Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 JUNE 2020

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3ggztjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18ryl5rtqx)
Coronavirus pandemic gets more political in Brazil

Brazil now has the world's second-highest number of coronavirus cases - and the third-highest number of deaths in the world - more than 40,000. Professor Anthony Pereira of the Brazil Institute at the University of London explains how the economy has been hit by the combination of the lockdown and the virus itself. Saudi Arabia is close to announcing whether the Hajj pilgrimage will be cancelled amid the coronavirus pandemic. Some two million people were expected to travel to Mecca and Medina this July and August for the annual gathering. The BBC’s Mohamed El Assar explains what impact this could have on the Saudi Kingdom. In the wake of a collapse in the Lebanese currency, public anger has boiled over. Nasser Saidi is a former Lebanese economy and industry minister, and discusses why the outlook seems so bleak for his country, and whether it is likely to receive a bailout from the International Monetary Fund. And Kai Ryssdal of the BBC’s partner show Marketplace has been speaking with Harvard Professor Torrey Taussig about how the USA’s image has shifted on the world stage.
All through the show we’ll be joined by Liz Gwynn, reporter for Australia’s Channel Nine News in Albury, New South Wales.

(Picture:A woman walking in Rio de Janeiro, Picture Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv027mt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzkgt8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qny02k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhj7)
Racism in cricket

As the Black Lives Matter movement sweeps across the world, we throw the spotlight on racial inequality in cricket.

We hear from the first black woman to play for England, Ebony Rainford-Brent, on her experiences of racism growing up in the sport and how she's trying to make a difference with young cricketers at Surrey.

We also hear from former West Indies captain Darren Sammy, who claims he was given a racially offensive nickname, and Aboriginal Australian John McGuire who says his path to the top of the game was blocked because of the colour of his skin.

Picture: Ebony Rainford-Brent and Darren Sammy (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv027rk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh3)
Brazil's Black Lives Matter protests

The killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis policeman has reignited the ongoing debate in Brazil about institutional racism. BBC Brasil's Camilla Costa tells the stories of some of Brazil's own George Floyds, including 5-year-old Miguel, whose shocking death last week led to the #justiçaparamiguel protests.

My home town: Cali, Colombia
Luis Fajardo of BBC Monitoring takes us to his hometown of Cali to swim in crystal clear rivers and hang out at his favourite bar.

Love, war and Communism
77-year-old actress Kim Chi is famous in Vietnam for her film roles set during Vietnam War era, and more recently, for quitting the Communist Party. She's back in the news now having married an 82-year-old academic, her fourth marriage. Thu Phan of BBC Vietnamese tells her story.

Measuring Mount Everest
Nepali researchers had nearly finalised a new calculation of the height of Mount Everest when their government agreed to make this a joint project with China. Phanindra Dahal of BBC Nepali tells us why the measurement is being made, and what China's involvement means for the project.

In the words of President Putin
2020 marks twenty years in power for Vladimir Putin. But what has changed over the years? Sergey Kozlovsky of BBC Russian has taken all Mr Putin's speeches, and analysed which words have fallen in and out of favour.

Picture: Woman holds "Justice for Miguel - Black Lives Matter" banner, Brazil
Credit: Leo Malafaia AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmtz)
Three Strikes Law

One man's experience of the controversial US law that saw thousands locked up for life. Under the law in California, a third conviction for a felony offence would lead to a life sentence. At times in California, 45% of "three strikers" were African American. Many were sentenced to life in prison for non-violent or minor offences. Alex Last hears the story of Bilal Chatman, and his hopes for reform.

Photo credit: Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv027w9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcmz)
Racial justice: Who are the allies?

Black protesters across the United States and the world have been joined by white people calling for lasting change in the way societies deal with systemic racism. But this isn’t the first time a cross-section of society has voiced its desire for radical action on race. In most instances calls for revolution die down and the moment brings only incremental change. So what else can history teach us? South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission was set up after the fall of apartheid in the 1990's and was praised for its ability to bring to light the facts surrounding black oppression in the country. So are white allies of black and other ethnic minority communities in the US, UK and other countries gripped by protest now willing to engage with their own difficult truths? Will they embrace policies that target racial inequality and a greater redistribution of government funds - polices that would reduce their own families’ access to opportunity? As the economic crisis sparked by the pandemic leaves record numbers out of work, will the coalition of voters taking to the streets still have the same priorities when they go to the polls? When it comes to addressing systemic racism, who are the allies of black activists - and what is their role now?


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02801k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzkv1n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qnyc9y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3cszvrt)
The children’s video game that turned toxic

It’s full of garish colours and blocky animals. Club Penguin was a huge smash for Disney upon its release 15 years ago. And an unofficial version became an unlikely comeback hit during the coronavirus pandemic, with millions of new players.

But things have gone downhill quickly. The unofficial version is outside of the entertainment giant’s control, and a BBC investigation found that moderation is lax to non-existent. Cybersecurity correspondent Joe Tidy donned his undercover avatar and discovered widespread bullying, sexual content, and racist abuse.

Disney says it’s “appalled” by the unofficial version of the game and has ordered it to be shut down, and parents say it shouldn’t exist anymore. So how did Club Penguin turn sour?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Joe Tidy
Picture caption: A screengrab from the Club Penguin game
Picture credit: Disney/Club Penguin
Power down sound effect courtesy of qubodup.


SAT 05:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjg)
The new distrust

In an era of fake news, are we living through a crisis in trust? Without trust society couldn’t function. We need to know that individuals and organizations are competent and reliable, that they’re not corrupt and that they’ll honour their word. But now we have digital manipulation, allegations of fabricated news stories and ubiquitous social media spewing out much that is bogus and emotionally manipulative. What, then, can be done to counter these developments? And how much of a threat do they pose to democracy? We speak to the most trustworthy of philosophers, Onora O’Neill.

Presented by David Edmonds

(Image: Pinnochio on newspapers, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0283sp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Evidence (w3ct0t36)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Covid 19: Transmission and South America

Claudia Hammond and a panel of international experts look at the latest research into Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus which is sweeping through the world.

As the disease spreads how is South America handling the pandemic? How are the indigenous people of the Amazon protecting themselves? We also look at the aerodynamics of infection - if the air in an ITU room is changed 12 times and the virus still lingers what hope do offices have?

On the panel are Professor Lydia Bourouiba, Associate Professor at the Fluid Dynamics of Disease Transmission Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr Adam Kucharski from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Professor Holgar Schunemann, co-director of the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases, Dr David Collier, Clinical Director at Queen Mary University London and Barbara Fraser, health journalist in the Peruvian capital Lima.

The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection.
Producers: Geraldine Fitzgerald and Caroline Steel
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: Employees of the Ciudad de Dios market wait respecting safety distances to be tested by workers of the Health Ministry to discard COVID-19 in Lima on May 11, 2020. Credit: Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0287jt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0snm)
Should the US pay reparations to the descendants of slaves?

Business Weekly continues the conversation around race and racism sparked by the death of George Floyd. We’ll be asking whether African Americans should be paid reparations for their ancestors' enslavement. We’ll hear from Bob Johnson, the founder of Black Entertainment Television and Mae Jamison, the first woman of colour in space, gives us her thoughts on how today’s protesters differ from those in the 1960s when she was a young girl in Chicago. Plus, the coronavirus pandemic has changed the way that a lot of us work so we’ll be asking whether office buildings will ever be the same again. Presented by Lucy Burton.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv028c8y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pk)
Mumbai’s missed opportunities

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

In India, the financial capital Mumbai has recorded more than 50,000 coronavirus cases, taking it past the peak in China’s Wuhan where the virus first emerged. The surge coincides with India’s decision to relax measures after three months of strict lockdown; opening markets, shopping malls, places of worship and offices, in order to minimise economic hardships. But, says Yogita Limaye, hospitals need more help as Mumbai enters even more unstable times.

There’s been widespread revolt in Minnesota, where George Floyd was killed by a police officer kneeling on his neck. So much so that the Minneapolis City Council has announced plans to disband the police and introduce community-based public safety programmes instead. At the core of these actions is an acknowledgement that police tactics have disproportionately targeted African Americans. Jo Erickson is originally British, but moved to Minneapolis a few years ago. She has had first-hand experience of the policing there.

Being under lockdown is not comparable to being a blindfolded hostage, and yet they have something in common. When your usual routine is stolen, the more it makes you think. You travel the landscape of the mind, and sometimes find unexpected things there. During lockdown in Ireland, no guests have been allowed to the home. But former hostage Brian Keenan has had unexpected visitors to his garden. They were a fox, an owl and a squirrel, and inspired a philosophical tale about our times.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: A man walks inside a hospital constructed to treat coronavirus patients in Mumbai, India. Credit: Reuters/Francis Mascarenhas)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qnyqkb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3r)
Rescued

The baby left at the orphanage. She’s been spat at and told her ancestors must have “done something terribly wrong”. Nisha Lobo has a skin condition called ichthyosis and was adopted. This is her story. She says happiness is a mindset. #MyIndianLife


SAT 08:50 Resolves (w3ct0v79)
Resolves

Environment journalist Gayathri Vaidyanathan

Gayathri Vaidyanathan remains with her family, in her own, self-imposed lockdown in Chennai, India. Her resolve is to be a "non-consumer for as long as possible". She continues, "I’ve been trying to cut down my consumption for a while, but my execution was imperfect. I tried to grow some vegetables in a raised garden bed back at my house in Bangalore, but white flies decimated them. I continued to buy things I didn’t need. I ordered lots of takeout. I bought a bamboo salad bowl last year when I don’t even enjoy salads. Why did I buy it?"

She recorded her resolve ahead of the broadcast, and was fearful of what would happen in the next few days. Each day she learns of more cases nearby, just two lanes away or one street down. "Workers in India don’t get paid to stay at home, there is little choice but to work," she reflects. "The daring, the desperation is all set to burst".


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv028h12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b5n7pggs0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qnyv9g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Trending (w3cszvrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf4c)
Covid-19: The Indian perspective

As the global Coronavirus spotlight focuses on India, we speak to the BBC’s bureau chief to ask how the team in Delhi are coping with the crisis. What are the challenges faced in deploying correspondents?
Plus: the Orgasm Gap recently asked what we should be taught about sexual pleasure. But one listener accuses it of adopting a casual and “giggling” style.

Presenter: Rajan Datar.
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv028ls6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3bsvqhjh4w)
'You have people wishing death upon another human because they disrespected a flag' - CJ Sapong

Chicago Fire forward - CJ Sapong - tells us he welcomes the US Soccer Federation's decision to repeal it's policy requiring national team players to stand during the national anthem. Sapong - who has played for the US Men's National Team - believes a situation has been created around the national anthem, which equates to: "if you're not loyal to this flag...you deserve to die". He also recalls an incident where his family were confronted at a high school soccer game because someone in the crowd felt he had disrespected the national anthem.

"My heart was broken. I'd given up." - Former AFL Star Adam Goodes describes the toll racist abuse took on him and how being abused by a teenage girl during a game set in motion a chain of events that saw him walk away from the sport in 2015. He also speaks about the importance of athletes using their platforms following George Floyd's death.

Nessun Dorma and Italia 90 - Thirty years on from the 1990 World Cup, the BBC's Head of TV Sport - Philip Bernie - tells us how and why the song was chosen as the soundtrack to the corporation's coverage.

"I was really shocked" - the fourteen year old snooker player given a tour card for the next two seasons by the World Snooker Tour. Ukraine's Lulian Boiko tells us how he got into the sport, what it was like meeting his hero Mark Selby and his hopes for life on the circuit. He was rewarded with a tour card after producing exceptional performances at leading international amateur tournaments over the last year.

Powering the NHS - Sam Cox tells us how he's delivered over fifteen thousand meals to NHS hospitals across London during the covid-19 pandemic. The professional boxer says it's his way of giving back after he lost his mother to cancer last year and for the way the National Health Service helped him when he was younger. Due to a growth hormone deficiency Cox was still the size of a six year old boy at the age of fifteen.

Super Rugby - The competition returned in New Zealand this week and crowds were able to attend. New Zealand's first female rugby commentator - Rikki Swannell - joins us to discuss how it went.

And in Sporting Witness - we tell the story of arguably the greatest upset in the history of the ancient Olympic sport of Greco-Roman wrestling. American Rulon Gardner discusses how he defeated a previously unbeaten Russian champion. It was a David-and-Goliath-style battle that made headlines around the world.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv028qjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzlkjf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qnz2sq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Global Questions (w3ct0w3k)
Is the global system racist?

The death of George Floyd sent shock waves around the world and has become a catalyst for demands for change. Millions have demonstrated in many different countries, calling for a change not just in policing, but in the way society treats black and ethnic minority people. Why are they so often bottom of the pile in terms of educational opportunity, employment, housing and health? Does what happened in Minneapolis represent a moment in history after which real structural change will come? Or is it just another false dawn, like so many that have come before with protests against racist brutality in America? Zeinab Badawi is joined by Alice Bah Kuhnke and Baratunde Thurston to debate these questions.

Alice Bah Kuhnke was until recently Swedish minister of culture and democracy. She is a member of the green party and one of the few black deputies in the European parliament and has been a fervent critic of a lack of ethnic diversity in EU institutions.

Baratunde Thurston is an American writer, activist and comedian. He wrote the New York Times best seller How to Be Black, he was a producer on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and is currently hosting live on lockdown on his Instagram.

Presenter: Zeinab Badawi
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Carey Clark


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv028v8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6sx)
Accidents, humour, and guilt with Joy Crookes and Georgia

On hosting duties is Olushola Ajose, a.k.a. Afrikan Boy, a London-born rapper and producer of Nigerian heritage whose music blends hip hop, grime and afrobeat. His track One Day I Went To Lidl caught the attention of MIA, who invited him to collaborate and tour with her. He’s since worked with the likes of Damon Albarn’s Africa Express, DJ Shadow, The Noisettes, Lady Leshurr and Nneka.

