SATURDAY 21 MAY 2022

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m0017cs8)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:30 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017cqc)
Ep 5 - OxyContin & Drug Abuse

Patrick Radden Keefe's award winning account of America's opioid epidemic tells the story of the Sackler family, how they amassed their fortune, and the role of their pharmaceutical company in a public health crisis that spanned the nation. Today, OxyContin drug abuse makes disturbing headlines and the Sacklers response is unexpected. Kyle Soller reads

The Sackler family are famed for their philanthropy. The name adorns the walls of many of the world's most prestigious institutions, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, and the British Museum to name just a few. Less well known is that much of their wealth came from the powerful painkiller, OxyContin. While the drug wasn’t the only opioid behind this public health emergency, it is regarded as the pioneer. What follows is the story of an immigrant family struggling to survive during the depression, and who, as the 20th century progressed turned their lives around by making their way into the pharmaceutical business. It was Arthur Sackler's role in the marketing of Valium that was the basis of the first Sackler fortune. Later, the lessons learned in making Valium a success story were applied to OxyContin in the 1990s, leading to phenomenal wealth for the Sacklers. Meanwhile, on the eve of the new millenium, families across America were beginning to fall victim to what would become the opioid epidemic.

Patrick Radden Keefe is an award-winning writer at the New Yorker, winner of the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the Baille Gifford Prize, 2021

Kyle Soller is an American film, stage, and television actor. His accolades include an Olivier Award, and three Evening Standard Theatre Awards.

Abridger: Katrin Williams.
Producer: Elizabeth Allard.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017csb)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017csg)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017csl)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (m0017csq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0017csv)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rt Revd Mary Stallard, Assistant Bishop in Bangor.


SAT 05:45 Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley (m0017cfl)
Dance

In this episode, Michael gets out his dancing shoes & shines some light on the many benefits of dancing, revealing that dancing has been shown to be BETTER than traditional fitness exercises for improving your muscles, your balance and even the size of your brain. He speaks to professional-ballet-dancer-turned-neuroscientist Dr Julia F Christensen at the Max Planck Institute in Frankfurt, to find out how dancing can improve our balance and coordination, and trigger new connections in our brain, while our volunteer Lorne has a go at adding some disco dancing to her everyday routine.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m0017k06)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (m0017ck8)
Bloody Bridge

In the first of two back-to-back hikes in the Mourne Mountains Clare walks from Bloody Bridge near Newcastle, on the coast of County Down, up into the hills. Led by Alex Rose of the Northern Ireland Young Walkers, they begin at a stone sculpture which – from a certain angle – look like a human face in profile. This is the Smuggler’s Head which helps to tell the story of the ‘Brandy Pad’ a local smuggler’s route. It’s a history-rich Ramblings which continues by following the Bloody Bridge River, so called because bodies thrown into the water, following a massacre during the 1641 rebellion, turned it blood red. Soon they’re climbing steeply up to one of the Mourne summits, Chimney Rock, partly following an old quarry-rail track used to bring granite down to sea-level.

The Northern Ireland Young Walkers were formed in 2005 as a way of getting more youthful hikers out and about. It’s such a successful club that people don’t like to leave, so the age range has widened as the members have aged.

The second Mournes ramble – recorded on the same day - will be broadcast next in the series. It starts at a place whose name couldn’t be more of a contrast: Happy Valley.

Grid Ref for Bloody Bridge Car Park: SB472822

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer for BBC Audio in Bristol: Karen Gregor


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m0017k08)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (m0017k0b)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 07:00 Today (m0017k0d)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m0017k0g)
Radio 4's Saturday morning show brings you extraordinary stories and remarkable people.


SAT 10:30 Soul Music (m0017k0j)
Purple Rain

"I never meant to cause you any sorrow,
I never meant to cause you any pain..."

True stories of what Prince's epic ballad means to different people around the world, from the very first jam in 1983 to the global hit that reigns over us today.

Bobby Z, the drummer from Prince and The Revolution, remembers the buzz of the first ever performance of Purple Rain, and how the recording from that night lives on. Susan Rogers, Prince's recording engineer, tells stories from the Purple Rain tour, when the crew took bets on how long Prince's guitar solos would last. Comedian Sindhu Vee first heard the song as a teenager growing up in India and was knocked sideways by it. Weather reporter Judith Ralston describes the beautiful and rare weather phenomenon of purple rain. Social historian Zaheer Ali sees the song as a cry out for change, bringing audiences from different backgrounds together in cross-genre harmony. And finally, an intensive care hospital nurse played Purple Rain to Kevin Clarke while he was in a coma, because his sister knew he loved the song and hoped it might pull him through.

Produced by Becky Ripley


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m0017k0l)
Top commentators review the political week.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m0017k0n)
Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world


SAT 12:00 News Summary (m0017k0q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (m0017k0s)
The latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (m0017crt)
Series 108

Episode 5

Topical panel quiz show, taking its questions from the week's news stories.


SAT 12:57 Weather (m0017k0v)
The latest weather forecast


SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m0017k0x)
The latest national and international news and weather reports from BBC Radio 4


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (m0017cry)
Nancy Fielder

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from Sheffield Hallam University with a panel which includes the Editor of The Sheffield Star Nancy Fielder.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Phil Booth


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m0017k0z)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:45 39 Ways to Save the Planet (m000v9bt)
Bog-tastic!

There's a lot of carbon locked up in the peatlands of Britain and Ireland but many of them have been drained for agriculture and dug for fuel or garden compost. The loss of water resulted in the massive loss of carbon to the atmosphere. Rewetting the bogs can not only stop that leaching of carbon but potentially help the bogs sequester carbon once more. Could these once forboding 'creepy' habitats be something of an underrated super solution?

Tom Heap speaks to peat expert, Florence Renou-Wilson of University College Dublin, and takes a virtual tour of a new carbon farm - designed to harvest carbon back from the atmosphere. Dr Tamsin Edwards from Kings College London assesses the potential of this solution.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock

Researcher: Sarah Goodman

Produced in conjunction with the Royal Geographical Society. Particular thanks for this episode to Professor Christopher Evans of the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and Mike Peacock of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.


SAT 15:00 Drama (b04wnpr6)
Cocktail Sticks

An adaptation for radio of the National Theatre's production of Alan Bennett's short autobiographical play "Cocktail Sticks", originally directed by Nicholas Hytner.

Alan looks back on his early life with affection and sadness, revisiting some of the themes and conversations of his memoir "A Life Like other People's". Both he and – to a certain extent - his mother (with her longing for "cocktail parties"), are seduced by the idea that other people's lives are much richer and more fulfilling than their own.

But, in adulthood, Alan came to realise the value of a happy family upbringing, and the particular strengths and virtues of his father and mother. When Alan and his mother do, finally, have cocktail parties, they are not at all what his mother would have envisaged.

Alan is played by Alex Jennings and Alan Bennett, supported by the original National Theatre cast of Gabrielle Lloyd, Jeff Rawle, Sue Wallace and Derek Hutchinson.

Cast
Alan Bennett ..... Alan Bennett and Alex Jennings
Mam ..... Gabrielle Lloyd
Dad/Nevill Coghill ..... Jeff Rawle
Other Parts ..... Sue Wallace and Derek Hutchinson
Music composed by ..... George Fenton
Music played by ..... Chris Fish and Rachel Elliot
National Theatre Director ..... Nicholas Hytner
Radio Abridgement and Production ..... Gordon House


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (m0017k11)
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.


SAT 17:00 PM (m0017k13)
Full coverage of the day's news


SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m0017k15)
Nick Robinson has a conversation with, not an interrogation of, the people who shape our political thinking about what shaped theirs.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0017k17)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SAT 17:57 Weather (m0017k19)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017k1c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m0017k1f)
Katherine Parkinson, Jess Phillips, Raven Smith, SOAK, Leyla McCalla, YolanDa Brown, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and YolanDa Brown are joined by Katherine Parkinson, Jess Phillips and Raven Smith for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Leyla McCalla and SOAK.


SAT 19:00 Profile (m0017k1h)
An insight into the character of an influential person making the news headlines


SAT 19:15 This Cultural Life (m0017k1k)
John Wilson talks to a leading cultural figure about their life, work and creative process


SAT 20:00 A Brief History of Progress (m0017cfp)
American satirist Joe Queenan follows up his programmes on blame, shame and truth with a question that has troubled many of us in recent years - has progress come to a halt? Beginning with the end of the Neanderthals, Queenan charts the ascent of man with the help of some surprising guests including Emma Garland, Terry Jones, Bertrand Russell and Edith Hall.

definition one: forward or onward movement towards an advanced or improved condition

Queenan tackles all the major areas of concern, including progress and nature, progress and money, and progress and war.

"I think it's inevitable that men will gather together and club each other to death," he says. "I don't think you can pin that one on women. If women were running Afghanistan things would be great."

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde


SAT 21:00 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0507lhn)
Series 2

Episode 9

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 8:
Brian gets scared of Jack's madness and asks his dad, Joey, to help him escape his influence.

Cast:
The Narrator...........Ross Kemp
Joey Oldman...........Toby Jones
Cath Oldman...........Denise Gough
Brian Oldman..........Joe Armstrong
Jack Braden............Luke Allen Gale
Leah Cohen............Jasmine Hyde

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:45 The Skewer (m0017chz)
Series 6

Episode 7

Jon Holmes's The Skewer returns to twist itself into current affairs.


SAT 22:00 News (m0017k1n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SAT 22:15 Generation Change (m0017chg)
Poverty Then & Poverty Now

Samira Ahmed and Katherine Rake bring together activists from two different generations united in their fight for decent social housing and an end to poverty in Britain.

In the summer of ’66 when most of the country was glued to the Football World Cup, Des Wilson toured our major cities. He found families packed into crumbling houses, rat infested hovels, and real poverty. Six months later he started the charity Shelter.

A few years later, Ruth Lister had just finished her degree in sociology course at Essex University. She signed a one-year contract as a Legal Research Officer at the recently launched Child Poverty Action Group. She went on to become its Director.

Joe Walker was still at school and too young to vote in the Brexit referendum. Angered by the growing poverty he saw around him, he volunteered at a foodbank. He now manages that foodbank in Brighton and helps a group of charities provide vital services to families in need.

When Kwajo Tweneboa moved into his housing association flat, there were mouldy walls, broken windows and part of the ceiling was missing. It took 10 months to get it fixed. Now Kwajo has gone viral – filming the failings of social housing in modern Britain and posting on you tube.
In this programme the four activists share stories of their individual experiences fighting for change and consider what lessons they can learn from each other. Finally, they map out a plan of action for activists today.

Samira is joined by social change consultant Katherine Rake, former Chief Executive of The Fawcett Society.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Emily Williams
Programme consultant: Katherine Rake
Editor: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0017cpk)
Programme 8, 2022

(8/12)
If Venice is an explorer, New Orleans a trumpeter, Pisa an astronomer, Warsaw a composer, Louisville a boxer and Granada a playwright, what's Belfast?

