Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 JUNE 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3ghn3wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18s9vhjzbr)
Americans mark the end of slavery

As Americans mark June the 19th and remember the end of slavery, the Black Lives Matter movement is forcing US businesses to get on message - fast. We have a special report from Oklahoma as President Trump's imminent rally stirs up ghosts of the past.

Also in the programme - Australia's Prime Minister says government and institutions are being targeted by on-going sophisticated state-based cyber hacks.

And after the paralysis of lockdown, we meet the boss of a Scottish distillery who's hoping that Father's Day will tempt visitors back to sample a little Water of Life.

Plus, we speak to the author Lynda Gratton about her new book which explores two big challenges people in the developed world are facing - living longer and having to contend with ever more complex technology.

Presenter Fergus Nicoll is joined by Sinead Mangan

PHOTO: A large group holds a Juneteenth prayer in Atlanta/Getty Images


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02wy4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9bmf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpl9f7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhj8)
Waqar, Australian turmoil & Windies rebels

As chief executive Kevin Roberts loses his job as CEO of Cricket Australia, we'll ask why the Covid-19 crisis has been so badly mishandled in one of the strongholds of the sport.

Plus, Pakistan fast bowling great Waqar Younis looks ahead to their tour of England.

And 'The Unforgiven' - a new book on the black West Indian cricketers branded traitors for taking money to play in apartheid South Africa.

Photo: Waqar Younis (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02x1wz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh4)
The herders caught between two armies

This week 20 Indian soldiers were killed in a clash with Chinese forces in the disputed region of Ladakh. It's the first fatality in 45 years, but one of many skirmishes along the de facto border. BBC Indian languages journalist Aamir Peerzada looks at the impact of the current stand-off on the nomadic livestock herders who inhabit the high altitude desert.

#A man should know his place
Many women in Turkey have taken to Twitter to mock sexist language and patriarchal attitudes. Under the hashtag 'A man should know his place', they've turned popular sayings and clichés upside down, applying them to men rather than women. Beril Akman of BBC Monitoring in Istanbul shares some of her favourite tweets.

Colombian love in the time of Covid-19
The coronavirus pandemic has taught us many unexpected things about our world and our eagle-eyed BBC Monitoring journalist Luis Fajardo spotted a curiosity from his home country, Colombia. It seems Colombians are finding it hard to give up their “love motel” habit, despite the lockdown.

The 'ugly-dirty' diamond of Indonesia
The Banjarmasin diamond originally belonged to the Sultan of Banjar in the 1800s, so why is it on display in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam? The BBC's Endang Nurdin visited the museum, which houses many other Indonesian treasures, and tells us what she found out.

How to shrink a 'big fat Indian wedding’
Indian weddings are traditionally lavish affairs with hundreds of guests, lasting several days. But Covid-19 has changed all that. Geeta Pandey of BBC Delhi has spoken to some couples who decided to abandon their dreams and go for the simplest possible ceremony.

Image: Nomadic herder in Ladakh with livestock
Credit: BBC Aamir Peerzada


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmv0)
The ‘Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes’ anti-racist exercise

When Dr Martin Luther King was assassinated in 1968, US school teacher, Jane Elliott, decided to try to teach her all-white class about racism. She decided to segregate them according to the colour of their eyes, and treated them differently. Although controversial from the start, the “blue eyes/brown eyes” teaching exercise has been adapted in schools and workplaces for diversity training ever since. Jane Elliott has been explaining to Rebecca Kesby why she still thinks the model has value today in defeating racial prejudice.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02x5n3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn0)
Is this the internet we always wanted?

The internet has proven invaluable during the coronavirus pandemic, allowing us to continue to work and learn from home, disseminating information to concerned citizens and providing desperately needed social contact for those cut off from family and friends. Before the pandemic, it seemed the internet was increasingly becoming an angry and cold place, providing a platform for selfish pursuits and amplifying extreme views and behaviour. That still goes on, of course, but is the pivot to more altruistic activities online an opportunity to consider again the potential of the internet and what it's for? A string of data scandals over recent years has prompted calls for greater regulation of companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon. But three decades on from the creation of the World Wide Web, is now the time to discuss more sweeping reforms? Proposals are now emerging that could radically change the way the internet works, how your data is managed, who’ll be able to make money, and even challenge the very concept that “the internet should be free”. Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests to discuss whether the coronavirus-era internet that has brought people together and even thrown us a lifeline might be the internet we wanted all along. If so, how can we build on the moment and make it even better?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02x9d7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9bznh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qplnnm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvrv)
Can viral videos stop police brutality?

It was a brutal killing which captured the attention of the US and the world. But the death of George Floyd wouldn’t have caused such an outcry if it hadn’t been captured on camera.
The person who shot that famous video was 17-year-old Minneapolis resident Darnella Frazier. Her footage, along with other angles captured by other witnesses on that day in late May, galvanised a social media wave and prompted protests around the world.
But are viral videos really an effective check on police abuse? We talk to the experts, look at the evidence – and talk to witnesses and people on the front lines of the protests.
Presenter: Michael Wendling
Reporter: Reha Kansara

Picture caption: A protest sign reading “No justice, no peace”
Picture credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjh)
Are we all racist?

Are we all racist? Harvard professor Mahzarin Banaji is the architect of what is arguably psychology’s most influential experiment. It’s called the Implicit Association Test (the IAT) and it has been taken millions and millions of times.

It purports to be a measure of our unconscious bias towards various groups – black people, women, the elderly or people with disabilities. Most people taking the IAT do exhibit some kind of bias. That leads to two questions: how worried should we be at these implicit attitudes? And what can be done about them?

Presenter: David Edmonds

(Photo: Question marks. Credit: Shutterstock)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02xf4c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Worklifeindia (w3cszvgt)
How can Bollywood survive the coronavirus pandemic?

India’s mega Hindi film industry, Bollywood, is staring at a loss of more than $300 million. Since mid-March, film production has been stalled and the country’s 9,500 theatres are shut because of the coronavirus outbreak. This has led to massive job losses.

Mumbai, India’s financial capital, which is also home to the multi-billion-dollar industry, has allowed resumption of film shoots and production work from next month, but with severe restrictions. How will social distancing norms affect filmmaking? How will Bollywood's trademark song-and-dance spectacles be filmed?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how Bollywood will have to change to survive the coronavirus crisis.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Tisca Chopra, Bollywood actor; Amit Behl, senior joint secretary, chairperson - outreach committee, CINTAA; Sidharth Anand Kumar, vice president - films & events, Saregama India Ltd


SAT 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qplsdr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:32 BBC OS (w172xm4lszzl757)
Coronavirus conversations: Another Beijing lockdown

We speak to people in China's capital, Beijing, where a fresh spike of Covid-19 cases has been detected. Fan Fan and Richard tell us what it feels like to go through lockdown all over again.

Meanwhile, the most intense outbreaks are now in Latin America. We hear accounts of how communities in countries including Peru and Colombia are dealing with the disease.

As restrictions ease elsewhere, businesses are preparing to open again in a very different world. We bring together business owners in Botswana, Turkey and the United States to talk about the challenges they face and their hopes for the future.

One consequence of coronavirus lockdowns being discussed around the world is an increase in reported cases of domestic abuse. We hear the experience of one woman in Texas who managed to escape her violent relationship.

Picture: Fan Yingziong


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02xjwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snn)
Hong Kong: Business and the new security laws

On Business Weekly we ask how international businesses based in Hong Kong will react to China’s new security laws. Also - it is finally illegal to discriminate against LGBTQ people in the workplace in the US. We’ll hear from the man who took his case to the Supreme Court. As the World Bank predicts that remittances will fall by 20% this year we look at how that will affect communities in the developing world and speak to those workers who send their wages home. And two big food companies say they're rebranding products that adhere to racial stereotypes - we consider the importance of this. Presented by Lucy Burton. (Picture: HK protesters, Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02xnmm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pl)
Post-lockdown problems for Turkey

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

In Turkey, where there has been a surge in new cases of Covid-19 – following the lifting of many restrictions on 01 June – there are fears that the country might face a second wave of infections. The authorities are urging the public to remain on their guard. So far more than 4,800 people have died of the virus, according to official figures. Orla Guerin has been in Istanbul since the start of the outbreak in mid-March.

Two journalists, Maria Ressa, the head of an investigative news website called Rappler, and one of their former writers, Reynaldo Santos Jr, have been sentenced to prison for libel in the Philippines. The case has been seen by many as an attack on press freedom and some question the government’s motives to prosecute, as Howard Johnson reports.

Following years of civil war in Yemen, they have the worst humanitarian crisis in the world. On top of malnutrition and a devastated healthcare system, in comes coronavirus. Iona Craig was in the worst-hit city, Aden, when the virus began.

The number of people facing hunger could double to 265 million by the end of the year, according to the UN – that’s because of the coronavirus pandemic. Kenya’s capital Nairobi is not immune to food shortages with reports from the biggest slum in the city of stampeding when flour and cooking oil were given away. One lab is looking at a more sustainable way of feeding the masses, their answer is insects. Emilie Filou has put them to the taste test.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: Women wearing face masks shop at the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul, Turkey, 01 June 2020. Credit: EPA/Sedat Suna)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpm0x0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3s)
Rapping Kashmir

A voice from the Valley. Ahmer Javed grew up making music under curfew in Kashmir.
Send us your stories: myindianlife@bbc.com
And let us know what you think: #MyIndianLife


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7b)
Resolves

Frans de Waal

Frans de Waal, a professor of psychology at Emory University in the USA, who is renowned for his work with non-human primates, resolves to find ways in which humans can learn to live alongside animals.

“The problems we have with the diseases that are coming up are all problems of us setting ourselves apart and thinking we can do anything we like with animals, with nature - because we think we are far superior.”

During lockdown, he’s imagined a new system for supermarkets to adopt which will let customers know where the meat they are buying has come from, and make clear what is meant by, for example, ‘free-range’ or ‘organic’. He proposes a scan code on the packaging that customers can read with their smart phones, which gives images and information about the farm and the ethos of the farmer.

A Cast Iron Production for the BBC World Service.
Part of Rethink - a series of programmes on BBC Radio looking at how the world should change post-coronavirus.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02xscr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9cgn0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpm4n4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Trending (w3cszvrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4d)
Does the historical series Spitfire make it off the ground?

The historical series Spitfire: The People’s Plane takes a deep dive into the rarely told aspects of the story of this iconic second world war fighter. But does it take liberties with the truth and why in one episode did the sound effects drown out what’s being said?
Plus a listener defends the documentary The Orgasm Gap.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02xx3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bt6zt9mrq)
The Premier League is back and Black Lives Matter

The Premier League returned this week following a one hundred day hiatus due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Ahead of the opening round of fixtures: players, managers, coaching staff and officials took a knee to highlight racial injustice. The BBC's football correspondent John Murray, former Liverpool defender Gary Gillespie and Liverpool fan and broadcaster Lizzi Doyle discuss the significance of English football making its voice heard and the prospect of Liverpool ending a thirty year wait for a League Title in the coming week. Gary was part of the last Liverpool side to be crowned English Champions, while Lizzi wasn't born the last time the club won the League.

"I'm behind NASCAR all the way - we are taking baby steps to better our sport" - Brehanna Daniels is the first African-American woman to work pit crew in Nascar, having made her debut as a tire changer in 2017. She joins us to discuss how she got into the sport and why she gives her backing to NASCAR's decision to ban the Confederate flag.

Afghanistan's Director of Cricket, Andy Moles, joins us from his home in Cape Town to discuss his recent life-altering operation. Following a walk in Abu Dhabi, Moles noticed an issue with his left foot, which led to him having to have the leg amputated below the knee. Moles was told his life could be in danger if he didn't opt for amputation.

Royal Ascot - no crowds and no Queen. On the final day of this year's meeting we speak to jockey Hayley Turner, who rode a winner there this week and Juliet Slot who is the commercial director at the course about a much changed Ascot experience. Due to the covid-19 pandemic there have been no crowds, jockeys have worn face masks and the Queen - a racehorse owner herself - has not attended for the first time in her sixty eight year reign.

And - Sporting Witness - tells the story of the pioneering black footballer, Clyde Best, who played for West Ham in the 1960s and 1970s alongside the likes of Bobby Moore and Geoff Hurst. After moving to London from Bermuda as a teenager, Best made a name for himself as a goal-scorer but faced constant racist abuse from opposition fans.