He’s joined by South London-based neo-soul singer and songwriter of Bangladeshi-Irish heritage, Joy Crookes. She has firmly established herself as one to watch with three critically acclaimed EPs and receiving a Rising Star Award nomination at the 2020 Brit Awards, just in time for the release of her debut album coming later this year.

Jaz Karis is a soulful RnB singer-songwriter who cites Erykah Badu, Frank Ocean and Amy Winehouse as some of her biggest influences. Since releasing her debut EP Into the Wilderness in 2017, she has signed to NAO’s record label Little Tokyo Recordings, and amassed nearly 10 million views for her performance of her track Petty Lover on music platform Colors.

Also joining the conversation is producer, singer and songwriter Georgia, who began her music career as a drummer for Kwes and Kate Tempest, and has gone on to collaborate with Africa Express, Honne, Mura Masa, Gorillaz and Peter Hook. She won the One to Watch Award at the AIM Independent Music Awards in 2019, and released her second record Seeking Thrills in January this year to critical acclaim.

They’ll be discussing what aspects of their personalities shine through the most when making music, what drives their creativity, and what life lessons they’ve learned so far from working in music.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gh18h8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yqh4bq774)
Beijing coronavirus outbreak leads to local lockdown

The largest wholesale food market in Beijing is shut after a number of coronavirus cases were detected, prompting fears of a second wave of Covid-19 in the Chinese capital.

Also in the programme: the film industry is banking on several summer blockbusters to recoup loses after cinemas were shuttered during the coronavirus pandemic; and gravediggers in Africa on burying the dead from Covid-19.

(Photo: A Chinese police officer wearing a face mask stand guard next to the closed Xinfadi market building in Fengtai district, Beijing, China, 13 June 2020. One of Beijing's largest markets, Xinfadi in Fengtai district, was shut down on 13 June, and the district placed under lockdown following the confirmation of new domestic coronavirus cases. EPA/Roman Pilipey)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0292rq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 BBC OS (w172xm3g5s3stbh)
Conversations on race and change

In the week of the funeral of George Floyd, we have continued to see the impact of his death and the reaction of people around the world. Protesters are demanding change to racial injustices and inequalities. And in the days since the death of Mr Floyd in Minneapolis on 25 May, we have witnessed many things from police officers marching alongside protesters; to the political debate about US police reform; to the toppling of statues that symbolise the history of slavery and racism.

Nuala McGovern takes you through conversations with some of the people involved in the global discussion that is taking place.

(Photo: A statue of Confederate States President Jefferson Davis lies on the street after protesters pulled it down in Richmond, Virginia, 10 June.2020. Credit: Parker Michels-Boyce/ AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 14:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qnzg13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:32 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvgs)
How are India’s healthcare systems tackling the coronavirus crisis?

India’s coronavirus infections have climbed to the fourth highest in the world.

As the country nears 300,000 cases, the significant spike in infections has begun taking a toll on India’s healthcare system. Hospitals are struggling to cope with the number of patients they are getting. Many allege that patients are being turned away due to a lack of space.

While local governments are trying to ramp up capacity, it is not uniform across the country. Mumbai, India’s financial capital is among the worst hit with nearly 100,000 cases and a need for at least 80,000 more hospital beds. The southern state of Kerala, on the other hand, has been praised for its stringent measures to tackle the infections. The state has reported just over 2,000 confirmed cases so far.

So, what is working and what could be done better to handle the situation? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the measures that can help India tackle its healthcare crisis.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Rathan Kelkar, mission director, National Health Mission Kerala; Preetha Reddy, vice chairperson, Apollo Hospitals and president, NATHEALTH; Prof K Srinath Reddy, president, Public Health Foundation of India


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv0296hv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l5v8xqtr4)
Euro 2021: How much difference will a year make?

On what should have been the opening weekend of the Euros, we look ahead to what is now Euro 2021. Sportsworld places the spotlight on Italy, Finland and Belgium, three teams who would have been competing at the Euros this summer.

We're joined by special guests to discuss how much difference a year will make to the teams competing at the Euros. Will young players get a chance which they wouldn't have got if the tournament was this year? Have we seen the last of some players on the international stage? Is the postponement beneficial to some teams, or will it be a hindrance? This would have been Finland's first time competing at the men's Euros, so how will they be affected by having to wait another year?

Plus we'll get the latest from the world of golf with the return of the PGA tour this week in Texas. And we'll be talking about one of the most hotly anticipated announcements in boxing, as confirmation comes that Tyson Fury will face Anthony Joshua in two fights for the undisputed title next year.

And with sport returning across the world but without the presence of crowds, we'll take a look at how referees and umpires will cope taking charge of matches behind closed doors.

Photo credit: (Getty Images).


SAT 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv029b7z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l5v8xqyh8)
Preview: The return of the Premier League

The Premier League is back. Sportsworld will have all the latest news and chat on the return of top flight football in England. We're joined by special guests Jose Enrique, Rachel Yankey and Mark Schwarzer to preview the restart.

Photo credit: Premier League ball (Getty Images).


SAT 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv029g03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 17:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l5v8xr27d)
The development of black and ethnic minority coaches in sport

Following the tragic death of George Floyd in America, the sporting world have spoken up about how they have been affected and how important their role can be in the fight against racial injustice. Sportsworld is joined by former Charlton manager Chris Powell, East End Tigers coach Victoria Conteh, Atlanta Hawks head coach Lloyd Pierce and more to discuss the development of black and ethnic minority coaches in sport.

Photo credit: Chris Powell as assistant coach at ADO Den Haag during the Dutch Eredivisie match between ADO Den Haag v RKC Waalwijk on January 19, 2020 in the Netherlands (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv029kr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzmdrb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qnzy0m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxd)
Spanish coronavirus figures and pangolins

Every country's Covid-19 statistics contain their own idiosyncracies, but some problems are larger than others. At the beginning of June, the Spanish government made headlines when they announced they had gone 48 hours without a coronvirus related death. But dig a little deeper, and it's clear a new way of registering cases was hiding the real number. Plus, are Pangolins the most trafficked animal in the world?


(Pangolin unrolling itself after being curled in a protective ball.
Credit: Getty images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv029phc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3cszt5x)
Coronavirus and Latin America

World Questions examines the impact of Coronavirus on Latin America. How has it dealt with the pandemic?

The lockdown, the needs of the economy, cash pay-outs to the poor, culture, tradition and safety in a time of crisis are all discussed with an expert panel and questions from the public across the region.

The programme is presented by Jonny Dymond and the panel of experts includes

Dr Denise Dresser - political scientist, Mexico.
Luiz Philippe de Orleans e Braganca - Chamber of Representatives , Social Liberal Party, Brazil.
Laura Alonso - former head of Argentina's Anti-Corruption office.
Margarita Lopez Maya - Venezuelan historian.
Dr Marcus Espinal - Pan American Health Organisation.

Producer: Helen Towner

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Photo: A medical professional stands by a disinfection tunnel at a Brazilian hospital, Credit: Luis Alvarenga/Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv029t7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2w)
Actor Tracee Ellis Ross

On The Arts Hour with Nikki Bedi,

Golden Globe winning actor Tracee Ellis Ross on playing a pop diva in `The High Note` and the reaction of her mother, the legendary Diana Ross; South Korean American comedian Margaret Cho on Haan, the uniquely Korean concept of vengeance; and Ian Brennan on the traditions of funeral music among the Fra Fra people of Northern Ghana.

Rosamund Pike talks about playing Nobel prize-winning scientist Marie Curie in Marjane Satrapi’s film 'Radioactive'; writer Steve Waters reveals the challenges of dramatizing the founding of Israel for radio; and there’s a dedicated performance from singer-songwriter Martha Wainwright.

Nikki’s guests are film critic MaryAnn Johanson and Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama, whose massive installations, questioning the way the world is run, have appeared all over the world.

(Photo: Tracee Ellis Ross in The High Note. Credit: Universal)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gh27g9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqh4br665)
French police clash with anti-racism activists in Paris

Also on the programme: Democratic Congressman Donald Norcross tells us why he hopes reform to a police department in his state of New Jersey could be a model for change nationwide; and the fear of second coronavirus wave in Beijing after a meat market outbreak.

(Image: Protesters take part in a demonstration against racism and police brutality at Republique Square in Paris on 13 June 2020. Credit: EPA/Badra)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02b1qr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp0f04)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Outlook (w3cszdzv)
The teenager who survived the Manchester bombing

In 2017, Freya Lewis was just 14 when she was injured in a bomb blast after an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester in the U.K. She woke up in intensive care to the news that her best friend had been killed. With the support of her family, her community and even her favourite pop stars like Harry Styles and Ariana Grande herself, Freya began to rebuild her life and find joy again in the songs that had become too painful in the aftermath. Hers is a story of a teenage friendship, fandom and the strength to carry on.

Freya's book is called What Makes Us Stronger.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Freya Lewis in Manchester
Credit: Courtesy of Nick Lewis


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02b5gw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzn0gz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp0jr8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70p)
Black lives matter

The homicide of George Floyd has led to widespread protests in the US. Tens of thousands of demonstrators have been hitting the streets daily, from Minneapolis to New Orleans, and from New York to Los Angeles. But the protests aren’t limited to the US. For the past few weeks, protests and demonstrations have spread across the globe. Issues of police brutality, racism and injustice have plagued nations around the world, including Greece, where people are protesting in solidarity with the death of Geroge Floyd, while also advocating for systemic change in their country.

Also, in France, the killing of George Floyd has invoked the memory of Adama Traoré, a black man who died in police custody there; protests in Belgium target statues of King Leopold II, the brutal colonizer of Congo and other countries in Africa; in Kenya, the death of George Floyd strikes a chord, as Kenyans look at police violence in their country; more than 100 African authors have signed a letter condemning the killing of African Americans at the hands of US police forces - Nigerian author Lola Shoneyin is one of them; and US based Nigerian writer, Sefi Atta, shares her experience of race and racism in America.

Image: Youth protest with placards in front of riot police officers in Athens, Greece, during a rally against racism and police brutality and in support of the protests in the US, sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis (Credit: Dimitris Lampropoulos/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 14 JUNE 2020

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65yw5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhnr)
Facial recognition pulled from police

IBM, Amazon, and Microsoft stop providing controversial facial recognition tools for law enforcement. Do they need to go further and bin the technology for other customers? Plus, how young activists are using the latest online techniques to amplify the Black Lives Matter message. And, what’s the oldest gadget you have lying around your house, and do you still use it? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo representing a facial recognition algorithm scanning an African man’s face. The tech is known to be less accurate when used to scan faces with darker skin, leading to the possibility of discrimination. Credit: Getty Images).


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsn7g1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Resolves (w3ct0v79)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02bjq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzncqc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp0wzn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1l)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

The Shilling factor

As brilliant as the Spitfire is, it has one major flaw. Take her into a steep dive and fuel can’t reach the engine. A solution is urgently needed. That’s a job for the fastest woman in Britain: champion motorcycle racer and pioneering engineer, Beatrice Shilling.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass

The audio for this programme was updated on 16 June 2020.


SUN 02:50 Over to You (w3cszf4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65z3nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t61)
My fake news whodunnit

When a name very similar to journalist Michelle Madsen’s was used as the cover for a fake news hatchet job on a Senegalese politician, she found herself entangled in a web of deception that she is seeking to unravel.

In the run up to Senegal’s hard-fought presidential election last year, a story surfaced accusing a candidate, Ousmane Sonko, of securing “financial assistance” from a European oil company in exchange for oil contracts. The article was attributed to a journalist called “Michelle Damsen”.

The controversial accusations made waves in Senegal, but no "Michelle Damsen" could be found. Michelle Madsen, a British journalist who investigates big companies and corruption in Africa, received a barrage of messages trying to verify the story instead. Despite Michelle denying any involvement, and a full retraction from the website which first published the story, the allegations levelled at Mr Sonko were reported widely, accompanied by additional documents and “proof” of bribes he denies taking.

Who wanted to smear Sonko? Who is behind “Michelle Damsen’s” byline? Could it have been one of Michelle’s contacts? Was this part of a wider disinformation campaign in Senegal’s election? Michelle travels to Senegal to find out.

(Illustration by George Wafula /BBC African Digital)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65z7f1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9pk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsnlpf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02bwyn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hznqyr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp1871)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8b)
Why I Instagram the Hong Kong protests

In Hong Kong thousands of demonstrators have been protesting against a controversial new security law announced by the Chinese government, a law which many state is used to suppress political opponents in mainland China. From a rooftop in the city, one Instagram photographer tells us why he is taking pictures of this crucial chapter of history.

Have you ever wondered what happens on the other side of the wall, in the home of a neighbour? Gail Albert Halaban is known for just that, taking photos of her neighbours and capturing what life is like next door. She speaks to the BBC’s Mugabi Turya about how her photography is bringing neighbours together during the coronavirus lockdown.

Medellin was once considered the most dangerous city in the world. But what is it like now? Photographer Santiago Mesa’s images of contemporary civil unrest and gang violence reveal the Colombian city through the eyes of one of its citizens. Santiago Mesa tells us how he uses his camera to tell stories of real life in Colombia now.

Plus the Washington Post’s Deputy Director of Photography Robert Miller and the photojournalist Marvin Joseph share their experiences of covering the continuing Black Lives Matter protests.

Presented by Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Protesters in Hong Kong. Credit: Ivan)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65zgx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 The Why Factor (w3cswrl1)
Wine

Wine has been referred to as the nectar of the gods, and has been tempting connoisseurs for centuries. But contained in this simple pleasure is an incredibly complex product; and anyone interested in reaching the pinnacle of the wine world must learn more about what goes into every wine bottle than most of us will ever take the time to know. In this edition of the Why Factor on the BBC World Service, Sandra Kanthal speaks to experts of the wine trade to find out why there is so much to discover from a bottle of wine.

