyond. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh50)
Cheerleading's first World Championships

In 2004 the first Cheerleading World Championships, or Worlds, were held at the Walt Disney World resort in Florida. It was a big moment for All Star Cheer – a new sport made up of demanding group routines of coordinated tumbles and stunts, rather than supporting a sports team from the sidelines. Lucy Burns talks to Ambrel Brannon, a member of the winning Cheer Athletics senior girls' squad, about a sport that’s becoming increasingly popular around the world.

PICTURE: A cheerleader is thrown in the air (Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03r8sz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xfnlk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqfn2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Why Factor (w3csyv0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 04:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:50 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03rdk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgh988)
Covid-19 death toll hits 500,000 worldwide

Half a million people have now died in the coronavirus epidemic - we'll hear from two countries where rates are still rising - the US and India; an exclusive interview with Rachael Denhollander - one of at least 250 young women who was abused by a US gymanstics team doctor; and we'll hear why campaigners are urging Australia to do more to help asylum seekers cope with financial pressures during the Covid-19 pandemic.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03rj97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rghf0d)
Coronavirus: death toll hits 500,000 worldwide

Half a million people have now died in the coronavirus epidemic - we'll hear from the US state of Arizona where rates are still rising; why the coronavirus pandemic is helping the resurgence of Islamic State in Syria and Iraq causing fear in the detention camps holding IS families; and France's Green party and its left-wing allies have made significant gains in a second round of local elections.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03rn1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rghjrj)
Covid-19 deaths worldwide passes half a million

Half a million people have now died in the coronavirus epidemic - we'll hear from the US state of California where rates are rising so quickly that the authorities have ordered the shutdown of bars in Los Angeles; has the coronavirus pandemic reduced attention on other important public health challenges such as HIV/ Aids? We'll hear from one specialist who thinks it has; and France's Green party and its left-wing allies have made significant gains in a second round of local elections.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03rrsh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1z)
Armando Iannucci: Is this a bad time to be funny?

It’s the job of the professional satirist to find the funny and expose the absurd in humanity’s most serious endeavours. But are there times when satire just doesn’t work, and is now one of them? Should we be laughing at Covid-19, or at racial discrimination? Stephen Sackur speaks to Armando Iannucci, a hugely successful writer and director of comedy on TV and film, whose credits include Veep, In the Loop and The Death of Stalin. Is there ever a bad time and place to be funny?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqg41w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jg)
The billionaire and the pandemic

Mohamed Mansour is a household name in Egypt. The billionaire head of the multinational conglomerate Mansour Group has been involved in business and politics in Egypt and abroad for decades, as the BBC’s Mohamed El Aassar explains. Mansour himself sat down to speak with Manuela Saragosa about globalisation, the long-term impact of coronavirus and donating to the UK conservative party.

(Picture: Mohamed Mansour. Picture credit: Mansour Group.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk1)
Jana Andolan – Nepal’s people power movement

A people’s movement called Jana Andolan brought an end to Nepal’s absolute monarchy in the spring of 1990. Political parties worked together with students, workers and civil society groups to organise strikes and street protests – but although the king eventually agreed to their demands, it was the beginning of a long period of political instability. Lucy Burns speaks to activist and writer Devendra Raj Pandey about his memories of the first Jana Andolan.

PHOTO: Jubilant protesters take to the streets on April 9, 1990 in Kathmandu after the government announced an end to the 30-year ban on multi-political parties. (DOUGLAS CURRAN/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03rwjm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqg7t0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03s08r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct0vzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqgck4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03s40w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xghtg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqgh98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3csynj6)
The beauty of ageing

How to subvert the negative stereotypes about older women? Kim Chakanetsa brings together two women - both in their late 70s - to discuss how to grow older with purpose, passion, and a certain playfulness.

Chilean author Isabel Allende is one of the most acclaimed writers in the world. Her novels, which draw on her own eventful life, tell stories of love, exile and loss, and have sold more than 70 million copies and have been translated from Spanish into 42 languages. Now aged 76, she has spoken openly about how to live passionately at any age.

Also aged 76, Lynne Segal is a British-based feminist academic who has grappled with the paradoxes, struggles and advantages of ageing in her book, 'Out of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Ageing'. Originally from Australia, Lynne is also a seasoned feminist and social activist and is Professor of Psychology and Gender Studies at Birkbeck College, London.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service.

Image:
(L) Lynne Segal (credit Andy Hall/Getty Images)
(R) Isabel Allende (credit Lori Barra)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03s7s0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd36)
I played violin during my brain surgery

In January 2020, Dagmar Turner was woken up in the middle of her brain surgery and handed a violin. It was her idea. She was an amateur but committed violinist and was willing to go to drastic lengths to keep playing the instrument. Dagmar had been diagnosed with a brain tumour in her right frontal lobe. It was dangerously close to areas of her brain that were responsible for coordinating delicate movements in her left hand - essential for her musical talent. So she sought the help of Dr Keyoumars Ashkan – he was a respected neurosurgeon but also an accomplished musician, so he understood her love of music. Dr Ashkan agreed to perform an incredibly rare procedure where Dagmar would play the violin during surgery so that he and his team could remove only brain tissue that would not damage her music skills.

Susanna Blackwell is a Swedish-American marine biologist who studies the effect of man-made sounds - from ships, drilling, anything unnatural – on marine animals. It’s brought her into very close contact with narwhals – these are incredible looking beasts sometimes known as the ‘unicorns of the sea’ because the males have a great long tusk.

Picture: Dagmar Turner with her violin during her brain surgery
Credit: King’s College Hospital


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03scj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xgr9q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqgqsj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03sh88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzgg04)
Covid 19: 500,000 deaths worldwide

There is a concern that poorer countries are now seeing an increase in cases and the World Health Organisation’s special envoy for Covid-19 David Nabarro has urged for greater global cooperation and ‘total unity of purpose’ in order to tackle the virus. Also: four armed men launched a deadly attack on Pakistan’s stock exchange in Karachi, and children’s author, Michael Rosen, reflects on being given a 50/50 chance of survival after contracting the coronavirus.

Photo: A woman puts a flower on the cross during a demonstration in honour of the victims of coronavirus in Brazil. Credit: Andressa Anholete/Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03sm0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqgz8s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltwh60l2sk)
Coty buys 20% of Kim Kardashian West’s beauty line

Cosmetics maker Coty is buying a $200m 20% stake in Kim Kardashian West’s beauty line. Leila Abboud of the Financial Times tells us about the deal. So what makes influencers like Kim Kardashian West’s make-up brands different from those that have gone before? We hear from Millie Kendall, who used to run her own make-up label, and is now chief executive of the British Beauty Council. And we talk to influencer Vanessa Davis, who is known as the Skull-tress. She records tutorials on elaborate face make-up and is planning to launch her own product range. Also in the programme, as Boeing prepares to restart test flights of its 737 Max planes which were grounded by regulators after two fatal crashes, the BBC’s Theo Leggett reflects on the significance of the moment for the firm. Plus, now that summer’s here in the northern hemisphere, many of us will be looking forward to a holiday. But due to coronavirus, complications abound, as our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores.

(Picture: Kim Kardashian West in front of a KKW Beauty sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03sqrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqh30x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3csynj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03svhn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2stxkngtxy)
Coronavirus conversations: More than 10 million cases worldwide

The world has experienced 10 million official cases of Covid-19 and recorded half a million deaths. The BBC's Science Editor David Shukman explains what is happening in various countries and continents and why some are seeing cases rising while others see a fall.

Peru is one country where there is concern about the cases of the coronavirus. We’ve received messages from people in the Amazon region about the scale of the problem there and discuss the response to the emergency in Peru with a local journalist.

And we speak to 27-year old medical student in the US, who contracted Covid-19 back in March. He is now warning others to take precautions to avoid getting and spreading the virus.