This is just one of the puzzles Kirsty Lang has in store for the panellists in today's cryptic contest. The Northern Ireland pairing of Paddy Duffy and Freya McClements were beaten by Paul Sinha and Marcus Berkmann of the South of England in their previous encounter a few weeks ago: can they turn the tables today? Kirsty will guide them through the apparently impenetrable questions if they need her to, but the more help she has to give them, the more points she'll be taking away.

The programme as always includes a number of questions suggested by Round Britain Quiz listeners, which are often even more devious than those set by the in-house team.

Producer: Paul Bajoria


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (m0017ctn)
Hannah Hodgson

Hannah Hodgson has a life limiting illness and writes remarkable poetry about her experience. She has selected a range of powerful poems reflecting on disability and by disabled poets. We hear from Raymond Antrobus, Amy Acre, Andrew McMillan and Dorothy Wordsworth as well as a little known poem by WB Yeats.

Producer Sally Heaven



SUNDAY 22 MAY 2022

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m0017k1q)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:15 Witness (b01lsts7)
The Battle for Mount Longdon

It is 40 years since the end of the Falklands War. Hear two very different views of the conflict from an Argentine veteran and a British veteran. Miguel Savage was a 19-year-old student conscript. He had never wanted to join the army but ended up a reluctant member of Argentina's Falklands invasion force nonetheless. Quintin Wright was a well-trained member of the 3rd Battalion of the Parachute Regiment. He had joined up voluntarily, and was excited at the thought of action. They both fought in one of the decisive encounters at the end of the war - the battle for Mount Longdon.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2012


SUN 00:30 Short Works (m0017crh)
Mother

A man takes a job in a very unusual bakery in Copenhagen that relies on a unique ingredient.

Copenhagen-born Heidi Amsinck has written numerous short stories for radio. Her collection, Last Train To Helsingør, was published in 2018. Her first novel, My Name Is Jensen, was published in 2021. The follow-up, The Girl In The Photo, is due out later in 2022.

Writer: Heidi Amsinck
Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017k1s)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017k1v)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017k1x)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m0017k1z)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m0017k21)
The parish church of St Nicholas Halewood in Merseyside.

Bells on Sunday comes from the parish church of St Nicholas Halewood in Merseyside. The church was built in 1839 of locally quarried sandstone and has seventeen stained glass windows designed by William Morris. The tower holds six bells, cast in 2012 by Royal Eijsbouts bell foundry of the Netherlands with a tenor weighing six hundredweight and tuned to the note of B. We hear them ringing Spliced Surprise Minor.


SUN 05:45 Profile (m0017k1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Summary (m0017k3j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01bwd3c)
When the Chips Are Down

Mark Tully asks what gives us courage to do what we ought to when things go against us. How do we decide what we should stand up for, and how do we cope if we fail to do so?

Using examples from 9/11, South African Apartheid, Nazi Germany, McCarthyism in the United States , the New Testament and his own experience, Mark gives examples of those who did meet their own expectations of how they would behave under pressure, and those who let themselves down. But he warns against any judgement against those who fail to stand up and be counted when the chips are down, asking "what would you have done under the circumstances".

In an interview with Vaughan Roberts, author, and Vicar of St Ebbes church in Oxford, Mark seeks the Christian perspective on how we might like to behave in extremis, and our responses should we fall short. And drawing inspiration from literature, as well as music from the likes of Simon and Garfunkel, JS Bach and, surprisingly, Tex Ritter he asks if we can really ever be truly heroic when the chips are down. And can we forgive ourselves if we are not.

Presented by Mark Tully

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (m0017k3l)
Seaweed on Skye

Could seaweed once again become a major part of the economy of the Scottish Highlands? The trade, which last blossomed 200 years ago, looks set for revival as new uses are found for the slippery plant. Richard Baynes visits crofting couple and seaweed farmers Kyla Orr and Alex Glasgow, and their business partner Martin Welsh, as they deal with their first proper kelp harvest. He takes a boat trip out to their seaweed farm, and goes into the lab with marine biologist Kyla to learn the secrets of seeding seaweed and the technology they are inventing to do it with.

Produced and presented by Richard Baynes.


SUN 06:57 Weather (m0017k3n)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m0017k3q)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (m0017k3s)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m0017k3v)
Live Music Now

Music broadcaster Clemency Burton-Hill makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Live Music Now.

To Give:
- UK Freephone 0800 404 8144
-You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Live Music Now’.
- Cheques should be made payable to ‘Live Music Now’.
Please note that Freephone and online donations for this charity close at 23.59 on the Saturday after the Appeal is first broadcast. However the Freepost option can be used at any time.

Registered charity number: 273596


SUN 07:57 Weather (m0017k3x)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m0017k3z)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m0017k41)
"My delight to learn or to teach or to write..."

A service marking the 1,000th anniversary of Durham Cathedral receiving one of its most precious artefacts of pilgrimage, the mortal remains of the Venerable Bede, the greatest of Anglo-Saxon scholars. Bede wrote the first ever history of England. Completed in 731, the Ecclesiastical History of the English People is the first work in which the AD system of dating is used. Charlie Hardwick will bring the History alive as she reads an extract. The service is led by the Dean of Durham the Very Reverend Andrew Tremlett, with a sermon by the Van Mildert Professor of Divinity in the Department of Theology and Religion, The Reverend Professor Canon Simon Oliver. Master of the Choristers and Organist: Daniel Cook; Sub-Organist: Joseph Beech; Producer: Philip Billson.

Order of service: Christ is the Morning Star (Words: The Venerable Bede, Music: Richard Lloyd); Christ is the world’s true light (Rinkart); Psalm 98:1-7 (Dom Gregory Murray); Ecclesiasticus 39: 1-3, 8, 9 (read by Professor Karen Kilby, Bede Professor of Catholic Theology); Prayers led by students from the Venerable Bede Church of England Academy in Sunderland; Ye watchers and ye holy ones (Lasst uns Erfreuen); O Rex gloriae (Palestrina); John 6: 1-9; Gloria Patri (Tallis); Angel-voices ever singing (Angel Voices).


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m0017cs0)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue from a range of contributors.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b09fxxkq)
Fyfe Dangerfield on the Guillemot

Musician Fyfe Dangerfield tells the story of an inspirational trip to the 'birdland' of the Farne Islands where a seabird inspired the name for the band that made him famous.

Producer: Mark Ward
Photograph: Simon Stobart.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m0017k43)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O'Connell


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m0017k45)
Writer, Daniel Thurman
Director, Peter Leslie Wild
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Adil Shah ….. Ronny Jhutti
Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Chelsea Horrobin ….. Madeleine Leslay
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Fallon Rogers ….. Joanna Van Kampen
Freddie Pargetter ….. Toby Laurence
Ian Craig ….. Stephen Kennedy
Jakob Hakansson ….. Paul Venables
Lily Pargetter ….. Katie Redford
Mia Grundy ….. Molly Pipe
Pip Archer ….. Daisy Badger
Roy Tucker ….. Ian Pepperell
Stella Pryor ….. Lucy Speed
Will Grundy ….. Phillip Molloy
Accountant ….. Rupi Lal


SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m0017k47)
Ellie Simmonds, swimmer

Ellie Simmonds, swimmer, shares the eight tracks, book and luxury item she would take with her if cast away to a desert island. With Lauren Laverne.
Producer: Sarah Taylor


SUN 11:45 Living with the Gods (b09byqfc)
Mother and Child

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world and across time.

He focuses on how societies and communities seek to protect the newly-born and their mothers, including the role of St Margaret of Antioch, patron saint of childbirth, and the use of protective omamori in Japan.

Producer Paul Kobrak

Produced in partnership with the British Museum
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (m0017k49)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (m0017cpw)
Series 89

Nosey Neighbours, Tap Dancing and Charlie Chaplin

Sue Perkins challenges Paul Merton, Pippa Evans, Tony Hawks and Suzi Ruffell to speak for 60 seconds without repetition, deviation or hesitation.

The long running Radio 4 national treasure of a parlour game is back for a new series with subjects this week ranging from Nosey Neighbours to Charlie Chaplin.

Production co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow
Sound editor: Marc Willcox
Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Studios Production


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m0017k4c)
Consider the Axe: Food, farming and the wonders of Stonehenge.

Dan Saladino and blacksmith Alex Pole explain how our food has been influenced by metals.


SUN 12:57 Weather (m0017k4f)
The latest weather forecast


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m0017k4h)
Radio 4's look at the week's big stories from both home and around the world


SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m0017k4k)
Outside the Box - Special Events & Seasons


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0017crf)
Wellcome Collection, London

Kathy Clugston and the panel are at the Wellcome Collection, London. Fielding your horticultural queries this week are Anne Swithinbank, Pippa Greenwood and James Wong.

Producer: Dominic Tyerman
Assistant Producer: Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 14:45 1922: The Birth of Now (m0013zsb)
Einstein, relativity, time, and indigenous Australian modernism

1922: The Birth of Now - Ten programmes in which Matthew Sweet investigates objects and events from 1922, the crucial year for modernism, that have an impact today.

10. Einstein, relativity, time, and indigenous Australian art.

In 1922, Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize. In that same year, his work was popularised with the publication of Easy Lessons in Einstein. Time was shown to be a relative quality - and there is a link here to the indigenous Australian conception of time, which is also not a constant.

In the concluding episode of the series Matthew hears from the theoretical physicist Fay Dowker, who expains relativity and Margo Neale, Senior Indigenous Curator at the National Museum of Australia. Margo speaks about Australian aboriginal ideas of time, their relationship with Einstein's idea of relativity, and the expression of these in recent indigenous art, by painters such as Mick Kurbarkku, who was born in 1922, and Emily Kame Kngwarreye. Both have been described as aboriginal modernists.

Producer: Julian May


SUN 15:00 Drama (m0017k4m)
In Diamond Square

A story of love in a time of war, starring Maxine Peake.

Barcelona, 1930s: Natalia, a pretty, naïve shop girl from the working-class quarter of Gracia, is hesitant when a stranger asks her to dance at the fiesta in Diamond Square. But Quimet is charming and forceful and she takes his hand. They marry and have two children, although Quimet proves an unpredictable husband. He gives her the nickname of Colometa, meaning Little Pigeon, and breeds the birds in their apartment.

Set against the backdrop of the turbulent years of the Spanish Republic and Civil War, Natalia experiences the conflict from a city in turmoil as she fights for her and her children’s survival.

Written in exile from Franco’s dictatorship by Mercè Rodoreda, the novel has been translated into 28 languages, produced in Spain as a film and TV series, and is taught as part of the school curriculum. Gabriel García Márquez learnt Catalan just to be able to read it in its original language.

The novel has been adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor, a multi-award winning scriptwriter and audio dramatist. Her gothic thriller Dead Weather won Best Drama, Best Actress and Best Supporting Performance at the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2022. She won the Tinniswood Award for Best Radio Script for Ivan and the Dogs which also picked up an Olivier nomination and has been adapted as a film.