Image: Wine being poured (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 06:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsnv5p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 06:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65zlnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 WorklifeIndia (w3cszvgs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:32 on Saturday]


SUN 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsnyxt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:32 Global Questions (w3ct0w3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65zqdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxx)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 7. The Warning

Episode seven of the drama. 1946. Elected headman of Deir Yassin Youssef promises peace with their kibbutz neighbours. Meanwhile, a bomb has been placed in British headquarters - the King David Hotel.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST

Miriam: Shani Erez
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Ben-Gurion: Elliot Levey
Harry Lister: Blake Ritson
Zahra: Lara Sawalha
Menachim Begin: Daniel Rabin
Other parts: Hasan Dixon and Clive Hayward

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsp2ny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjpy)
Coronavirus: The survival business

Food businesses have been some of the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. Worldwide lockdowns have forced thousands of restaurants, bars and cafes to close, but many entrepreneurs have managed to keep their businesses afloat, forced to innovate to survive.

We revisit some past Food Chain guests to find out how they’ve been coping and ask what they’ve learned about their business, their customers, and themselves. Tamasin Ford speaks to a chocolate maker in Ghana who hasn’t sold a single bar since the country locked down in March, and a fried chicken entrepreneur in South Africa who’s turned to feeding frontline workers to keep his kitchens and staff going.

But business hasn’t been all bad - we hear from a baker in Montreal, Canada, who says he’s never sold more bread and has started selling bags of flour to meet a growing demand from home bakers. Plus, a restaurant critic from Melbourne, Australia, tells us what it was like going out for a meal for the first time in more than three months.

Let us know what you think about the show by emailing thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk or using #BBCFoodChain on social media.

Presenter: Tamasin Ford
Producers: Simon Tulett and Siobhan O’Connell
Studio manager: Hal Haines

(Picture: A woman picks up food and a drink from a restaurant during lockdown. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02ccy5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b5n7pkcp3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp1r6k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr65zywt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3h)
Will Covid-19 change cities?

From the bubonic plague and cholera to tuberculosis, pandemics have changed the ways cities have been designed and built. The coronavirus has been no different: with cities all over the world on lockdown, our cities have changed to become quieter, greener, with wildlife returning on an unprecedented scale. Now, with the lockdowns beginning to ease, Kavita Puri asks: what is the future of our cities? Will they return to the way they were - and do we want them to?

Producer: Eleanor Biggs
Presenter: Kavita Puri


(Parisians cycle through the streets of Paris on the Rue de Rivoli, which has been made almost entirely cycleable. Photo:Samuel Boivin/Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xspb56)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Outlook (w3cszdzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02cmff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzpgfj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp1zpt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0t26)
Reflections on Faith in a Global Crisis

Moving Forward

In this final programme of a special Heart and Soul series for the BBC World Service, the journalist John McCarthy brings back together those who have been sharing reflections and insights on faith during the Coronavirus crisis.

We hear how they’re coping now. How have their attitudes to rituals, compassion, solitude and community, changed in the last six weeks? What are their personal thoughts on moving forward, and through, this pandemic, now that many countries have lifted, or have left, lockdown?

We’ll hear how personal faith has been challenged, changed or strengthened during the dark days of Covid-19.

Presenter: John McCarthy
Producer: Olive Clancy


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr6606d2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3cszt5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gh45dc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2yqh4bt447)
Atlanta police chief resigns over fatal shooting

Atlanta's police chief, Erika Shields, has resigned after the fatal shooting of an African-American man who had fallen asleep in his car at a drive-through restaurant. Rayshard Brooks was shot by a police officer during a struggle on Friday evening, authorities say. Protesters in Atlanta took to the streets this weekend. The Wendy's restaurant outside which Mr Brooks died was also set on fire.

Also in the programme: The Italian families calling for an investigation into the country's coronavirus response; and who is Kim Yo Jong, the sister of North Korea's leader playing an increasingly important role in the secretive country?

(Image: Protesters hold placards near the scene of the police shooting which left a black man dead at a Wendy's restaurant in Atlanta. Credit: EPA/Erik S. Lesser)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr660fwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr660kmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjvg)
Joan of Arc: Making a martyr

Born more than six hundred years ago, Joan of Arc is regarded as a French national heroine – a peasant girl who, inspired by saintly visions, battled to break the Siege of Orléans and see Charles VII finally crowned King of France in a grand cathedral. But in 1431, she was burned at the stake.

Bridget Kendall and guests discuss the life and death of this medieval teenage celebrity who helped to shape the course of the Hundred Years War with England. They also reflect on her status as an enduring symbol in popular culture through the ages, including on the stage and the big screen.
Bridget is joined by film scholar Robin Blaetz, and historians Juliet Barker, Xavier Helary and Daniel Hobbins.

Photo: Joan of Arc: Painting by J D Ingres in the Louvre. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr660pcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3l5v8xtvdc)
From Euro 2020 to Euro 2021: What is the real impact of moving the Euros?

The Euros should have started this weekend, but due to the coronavirus pandemic they will now take place during summer 2021 - how will this affect the tournament? Sportsworld discusses how teams will be affected by the postponement, will it be a help or a hindrance? What does it mean for young players or for those who were planning to retire? Mina Rzouki and Loic Tanxi join Sportsworld to debate the issue.

Plus, we'll be joined by West Indies cricketer Kemar Roach about the resumption of cricket and the West Indies tour of England.

And we'll have the latest from the European football leagues and updates on golf's PGA Tour in Texas.

Photo credit: The Olympic stadium in Rome which was due to host several matches of the 2020 Euros, including the opening match (Getty Images).


SUN 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr660t3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv15)
Kids fixing the world

This week we look at four brilliant inventions by children: a phone app to stop drivers missing road signs; a robot that is activated when a vulnerable person falls over; a tool to help fire departments predict the likelihood of wildfires, and a way to make your fish tank double as a vegetable patch for microgreens.

The future engineers and scientists behind these innovations are aged between 12 and 16 and were all entrants in the UK’s Big Bang Competition. Head judge Helena Dodd joins William Kremer to discuss what makes a winning design, and what grown-ups everywhere can do to unleash the problem-solving power of the next generation.

Reported and produced by William Kremer.

Picture: Freddie with Fallbot


SUN 17:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsq5d3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:32 Kalki Presents: My Indian Life (w3ct0t3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 17:50 Resolves (w3ct0v79)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


SUN 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr660xvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 18:06 The Evidence (w3ct0t36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02dldg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzqfdk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp2ynv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 13 Minutes to the Moon (w3ct0v1r)
Apollo 13

S2 Ep.07 Resurrection

“I still have nightmares about this.” Can the crew survive the dangers of re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere? An error could see them either incinerated or becoming lost forever in deep space. #13MinutestotheMoon
For more Apollo films and photos: www.bbcworldservice.com/13minutes
Presented by Kevin Fong.
Archive: Nasa
Starring
Jim Lovell
John Aaron
Dave Reed
Hal Loden
Jerry Bostick
Jim Kelly
Fred Haise
Charlie Duke
Joe Kerwin
Gene Kranz, courtesy of the Johnson Space Center Oral History Project
Chuck Deiterich
Marilyn Lovell
Gerry Griffin
Written by Kevin Fong and Andrew Luck-Baker
Theme music by Hans Zimmer and Christian Lundberg for Bleeding Fingers Music
BBC Radio Science Unit for the BBC World Service


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr6615c3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6sx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nr3gh54cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqh4bv338)
Atlanta police shooting of black man condemned

A white policeman accused of shooting dead a fleeing black suspect in the US city of Atlanta has been sacked after a night of unrest over the killing. Another officer involved has been put on leave, and the city's police chief has resigned.

Also in the programme: The head of the World Trade Organisation on changing the rules on state aid because of China's growing power; and the families in northern Italy taking legal action to find out why so many people there
died of Covid-19.

(Photo: A protester stands outside of a Wendy"s restaurant which was destroyed after a black man shot and killed during incident with the Atlanta Police Department on Friday. Credit: EPA)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nqr661dvc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pk5xsqs3r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0t26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02f2cz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b60hzqxd2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp3fnc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3csxfjg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]



MONDAY 15 JUNE 2020

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02f9w7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57md249m23)
What’s the future for Hong Kong?

Just over a year since protests began anew in Hong Kong, the region now faces another perceived crisis: the imposition of a new national security law, which purports to address "subversion, secession, terrorism and foreign interference". Critics say it will erode the judiciary and would be tantamount to making a crime of free speech, protest and dissent. Jodie Schneider with Bloomberg News in Hong Kong explains how fear over this new law could be prompting wealthier citizens to find new homes for themselves, and their money. Simon Littlewood, president of ACG Consulting, says the protests may accelerate the region's decline in favour of Shanghai and Shenzhen. But the independent economist Michael Hughes thinks Hong Kong’s financial power remains useful to Beijing. And the row between China and the US over Hong Kong places South Korea in a difficult position, explains Jen Kwon of CBS in Seoul. Also in the programme, Hong Kong activists express support and solidarity for the Black Lives Matter protests, but how much crossover is there between the two movements?
(Picture: Protestors and Police in Hong Kong. Picture Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp3p4m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02ffmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8w3wm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp3swr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5r)
Were my atoms once your atoms?

We were bowled over by a question from one CrowdScience listener in Australia wants to know how likely it is that the atoms in his body have been used in someone else’s body? We all like to think we are unique; no one is quite like us. But is that really true?

Presenter Marnie Chesterton tackles Moshe’s question with help from every area of science. From geologists helping us work out how many atoms are on the Earth’s surface to biologists helping us work out how many atoms each body uses. Perhaps we are much less special than we think.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

(Photo:


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02fkch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh4y)
Rulon Gardner - Wrestling Hero

At the 2000 Olympics, American Rulon Gardner pulled off the greatest shock in the history of modern Greco-Roman wrestling when he beat the Russian Aleksander Karelin. Karelin had not been defeated for 13 years and had already prepared a party to celebrate his latest gold medal. The win made Gardner a hero in America and is credited with sparking a boom in the popularity of his sport. He talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-in-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Rulon Gardner (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02fp3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8wccw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp41d0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Why Factor (w3cswrl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 04:50 More or Less (w3ct0pxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02fsvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6ty01l)
Europe reopens for business after months of lockdown

Europe begins to open up following three months of lockdown across most of the continent.

A court in the Philippines has convicted the prominent journalist Maria Ressa of libel.

Statues of the British explorer Captain James Cook have been defaced by anti-racism protesters in Australian cities.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02fxlw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6ty3sq)
Philippine journalist Maria Ressa found guilty of libel

A court in the Philippines has convicted the prominent journalist, Maria Ressa, of libel.

Doctors go on strike in Nigeria today over the lack of protective equipment and poor pay.

Help Age International say that Covid-19 has amplified the violence, abuse and neglect of older people around the world.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02g1c0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6ty7jv)
Maria Ressa found guilty of cyber libel in the Philippines

A court in the Philippines has convicted the prominent journalist Maria Ressa of libel.

Europe is beginning to open up following three months of lockdown across most of the continent.

The US ambassador to Russia has told the BBC that an American man accused of spying is the subject of a ‘gross injustice’.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02g534)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1x)
Epidemiologist Ian Lipkin: Are we getting the pandemic response right?

All of us fervently want to believe the worst of the coronavirus pandemic is over. Governments around the world are easing lockdowns and focusing on economic recovery. But Covid-19 hasn’t gone away. Infection rates are rising in Latin America, parts of the US and Africa. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the internationally renowned epidemiologist Ian Lipkin, the scientific advisor for the movie Contagion which, nine years ago, predicted a scenario uncannily like this one. Are we getting the real-life pandemic response right?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp4jcj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7jd)
A conversation with Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

The Nigerian economist and former World Bank managing director talks about Africa, Covid-19, boardroom diversity, and her hopes to lead the World Trade Organisation.

She is one of several candidates vying for the position, after the current managing director unexpectedly resigned a year early. But at a time when trade is suffering from the ravages of a sceptical Trump administration and a pandemic, is the job something of a poisoned chalice? And what would it mean for an African woman to take over?

The former Nigerian finance minister now holds multiple jobs - on the boards of Twitter, Standard Chartered Bank, and the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization. They give her a unique perspective on many of the challenges now facing the planet. But Manuela Saragosa asks her whether she thinks the pool of Africans invited to these top positions needs to be widened.

Correction: During the programme, the departing head of the WTO Roberto Azevedo is erroneously referred to as Mexican. Mr Azevedo is actually from Brazil.

(Picture: Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala; Credit: Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmjz)
Elisabeth Kübler-Ross and the Five Stages of Grief

Denial. Anger. Bargaining. Depression. Acceptance. When Swiss psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross published her bestselling book On Death and Dying in 1969, she described a series of emotional stages that she had seen terminally ill patients experience – later known as the Five Stages of Grief. But there was much more to her work in end of life care. Her son Ken speaks to Lucy Burns.

Photo: Dr. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross, Virginia Farm, 1987. Photo courtesy of Ken Ross www.ekrfoundation.org


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02g8v8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Why Factor (w3cswrl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp4n3n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02gdld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 BBC OS (w172xm3g5s3z455)
Conversations on race and change

In the week of the funeral of George Floyd, we have continued to see the impact of his death and the reaction of people around the world. Protesters are demanding change to racial injustices and inequalities. And in the days since the death of Mr Floyd in Minneapolis on 25th May, we have witnessed many things from police officers marching alongside protesters; to the political debate about US police reform; to the toppling of statues that symbolise the history of slavery and racism.

Nuala McGovern takes you through conversations with some of the people involved in the global discussion that is taking place.

((Photo: A statue of Confederate States President Jefferson Davis lies on the street after protesters pulled it down in Richmond, Virginia, 10 June.2020. Credit: Parker Michels-Boyce/ AFP/Getty Images)


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp4rvs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Boston Calling (w3csz70p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02gjbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8x6ls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp4wlx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3csynk8)
Social media poetry stars

Poets Leticia Sala and Nikita Gill on being taken seriously by the establishment after launching their careers on social media. They talk to Kim Chakanetsa about overcoming snobbery around the title 'insta-poet' and balancing being able to share their work with millions of people with the immediacy of follower feedback.

Nikita Gill is a British-Indian writer and artist. Born in Belfast, she spent the majority of her childhood in New Delhi. She had poems published in papers and magazines as a teenager but went on to study a 'more practical' degree. She began posting her poetry on Tumblr in 2015 and later on Instagram, where she now has over half a million followers. She's since had five books of poetry published.