Picture: Pierre Emerick Aubameyang takes a knee before Arsenal's match away to Manchester City. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02y0w0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9cq48)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpmd4d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0whd)
Dame Vera Lynn

Dame Vera Lynn began her career singing in London's working men's clubs at the age of 7 and became the Forces' Sweetheart after being chosen by the BBC to win the propoganda war as the 'girl next door' reuniting soldiers and their sweethearts via the Radio programme, 'Sincerely Yours'. These programmes and her trips to places like Burma with ENSA during the rest of the war years, cemented her in the hearts of those troops forever and not just in the UK.
Dame Vera was a trailblazer she knew her own mind and always chose her own songs and she was a record breaker, she became the first artist to have a no 1 in the US Charts with 'Auf Wiedersehn' and the first centenarian to be in the UK Charts in 2017 at her 100th birthday.

Tessa Dunlop, author and historian, presents this celebration of the formidable 'Forces Sweetheart' with archive and interviews including Katherine Jenkins, Virginia Lewis-Jones and fellow centenarians.

Image: Vera Lynn, pictured in 2007 (Credit: Fiona Hanson/PA Wire)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02y4m4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6sy)
Dance and wash the dishes with Laetitia Sadier and Peter Zummo

Stereolab founder Laetitia Sadier chats to Mabe Fratti, Peter Zummo, and Zooey’s Marie Merlet.

French singer, keyboardist, percussionist and trombonist Laetitia Sadier has worked with the likes of Blur, Luna, Deerhoof, Common, Mouse on Mars, and Tyler, The Creator. She’s asking the guests how they overcome hurdles, how they define originality, expanding musical ideas, and what sparks the creative process.

Answering these tough questions is American composer, trombonist and producer Peter Zummo. He’s perhaps most famous for his years of work with cellist and producer Arthur Russell, plus the Love of Life orchestra, Flying Hearts, and Lounge Lizards, which saw him create a style that he wryly termed "minimalism plus a whole lot more". Guatemalan cellist, singer, and sound artist Mabe Fratti started playing the cello when she was just eight years old. She released her debut album Pies Sobre la Tierra earlier this year to critical acclaim. And French singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Marie Merlet completes the line-up. You might also know her as Iko Cherie; she also makes up one half of French duo Zooey with Matthieu Beck, and used to be in the French post-rock band Monade with host Laetitia.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3ghpkty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdnhctz)
Brazil passes one million coronavirus cases

The new figure was revealed hours after the World Health Organization warned that the pandemic was entering a "new and dangerous" phase.
Also on the programme: After a gap of more than three months because of the coronavirus pandemic, President Trump is due to resume campaign rallies with an event in Tulsa today; and a divine calling to a drive-in church service.

(Photo: An open mass grave is seen on May 27, 2020 in Manaus, Brazil. Photo by Andre Coelho/Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02yd3d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l66k7hvlv)
Live Premier League commentary

The Premier League is back and with that Sportsworld brings you live commentary of Brighton & Hove Albion against Arsenal. Sportsworld will be joined by Anita Asante from Chelsea Ladies, the Champions League winner Benni McCarthy and the Euro 2016 winner and former Southampton and West Ham defender Jose Fonte. Plus all the latest updates from all games in the Premier League.

As men's sport returns and continues to dominate headlines we'll be finding out what's next for women's sport amid the coronavirus pandemic.

And we'll have the latest from all the major football leagues across Europe.

Photo credit: Granit Xhaka of takes on Leandro Trossard during the Premier League match between Arsenal FC and Brighton & Hove Albion at Emirates Stadium in December 2019 (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02yw2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9dkc5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpn7c9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Over to You (w3cszf4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02yzv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Coronavirus and Your Money (w3ct0t2w)
Class of Covid-19: Should I go to university?

The pandemic has led to job cuts and reduced salaries, so does going to university still make financial sense? And if you took a cut in wages during lockdown but are now back at work, how should you talk to your boss about pay?

Listeners share their stories and get expert advice on managing money in the time of coronavirus, including:

- How to increase your chances of getting a job in the post-pandemic world.

- Whether a change of career is a good idea right now.

- And where you can get financial help if you are struggling to survive.

Plus money for nothing – the arguments for a universal basic income - where everyone is guaranteed a minimum wage without the need to work for it.

Email the team your stories, questions and suggestions: yourmoney@bbc.com

Paul Lewis and Manuela Saragosa are joined by:

Oluwatosin Olaseinde, founder of Money Africa in Nigeria
Farnoosh Torabi, the award-winning financial strategist and host of the So Money podcast in the US
Mitul Lakhani, the CEO of iMoney a financial comparison website operating in Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.
Professor Andrew Norton, an expert in higher education based at the Australia National University.
Leire Rincon, chair of Universal Basic Income Europe.

Producer: Joe Kent
Editor: Emma Rippon

(Image: Socially distanced Graduation, Credit: Reuters)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02z3l5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2x)
Director Spike Lee

This week on The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi, director Spike Lee talks about his latest feature film Da 5 Bloods which follows a group of African American veterans who return to Vietnam. Pop superstar Lady Gaga discusses releasing her new album during lockdown and singer songwriter Imelda May explains why she’s turned to poetry.

Hollywood heavyweight Judd Apatow talks about making a more poignant sort of comedy with his new movie The King of Staten Island, Miranda July reminisces about distributing her early films on VHS tapes and music journalist Armen Manukyan takes listeners on a musical road trip around Armenia.

Nikki is joined by the writer and film-maker Bidisha and the director Dominik Moll who discusses his tense and complex thriller Only the Animals.

(Photo: Spike Lee. Credit: Jeff Overs / BBC)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3ghqjsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdnjbt0)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02zc2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpnqbt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Outlook (w3cszdzw)
Dynamo: turning illness into magic

Steven Frayne, aka Dynamo, isn't your usual white-gloved magician pulling rabbits out of hats. His tricks have seen him walk on water and stroll down the side of a huge building. He's one of the world's most celebrated magicians but it hasn't been an easy path to success for the British entertainer. His entire life has been hampered by Crohn's disease, a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease. But this adversity has been the source of inspiration for some of his best tricks.

His latest TV show Dynamo: Beyond Belief is available now on Sky One.

Presented and produced by Saskia Edwards

Picture: Dynamo in a city street at night
Credit: courtesy of Clare Britt


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02zgtk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9f52t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpnv2y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70q)
In retrospect

In the penultimate edition of Boston Calling, we’re looking back at some of the moments, from the past eight or so years, that have shaped the world and this programme. We start in 2012, also an election year, finding out how the role of the US presidency and American power looked to the world then. We also take a look back at the Boston Marathon bombings of 2013. We reflect on the US role in the Middle East, and the impact that military deployments have on the lives of US soldiers. Finally, we revisit a conversation with comedian Trevor Noah, from the day after the election of Donald Trump in 2016.

Photo: Passengers pass through the main concourse at St. Pancras Station, in April 2018, in London, England. Credit: Richard Baker/Getty Images Images



SUNDAY 21 JUNE 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66m5jb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Worklifeindia (w3cszvgt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xt9jsq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v7b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02zv1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9fjb6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpp6bb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1m)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

New planes, new rules

Ramping up Spitfire production requires another new factory. Bigger, better, full of cutting-edge machinery and the best workers in the business. But it’s a catastrophe – one that nearly costs Britain dearly.


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66mf0l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t97)
Reporting Covid-19

As the pandemic continues to impact the world, BBC World Service's Nina Robinson, talks to journalists from two daily newspapers in India and the United States as we explore its impact on people in their regions.
Working with experienced editors and reporters from the daily Mumbai Mirror and Kentucky’s Courier Journal, this documentary gets under the skin of two newsrooms during this time of great uncertainty as each country comes to terms with coronavirus, handling lockdowns, hospital admissions and the unequal impact the virus is having on the poor and on ethnic minorities.
Nina taps into daily editorial meetings on Zoom and talks to staff on both papers, finding important news stories they are following closely, offering insight into how these newspapers are reporting Covid-19 in Louisville, Kentucky and Mumbai in India.

Producer/presenter: Nina Robinson

(Photo: Mumbai Mirror newspaper stack Credit: Nina Robinson)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66mjrq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xt9x13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03069b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9fwkl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qppkkq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8c)
Tumi Morake: South Africa’s pioneering comedian

Tumi Morake’s comedy confronts tough areas from discrimination to poverty, corruption to inequality. Her fearless performances have seen her both lauded and severely criticized. In 2018 she became the first African woman to have her own stand-up show on Netflix but she has also received threats for her work which highlights the continuing inequalities of modern day South Africa. Reporter Mpho Lakaje speaks to Tumi about using comedy to make her voice heard.

At the start of the coronavirus lockdown comedy duo Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini swapped their New York apartment for a remote cabin in the Canadian wilderness. For the Cultural Frontline they share a postcard with their views on the events taking place back in the USA.

Making an audience laugh is tricky at the best of times, but lockdown has made it much harder. Comedians Bright Okpocha AKA Basketmouth and Prashasti Singh tell us about the brave new world of producing comedy for social media, and discuss the future of the industry in Nigeria and India.

Has a comedian, a musician or a sports star ever changed the way you see the world? Have they made you stand a little bit taller or feel that little bit more confident as you take on life’s challenges? The Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani reflects on the impact of his idol and inspiration the boxer, Muhammad Ali.

Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo: Tumi Morake. Credit: Kevin Mark Pass/Blu Blood Africa)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66ms7z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0k)
Why does music affect the way we feel?

An exploration of why and how music can exert a powerful effect on our emotions. Why does one particular collection of notes make us want to get up and dance, and another calm us down?

Edwina Pitman hears from record producer turned neuroscientist Daniel Levitin about how our brains process music and from psychologist Victoria Williamson about how we react to the memories that sounds trigger. Renowned Hollywood film composer Brian Tyler demonstrates how he creates music that reflects the many shades of emotional grey between happy and sad, and Emmanuel Jal, the South Sudanese-Canadian musician and former child soldier, reveals how music helped him come to terms with the trauma of his childhood.

Guests:
Bryan Tyler - film composer and conductor
Dr Daniel Levitin - neuroscientist, and Founding Dean of Arts & Humanities at The Minerva Schools at KGI and author of This Is Your Brain On Music
Dr Victoria Williamson - Lecturer in Music Psychology at the University of Sheffield and author of You Are The Music
Rob Wood - founder of Music Concierge
Bibi Heal - opera singer
Emmanuel Jal - singer and musician

Presented and produced by Edwina Pitman
Editor: Andy Smith


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtb4jc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 06:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxf)
Who should be quarantined?

Some countries are requiring new arrivals to self-isolate, a policy designed to stop infection spreading from areas of high prevalence to low prevalence. Tim Harford and Ruth Alexander find out which countries have the highest rate of Covid-19 infection.
Plus, is it really true that the coronavirus mostly kills people who would die soon anyway?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producers: Ruth Alexander and Kate Lamble

(Passengers wearing PPE arrive at Heathrow airport in London UK. Credit: Tolga Akmen/Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66mx03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 The Documentary (w3csz4f8)
Robots on the road

The world’s biggest car makers and technology companies are investing billions of dollars in autonomous vehicles. They believe it’s just a few years before computers with high-tech sensors do the driving for us, filling our roads with robot cars ferrying human passengers from A to B. But is a driverless future really just around the corner?

The BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones travels to Arizona in the US – a hotbed for autonomous vehicle testing – to try out the robot taxi service developed by Google that’s already ferrying paying passengers around the suburbs of Phoenix, and discovers that robots still have a lot of learning to do when it comes to the tough driving conditions on busy American freeways. He also hears how Arizona locals have responded to sharing their roads with robots, and visits the Phoenix suburb that saw the first fatal accident involving a driverless car to ask if autonomous technology will ever be safe enough to gain public acceptance. Despite those challenges, we hear from car-maker Ford about its plans for a driverless car service in the next two years as car makers race to keep up with tech firms like Google and Uber in the autonomous driving space, and critics of the technology discuss how robot cars might change the dynamic between cars, pedestrians and other road users forever.

(Photo: Pilot models of the Uber self-driving car is displayed at the Uber Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Credit: Angelo Merendino/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtb88h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 The Conversation (w3csynk8)
Social media poetry stars

Poets Leticia Sala and Nikita Gill on being taken seriously by the establishment after launching their careers on social media. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about overcoming snobbery around the title 'insta-poet' and balancing being able to share their work with millions of people with the immediacy of follower feedback.

Nikita Gill is a British-Indian writer and artist. Born in Belfast, she spent the majority of her childhood in New Delhi. She had poems published in papers and magazines as a teenager but went on to study a 'more practical' degree. She began posting her poetry on Tumblr in 2015 and later on Instagram, where she now has over half a million followers. She's since had five books of poetry published.

Leticia Sala is a Spanish poet and writer. A law graduate, she always assumed she couldn't earn a living as a professional poet, but then started getting huge feedback on poems she wrote and posted on social media in her spare time. She very quickly signed a book deal and has a huge online following in Europe and Latin America.