Cast:
Natalia (Colometa) ….. Maxine Peake
Quimet ….. Will Howard
Mateu ….. Luke Jerdy
Cintet ….. Liam Garrigan
Mrs Enriqueta ….. Jane Slavin
Julieta ….. Faye Marsay

Other voices played by the cast

Written by Mercè Rodoreda
Adapted for radio by Hattie Naylor from the translation by Peter Bush

Sound Design ….. Adam Woodhams
Mix ….. Steve Bond

Executive Producer ….. Sara Davies

Directed and produced by Nicolas Jackson

An Afonica production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 16:00 Open Book (m0017k4p)
Programme looking at new fiction and non-fiction books, talking to authors and publishers and unearthing lost classics


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m0017k4r)
Colm Tóibín

The writer Colm Tóibín selects some favourite poems from amongst our listeners' requests and recommendations. His picks include poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Thom Gunn, Maura Dooley, Victoria Kennefick and Anthony Cronin.

Colm Tóibín is the author of ten novels - including Brooklyn, The Magician and The Master. He published his first poetry collection, Vinegar Hill, in spring 2022.

With thanks to RTÉ Archives for their recording of Seán Mac Réamoinn's reading of The Two Travellers read by CJ Boland, and to the Irish Poetry Reading Archive in UCD Library for their kind permission to use their recording of Anthony Cronin reading his poem 'For a Father'.

Produced by Mair Bosworth for BBC Audio


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m0017cmv)
Ukraine: Taking in the Trauma

More than 150 thousand people have signed up to the UK’s ‘Homes for Ukraine’ scheme - hoping to open their doors to those desperately fleeing the war. But it’s a process that has been dogged with delays, and is raising serious safeguarding concerns as vulnerable women and children try to match up with potential hosts through unregulated sites online. By following those escaping the conflict, and the host families trying to help them, File on 4 investigates the difficulties this new scheme is facing, and examines how schools, councils and health services are coping with the arrival of so many traumatised families.

Reporter: Adrian Goldberg
Producer: Mick Tucker
Editor: Maggie Latham


SUN 17:40 Profile (m0017k1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m0017k4t)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


SUN 17:57 Weather (m0017k4w)
The latest weather reports and forecast


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017k4y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m0017k50)
Christian Fraser

A selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio


SUN 19:00 The Archers (m0017k52)
Alice shares an uncomfortable truth, and Tracy is well and truly stuck.


SUN 19:15 Stand-Up Specials (m0017k54)
Don Biswas: Neurotopical

For years, comedian Don Biswas struggled with things most people take for granted - from telling the time to following simple directions.

Not long after graduating from university he found himself sacked from not one but two management trainee positions, and he fell into a depression. Well into his 20s, Don decided to seek medical advice and doctors told him he had Dyspraxia, ADHD and mild Asperger's Syndrome. Suddenly, everything made much more sense.

In Don Biswas: Neurotopical, Don explores how his diagnoses were his ticket out of the rat-race and how, as a result, he decided to take a keen interest in politics, much to the chagrin of his parents.

In his first stand-up comedy special for Radio 4, recorded in front of a live audience at the famous Frog and Bucket Comedy Club in Manchester, Don speaks candidly about his mental health conditions and the impact they've had on his outlook.

Written and performed by Don Biswas

Sound Engineer and Editor: Mark Burrows

Producer: Kurt Brookes

Photo credit: Steve Best

A Made In Manchester production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 19:45 How One Becomes Lonely (m0017k56)
Episode 3

Novelist and musician Luke Sutherland’s immersive tale of cowardice, courage and connection tackles the perpetual struggle to make sense of an ever-changing world. From the comfort of his Perthshire home, 81-year old Archie Devine dips into the murkier corners of the internet as he remembers the time he let true love slip through his fingers.

Archie is determined to track down first love, Nadine, in spite of the misgivings of his housemate Paulie, who remembers how the romance ended.

Words and music by Luke Sutherland
Read by Cal MacAninch
Produced by Eilidh McCreadie


SUN 20:00 Feedback (m0017crm)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations


SUN 20:30 Last Word (m0017crk)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to the unsung but significant.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (m0017k0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m0017k3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 The Digital Human (m000sy3j)
Series 22

Treasure

Every time we seek treasure and eventually find, we get a hit of endorphins that tickles the happy parts of our brains.

There are tales of extraordinary discoveries; King Tut’s tomb, The Mona Lisa, Viking gold. Incredible things that took ingenuity and dedication to uncover. Wouldn't it be remarkable to strike it lucky and find real treasure buried for hundreds or even thousands of years? Every rabbit hole we go down, every mystery we try to solve scratches that itch. It might be offline, or on. What does it look like? How do we find it? And is it wise to do so?

Archaeologist Peter Reavill tells us about the discovery of an astonishing Viking hoard in Herefordshire, but like so many tales of treasure warn, it became a curse to those who found it. They chose to value secrecy about what they discovered digging up the hoard, higher than its historical value.

Stefan from Germany is sitting on an unbelievable hoard of digital treasure - $371,000,000 but with only two goes left on his flash drive to guess the password, it became such a curse it drove him to contemplate ending it all.

And alternate reality game developer Dan Hon introduces us to Perplex City, an online and offline treasure hunt which led Andy Darley to dig up a metal cube claim a£100,000 prize. Dan draws similarities between alternate reality games and how QAnon works and we hear from Leila who after becoming obsessed with QAnon explains how a search for information, patterns and connections became the digital equivalent of seeking treasure but became so toxic it started affecting her mental health until she managed to pull herself out of it.

Producer Kate Bissell
Researcher Juliet Conway


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m0017k58)
Radio 4's Sunday night political discussion programme.


SUN 23:00 Loose Ends (m0017k1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01bwd3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 23 MAY 2022

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m0017k5c)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (m0017ch2)
Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m0017k21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017k5f)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017k5h)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017k5k)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (m0017k5m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0017k5p)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rt Revd Mary Stallard, Assistant Bishop in Bangor.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (m0017k5r)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


MON 05:56 Weather (m0017k5t)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09sqgkp)
Helen Moncrieff on the Shetland Starling

Ever since childhood, Helen Moncrieff, Shetland Manager for RSPB Scotland has been fascinated by the ways in which Shetland Starlings can mimic not only other birds but other sounds including a squeaky toy belonging to her own dog!

Producer: Sarah Blunt
Photograph: John Dixon.


MON 06:00 Today (m0017k6q)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (m0017k6s)
Learning from apes, fish and wasps

Adam Rutherford explores how other species can help us understand our own. The world-renowned primatologist Frans de Waal has spent decades observing the behaviours of chimps and bonobos. In Different: What Apes Can Teach Us About Gender he looks at, and questions, the interplay of biology and culture. Using his knowledge of apes he challenges widely held beliefs about masculinity and femininity and assumptions about authority, power, cooperation and sexual behaviour.

Nichola Raihani’s research focuses on the evolution of social behaviour in humans and non-human species. In her book, The Social Instinct, she looks at the science of cooperation and how humans have evolved socially and built, and fought over, hugely complex communities. But she also suggests we might have something to learn from the pied babblers of the Kalahari, and the cleaner fish of the Great Barrier Reef – two of the most fascinating and extraordinarily successful species on the planet.

While ants and honey bees are often held up as exemplars of social cohesion, the entomologist Seirian Sumner wants to rehabilitate the much-maligned thug of the insect world, the wasp. In Endless Forms: The Secret World of Wasps she shows how wasps are older, cleverer and more diverse than their evolutionary new-comer the bee. And she makes the case that they hold hidden treasures of relevance to human culture, survival and health, and one species even taught us how to make paper.

Producer: Katy Hickman


MON 09:45 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017k6v)
Ep 6. The Case Against Purdue Pharma

Today, in Patrick Radden Keefe's award winning account of America's opioid epidemic federal prosecutors in Virginia investigate the Sackler's family run pharmaceutical business. Millions of pages of documents bring to light revelations about the company and its powerful pain killer, OxyContin. Kyle Soller reads.

The Sackler family are famed for their philanthropy. The name adorns the walls of many of the world's most prestigious institutions, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, and the British Museum to name just a few. Less well known is that much of their wealth came from the powerful painkiller, OxyContin. While the drug wasn’t the only opioid behind this public health emergency, it is regarded as the pioneer. What follows is the story of an immigrant family struggling to survive during the depression, and who, as the 20th century progressed turned their lives around by making their way into the pharmaceutical business. It was Arthur Sackler's role in the marketing of Valium that was the basis of the first Sackler fortune. Later, the lessons learned in making Valium a success story were applied to OxyContin in the 1990s, leading to phenomenal wealth for the Sacklers. Meanwhile, on the eve of the new millenium, families across America were beginning to fall victim to what would become the opioid epidemic.

Patrick Radden Keefe is an award-winning writer at the New Yorker, winner of the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the Baille Gifford Prize, 2021

Kyle Soller is an American film, stage, and television actor. His accolades include an Olivier Award, and three Evening Standard Theatre Awards.

Abridger: Katrin Williams.
Producer: Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0017k6x)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


MON 11:00 The Untold (m0017k6z)
Life Interrupted

You could say Seán Binder was doing the right thing in the right place at the wrong time. In 2018, he was part of the volunteer humanitarian effort on the island of Lesbos. Still a point of arrival for the inflatable dinghies & ramshackle craft packed with refugees & migrants & usually sent by smugglers. These overfilled craft would arrive on Lesbos & other Greek islands with people in various states of distress & need.
A trained rescue diver, Sean was part of Emergency Response Centre International, a small humanitarian aid group that co-ordinated efforts with the Greek Coast Guard to prevent loss of life. Frequently for Seán, that would mean waiting on a dark beach to hand a blanket to an utter stranger but in February 2018 the local island police arrested Binder & a colleague & began an investigation that led first to 106 days in pre-trial detention & then a raft of unproven charges that include money laundering, espionage and assisting illegal smuggling networks. The case remains ongoing with the threat of up to 20 years imprisonment for Binder & his fellow accused. Meanwhile Seán has simply had get on with his life. The nightmare experience has been both transformative & chilling-it hangs over everything. Never quite happening, sometimes farcical yet always threatening to tug away at the normality of Sean's day to day existence.
Producer Mark Burman


MON 11:30 Don't Log Off (m0017k71)
Series 13

A Different Way

An ecological retreat on the edge of Amazonian rainforest which has the area's indigenous people as its nearest neighbours. A self declared independent artist's republic in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius with its own flag, currency and constitution. A peace loving village community in New Zealand where everyone shares their money and children can safely roam free. Alan Dein connects with people across the world who are reaching further, dreaming deeper and seeking a different path in life.