Leticia Sala is a Spanish poet and writer. A law graduate, she always assumed she couldn't earn a living as a professional poet, but then started getting huge feedback on poems she wrote and posted on social media in her spare time. She very quickly signed a book deal and has a huge online following in Europe and Latin America.

Image credits
L: Leticia Sala (Paloma Lanna)
R: Nikita Gill (BBC)


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02gn2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd34)
The lawyer, the chemical giant, and the contaminated water

Robert Bilott is an American lawyer who, in the 1990s defended big corporations, including chemical companies. One day he got a call from a farmer called Wilbur Earl Tennant, whose cattle were dying. Mr Tennant thought something was wrong with his cattle's drinking water.

Robert took on what he thought would be a simple case. But what he uncovered was an environmental crisis affecting thousands of people. It became a fight against one of the world’s biggest chemical companies, DuPont.

A chemical – PFOA - used in the production of Teflon - had been making its way into the water supply of several towns along the Ohio River. Now this was an unregulated chemical - but studies obtained by Robert as part of the lawsuit against DuPont appeared to show that it could cause cancer in rats and that it could make its way into human blood.

Robert became concerned people didn’t realise the chemical could be found in drinking water. He launched a class-action lawsuit against DuPont on behalf of 70,000 people whose water was affected by PFOA. It took six years for a team of independent scientists to conclude a "probable link" between PFOA and a list of health conditions including kidney cancer and thyroid disease. 

In 2017 DuPont settled over 3,500 PFOA lawsuits for a total of 671 million dollars.

DuPont denies any wrongdoing - the company told us: "We are committed to upholding the highest standards for the wellbeing of our employees, our customers and the communities in which we operate.  In 2006, historical DuPont announced its commitment to discontinue manufacture, purchase, or use of PFOA”.

Robert has written a book about what happened called 'Exposure', and a major feature film has been made about his story called 'Dark Waters' where Robert is played by the actor Mark Ruffalo.




Producer: June Christie
Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Robert Bilott. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02grts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8xg31)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp5435)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02gwkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn101m)
Coronavirus cases reappear in Beijing

The Chinese capital, Beijing records dozens of new locally transmitted cases of Coronavirus, after more than 50 days of no cases. China's Vice Premier Sun Chunlan has called on officials to take "decisive measures", warning that the risk of further spread remained high.

Also on the programme: We speak to Maria Ressa, the most prominent journalist in the Philippines, who has been found guilty of cyber libel and faces six years in prison; and do statues help us understand history and if not, should they be taken down: a new chapter in an old culture war.

(Photo: Medical workers in protective suits help people lining up inside a sports centre for tests, following new cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections in Beijing, China June 15, 2020. Credit: China Daily via Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02h0b1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 The Why Factor (w3cswrl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp5clf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltvrnd0skw)
BP faces $17.5bn hit as it forecasts cheaper oil

Oil giant BP expects prices to fall as coronavirus accelerates a shift from fossil fuels. Cornelia Meyer used to work at BP and is the chief executive of Meyer Resources, and tells us BP's announcement is dramatic. And Sir Ed Davey, acting leader of the Liberal Democrats political party in the UK, who was secretary of state for energy and climate change between 2012 and 2015, considers BP's assertion the pandemic will catapult us into a future where we burn less carbon. Also in the programme, our workplace commentator Pilita Clarke considers how to figure out your place in the office hierarchy now that so much work is being done from home. Plus, as shops across the UK reopen with lockdown measures gradually easing, we find out how the shopping experience will change. We talk to the owner of Northfields Toy Shop in west London, as well as Mark Allsop, chief operating officer of the Dixons Carphone group's electronics and electrical equipment stores. And Bridey Lipscombe, founder of creative agency Cult, gives us her assessment of whether with all the changes retailers are having to make, the sector will still be successful.

(Picture: A BP logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02h425)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp5hbk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 16:32 The Conversation (w3csynk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02h7t9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss374jzxs)
George Floyd death: African-American family

One of our conversations is with three generations of African Americans: Raymon Curry is the 16-year-old who went viral during a protest in Charlotte, North Carolina, when he was brought into a heated exchange with two older men. Today, we hear Ray in conversation with his mother Jasmaine and grandmother Sherondia Morgan, whose early childhood memories go back to the 1960s. They discuss what their collective history teaches them in order to achieve a different outcome from the current protests.

We also go to Atlanta, where more protests are planned later, following the police shooting and death of Rayshard Brooks.

On Coronavirus, one of the things we discuss is the wearing of face coverings. In England, people are required to use them for the first time on places like public transport. In other countries and cultures, people are more familiar. We hear from Singapore where it is mandatory to wear a mask in public places.

(Photo: (from left) Jasmaine Curry, Ray Curry, Princeton Holmes, Sherondia Morgan Credit: Jasmaine Curry).


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02hckf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02hh9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8y5kt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp5vky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkb30pdlq)
2020/06/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02hm1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp5zb2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct0t92)
The Origin of Stuff

High heel

Katy Brand loves a high heel. Once known by friends and family for her ‘shoe fetish’, her dad even gave her a ceramic heel that could hold a wine bottle at a jaunty angle.

These days, Katy’s cherished heels from her torture days live in her cupboard. She has traded the pain for the statement trainer. But their art, history and construction still fascinate her.

So what is it about the high heel that has made it stand the test of time?

With the help of resident public historian, Greg Jenner, Katy explores the heel’s fascinating passage through time, finding a place on the feet of men, as well as women, in high and low places. Heels donned the feet of men on horseback in 17th century Persia, were adored by King Louis XIV, and gained an erotic currency with the invention of photography.

But how has science and engineering ensured the high heel’s survival?

Footwear Technologist, Mike George, shows us how the high heel is engineered, and how he can test if a particular design is teetering on the edge of safety. Social scientist, Heather Morgan, reveals the perceived benefits of wearing heels, as well as the risks when she fell foul to when fell in heels and broke her ankle.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: High heels, Credit: European Photopress Agency


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02hqst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn1v8j)
US 'outraged' as Russia jails ex-marine

The American Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, has sharply criticised a Moscow court's decision to sentence Paul Whelan, a former Marine, to 16 years of hard labour on spying charges.

Also on the programme: New coronavirus scare in Beijing; and why Iran is reducing family planning service in the state-run healthcare system.

Picture: Paul Whelan holds up a sign denouncing the legal proceedings against him at the Moscow City Court. Credit: EPA/YURI KOCHETKOV.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02hvjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Why Factor (w3cswrl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Sunday]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp66tb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3csynk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02hz92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8ynkb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp6bkg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ftsr2mkj)
US Supreme Court backs LGBT workers

America's top court has ruled that employers who fire workers for being gay or transgender are breaking the country's civil rights laws. In a 6-3 decision, the Supreme Court said federal law, which prohibits discrimination based on sex, should be understood to include sexual orientation and gender identity. We hear from Slate writer Mark Stern what this will practically mean for LGBT people.

Oil giant BP expects prices to fall as coronavirus accelerates a shift from fossil fuels. Cornelia Meyer used to work at BP and is the chief executive of Meyer Resources, and tells us BP's announcement is dramatic.

Also in the programme, our workplace commentator Pilita Clarke considers how to figure out your place in the office hierarchy now that so much work is being done from home.

Plus, as shops across the UK reopen with lockdown measures gradually easing, we find out how the shopping experience will change. We talk to the owner of Northfields Toy Shop in west London, as well as Mark Allsop, chief operating officer of the Dixons Carphone group's electronics and electrical equipment stores. And Bridey Lipscombe, founder of creative agency Cult, gives us her assessment of whether with all the changes retailers are having to make, the sector will still be successful.

(Picture: Getty Images)



TUESDAY 16 JUNE 2020

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02j6sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18s9vh5cqc)
US Supreme Court bars discrimination against LGBT workers

The US Supreme Court ruled that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and transgender workers from workplace discrimination, handing the movement for LGBT equality a stunning victory. We hear from the last surviving plaintiff Gerald Bostock and his lawyer Thomas Mew.

Also in the programme, six former employees of the e-commerce company eBay - including some senior executives - have been charged with federal cyberstalking. They are accused of harassing a couple behind an online newsletter that criticised the company.

Plus - we report on how Europe's shops, zoos and bars are slowly re-opening after a long lockdown.

And - our workplace commentator Pilita Clarke considers how to figure out your place in the office hierarchy now that so much work is being done from home.

Presenter Jamie Robertson is joined by guests Peter Morici in the US and Mehmal Sarfraz in Pakistan

PHOTO: Reuters


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02jbjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8z0sq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp6psv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct0t92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02jg8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02jl0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs8z88z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp6y93)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct0hz0)
Life Changes

ADHD and me

For many years ADHD was dismissed by sceptics as a dubious condition. Later, when it achieved recognition, if not acceptance, the focus was very much on the negative impact it had on the lives of people it affected and their close ones.

As Saeedeh Hashemi - herself diagnosed with ADHD - will show, there is now increasing understanding that living with the condition also brings positives.

Saeedeh will meet others who, for all the downsides of the disorder, feel that life without it would be like “living cramped within a frame” and who would not give it up as it has fundamentally shaped their personalities.

She will also talk to top medical professionals to hear how they are seeking to recognise the positive potential of ADHD and what innovative ways of treating the condition they’re suggesting.
The modern working environment has shifted and employers are finally embracing neuro-diversity as a vital tool in building effective teams. Saeedeh will explore what it actually means, how the thinking about workflow, work space and team work reflects the needs of people with the condition and allows them to grow to the best of their potential and to the benefit of business.

The programme, of course, certainly won’t suggest that ADHD is entirely a gift. It will, however, seek to emphasise that alongside negatives come strengths and qualities that can help propel individuals to enormous personal success, and how society and businesses are beginning to see it as an opportunity rather than a disadvantage.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02jprv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v0wyp)
Beijing neighbourhoods in lockdown to contain fresh Covid-19 outbreak

The Chinese capital Beijing has put more neighbourhoods under lockdown and boosted testing as it tries to contain an outbreak of coronavirus.

President Trump has confirmed plans to withdraw around 9,500 US troops from bases in Germany.

The Mayor of Atlanta has ordered a change in the police use of force following the shooting dead of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02jthz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v10pt)
Coronavirus: 100 new cases in Beijing

The Chinese capital Beijing has put more neighbourhoods under lockdown and boosted testing as it tries to contain an outbreak of coronavirus.

The Mayor of Atlanta has ordered a change in the police use of force following the shooting dead of Rayshard Brooks outside a burger joint in Atlanta.

Why are decades of progress on gender equality under threat because of the COVID-19 pandemic?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02jy83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v14fy)
Fresh Covid-19 outbreak in Beijing linked to city's largest market

The Chinese capital Beijing has put more neighbourhoods under lockdown and boosted testing as it tries to contain an outbreak of coronavirus.

Booker prize winning author Bernardine Evaristo on becoming the first British black woman to top the UK paperback fiction chart with her novel 'Girl, Woman, Other'.

How are Ghanaians coping now that wearing a mask everywhere is mandatory?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02k207)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv16)
Personality tests for loans

A short online test that reveals attitudes, opinions and thought processes is being used to help decide whether to give people loans.

The idea is to use psychometric tests to give people with little or no credit history a better chance of getting support and investment.

New ways of providing financial services are needed because 1.7 billion people have no access to any kind of formal banking facilities, according to the World Bank. Known as the unbanked, they deal only in cash. This can make it harder to reduce poverty, save money or invest for the future.

Cheap mobile phones and good network coverage in Nigeria are also transforming the lives of people who previously only dealt in cash.

Presented and produced by Anisa Subedar

Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp7f8m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz89f)
How batteries are powering ahead

Tesla's Elon Musk plans to make some big announcements about batteries that could transform cars, electricity and the fight against climate change.

Justin Rowlatt gets the inside scoop from Seth Weinbaum, journalist at the electric vehicles news-site Electrek. Meanwhile, battery chemist Paul Shearing of University College London and the Faraday Institution explains how lithium-ion batteries made the smartphone possible, and are now set to revolutionise transport.

But electrifying the world's one billion road vehicles is no small task, not to mention building even bigger batteries to stabilise renewable energy sources on our electricity grids. Where on earth will all the lithium come from? Justin speaks to another American tech entrepreneur who thinks he has the answer - Teague Egan of start-up EnergyX.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Battery charging icons; Credit: Iuliia Kanivets/Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmph)
Beethoven's role in China's Cultural Revolution

During the early years of Cultural Revolution in China, all European music was banned. Even enjoying traditional Chinese music and art was illegal. Anyone found with old instruments or recordings could be imprisoned. But that didn’t stop some musicians and enthusiasts from playing or listening to the music they loved, sometimes as an act of rebellion. A favourite during those times in China was the German composer – Ludwig Van Beethoven. Conductor, Jindong Cai tells Rebecca Kesby how he decided to become a musician after listening to an illegal recording of one of his symphonies.

(Portrait of German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827) by German painter Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820. (Photo by Kean Collection/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02k5rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp7k0r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct0t92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02k9hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02kf7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs903hw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp7sj0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvb9)
Nnedi Okorafor: Creating sci-fi worlds

The award-winning science fiction author Nnedi Okorafor always has a project - or three - on the go. From her home outside Chicago she creates stories driven by what she describes as Africanfuturism and Africanjujuism for children and adults -a legacy of her Nigerian roots. Her work now ranges across comics for Marvel, screenplays and yet another new novel due out in the summer.

But she wasn’t always destined to be a writer. She spent her youth training hard to be a top class athlete until she developed curvature of the spine, which put an end to her dreams. After corrective surgery she became temporarily paralysed and it was then, during her darkest time, that she began to create stories.

Now, as Chicago, like the rest of the US endures lockdown, Nnedi’s been adapting to her changed life and restricted movements. Mark Burman talks to her about her work and how her creative process has been affected during the Covid-19 pandemic. During recordings made in April and early May he eavesdrops on some of her writing moments including her fruitful collaboration with the Kenyan director Wanuri Kahiu and their story of an A.I. traffic police robot – and hears about the therapeutic distraction of her trumpet-playing daughter and magnificent cat which now has his own Twitter account!

