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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 25 JUNE 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07gctdj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07gctdl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07gctdn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07gctdq)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07gctds)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07glxfg)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with Anna Magnusson.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b07glxfj)
Jury Duty Trauma

Is there enough support available for jurors in cases of extreme violence? An iPM listener describes the trauma he experienced after serving on the jury of a murder trial, and listening to graphic details about the crime. He's concerned that unlike other people in the courtroom, jurors are left alone to deal with what they've seen in evidence, and he believes more should be done to prepare them for "the horrors they'll face".


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07gctdv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b07gctdx)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b07gh57v)
Series 33

Northumberland: Bothy Bagging

Clare Balding meets Phoebe Smith, an expert in planning long walks and bagging bothies.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07gctdz)
Brexit Reaction

Charlotte Smith hosts a debate with farmers and experts from around the UK following the historic vote to leave the European Union. The programme - recorded on a farm in Essex - explores the implications of Brexit for UK agriculture, and the next steps.
Guests include the former Environment Secretary and Leave campaigner Owen Paterson; Essex farmer and NFU vice president Guy Smith; Lynsey Martin of the National Federation of Young Farmers Clubs; and Stephen Rash - the undecided farmer we featured right at the beginning of the campaign. Where did he put his cross in the end? We also gauge reaction from the devolved Nations.
Produced on location by Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b07gctf1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b07h2v2t)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:30 Saturday Live (b07gctf3)
Richard Madeley

Richard Madeley is one of the most recognizable faces on British TV, part of a successful husband and wife presenting team that lasted over 20 years. He has written four books - one about his relationship with his father, the latest called 'The Night Book' which is published this month.

Living statues. You see them now in Trafalgar Sq. and at the seaside, wherever tourists gather, standing dead still, or sometimes even appearing to hover, for hours for the amusement of the crowds. One (at least) is a regular listener to the programme, Eve Blakemore, and she's with us now, and she's dressed magnificently...

Steve Rich loved football and played at amateur level until a car accident and a ruptured knee in his twenties ended all that. Twenty years later, he's back on the pitch, but at his own pace - playing walking football.

Gina Yashere has been a stand up and TV star in the UK for several years now, with appearances on iconic TV shows such as Live at the Apollo & Mock the Week, as well as creating & performing popular comedic characters on The Lenny Henry Show. She broke onto the American comedy scene with her appearances on Last Comic Standing (NBC), where she made it to the final 10, and then never went home.

Playwright David Hare shares his Inheritance Tracks. He has chosen 'Oh What a Lovely War (Joan Littlewood Stage Show) & Simple Twist of Fate (by Bob Dylan) Sung by Diana Krall)

Richard Madeley's new book The Night Book is Published by Simon & Schuster 30 June 2016 | Paperback

Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b07h2v2y)
Steve Richards reports on the result of the EU referendum.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07gctf7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07h2v30)
EU Referendum: From What If? to What Now?

In a special edition of Money Box Paul Lewis and guests examine the post-Referendum financial landscape following the UK's decision to leave the EU?

What now for sterling, property, pensions, savings, investors and British citizens who plan to continue working in EU countries.

Guests: Richard Hunter Head of Research at Wilson King Investment Management, Lucian Cook UK Head of Residential Research Savills, Brenda Kelly Independent Market Analyst, Rose Carey Head of Immigration at Charles Russell Speechlys law firm, Tom McPhail Head of Retirement Policy with Hargreaves Lansdown, James Rees Director with Savings Champion.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Charmaine Cozier
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (b07glx81)
Series 16

Episode 2

With the Referendum result now in the team give in-depth analysis of the highs, lows and madness of the EU Campaigns. Performed by Jon Culshaw, Lewis MacLeod, Jan Ravens, Debra Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

Written by... Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, Tom Coles and Ed Amsden, Laurence Howarth, Duncan Wisbey, Sarah Campbell, Laura Major, James Bugg, Jack Bernhardt, Liam Beirne and Max Davis.

Producer.. Bill Dare
A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b07gctf9)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b07gctfc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07glx85)
Ken Clarke MP, Chris Grayling MP, Emily Thornberry MP, Steven Woolfe MEP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Broadcasting House Radio Theatre in London, with former Chancellor of the Exchequer, Ken Clarke MP; Leader of the House of Commons Chris Grayling MP; Shadow Secretary of State for Defence Emily Thornberry MP; and UKIP Frontbench Spokesman on Migration and Financial Affairs Steven Woolfe MEP.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07gctff)
Your say on the EU referendum

You have your say on the EU Referendum result.
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email is any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Or tweet, the hastag is BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b07h2v3d)
August Strindberg - Miss Julie

A reimagined version of August Strindberg's 1888 stage play by Roger James Elsgood, starring Sofie Grabol, Lars Mikkelsen, and Marie Bach Hansen.

Strindberg's Miss Julie concerned a well-bred woman from the land-owning classes who has a one-night stand with her father's valet, Jean.

Over the course of a midsummer night, Julie and Jean discuss their different stations in life and, emboldened by alcohol, she goads Jean to cross the social, economic and sexual lines that divide them and seduces him into her bed. Following their lovemaking, the axis of their relationship reverses - he now has power over her as she realises she is vulnerable to exposure and disgrace. Julie becomes conflicted about the implications of their deed and, with no one else to turn to, relies on Jean for advice. Jean is concerned about losing his job and he contrives a lethal scenario which best serves his needs.