Producer: Conor Garrett


MON 12:00 News Summary (m0017k73)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 You and Yours (m0017k75)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


MON 12:57 Weather (m0017k77)
The latest weather forecast


MON 13:00 World at One (m0017k79)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


MON 13:45 Metamorphosis - How Insects Transformed Our World (m0017k7c)
Dazzling Disguise

Dr Erica McAlister of London's Natural History Museum takes a look at some of the entomological pioneers, whose groundbreaking observations and experiments have led to some truly innovative developments.

Erica examines the huge butterfly collection of the intrepid Victorian lepidopterist Margaret Fountaine who was seduced by the iridescent nature of the morpho butterfly wing. Its dazzling electric blues are caused not by pigments, but by interference effects within the wing structure. In the early 20th century the “father of camouflage” Abbot Thayer controversially cited iridescence as a means of disguise within animal world as well as obvious attraction. Scientists are revisiting the idea that the best disguises are dazzling and now engineers are attempting to recreating iridescence from the insect world to generate high impact hues with multiple effects for a host of different commercial products.

With contributions from: Dr David Waterhouse, (Senior Curator of Natural History & Geology at Norfolk Museums); biologist Dr Karin Kjernsmo,(Bristol University); Andrea Hart (Library Special Collections Manager Natural History Museum); physiologist Prof Andrew Parker, (University of Oxford)

Producer Adrian Washbourne


MON 14:00 The Archers (m0017k52)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (m0017k7f)
Jason's Mates

Peter Strickland is a highly regarded, award winning independent film maker. He has written and directed several Radio 4 dramas, all well received by audiences and critics. In Jason's Mates, Peter satirises the low to high level corruption that permeates some democracies at local level. He has harnessed the style of old, children’s television animation in order to create a highly stylised world of reality-based but fictionalised political corruption, exploring it with wit and acute observation.

Peter says, "Jason’s Mates is a response to the perennial problems of corruption and almost every incident in the play is loosely based on real life practices or occurrences. Playful satire felt like an appropriate response to something profoundly poisonous in society and I wanted to aim for a tone similar to the BBC animation I grew up on in the 70s. The play is narrated (as well as sporadically sung) and has the feel of a children’s show. Presenting adult themes within the context of a children’s format felt like the most effective way to tell a story of corruption, which is regrettably ever-relevant. The fictitious locale is also important in order to avoid scrutiny over what is or isn’t correct, which will give us the freedom to tell the story of something all too real."

Jason is the Mayor of the prestigious and picturesque town of Ramsonlea. An election is coming up and an opposition candidate called Ernest is promising an overhaul of all the corruption and nepotism that has plagued local government under Jason’s watch. Jason’s mates have hugely benefited from his rule and become obscenely rich from the funds he’s diverted to them and himself.

His friend Portie owns countless companies that win various tenders for roadworks and church renovation, which are invariably done badly to siphon off money, allowing local government to beg for more funds later down the line. His louche and arrogant son Lance is given a high-ranking position after the University is forced to give him top marks. Meanwhile, Ramsonlea Hospital is falling apart and the schools are suffering.

Cast:
Jason…………………………Richard Bremmer
Wilf……………………………Hugh Dennis
Portie Winterworth………Toby Jones
Lance Winterworth…………..Leo Bill
Ernest Montague…………….Paul Ready
Professor Pontifex…………. Fatma Mohamed
The Narrator……………….. Stephanie Racine

Original music……………….Jon Fletcher
Lyrics…………………………Peter Strickland

Sound Design………………Eloise Whitmore

Written and directed by Peter Strickland

Executive Producer: Polly Thomas

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (m0017k7h)
Programme 9, 2022

(9/12)
What might be the preferred tipple of Eric's porcine dictator, Ilya's singular companion, Elvis's explosive alter-ego and Arthur's devious villain?

This can only be a Round Britain Quiz puzzle, and if anyone can answer it it's likely to be the teams from the North of England or the South of England, who have dominated the RBQ rankings in recent series. Stuart Maconie and Adele Geras appear for the North, against Marcus Berkmann and Paul Sinha of the South. Stuart and Adele will be out for vengeance after their defeat the last time these two teams met.

The questions include some ingenious ideas from listeners, who have sent them to the production team at rbq@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Paul Bajoria


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m0017k4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Youth Unites (m0017cjg)
Singer, songwriter and broadcaster Cerys Matthews returns to her roots to celebrate the success of a unique message of Peace and Goodwill from the Youth of Wales to the Youth of the World. The message and the organisation now responsible, Urdd Gobaith Cymru (Welsh League of Hope), both celebrate their centenary this year.

The message was the brainchild of a Baptist Preacher who believed that communication between the children of nations was the best way of promoting world peace. The first message was sent via Morse Code from the UK in 1922, kindly reproduced for the programme by Duncan Fisken. A new message has been shared every year since, written by Urdd members about issues that concern them, and translated into as many languages as possible. Replies have been received from all over the world in letters and post cards. Last year, the message was sent in 65 languages to 59 countries and had 84 million responses on social media.

Cerys looks back at the history, discovering how the messages have affected the young people composing them. She demonstrates how the Urdd, a gender equal organisation from day one, expanded from Camps and Eisteddfods to a humanitarian organisation offering aid and safe havens for refugees. Cerys talks to Urdd members old and new, a recent Afghan refugee, Urdd staff and authors of messages over the years.

This year, the message is being presented to the World from Nobel Peace Centre Oslo, the first time outside the UK.

A Telesgop Cyf production for BBC Radio 4


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m0017k7l)
Series 26

23/05/2022

This year, The Digital Human celebrates its 10 year anniversary. During that time, we have explored all corners of the digital realm, and told hundreds of stories that have revealed how we as humans have been shaped by the technological world we have created, and what we may become in the future.

Some of those stories have always stayed with us, because they have generated more questions - questions that we’ve always wanted to have answered, and in this series, we finally will.

In one of our all time fan-favourite episodes, Altruism, we told stories of online kindness, and how the internet could be used to bring out the best of human nature. But in the last decade, we have seen the online environment become more fractious, less community based, and in some cases, outright hostile. Aleks sets out to find out why some online spaces can bring out the best in us, while others the worst, and discovers how we could actually tailor our technology to become a real force for good.


MON 17:00 PM (m0017k7p)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017k7r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (m0017k7t)
Series 89

The Ukulele, Bingo and The Pawn Shop

Sue Perkins challenges Gyles Brandreth, Ria Lina, Zoe Lyons and Paul Merton to speak for 60 seconds without repetition, deviation or hesitation.

The long-running Radio 4 national treasure of a parlour game is back for a new series with subjects this week ranging from Bingo to The Pawn Shop.

Production co-ordinator: Caroline Barlow
Sound editor: Marc Willcox
Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Studios Production


MON 19:00 The Archers (m0017k7w)
Jazzer has an elaborate plan, and Stella gets the wrong idea.


MON 19:15 Front Row (m0017k7y)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


MON 20:00 Sports Star (m0017k80)
Some sports stars appear to have more political influence than any of their predecessors. Some have forced politicians into policy U-turns. While many have welcomed the rise and impact of sporting campaigners, there are questions too. In this programme political journalist turned sports writer Joey D'Urso examines the phenomenon. How did we get here? Whose advice is being heard behind the scenes? And should we be wary of such political power?

Joey talks to top football agent Kelly Hogarth - who represents Marcus Rashford and Raheem Sterling - in one of her first ever in-depth interviews. He also hears from Dr Erkut Sögüt, who represents former Arsenal player Mesut Özil; former Newcastle goalie and founder of Show Racism the Red Card, Shaka Hislop; The Sun's Deputy Head of Sport Martin Lipton and campaigns expert Jo Tanner.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (m0017cjb)
Series focusing on foreign affairs issues.


MON 21:00 The Long View (m0014p87)
When Things Fall Apart

Jonathan Freedland explores the past behind the present. In the last of this long view of the future we ask when do civilizations & systems know that things cannot go on as they are. When do the rulers and the ruled sense the game is up? Historians Craig Clunas summon up the last days of the Ming Dynasty of the 17th Century, Maria Fusaro considers how the Venetian Republic registered its waning powers & end days in the 18th Century and Anthony Badger explores the existential crisis of America in 1933-would it survive as a democracy, could it be reformed & avoid collapse?

Producer Mark Burman


MON 21:30 Start the Week (m0017k6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m0017k83)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Love Marriage by Monica Ali (m0017k85)
6: Confusion

Meera Syal reads Monica Ali’s first new novel for a decade, a bighearted and hilarious story of two very different families brought together by marriage.

Yasmin Ghorami has brilliant career in medicine, and is engaged to a charming junior doctor. But as their wedding approaches, and the two families are thrown together, they all find themselves confronting long-held and dark secrets.

Today: Yasmin is confused over her feelings for Joe, and by his unorthodox relationship with his mother....

Author: Monica Ali
Reader: Meera Syal
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


MON 23:00 DMs Are Open (m0017d8l)
Series 1

Episode 1

DMs Are Open is a weekly comedy sketch show hosted by Athena Kugblenu (BBC 1 “Mock The Week” Radio 4 “Cancel Culture”) & Ali Official (BBC Three “Muzlamic” Radio 4 “The Train At Platform 4”)

It’s a brand new show that takes a satirical swipe at the latest news and trending topics. Each week, the Great British public will be sliding into Athena and Ali’s DMs with sketches, one liners and voice notes about anything from Martin Lewis taking over the world to Rihanna’s new baby. Tune in for the best comedy sketches, performed by some of the biggest social media influencers, showcasing the very best of the British public’s submissions.

It is an open submissions show which means it is written by you, the listeners! DMs Are Open seeks to develop new comedy writers and performers and is looking for sketches, one-liners, new characters and voicenote submissions.

Producers: Sadia Azmat and Rajiv Karia
Production Coordinator: Sarah Nicholls

A BBC Studios Production


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0017k87)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



TUESDAY 24 MAY 2022

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m0017k89)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 00:30 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017k6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017k8c)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017k8f)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017k8h)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m0017k8k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0017k8m)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rt Revd Mary Stallard, Assistant Bishop in Bangor.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m0017k8p)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbz1g)
Sedge Warbler

David Attenborough presents the Sedge Warbler. Sedge warblers like tangled vegetation near water. They're summer visitors here but seek out similar habitats in Africa where they spend the winter. Before leaving our shores in autumn, they gorge on insects, often doubling their weight.


TUE 06:00 Today (m0017khb)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (m0017khd)
Chi Onwurah on why engineering is the most caring profession

Being a black, working-class woman from a council estate in Newcastle, Chi Onwurah was in a minority of one studying engineering at university in London in the 1980s. ‘It was probably the worst experience of my life’ she says. But it led to the best experience of her life, to date: building the first mobile phone network in Nigeria. It was no mean feat in a country which was without a reliable electricity supply at the time, and Chi was delighted when her Nigerian father (who had desperately wanted her to be a doctor) conceded that perhaps engineering was a useful profession after all.