Reader: Keziah Joseph
Reporter: Mark Burman.
Produced by Mark Burman and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service

Image: Nnedi Okorafor (Credit: Colleen Durkin)


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02kjzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdjp)
We missed our baby’s birth because of Covid-19

In March 2020, Patrick and Enitan Goredema were supposed to travel from their home in Toronto, Canada to Tbilisi in Georgia to witness the birth of their first child to a surrogate mother. But on March 18th, Georgia closed its borders in a bid to contain the spread of Covid-19 and despite their best efforts, they couldn’t get there in time for their son’s birth. Patrick and Enitan had to wait for more than a month to be united with him. They spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb.

Ghislain Bardout and his wife, Emmanuelle, are extreme divers from France, who love to explore the most remote parts of the world's oceans. And it's not just them - they've roped in their two children and the family dog, to join them on their underwater adventures. Most recently, the couple spent time in an underwater capsule in French Polynesia. You can find more information about their adventures at www.underthepole.com.

Picture: Patrick and Enitan Goredema with their baby son
Credit: Pearly Jacob


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02knqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs90c04)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp8108)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct0t92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02ksh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn3wyq)
Beijing tightens controls as new outbreak spreads

The Chinese capital, Beijing, has put more neighbourhoods under lockdown and boosted testing as it tries to contain a new outbreak of coronavirus. Could this virus strain be more infectious than the Wuhan one?

Also in the programme: A commonly available steroid has been shown to reduce the risk of dying from covid-19; and have we lost faith in science or has science been politicised?

(Image: A nurse takes a nucleic acid test for Covid-19 from a person in Beijing. Credit: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02kx74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp88hj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwhn3lh9bk)
Pandemic hits remittances

Coronavirus has hit the amount of money migrant workers can send their families back home. Caroline Theoharides is an assistant professor of economics at Amherst College and explains how significant so-called remittances are for the 800 million people globally who rely on them. We meet one Indian IT consultant sending money from the UK, and hear from his family how those funds have helped pay for education and housing back in India. And Dora Zambria, chief operating officer of digital remittances company Azimo, tells us how his firm is working to bring the cost of sending money down significantly from a typical rate of around 7%. Also in the programme, the European Commission has launched an investigation into claims the US technology giant Apple has breached competition law. The BBC's Theo Leggett brings us the details. Plus, as many hospitality firms in the UK argue that their business models are unviable with a two metre minimum social distance between customers, we explore the trade-off between health and the economy, with Dr Andy Wood, chief executive of Adnams pubs and breweries.

(Picture: A house under construction in India. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02l0z8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp8d7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:32 In the Studio (w3cszvb9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02l4qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss374mwtw)
Coronavirus conversations: Reopening businesses

How do you approach restarting your business after coronavirus lockdown? We speak to a restaurant owner in Dalyan, Turkey; an educational entrepreneur in Gaborone, Botswana; and a tattoo artist and shop owner in Grand Rapids, Michigan. How have they kept their businesses afloat? What are they doing to prepare to trade again in a world with Covid-19?

We'll also explain how a cheap steroid has been found to help patients who are severely ill with the disease. Research has shown that Dexamethasone significantly reduces the risk of death in patients on ventilators or oxygen. Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto is on the programme to answer your questions about that or any other aspect of the coronavirus story. You can send your question on WhatsApp: +447730751925 or Twitter: @BBCOS.

Also, we talk about the future of policing in the United States after the killing of George Floyd. As President Trump signs an executive order on the changes that he is backing, we talk about the other visions to change, reform, defund or abolish police departments.

Photo: Tattoo artist Gareth Hawkins in Grand Rapids, Michigan
Credit: Instagram / @intricate_exposures


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02l8gj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02ld6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs912gx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp8rh1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkb30s9ht)
2020/06/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02lhys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp8w75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz981)
Is this the end of facial recognition tech?

Facial recognition – what’s the future for the tech with the big names pulling out?
Most of the big tech companies have now declared they will not sell facial recognition tech to police, but will this mean that police forces will stop using this tech? There are many smaller companies that have so far not declared their intentions and others are clearly breaking the few regulations in place by using people’s images without consent. It’s widely known that facial recognition technology is racially and sexually biased, and there is little, if any, evidence that this tech does help to reduce crime levels. Dr.Stephanie Hare discusses what might now happen with this tech.

Online gambling surge during COVID-19
Lockdowns are making many players and gamblers move to online gambling platforms, the big issue here is that they do not come under strict regulations like their real world counterparts. Silvia Lazzaris and Katie Kropshofer report on this growing problem. Can you protect a rising number of online gamblers, many of whom suffer from addiction and are bunkered in their homes, from targeted advertising and fraud? And how can regulation catch up with this sudden shift to the online world?

Will gaze tech replace touch tech in times of the pandemic?
As computer processing speeds continue to increase, so does the versatility and accuracy of gaze tech – using your eyes instead of a computer mouse or touchpad. Dr. David Souto, from the University of Leicester, explains that as our eye muscles do not tire this technology has untapped benefits. His work is part of the British Academy Virtual Summer Showcase which goes live online this week.



(Image: Human face recognition scanning system illustration. Credit: Getty Images)


Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz



TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02lmpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn4r5m)
President Trump signs executive order on police reform

The move comes after widespread protests about police brutality, which disproportionately affects black men. The order encourages “best practice” within the police but critics say it falls short of the deep reform they’re calling for. Also: confrontation along the border between India and China has escalated, and a drug provides a “major breakthrough” in lifesaving coronavirus treatment.

(Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump is applauded by law enforcement leaders surrounding him as he holds up an executive order on police reform. Credit: Reuters/Leah Millis)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02lrg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct0hz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp93qf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3cszvb9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02lw65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs91kgf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp97gk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ftsr5jgm)
Trump signs executive order on police reforms

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order introducing police reforms. It offers federal grants to improve police practices and comes amid anger over the killing of African Americans by police officers. Mr Trump said the police played an essential role in society, which must be protected and he said he would not support attempts to defund and dismantle police forces. However, activist and Yale University academic Philip McHarris tells us why he believes defunding the police is the way forward.

Also in the programme, we investigate how much has the coronavirus pandemic hit remittances world-wide.

Plus, the European Commission has launched an investigation into claims the US technology giant Apple has breached competition law.

PHOTO: President Trump signs an executive order on police reform/Reuters



WEDNESDAY 17 JUNE 2020

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02m3pf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18s9vh88mg)
Trump signs executive order on policing

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order introducing police reforms. It offers federal grants to improve police practices and comes amid anger over the killing of African Americans by police officers. Mr Trump said the police played an essential role in society, which must be protected and he said he would not support attempts to defund and dismantle police forces. However, activist and Yale University academic Philip McHarris tells us why he believes defunding the police is the way forward.

There have been a clash between Chinese and Indian troops in the Galwan valley in Kashmir, along the disputed border between the two countries. The Indian army says twenty of its soldiers were killed. China admits it suffered casualties but did not say how many. How is this seen in India?

Also in the programme, the overall unemployment rate in the US for May fell - surprising economists - but the unemployment rate for African Americans went up, making it the highest jobless rate for the black Americans in more than a decade.

And - we investigate how much has the coronavirus pandemic hit remittances world-wide.

Plus, the European Commission has launched an investigation into claims the US technology giant Apple has breached competition law.

And, football in England is back, but without spectators. We ask if the home advantage is lost under those circumstances?

Presenter Jamie Robertson is joined by guests Alison Van Diggelen in San Francisco and Jyoti Malhotra in Delhi.

PHOTO: President Trump signs an executive order on police reform/Reuters


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02m7fk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs91xpt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp9lpy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3csz981)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02mc5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02mgxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs92562)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qp9v66)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxy)
Miriam and Youssef

Ep 8. Partition

1947. A vote is due to take place at the UN, proposing that Palestine be divided into two states, with Jerusalem held under international jurisdiction. But this does not meet with everyone’s approval. The drama continues.

Written by Steve Waters

CAST
Youssef: Amir El-Masry
Miriam: Shani Erez
Yehoshua: Philip Arditti
Ben-Gurion: Elliot Levey
Zahra: Lara Sawalha
Musa Alami: Sargon Yelda
Mohammed: Ramzi Dehani
Judah Magnes: Neil McCaul
Other parts: Jessica Turner, Steve Waters and Sargon Yelda

Original music: Glenn Sharp
Sound design: Caleb Knightley
Produced by Radio Drama London for BBC World Service


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02mlny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v3svs)
North Korea threaten to send troops into border areas

North Korea says it will send soldiers back into border areas that were disarmed under a peace agreement with the South.

The United States is imposing new economic sanctions on Syria from today.

At least 20 Indian soldiers were killed in a clash with Chinese forces in a disputed Himalayan border area, Indian officials say.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02mqf2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v3xlx)
Tensions and threats of troop movements on the Korean peninsular

North Korea says it will send soldiers back into border areas that were disarmed under a peace agreement with the South.

Scientists in Florida have found that a tiny genetic mutation in the SARS coronavirus 2 variant circulating throughout Europe and the US has been significantly increasing the virus’ ability to infect cells.

The row over the dam being built by Ethiopia to harness the power of the Blue Nile has heated up again with Egypt saying Ethiopia was being 'intransigent'.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02mv56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v41c1)
South and North Korea tensions escalate

North Korea says it will send soldiers back into border areas that were disarmed under a peace agreement with the South.

New US sanctions against Syria come into force today.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced that the department responsible for international aid - DFID - is to be merged with the foreign office.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02myxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6f)
Arancha Gonzalez: Why isn't the world working together?

Covid-19 has presented governments across the world with a common threat, but the response has been far from united and collaborative. Has the pandemic further weakened the multilateral institutions that were the hallmark of globalisation? Stephen Sackur speaks to Spain's foreign minister Arancha Gonzalez. Is Europe's liberal political elite struggling to cope with a geopolitical reality increasingly defined by nationalism in the US and China?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpbb5q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8mq)
China's debt relief for Africa

China has been one of the biggest financiers of infrastructure projects in Africa, but many African economies have been hit hard by the Covid 19 pandemic. So will China prove to be a generous and understanding creditor? Can it even afford to be?

In the edition of the programme we hear from Zhengli Huang, a freelance researcher in Nairobi, on what’s likely to happen to Chinese-financed projects in Africa. Deborah Brautigam, director of the China Africa Research Initiative at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, looks at what sort of debt relief China can realistically offer; and Ben Cavender, managing director of the China Market Research Group in Shanghai, talks about whether China could cope with the economic hit of many countries suddenly defaulting on their debt repayments.

Presented by Manuela Saragosa. Produced by Joshua Thorpe.

(Picture: Woman serving Chinese tea in a traditional tea ceremony; Credit: Creative-Family/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmrr)
Sex trafficking and peacekeepers

In the late 1990s, whistle-blowers implicated UN peacekeepers and international police in the forced prostitution and trafficking of Eastern European women into Bosnia, which was just emerging from a bitter civil war. Louise Hidalgo has been talking to one of those who sounded the alarm, British human rights lawyer, Madeleine Rees, who was then working for the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Bosnia.

Picture: the United Nations Peacekeeping Force patrols the Bosnian capital Sarajevo in March 1996 (Credit: Roger Lemoyne/Liaison/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02n2ng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpbfxv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3csz981)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02n6dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0t61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02nb4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs930dz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpbpf3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8t)
The Californian Century

California: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

Stanley Tucci imagines the story of modern California as a movie screenplay, tracing the dramatic history of the state from Hollywood to Silicon Valley. In this episode, the first man to direct a full movie in California meets a dramatic end. In 1911, 41-year-old Francis Boggs was on the up, a pioneering movie director. But his luck was just about to run out. And the story of William Mulholland and the lies that made Los Angeles possible. Mulholland first brought water to arid LA, with much double dealing.

Academic consultant: Dr Ian Scott, University of Manchester
Producer: Laurence Grissell

(Photo: Actor Stanley Tucci. Credit: David M. Benett/Getty Images)


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02nfwv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdrg)
Hamilton: Overcoming hearing loss to make its music

Alex Lacamoire is the award-winning orchestrator, arranger and conductor for the hit musical Hamilton. This hip hop homage to the revolutionary US statesman Alexander Hamilton - which was created by Lin-Manuel Miranda - has become one of the most successful musicals of all time.

But Alex has his own story to tell. He's the son of Cuban immigrants, and although he's now one of the world's most celebrated composers, as a child he was diagnosed with a hearing impairment. It was even suggested he go to a school for deaf children. But his mother was determined he would stay in mainstream school. And despite his hearing challenges, his passion and talent for music grew.

Alex first encountered Lin-Manuel Miranda back when he was a lyricist and rapper trying to create his first professional show. They joined forces. Lin would dream up the songs, and Alex would work out how the music would sound. And the chemistry between them would form part of the magic behind the development of Hamilton.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf
Sound design 'Rockin' hits of the 80s': Joel Cox

Picture: Alex Lacamoire and Lin-Manuel Miranda
Credit: Theo Wargo / Wire Image / Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmrr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02nkmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs937x7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpbxxc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3csz981)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02npd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn6svt)
New US sanctions target Assad government's foreign backers

The United States is imposing harsh new economic sanctions on Syria, the Caesar Act aims to compel President Bashar al Assad to stop what the US describes as murderous attacks on the Syrian people.

Also in the programme: North Korea has threatened to redeploy troops to the demilitarised border with South Korea in an escalation of tension between the two countries. How detectives help fight Covid-19 in Iceland.

(Photo: President Bashar al-Assad's government blames the economic crisis on Western sanctions. Credit: AFP)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02nt47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpc5dm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxb2v68hny)
Facebook aims to prevent US election interference

Facebook has unveiled a range of measures aimed at combatting US election interference. Dan Sodergren is a social media and technology expert, and offers his assessment of whether the company’s plans are likely to be effective. Also in the programme, as Black Lives Matter protests continue around the world, the BBC’s Samira Hussain reports on the unequal employment and income prospects of African Americans compared to other racial groups, and whether anything can be done about it. Plus, as Premier League football matches get under way again in England, Josh Sandhu who runs a club for supporters of the London side Tottenham Hotspur tells us what it will be like to watch games with no supporters attending. And we hear about the complicated legal implications of the recent shutdown for TV broadcast rights from Trevor Watkins, global head of sport at the law firm Pinsent Masons, who is also former chairman of AFC Bournemouth football club.