Image credits
L: Leticia Sala (Paloma Lanna)
R: Nikita Gill (BBC)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66n0r7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxy)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 8. Partition

1947. A vote is due to take place at the UN, proposing that Palestine be divided into two states, with Jerusalem held under international jurisdiction. But this does not meet with everyone’s approval. The drama continues.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Miriam: Shani Erez
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Ben-Gurion: Elliot Levey
Zahra: Lara Sawalha
Musa Alami: Sargon Yelda
Mohammed: Ramzi Dehani
Judah Magnes: Neil McCaul
Other parts: Jessica Turner, Steve Waters and Sargon Yelda

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtbd0m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3csvsc0)
Antonio Carluccio: My life in five dishes

Antonio Carluccio describes his most memorable dishes in his last ever interview. The cook, restaurateur and writer, known as the 'Godfather of Italian cooking', died five days after this recording was made, aged 80.

He tells Emily Thomas about his passion for simple, authentic Italian cuisine, and why he only began to pursue it professionally relatively late in life. He describes his horror at Britain's version of Italian food in the 1970s, his obsession with mushrooms, and reveals how much the late opera singer Luciano Pavarotti could devour in one sitting.

Plus, hear about his struggles with fame and heartache, the tensions that came with expanding his eponymous chain of restaurants and delis, and the dish he would choose as his last.

This interview was first broadcast on 16 November 2017.

(Picture: Antonio Carluccio. Credit: Fred Duval/FilmMagic via Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv030p8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9gck3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpq1k7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66n87h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3j)
How will Hollywood respond to the Black Lives Matter and Me Too movements?

Why is the movie business having trouble representing the world’s population on and behind the big screen? A rising share of the U.S. population are black, more than half of the demographic are female – so why is it so difficult to translate this into cinema?

Hollywood has found itself red-faced in an era of Black Lives Matter and MeToo movements. From #OscarsSoWhite to criticism of who’s behind the films we see, the pressure to change is stacking up.

Charmaine Cozier discovers the issues within the industry and what movie bosses prioritise over diversity. But will activists, actors and data be enough to convince big studios that the revolution is here – or will it just be business as usual?

Guests:
April Reign, Diversity and Inclusion Advocate and creator of the #OscarsSoWhite movement
Naomi McDougall-Jones, a film producer, writer and women in film activist
Darnell Hunt, Dean of Social Sciences at UCLA and Professor of Sociology in African American Studies. He is co-author of the UCLA Hollywood Diversity report
Bonnie Greer, a writer and critic


Presenter: Charmaine Cozier/ Producer: Bethan Head

(Actor John Boyega raises his fist in protest at a Black Lives Matter march in London, UK (Credit: Daniel Leal-Olivas /Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtbmhw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszdzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv030xs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9gm1c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpq91h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w3g)
Redemption in recycling

In Philadelphia, husband and wife George and Mimi Limbach sit down in an old warehouse with 15 men who have recently been released from prison. Surrounding them are hundreds of old computers, which these former inmates will soon recycle as part of a rehabilitation programme underpinned by the couples Christian faith. They feel by offering these former offenders work they are keeping true to values such as forgiveness, love and second chances. “No one is here to judge. We are all on the same level,” George tells the young men.

In this programme, Colm Flynn travels to the computer recycling centre in a disadvantaged neighbourhood in Philadelphia to meet some of the former inmates who are building a better future "one computer tower at a time." We hear their raw stories, and hear why George and Mimi feel these people deserve a chance despite their past crimes.

Presenter: Colm Flynn


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66nhqr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Coronavirus and Your Money (w3ct0t2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3ghsgr1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdnl8r2)
Trump's Tulsa rally fails to draw expected crowds

President Trump's team said that a million people had asked for tickets, but the 19,000 seat arena was far from full. Mr Trump blamed the media for the poor attendance, saying there were 'bad people' outside who had scared off his supporters. Also on the programme: Spanish hotel and restaurant owners hope to have a smile on their face as the country reopens for European tourists; Serbia holds an election today - but why is the opposition not taking part ? And Sir David Attenborough on the troubles faced by London Zoo in a pandemic.

(Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump holds his first re-election campaign rally in several months in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Credit: Reuters/Leah Millis)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66nr70)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66nvz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvh)
Bertha von Suttner: A champion of peace

Bertha von Suttner’s path to becoming a leading 19th-century pacifist and the first woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize was far from straightforward. The product of the aristocratic and militaristic world of 19th century Bohemia, as a young woman von Suttner eloped to the Caucasus and turned her hand to writing for a living. On her return to Europe she published an acclaimed anti-war novel, Lay Down Your Arms, a work that marked the start of her quest for disarmament. Her long friendship with Alfred Nobel finally bore fruit in the Swedish industrialist’s last will which included the Peace Prize.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr. Barbara Burns, Reader in German at Glasgow University, and the editor of a new English edition of Lay Down Your Arms; Dr. Peter van den Dungen, former Lecturer in Peace Studies at the University of Bradford and until recently General Coordinator of the International Network of Museums for Peace; and musician Stefan Frankenberger, the author of an audio book called The Unknown Soldier, In memory of Bertha von Suttner.

[Photo: Bertha von Suttner (nee Kinsky),c.1870 Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66nzq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l66k7m006)
Live Premier League commentary

The Premier League is back and Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of Aston Villa against Chelsea. We'll bring you up to date with all the latest from the day's Premier League matches. We'll have all the build up to the late kick off which sees Liverpool face Everton in the Merseyside derby.
And we'll be talking all things Jordan Henderson as he prepares to become the first captain of Liverpool since Alan Hansen in 1990 to lift the Premier League trophy.

Plus, we'll be talking Netball as the ANZ Premiership returns in New Zealand. And the LGPA is set to return so what can we expect for women's golf in the coming months.

Photo credit: Christian Pulisic and Ezro Konsa in action during the Premier League match between Chelsea FC and Aston Villa at Stamford Bridge in December 2019 (Getty Images).


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv031wr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9hl0d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpr80j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 The Documentary (w3ct0whd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66pgps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6sy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3ghtfq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdnm7q3)
UK park stabbing declared 'terrorist incident'

Three people have died and three more have been seriously injured after stabbings in a park in Reading. The attack, on Saturday evening, is being treated as a 'terrorist incident'.

Also in the programme: Sir David Attenborough tells us why he's so keen to save London zoo from closure, and did K-pop fans and users of TikTok sabotage Donald Trump’s Saturday night rally in Tulsa?

(Picture: Forensic officers work near Forbury Gardens, in Reading town centre, the scene of a multiple stabbing attack which took place at around 7pm on Saturday leaving three people dead and another three seriously injured. Credit: Aaron Chown/PA Wire)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr66pq61)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xtd2gf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv032cqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9j1zx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qprr01)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]



MONDAY 22 JUNE 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv032m6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57mrbg2rny)
Crime on the high seas

Brazil has become the second country in the world to confirm that it has more than one million cases of Covid-19. Eduardo Gomez of the College of Health at Lehigh University explains how the country got its response wrong. Then, we hear why high seas piracy is on the rise. Cindy Sui in Taiwan explains the reasons behind the increase in parts of Asia. We also hear from former Royal Marine Stephen Askins, who is now involved in getting hostages safely home.

Photo: Nigerian special forces sail to intercept pirates during a joint exercise between Nigerian and Moroccan navy personnel in 2019 (Credit: Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qprzh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3csvsc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv032qz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1ln8hg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qps37f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5s)
Do animals have consciousness?

What exactly it means to be conscious has long been a question of profound debate amongst philosophers, and more recently, scientists. There are no easy answers, and it gets even trickier when you start asking whether animals are conscious: how can you find out about their subjective experience when they can’t tell you about it?

Never afraid to tackle the impossible, CrowdScience is looking for answers after listener Natalie got in touch. She has lived with her cat for years and has a strong sense that he has thoughts and feelings: he has his own personality, acts in complex ways, and even has ‘grumpy days’. But is this consciousness? Is there any way of scientifically testing for it? How different from our own inner world is that of a cat, an octopus, or a bumblebee? And if we can find any answers to these puzzling questions, how does that affect the way we treat animals - not just our pets, but all the animals we share our planet with?

We meet Natalie and her cat, and discover how scientists have explored the minds of pigs, cows and cuttlefish. Helping us ponder the elusive question of animal consciousness are philosopher Peter Godfrey-Smith, neuroscientist Anil Seth, animal welfare expert Donald Broom, ethicist Jessica Pierce, and comparative psychologist Alex Schnell.

Featuring David Seddon as the voice of Chicco the Cat.

Presented by Anand Jagatia and Produced by Cathy Edwards for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Black Cat. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv032vq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh4z)
Clyde Best: A black footballing pioneer

Bermuda-born Clyde Best came to England as a teenager in 1968 and went on to play for West Ham United alongside the likes of Bobby Moore and Geoff Hurst. Best made a name for himself as a talented goal-scorer in more than 200 appearances for the Hammers, but he faced constant racist abuse from fans, and on occasion, from opposition players. Now in his 60s, Clyde Best has been telling Mike Lanchin about how he stood up to the racists in English soccer.

Photo: Clyde Best on the ball, 4th March 1972. Credit: Mirror Group Newspapers/Mirrorpix/Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv032zg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lnhzq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpsbqp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Why Factor (w3csyv0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 04:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:50 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03336f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4q4nf)
Coronavirus: biggest rise in global cases

We hear from Brazil, one of the countries worst affected - and why Australia is having to bring back tougher restrictions after a rise in infections.

Will John Bolton's revelations about life in the White House affect how Americans vote this autumn? He says he won't be voting for his former boss.

And how letters between two towns with the same names in the UK and US over slavery in the 1840's have led to a joint Black Lives Matter campaign now, in 2020.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0336yk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4q8dk)
A record single day jump is recorded in global coronavirus cases

North and South America have registered the most new infections - with Brazil only the second country behind the US to pass 50 thousand deaths mark.

Ahead of the publication of his memoir, President Trump's former US national security adviser John Bolton says his former boss is not fit for for office and he won't vote for him in the election.

Plus we hear from a photographer who took photos at the site of the latest Covid-19 outbreak in Bejing about his experience of being 'tracked and tested'.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv033bpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4qd4p)
WHO records biggest global one day increase of coronavirus cases

Are the numbers dying in India actually much higher than those reported?

As countries begin to lift some Covid-19 restrictions - how are they responding to spikes in the virus as they appear?

And as he releases his memoirs, Donald Trump's former National Security Adviser John Bolton says he won't be voting for his old boss in the forthcoming Presidential elections.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv033gft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1y)
Judge Chile Eboe-Osuji: President of the International Criminal Court

President Trump has just widened the scope of US sanctions placed on top officials of the International Criminal Court describing the court as an extraordinary threat to the United States. Stephen Sackur speaks to the president of the ICC, Judge Chile Eboe-Osuji. It was an institution set up to end impunity for the worst of crimes – is it time to conclude that grand ambition will never be realised?

(Photo: President of the ICC, Judge Chile Eboe-Osuji)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpstq6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jf)
Will China embrace fake meat?

In today's programme, Elizabeth Hotson asks how supply chain issues in China’s pork industry could help home grown meat alternatives go mainstream. As pork prices rise and China looks to new forms of protein, we hear from David Yeung from Green Monday, the company behind popular mock-pork product, OmniPork. A rival for the synthetic pork crown, Vince Lu from Zhenmeat, tells us why he has high hopes that his meat free tenderloin will corner the hot pot market and Matilda Ho, founder of Bits x Bites, a food tech VC fund, explains why she's investing in the alternative protein market. We also hear from Bruce Friedrich, co-founder of the Good Food Institute which promotes plant-based alternatives to animal protein. And Shaun Rein, Managing Director of the China Market Research Group asks whether the sales match the hype.

Picture: Soup dumplings with OmniPork filling via OmniPork


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmk0)
The New Deal

When Franklin D Roosevelt became President in 1933 he promised to spend his first 100 days rescuing the USA from the Great Depression with one of the biggest public spending projects in history - the New Deal.

Photo: Franklin D Roosevelt in 1935. Credit: Getty Images.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv033l5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0w57)
The edge of change

Amol Rajan and an international panel of guests discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has created an opportunity to reshape our world. In nations across the globe, it exposes underlying tensions within and between communities - whether over inequality, age, wealth or nationalism. Does this brutal disease paradoxically create the conditions necessary for radical change in our societies, economies and international relations?

Contributors include:
Tony Blair, former British prime minister
Michelle Bachelet, former president of Chile
Kevin Rudd, former Australian prime minister
George Osborne, former British chancellor
Amani al-Khatahtbeh, author, tech entrepreneur and candidate for the United States House of Representatives
Zoltan Kovacs, Hungarian secretary of state for public diplomacy and relations

Producer: Ben Crighton
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight

Part of BBC radio’s Rethink week.