Talking to Jim Al-Khalil about her life and work, Chi shares her passion for digital networks, the networks that make today's instant multimedia communications possible from social media to online banking. But mid-career Chi decided to stand for parliament, much to her engineering colleagues dismay. Why would anyone want to leave such a noble profession to enter such a chaotic, disreputable and dubiously useful non-profession as politics, they asked. Even today, there are shockingly few members of parliament who understand science and engineering. And it’s a problem, says Chi.

Learning about statistics at school helped Chi to realise that she was an outlier and 'not a freak' as some of her classmates called her. These days she represents the people she grew up with in parliament and is Shadow Minister for Science, Research and Innovation.

Producer: Anna Buckley


TUE 09:30 One to One (m0017khg)
The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Eris Drew

Faranak Amidi from BBC Persian talks to DJ Eris Drew about how rave culture triggered massive changes in each of their lives. For Faranak, it meant rebelling against the strict culture of her home country of Iran, and finding a new life elsewhere. And for Eris, it meant even more profound questions about identity. But what is it about the "motherbeat", as Eris calls it, that makes it so powerful?

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton


TUE 09:45 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017khj)
Ep 7. Going Global

Today, in Patrick Radden Keefe's book on America's opioid epidemic it's 2014 & the Sackler family see new potential for OxyContin abroad. Meanwhile, the drug continues to play a devastating role in the public health crisis which continues to unfold across the United States. Kyle Soller reads.

The Sackler family are famed for their philanthropy. The name adorns the walls of many of the world's most prestigious institutions, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, and the British Museum to name just a few. Less well known is that much of their wealth came from the powerful painkiller, OxyContin. While the drug wasn’t the only opioid behind this public health emergency, it is regarded as the pioneer. What follows is the story of an immigrant family struggling to survive during the depression, and who, as the 20th century progressed turned their lives around by making their way into the pharmaceutical business. It was Arthur Sackler's role in the marketing of Valium that was the basis of the first Sackler fortune. Later, the lessons learned in making Valium a success story were applied to OxyContin in the 1990s, leading to phenomenal wealth for the Sacklers. Meanwhile, on the eve of the new millenium, families across America were beginning to fall victim to what would become the opioid epidemic.

Patrick Radden Keefe is an award-winning writer at the New Yorker, winner of the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the Baille Gifford Prize, 2021

Kyle Soller is an American film, stage, and television actor. His accolades include an Olivier Award, and three Evening Standard Theatre Awards.

Abridger: Katrin Williams.
Producer: Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0017khl)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


TUE 11:00 The Dolittle Machine (m0017khn)
Can we build a Dolittle Machine, a piece of technology that will let us converse with the animals of planet Earth? Science fiction writer Matthew De Abaitua investigates how the latest advances in AI mean that this is now more in the realms of the possible, rather than in the purely fantastical.

Starting in his garden with two cats, he finds himself in a tropical forest with big-brained hook-wielding birds, surveying multidimensional neural networks, and meets a woman who found out about her pregnancy from a dolphin. There are also robotic fish and sound pictures painted at high speed by fruit bats.

What is Matthew’s machine going to look like, how will it operate, and what will we learn from it all?

Featuring:
Linda Erb, vice president of animal care and training, Dolphin Research Center, Florida.
Martha Nussbaum, professor of law and philosophy, University of Chicago.
Diana Reiss, professor, Department of Psychology, Hunter College.
Daniela Rus, roboticist, professor and Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, MIT.
Natalie Uomini, researcher into New Caledonian crows and animal intelligence.
Yossi Yovel, professor, Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University.

Extracts from ‘Songs of the Humpback Whale’ used with permission from Ocean Alliance.
Sperm whale sounds courtesy of Project CETI.

Presenter: Matthew De Abaitua
Producer: Richard Ward
Executive Producer: Jo Rowntree
A Loftus Media production for Radio 4


TUE 11:30 Black Roots (m0017khq)
Episode One – Frank Johnson, Joe Thompson and the fiddle in North Carolina.

String bands, hoedowns, square dances, old-time fiddle and banjo styles, these sounds were a dominant strand in African American roots music from the 17th century onwards. Despite this, many people think that such music comes solely from dungaree-wearing, white rural folk. Country might appear to be the whitest of all music genres, but it has some surprising roots.

How have these black roots been whitewashed from the history of American folk and country music? How have folk and country been positioned as white genres? What does black Americana sound like today?

In this episode, acclaimed musician Rhiannon Giddens returns to her home state of North Carolina to explore the lives of two black fiddlers - Joe Thompson and Frank Johnson. Johnson was one of the first black celebrities in the Southern states of the USA. Born into slavery, he bought freedom for himself and his family on the back of his profits as a musician. More than 2,000 people processed through Wilmington, North Carolina for his funeral in 1871. Though he died before the start of the recording industry, his music was passed down through generations of black fiddlers in the region. The last of these fiddlers was Joe Thompson, who taught Rhiannon countless songs.

Featuring Iris Thompson Chapman, Phil Jamison, John Jeremiah Sullivan and Dr. Lewin Manly.

Presented by Rhiannon Giddens
Produced by Tom Woolfenden
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 12:00 News Summary (m0017kht)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 You and Yours (m0017khw)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


TUE 12:57 Weather (m0017khy)
The latest weather forecast


TUE 13:00 World at One (m0017kj0)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


TUE 13:45 Metamorphosis - How Insects Transformed Our World (m0017kj2)
The Ultimate Upcycler

Dr Erica McAlister of London's Natural History Museum takes a look at some of the entomological pioneers, whose groundbreaking observations and experiments have led to some truly innovative developments.

Erica examines the innocuous wasp-like Black Soldier fly which for centuries was regarded as a serious agricultural pest in North America’s southern states. Its reputation underwent a compete rewrite thanks to the close observations of artist and entomologist Charles Valentine Riley. Its larvae have a remarkable ability to shred, devour and transform nearly any kind of organic waste into high-quality edible protein. They are now the ‘crown jewels’ of a fast-growing insect-farming industry – addressing a growing need to find cheap, clean reliable protein.

With contributions from Donald Weber biographer of CV Riley , entomologist Prof Jeff Tomberlin (Texas A+M University), Keiran Whittaker (CEO Entocycle), Katharina Unger (CEO Livin Farms)

Producer Adrian Washbourne


TUE 14:00 The Archers (m0017k7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (m000gbj4)
Moving the Goalposts

Pam Ferris is Mattie in Juliet Ace's new drama.

Words are becoming more and more difficult for Mattie. Is this because of her illness, dementia or just old age?
Duty. Dignity. Fear. Pain and Humour are words she'll never forget. You can add Bloody-mindedness to the list
and the refusal to call cancer a battle to be won. Her diagnosis allows Mattie the golden opportunity to plan her
'future' but then unbelievably she doesn't die. Mattie is startling truthful but she has a wicked sense of humour too.

Mattie ...... Pam Ferris
Written by Juliet Ace
Directed by Tracey Neale

Juliet Ace, television and radio writer, has written a wonderful drama right from the heart.
Eighty year old Mattie has Stage 4 cancer. Words are becoming more and more difficult to find. Is this because of cancer, dementia or just old age? Duty. Burden. Dignity. Fear. Pain and Humour are words she’ll never forget. You can add Bloody-mindedness to the list and the refusal to call cancer a battle to be won. Mattie regards her cancer as a pantomime villain who is, by turns, devious and full of dark humour.
She is given 18 months to live which allows Mattie the golden opportunity to plan her ‘future’. There’s a will to make, a funeral to organise and possessions to give away. It’s an empowering experience. But then, unbelievably, she doesn’t bloody die. Four years later, Mattie is left with very limited mobility and exhaustion – a condition she shares with many cancer patients who are supposedly cured of the disease. Thank god for her wicked sense of humour, her irreverence and her ability to appreciate the ironies of the situation.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m0017n1y)
Series 31

I Will Wait For You

A wait of 33 years between a marriage proposal and a response, a skittish piano tries to avoid the stage and a young boy looks out to sea waiting for his father. Josie Long presents short documentaries and works of sound art about waiting, yearning and anxiously anticipating.

Skittish Piano
Produced by Eleanor McDowall

Isabel and Alf
Featuring Isabel Bader
Produced by Kalli Anderson
Thank you to Isabel Bader, Ruth Clarke and Olivia Richardson.

The Voice of the Sea
Feat.uring Abel Coentrão
Produced by Rebecca Nolan

Curated by Axel Kacoutié, Eleanor McDowall and Andrea Rangecroft
Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (m0017kdc)
Environment and War in Ukraine

It's said that the environment is the silent victim of war. In this programme, Tom Heap finds out how the conflict in Ukraine is affecting environmental work in the country. With so many people forced to flee, what happens to projects which were trying to protect fragile wildlife habitats? He talks to an award-winning Ukrainian environmentalist who has had to temporarily abandon his conservation project around Chernobyl in order to help with the humanitarian aid effort. Meanwhile, with airstrikes taking place in some of the most industrialised areas in the east of the country, the risk of long-term contamination from damaged coal mines and nuclear installations is very real. Tom asks what lessons can be learned from previous wars around the world, and discovers how long-lasting the environmental impacts of military action can be. How can environmental concerns be can be given a voice, instead of remaining the silent victim, at a time when the focus is understandably on saving human lives?

Produced by Emma Campbell


TUE 16:00 The Amazing Life of Olaudah Equiano (m0017kj4)
New documentary for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (m0017kgp)
Joan Rhodes, strongest woman in the world

Joan Rhodes picked by Anna Maxwell Martin, star of Line of Duty and Motherland. Her choice is a lovely surprise, a strongwoman who could rip up phone books and bend nails. There's archive of her holding up 14 stone cricket commentator Brian 'Johnners' Johnstone in 1949 as well as the voice of the woman who knew her well - Triona Holden, author of An Iron Girl in a Velvet Glove. Abandoned by both her parents as a child, Joan Rhodes is an inspiring character who utterly merits her selection here.

Anna Maxwell Martin is the double BAFTA winning actress who has starred in Bleak House, Poppy Shakespeare and Motherland.

The presenter is Matthew Parris and the producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


TUE 17:00 PM (m0017kj6)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017kj8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Daphne Sounds Expensive (b08y2b70)
Series 2

Time Travel

After Phil blows a fortune on a spanking new time machine, the Daphne boys must use it to embark on a treacherous adventure in a desperate attempt to recoup their losses.

Join critically-acclaimed sketch trio, Daphne, as they pull out all the stops in a dazzling array of peculiar characters, whacky scenarios, dodgy remarks, curious observations, minor altercations and major peacemaking - served on a bed of catchy little numbers with a live nine-piece band.