(Picture: A Facebook logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02nxwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpc94r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 16:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02p1mh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss374qsqz)
Coronavirus: More cases in Beijing

We look at the fresh spikes of coronavirus cases, particularly in Beijing and parts of India; we reach out to people in those places and also explain statistics in the context of infection rates around the world.

The English Premier League returns today after being on hold for 100 days, due to the coronavirus pandemic. There will be no fans in the stadiums. We get football fans in countries where the games have already resumed to talk with their contemporaries in England about the new supporter experience.

We also explain the border clashes between India and China, using the expertise of BBC colleagues from BBC Chinese Service and from our Delhi bureau.

(Photo: A man brings boxes of food to the security fence on a blocked road to be delivered to the residents living in locked-down areas in Fengtai district, near Xinfadi market, in Beijing, China. Credit: ROMAN PILIPEY/EPA)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02p5cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdrg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmrr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02p93r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs93zd0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpcnd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkb30w6dx)
2020/06/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02pdvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpcs48)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcby)
Covid-19: Steroid drug reduces deaths

Some good news at last – A widely available drug can help save the lives of patients seriously ill with coronavirus. It cuts the risk of death by a third for patients on ventilators. Claudia Hammond discusses the results with Clare Wilson from the New Scientist.

In the hunt for a treatment for Covid-19, health workers will take chloroquine as part of a large trial that is about to start. Claudia talks to Sinead Delany-Moretlwe, director of research at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa.

The surge of Covid-19 cases in huge cities like Mumbai has brought attention to a long-standing problem – the lack of sanitation and access to toilets. Health Check reporter Chhavi Sachdev reports.

What effect does immobility have on our brains? A new study offers a detailed insight from 12 fit astronauts subjected to a battery of tests in a microgravity simulator. Ivana Rosenzweig, head of the Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre at Kings College London explains how her work has important implications for understanding astronaut behaviour.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Caroline Steel

(Photo: A female researcher testing a potential vaccine in a laboratory. Credit: Sam Thomas/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02pjm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn7n2q)
Prime Minister Modi threatens retaliation

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has told his country that the deaths of Indian soldiers in Kashmir 'will not go to waste'. But his soldiers were killed by Chinese troops and India has few options against a richer and better armed China

Also in the programme, philosopher Francis Fukuyama on the political consequences of Covid-19, and how and why to hug in a pandemic.

(Photo: India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi making a statement on television in India. Credit: EPA/JAGADEESH NV)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02pnc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 Miriam and Youssef (w3ct0sxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpd0mj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct0t8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02ps38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs94gcj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpd4cn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ftsr8fcq)
Facebook aims to prevent US election interference

Facebook has unveiled a range of measures aimed at combatting US election interference. Dan Sodergren is a social media and technology expert, and offers his assessment of whether the company’s plans are likely to be effective. Also in the programme, as Black Lives Matter protests continue around the world, the BBC’s Samira Hussain reports on the unequal employment and income prospects of African Americans compared to other racial groups, and whether anything can be done about it. Plus, as Premier League football matches get under way again in England, Josh Sandhu who runs a club for supporters of the London side Tottenham Hotspur tells us what it will be like to watch games with no supporters attending. And we hear about the complicated legal implications of the recent shutdown for TV broadcast rights from Trevor Watkins, global head of sport at the law firm Pinsent Masons, who is also former chairman of AFC Bournemouth football club.

(Picture: A Facebook logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 18 JUNE 2020

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02q0lj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18s9vhc5jk)
Mars and PepsiCo drop racially stereotyped mascots

Mars says its Uncle Ben brand needs 'evolution', as Black Lives Matter protests continue and brands pull mascots based on racial stereotypes, including PepsiCo's Aunt Jemima. We speak with Barrington Reeves, organiser of Black Lives Matter protests in Glasgow and owner of branding agency Too Gallus about the continuing battle big brands will have when assessing their advertising and logos in the future. The US has announced it will be pulling out of talks around taxing tech companies fairly - we speak with Sabrina Rodriquez of Politico to hear what it all means. Finally, one of the world's biggest theatre owners says the industry will severely shrink because of coronavirus - we talk about all this with guests Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe in Virginia
and Colin Peacock, the presenter of MediaWatch on Radio New Zealand.

(Image: Uncle Ben rice pouch. Photo by Eva Hambach / AFP / Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02q4bn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs94tlx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpdhm1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3cszcby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02q82s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdrg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmrr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02qctx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs95235)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpdr39)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Assignment (w3csz6l5)
The 5G con that could make you sick

Since the outbreak of coronavirus something strange has been happening – attacks on telephone masts and telecom workers are being reported all across the world. That’s because some people think that 5G can make you sick – from coronavirus to cancer and a whole host of other symptoms. Even more worryingly, some scientists say they can prove that it’s harmful. But at a time when many businesses are struggling, could this apparent threat be helping to fuel a whole industry of strange and expensive products? And worse, could stoking these fears actually be damaging people’s health? Assignment investigates how bad science could be making you sick.

Presenter: Tom Wright
Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou

(Image: A banner draped across a Place Royale statue during an anti-5G protest in Nantes, France. Credit: Estelle Ruiz/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02qhl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v6prw)
Trump sought Xi's help with re-election - Bolton

US President Donald Trump tried to get China's Xi Jinping to help him secure re-election, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton's new book says; a police officer who fatally shot a fleeing black man in the back last week in Atlanta, Georgia, will be charged with murder and assault, officials say; and good news for Hong Kong's children as Disney World there re-opens.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02qmb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v6tj0)
John Bolton’s bombshell Trump book

Did Donald Trump turn to China for help in his bid for re-election later this year? That's what his former ally John Bolton says in his new book out next week;
does being infected with Covid-19 make you immune once you've had it? Recent research suggests it doesn't always. So who becomes immune and who doesn't?; and a BBC investigation looks at how the coronavirus has caused more deaths than reported.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02qr29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v6y84)
Trump asked Xi Jinping for election help, John Bolton claims

President Trump's former national security advisor, John Bolton, turns on the president in his forthcoming book: did Donald Trump turn to China to help secure his re-election?; the coronavirus pandemic has triggered a whole host of problems - not least a rise in domestic violence. We talk the UN official whose job it is to tackle the problem; and we remember the day that General de Gaulle spoke to the French nation from the BBC.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02qvtf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3j)
How will Hollywood respond to the Black Lives Matter and Me Too movements?

Why is the movie business having trouble representing the world’s population on and behind the big screen? A rising share of the U.S. population are black, more than half of the demographic are female – so why is it so difficult to translate this into cinema?

Hollywood has found itself red-faced in an era of Black Lives Matter and MeToo movements. From #OscarsSoWhite to criticism of who’s behind the films we see, the pressure to change is stacking up.

Charmaine Cozier discovers the issues within the industry and what movie bosses prioritise over diversity. But will activists, actors and data be enough to convince big studios that the revolution is here – or will it just be business as usual?

Guests:
April Reign, Diversity and Inclusion Advocate and creator of the #OscarsSoWhite movement
Naomi McDougall-Jones, a film producer, writer and women in film activist
Darnell Hunt, Dean of Social Sciences at UCLA and Professor of Sociology in African American Studies. He is co-author of the UCLA Hollywood Diversity report
Bonnie Greer, a writer and critic


Presenter: Charmaine Cozier/ Producer: Bethan Head

(Actor John Boyega raises his fist in protest at a Black Lives Matter march in London, UK (Credit: Daniel Leal-Olivas /Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpf72t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7wk)
Hong Kong's last gasp?

China's plan to impose its new so-called security law in Hong Kong may flout the territories legal independence. Some say it may jeopardise Hong Kong's status as Asia's largest financial hub. Hedge fund manager Edward Chin tells Ed Butler that the new law will mean an end to the principle of "one country, two systems" and may lead to companies leaving the territory. Victor Shih, an expert in Chinese banking and finance based at the University of San Diego, says it could have a much more detrimental effect on China's banking system and the country's access to the world's financial markets. But James Crabtree from the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy in Singapore, thinks Beijing has taken a cool headed decision and is willing to sacrifice some business for the sake of political stability.

(Picture: A Hong Kong anti-government protester raises a hand; Credit: Anna Wang/Reuters)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmm7)
The friendship train

The passenger train service between India and Bangladesh was resumed after more than 40 years. The train service had been suspended after the 1965 war between India and Pakistan of which Bangladesh was then a part. Partitioned in 1947, Bengal was divided in half between Hindu majority India and Muslim majority East Pakistan. Families were torn apart. East Pakistan later become Bangladesh after gaining independence in 1971. The Maitree or Friendship Express was the first passenger train service to connect the two Bengals in 43 years. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Dr Azad Chowdhury who was on board the inaugural train journey.

Photo: Calcutta-Dhaka Maitree (Friendship) Express in Calcutta station, India, 14 April 2008, before its inaugural run to Bangladesh. Credit: EPA/PIYAL ADHIKARY


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02qzkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpfbty)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02r39p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjvh)
Bertha von Suttner: A champion of peace

Bertha von Suttner’s path to becoming a leading 19th-century pacifist and the first woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize was far from straightforward. The product of the aristocratic and militaristic world of 19th century Bohemia, as a young woman von Suttner eloped to the Caucasus and turned her hand to writing for a living. On her return to Europe she published an acclaimed anti-war novel, Lay Down Your Arms, a work that marked the start of her quest for disarmament. Her long friendship with Alfred Nobel finally bore fruit in the Swedish industrialist’s last will which included the Peace Prize.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr. Barbara Burns, Reader in German at Glasgow University, and the editor of a new English edition of Lay Down Your Arms; Dr. Peter van den Dungen, former Lecturer in Peace Studies at the University of Bradford and until recently General Coordinator of the International Network of Museums for Peace; and musician Stefan Frankenberger, the author of an audio book called The Unknown Soldier, In memory of Bertha von Suttner.

[Photo: Bertha von Suttner (nee Kinsky),c.1870 Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh4z)
Clyde Best: A black footballing pioneer

Bermuda-born Clyde Best came to England as a teenager in 1968 and went on to play for West Ham United alongside the likes of Bobby Moore and Geoff Hurst. Best made a name for himself as a talented goal-scorer in more than 200 appearances for the Hammers, but he faced constant racist abuse from fans, and on occasion, from opposition players. Now in his 60s, Clyde Best has been telling Mike Lanchin about how he stood up to the racists in English soccer.

Photo: Clyde Best on the ball, 4th March 1972. Credit: Mirror Group Newspapers/Mirrorpix/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02r71t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs95xb2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpflb6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3csvsc0)
Antonio Carluccio: My life in five dishes

Antonio Carluccio describes his most memorable dishes in his last ever interview. The cook, restaurateur and writer, known as the 'Godfather of Italian cooking', died five days after this recording was made, aged 80.

He tells Emily Thomas about his passion for simple, authentic Italian cuisine, and why he only began to pursue it professionally relatively late in life. He describes his horror at Britain's version of Italian food in the 1970s, his obsession with mushrooms, and reveals how much the late opera singer Luciano Pavarotti could devour in one sitting.

Plus, hear about his struggles with fame and heartache, the tensions that came with expanding his eponymous chain of restaurants and delis, and the dish he would choose as his last.

This interview was first broadcast on 16 November 2017.

(Picture: Antonio Carluccio. Credit: Fred Duval/FilmMagic via Getty Images/BBC)


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02rbsy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd9x)
We risked our lives to save my brother's heart

Hamed Amiri's family knew they would one day have to leave their home in Afghanistan to travel to the city of Southampton in the UK. It was one of the few places in the world where doctors were able to perform the heart surgery that could save his brother Hussein's life. Then, suddenly, the need to leave became even more urgent. This was the year 2000, and Hamed’s mother was being threatened by the Taliban for speaking out in support of women’s rights and education. The family had to sell their belongings and flee into the night, starting what would be a long and dangerous journey at the mercy of people smugglers. Hamed has recently published a book about his family’s experiences called The Boy With Two Hearts: A Story of Hope.

Dr Allison Amarachukwu Karen diagnosed the first known case of Covid-19 in Nigeria. She works at a private clinic run by International SOS in Ogun State and she found herself in the middle of an unfolding crisis. She was praised for spotting the virus early in a patient from Italy, so they had a chance to try and contain the outbreak. But she was also stigmatised by some who called her "corona doctor" and didn't want to be treated by her.

Presenter: Emily Webb

Picture: Hussein (left) and Hamed Amiri as children
Credit: Amiri Family


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02rgk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs964tb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpfttg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02rl96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdn9prx)
Bolton: Trump sought China's help to win re-election

The White House has launched a last-minute legal action to stop the release of a new book written by President Trump's former National Security adviser, John Bolton, about his experiences in the administration.

Also on the programme: Our correspondent returns to Wuhan, China; and Dame Vera Lynn, WWII Forces' Sweetheart dies aged 103.

Picture: Former National Security Adviser John Bolton stands alongside US President Donald Trump in the Oval Office at the White House in 2018. Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images.


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02rq1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 Assignment (w3csz6l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpg29q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvp6czzsqg)
Coronavirus impacts Spain's fruit pickers

Spain's migrant fruit pickers face tougher challenges than usual in the era of coronavirus. Hannah Wilson is a lawyer in the Madrid office of Women's Link Worldwide, which campaigns to advance the rights of women and girls, and explains how the industry sources migrant workers from Morocco. Spanish strawberry picker Ana Pinto who runs workers' rights group Jornaleras en Lucha describes the poor working practices she has seen Moroccan migrants subjected to. And Peter Andrews, head of sustainability at the British Retail Consortium, tells us whether his organisation feels labour standards in Spanish fruit fields need to be improved. Also in the programme, Eric Schmidt, adviser to the US Department of Defence, and former head of the internet giant Google, has told the BBC that Chinese electronics firm Huawei is a threat to western nations' national security. BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera brings us the latest. Plus, Lyndon Davies, chief executive of model train company Hornby, tells us how the coronavirus pandemic has actually led to an increase in sales for the firm, which also owns the toy car racing brand Scalextric and model plane maker Airfix.