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv033py2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS (w172xm4lszzsg9n)
Coronavirus conversations: Another Beijing lockdown

We speak to people in China's capital, Beijing, where a fresh spike of Covid-19 cases has been detected. Fan Fan and Richard tell us what it feels like to go through lockdown all over again.

Meanwhile, the most intense outbreaks are now in Latin America. We hear accounts of how communities in countries including Peru and Colombia are dealing with the disease.

As restrictions ease elsewhere, businesses are preparing to open again in a very different world. We bring together business owners in Botswana, Turkey and the United States to talk about the challenges they face and their hopes for the future.

One consequence of coronavirus lockdowns being discussed around the world is an increase in reported cases of domestic abuse. We hear the experience of one woman in Texas who managed to escape her violent relationship.

Picture: Fan Yingziong


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpt26g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv033tp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lpc6m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpt5yl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3csynkj)
Vegan campaigners

Is veganism more than just a food fad or diet trend? Research suggests the majority of vegans are female - why? Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who promote a vegan diet about the challenges they face getting their message across - and the anger they encounter from those who see it as a criticism of their own choices.

Selene Nelson is a British American freelance journalist, activist and author of Yes Ve-gan! In 2018 she offered an article to a supermarket chain magazine on vegan cookery and the editor responded including a joke suggestion for a series on “killing vegans one by one”. When his email was included in an article about hostile attitudes to vegans it caused such a furore he resigned.

Itua Iyoha set up Eat Right Naija after transitioning to a vegan diet herself. She wants to share what she's learned with others in Nigeria and support them to make the change. She says she faces questions about whether she can't afford meat, is seriously ill or whether she'll ever find a man to marry her.

IMAGE CREDITS:
L: Itua Iyoha (Credit, Itua Iyoha)
R: Selene Nelson (Credit, Selene Nelson)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv033yfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd35)
The deserted island and the lost graves

In 1979, a teenage Carina Hoang and her siblings boarded a rickety boat with other refugees fleeing Vietnam after the end of the war. They thought they were heading to a refugee camp, but when their boat was turned away from Malaysia, they found themselves stranded on an uninhabited island in the South China Sea. They awaited rescue while more and more boatloads of people filled up the beach. Sleeping out in the rain and fighting off starvation and disease, Carina knew that she had to stay alive to keep her younger siblings safe.

They were finally rescued three months later and were reunited with family members who'd faced similar ordeals on nearby islands. Not all of them had survived. Many years later, Carina's aunt was still haunted by the fact she hadn't been able to give her son a proper burial. So Carina decided to return to the island, determined to find his grave and bring peace to their family. It would be the first of many such trips, because when other refugees heard of Carina's mission, they started calling her, asking for help in finding their loved ones.

Carina's book is called Boat People: Personal Stories from the Vietnamese Exodus 1975-1996.

Presented by Emily Webb
Produced by Mariana Des Forges

Photo: Carina Hoang on her return to the islands
Credit: Carina Hoang


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03425g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lplpw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qptffv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0345xl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nyt4ng)
Brazil becomes second country to pass 50,000 coronavirus deaths

Brazil becomes the second country after the US to record more than 50,000 Covid-19 deaths. Two days ago, the country passed the one million mark for confirmed cases. President Jair Bolsonaro has been heavily criticised for his response to the outbreak of the virus. He has opposed lockdowns and openly disagreed with advice from his government's own health ministry.

Also in the programme: Germany sees another case of hundreds testing positive for coronavirus at a slaughterhouse; and an extensive neolithic circle of deep shafts is found near Stonehenge.

(Photo: People attend an anti-racist protest and against the government of President Jair Bolsonaro amidst the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic at the Esplanada dos Ministerios on 21 June 2020 in Brasilia. Brazil has over 1,000,000 confirmed positive cases of Coronavirus and has over 50,000 deaths. Credit: Andressa Anholete/Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0349nq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qptny3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltw3xpsy5q)
Wirecard admits $2.1bn is missing

Scandal-hit German payments firm Wirecard admitted $2.1bn is missing from the Philippines. Dan McCrum of the Financial Times brings us the latest details. Also in the programme, whilst the coronavirus pandemic has supercharged the move towards home working, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan questions the wisdom of those who argue there may be no need for lots of workers to return to the office ever again. A major outbreak of Covid-19 at a meat processing plant in north-western Germany has forced 7,000 people into quarantine. Peter Schmidt from the Food, Beverages and Catering Union in Hamburg tells us why he thinks German meat processing plants have been falling victim. Plus, we ask whether a lack of live support could force some rugby clubs out of business. Eric de Cromieres is president of France’s Clermont Auvergne club, and describes their challenges. And we hear there have also been difficult decisions for Colin Mansbridge, chief executive of the most successful rugby club on the planet, the Crusaders of Christchurch, New Zealand.

(Picture: A wirecard building. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv034fdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qptsp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3csynkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv034k4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss375698g)
Coronavirus conversations: Tennis cases

Top men's tennis player Grigor Dimitrov has tested positive for coronavirus after playing a tournament organised by men's world number one, Novak Djokovic. There's now a conversation online about whether it was a good idea to stage the tournament in Croatia so early in Europe's recovery phase from Covid-19. We hear from someone who went to watch one of the events in the series.

We also explain the important issues of the moment on the global pandemic with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University - including why there are so many outbreaks in meat processing plants and why the global case numbers have reached 183,000 per day. You can ask your questions for future editions using WhatsApp: +447730751925 or Twitter: @BBCOS.

We return to a conversation with three African-American women who have researched the stories of their own forebears who were enslaved. How does that knowledge shape the way they think about the issues of today?

Picture: Novak Djokovic with Grigor Dimitrov during their doubles match at the Novak Tennis Centre in Belgrade, Serbia on June 12th (REUTERS/Marko Djurica).


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv034nx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv034sn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lqb5n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpv4xm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkpcbgk6k)
2020/06/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv034xdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpv8nr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0t93)
The Origin of Stuff

Fork

The fork is essential. Even camping without one is a false economy, in Katy’s experience. Even a spork - with a spoon at one end and a fork at the other, with a knife formed along one prong - just won’t do. You need both - a fork to steady the meat and a knife to cut it with.

So how did the fork come to be so indispensable?

We didn’t always love the fork. Public historian, Greg Jenner, reveals how it was abandoned for the chopstick in Ancient China, and greeted with scorn in Western Europe when a Byzantine princess ate with a golden double-pronged one.

It was only after the traveller, Thomas Coryat, in 1608, celebrated its use by pasta-loving Italians that the English started to take note. By the mid-19th century, there was a fork for every culinary challenge – from the pickle and the berry, to ice-cream and the terrapin. The utensil transformed the dining experience, bringing the pocket knife onto the table in a blunt, round-tipped form, and ushering in British table manners.

So is there a perfect version of the fork? With the help of tomato, milkshake and mango, Katy discovers that the material a fork is made from can drastically alter a food’s taste.

Featuring material scientist, Zoe Laughlin, and food writer and historian, Bee Wilson.

Picture: a fork, Credit: BBC


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03514h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nytzwc)
US and Russia restart nuclear talks

Russia and the United States have resumed talks on extending a major nuclear disarmament treaty. We speak to Former United States Secretary of Defence Robert Gates.

Also in the programme: the thoughts of the Pope on his vision for a post-pandemic world, and the Italian musicians who took to boats to beat the blues.

(Picture: A Russian policeman wearing protective face mask guards in front of Russian strategic nuclear missiles RS-24 Yars which moves along a street prior to a night rehearsal of the Victory military parade in the Red Square, in Moscow, Russia, 17 June 2020. Credit: EPA/SERGEI ILNITSKY)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0354wm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Why Factor (w3csyv0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpvj50)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3csynkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0358mr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9lyx0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpvmx4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58g621vs5c)
Wirecard admits $2.1bn is missing

Scandal-hit German payments firm Wirecard admitted $2.1bn is missing from the Philippines. Dan McCrum of the Financial Times brings us the latest details. Also in the programme, whilst the coronavirus pandemic has supercharged the move towards home working, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan questions the wisdom of those who argue there may be no need for lots of workers to return to the office ever again. A major outbreak of Covid-19 at a meat processing plant in north-western Germany has forced 7,000 people into quarantine. Peter Schmidt from the Food, Beverages and Catering Union in Hamburg tells us why he thinks German meat processing plants have been falling victim. Plus, we ask whether a lack of live support could force some rugby clubs out of business. Eric de Cromieres is president of France’s Clermont Auvergne club, and describes their challenges. And we hear there have also been difficult decisions for Colin Mansbridge, chief executive of the most successful rugby club on the planet, the Crusaders of Christchurch, New Zealand.

(Picture: A wirecard building. Picture credit: EPA.)



TUESDAY 23 JUNE 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv035j40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18sp3syjb6)
Apple ditches Intel

Intel had faced problems manufacturing its own designs, leading it to issue a public apology to computer-makers. Apple's challenge will be to carry off the transition smoothly to using in-house chips and convince third-party developers to update their apps accordingly. We talk to the BBC's James Clayton in California. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has banned international visitors from making the Islamic pilgrimage, or Hajj, this year in a bid to control coronavirus. However, locals will be allowed to attend, allowing the spirit of the Hajj to live on. We speak to Rashid Mogradia, founder and Chief Executive of the Council of British Hajjis. And can Rugby survive the lockdown? Teams are struggling to pay salaries and don't know when they can get spectators back into the stadia. (Picture: An iPhone. Credit: iStock Editorial/ Getty Images Plus)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv035mw4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lr5dk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpw04j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct0t93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv035rm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv035wcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lrdwt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpw7ms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct0v1t)
New York Covid-19 diary

Public health physician Dr Tom Frieden reflects on the ongoing global pandemic. An expert in infectious disease, Dr Frieden is a former director of the US States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He was a leading figure in the global response to the Ebola outbreak and he now heads Resolve to Save Lives, an Initiative of Vital Strategies, an organisation dedicated to the prevention of epidemics.

From his New York apartment, Dr Frieden provides his unique insight on the unfolding international situation. He records his response to key moments in the development of the pandemic and the measures being taken to face it in the United States, Africa and across the world.
As well as analysis, he offers his own personal viewpoint on lockdown life by the Hudson River. Dr Frieden’s home city of New York has become the epicentre of the virus and his recordings give us an individual perspective on the impact of the disease for communities both local and global.

Producer: Sam Peach

(Photo: Times Square screens are illuminated in blue as part of the "Light It Blue" initiative to honor healthcare workers, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease. Credit: Eduardo Munoz/ Reuters)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03603j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4t1kj)
Confusion over China-US trade deal

Trump tweets deal IS still on, after his trade adviser tells reporters it has been cancelled.

We hear from Germany where 10 million people have signed up to a track and trace app. But with privacy concerns, not everyone is happy.

And we hear how two million travellers will have to cancel their plans for Hajj.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0363vn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4t59n)
Is the trade deal between the US and China on or off?

President Trump's trade adviser said it was off in a TV interview only to backtrack once the President tweeted that it was "still intact". So what's the truth?

Coronavirus is peaking in the US, where there's a quarter of all global infections. We take a look at why meat processing plants are acting as super-spreaders.

Plus in NASCAR, teams lined up behind Bubba Wallace, the sport's only black top flight driver, after a noose was found in his team's garage.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0367ls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4t91s)
US stock markets react to confusion over China deal

White House adviser Peter Navarro said the trade deal with China was over. President Trump later tweeted that the deal was "fully intact".

In Iraq, the coronavirus is starting to bite. 1800 new cases were diagnosed on Monday.

And Saudi officials declare that the Hajj is on but only for some, with international pilgrims told to stay away.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv036cbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv17)
How tech is tackling wildlife trafficking

New technology is helping in the fight against wildlife poaching. Computer scientists have created a programme that uses artificial intelligence to predict where poachers are going to strike; a new generation of smart cameras is catching the criminals red-handed; and the latest police forensic techniques are being adapted to investigate these crimes.

The aim is to put a stop to the illegal trade of wildlife trafficking, which is worth billions of dollars and is threatening the survival of species such as elephants, rhinos and tigers. Each year 20,000 elephants are killed for their ivory, according to WWF estimates.

Reporter and producer: Richard Kenny

Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpwqm9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89g)
Lifting the lockdowns

Ever since governments first began trying to contain the coronavirus pandemic, economists and pundits around the world have debated the apparent trade-off between protecting public health, and minimising the economic harm that the containment measure would likely cause.

But is the whole idea of health versus wealth wrongheaded? We hear from Jo Michell, associate professor in economics at the Bristol Business School, and from Laurence Boone, chief economist at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Meanwhile, businesses and workers around the UK are holding their breath for the end of lockdown, as the BBC’s Joshua Thorpe has been finding out.