Written by and starring: Jason Forbes, Phil Wang & George Fouracres

with Lewis Mcleod, Elizabeth Tan and Sir Willard White

Original music composed by Jeff Carpenter

Orchestrator: Simon Nathan

The live band were the London Musical Theatre Orchestra:

Musical Director - Freddie Tapner

Violin - Debs White
Cello - Nick Squires
Trumpet - Michael Maddocks
Trombone - Elliot Pooley
Tenor Sax - Joe Atkin Reeves
Drum Kit - Ben Hartley
Percussion - Ben Burton
Piano - Jon Ranger
Bass - Jack Cherry

The Production Coordinator was Hayley Sterling

It was produced by Matt Stronge and was a BBC Studios production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (m0017kcp)
Chris demands answers, and Justin's just in demand.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (m0017kjb)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m0017kjd)
Award-winning current affairs documentary series


TUE 20:40 In Touch (m0017kjg)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m0017kct)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (m0017khd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m0017kjj)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Love Marriage by Monica Ali (m0017kjl)
7: Broken Rules

Meera Syal reads Monica Ali’s first new novel for a decade, a bighearted and hilarious story of two very different families brought together by marriage.

Yasmin Ghorami has brilliant career in medicine, and is engaged to a charming junior doctor. But as their wedding approaches, and the two families are thrown together, they all find themselves confronting long-held and dark secrets.

Today: with her relationship and her career both in turmoil, Yasmin finds herself struggling to understand her parents' own difficult past...

Author: Monica Ali
Reader: Meera Syal
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


TUE 23:00 Fortunately... with Fi and Jane (m0017kjn)
Two women who know what's what and who's who in the world of radio.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0017kjq)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 25 MAY 2022

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m0017kjs)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


WED 00:30 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017khj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017kjv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017kjx)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017kjz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (m0017kk1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0017kk3)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rt Revd Mary Stallard, Assistant Bishop in Bangor.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (m0017kk5)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkwbt)
African Southern Ground Hornbill

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the African southern ground hornbill. Ground hornbills live in south and south east Africa. They're glossy black birds, as big as turkeys with huge downward-curving bills. The bird produces a deep booming sound that reverberates over long distances, sometimes as much as 5 kilometres, across its grassy habitat. Preferring to walk rather than fly, they strut about in the long grass, searching for prey. Snakes are a favourite: even deadly puff adders are no match for the birds' bludgeoning beaks.


WED 06:00 Today (m0017kc3)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 More or Less (m0017kc5)
Tim Harford explains - and sometimes debunks - the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.


WED 09:30 Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley (m0017kc7)
Drink Coffee

Coffee drinkers rejoice! Did you know that a simple cup of coffee can improve your mood, boost your workout and even stimulate your brown fat, helping you burn calories? In this episode, Michael Mosley finds out all the benefits of our beloved bean - with research suggesting that it could help your brain and heart. What’s more, if you time it right, a simple cup of coffee could help you get more out of your workout and could even change the way you break down fat. Michael speaks to Professor James Betts at the University of Bath to find out how much coffee is the best dose, and what to bear in mind when having a cup.


WED 09:45 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017kc9)
Ep 8. Protest

Today, in Patrick Radden Keefe's award winning book, a revered artist uses her leverage to lay bear the Sackler's family's role in America's opioid epidemic. Kyle Soller reads.

The Sackler family are famed for their philanthropy. The name adorns the walls of many of the world's most prestigious institutions, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, and the British Museum to name just a few. Less well known is that much of their wealth came from the powerful painkiller, OxyContin. While the drug wasn’t the only opioid behind this public health emergency, it is regarded as the pioneer. What follows is the story of an immigrant family struggling to survive during the depression, and who, as the 20th century progressed turned their lives around by making their way into the pharmaceutical business. It was Arthur Sackler's role in the marketing of Valium that was the basis of the first Sackler fortune. Later, the lessons learned in making Valium a success story were applied to OxyContin in the 1990s, leading to phenomenal wealth for the Sacklers. Meanwhile, on the eve of the new millenium, families across America were beginning to fall victim to what would become the opioid epidemic.

Patrick Radden Keefe is an award-winning writer at the New Yorker, winner of the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the Baille Gifford Prize, 2021

Kyle Soller is an American film, stage, and television actor. His accolades include an Olivier Award, and three Evening Standard Theatre Awards.

Abridger: Katrin Williams.
Producer: Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0017kcc)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


WED 11:00 Sports Star (m0017k80)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Lady Killers with Lucy Worsley (p0c25895)
6. Amelia Dyer

Lucy Worsley investigates the ordinary lives and extraordinary crimes of Victorian women accompanied by a team of female detectives.

This time, Lucy is on the case of a baby farmer who’s thought to have killed between 200 and 400 children, by strangling them and throwing the bodies in the River Thames.

Baby farming was almost an acceptable practice in the 19th century, seen as a necessary solution to deal with the 50,000 babies that were born illegitimately each year. The shame and economic burden of caring for a child forced many unmarried mothers to enlist the services, for a fee, of a baby farmer, who promised a safe and loving home for infants. Tragically, some of them were unscrupulous, taking the money and getting rid of the children.

Lucy is joined by former detective Jackie Malton, who was the inspiration for the TV series Prime Suspect, and in-house historian Rosalind Crone as they follow in the footsteps of the Victorian detectives who painstakingly tracked our baby killer.

The case began with the discovery of a body in the river and Jackie and Ros revisit the scene of the crime. They also examine original evidence at the Thames Valley Police Museum, in Reading.

Lucy asks what kind of society turned a blind eye to these baby farmers. And crucially, did women really have a choice, when their childcare options were so limited?
This was a high profile case but did anything change as a result? And what happened to our baby killer?

Producer: Julia Hayball
Readers: Clare Corbett and Jonathan Keeble
Sound design: Chris Maclean
A StoryHunter production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (m0017kcf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 You and Yours (m0017kch)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


WED 12:57 Weather (m0017kck)
The latest weather forecast


WED 13:00 World at One (m0017kcm)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


WED 13:45 Metamorphosis - How Insects Transformed Our World (m0017n26)
Namib Fog Harvesters

Dr Erica McAlister of London's Natural History Museum takes a look at some of the entomological pioneers, whose groundbreaking observations and experiments have led to some truly innovative developments.

Namib Desert beetles have evolved in a very special environment, where the only source of water exists in the air. For decades researchers tried to figure out what gave the beetles a unique superpower of drinking without water. Dr Erica McAlister hears how desert ecologist Mary Seely unravelled the mystery by discovering an ingenious series of structures on their wing scales to trap night-time fogs as they emerged to bask on the tops of sand dunes during these nocturnal pea soupers. It’s now inspiring engineers to develop industrial sized fog harvesting systems for collecting water in some of the most arid areas of the planet

With contributions from Max Barclay (Curator of beetles Natural History Museum, London) , physiologist Duncan Mitchell, (University of the Witwatersrand), ecologist Mary Seeley, physiologist Prof Andrew Parker (Oxford University)

Producer Adrian Washbourne


WED 14:00 The Archers (m0017kcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (m000f134)
The Disappearance of Mr Chan

Hong Kong writer Mr Chan fails to arrive at Heathrow. His daughter Poppy sets out to find him. But her mother begs her to come home and keep her company. She’s scared.

Poppy enlists the help of ex-boyfriend Jason, who’s an online journalist. They fly out to Hong Kong determined to research and write a story that will help get her father released, but Poppy’s mother Ada is certain the best way to help is to comply with the authorities by staying silent.

Set against the backdrop of student protests at the newly proposed Extradition Bill, this is a story of a clash between generations about the best way to deal with political disturbance. It’s also a story about fear, courage and determination.

The author is Simon Wu, who was born in Hong Kong and writes for theatre, radio and film. His plays have been performed in Hong Kong and in London, and showcased at the Soho Theatre, Greenwich Theatre, Oval House, Tara Arts and the Decibel Festival.

Director David Tse has worked in theatre for many years as an actor, writer and director. He co-founded and ran Yellow Earth Theatre for over a decade and Chinese Arts Space, creating platforms for hundreds of British Chinese / East Asian artists and young performers. The Disappearance of Mr Chan is the second drama he has directed for Radio 4.

Cast:
Poppy – Jennifer Leong
Jason – Jeremy Ang Jones
Mr Chan and Uncle – Jamie Zubairi
Mrs Chan and Auntie – Liz Sutherland-Lim
Vicky and Security Officer – Michelle Yim

Writer: Simon Wu
Director: David Tse
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jeremy Mortimer
Sound Designer: Eloise Whitmore

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (m0017kcr)
A panel of experts answer calls on personal finance.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m0017kct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (m0017kcw)
Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (m0017kcy)
Social media, anti-social media, breaking news, faking news: this is the programme about a revolution in media.


WED 17:00 PM (m0017kd0)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017kd2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Heresy (m0017kd4)
Series 12

Episode 1

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents a new series of the show which dares to commit heresy.

Joining Victoria Coren Mitchell to commit heresy about feelings and trigger warnings are comedians Desiree Burch and David Baddiel and artist Grayson Perry.

Written, presented, and produced by Victoria Coren Mitchell
with additional material from Dan Gaster and Charlie Skelton
Series created by David Baddiel

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4


WED 19:00 The Archers (m0017k9l)
Brian is put on the back foot, and should Alistair be worried about a friend?


WED 19:15 Front Row (m0017kd7)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m0017kd9)
Combative, provocative and engaging live debate examining the moral issues behind one of the week's news stories. #moralmaze


WED 20:45 Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley (m0017kc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (m0017kdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 The Media Show (m0017kcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m0017kdf)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Love Marriage by Monica Ali (m0017kdh)
8: Adventure

Meera Syal reads Monica Ali’s first new novel for a decade, a bighearted and hilarious story of two very different families brought together by marriage.

Yasmin Ghorami has brilliant career in medicine, and is engaged to a charming junior doctor. But as their wedding approaches, and the two families are thrown together, they all find themselves confronting long-held and dark secrets.

Today: Yasmin breaks more rules, this time to help a beloved patient...

Author: Monica Ali
Reader: Meera Syal
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


WED 23:00 Sunil Patel: An Idiot's Guide to Cryptocurrency (m0017kdk)
How to Become the Greatest NFT Artist

Continuing his mission to get internet-rich, comedian and broadcaster Sunil Patel tries to take the Crypto art space by storm. However, as he’s terrible at art, Sunil decides to make himself into an NFT to find out just how far he can get selling himself.

Featuring interviews with NFT entrepreneur Benyamin Ahmed and Holly Wood from NFT art market Rarible. Can Sunil get rich in the art space, with no artistic talent whatsoever?

Written by and starring Sunil Patel
Featuring Helen Bauer, Dot Cosgrove and Ninette Finch
Additional Material from Charlie Dinkin

Assistant Producer - Ewan McAdam
Production Manager - Laura Shaw

Producer - Benjamin Sutton

A Daddy’s SuperYacht production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 The Skewer (m0017kdm)
Series 6

Episode 8

Jon Holmes's The Skewer returns to twist itself into current affairs.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0017kdp)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



THURSDAY 26 MAY 2022

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m0017kdr)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


THU 00:30 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017kc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017kdt)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017kdw)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017kdy)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (m0017kf0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0017kf2)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rt Revd Mary Stallard, Assistant Bishop in Bangor.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (m0017kf4)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5bnl)
Mute Swan

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the Mute Swan. Mute Swans are deeply embedded in our culture. They are unique among British birds because the Crown retains the rights of ownership of all unmarked mute swans in open water. Since the 15th century, an annual census of mute swans has been held annually on the River Thames.