(Photo: A relative places a cross at the grave of a victim of Covid-19 during a protest at the site of a common grave 18 kilometers away from Iquitos, Peru Credit: CESAR VON BANCELS/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03sz7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03t2zx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xhgsh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqhg89)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jl1mn7ptd)
2020/06/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03t6r1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqhl0f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0t94)
The Origin of Stuff

Wine glass

Have you got one of those wine glasses that can hold an entire bottle of wine? Katy Brand does and she’s even used it for wine - albeit because of a sprained ankle, which would have stopped her from hobbling back and forth to the kitchen for refills.

But if we skip back a few hundred years, the wine glass was tiny. Footmen brought their masters what was essentially a shot glass. They quaffed back their wine in one. So how did we go from those dinky little things to the gargantuan goblets we have today? Is it because letting the wine breathe in a bigger glass makes it smell and taste better? Or is it a reflection of our drinking habits?

Join Katy and the show's resident public historian, Greg Jenner, is glass expert Russell Hand from Sheffield University and Barry Smith, Director for the Study of the Senses at London University.

Producer: Graihagh Jackson

Picture: Wine glass, Credit: Albina Kosenko/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03tbh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzh971)
Coronavirus: WHO chief warns 'worst is still to come'

The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned the world that the "worst is yet to come" in the Covid-19 pandemic. We focus on the impact on South America.

Also in the programme: We'll hear from the researcher who says he has evidence that China is forcibly sterilising Uighur Muslim women, and the US Supreme Court strikes down a restrictive abortion law in Louisiana.

(Picture: Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO). Credit: EPA/Salvatore Di Nolfi)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03tg79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqhthp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3csynj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03tkzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xhys0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqhy7t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gkbcmxs6)
Coty buys 20% of Kim Kardashian West’s beauty line

Cosmetics maker Coty is buying a $200m 20% stake in Kim Kardashian West’s beauty line. Leila Abboud of the Financial Times tells us about the deal. So what makes influencers like Kim Kardashian West’s make-up brands different from those that have gone before? We hear from Millie Kendall, who used to run her own make-up label, and is now chief executive of the British Beauty Council. And we talk to influencer Vanessa Davis, who is known as the Skull-tress. She records tutorials on elaborate face make-up and is planning to launch her own product range. Also in the programme, as Boeing prepares to restart test flights of its 737 Max planes which were grounded by regulators after two fatal crashes, the BBC’s Theo Leggett reflects on the significance of the moment for the firm. Plus, now that summer’s here in the northern hemisphere, many of us will be looking forward to a holiday. But due to coronavirus, complications abound, as our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores.

(Picture: Kim Kardashian West in front of a KKW Beauty sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 30 JUNE 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ttgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18t1d3qny1)
India bans TikTok and WeChat

India has banned 59, mostly Chinese, apps from the country. The country's technology ministry said the apps are "prejudicial to the sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, security of state and public order". We talk to Tanvi Madan, senior fellow and director of the India Project at the Brookings Institution. Meanwhile, Boeing's controversial and ill-starred 737 Max may soon see its ban on flying lifted. It has begun official testing by the US Federal Aviation Administration, the FAA, that could lead to the fleet returning to service. The BBC's Theo Leggett tells us more. And, the owner of Max Factor, Coty, has just paid $200 million to buy one-fifth of Kim Kardashian West's brand, KKW. Leila Abboud of the Financial Times tells us what this means for the make up industry. (Picture: TikTok app on a mobile Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ty6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xjb0d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqj9h6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct0t94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03v1yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03v5q2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xjkhn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqjjzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct0w55)
The 'Grandma Benches' of Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe has over 14 million people but fewer than 20 psychiatrists.

After years of economic turmoil, unemployment and HIV, mental health is a huge challenge and doctors estimate one in four Zimbabweans battles with depression or anxiety.

Lucia is one of the 700 grandmothers in the country turning the nation around. She sits on a wooden bench using a gentle form of cognitive behavioural or talking therapy with her community.
This is one of 250 Friendship Benches set up by Zimbabwean psychiatrist Dr Dixon Chibanda, who believed that after a few weeks of simple training, grandmothers could become lay health workers for their communities.


Lucia has the time, wisdom and respect to help the people who come to her. She understands them and has direct experience of their problems.

Presenter Kim Chakanetsa hears the grandmothers are having astounding results. They have helped over 50,000 people and are breaking down the stigma around mental health. Recent clinical trials found they are more effective than conventional medical treatments.

As a result, Dixon Chibanda gets enquiries from around the world for the Friendship Bench and he’s setting them up in Malawi, Zanzibar, Kenya, Tanzania and now New York.

The World Health Organisation said more than 264 million people were suffering from depression. That was before Covid-19 brought new challenges. As people are more isolated and anxious, Dixon Chibanda explains how he is facing up to the pandemic, moving his idea online and giving the world access to a virtual Friendship Bench.

Photo: Two people talk on a 'Friendship bench' Copyright: Rainer Kwiotek


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03v9g6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgl65c)
China passes controversial Hong Kong security law

China's top legislative body is reported to have approved a tough new national security law for Hong Kong, in a controversial attempt to quell pro-democracy opposition in the territory; Arizona has abruptly reversed course on reopening its economy as coronavirus cases spike there and nationwide; and we'll head to Afghanistan where doctors have told the BBC the country’s fragile healthcare system is being overrun with coronavirus cases.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03vf6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgl9xh)
China reportedly imposes controversial national security legislation for Hong Kong

China reportedly imposes controversial national security legislation for Hong Kong - undermining the territory's autonomy and setting Beijing on a collision course with the US; how did Black Lives Matter change from a small radical group to an international movement, we have a report from inside the organisation; and we'll also hear from Greece as the country prepares to welcome back tourists after easing coronavirus restrictions.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03vjyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rglfnm)
Hong Kong security law: China passes controversial legislation

China's top legislative body is reported to have approved a tough new national security law for Hong Kong, in a controversial attempt to quell pro-democracy opposition in the territory; we'll hear from a US care home that has managed to avoid a single case of coronavirus since the pandemic started; and what's the future for restaurants in the new post coronavirus world?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03vnpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv18)
A future without bees

Tech companies have developed drones to drop pollen on orchards or shoot it at crops through pipes from tractors.

They’re responding to a crisis in insect pollination as studies suggest numbers of both wild pollinators and farmed bees are declining. This could have a serious knock-on effect on how we grow our fruit and veg. But some experts argue high-tech alternatives are a short-term solution to a much bigger and long-term problem.

Presenter: Claire Bates
Reporter: Craig Langran


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqk0yz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89h)
Rethinking the future

The 2020s will be transformational for humanity, according to the tech prophet founders of RethinkX,

Tony Seba and James Arbib talk to Justin Rowlatt about their prediction that a confluence of new technologies - in energy, transportation, and food and materials production - could wipe out poverty and solve climate change in the next 10-15 years, and usher in a new "Age of Freedom" for our species.

But while it sounds utopian, they also warn in their new book Rethinking Humanity that it could pose huge civilizational challenges for a planet that still clings to outdated concepts such as democracy, capitalism and the nation state.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Global communications Planet Earth graphic; Credit: metmorworks/Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpk)
The Rolling Stones drugs trial

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards went on trial for drugs offences in June 1967. The case attracted attention around the world, and sealed their reputation as rebels. The men were originally sentenced to prison but on appeal their sentences were drastically cut and the trial came to symbolise Britain's changing values.

Photo: Mick Jagger (left) and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones walk in the garden of Redlands, Richards' Sussex house, after the disclosure of their sentences for drug violations, July 1967. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03vsfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqk4q3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0t94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03vx5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03w0xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xkdqk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqkd6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbc)
Eimear Noone and Craig Garfinkle: Composers in isolation

Cellist Matthew Barley connects with composer and conductor team Eimear Noone and Craig Garfinkle, as they race to complete a film score from their temporary lockdown studio in rural Ireland.

Eimear and Craig create soundscapes and soundtracks for feature films and video games, including the global hit World of Warcraft. Early in 2020 Eimear and Craig and their two young children travelled from the US to Dublin to compose and record the score for the animated movie Two by Two: Overboard. They recorded the first half of the score in February but then the Covid-19 restrictions radically changed their plans. They had to leave Dublin with what little equipment they could carry and head to Eimear’s family home on the West Coast of Ireland.