(Picture: Workers in a Spanish strawberry farm. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02rtsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpg61v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 The Food Chain (w3csvsc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02ryjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss374tpn2)
Coronavirus in Latin America: Your questions answered

We focus on the coronavirus pandemic in Latin America. The region is now the epicentre for infections with nearly four million recorded and rising. Dr Jarbas Barbosa, the Assistant Director of the Pan American Health Organisation, which is part of the World Health Organisation will be answering audience questions about the Covid-19 situation in Latin America, and also in the United States.

The BBC has also been looking into what is called “excess deaths” during the pandemic. A review of preliminary mortality data from 27 countries shows that in many places the number of overall deaths has been higher than normal, even when accounting for the virus. We explain the data and hear some of the stories the researchers have heard, as they looked deeper into the consequences of the coronavirus.

(Photo: Gravediggers work during a burial of a person who passed away due to Covid-19 at the Parque Taruma cemetery, in Manaus, Brazil June 17, 2020. Credit: Bruno Kelly/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02s28q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02s60v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs96w93)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpgk97)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkb30z3b0)
2020/06/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02s9rz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpgp1c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0g)
Covid -19 hope for severe cases

A multi arm trial testing a range of drugs has shown that readily available steroids can be lifesaving for people severely ill with Covid-19. Max Parmar, head of the UK Medical Research Council’s clinical trials unit says the trial design, where many potential drugs can be tested against the same controls, is key to producing results quickly.

As it spreads around the world SARS-CoV-2 is mutating. But what does this mean? These mutations are part of a natural process and some researchers are finding they make no real difference to patient outcomes so far, but others are concerned the virus may become more dangerous. Neville Sanjana from New York University has been running lab tests on the mutant virus.

Measles mutated from an animal virus, developing the ability to jump from cattle to human around 2,500 years ago. Sebastien Calvignac-Spencer from Germany’s Robert Koch Institute tracked its origins using preserved lung samples from centuries old measles victims.

Covid -19 has become a magnet for conspiracy theorists. A common unfounded claim is that the virus was deliberately manufactured. During the boredom of lockdown such ideas have taken off online, with conspiracy videos receiving millions of views. We speak to scientists who have been targeted, and become the subject of this online misinformation.


(Image: Doctor examines Covid-19 virus patient. Credit: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02sfj3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdnbjzt)
Trump's bid to end Obama-era immigration policy ruled unlawful

The US Supreme Court justices upheld lower court rulings which found Trump’s move to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (Daca) programme was "unlawful".

Also in the programme: the escalating international row over taxation of digital giants like Amazon and Facebook; and we remember the famous wartime broadcast L’Appel made by Charles de Gaulle in a BBC studio.

(Photo: Immigration advocates gather outside the Supreme Court following a ruling in Washington, DC. Credits: EPA)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02sk87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 Assignment (w3csz6l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpgxjm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3csvsc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02sp0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs97c8m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qph18r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ftsrcb8t)
Coronavirus impacts Spain's fruit pickers

Spain's migrant fruit pickers face tougher challenges than usual in the coronavirus era. Hannah Wilson is a lawyer in the Madrid office of Women's Link Worldwide, which campaigns to advance the rights of women and girls, and explains how the industry sources migrant workers from Morocco. Spanish strawberry picker Ana Pinto who runs workers' rights group Jornaleras en Lucha describes the poor working practices she has seen Moroccan migrants subjected to. And Peter Andrews, head of sustainability at the British Retail Consortium, tells us whether his organisation feels labour standards in Spanish fruit fields need to be improved. Also in the programme, Eric Schmidt, adviser to the US Department of Defence, and former head of the internet giant Google, has told the BBC that Chinese electronics firm Huawei is a threat to western nations' national security. BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera brings us the latest. Plus, Lyndon Davies, chief executive of model train company Hornby, tells us how the coronavirus pandemic has actually led to an increase in sales for the firm, which also owns the toy car racing brand Scalextric and model plane maker Airfix.

(Picture: Workers in a Spanish strawberry farm. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 19 JUNE 2020

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02sxhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x18s9vhg2fn)
US overturns blocking of undocumented immigrant children

The US Supreme Court overturns the Trump administration's bid to deport hundreds of thousands of immigrants who were brought to the US illegally as children. As the Chinese leadership prepares to table its first draft of a new security law for Hong Kong, we assess its future as a secure financial hub. And the African fruit-pickers in southern Spain, who are already struggling with work conditions, are hit by coronavirus fears in their small workplaces, where they work close to each other. And, for the thirteenth straight week, more than a million more Americans have been forced to get on line to register for unemployment insurance benefits. We talk about all this with guests Dante Disparte, Head of Policy at Libra and founding CEO of Risk Cooperative in Washington DC, and Jodi Schneider, Senior International Editor for Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

(Image: Greisa Martinez, who grew up as an undocumented immigrant in Dallas, Texas, reacts following the Supreme Court's decision. Credit: Drew Angerer / Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02t17r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs97qj0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qphdj4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02t4zw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02t8r0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs97z08)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qphn0d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w3g)
Redemption In Recycling

.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02tdh4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v9lnz)
African-Americans commemorate Juneteenth

Juneteenth is being observed by many African-Americans to mark the emancipation from slavery in the US. We go live to Tulsa, Oklahoma; China has freed 10 Indian soldiers following a deadly clash between the two sides on Monday, according to Indian media reports; and we go to Hungary where a legal ruling has forced a review of the country's asylum policy.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02tj78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v9qf3)
Juneteenth marked across the US

Reflection and celebration as the United States commemorates Juneteenth, the day slaves were told that they were free; Australia's government and institutions are being targeted by an ongoing sophisticated state-based cyber hack, Prime Minister Scott Morrison says; and we go to one of America's most important trading hubs to hear how the coronavirus pandemic is disrupting global business patterns.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02tmzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2w8j6v9v57)
African-Americans across the US are celebrating Juneteenth

It's Juneteenth in America, the day that marks the abolition of slavery. We look at the anniversary in the context of the Black Lives Matters movement; Facebook says it has removed adverts for US President Donald Trump's re-election campaign that featured a symbol used in Nazi Germany; and DNA has been used to confirm the existence of an elite social class in the Stone Age inhabitants of Ireland.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02trqj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxd)
Jim McGovern: Can Biden unite the left?

President Donald Trump is in trouble. Coronavirus has plunged the US economy into recession, the killing of George Floyd has inflamed racial tensions and the president’s poll ratings have slumped. This summer the Democrats can sense an historic opportunity. But are they capable of seizing it? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Democratic Congressman Jim McGovern – is it enough for Democrats and their presidential candidate Joe Biden to be the party of Not Trump?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpj3zx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz78d)
#BLM: Are brands cashing in?

Companies are pledging support and money to the Black Lives Matter movement, and an end to systemic racism. Do they mean it?

Ed Butler asks Pepper Miller, a market researcher who has campaigned for over 20 years for companies to realise the value of African-American consumers.

One business that already has a long history of supporting black equality and other social justice movements is the ice cream brand Ben & Jerry's. But the company is based in Vermont, the second whitest state in America. Ed asks activism manager Chris Miller whether the firm's purported values are also reflected in their own personnel decisions.

It's a pertinent question, according to Scott Galloway, professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business. With the shift in demographics and purchasing power towards young educated liberal urban workers, and the increased scrutiny of company behaviour in the Google era, he says American businesses see commercial opportunity in taking a much more overt position on US politics than we have seen in the past.

(Picture: Ben & Jerry's Justice Remixed ice cream brand ice cream tub; Credit: Ben & Jerry's)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmv0)
The ‘Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes’ anti-racist exercise

When Dr Martin Luther King was assassinated in 1968, US school teacher, Jane Elliott, decided to try to teach her all-white class about racism. She decided to segregate them according to the colour of their eyes, and treated them differently. Although controversial from the start, the “blue eyes/brown eyes” teaching exercise has been adapted in schools and workplaces for diversity training ever since. Jane Elliott has been explaining to Rebecca Kesby why she still thinks the model has value today in defeating racial prejudice.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02twgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 The Documentary (w3csz4f8)
Robots on the road

The world’s biggest car makers and technology companies are investing billions of dollars in autonomous vehicles. They believe it’s just a few years before computers with high-tech sensors do the driving for us, filling our roads with robot cars ferrying human passengers from A to B. But is a driverless future really just around the corner?

The BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones travels to Arizona in the US – a hotbed for autonomous vehicle testing – to try out the robot taxi service developed by Google that’s already ferrying paying passengers around the suburbs of Phoenix, and discovers that robots still have a lot of learning to do when it comes to the tough driving conditions on busy American freeways. He also hears how Arizona locals have responded to sharing their roads with robots, and visits the Phoenix suburb that saw the first fatal accident involving a driverless car to ask if autonomous technology will ever be safe enough to gain public acceptance. Despite those challenges, we hear from car-maker Ford about its plans for a driverless car service in the next two years as car makers race to keep up with tech firms like Google and Uber in the autonomous driving space, and critics of the technology discuss how robot cars might change the dynamic between cars, pedestrians and other road users forever.

(Photo: Pilot models of the Uber self-driving car is displayed at the Uber Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Credit: Angelo Merendino/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpj7r1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02v06s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcn0)
Is this the internet we always wanted?

The internet has proven invaluable during the coronavirus pandemic, allowing us to continue to work and learn from home, disseminating information to concerned citizens and providing desperately needed social contact for those cut off from family and friends. Before the pandemic, it seemed the internet was increasingly becoming an angry and cold place, providing a platform for selfish pursuits and amplifying extreme views and behaviour. That still goes on, of course, but is the pivot to more altruistic activities online an opportunity to consider again the potential of the internet and what it's for? A string of data scandals over recent years has prompted calls for greater regulation of companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon. But three decades on from the creation of the World Wide Web, is now the time to discuss more sweeping reforms? Proposals are now emerging that could radically change the way the internet works, how your data is managed, who’ll be able to make money, and even challenge the very concept that “the internet should be free”. Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests to discuss whether the coronavirus-era internet that has brought people together and even thrown us a lifeline might be the internet we wanted all along. If so, how can we build on the moment and make it even better?


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02v3yx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs98t75)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpjh79)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3csztg4)
“1970 wasn’t football...it was like Cirque du Soleil”

Sunday will be the 50th anniversary of the World Cup final of 1970 when Brazil beat Italy 4-1 in Mexico City's Azteca stadium to win their third World Cup in 12 years. But this wasn't any old World Cup-winning team. It's a team that's become encircled by an almost mystical aura, and carries the seemingly eternal tag of the greatest team in the history of football. We'll hear memories from Pele and the late Carlos Alberto, and find out how that team influenced a man who, many years later, would coach a Brazil team to another World title. To discuss why Brazil 1970 is so revered, Mani Djazmi, Pat Nevin and Alicia Ferguson are joined by two experts - Ricardo Setyon, who’s been to nine World Cups, often working with the Brazil teams; and Andrew Downie, who’s a veteran foreign correspondent including nearly 30 years in Latin America, much of them in Brazil, and is the author of a soon-to-be-published book about the 1970 World Cup called ‘The Greatest Show On Earth’. Pat also goes behind the scenes at the Etihad Stadium to tell us what it’s really like to commentate on a Premier League game behind closed doors during the coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: Pele celebrates Brazil's victory in the 1970 World Cup final. (Getty Images)


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02v7q1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh4)
David Amanor showcases global stories from the Fifth Floor - home to the BBC’s 27 Language Services.


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02vcg5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs991qf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpjqqk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3cszh0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02vh69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdndlp0)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02vlyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhns)
Rory Cellan-Jones on the latest stories in the tech world.


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpjz6t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlt19xsq2rz)
First broadcast 19/06/2020 14:32 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02vqpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpk2yy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 World Football (w3csztg4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02vvfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2ss374xlk5)
2020/06/19 16:06 GMT

BBC OS gives a vibrant account of the day’s events with explanation and reaction from those involved.


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02vz5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjh4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02w2xy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs99s66)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpkg6b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jkb312073)
2020/06/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02w6p2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpkkyg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv5s)
Do Animals Have Consciousness?

What exactly it means to be conscious has long been a question of profound debate amongst philosophers, and more recently, scientists. There are no easy answers, and it gets even trickier when you start asking whether animals are conscious: how can you find out about their subjective experience when they can’t tell you about it?
Never afraid to tackle the impossible, CrowdScience is looking for answers after listener Natalie got in touch. She has lived with her cat for years and has a strong sense that he has thoughts and feelings: he has his own personality, acts in complex ways, and even has ‘grumpy days’. But is this consciousness? Is there any way of scientifically testing for it? How different from our own inner world is that of a cat, an octopus, or a bumblebee? And if we can find any answers to these puzzling questions, how does that affect the way we treat animals - not just our pets, but all the animals we share our planet with?
We meet Natalie and her cat, and discover how scientists have explored the minds of pigs, cows and cuttlefish. Helping us ponder the elusive question of animal consciousness are philosopher Peter Godfrey-Smith, neuroscientist Anil Seth, animal welfare expert Donald Broom, ethicist Jessica Pierce, and comparative psychologist Alex Schnell.
Presented by Anand Jagatia and Produced by Cathy Edwards for BBC World Service.