THU 06:00 Today (m0017k8r)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (m0017k8w)
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas, people and events that have shaped our world.


THU 09:45 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017kbn)
Ep 9. Litigation

Today, in Patrick Radden Keefe's award winning account of America's opioid epidemic it's 2019 and vast numbers of lawsuits and public condemnation are brought against eight Sackler family members. Meanwhile, a fashion show gets underway. Kyle Soller reads.

The Sackler family are famed for their philanthropy. The name adorns the walls of many of the world's most prestigious institutions, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, and the British Museum to name just a few. Less well known is that much of their wealth came from the powerful painkiller, OxyContin. While the drug wasn’t the only opioid behind this public health emergency, it is regarded as the pioneer. What follows is the story of an immigrant family struggling to survive during the depression, and who, as the 20th century progressed turned their lives around by making their way into the pharmaceutical business. It was Arthur Sackler's role in the marketing of Valium that was the basis of the first Sackler fortune. Later, the lessons learned in making Valium a success story were applied to OxyContin in the 1990s, leading to phenomenal wealth for the Sacklers. Meanwhile, on the eve of the new millenium, families across America were beginning to fall victim to what would become the opioid epidemic.

Patrick Radden Keefe is an award-winning writer at the New Yorker, winner of the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the Baille Gifford Prize, 2021

Kyle Soller is an American film, stage, and television actor. His accolades include an Olivier Award, and three Evening Standard Theatre Awards.

Abridger: Katrin Williams.
Producer: Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0017k90)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m0017k92)
Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world


THU 11:30 The Dancer and Her Shoe Maker (m0017k94)
New arts documentary feature for Radio 4


THU 12:00 News Summary (m0017kkf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 You and Yours (m0017k98)
News and discussion of consumer affairs


THU 12:32 Sliced Bread (m0017k9b)
The latest ad-hyped products and trending fads promise to make us healthier, happier and greener, but are they really 'the best thing since sliced bread'? Greg Foot finds out.


THU 12:57 Weather (m0017k9d)
The latest weather forecast


THU 13:00 World at One (m0017k9g)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.


THU 13:45 Metamorphosis - How Insects Transformed Our World (m0017k9j)
Bee Brain Intellect

Dr Erica McAlister of London's Natural History Museum takes a look at some of the entomological pioneers, whose groundbreaking observations and experiments have led to some truly innovative developments.

Bees may have tiny brains, but they are surprisingly clever. They can learn from their environment to gain a reward, and then teach other bees to do the same. Dr Erica McAlister examines the pioneering work of African American biologist and civil rights activist Charles Henry Turner, who during the early 20th century conducted painstaking research into honeybee foraging, orientation and intelligence. His long overlooked work has led modern day researchers to question whether bigger brains are always better.

With contributions from Dr Jessica Ware, entomologist, (American Museum of Natural History), Prof Martin Giurfa neurobiologist, (Centre de Biologie Intégrative de Toulouse), Prof,.Lars Chittka zoologist (Queen Mary, University of London), engineer Farrell Helbling, (Cornell University)

Producer Adrian Washbourne


THU 14:00 The Archers (m0017k9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Our Friends in the North (m0017k9n)
Episode 8: 1987

Peter Flannery once famously said of Our Friends in the North, "I've always said it's just a posh soap opera - but it's a posh soap opera with something to say."

And now he has rewritten his multi-award winning and highly acclaimed television series as an audio drama for BBC Radio 4.

Ambitious in scale and scope, the drama chronicles the lives of four friends over three decades beginning in the 1960s. The series tackles corporate, political and police corruption in the 1960s, the rise and fall of the Soho porn empires in the 1970s, the nouveau riche and the Miners’ Strike of the 1980s and the rise of New Labour in the 1990s. Some of the stories are directly based on the real-life controversies involving T. Dan Smith and John Poulson in Newcastle during the 60s and 70s.

And the adapted series will now end with a new, tenth episode by writer Adam Usden, bringing the story up to the present day.

In episode 8 it’s 1987, the year of The Great Storm. Nicky, now a well-known photographer, has been married to Mary for two years, Tosker and Mary are now grandparents, and Geordie is still missing.

Cast
Florrie / Psychiatrist: Tracey Wilkinson
Felix: Trevor Fox
Nicky / Christopher Collins: James Baxter
Tosker: Philip Correia
Elaine / Alice: Eve Shotton
Mary / Francine: Norah Lopez Holden
Geordie: Luke MacGregor
Eddie Wells: James Gaddas
Colin Butler: Tom Goodman-Hill

Writer: Peter Flannery
Studio Engineer: Paul Clark
Sound Design: Steve Brooke
Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jeremy Mortimer

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Ramblings (m0017k9q)
Happy Valley

Today’s walk starts at Happy Valley in the Mourne Mountains about thirty minutes inland from the coast of County Down. Clare is walking with Kelly Hargie who, for very personal reasons, launched Wild Women Events as a way of encouraging female walkers to explore the countryside of Northern Ireland. Kelly has long understood that escaping into the wild helped her greatly with postnatal depression and recovery from injury and she wanted to share this discovery with like-minded women.

From Happy Valley they head steeply up towards the 7th highest peak in the Mournes, Slieve Meelmore, partly alongside the Shimna River.

This is the second of two back-to-back hikes in the Mournes, recorded on the same day. The first walk was broadcast last week and began – in great contrast to today’s route – at Bloody Bridge.

Grid Ref for their starting point: SB 379 857

Presenter: Clare Balding
Producer for BBC Audio in Bristol: Karen Gregor


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m0017k3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (m0017k4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 Elon Musk: The Evening Rocket (m000y5ds)
Robin Hood

At the start of 2021, Elon Musk briefly became the richest man in the world. The global pandemic was a boom time for American billionaires, many of whom saw their wealth rise even as much of the world was locked down. As Musk, Bezos, Gates and others jockeyed for first place in the world’s richest-man contest, the rise of cryptocurrencies was generating headlines about the fictive quality of money. “All forms of currency are acts of imagination”, says Jill Lepore: they require communal belief in their value - what economists sometimes call the Tinkerbell Effect. Musk started tweeting about Dogecoin - a cryptocurrency started as a joke, based on a meme about a dog - even dubbing himself 'The Dogefather'. Although Musk’s tweets looked ironic, jokey, irreverent, they seemed to be having a very real and destabilizing effect on financial markets.

The Evening Rocket is presented by Jill Lepore, Professor of American History at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker. Her latest book is If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future. She is also the host of The Last Archive, a podcast from Pushkin Industries.

Producer: Viv Jones
Researcher: Oliver Riskin-Kutz
Editor: Hugh Levinson
Mixing: Graham Puddifoot
Original music by Corntuth


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m0017k9s)
A weekly programme that illuminates the mysteries and challenges the controversies behind the science that's changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (m0017k9v)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017k9z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (m0017kb1)
Series 5

The Repair Bear Bunch

Inspired by Pauline's favourite teddy bear, Milton opens a cherished items repair shop, but soon discovers he's bitten off more than he can mend.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is ‘Help!’. Because each week Milton and his trusty assistant Anton (played by Milton regular, Tom Goodman-Hill) set out to help people and soon find they’re embroiled in a new adventure. When you’re close to the edge, Milton can give you a push...

“Milton Jones is one of Britain’s best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners” – The Guardian.

“King of the surreal one-liners” - The Times

“If you haven’t caught up with Jones yet – do so!” – The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary (Bluestone 42, Miranda), and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton’s Channel 4 show House Of Rooms), the man they call “Britain’s funniest Milton" returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill ( Spamalot, Mr. Selfridge) as the ever-faithful Anton, Josie Lawrence and Dan Tetsell (Peep Show, Upstart Crow)

With music by Guy Jackson.

Produced and Directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4


THU 19:00 The Archers (m0017kb3)
Writer, Adrian Flynn
Director, Kim Greengrass
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Alice Carter ….. Hollie Chapman
Alistair Lloyd ….. Michael Lumsden
Brian Aldridge ….. Charles Collingwood
Chris Carter ….. Wilf Scolding
Fallon Rogers ….. Joanna Van Kampen
Jakob Hakansson ….. Paul Venables
Jazzer McCreary ….. Ryan Kelly
Justin Elliott ….. Simon Williams
Lilian Bellamy ….. Sunny Ormonde
Lily Pargetter ….. Katie Redford
Neil Carter ….. Brian Hewlett
Shula Hebden Lloyd ….. Judy Bennett
Stella Pryor ….. Lucy Speed
Tracy Horrobin ….. Susie Riddell
Denise ….. Clare Perkins
Fern ….. Joanna Gay


THU 19:15 Front Row (m0017kb5)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music


THU 20:00 A Celebration for Ascension Day (m0017kb7)
The Dean of Chapel at Trinity College, Cambridge, the Revd Dr Michael Banner is the preacher at a service for Ascension Day, live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London. The celebrant at the Eucharist is the vicar, the Revd Dr Sam Wells, and the music – provided by St Martin’s Voices and the BBC Young Chorister of the Year, Ruby – includes Schubert’s Mass in G Major, and the Ascensiontide hymns Hail the day that sees him rise, Alleluia, sing to Jesus and Crown Him with Many Crowns. They are joined in the church by the Venerable Rosemarie Mallett, Dr Krish Kandiah and Lyndall Bywater who will lead various parts of the service. Director of Music: Andrew Earis. Producer: Alexa Good.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m0017k9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (m0017k8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m0017kbb)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Love Marriage by Monica Ali (m0017kbd)
9: Things Fall Apart

Meera Syal reads Monica Ali’s first new novel for a decade, a bighearted and hilarious story of two very different families brought together by marriage.

Yasmin Ghorami has brilliant career in medicine, and is engaged to a charming junior doctor. But as their wedding approaches, and the two families are thrown together, they all find themselves confronting long-held and dark secrets.

Today: pulling together but falling apart...

Author: Monica Ali
Reader: Meera Syal
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


THU 23:00 Gaslit, Groomed and Ghosted (m0017kbg)
Luisa Omelan investigates badass women who've been left out or written out of history,


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0017kbj)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.



FRIDAY 27 MAY 2022

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m0017kbl)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 00:30 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017kbn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m0017kbq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m0017kbs)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m0017kbv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m0017kbx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m0017kbz)
A reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rt Revd Mary Stallard, Assistant Bishop in Bangor.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m0017kc1)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08slp5r)
David Lindo on the Kestrel

David Lindo is known as the Urban Birder. His love of all things feathered began when he was tiny, but it was seeing a kestrel while he was at school in north London one day that set him on the road to birdwatching in the city.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


FRI 06:00 Today (m0017kf6)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m0017k47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (m0017kgw)
Ep. 10 A Reckoning

Patrick Radden's account of the Sackler family's role in America's opioid crisis concludes. Today, the Sackler reputation comes under scrutiny around the world. In the meantime, there are questions around criminal prosecution and financial settlements, will justice be served? Kyle Soller reads.