With an out of tune piano, limited IT resources, no access to a recording studio or live musicians, and the delivery date looming, the pressure is on. From trying to write upbeat music at a moment of crisis, to managing the baby’s nap time and homeschooling while working out the perfect chord progression for a scene of utopia, Craig and Eimear are navigating new territory. Will they do it?

All musical excerpts are courtesy of Moetion Films

A Tandem production for the BBC World Service
Presenter: Matthew Barley
Produced by Faith Waddell


Image: Craig Garfinkle (Credit: Wendy Tigerman) and Eimear Noone (Credit: Steve Humphreys)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03w4p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjr)
The adventurer’s son who went missing in the jungle

Roman Dial is a science professor and explorer who's travelled to some of the toughest places on Earth. His son Cody Roman was raised to love the wilderness too, and used to join his father on expeditions around the world. As he grew older, he went on adventures of his own. But in 2014, whilst trekking in the Costa Rican jungle, Cody Roman went missing. Roman Dial began a two year search for his son. He spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen.

Born in a Rio de Janeiro favela, Elza Soares overcame poverty, child marriage and public scandal to become one of her country's most beloved singers. She started out in the smokey nightclubs of Rio de Janeiro in the 1950s and with her unique raspy voice and the intensity of her dancing, she quickly became a hit on the club scene. In the 1960s a highly publicised relationship with a footballing legend briefly made her a national hate figure, but she came back and now into the seventh decade of her career she continues to be a Brazilian icon. She spoke to Outlook's Harry Graham.

Photo Credit: Roman Dial


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03w8f7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xkn6t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqkmpm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0t94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03wd5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzkbx7)
Anger as China approves Hong Kong Security Law

The Chinese president, Xi Jinping, has signed a controversial security law that will give the country new powers over Hong Kong.

Also in the programme: Israel's threat to annexe the West Bank sowhere does it leave Palestinians? and the Belgian King expresses his "deepest regrets" for the crimes committed by his ancestor King Leopold in the former colony of Congo.

(Photo: Opponents fear the law will curtail the right to protest. Credit: AFP)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03whxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqkw5w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwjcn71lk7)
China approves new Hong Kong security law

China's parliament has approved a controversial new national security law for Hong Kong. Gary Leung runs a business in Hong Kong helping people to move overseas, and tells us he's seen a big increase in emigration enquiries since the security law first emerged. Jodi Schneider of Bloomberg explains how Hong Kong originally established itself as a centre for global business. And we hear from Allan Zeman, chairman of Lan Kwai Fong Concepts Holdings, and Scott Salandy-Defour of Liquidstar, about why they respectively support and oppose the new regulations. Also in the programme, the International Labour Organisation estimates that 400 million full-time jobs have been lost in the first half of the year as a result of coronavirus. The organisation's director general, Guy Ryder, discusses the sort of roles that have been hit hardest. Plus we find out why Kweichou Moutai, which makes a quintessentially Chinese alcoholic spirit, has become the most valuable business listed on China's stock market. Lucille Liu is from Bloomberg in Beijing and fills us in.

(Picture: Police confront protesters in Hong Kong on June 28th. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03wmnm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqkzy0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03wrdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2stxknkqv1)
Conversations: Black America Speaks

As the United States continues a mass reflection on race and racism following the death of George Floyd, we're spending time listening to conversations on black American radio stations. On today's edition, we hear hosts and callers on Philadelphia station WURD describe how this moment feels and what ideas are out there to change things for the better.

Also - we're learning some of the detail behind a new security law for Hong Kong from the Chinese government. Pro-democracy activists have said they're afraid of the consequences for the territory's relative freedoms.

And we'll bring you up-to-date on the coronavirus pandemic with Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto. Should we be worried about a new flu found in pigs in China? Why are South Korean officials sceptical about the prospects for "herd immunity" from Covid-19? And why has Uruguay done so well in controlling cases compared to its neighbours in South America?

Picture: Police Deputy Commissioner Melvin Singleton speaks to demonstrators during a protest against racial inequality in Philadelphia on June 6th, 2020 (REUTERS / Bastiaan Slabbers)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ww4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03wzx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xlcpl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqlc5d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jl1mnblqh)
2020/06/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03x3n4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqlgxj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz983)
Exploring digital death

This week Digital Planet explores digital death and how the COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to update our death rituals and move most of our grieving online. We hear from a listener whose mother passed away with her children by her side via Facetime and how they then moved their traditional American-Irish funeral practices online. In India people of all religions are facing huge disruptions to their traditional burials and are taking tech into their own hands to share their experiences. In some developed countries funeral businesses are using cutting edge tech including sophisticated recording set ups in places of worship to bring together mourners from across the world. People are moving more and more online not only with virtual memorials, RFID tags on gravestones and also ceremonies in gaming environments including Animal Crossing. And we find out more about the Reimagine Festival that’s about to start. The now virtual event explores death during COVID-19 and we see how people are determining their digital legacies after they die.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with studio commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.


(Image: Mourners live stream a funeral to family back in Nepal and to those waiting just outside. Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds vis Getty Images)


Studio Manager: Jackie Margerum
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03x7d8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzl644)
Hong Kong security law: China passes controversial legislation

China has formally adopted a controversial security law, giving it new powers over Hong Kong and deepening fears for its freedoms. We speak to a pro-democracy legislator from the territory who says he's worried about even speaking to us.

Also in the programme: We hear from a Nobel laureate economist who thinks it's time to turbo-charge testing for Covid-19, and deadly protests erupt after a prominent Ethiopian singer is killed.

(Picture: Pro-China supporters display Chinese and Hong Kong flags during a rally near the government headquarters in Hong Kong. Credit: Anthony Wallace / AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03xc4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqlqds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03xgwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xlvp3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqlv4x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gkbcqtp9)
China approves new Hong Kong security law

China's parliament has approved a controversial new national security law for Hong Kong. Gary Leung runs a business in Hong Kong helping people to move overseas, and tells us he's seen a big increase in emigration enquiries since the security law first emerged. Jodi Schneider of Bloomberg explains how Hong Kong originally established itself as a centre for global business. And we hear from Allan Zeman, chairman of Lan Kwai Fong Concepts Holdings, and Scott Salandy-Defour of Liquidstar, about why they respectively support and oppose the new regulations. However, Robert Lawrence Kuhn is an adviser to the Chinese government and several of the country's big businesses. He says the new law will bring stability to the region.

Also in the programme, the International Labour Organisation estimates that 400 million full-time jobs have been lost in the first half of the year as a result of coronavirus. The organisation's director general, Guy Ryder, discusses the sort of roles that have been hit hardest. Plus we find out why Kweichou Moutai, which makes a quintessentially Chinese alcoholic spirit, has become the most valuable business listed on China's stock market. Lucille Liu is from Bloomberg in Beijing and fills us in.

(Picture: Police confront protesters in Hong Kong on June 28th. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 01 JULY 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03xqcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18t1d3tkv4)
Hong Kong: Life sentences for breaking China-imposed law

China has passed a controversial security law giving it new security powers over Hong Kong. The law makes secession, subversion of the central government, terrorism or collusion with foreign forces punishable by up to life in prison. We hear from businesses, journalists as well as an adviser to the Chinese government and several of the country's big companies.

Also in the programme - today marks the start of a worldwide boycott of Facebook by some of the world's leading advertisers. Ford, Adidas and Unilever are among those calling on the social networking giant to cut hate speech from its platforms. But given Facebook's huge global dominance, will this make any difference?

And, Milan's La Scala is preparing to open its doors for the first time since March with a series of one-hour concerts without intervals and with significantly reduced audience numbers. But can iconic opera houses and classical music venues survive the collapse of income?