(Picture: Woman reopening her small business after Covid-19; Credit: FatCamera/Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmpj)
South Korea's economic miracle

An eyewitness account of how a poor, war-ravaged nation became a global economic powerhouse. We hear the memories of Dr Kongdan Oh, who grew up in South Korea in the 1950s, in the aftermath of the Korean War. The country had been left devastated by the conflict. Then, in the early 1960s, South Korea's new military leader, General Park Chung-hee, launched an ambitious national drive for rapid economic growth. For many, it marked the start of South Korea's economic transformation.

Photo: South Korean labourers balancing baskets of coal, while working inside the grounds of a factory. Busan, 1967 (Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv036h31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0v1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpwvcf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0t93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv036lv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv036ql9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1ls83q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpx2vp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbb)
Demond Melancon: The bead master of New Orleans

This week’s In The Studio is presented by acclaimed actor and New Orleans resident Wendell Pierce (The Wire, Suits, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan). We join him as he meets Demond Melancon, a fine artist from New Orleans who is also the Big Chief of a Black Masking Indian tribe, the Young Seminole Hunters.

The Black Masking culture of New Orleans is a centuries-old African-American tradition. Around 45 neighbourhood groups - or tribes - spend thousands of hours each year hand-sewing exquisitely beaded ceremonial suits, trimmed with rhinestones, velvet ruffles, and hundreds of brightly coloured feathers. On Mardi Gras day they take to the streets to compete against each other for the prettiest suit.

Every suit tells a story, and this year Demond is depicting Ethiopian history and culture, beading an ancient Nyabinghi warrior on a white horse as the centerpiece of his front ‘apron’. Surrounding it on the left and right sides will be beaded portraits of Empress Menen Asfaw and her husband King Haile Selassie of Ethiopia. On his arms are patches with portraits of reggae music icon Vaughn Benjamin and an Ethiopian soldier.

Usually it takes 12 months of beading to make a suit, but Demond is a rising star of New Orleans’ contemporary art scene, and in high demand for exhibitions and art fairs across the USA, so this year he has just three months to prepare. We join him and his wife Alicia as he works night and day in his Bywater studio doing ‘the needle dance’, as he calls it, in the run up to the city’s world-famous Mardi Gras celebrations.

Produced by Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio Production for BBC World Service

Image: Big Chief Demond Melancon of the Young Seminole Hunters on Mardi Gras day in New Orleans (Credit: David Favret)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv036vbf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjq)
Fire and justice: my life after Grenfell

Antonio Roncolato was one of the last survivors to escape London’s Grenfell Tower fire in 2017. He had lived on the 10th floor for 27 years, and was only alerted to the fire when his son Christopher called him at around 01:40. He tried to leave the building but the corridors were filled with black smoke, and then came the official instruction – to stay put. He stayed there for over four hours and as the flames began to creep closer to his home, he called his son in desperation. Outside the building, Christopher took drastic action – crossing police lines to find a firefighter who could bring his father out alive. In the years since the fire, Antonio was one of the first residents to give evidence to the public inquiry into the disaster. He now has a new home and is continuing his fight for justice for the survivors.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Deiniol Buxon

Picture: Antonio Roncolato
Credit: Alessandro Allocca – LondraItalia


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv036z2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lshlz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpxbby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0t93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0372tp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nyx1kk)
England eases coronavirus restrictions

Virus restrictions are eased in England, as cases surge in the Americas. But is England coming out of lockdown too early? We hear from a doctor with the World Health Organisation.

Also in the programme: Malawi re-runs its disputed presidential election. And as police in Sicily make dozens of arrests in dawn raids against the mafia, an interview with the Mayor of the regional capital, Palermo.

(Photo: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaking in Parliament on 23 June 2020. Credit: EPA/UK PARLIAMENTARY RECORDING UNIT)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0376kt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0v1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpxkv6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwj0cx8fyd)
Nestle UK cuts ties with Fairtrade

Swiss confectioner Nestle is ending its relationship with the Fairtrade ethical trading initiative for its biggest selling KitKat bars in the UK. It will use its own sustainability programme from now on, and Michael Gidney, chief executive of the Fairtrade Foundation gives us his reaction to the news. Also in the programme, it has been announced that pubs, hotels and restaurants can reopen in the UK on July 4th. Sarah Weir is managing director of Albion and East, which runs four bar-restaurants in London, and tells us about their plans. We have a report from Mexico examining the economic impact that coronavirus has had on the country. Plus, with the ending of lockdown in Italy, some pet owners are concerned about the welfare of their animals as they return to work. Annalisa Voccia of the University of Verona explains why they’ve decided to let dog and cat owners bring their pets to work.

(Picture: A Nestle logo on a building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv037b9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpxplb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv037g22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss375965k)
Coronavirus conversations: What we've learnt

It's nearly six months since reports started to emerge from China of a mysterious pneumonia-like illness. We've been putting your coronavirus questions to several health experts during the pandemic. On this edition, we bring them together to talk about how far we've come in our knowledge of Covid-19 since the virus emerged. What are the key questions already answered? Which important questions remain? How close are we to a vaccine? And what has life been like for an epidemiologist or public health expert over the past few months?

Also - we go to Gutersloh in Germany where an outbreak at a meat processing plant means a new, local lockdown is now in place.

And the church in Atlanta where Rev Martin Luther King Jr once preached will hold a funeral service later for Rayshard Brooks, a black man shot dead by a police officer in a restaurant car park. We'll speak to people in the city.

Photo: A woman wearing a protective mask steps off a tram in the center of the Moroccan capital Rabat (FADEL SENNA/AFP via Getty Images).


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv037kt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv037pkb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lt72r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpy1tq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkpcbkg3n)
2020/06/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv037t9g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpy5kv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz982)
Nigerian internet land rights costs fall

A major problem in laying internet cables in Nigeria is the phenomenal cost of right of way charges – these are local state imposed fees to broadband providers. Ekiti, one of Nigeria’s smallest states, has cut its right of way charges by 96%. It will now cost $374 to lay a kilometre of broadband cable down from $11,600. Tech reporter Yomi Kazeem joins us from Lagos and explains that Ekiti aims to have full broadband access by 2021.

Superethics instead of superintelligence
Artificial intelligence research is striving towards creating machines that could surpass the human mind, but shouldn’t we focus on technologies that make us wiser instead of smarter? This is the central question in philosopher Pim Haselager’s most recent paper. He explains how we might use technology as moral crutches for ethical behaviour.

Solar Batteries storage
Renewable technology accounted for a quarter of energy production globally in 2018. It’s expected to rise to 45% by 2040. At the end of last year, the Pavagada solar park, in Karnataka, India, became fully operational. Spanning 53 square kilometres, and with a capacity of over 2000 megawatts, this is the largest solar farm in the world. But basic limitations still exist - what can be done to supply electricity when there isn’t sufficient sunlight? Our reporter, Jason Hosken, has been finding out about some energy storage solutions.


(Image: Nigeria network map. Credit: Getty Images)


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.


Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv037y1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nyxwsg)
Top health official warns of "disturbing" new US surge

America's top infectious disease expert has told lawmakers that the nation is seeing a "disturbing surge" in coronavirus infections in some states.

Also in the programme: We will hear why an Oxford vaccine trial is heading to South Africa; lockdown to be relaxed in England; and why an opera has been composed and performed about an imprisoned Turkish environmentalist and two snails.

(Photo: Dr Fauci testified to the congressional committee in person on Tuesday. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0381sq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct0v1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpyf23)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0385jv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9pvt3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpyjt7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58g621yp2g)
Mexico's 'powerful' earthquake

We hear from Mexico City, where a 'powerful' earthquake shook buildings - BBC Mundo's Marcos Gonzalez Diaz updates us on the response to the after-effects. Police in Nigeria say they have rescued 300 people who were locked in a rice-processing factory and forced to work throughout a coronavirus lockdown - from Abuja, editor-in-chief of the Daily Trust, Naziru Mikailu, tells us more. Plus, we analyse the latest on the day's stock market moves with Joe Saluzzi in New Jersey.

(Image: An search and rescue worker looks at a damaged building from the earthquake in Mexico on 23 June 2020. Credit: Manuel Velasquez/ Getty Images)



WEDNESDAY 24 JUNE 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv038f13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18sp3t1f79)
Warning over US's second coronavirus wave

A leading authority in the US's fight against coronavirus warns of a second wave - we'll look at how the US is dealing with its spike in new Covid 19 cases already being seen in Texas. We're in Mexico looking at how it too is facing up to the rising tide of coronavirus = and we'll be following the latest news on the earthquake in the coastal state of Oaxaca. In Nigeria, 300 workers have been found by police, forced to work in a rice factory for the duration of the lockdown, without being allowed to leave – we get the most recent detail and what it says about Nigeria’s complex labour market structure. And as workers across the globe return to their workplaces after lockdown: should pets be allowed in the office? We discuss all this with political journalist Erin Delmore in New York, and consultant and business advisor Simon Littlewood in Singapore.

(Image: A coronavirus crisis volunteer greets local residents in foreground. Credit: John Moore/ Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv038js7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lv29n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpyx1m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3csz982)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv038njc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv038s8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lv9sx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpz4jw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxz)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 9. Death of a Village

The epic drama series continues. 1948. Miriam and Youssef try to hold on to their ideals of peace as violence erupts following the UN vote for the partition of Palestine, and Deir Yassin comes under attack.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST
Miriam: Shani Erez
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Zahra: Lara Sawalha
Musa Alami: Sargon Yelda
Mohammed: Ramzi Dehani
The Haganath Major: Clive Hayward
Other parts: Hasan Dixon, Steve Waters and members of the cast

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv038x0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4wygm)
President Trump addresses his supporters in his second rally of the Covid-19 era

President Trump has just visited the US state of Arizona - a crucial election battleground, but how is the rising rate of coronavirus infections likely to affect the campaign.

Lots of other news on the virus.....we hear from very badly hit Armenia where the Prime Minister succumbed, from Haiti where the foreign minister tells us his country - one of the poorest in the world - is doing well.

Also we hear about the funeral of Rayshard Brooks killed in Atlanta by the police, just weeks after the George Floyd's controversial death at the hands of the police.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0390rr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4x26r)
Brazil downplays the severity of the coronavirus disease

The Covid-19 pandemic passes the sad milestone of 100,000 deaths in Latin America and parts of the Caribbean.

There's increasing concern about a rise in the number of cases in Arizona - as President Trump addresses an indoor rally there, some are calling a recipe for viral spread. Meanwhile Germany has returned to lockdown in two areas where case numbers have soared

And the factors behind women in Europe finding it difficult to get an abortion during the pandemic.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0394hw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4x5yw)
President Trump condemns anti-racism protestors

At a rally in Arizona, President Trump has condemned violence by anti-racism protestors - the state is a battleground in the elections, but it's fight with Covid-19 is also far from over.

Could Americans be stopped from travelling to Europe as a result of the European Union's Covid-19 restrictions?

And we're live in Moscow for the military parade marking 75 years since the end of the Second World War - which was delayed by over a month due to the pandemic.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039880)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6g)
Former Creative Director at US Vogue magazine: André Leon Talley

Since George Floyd died in Minneapolis with a white police officer’s knee on his neck, new conversations about racism and discrimination have begun all over the world. It’s not just about policing, it’s about business, sport, culture – every aspect of life. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Andre Leon Tally who was creative director of American Vogue magazine when the fashion industry was almost devoid of senior black men. He’s just written a controversial memoir of his life in what he calls “the chiffon trenches”.


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpzmjd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8mr)
Can we guarantee a job for everyone?

One of the long-run impacts of the coronavirus pandemic is dramatically worsened unemployment around the world, with millions of people suddenly unable to support themselves and their families. Aside from the obvious financial implications, Dr Stephen Blumenthal, a clinical psychologist in the UK tells Ed Butler about the tremendous impact this could have on mental health and human life. Meanwhile, some economists are discussing whether societies could, or indeed should, make sure everyone who wants a job can have one. Economist Pavlina Tcherneva lays out “The Case for a Job Guarantee.”

(Picture credit: An unemployment line in Chile. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmrs)
Tanzania's socialist experiment

In the late 1960s Tanzania's first post-independence president, the charismatic Julius Nyerere, believed that endemic poverty in rural areas could only be addressed if peasant farmers relocated to larger villages and worked collectively. It was part of a new experimental form of socialism, known as Ujamaa.
In 2016 Rob Walker spoke to two Tanzanians who remember it well.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Tanzanian women cultivating the soil (AFP/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039d04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpzr8j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz982)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039hr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039mhd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lw50t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpzzrs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8v)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Actor Stanley Tucci imagines the story of modern California as a movie screenplay, tracing the dramatic history of the state from Hollywood to Silicon Valley.
In this episode, he tells the story of celebrity revivalist preacher Aimee Semple McPherson who vanished one day in 1926. And he remembers Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American to win an Oscar in 1940, criticised by civil rights groups for her role in Gone With The Wind.

Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester
Producer: Laurence Grissell


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039r7j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrh)
Touched by magic

Magicians who used their craft to overcome social awkwardness, sexism and bullying - stories from the UK, Russia and Singapore.

British illusionist and writer Derren Brown talks to Emily Webb about some of his famous stunts - like the time he hypnotised almost an entire audience at one of his shows - and how he survived a controversial Russian roulette stunt on live TV. He describes how magic has transformed his understanding of the way humans work and how he lives his own life.

Gemma Cairney in conversation with Ekatarina Dobrokhotov, a Russian-born magician who learned magic from the internet and is the most watched female magician on Youtube and Adeline Ng, who incorporates elements of her Chinese culture into her show and is the only practising female magician in Singapore.

Steven Frayne, aka Dynamo, isn't your usual white-gloved magician pulling rabbits out of hats. His tricks have seen him walk on water and stroll down the side of a huge building. He's one of the world's most celebrated magicians but it hasn't been an easy path to success. His entire life has been hampered by Crohn's disease, a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease. But he tells Saskia Edwards that this adversity has been the source of inspiration for some of his best tricks.

Picture: Magician or illusionist is showing magic trick
Credit: Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039vzn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lwdj2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq0781)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz982)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv039zqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nyzygn)
Russia holds Victory Day parade in coronavirus shadow

Russia is staging military parades across the country today - more than 6 weeks after the 75th anniversary of the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany. The Victory Day celebrations were postponed in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Also in the programme: More than 1,000 parliamentarians from across Europe have signed a letter strongly opposing plans by Israel to annex parts of the occupied West Bank; and Latin America has registered more than 100,000 deaths from Covid-19.

Picture: The military parade on Red Square in Moscow to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Victory in World War II. Alexander Vilf, Russia, 24 June 2020. Credit: EPA/ALEXANDER VILF.


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03b3gx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq0gr9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxbg3j1n8s)
Indian healthcare feels coronavirus pressure

India's coronavirus outbreak has put the country's healthcare system under immense strain. We hear from Vijender Singh, whose pregnant wife lost her life after being turned away by nine hospitals. Economist Ashwini Deshpande explains why India's health infrastructure is struggling. And we get an overview of the situation from former health secretary Keshav Desiraju. Also in the programme, BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker talks us through the International Monetary Fund's latest forecasts for the world economy. We hear from Marc Bain of Quartz about the growing number of firms, including Ben & Jerry's, Patagonia and The North Face, which are choosing to suspend advertising on Facebook, as they call on the company to do more to counteract hate speech on the platform. And we get reaction to the move from Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive of the Anti-Defamation League. Plus, South Africa's finance minister Tito Mboweni has been outlining the government's latest spending plans. The BBC's Vumani Mkhize in Johannesburg brings us the details of Mr Mboweni's second budget in just five months.

(Picture: Suspected coronavirus patients queue at a clinic in Delhi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03b771)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq0lhf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03bbz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss375d32n)
Coronavirus conversations: Where will we be in six months?

We play the second part of our conversation with the health experts who have been answering coronavirus questions on OS during the pandemic. Today, they discuss what might happen next and how close we are to defeating the virus.

And as the top US health official, Anthony Fauci warns of “disturbing” new surges in many states in the US, we focus on one of them, Texas. On Tuesday the state reported, for the first time, more than 5000 new coronavirus cases in a single day. We speak to some Texans about the calls for a renewed lockdown in some cities.

And we hear about a trial in Germany of another potential medication against Covid-19. Max Planck Institute has been testing sweet wormwood, and we’ll get BBC Health to explain what we know about impact of plant-based medication on various coronaviruses.

(Photo: A medical worker administers a test for the coronavirus at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas. 23th June 2020 Credit: Callaghan O"Hare/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03bgq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03blgf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lx3zv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq0yqt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkpcbnc0r)
2020/06/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03bq6k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq12gy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcbz)
Faster cheaper Covid testing in Rwanda

In lower income countries, shortages and costs of Covid-19 testing kits undermine the efforts to keep the virus under control. But Rwanda is now implementing a new form of pooled testing which can identify all infected individuals in a population without testing everyone, and it does so at tiny fraction of the cost. It was devised by Prof Wilfred Ndifon and Prof Leon Mutesa in Kigali.

Taiwan has been one of the countries that has most effectively kept its population safe from the spread of Covid-19. Cindy Sui visits one of Taipei’s main hospitals to see the super-rigorous regime in place to protect its nurses from infection and prevent the spread of the virus from the hospital to the community.

For the BBC’s Rethink season, sleep researcher Matthew Walker muses on how lockdowns have changed the sleep habits of many people.

Boston University epidemiologist Matthew Fox is Claudia’s studio guest. They discuss why US public health researchers support both lockdowns and the Black Lives Matter protests, why meat-processing factories are the sites of notable Covid outbreaks, and new research which finds that women who suffer with migraines with aura have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: A health worker collects a sample from a man in Kenya during the Covid-19 crisis. Photo credit: Luis Tato/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03btyp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz0spk)
Coronavirus cases surge in Texas

The areas around Houston are seeing the most new cases and the Governor of Texas is encouraging people to stay home where possible. Also: the president of Kosovo, Hashim Thaci, has been accused of war crimes by a special international prosecutor in The Hague, and the Czech Philharmonic is holding its first public concert in six months.

(Photo: A medical worker administers a test for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Houston, Texas. Credit: Reuters/Callaghan O'Hare)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03bypt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq19z6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03c2fy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9srq6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq1fqb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58g6221kzk)
Coronavirus second wave fears amid economic warnings

The global economic outlook causes woe amid second wave fears - we speak to the International Monetary Fund's chief economist, Gita Gopinath. India's coronavirus outbreak has put the country's healthcare system under immense strain. We hear from Vijender Singh, whose pregnant wife lost her life after being turned away by nine hospitals, and economist Ashwini Deshpande explains why India's health infrastructure is struggling. And we get an overview of the situation from former health secretary Keshav Desiraju. We hear from Marc Bain of Quartz about the growing number of firms, including Ben & Jerry's, Patagonia and The North Face, which are choosing to suspend advertising on Facebook, as they call on the company to do more to counteract hate speech on the platform. And we get reaction to the move from Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive of the Anti-Defamation League. Plus, we hear about how coral reefs could soon be farmed on land, as underwater temperatures becomes too high for them to survive - entrepreneur Sam Teicher who founded the company Coral Vita with Gator Halpern, tells us more. Finally, we hear the latest from the stock markets with Susan Schmidt from Aviva Investors in the US.

(Picture: Patients queue at a clinic in Delhi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 25 JUNE 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03c9y6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18sp3t4b4d)
Global stock markets fall amid IMF warnings

Fears of a second wave of the coronavirus pandemic have caused financial markets to fall, amid warnings from the the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that the global economic crisis will be even worse than previously forecast - we speak with the IMF's chief economist, Gita Gopinath. India's healthcare system is still struggling under the burden of the epidemic - we have an extended report from the BBC's Rahul Tandon, speaking with patients, many who have been left unattended for up to 30 hours when they go hospital for help. Plus, as coral reef declines in the face of rising water temperatures, one entrepreneur has found a way of farming them – on land. And Olympus is selling its iconic camera brand - after it was snapped out the market by the competition; Ben Parr, a venture capitalist and tech watcher in Silicon Valley, outlines the future for a brand with such nostalgic value. We discuss all this with guests Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto and Jeanette Rodrigues, Mumbai Bureau Chief at the Bloomberg news service.

(Image: The International Monetary Fund (IMF) logo seen displayed on a smartphone, with stock market graphics in the background. Credit: Rafael Henrique/ SOPA Images/ LightRocket / Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03cfpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lxz6r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq1syq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3cszcbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ckfg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03cp5l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1ly6q0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq21fz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Assignment (w3csz6l6)
Kenya’s locust hunters

East Africa has seen the worst invasion of desert locusts for decades and there are warnings of even larger swarms to come. Millions of people across the region, who are already feeling the impact of coronavirus and floods, will now face increased hunger and poverty. Just an average swarm can eat the same in a day as 2,500 people for a year.

For Assignment, the BBC’s Senior Africa Correspondent Anne Soy joins Albert the Samburu herdsman turned locust hunter as he struggles to track the pests who have been decimating crops and pastures across his native northern Kenya. It is a race against time to exterminate this generation before they breed another, larger, more voracious generation.

Producer: Charlotte Atwood
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Man chasing away a swarm of desert locusts in Samburu County, Kenya. Credit: Fredrik Lerneryd/Getty Images)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03csxq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4zvcq)
George Floyd: Record numbers of black women run for office in Minnesota

We hear from three black women about their life changing decision.

As coronavirus cases soar in India, we speak to a doctor who's gone to court to ensure that health workers get protective clothing.

Researchers say they have discovered a technique that can reverse symptoms of Parkinson's disease in mice - so what does this mean for humans?


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03cxnv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh4zz3v)
India struggles to cope with coronavirus spike

With over 456,000 cases and rates of infection rising fast, India is becoming one of the worst hit countries.

The head of a nursing union in Brazil says the safety of nurses is being overlooked and many are dying.

And how the 70th anniversary of the start of the Korean war is being marked today on both sides of the divided peninsula.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03d1dz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh502vz)
India reports 16,000 new Covid-19 cases

We speak to one of the 2000 doctors fighting the outbreak in the capital Delhi, as this highest one day figure is released.

As a retired policeman and two of his sons are charged with murder of a black American jogger in the US state of Georgia, we hear from three black mums who've been inspired to run for office.

And we have a report from Turkana in the north west of Kenya, where a plague of locusts is still devastating swathes of farmland.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03d553)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3k)
Why do we care about statues?

The killing of African American George Floyd ignited anti-racist protests around the world - many centred on statues associated with colonialism and slavery. Why do these figures of bronze and stone generate such strong feelings? And what do they tell us about how countries deal with their past?

Contributors:
Sarah Beetham Chair of Liberal Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy in the Fine Arts.
Ghaith Abdul-Ahad journalist for The Guardian newspaper.
AGK Menon, architect, urban planner and founder of the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage.
Daniel Libeskind, architect.

Presenter: Kavita Puri


(Protesters attempt to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson near the White House June 22, 2020 in Washington, DC. Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq2jfh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wl)
Why your boss is incompetent

Why is it that the boss never seems to know what they’re doing? The famous “Dilbert principle” asserts that companies promote incompetent employees into middle management to get them out of the way. But Professor David Dunning, co-creator of the competing “Dunning–Kruger effect”, says there’s more to it than that, specifically that the more incompetent a person is, the more confident they can be. Meanwhile, Kelly Shue, Professor of Finance at Yale, says an even simpler idea, the “Peter Principle” helps to explain why people get promoted beyond their level of competence. And entrepreneur Heather McGregor explains why the incompetence of a former boss led her to buy her own company

(Picture: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmm8)
The Chilean economy and its 'Chicago Boys'

Following the violent military coup that overthrew Chile's socialist government in 1973, the new regime led by General Augusto Pinochet began a radical overhaul of the economy. It was based on a free-market economic plan created by a group of economists known as the Chicago Boys. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to one of them, Rolf Lüders.

Photo: General Augusto Pinochet (L) poses with socialist Chilean president Salvador Allende (R) in Santiago, just after Allende appointed him the head of the army, and only three weeks before Pinochet's military coup in September 1973. Credit: AFP/Getty Images


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03d8x7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6l6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq2n5m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ddnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvj)
Silk routes: 2000 years of trading

China, Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, Uzbekistan and India: if you went to any of these places a thousand years ago, you would find goods and produce from the others. But how did they get there and why? This week’s Forum explores the ancient pattern of trading networks which criss-crossed the plains, deserts and mountains of China, Central Asia and points further West, and which encouraged not just the exchange of commodities such as silk, paper and horses but ideas and people too.
Bridget Kendall talks to Valerie Hansen, professor of history at Yale University who has a particular interest in trade and exchanges across Eurasia; historian Dr. Susan Whitfield, former curator of the Central Asian collections at the British Library in London; and Tamara Chin, professor of comparative literature at Brown University whose work focuses on ancient China.

(Photo: A man rides a horse at Band-e-Amir lake, central Afghanistan, on a former Silk Route that once linked China with Central Asia and beyond. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh50)
Cheerleading's first World Championships

In 2004 the first Cheerleading World Championships, or Worlds, were held at the Walt Disney World resort in Florida. It was a big moment for All Star Cheer – a new sport made up of demanding group routines of coordinated tumbles and stunts, rather than supporting a sports team from the sidelines. Lucy Burns talks to Ambrel Brannon, a member of the winning Cheer Athletics senior girls' squad, about a sport that’s becoming increasingly popular around the world.