(Photo:


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02wbf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2yqvdnffwx)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02wg5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpktfq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3csztg4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5nrv02wkxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x7b6cs9b85q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pl8qpky5v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172x58ftsrg75x)
First broadcast 19/06/2020 22:32 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

13 Minutes to the Moon 19:32 SUN (w3ct0v1r)

Assignment 04:32 THU (w3csz6l5)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6l5)

Assignment 15:06 THU (w3csz6l5)

Assignment 22:06 THU (w3csz6l5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qny02k)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qnyc9y)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qnyqkb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qnyv9g)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qnz2sq)

BBC News Summary 14:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qnzg13)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qnzy0m)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qp0f04)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172x5pl8qp0jr8)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsn7g1)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qp0wzn)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsnlpf)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qp1871)

BBC News Summary 06:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsnv5p)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsnyxt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsp2ny)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qp1r6k)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xspb56)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qp1zpt)

BBC News Summary 17:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsq5d3)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qp2ynv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5pk5xsqs3r)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pl8qp3fnc)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp3p4m)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp3swr)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp41d0)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp4jcj)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp4wlx)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp5435)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp5clf)

BBC News Summary 16:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp5hbk)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp5vky)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp5zb2)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp66tb)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5pl8qp6bkg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp6psv)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp6y93)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp7f8m)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp7k0r)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp7sj0)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp8108)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp88hj)

BBC News Summary 16:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp8d7n)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp8rh1)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp8w75)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp93qf)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5pl8qp97gk)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5pl8qp9lpy)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5pl8qp9v66)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpbb5q)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpbfxv)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpbpf3)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpbxxc)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpc5dm)

BBC News Summary 16:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpc94r)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpcnd4)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpcs48)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpd0mj)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5pl8qpd4cn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpdhm1)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpdr39)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpf72t)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpflb6)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpfttg)

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BBC News Summary 16:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpg61v)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpgk97)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5pl8qpgxjm)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5pl8qph18r)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qphdj4)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qphn0d)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpj3zx)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpj7r1)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpjh79)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpjqqk)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpjz6t)

BBC News Summary 16:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpk2yy)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpkg6b)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpktfq)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5pl8qpky5v)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5nr3ggztjq)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5nrv028qjb)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5nrv028v8g)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5nr3gh18h8)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5nrv0292rq)

BBC News 15:00 SAT (w172x5nrv0296hv)

BBC News 16:00 SAT (w172x5nrv029b7z)

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BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5nrv029kr7)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5nrv029phc)

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BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5nr3gh27g9)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5nrv02b1qr)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5nrv02b5gw)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5nqr65yw5n)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5nrv02bjq8)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5nqr65z3nx)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5nqr65z7f1)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5nrv02bwyn)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5nqr65zgx9)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5nrv02cmff)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5nqr6606d2)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5nr3gh45dc)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5nqr660fwb)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5nqr660kmg)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5nqr660pcl)

BBC News 17:00 SUN (w172x5nqr660t3q)

BBC News 18:00 SUN (w172x5nqr660xvv)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5nrv02dldg)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5nqr6615c3)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5nr3gh54cd)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5nqr661dvc)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5nrv02f2cz)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5nrv02f9w7)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5nrv02ffmc)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5nrv02fkch)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5nrv02fp3m)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5nrv02fsvr)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5nrv02fxlw)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5nrv02g1c0)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5nrv02g534)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5nrv02g8v8)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5nrv02gdld)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5nrv02gjbj)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5nrv02gn2n)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5nrv02grts)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5nrv02gwkx)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5nrv02h0b1)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5nrv02h425)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5nrv02h7t9)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5nrv02hckf)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5nrv02hh9k)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5nrv02hm1p)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5nrv02hqst)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5nrv02hvjy)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5nrv02hz92)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02j6sb)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02jbjg)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02jg8l)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02jl0q)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02jprv)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02jthz)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02jy83)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02k207)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02k5rc)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02k9hh)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02kf7m)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02kjzr)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02knqw)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02ksh0)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02kx74)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02l0z8)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02l4qd)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02l8gj)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02ld6n)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02lhys)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02lmpx)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02lrg1)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5nrv02lw65)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5nrv02m3pf)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5nrv02m7fk)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5nrv02mc5p)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5nrv02mgxt)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5nrv02mlny)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5nrv02mqf2)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5nrv02mv56)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5nrv02myxb)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5nrv02n2ng)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5nrv02n6dl)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5nrv02nb4q)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5nrv02nfwv)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5nrv02nkmz)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5nrv02npd3)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5nrv02nt47)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5nrv02nxwc)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5nrv02p1mh)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5nrv02p5cm)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5nrv02p93r)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5nrv02pdvw)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5nrv02pjm0)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5nrv02pnc4)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5nrv02ps38)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5nrv02q0lj)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5nrv02q4bn)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5nrv02q82s)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5nrv02qctx)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5nrv02qhl1)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5nrv02qmb5)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5nrv02qr29)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5nrv02qvtf)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5nrv02qzkk)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5nrv02r39p)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5nrv02r71t)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5nrv02rbsy)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5nrv02rgk2)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5nrv02rl96)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5nrv02rq1b)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5nrv02rtsg)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5nrv02ryjl)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5nrv02s28q)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5nrv02s60v)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5nrv02s9rz)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5nrv02sfj3)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5nrv02sk87)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5nrv02sp0c)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02sxhm)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02t17r)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02t4zw)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02t8r0)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02tdh4)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02tj78)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02tmzd)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02trqj)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02twgn)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02v06s)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02v3yx)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02v7q1)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02vcg5)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02vh69)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02vlyf)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02vqpk)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02vvfp)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02vz5t)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02w2xy)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02w6p2)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02wbf6)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02wg5b)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5nrv02wkxg)

BBC OS 14:06 SAT (w172xm3g5s3stbh)

BBC OS 10:06 MON (w172xm3g5s3z455)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2ss374jzxs)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2ss374mwtw)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2ss374qsqz)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2ss374tpn2)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2ss374xlk5)

Boston Calling 23:32 SAT (w3csz70p)

Boston Calling 04:32 SUN (w3csz70p)

Boston Calling 10:32 MON (w3csz70p)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7jd)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz89f)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8mq)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7wk)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz78d)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x18ryl5rtqx)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x18s9vh5cqc)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x18s9vh88mg)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x18s9vhc5jk)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x18s9vhg2fn)

Business Weekly 07:06 SAT (w3ct0snm)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3cszv5r)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv5r)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3cszv5r)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv5s)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz981)

Digital Planet 02:32 WED (w3csz981)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3csz981)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3csz981)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct0t92)

Discovery 02:32 TUE (w3ct0t92)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct0t92)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct0t92)

From Our Own Correspondent 08:06 SAT (w3csz9pk)

From Our Own Correspondent 22:06 SAT (w3csz9pk)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9pk)

Global Questions 11:32 SAT (w3ct0w3k)

Global Questions 07:32 SUN (w3ct0w3k)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc1x)

HARDtalk 16:06 MON (w3cszc1x)

HARDtalk 20:06 MON (w3cszc1x)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc6f)

HARDtalk 16:06 WED (w3cszc6f)

HARDtalk 20:06 WED (w3cszc6f)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbxd)

HARDtalk 16:06 FRI (w3cszbxd)

HARDtalk 20:06 FRI (w3cszbxd)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcby)

Health Check 02:32 THU (w3cszcby)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3cszcby)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3cszcby)

Heart and Soul 11:32 SUN (w3ct0t26)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SUN (w3ct0t26)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct0w3g)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3cszvb9)

In the Studio 16:32 TUE (w3cszvb9)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3cszvb9)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 08:32 SAT (w3ct0t3r)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 01:32 SUN (w3ct0t3r)

Kalki Presents: My Indian Life 17:32 SUN (w3ct0t3r)

Miriam and Youssef 08:06 SUN (w3ct0sxx)

Miriam and Youssef 04:32 WED (w3ct0sxy)

Miriam and Youssef 09:06 WED (w3ct0sxy)

Miriam and Youssef 15:06 WED (w3ct0sxy)

Miriam and Youssef 22:06 WED (w3ct0sxy)

More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pxd)

More or Less 06:50 SUN (w3ct0pxd)

More or Less 04:50 MON (w3ct0pxd)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6sx)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6sx)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2w8j6ty01l)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2w8j6ty3sq)

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Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2w8j6v41c1)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2w8j6v6prw)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2w8j6v6tj0)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2w8j6v6y84)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2w8j6v9lnz)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2w8j6v9qf3)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2w8j6v9v57)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2yqh4bq774)

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Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2yqvdnbjzt)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2yqvdndlp0)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2yqvdnffwx)

Outlook 22:32 SAT (w3cszdzv)

Outlook 10:32 SUN (w3cszdzv)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd34)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszd9x)

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Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszd9x)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf4c)

Over to You 02:50 SUN (w3cszf4c)

People Fixing the World 17:06 SUN (w3cszv15)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv16)

People Fixing the World 16:06 TUE (w3cszv16)

People Fixing the World 20:06 TUE (w3cszv16)

Resolves 08:50 SAT (w3ct0v79)

Resolves 01:50 SUN (w3ct0v79)

Resolves 17:50 SUN (w3ct0v79)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh0g)

Science in Action 02:32 FRI (w3cszh0g)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3cszh0g)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3cszh0g)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 02:32 SUN (w3ct0t1l)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 06:32 SUN (w3ct0t1l)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 23:32 SUN (w3ct0t1l)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3jkb30pdlq)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3jkb30s9ht)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3jkb30w6dx)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3jkb30z3b0)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3jkb312073)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh4y)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh4z)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3bsvqhjh4w)

Sportsworld 15:06 SAT (w172x3l5v8xqtr4)

Sportsworld 16:06 SAT (w172x3l5v8xqyh8)

Sportsworld 17:06 SAT (w172x3l5v8xr27d)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3l5v8xtvdc)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhj7)

Tech Tent 01:06 SUN (w3cszhnr)

Tech Tent 15:06 FRI (w3cszhns)

Tech Tent 22:06 FRI (w3cszhns)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk2w)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3cszk2w)

The Big Idea 05:50 SAT (w3csxfjg)

The Big Idea 15:50 SUN (w3csxfjg)

The Big Idea 23:50 SUN (w3csxfjg)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3csynk8)

The Conversation 16:32 MON (w3csynk8)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3csynk8)

The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj8b)

The Cultural Frontline 09:32 SUN (w3cszj8b)

The Cultural Frontline 22:06 SUN (w3cszj8b)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct0t61)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct0t61)

The Documentary 04:32 TUE (w3ct0hz0)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct0hz0)

The Documentary 15:06 TUE (w3ct0hz0)

The Documentary 22:06 TUE (w3ct0hz0)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct0t61)

The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct0t8t)

The Documentary 16:32 WED (w3ct0t8t)

The Documentary 22:32 WED (w3ct0t8t)

The Documentary 09:06 FRI (w3csz4f8)

The Evidence 06:06 SAT (w3ct0t36)

The Evidence 18:06 SUN (w3ct0t36)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjh3)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3cszjh4)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3cszjh4)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjpy)

The Food Chain 01:32 MON (w3cszjpy)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3csvsc0)

The Food Chain 16:32 THU (w3csvsc0)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3csvsc0)

The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjvg)

The Forum 03:06 MON (w3cszjvg)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3cszjvh)

The Inquiry 10:06 SUN (w3cszl3h)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl3j)

The Inquiry 16:06 THU (w3cszl3j)

The Inquiry 20:06 THU (w3cszl3j)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172x7b60hzkgt8)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172x7b60hzkv1n)

The Newsroom 09:06 SAT (w172x7b5n7pggs0)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172x7b60hzlkjf)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172x7b60hzmdrb)

The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172x7b60hzn0gz)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172x7b60hzncqc)

The Newsroom 05:06 SUN (w172x7b60hznqyr)

The Newsroom 09:06 SUN (w172x7b5n7pkcp3)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172x7b60hzpgfj)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172x7b60hzqfdk)

The Newsroom 23:06 SUN (w172x7b60hzqxd2)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172x7b6cs8w3wm)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172x7b6cs8wccw)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172x7b6cs8x6ls)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172x7b6cs8xg31)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172x7b6cs8y5kt)

The Newsroom 23:06 MON (w172x7b6cs8ynkb)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172x7b6cs8z0sq)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172x7b6cs8z88z)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172x7b6cs903hw)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172x7b6cs90c04)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172x7b6cs912gx)

The Newsroom 23:06 TUE (w172x7b6cs91kgf)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172x7b6cs91xpt)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172x7b6cs92562)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172x7b6cs930dz)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172x7b6cs937x7)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172x7b6cs93zd0)

The Newsroom 23:06 WED (w172x7b6cs94gcj)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172x7b6cs94tlx)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172x7b6cs95235)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172x7b6cs95xb2)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172x7b6cs964tb)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172x7b6cs96w93)

The Newsroom 23:06 THU (w172x7b6cs97c8m)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172x7b6cs97qj0)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172x7b6cs97z08)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172x7b6cs98t75)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172x7b6cs991qf)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172x7b6cs99s66)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172x7b6cs9b85q)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3cszcmz)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3cszcn0)

The Why Factor 06:06 SUN (w3cswrl1)

The Why Factor 04:32 MON (w3cswrl1)

The Why Factor 09:06 MON (w3cswrl1)

The Why Factor 15:06 MON (w3cswrl1)

The Why Factor 22:06 MON (w3cswrl1)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3cszvrt)

Trending 09:32 SAT (w3cszvrt)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3cszvrt)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmtz)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3cszmjz)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3cszmjz)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3cszmjz)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3cszmjz)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3cszmph)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3cszmph)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3cszmph)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3cszmph)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3cszmrr)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3cszmrr)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3cszmrr)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3cszmrr)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3cszmm7)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3cszmm7)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3cszmm7)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3cszmm7)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3cszmv0)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3cszmv0)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3cszmv0)

WorklifeIndia 14:32 SAT (w3cszvgs)

WorklifeIndia 07:06 SUN (w3cszvgs)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57md249m23)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xltvrnd0skw)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172x58ftsr2mkj)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172xlwhn3lh9bk)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172x58ftsr5jgm)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172xlxb2v68hny)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172x58ftsr8fcq)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172xlvp6czzsqg)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172x58ftsrcb8t)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172xlt19xsq2rz)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172x58ftsrg75x)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3csztg4)

World Football 16:32 FRI (w3csztg4)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3csztg4)

World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3cszt5x)

World Questions 12:06 SUN (w3cszt5x)