Presenter Jamie Robertson is joined by guests Melissa Chan in the US and Nate Taplin in Hong Kong

PHOTO: Police detain in a man in Causeway Bay in Hong Kong on June 12/AFP


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03xv3x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xm6xh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqm6d9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3csz983)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03xyw1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03y2m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xmgdr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqmfwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sy0)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 10. Birth of a Nation

1948. The final episode of the epic drama. With the UN voting to establish a Jewish state, Israel is born – but the new state comes under attack from its Arab neighbours. The final episode of the epic drama series.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Miriam: Shani Erez
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Ben-Gurion: Elliot Levey
Musa Alami: Sargon Yelda
Judah Magnes: Neil McCaul
The Palestinian woman: Nathalie Armin
Other parts: Heather Craney, Clive Hayward and Hasan Dixon

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03y6c9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgp32g)
Netanyahu’s West Bank annexation plan

Concerns have been expressed around the world over plans by Israel’s prime minister to annex parts of the West Bank. Benjamin Netanyahu could make an announcement later today – we look at what might happen if it does goes ahead; coronavirus lockdown will be reimposed today in some neighbourhoods of Australia's second city, Melbourne, following a surge in new cases; and the campaign for recognition and a statue for Jack Leslie who was all set to become England's first black football player back in the 1920s.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03yb3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgp6tl)
Russia's Putin appeals to patriotism as key vote reaches climax

The final day of voting is taking place in Russia in a wide ranging referendum that could pave the way for President Putin to remain in office for sixteen more years; the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, could make an announcement on his plans to annex parts of the West Bank later today; and Indian TikTok star faces uncertain future after app ban.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03yfvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgpbkq)
Putin appeals to patriotism as vote reaches climax

The final day of voting is taking place in Russia in a wide ranging referendum that could pave the way for President Putin to remain in office for sixteen more years; how do you make a historic museum packed with renaissance masterpieces relevant in the coronavirus era?; and how Tyson the Alpaca could help in the fight against coronavirus.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03yklp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6h)
Kathy Sullivan: Exploring space and the Mariana Trench

The human impulse to explore new frontiers has taken us into space and to the deepest, most remote corners of our own planet. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to one woman who has done both. Kathy Sullivan was the first American woman to walk in space, in 1984. She has just returned from a mission to the deepest point underneath the oceans, the Mariana Trench in the Pacific. She is first and foremost a scientist; as we try to navigate our future, are we properly respecting the science?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqmxw2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8ms)
Brands boycott Facebook

Will the Stop Hate for Profit campaign change the social network's handling of "toxic" content? Big names like Ford, Starbucks and Unilever are pulling ads from Facebook starting this month.

Ed Butler speaks to some of the companies involved: Damien Huang, president of outdoor clothing company Eddie Bauer, Mary Ellen Muckerman from tech firm Mozilla, and Ryan Gellert from Patagonia.

As the campaign appears to gather momentum, how much will it hurt Facebook's business? Jordan Bucknell, founder and CEO of Upbeat Agency, a facebook and Instagram advertising agency, describes the draw of the platform for many small businesses. And Steven Levy, author of the book Facebook: The Inside Story, explains why the real pressure for change could come from Facebook's own workforce.

Producer: Edwin Lane

(Photo: Stop Hate for Profit campaign displayed on a smartphone, Credit: EPA)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmrt)
Quarantined in a TB sanatorium

What it was like to be a child quarantined in a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients in the 1950s. Ann Shaw was nine when she was first admitted to the Craig-y-nos sanatorium in Wales and 13 when she was finally allowed home. Until antibiotic treatments came along, to stop the disease spreading, TB patients were kept apart from the general population and their families, often for years. This included babies and children, leaving many traumatised. Ann Shaw tells Louise Hidalgo about the half-life they lived in the sanatorium.

Picture: boys on the balcony of the Craig-y-nos TB sanatorium; fresh mountain air was regarded as one of the best treatments for TB (Credit: from the private collection of the family of Mari Friend, a former patient at Craig-y-nos)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ypbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sy0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqn1m6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz983)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03yt2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03yxv2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xn9mn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqn93g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8w)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Stanley Tucci imagines the story of modern California as a movie screenplay. In this episode, he tells the story of Leon Lewis who hunted down Nazis in LA in the '30s and '40s. With its aircraft factories and shipyards, California was a prime target for Hitler. And he remembers Silicon Valley's troubled founder, William Shockley: a genius, a hideous boss and an irredeemable racist.


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03z1l6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrj)
"Look after her" - the story of a hidden WW2 child

Lien de Jong was a young girl living in The Hague in the Netherlands when the Second World War broke out. The country was occupied, and her parents took a desperate decision to protect their child, sending her to live with the Van Es family, passionate anti-Nazis who raised Lien as their own. After the end of the war Lien remained with her adoptive family. Her biological parents had been murdered in Auschwitz, and she had nowhere else to go. But the trauma of the war took a heavy toll on Lien, and over time she became increasingly estranged from the Van Es family. Then, years later, she received an email from Bart Van Es. He was the son of Lien's adoptive brother, and he wanted to tell her story. Lien and Bart spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen.

For more than 40 years, Billy Barr has been living alone up in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. To fight the boredom of the long cold winters, he started collecting information about snow. When scientists found out about his unique archive, they got really excited.

Photo: Nazi Germany occupies the Netherlands
Credit: Getty Images/Three Lions


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03z5bb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xnk3x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqnjlq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz983)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03z92g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzn7tb)
Hong Kong: protesters arrested as security law comes into effect

Hundreds arrested under Hong Kong’s new security law imposed by Beijing, as crowds mark 23 years since the end of British rule. Newshour spoke to a pro-democracy and pro-Beijing lawmaker.

Also in the programme: Millions of Russians are voting to reform their constitution, but was the result ever in doubt? And opera returns to Madrid after the Covid-19 lockdown.

(Photo: Hong Kong national security law protest. Credit: EPA/Miguel Candela.)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03zdtl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sy0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqns2z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxbtcttswm)
German economy shows signs of recovery

As a value added tax cut comes into force, there are signs of life in the German economy. Thomas Lengfelder runs Berlin’s hotels and restaurants association, DE-HOGA, and tells us many businesses can't afford to pass on the tax cut. And Holger Schmieding, chief economist at the German bank Berenberg discusses the implications of today’s changes for the German economy. Also in the programme, amidst the recent upsurge in Black Lives Matter activism, some firms decided to suspend advertising on Facebook in an attempt to persuade it to do more about hate speech on the platform. Damien Huang of outdoor clothing company Eddie Bauer explains his company’s stance, and we get wider context from Steven Levy, editor-in-chief of Wired magazine. Plus, we hear from the British film director Gurinder Chadha, whose credits include ‘Bend it Like Beckham’, on why she’s contributed to a series of short films made entirely at home for the streaming service Netflix.

(Picture: Customers at a Berlin restaurant in May. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03zjkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqnwv3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03zn9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2stxknnmr4)
Black America Speaks: Being 14

We continue our Black America Speaks series about the conversations on black-owned radio stations across the US. Today, we hear from KCOH in Houston, on the edge of the Third Ward neighbourhood, where George Floyd grew up. We hear a fascinating conversation with 14-year-old Dre and his mother. They discuss their fears of the police and for his safety; their feeling of being disadvantaged and racially profiled, no matter how well educated and behaved; their interactions with white friends; the impact of the coronavirus pandemic; the frustration at what Dre sees as a lack of change; but also their hopes for the future.

And, we return to hear from more people in Hong Kong. It’s 24-hours since the introduction by China of a new security law, giving Beijing greater authority. The day has seen clashes with police and arrests. We also explain China’s 50 year pledge to maintain the so called “one country, two systems” approach.

(Photo: Dre Barnes. Credit: KCOH)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03zs1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03zwt3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xp8lp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqp82h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jl1mnfhml)
2020/07/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0400k7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqpctm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcc0)
Double threat of Covid-19 and flu

There’s some progress of trials for potential Covid-19 vaccines – but doctors in the United States are also keen to avoid citizens getting infected with another virus: influenza. Manufacturers have been asked to make 10% more vaccines than last year because of a fear that a surge in coronavirus during the flu season could overwhelm hospitals. Dr Litjen Tan from the Immunization Action Coalition hopes that everyone will get the jab.