PICTURE: A cheerleader is thrown in the air (Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03djdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lz1xx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq2wnw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq0)
Is lockdown good news for fish?

The fishing industry has been brought to its knees in some countries, with Covid-19 forcing fishing to stop.
Graihagh Jackson asks if the global slowdown could present an opportunity for beleaguered fish stocks to flourish once more and what would it mean for the fishing industry.

If you would like to get in touch please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

(Picture: Fisherman holds fish on trawler. Credit: Chris Furlong/Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03dn4m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd9y)
Ups and downs in a vertical world

As a child in the US, Ian Powell had two great loves: art and rock climbing, and he was good at them both. By the early 1990s he had made a name for himself as a sculptor and professional climber, and had taken part in global competitions. He even combined his two great passions by designing climbing holds – objects that climbers grab and stand on as they make their way up a climbing wall. But by 2010, aged 39, Ian was a homeless drug addict and facing prison for credit card fraud. He tells Emily Webb how the climbing world came to his rescue and helped him get his life back on track. He now runs a successful multimillion dollar business making a popular brand of climbing hold.

Obi Emelonye is a Nigerian filmmaker known for large scale Nollywood epics, such as the disaster movie, Last Flight to Abuja, and the fantasy adventure, The Mirror Boy. But his latest work was made entirely in lockdown and features just two actors - who roped in their relatives to be crew members. Heart2Heart is about a couple who find themselves on two different continents just before their wedding day – and Obi directed the whole thing sitting at home on his laptop.

Romain Malan is a UK-based cello player from France and the founder of the World Harmony Orchestra, which brings together musicians from different backgrounds. When lockdown started in London, he organised gigs in the streets for people who were self-isolating and to accompany food deliveries for vulnerable people.

Picture: Ian Powell
Credit: Jackie Hueftle


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmm8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03drwr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1lz9f5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq3454)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03dwmw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz2vcr)
Coronavirus: New York imposes quarantine on eight US states

Quarantine measures have come into force in three US states, targeting visitors from other parts of the country where infection rates are surging.

Also in the programme: Russians start voting on constitutional changes that could allow Vladimir Putin to run for another two presidential terms. And how police brutality persuaded three African American women in Minnesota to run for office.

(Photo: Traders wear masks as they work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange .Credit: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03f0d0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6l6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq3cnd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvpkn9ryb9)
Bayer agrees to $10.9bn settlement over Monsanto’s weedkiller Roundup

The German chemical firm Bayer is to pay out nearly $11bn to settle cancer claims linked to its Roundup weedkiller, whilst denying any wrongdoing by the firm. We discuss the extent to which such weedkillers are used in UK farming with Joe Stanley, a beef and arable farmer who works in central England. And we get further reaction from Anja Hazekamp, a Member of the European Parliament from the Netherlands, who sits on the parliament's Environmental Committee.

Also in the programme, some US private schools have re-examined issues of racism after George Floyd's death. Ayo Lewis and Ashley Prescott describe some of the issues they faced as black students at an elite New York private school. Harvard Graduate School professor Anthony Abraham Jack is author of The Privileged Poor, and tells us access to elite colleges doesn't always mean inclusion. And Shartoyea Scott Dixon, vice president of campus programmes at Management Leadership for Tomorrow explains why the number of black MBA students at Harvard University has remained stagnant for three decades.

Plus, on International Day of the Seafarer, we examine the plight of ship crew members who are stuck on vessels as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, with Bob Sanguinetti, chief executive of the UK Chamber of Shipping.

PHOTO: Roundup/Getty Images


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03f444)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq3hdj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03f7w8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss375gzzr)
Coronavirus conversations: US quarantine orders

We look at the decision by New York, New Jersey and Connecticut to ask travellers from the US states with high number of Covid-19 cases to go to self-isolation for 14 days. We speak to people who are planning to travel this week what they think about the new rules and how they expect to manage self-isolation.

We also continue our conversations on race, and today we bring together two white mothers who both have adopted a black child. They discuss what’s it like to explain and discuss racism with their children, without having any first-hand knowledge or experience of what it is like to live in America as a black person.

We also discuss the problem of locusts in the African continent. This year the locust infestation has caused major havoc, destroying crops across the region. Our correspondent has met Kenyan farmers and we hear about their desperate fight against locusts.

(Photo: Physician John Jones, D.O. tests administrative assistant Morgan Bassin for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at One Medical in Scottsdale, Arizona. Credit: Courtney Pedroza/Reuters).


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03fcmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmm8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03fhcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m00wy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq3vmx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkpcbr7xv)
2020/06/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03fm3n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq3zd1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0h)
Record high temperatures – in the Arctic

A record summer temperature in Siberia is an indication of major changes in the Arctic climate. Changing weather patterns there have a knock on effect for other parts of the planet says Climatologist Steve Vavrus

Chile appeared to get Covid-19 under control, but in reality the virus was spreading uncontrollably through poor areas, As we hear from our correspondent in Santiago Jane Chambers, the lockdown has tightened but cases continue to rise.

And could mass testing using new saliva tests help control or even end the epidemic? Epidemiologist Julian Peto tells us about his plan which is designed to contain the virus within individual households and stop community spread.

Experiments to investigate dark matter have produced some tantalising results, Physicist Laura Manenti says it’s not confirmation of detection, but potentially close.

(Image: Rural Scene in Verkhoyansk. Credit: Dean Conger/Corbis via Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03fqvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz3pln)
WHO warns of COVID-19 increase in Europe

As countries across Europe ease their coronavirus restrictions, the World Health Organisation has warned about what it calls a "very significant resurgence of the disease" in 11 countries - we'll hear from the organisation's regional director for Europe.
Also on the programme: Russians start voting on a huge number of constitutional changes, which could see President Putin rule until 2036; and a month after George Floyd's death, what it means to be black in America now.

(Photo: Scientists at a laboratory analysing coronavirus swabs in Glasgow, Scotland, June 2020. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03fvlx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 Assignment (w3csz6l6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq46w9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03fzc1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9wnm9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq4bmf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58g6224gwn)
The challenge of racism in schools

Some US private schools have re-examined issues of racism after George Floyd's death. Ayo Lewis and Ashley Prescott describe some of the issues they faced as black students at an elite New York private school. Harvard Graduate School professor Anthony Abraham Jack is author of The Privileged Poor, and tells us access to elite colleges doesn't always mean inclusion. And Shartoyea Scott Dixon, vice president of campus programmes at Management Leadership for Tomorrow explains why the number of black MBA students at Harvard University has remained stagnant for three decades. Also in the programme, the German chemical firm Bayer is to pay out nearly $11bn to settle cancer claims linked to its Roundup weedkiller, whilst denying any wrongdoing by the firm. We discuss the extent to which such weedkillers are used in UK farming with Joe Stanley, a beef and arable farmer who works in central England. And we get further reaction from Anja Hazekamp, a Member of the European Parliament from the Netherlands, who sits on the parliament's Environmental Committee. Plus, on International Day of the Seafarer, we examine the plight of ship crew members who are stuck on vessels as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, with Bob Sanguinetti, chief executive of the UK Chamber of Shipping.

(Picture: A classroom. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 26 JUNE 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03g6v9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18sp3t771h)
Texas halts re-opening after coronavirus spike

Texas delays re-opening its businesses after coronavirus cases spike – we speak with the Texas Chamber of Commerce. The makers of the weedkiller Roundup have reached a settlement over claims that one of its ingredients, glyphosate, causes cancer – we speak to one farmer who explains why he is disappointed, and the victorious lawyer who represented those who say they were harmed by using the weedkiller. Also, we look at illegal lockdown parties where drugs and alcohol fuel long nights and irritated neighbours. Finally, PHD researcher Somia Bibi talks about the economics of skin shades, as moisturiser Fair and Lovely says it will rebrand; we explore the cultural experiences of beauty. We discuss all this with Jasper Kim, from Ewah Women's University in Seoul and Paddy Hirsch, editor of the NPR podcast the Indicator from Planet Money.

(Image: A healthcare worker organizes Covid-19 tests that were just administered at United Memorial Medical Center Covid-19 testing site in Houston, Texas. Photo by MARK FELIX/AFP /AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03gblf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m0w3v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq4pvt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03ggbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmm8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03gl2p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m13m3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq4yc2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w56)
The paddle-out

The sight of dozens of surfers circled together and floating beyond the breakwater will always mean one thing - that another surfer has died. A paddle-out is a way of honouring someone who’s had a love for the ocean. It’s a practice which has become entwined with surf’s cherished culture.

On the coast of Cornwall we meet a gathering of surfers who have come to pay homage to their friend Riccardo, who has recently died from cancer. We join them as they prepare to paddle out with flowers around their necks. They join hands in the water and share stories, memories and songs.

Big wave rider Clyde Aikau, brother to legendary surfer Eddie Aikau, describes the first ever paddle out in 1978, when his brother was lost at sea and drowned. After Eddie died, thousands of people gathered to paddle out from his favourite surf spot at Waimea Bay to celebrate him. It was a defining moment, and surfers around the world still paddle out to mark the anniversary of Eddie’s death each year.

In Cape Town, we also hear the voice of Mikhail Thompson, a surfer and mentor who has administered a number of paddle-out ceremonies during his lifetime. He describes the profoundly spiritual experience of surfing waves, and how losing someone from the close-knit surfer community leaves a void. And we hear him reflect on a special moment in the paddle-out ceremony, when the whole party erupts in hoots and cheers, splashing the water and throwing flowers into the air.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon

Image: Pictures of Eddie Aikau (Courtesy of the Eddie Aikau Foundation; left image credit David Bettencourt)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03gptt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh52r8t)
Liverpool end 30-year wait for English title

Manchester lose 2-1 at Chelsea to see Liverpool confirmed as Premier League champions.

Shutting down the economy AGAIN because of Covid - we hear from Texas, which has reversed its policy of easing up.

And the bat backlash. The flying mammals have been blamed for being at the heart of the coronavirus outbreak -- we hear how they are suffering as a result.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03gtky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh52w0y)
Are people dying of other illnesses because of coronavirus?

We speak to the head of UN-Aids about how Covid-19's unexpected consequences.

Liverpool has secured its first title in 30 years - winning the Premier League.

Plus there's concern as the Arctic reaches incredibly hot temperatures.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03gyb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8wh52zs2)
The fight for racial justice in Canada

As the US House passes a sweeping police reform bill, an activist tells us reform is also needed in Canada to help the indigenous population.

A plea to remove all barriers to equality from Graca Machel, in a special interview with the BBC.

We look the plight of thousands of cruise ship workers left stranded in the covid pandemic for more than 100 days now.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03h226)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxf)
Maria Ressa: Is the press under attack in the Philippines?

No world leader better epitomises the strong man style of political leadership than President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines. One hallmark of his rule? A visceral dislike of scrutiny from the independent media. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to journalist Maria Ressa who founded the Rappler news website and has just been convicted of cyber-libel in a case that has raised worldwide concern. Is press freedom being strangled by populist politics?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq5fbl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78f)
Does the WTO have a future?

With current World Trade Organization Director-General Roberto Azevêdo due to leave his post later in the year, the race is on for a new DG. Abdel Hamid Mamdouh, a former diplomat and candidate for the top job, tells Manuela Saragosa how he imagines the WTO of the future, while the BBC’s Andrew Walker explains how US opposition under President Trump to a global multilateral trading system is putting the organisation’s future in doubt.

(Picture: A shipping freighter with cargo containers. Picture credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv1)
Russia’s bitter taste of capitalism

Chaos and hardship hit Russia with the rapid market reforms in early 1992, just weeks after the collapse of the USSR. In 2018 Dina Newman spoke to one of the architects of this “shock therapy” - Andrei Nechaev, who was then the Minister for Economic Development.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Old women selling cigarettes on the streets of Moscow in 1992. Credit: BBC.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03h5tb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnt)
Apple ditches Intel chips

The tech giant tells developers future Macs will use Apple-designed chips as found in the iPad and iPhone. Plus, as shops reopen after lockdowns, how can tech make physical shopping safer and more pleasant? And CEO of Slack, Stewart Butterfield, talks to us about communication between businesses, and how President Trump’s ban on work visas will hurt Silicon Valley. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC North America tech reporter James Clayton. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Apple CEO Tim Cook gives the keynote address at the 2020 Worldwide Developers’ Conference WWDC, Credit: EPA/ BROOKS KRAFT/ APPLE).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq5k2q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03h9kg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn1)
How will Covid-19 change our cities?