The Sackler family are famed for their philanthropy. The name adorns the walls of many of the world's most prestigious institutions, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre, and the British Museum to name just a few. Less well known is that much of their wealth came from the powerful painkiller, OxyContin. While the drug wasn’t the only opioid behind this public health emergency, it is regarded as the pioneer. What follows is the story of an immigrant family struggling to survive during the depression, and who, as the 20th century progressed turned their lives around by making their way into the pharmaceutical business. It was Arthur Sackler's role in the marketing of Valium that was the basis of the first Sackler fortune. Later, the lessons learned in making Valium a success story were applied to OxyContin in the 1990s, leading to phenomenal wealth for the Sacklers. Meanwhile, on the eve of the new millenium, families across America were beginning to fall victim to what would become the opioid epidemic.

Patrick Radden Keefe is an award-winning writer at the New Yorker, winner of the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the Baille Gifford Prize, 2021

Kyle Soller is an American film, stage, and television actor. His accolades include an Olivier Award, and three Evening Standard Theatre Awards.

Abridger: Katrin Williams.
Producer: Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (m0017kfd)
Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.


FRI 11:00 Sketches: Stories of Art and People (m000s813)
Remaking

The writer Anna Freeman hears stories of people using art and creativity to reinvent, rebuild and to remake old traditions.

Callen Martin was taken into care at the age of four and grew up with a foster family. Through his childhood and teenage years he escaped into books whenever things were tough, but rarely saw an accurate reflection of his own experiences. Today, he is working on his first novel for young adults - writing the characters and experiences he always wanted to see.

Growing up in the Midlands, as small girl Parv Kaur didn't go out and play with her brothers and sisters. Instead, she'd sit in the back room watching her father rehearse with his band and became fascinated and enthralled with the bhangra music they played. She loved music but couldn't see there was a place for her in the male-dominated world of bhangra. She grew up to become the UK's first female dhol drummer, and now leads an all-female bhangra group, playing weddings, TV shows and even Glastonbury.

Eleanor Kerr-Patton is an art jeweller who uses her jewellery to explore her relationship with her own mental health. She uses a process inspired by the Japanese art of kintsugi, a traditional method of repairing broken pottery with golden lacquer to show rather than hide the broken places.

Produced by Mair Bosworth and Maggie Ayre


FRI 11:30 Believe It! (m0017kfg)
Series 6

Party

This is the sixth series of Jon Canter's "radiography" of Richard Wilson - exploring elements of Richard's life that are very nearly true.
Expect visits from David Tennant, Sir Ian McKellen, Arabella Weir and Stephen Mangan to name but four.

Richard Wilson decides to hold the party to end all parties. But who will be invited? And will they come? And who's doing the canapés?

Written by Jon Canter

Starring

Richard Wilson
Sir Ian McKellen
Arabella Weir
Jos Vantyler

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (m0017kh8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Archive on 4 (m0017kfl)
Over the Top

What does it mean to be too much, excessive or extra? We're partying in the archives to examine and celebrate extravagance in all its forms as Kit Green takes us Over The Top...

Kit Green has a complicated relationship to being 'Over The Top', they've channelled maximum excess into their beloved character, country music icon Tina C, and written and performed a show about the music hall star Fred Barnes - a man who was excessive to tragic extremes. In this programme Kit asks what being over the top means to them now, in glorious extravagance.

Kit's invited some friends to the party to help them reach maximum excess. They are joined by the king of 90's extravagance, Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen and Professor of the History of Emotions Thomas Dixon drops in to talk extreme joy and extreme sadness. We have an intimate kitchen party chat with Malika Booker on being 'too loud' for poetry, fashion historian Amber Buchart helps us get dressed and fellow performers and hedonists 'Bourgeois & Maurice' bring us their post-pandemic party show 'Pleasure Seekers'.

Keeping us entertained are a host of fantastically over the top characters from the BBC Archives. Party guests include Quentin Crisp, Edina & Patsy and Jilly Goolden. And of course there's some Eurovision. How much? Too Much? Let's find out...

Presenter: Kit Green
Producer: Jessica Treen


FRI 12:57 Weather (m0017kfn)
The latest weather forecast


FRI 13:00 World at One (m0017kfq)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Jonny Dymond.


FRI 13:45 Metamorphosis - How Insects Transformed Our World (m0017kfs)
The Nerve of a Cockroach

Dr Erica McAlister of London's Natural History Museum takes a look at some of the entomological pioneers, whose groundbreaking observations and experiments have led to some truly innovative developments.

She unravels the mystery behind the nervous system of the cockroach. It appears to be anatomically hard-wired, yet has an extraordinary flexibility that enables it to adopt new behaviour in matter of minutes or hours, It would lead to proof of the controversial idea that nerves and hormones form an intimate and influential relationship with each other, and the birth of the field of neuroendocrinology

With contributions from Historian and zoologist Prof, Matthew Cobb (University of Manchester), Prof. Stephen Simpson (Director Charles Perkin Centre Sydney), neurobiologist George Stefano.

Producer Adrian Washbourne


FRI 14:00 The Archers (m0017kb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Lusus (m0017kfv)
6. Boonies

Ben (David Mumeni) and his wife Cammie (Susannah Fielding) are a high-value high-spend couple, but Ben is worried that he won’t be making bonus this month. When he decides to short-change all the service workers and staff who help maintain his comfortable lifestyle, his kids (played by newcomers Henry and Laila Newton) are the ones who suffer. Will Ben listen to his son’s warnings of the man without a face?

Cast

Ben - David Mumeni
Cammie - Susannah Fielding
Sophia - Laila Newton
Kevin - Henry Newton
Anisa - Roni Zisser
Mindfulness Narrator - Caroline Faber
Teacher - Annabel Miller
Teaching Asst - Avril Poole
Dad at pickup - Dugal Macdiarmid
Mum at pickup - Louise Heard
Delivery Guy - Jacob Jackson
Answer Bot - Susannah Fielding
Old lady - Tamar Baruch

Crew

Production Company - Clarence Beeks
Co-Creator/Writer - Samantha Newton
Co-Creator/Director - Rachel Zisser
Executive Producer - Sara Johnson
Executive Producer - Daniel M Jackson
Producer - Hannah Charman, Sister Music
Casting Director - Sophie Kingston-Smith
Casting Assistant - Lainey Lipson
Composer - Na’ama Zisser
Vocalists - Tomer Damsky, Aya Gavriel, Ron Sheskin, Quantum Choir
Sound engineer - Laura Blake
Sound engineer - Charlie Braham
Sound engineer - Gareth Wood
Sound Recording - The Sound Company
Vocalist Recording - Marco Milevski, Mazkeka Studio
Sound Design - King Lear Music & Sound
Lead Sound Designer - Dugal Macdiarmid
Asst Sound Designer - Ned Sisson
Asst Sound Designer - Lauren Cooper


FRI 14:45 Living with the Gods (b09byxlr)
Becoming an Adult

Neil MacGregor continues his series on the expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world and across time.

He focuses on rites of passage, marking the transition from childhood to adulthood, including a lock of bound hair, from the collections of the British Museum, which reveals an important ritual for teenage boys on the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu.

Producer Paul Kobrak

Produced in partnership with the British Museum
Photograph (c) The Trustees of the British Museum.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (m0017kfx)
RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2022: Postbag Edition

Horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts.

Producer: Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Aniya Das and Bethany Hocken

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:45 Short Works (m0017kfz)
Short Stories from the best writers.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (m0017kg1)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to the unsung but significant.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (m0017kc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]


FRI 17:00 PM (m0017kg3)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day's headlines


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (m0017kg7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (m0017kg9)
Series 108

Episode 6

Topical panel quiz show, taking its questions from the week's news stories.


FRI 19:00 Past Forward: A Century of Sound (m0015lq9)
Talking Technology

Greg Jenner discovers a 1990 innovation that allowed blind people to access newspapers, and speaks to accessibility engineer Leonie Watson and author and disability campaigner Dr Amit Patel about the evolution and implications of digital voice technology.

Marking the centenary of the BBC, Past Forward uses a random date generator to alight somewhere in the BBC's vast archive over the past 100 years. Greg Jenner hears an archive clip for the first time at the top of the programme, and uses it as a starting point in a journey towards the present day. The archive captures a century of British life in a unique way - a history of ordinary people’s lives, as well as news of the great events. Greg uncovers connections through people, places and ideas that link the archive fragment to Britain in 2022, pulling in help from experts and those who remember the time, and looking at how far we've come since then.

Produced by Amelia Parker

[Image description: Presenter Greg Jenner stands holding a microphone - the left side of his body is styled like it's 1922, his right side 2022]


FRI 19:15 Screenshot (m0017kgc)
Ellen E Jones and Mark Kermode take a look at the kaleidoscopic world of the moving image


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m0017kgf)
Thangam Debbonaire MP, Martin Thatcher

Chris Mason presents political debate from The Princess Theatre, Burnham-on-Sea.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Tim Allen


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m0017kgh)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue from a range of contributors.


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b01nnw8t)
Tuning In

The press fulminated, the enthusiasts were frustrated, and the radio manufacturers fumed. Despite the fact that Marconi had invented radio before Queen Victoria had celebrated her Diamond Jubilee in 1897, radio in Britain took another 25 years to begin an official service to listeners. But when, on November 14th 1922 the British Broadcasting Company's station at Marconi House radiated to an awaiting nation "This is 2LO calling" for the first time under the company's name, it marked the start of the first and most distinguished public-service radio station in the world.

In the BBC's centenary year, historian Dominic Sandbrook explores the long and involved pre-BBC history of radio in Britain, how Britain's broadcaster got going and developed into an institution dedicated to entertainment, education and information, discovers why Australian diva Dame Nellie Melba was involved, and how the improbably-named Captain Plugge made his first commercial broadcast to Britain, sponsored by Selfridges department store, from the Eiffel Tower. From Marconi to Savoy Hill via an old army hut in Essex, the story of the early radio in Britain.

Producer: Simon Elmes.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m0017kgk)
In-depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Love Marriage by Monica Ali (m0017kgm)
10: The Past

Meera Syal reads Monica Ali’s first new novel for a decade, a bighearted and hilarious story of two very different families brought together by marriage.

Yasmin Ghorami has brilliant career in medicine, and is engaged to a charming junior doctor. But as their wedding approaches, and the two families are thrown together, they all find themselves confronting long-held and dark secrets.

Today: Ma finally tells the shocking true story of how she came to meet her husband...

Author: Monica Ali
Reader: Meera Syal
Abridger: Katrin Williams
Producer: Justine Willett


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (m0017kgp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m0017kgr)
All the news from today's sitting at Westminster.