Many thousands of people have lost loved ones during the Covid-19 pandemic. Talking about dying is never easy and people sometimes regret what they didn’t say. We hear from Janie Brown, a former nurse who now offers counselling to families affected by cancer, and has written a book Radical Acts of Love: how we find hope at the end of life, and from writer Audrey Nieswandt who looked after her mother when she was dying.

Do you mind if people know if you’re online or not? Quite a few apps now indicate whether you’re online or even if you’ve seen a message. Is it rude not to reply straight away? Camille Cobb from Carnegie Mellon University wonders whether people realise just how much information they are giving away about us.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: A nurse in Los Angeles with boxes of flu vaccine. (Photo credit: Lawrence K. Ho/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04049c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzp317)
Hong Kong security law: how the world has responded

We look at the international response to the controversial security law imposed by China on Hong Kong, after criticism from the UK and US.

Also in the programme: Why Israel's Prime Minister has postponed his big announcement on annexing the West Bank, and the unexplained deaths of hundreds of elephants in Botswana.

(Picture: A couple hugs each other as police fire tear gas into the crowds to disperse anti-national security law protesters during a march at the anniversary of Hong Kong's handover to China from Britain in Hong Kong, China July 1, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Tyrone Siu)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04081h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sy0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqpm9w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv040csm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xprl6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqpr20)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gkbctqld)
German economy shows signs of recovery

As a value added tax cut comes into force, there are signs of life in the German economy. Thomas Lengfelder runs Berlin’s hotels and restaurants association, DE-HOGA, and tells us many businesses can't afford to pass on the tax cut. And Holger Schmieding, chief economist at the German bank Berenberg discusses the implications of today’s changes for the German economy. Also in the programme, amidst the recent upsurge in Black Lives Matter activism, some firms decided to suspend advertising on Facebook in an attempt to persuade it to do more about hate speech on the platform. Damien Huang of outdoor clothing company Eddie Bauer explains his company’s stance, and we get wider context from Steven Levy, editor-in-chief of Wired magazine. Plus, we hear from the British film director Gurinder Chadha, whose credits include ‘Bend it Like Beckham’, on why she’s contributed to a series of short films made entirely at home for the streaming service Netflix.

(Picture: Customers at a Berlin restaurant in May. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 02 JULY 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv040m8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18t1d3xgr7)
Canada's battle with coronavirus

On Canada Day, we take stock of the country's efforts to eradicate coronavirus with CBC's reporter Laura Lynch.

Earlier this month, twenty Indian soldiers were killed in a clash with Chinese forces in the disputed Himalayan region of Ladakh, prompting the Indian government to ban 59 Chinese apps. But China is India’s second largest trading partner and beyond the shrill rhetoric, what’s the impact of this economic standoff on small enterprises in the country?

Also in the programme, Tesla has become the most valuable car firm by market capitalisation, despite never making a profit. What is behind its pandemic-defying success?

Plus - in Germany, VAT has been cut, but will it result it increased consumer spending? And, Tt what extent are these policies that incentivise more consumer spending at odds with the claim frequently made by government - in Germany and elsewhere - that the need for recovery gives us a splendid chance to make it a green recovery?

And - we hear from the British film director Gurinder Chadha who has made an 11-minute film for Netflix under lockdown, with no crew and no budget - and with a cast of only her family members.

Presenter Fergus Nicoll is joined by guests Alison Schrager in the US and Madhavan Narayanan in India

PHOTO: Canada's PM Justin Trudeau/AFP


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv040r10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xq3tl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqq39d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3cszcc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv040vs4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv040zj8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xqc9v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqqbsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Assignment (w3csz6l7)
Wuhan: City of silence

The BBC’s China correspondent, John Sudworth, travels to Wuhan – the city on the banks of the Yangtze river where Covid-19 first emerged. As the city returns to life, he examines one of the biggest questions on everyone’s mind: did the virus emerge naturally or could it have been leaked, as the US alleges, from a Wuhan lab, where work was being carried out to research bat viruses? As John and his team discover, asking questions and getting answers in Wuhan is no easy task.

Reporter: John Sudworth
Producer: Kathy Long

Photo: Two motorcyclists in Wuhan, China - June 2020 Credit: Getty Images


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04138d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgrzzk)
Partial results in Russian referendum give Putin clear lead

Russia's President Putin is heading for a resounding victory in a referendum which could open the way for him to stay in power until 2036.

Coronavirus restrictions are being tightened in large areas of California after a resurgence of cases.

And the founder of Black Entertainment Television in the United States - billionaire Robert Johnson - says Black Americans should form their own political party.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04170j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgs3qp)
US daily coronavirus infections hit new record

The US has registered fifty thousand new Covid-19 cases in one day - a fifth of those in California. We get the latest from the State.

Vladimir Putin could stay in office until 2036 - after voters overwhelmingly endorsed constitutional changes he'd proposed. But is he really as popular as the voting figures suggest?

And will Istanbul's famous Hagia Sophia - currently a museum and heritage site visited by millions of tourists - become a mosque once again ?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv041brn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgs7gt)
America records more than 50,000 Covid-19 in one day

We go to California which is going back into lockdown after 10,000 cases were registered.

Why Turkey's President wants to turn one of the Istanbul's most famous landmarks, Hagia Sofia, into a mosque

And in every crisis there's an opportunity: we talk to the author who says we should use the economic slowdown brought on by the pandemic as a turning point in tackling climate change.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv041ghs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3l)
What does Putin want?

President Vladimir Putin has been in power for 20 years. The Russian people have been voting on a change to the constitution that could keep him in the Kremlin until 2036. While world leaders and opponents struggle to second guess him, some objectives appear to be clear: stability at home, respect abroad and power maintained for his inner circle.

Presented by Charmaine Cozier

(President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, February 2020. Credit: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqqts5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wm)
US states resist second lockdown

Coronavirus cases have been rising in two dozen states over the last 14 days. Of these, Texas, Florida, Arizona and California have emerged as the country's latest virus epicentres. And yet governors in many of these states are resisting efforts to close down economic and social activity, or a “second lockdown".

Republican strategist Chris Ingram in Tampa, Florida, explains to Business Daily's Ed Butler the thinking behind allowing most Americans, apart from the most vulnerable, to get back to normal life. But some Floridians are not waiting for directions from the government. Ed Boas, owner of Lanes clothing store, describes the precautions he’s taking on his own initiative.

Meanwhile Dr Cheryl Holder, at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, says that while the state is better-equipped to deal with a second wave, she’s concerned many young people think themselves invulnerable. And Wendell Potter, former health insurance broker turned whistle-blower, explains how the US healthcare system is leaving tens of millions of people untreated, potentially worsening the public health crisis.

(Picture: A pamphlet on how to stay safe from COVID-19 being distributed in Miami, Florida; Credit: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmm9)
The lost Nazi-era art trove

In 2012 a stunning, secret collection of art was found in Germany. Much of it had disappeared during Nazi rule in the 1930s and 40s. It had once belonged to one of the Nazi's top art dealers, Hildebrand Gurlitt. It was found by chance in the Munich apartment of his elderly, reclusive son, Cornelius. It contained lost works by Renoir, Matisse, Chagal and the masters of the German expressionist movement. Many of the works had been confiscated during the Nazis "Degenerate Art" campaign in the late 1930s, when the Nazis stripped thousands of works of art from public display. Alex Last spoke to Dr Meike Hoffmann, an expert on Nazi art policy, who was one of the first to examine the collection.