So far, people in cities have borne the brunt of Covid-19. Coronavirus thrives when humans interact in shared spaces where infections are easily transmitted. Because of this, many column inches have been dedicated to predicting the demise of urban living and a revival of suburbs, towns and villages. But the fact remains the majority of us live in urban settings and people will need to keep seeking out the economic and social opportunities that cities provide. So, if cities are here to stay, how will coronavirus change them? Some aspects of city living that came in for criticism before the virus now seem unviable. Urban density was already a problem with so much cramped and scarce housing. Now, for many, it’s intolerable. Long commutes on dirty, crowded public transport will no longer do. Cars, roads and parking lots claiming vast outdoor areas no longer makes sense if we are to spend more time outdoors. And, in developing world cities, how much longer can poor sanitation and lack of running water be ignored when neglecting basic infrastructure will likely lead to new deadly outbreaks? Policy makers have, in the past, flirted with tackling the big problems in cities - but these problems haven’t gone away. So in the end, will the pandemic force drastic changes to urban design? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03hf9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m1yv0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq5skz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztg5)
Black Lives Matter: The backlash

Sparta Prague's Costa Nhamoinesu describes the racist incidents in Czech football in reaction to the Black Lives Matters movement. The former Australia international Alicia Ferguson reacts to the announcement that Australia and New Zealand will host the 2023 women's World Cup. And the owner of Mexican club Santos Laguna, Alejandro Irarragorri, tells us how Covid-19 has affected his club and his country.

(Picture: Paul Pogba of Manchester United takes a knee in support of the Black Lives Matter movement by Michael Steele/Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03hk1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh5)
Filming from behind 5 layers

India's financial capital Mumbai is its worst affected city with 70,000 confirmed Covid-19 infections and more than 5,000 deaths. BBC Marathi's Mayuresh Konnur filmed doctors and nurses in The King Edward Memorial hospital ICU to find out how they are coping. It was a challenging story to report.

My Home Town: Eldoret
BBC Swahili’s Beryl Munoko shares memories of her home town in western Kenya.

The price of mocking Myanmar’s military
Last year members of a satirical drama group, the Peacock Generation were jailed for mocking the military, and still face additional charges. They were performing "thangyat”, a mix of poetry, dance and song traditionally used to criticise those in authority. Soe Win Than of BBC Burmese explains why this one fell foul of the government.

Salisbury poisonings remembered
A recent BBC series dramatized the nerve agent poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal in 2018. Watching it brought back memories for BBC Russian’s Olga Ivshina, one of the first journalists on the scene in Salisbury.

The political power of K-pop fans
K-pop fans have been making headlines with their political activism. They've been involved in both the Black Lives Matter campaign and President Trump's rally in Tulsa, where they registered for tickets with no intention of attending, contributing to an embarrassing number of empty seats. David Cann of BBC Korean has been looking into K-pop activism.

Image: Mayuresh Konnur wears full PPE to film in ICU Covid ward
Credit: BBC, Sharad Badhe


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03hnsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m26b8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq6127)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03hsjz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz5r8v)
Coronavirus: US hits record high in daily cases

The White House says the increase in numbers is a result of more testing, with states such as Texas and Florida seeing the biggest rise in cases. Also: Iraqi security forces have raided the headquarters of an Iranian backed militia, and Australia and New Zealand will be the joint hosts of the next football Women's World Cup in 2023.

(Photo: A healthcare worker administers a coronavirus test to a patient in Tampa, Florida. Credit:Octavio Jones/Getty Images)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03hx93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq68kh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt1p63h7ct)
Air France-KLM granted $3.7bn Dutch bailout

As the Netherlands lends Air France-KLM $3.7bn we look at the future of travel. The BBC’s Tom Burridge has been sampling the new normal of air travel on a domestic flight from London to Inverness. We get a sense of how France’s tourism sector is recovering in the aftermath of coronavirus lockdowns with a report from the BBC’s Hugh Schofield in Brittany. Also in the programme, future stability in Sudan will depend on a thriving economy, and according to the UN that is best achieved if countries are willing to offer financial help. We hear more from UK Minister for Africa, James Duddridge, whose government has pledged $185m at a donor conference on the subject in Berlin. The selection process to find a new director general of the World Trade Organisation is under way, and one of the candidates, Hamid Mamdouh, tells us about his vision for the organisation. Plus on the day the Glastonbury Music Festival was due to start in southwest England, we hear about the challenges faced by those who would normally be crewing the event, from Peter Heath, head of the Professional Lighting and Sound Association.

(Picture: KLM planes. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03j117)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq6d9m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03j4sc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss375kwwv)
Coronavirus conversations: Lorry drivers in Africa

We again bring people together in conversation about a shared experience of the pandemic. Today, we talk to two lorry drivers: Bob and Hosea, both from Kenya. They are both being affected by long delays at borders, due to coronavirus testing, as they attempt to transport goods across East Africa.

We also get an update on the latest situation across Latin America and also in India and Pakistan; all places where the impact of the virus is being felt.

And Liverpool are English football’s most successful side, in terms of winning major honours. They are also one of the world’s most widely supported teams, with more than 300 official supporters’ clubs around the globe. Yet it has taken until now for them to win the English league title for the first time in 30 years. We’ll explain the history of Liverpool FC, and hear from those fans in different parts of the planet.

(Photo: People queue to be registered at a site for mass testing in Ruaraka, a densely populated suburb in Nairobi on May 28. Credit: Tony Karumba/AFP)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03j8jh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03jd8m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6r1m2xt1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq6rk0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkpcbv4ty)
2020/06/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03jj0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq6w94)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5t)
What’s the point of blood types?

If you put one person’s blood into another person , sometimes it’s fine and sometimes it’s a death sentence.

French physician Jean-Baptiste Denis discovered this when he performed the first blood transfusion back in 1667. He put the blood of a lamb into a 15-year boy. The teenager survived but Denis’s third attempt killed the patient and led to a murder charge.

In 1900, Austrian doctor Karl Landsteiner discovered the reason for this lottery – blood types. The red blood cells in our bodies are decorated with different marker molecules called antigens. These define us as A, B, AB or O blood type. And this is just one of 38 different systems for classifying our blood. CrowdScience listeners have discovered that we aren’t the only animal with blood types and want to know more.

Dogs have 12 different blood groups, so how do they cope when they need a transfusion? CrowdScience meets some very good dogs who donate a pint to the pet blood bank in return for a toy and a treat. Each pint saving up to 4 other dogs’ lives.

We also hear how examining our blood types can tell us more about our links to our ape-like cousins and how the human species spread around the world. And what about the future of blood types – can we use science, and animal blood to get around the problems of transfusions?

Producer and Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Photo: Red Blood Cells. Credit: Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03jmrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yr6nz6lhr)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03jrj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq73sd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv03jw84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9zkjd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qq77jj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58g6227csr)
Air France-KLM granted $3.7bn Dutch bailout

As the Netherlands lends Air France-KLM $3.7bn we look at the future of travel. The BBC’s Tom Burridge has been sampling the new normal of air travel on a domestic flight from London to Inverness. We get a sense of how France’s tourism sector is recovering in the aftermath of coronavirus lockdowns with a report from the BBC’s Hugh Schofield in Brittany. Also in the programme, future stability in Sudan will depend on a thriving economy, and according to the UN that is best achieved if countries are willing to offer financial help. We hear more from UK Minister for Africa, James Duddridge, whose government has pledged $185m at a donor conference on the subject in Berlin. The selection process to find a new director general of the World Trade Organisation is under way, and one of the candidates, Hamid Mamdouh, tells us about his vision for the organisation. Plus on the day the Glastonbury Music Festival was due to start in southwest England, we hear about the challenges faced by those who would normally be crewing the event, from Peter Heath, head of the Professional Lighting and Sound Association.

(Picture: KLM planes. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 04:32 THU (w3csz6l6)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6l6)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6l6)

Assignment 22:06 THU (w3csz6l6)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qpl9f7)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qplnnm)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qplsdr)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qpm0x0)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qpmd4d)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qpnv2y)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xt9jsq)

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BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xt9x13)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qpx2vp)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5pl8qq1syq)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5pl8qq2wnw)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5nr3ghn3wd)

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BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5nqr66m5jb)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5nrv032cqn)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5nrv032m6x)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5nrv033tp6)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5nrv033yfb)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5nrv03425g)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5nrv0358mr)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5nrv035j40)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5nrv035mw4)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5nrv035rm8)

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BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5nrv036cbx)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5nrv036h31)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5nrv036lv5)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5nrv036ql9)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5nrv036vbf)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5nrv036z2k)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5nrv0372tp)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5nrv0376kt)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5nrv037b9y)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5nrv037g22)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5nrv037kt6)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5nrv037pkb)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5nrv037t9g)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5nrv037y1l)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5nrv0381sq)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5nrv0385jv)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5nrv038f13)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5nrv038js7)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5nrv038njc)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5nrv038s8h)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5nrv038x0m)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5nrv0390rr)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5nrv0394hw)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5nrv039880)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5nrv039d04)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5nrv039hr8)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5nrv039mhd)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5nrv039r7j)

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BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5nrv039zqs)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5nrv03b3gx)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5nrv03b771)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5nrv03bbz5)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5nrv03bgq9)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5nrv03blgf)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5nrv03bq6k)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5nrv03btyp)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5nrv03bypt)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5nrv03c2fy)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5nrv03c9y6)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5nrv03cfpb)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5nrv03ckfg)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5nrv03cp5l)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5nrv03csxq)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5nrv03cxnv)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5nrv03d1dz)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5nrv03d553)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5nrv03d8x7)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5nrv03ddnc)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5nrv03djdh)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5nrv03dn4m)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5nrv03drwr)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5nrv03dwmw)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5nrv03f0d0)

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BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5nrv03f7w8)

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BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5nrv03fqvs)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5nrv03fvlx)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5nrv03fzc1)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5nrv03g6v9)

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BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5nrv03jw84)

BBC OS 06:32 SAT (w172xm4lszzl757)

BBC OS 10:06 MON (w172xm4lszzsg9n)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2ss375698g)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2ss375965k)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2ss375d32n)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2ss375gzzr)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2ss375kwwv)

Boston Calling 23:32 SAT (w3csz70q)

Boston Calling 04:32 SUN (w3csz70q)

Boston Calling 10:32 MON (w3csz70q)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jf)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89g)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8mr)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wl)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78f)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18s9vhjzbr)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18sp3syjb6)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18sp3t1f79)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18sp3t4b4d)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18sp3t771h)

Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snn)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3cszv5s)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv5s)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv5t)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz982)

Digital Planet 02:32 WED (w3csz982)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz982)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz982)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0t93)

Discovery 02:32 TUE (w3ct0t93)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0t93)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0t93)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pl)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pl)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pl)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc1y)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc1y)

HARDtalk 20:06 MON (w3cszc1y)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6g)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6g)

HARDtalk 20:06 WED (w3cszc6g)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxf)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxf)

HARDtalk 20:06 FRI (w3cszbxf)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcbz)

Health Check 02:32 THU (w3cszcbz)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcbz)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcbz)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0w3g)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SUN (w3ct0w3g)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct0w56)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvbb)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvbb)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvbb)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3s)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3s)

Miriam and Youssef 08:06 SUN (w3ct0sxy)

Miriam and Youssef 04:32 WED (w3ct0sxz)

Miriam and Youssef 09:06 WED (w3ct0sxz)

Miriam and Youssef 15:06 WED (w3ct0sxz)

Miriam and Youssef 22:06 WED (w3ct0sxz)

More or Less 06:50 SUN (w3ct0pxf)

More or Less 04:50 MON (w3ct0pxf)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6sy)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6sy)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2w8wh4q4nf)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2w8wh4q8dk)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2w8wh4qd4p)

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Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2w8wh4t59n)

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Outlook 22:32 SAT (w3cszdzw)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4d)

Over to You 18:50 SAT (w3cszf4d)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4d)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv17)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv17)

People Fixing the World 20:06 TUE (w3cszv17)

Resolves 08:50 SAT (w3ct0v7b)

Resolves 01:50 SUN (w3ct0v7b)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0h)

Science in Action 02:32 FRI (w3cszh0h)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0h)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh0h)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 02:32 SUN (w3ct0t1m)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 06:32 SUN (w3ct0t1m)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 23:32 SUN (w3ct0t1m)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jkpcbgk6k)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jkpcbkg3n)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jkpcbnc0r)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jkpcbr7xv)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jkpcbv4ty)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh4z)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh50)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bt6zt9mrq)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3l66k7hvlv)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l66k7m006)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhj8)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhnt)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhnt)

Tech Tent 22:06 FRI (w3cszhnt)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk2x)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3cszk2x)

The Big Idea 05:50 SAT (w3csxfjh)

The Big Idea 15:50 SUN (w3csxfjh)

The Big Idea 23:50 SUN (w3csxfjh)

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