Photo: One of the art works discovered in the Gurlitt collection was Pferde in Landschaft (Horses in Landscape) by famous German expressionist Franz Marc.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv041l7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6l7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqqyj9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv041q01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvk)
Valkyries: Fierce women of war

In Norse mythology, Valkyries were women who went out into battles to choose the slain warriors who deserved to be in Valhalla, Odin’s place in Asgard, to carry on fighting in preparation for the final apocalyptic confrontation of Ragnarok, between gods and giants. Fighters would see the Valkyries flying through the air or riding on horses, with shields and helmets, some saving the lives and ships of those they favoured, some causing death to those they disliked. These stories of Valkyries and Valhalla offer insights into the lives and values of the people who told them, with the possibility that human women went into battle too.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Sif Rikhardsdottir, Professor and Chair of Comparative Literature at the University of Iceland, Marianne Hem Eriksen, Associate Professor of Archaeology at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo in Norway, and Judith Jesch, Professor of Viking Studies at the University of Nottingham, in the UK.

(Picture: Illustration from The Rhinegold and the Valkyrie, 1910. Artist: Arthur Rackham Credit: Historica Graphica Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh51)
Greece's stunning football triumph

In July 2004, Greece pulled off one of the biggest shocks in football history by winning the European Championship with a 1-0 victory over Portugal. The Greeks had never previously scored a point in tournament football, but fought their way to the final thanks to set-pieces and a well-marshalled defence. Charlotte North talks to the Greek goal-scorer, Angelos Charisteas. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Angelos Charisteas celebraring with the Euro 2004 trophy (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv041tr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xr6jr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqr60k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq1)
Losing your taste to coronavirus

Taste and smell loss are thought to be two of the most common symptoms of coronavirus, but some of the least understood, persisting long after the virus has gone.

Scientists all over the world are racing to find out why Covid-19 is attacking these senses, and what this might teach us about the virus and how to track it – we hear about the latest theories from Turkey-based research scientist Maria Veldhuizen from The Global Consortium for Chemosensory Research.

Meanwhile, thousands of coronavirus survivors are struggling to adapt to a life without taste and smell, including a young doctor who tested positive for the virus more than three months ago. She tells Graihagh Jackson how she’s been desperately trying to recover her sense of smell ever since, and how it has destroyed one of her great passions – food.

We hear how smell is vital to the way we perceive flavour, but that it’s also important in other ways. Dr Rachel Herz, a neuroscientist and researcher on the psychology of smell at Brown University and Boston College in the US, explains that long-term smell loss is linked to depression because of the way the sense is plugged into the part of our brain that processes emotions and memories.

But there is some hope - we speak to Chrissi Kelly, from the charity Abscent, who tells us how it’s possible to train your nose to smell again.

Producer: Simon Tulett
Studio Manager: Hal Haines

Let us know what you think about the show - email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A woman staring at an apple on a plate. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv041yh9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd9z)
Caring for my dying father made me a better doctor

Dr Rachel Clarke spends her working life in the company of people who are dying, and she says they’ve taught her everything she needs to know about living. She works in palliative care for England’s National Health Service, providing support for people at the end of their lives. She adores her job, and she's written a book about how much she gets out of it. But when her beloved father became terminally ill, she had to face his decline as a daughter, not a doctor. She spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen.

Photo: Rachel and her father Mark
Photo credit: Sarah Oscroft


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmm9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04227f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xrg10)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqrfht)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0425zk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzr4qf)
Coronavirus cases soar in the United States

As the US registers 50,000 new virus cases in a single day, we hear from the country's leading disease control expert, Anthony Fauci, and look at the psychology of facemasks.

Also in the programme: Turkey struggles with the future of one of the world's great religious buildings, Hagia Sofia; the perils of jade mining in Myanmar; and we ask how many residents might leave Hong Kong as China tightens its control.

(Picture: New York Public Library lion statues wear masks in COVID-19 awareness campaign. Credit: EPA/PETER FOLEY)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0429qp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6l7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqrp02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvpxxmk2y4)
India-China business relations worsen

Business relations have declined between India and China following a border dispute. Users of the Chinese mobile app TikTok express frustration that they're no longer allowed to use the service since the Indian government banned it along with dozens of other apps. Renu Agal, Hindi editor at The Print explains the background to the row, whilst we get wider context from Dr Yu Jie, senior research fellow on China at Chatham House. And Parveen Khandelwal, secretary of the Confederation of All Indian Traders discusses a boycott of Chinese goods that many shops are engaged in. Also in the programme, the US economy created 4.8 million jobs in June. The BBC's Samira Hussein brings us the latest figures, and we examine the likely impact of it all on the US economy, with Chris Low of FHN Financial. Plus, a committee of the UK House of Lords is calling for tougher controls on loot boxes that can be bought in video games, which contain special characters or equipment, arguing that it is a form of gambling. Lord Grade is chairman of the committee, and explains why it has taken that stance. And we get reaction from Jo Twist, chief executive of UKIE, the trade body for the UK's games and interactive entertainment industry.

(Picture: A protest in India against Chinese phone apps. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv042fgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqrsr6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv042k6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2stxknrjn7)
Black America Speaks: Chicago

We continue our Black America Speaks series, where we are playing extracts from black-owned radio stations across the United States as they discuss race with their audiences. Today, we hear from WVON in Chicago. One of the topics of conversation is the concern around the levels of shootings in the city.

Wearing face coverings is a topic of conversation on the Coronavirus that we will reflect. President Trump appears to have changed his view on it. We’ll hear if his supporters agree with him.

And we speak to one of our expert guests, Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Basel in Switzerland. She has been tweeting about face coverings and also her concern about the increasing infections in parts of the world, including Switzerland.

(Photo: Protesters raise their fists during a line dance in honour of George Floyd on June 13th in Chicago. Credit: Natasha Moustache / Getty Images)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv042nz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmm9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv042sq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xs5hs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqs4zl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jl1mnjdjp)
2020/07/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv042xgb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqs8qq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0j)
Covid -19 and Children

Studies in Children who have been severely affected by Covid 19 in Italy, Britain and the US are showing the same thing – a range of symptoms linked to an overactive immune system. Elizabeth Whittaker from London’s Imperial College discusses the similarities in these cases and possible reasons for this syndrome with Shanna Kowalsky from Mount Sinai hospital in New York.

How much should drugs for Covid 19 cost? Remdesivir which has shown promise against the virus has been priced at over $2000 for a course of treatment, but Drug price analyst Andrew Hill says the cost of production is actually below $10.

And how about some really alternative energy? Marion Cromb at Glasgow University has run an experiment to simulate a spinning black hole. In theory a rocket sent to an equivalent real black hole could use its rotation as a power source


(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04316g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzrzyb)
Are reports Russia paid the Taleban to kll US troops 'fake news'?

US President Donald Trump has continued to play down allegations that Moscow paid the Afghan Taleban to kill US troops in Afghanistan.

Also in the programme: how European police broke into a secret messaging service used by hundreds of criminals; and
British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell is charged with procuring underage girls for the convicted paedophile, Jeffrey Epstein.


Photo: Armed Taliban in Nangarhar province, Afghanistan, in June 2018. Credit: REUTERS


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0434yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 Assignment (w3csz6l7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqsj6z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0438pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xsnh9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqsmz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gkbcxmhh)
Lethal Myanmar jade mine landslide

At least 162 bodies have been found after a landslide at a jade mining site in northern Myanmar. Rescue work has continued all day for people still missing at the site in the Hpakant area of Kachin state. We investigate who controls this often murky industry which produces about 70% of the world's jade. Jade is believed to be one of Myanmar's most profitable exports and worth billions of dollars, fuelled in large part by demand in neighbouring China.

The High Court here in London has ruled against President Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela in a legal battle over access to a billion-dollar stash of gold in the vaults of the Bank of England. Why was the High Court involved in the first place?

Business relations have declined between India and China following a border dispute. Users of the Chinese mobile app TikTok express frustration that they're no longer allowed to use the service since the Indian government banned it along with dozens of other apps. Renu Agal, Hindi editor at The Print explains the background to the row, whilst we get wider context from Dr Yu Jie, senior research fellow on China at Chatham House. And Parveen Khandelwal, secretary of the Confederation of All Indian Traders discusses a boycott of Chinese goods that many shops are engaged in.

(Picture: Rescuers/Myanmar Fire Service)



FRIDAY 03 JULY 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv043j5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18t1d40cnb)
US firms create 4.8 million jobs in June

The US economy created jobs at a record pace in June as firms took on more staff after the coronavirus downturn. Payrolls surged 4.8 million, the most since the Labor Department began keeping records in 1939, helped by the reopening of factories and restaurants. But a recent spike in Covid-19 cases has raised fears for continued growth.

China's decision to impose a new security law on Hong Kong is having rapid international ramifications. We explore how various countries are reacting.

Also in the programme - another fatal accident in one of Myanmar's enormous jade mines. We discuss the scale and immense value of a decidedly murky industry - and how men, women and children can be victims of the blood jade trade.

And we'll hear how a ruling in the UK High Court means that President Maduro of Venezuela will not gain access to a billion-dollar stash of gold stored at the Bank of England.

Plus - do loot boxes in the game Overwatch encourage problem gambling?

Presenter Fergus Nicoll is joined by Rachel Cartland in Hong Kong and Tony Nash in the US.

PHOTO: Getty Images


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv043my3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xt0qp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqt06h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv043rp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmm9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv043wfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xt86y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqt7pr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w59)
USA: A discussion about race

In this special American Impendence day program, presenter Martin Bashir brings together Ilyasah Shabbaz - the third daughter of Malcolm X, Joshua DuBois - President Obama's former spiritual advisor and Lama Rod Owens - a Buddhist Black radical thinker to discuss the nature of the Black Lives Matter movement. They discuss the objectives and methods of the movement and interrogate if the use of violence is a necessary evil in search of equality.

The three guests draw upon their own respected faith traditions as well as the experience of being African American in modern day America to share their views on how best to achieve equal rights.

Presented by Martin Bashir
Produced by Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Black Lives Matter protest, June 2020. Credit: Jo Holland/BBC)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv04405h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgvwwn)
US coronavirus cases soar

Texas joins other states in making the use of face masks compulsory, as its governor warns many intensive care units are almost full.

A lawyer representing victims of Jeffrey Epstien - a convicted sex offender who killed himself in prison - reacts to the arrest of his former girlfriend, British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell.

And the old people who have been inundated with good wishes in the shape of old-fashioned letters.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0443xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgw0ms)
Jeffrey Epstein ex-girlfriend charged in US

Ghislaine Maxwell has been accused of assisting Epstein's abuse of minors by helping to recruit and groom victims known to be underage.

A leading Trump administration member has defended the push for US states to ease lockdown restrictions, despite an increases in coronavirus cases.

We'll hear about a prominent pro-democracy activist who's fled Hong Kong.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0447nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w97rgw4cx)
Latest on Iranian nuclear fuel plant explosion

It's not yet known what caused the incident at the country's main nuclear fuel production site at Natanz but a previously unknown group claims it was behind the explosion.

A trial is set to begin in Turkey of 20 Saudi officials over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi - but they won't be in the court room.

And in South Africa, the townships of Cape Town have become the latest hotspot for coronavirus.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv044cdw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxg)
Nadya Tolokonnikova: Pussy Riot & Russian protest

Vladimir Putin can now seek to extend his rule in Russia to 2036 thanks to a constitutional referendum, stage managed by the Kremlin. Is there any prospect of an opposition movement ever challenging Putin’s grip on power? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the founders of the Pussy Riot punk protest collective, Nadya Tolokonnikova. What, if anything, can stir Russians to rebel?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqtqp8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78g)
Nollywood under lockdown

Coronavirus has brought one of the most prolific film industries to a virtual standstill. Nollywood, Nigeria’s film industry, is the third largest in the world after Hollywood and India’s Bollywood. Chijioke Uwaegbute from the entertainment desk at Price Waterhouse Coopers Nigeria explains the financial impact of the virus on Nollywood. Moses Babatope, co-founder of Filmhouse, the biggest cinema chain in West Africa, says that with all his cinemas closed, he’s having to pay furlough money out of his own pocket. Plus actress and screenwriter Alexendra Amon tells us that she has had projects cancelled. And we’ll also hear from Obi Emelonye on using smartphones to overcome restriction during the pandemic.

(Image: Nollywood films at a market in Lagos. Picture credit: CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv2)
How South Africa banned skin-lightening creams

In 1990, South Africa became the first country in the world to ban skin-lightening creams containing the chemical compound hydroquinone. For years the creams had caused an irreversible form of skin damage called ochronosis for the black and Asian South Africans using the products. Rachael Gillman has been speaking to Dr Hilary Carman, one of the activists who worked to ban the creams and Dr Ncoza Dlova who became one of the country's first black dermatologists.

Photo: A woman applying a skin-lightening cream to her face. Credit: AFP/Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv044h50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnv)
Big advertisers boycott Facebook

Marketers express unease about Facebook’s handling of hate speech. Plus, how Singapore is introducing wearable dongles to help log and trace people who might have Covid-19. And the simulation company aiming to help redesign cities fit for a post-pandemic world. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: A smartphone showing the website of the “StopHateForProfit” campaign, Credit: EPA/ SASCHA STEINBACH).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqtvfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv044lx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn2)
Generation Covid?

Young people may not be the most exposed to the health risks during the global coronavirus pandemic, but right around the world they will pay a high price in lost wages, opportunities and greater public debt - much of which they’ll have to service. Generations are forged through common experiences, and the bigger the shock of Covid-19 to the global economy, the greater the likelihood that it will become a defining event for Millennials, Generation Z and the next generation of young children. How will Covid-19 shape the mindset of those people just starting out in life and what can we learn from the formative events of past generations? How will gains by young people in developing countries be impacted by the pandemic? And as the virus further exposes intergenerational inequalities, could its legacy be a new conversation about how to fix them?


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv044qn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xv3fv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqv2xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztg6)
Tough times in Colombia and Brazil

Goalkeeper Vanessa Cordoba discusses the frustrations of being a female footballer in Colombia. We're in Brazil to find out more about the controversial decision to resume football. And we pay tribute to the only Iraqi to score at a World Cup, Ahmed Radhi.

(Picture: Colombian players watch the penalty shoot-out against Argentina during the 2019 Pan-American Games by CRIS BOURONCLE/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv044vdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh6)
Nollywood’s Coronavirus intermission

Nollywood, the Nigerian film industry, is famous for high productivity, addictive plots and glamorous premiers. Princess Abumere in BBC Lagos has been to a few premiers herself, and has been finding out how Nollywood is adapting to the Covid-19 shutdown.

Tongue Twisters revisited
Fun and epic fails from the Fifth Floor teams trying to get their tongues round some fiendish tongue twisters.

Black Lives Matter in Tunisia
“I can’t breathe” was chanted by crowds in the Tunisian capital after the killing of African-American George Floyd in the USA. It’s part of the black community’s response to racism and lack of opportunities for the minority black population of the country. Nora Fakim has been following the story for BBC Africa.

Cape Verde, or Highway 10
Cape Verde found itself in the headlines when a controversial Colombian businessman Alex Saab was detained there charged by the US with money laundering. BBC Afrique reporter, and Cape Verdean, Anne-Marie Dias Borges, sheds light on the islands' strategic position in many trans-Atlantic dealings.

Russia on a bike
BBC Russian journalist Oleg Boldyrev took a novel approach to gathering local opinions ahead of this week's Russian referendum. He got on his bike and set off on a week's odyssey along the rural byways. It was a bone shaking experience.

Photo: Actor and television presenter Ada Afoluwake Ogunkeye AKA Folu Storms
Credit: Damilola Oduolowu-BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv044z4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xvby3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqvbdx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0452wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzv1mj)
Jamal Khashoggi murder trial opens

Twenty Saudi nationals are being tried in absentia by a Turkish court, over the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in 2018.

Also in the programme: An explosion at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility is claimed by an unknown group calling themselves 'Cheetahs of the Homeland'; and how coronavirus outbreaks could be detected early in sewage.

Photo: A candlelit vigil is held for journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Credit: Reuters


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0456ms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqvkx5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt21gf8czn)
England's pubs and restaurants prepare to open

For the first time since UK lockdown started, England's pubs and restaurants are to open. Clare Smyth of Michelin-starred restaurant Core in London describes the changes they're putting in place to accommodate diners from this weekend. We hear from Moutaz Altaweel, owner of Syrian restaurant Ayam Zaman, that his capacity will be cut by more than half as a result of safety measures being put in place. And Stephanie Robson, senior lecturer at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration shares her tips for restaurateurs seeking to ensure customers will still want to visit in spite of coronavirus precautions. Also in the programme, amidst the growth of the Black Lives Matter movement, firms including Twitter and Microsoft say they will re-write computer code and handbooks that include the terms 'master' and 'slave'. Ibrahim Diallo is a software engineer in Los Angeles, and explains the origins of the terms and what they might be replaced with. Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, many parts of the US have had a moratorium on residential evictions. But they're ending in some places, and in protest some people have started a rent strike to show solidarity with their neighbours in financial difficulty. The BBC's Samira Hussain brings us the story of one woman who has hit hard times. Plus, after the pandemic brought Nigeria's film industry, Nollywood, to a virtual standstill, we meet some of those trying to get the cameras rolling again, including Moses Babatope, co-founder of Filmhouse in Lagos, the largest cinema chain in West Africa.

(Picture: Moutaz Altaweel, owner of Ayam Zaman restaurant. Picture credit: BBC.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv045bcx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqvpn9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztg6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv045g41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2stxknvfkb)
Black America Speaks: Los Angeles

We continue our Black America Speaks series, where we are playing extracts from black-owned radio stations across the United States as they discuss race with their audiences. We hear from KJLH in Los Angeles with conversations around Covid-19, school policing and lack of job opportunities for African Americans.

We also talk about the warnings of a devastating health crisis in South Africa where coronavirus infections have been rising steeply. The lockdown restrictions in the country have been eased but Western Cape has the highest concentration of infections in the whole of Africa. We hear the concerns by local people and health workers in the region.

Today's guest expert is Dr Megan Murray- the Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University. We discuss the reports that the coronavirus – when it moved from Asia to Europe- mutated and became more infectious.

(Photo: Dominique Di Prima from KJLH in Los Angeles)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv045kw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv045pm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xw2dw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqw1wp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jl1mnm9fs)
2020/07/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv045tcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqw5mt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5v)
Is barefoot running better?

Shoes are a surprisingly recent human invention. But running isn’t. That means for most of our time on the planet, we’ve run barefoot. Today, in most countries it’s rare to see people out in public without shoes, let alone running. But might our aversion to the free foot be causing us pain?

CrowdScience mega-fan Hnin is an experienced runner, she enjoys ultra-marathons back home in Australia. But about six months ago she developed extreme foot pain, the condition ‘Plantar Fasciitis’, and this has meant she had to stop doing what she loves. She reached out to CrowdScience presenter Chhavi Sachdev, to find out if barefoot running could reduce her pain and improve her performance. Simply put, is barefoot running better?

In an attempt to find Hnin some answers, Chhavi hits the ground… running. Literally throwing off her own shoes on the streets of her home city of Mumbai, India, to see how feeling the ground can change her whole gait. And with Prof. Dan Lieberman, Chhavi learns what sets the human runner apart from other species while uncovering the strange form our feet have. She speaks with the Dr Peter Francis, a researcher whose life’s work has focused on curing the pain in his own feet and learning how to help others.
But performance is also important for runners. Biomechanics and shoe expert Dr Sharon Dixon explains how modifications to the sports-shoe are helping marathon runners set records, and blade-running athlete Kiran Kanojia shows Chhavi how the technology behind her two prosthetic legs let her emulate either natural walking or natural running.
Presented by Chhavi Sachdev
Produced by Rory Galloway

(Photo: barefoot running on beach. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv045y3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nzvwvf)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0461vp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqwf42)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztg6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0465lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b739xwkdd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qqwjw6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58gkbd0jdl)
England's pubs and restaurants prepare to open

For the first time since UK lockdown started, England's pubs and restaurants are to open. Clare Smyth of Michelin-starred restaurant Core in London describes the changes they're putting in place to accommodate diners from this weekend. We hear from Moutaz Altaweel, owner of Syrian restaurant Ayam Zaman, that his capacity will be cut by more than half as a result of safety measures being put in place. And Stephanie Robson, senior lecturer at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration shares her tips for restaurateurs seeking to ensure customers will still want to visit in spite of coronavirus precautions. Also in the programme, amidst the growth of the Black Lives Matter movement, firms including Twitter and Microsoft say they will re-write computer code and handbooks that include the terms 'master' and 'slave'. Ibrahim Diallo is a software engineer in Los Angeles, and explains the origins of the terms and what they might be replaced with. Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, many parts of the US have had a moratorium on residential evictions. But they're ending in some places, and in protest some people have started a rent strike to show solidarity with their neighbours in financial difficulty. The BBC's Samira Hussain brings us the story of one woman who has hit hard times. Plus, after the pandemic brought Nigeria's film industry, Nollywood, to a virtual standstill, we meet some of those trying to get the cameras rolling again, including Moses Babatope, co-founder of Filmhouse in Lagos, the largest cinema chain in West Africa.

(Picture: Moutaz Altaweel, owner of Ayam Zaman restaurant. Picture credit: BBC.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 04:32 THU (w3csz6l7)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6l7)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6l7)

Assignment 22:06 THU (w3csz6l7)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qq7lrx)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qq7z09)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qq8b7p)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qq8fzt)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qq8ph2)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qq9jpz)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqb0ph)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qqb4fm)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xtyv4d)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qqbhp0)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xtz6cs)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qqbvxd)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xtzfw1)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xtzkm5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xtzpc9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qqcbwx)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qqcld5)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qqdkc6)

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Boston Calling 23:32 SAT (w3csz70r)

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Boston Calling 10:32 MON (w3csz70r)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jg)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18sp3tb3yl)

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Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snp)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3cszv5t)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz983)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0t94)

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Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0t94)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0t94)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pm)

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From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pm)

Global Questions 11:32 SAT (w3ct0wj0)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc1z)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc1z)

HARDtalk 20:06 MON (w3cszc1z)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcc0)

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Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0w56)

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In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbc)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbc)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbc)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3t)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3t)

Miriam and Youssef 08:06 SUN (w3ct0sxz)

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More or Less 06:50 SUN (w3ct0pxg)

More or Less 04:50 MON (w3ct0pxg)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6sz)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2w97rgh988)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2w97rghf0d)

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Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2yr6nzgg04)

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Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2yr6nzv1mj)

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Outlook 22:32 SAT (w3cszdzx)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd36)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd36)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3cszd36)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszd9z)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4f)

Over to You 18:50 SAT (w3cszf4f)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4f)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv18)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0j)

Science in Action 02:32 FRI (w3cszh0j)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0j)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh0j)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 02:32 SUN (w3ct0t1n)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 06:32 SUN (w3ct0t1n)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 23:32 SUN (w3ct0t1n)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jl1mn7ptd)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jl1mnblqh)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jl1mnfhml)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jl1mnjdjp)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jl1mnm9fs)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh50)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh51)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3btl842sck)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3l66k854yj)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l66k889bw)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhj9)

Tech Tent 01:06 SUN (w3cszhnt)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhnv)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhnv)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk2y)

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The Big Idea 05:50 SAT (w3csxfjj)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3csynj6)

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The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8d)

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The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct0w3h)

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The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct0t8w)

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The Evidence 06:06 SAT (w3ct0whg)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjh5)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjq0)

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The Forum 03:06 MON (w3cszjvj)

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The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl3l)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3cszcn1)

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The Why Factor 06:06 SUN (w3csyv0j)

The Why Factor 04:32 MON (w3csyv0j)

The Why Factor 09:06 MON (w3csyv0j)

The Why Factor 15:06 MON (w3csyv0j)

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The World Debate 19:06 SAT (w3ct0whb)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57n3lrvx8s)

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World Football 11:32 FRI (w3csztg6)

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