In this fresh version, the themes that lead to the dramatic denouement are not so much those of social class, status, and breeding, but gender, identity and sexual orientation - issues that Victorian-era audiences were not ready for, but which are being openly debated today.

Recorded on location in a 19th-century country house in Ballerup on the island of Zealand in Denmark.

Miss Julie ...... Sofie Grabol
Jean ...... Lars Mikkelsen
Kristen ...... Marie Bach Hansen

Written by August Strindberg
Adapted by Roger James Elsgood

Director: Willi Richards
Producer: Roger James Elsgood

An Art and Adventure production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


SAT 15:30 Tales from the Stave (b07gfgv7)
Series 13

Haydn's Drum Roll Symphony No 103

Josef Haydn's two visits to London produced the final flourish of his symphonic writing. His fame, established in the Esterhazy Court in the Austro-Hungarian Empire had travelled before him and once in the UK he was something of a celebrity. But on his final departure in 1795 he took most of his music with him. The fact that the handwritten manuscript of the Drumroll Symphony, his 103rd and penultimate, is in the hands of the British Library is due to its journey by way of the French composer Luigi Cherubini.
Frances is joined by the British Library's Richard Chesser, Percussionist Mick Doran, Co-leader of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Maggie Faultless and music scholar David Wynn Jones to tell the story of that journey. They're also inspired by the careful and clear penmanship of the composer, the small but telling instructions to players and the brilliance of his creativity under the pressure of the London celebrity spotlight.

Producer: Tom Alban.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07gctfh)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Laura Mvula, EU referendum, Kim Cattrall

The British soul singer Laura Mvula discusses the impact of sudden fame and what's inspired her latest album The Dreaming Room.

Three young women Ruth Douglas, Beth Button and first time voter Jane Prinsley give us their reactions to the outcome of the EU Referendum.

Tracey McDermott the acting Chief Executive of the Financial Conduct Authority tells us why didn't want the the top job.

Schools across the UK will start sending students off for work experience in the next few weeks but what do you do if your child has a disability? Rowan Crosby a student from Wales and her dad Pete tell us about the challenges they've faced looking for a work placement.

The actor Kim Cattrall tells us about the second series of the critically acclaimed comedy drama 'Sensitive Skin'.

The author CJ Grace discusses her new book Adulterers Wife which asks should she stay or should she go?

And we Cook the Perfect...Kimchi Fried Rice with the French trained, Korean-American Londoner Judy Joo.


SAT 17:00 PM (b07gctfk)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b07gctfp)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07gctfr)
25/06/16 EU politicians pile pressure on the UK to get on with exit talks

Calls cross Europe for Britain to move quickly to implement the referendum result.


SAT 18:30 Loose Ends (b07h2v3q)
Nikki Bedi, Scottee, Tamsin Greig, Robert Muchamore, Alice Nutter, David McAlmont and Alex Webb

Nikki Bedi and Scottee are joined by actress Tamsin Greig, author Robert Muchamore and writer Alice Nutter for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from David McAlmont and Alex Webb.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b07h2v3s)
Michael Eavis

Synonymous with Glastonbury Festival, Michael Eavis is the bearded impresario of one of the biggest parties on earth. But this is no hedonistic figure: in reality, Eavis is a near-teetotal Method-ist who happily admits that his beloved herd of cows comes before the celebrities, rock and roll... or even the show itself.
As more than 100,000 revellers descend upon Worthy Farm in Somerset, Mark Coles profiles this complex individual. Through his early battles with authority, financial setbacks and personal tragedy, we learn what drove Eavis to turn the land his family have owned for 150 years into the home of an iconic music festival. We hear from his GP son, the best man at his wedding and a host of famous DJs and musicians who have known him. From naked morning swims on the farm - every day of the year - to a ferociously competitive table tennis tournaments, we get beneath this skin of this individual and learn what makes him tick. World famous bands have graced his property and David Bowie's stayed in his farmhouse; yet at home Eavis is more likely to listen to Methodist Hymns or Elvis Presley (the latter for his gospel songs) than the many household names to have played Glastonbury.
We speak as well to one of Mr Eavis's opponents over the years. We hear how his politics and commitment to unilateral nuclear disarmament have shaped both his life and the festival itself. And at 81 years old - with Glastonbury Festival still going strong - we learn whether this driven workaholic is likely to retire any time soon.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07gctfv)
Henry V, Elvis and Nixon, The Girls, Sculpture in the City, The Border

Liza Johnson directs Michael Shannon and Kevin Spacey in the title roles of Elvis and Nixon a film which dramatises the unlikely 1970 meeting between the two men .
The title role in a production of Shakespeare's Henry V at the Regent's Park Open Air theatre is taken by the actress Michelle Terry.
Debut novel The Girls by Emma Cline looks at relationships and their consequences in a Charles Manson-like cult in California.
The City of London has placed 15 sculptures by leading artists among architectural landmarks such as the Gherkin and the Cheesegrater - an opportunity to see engaging works in unusual settings.
Polish television drama serial The Border dealing with the highly topical subject of immigration control starts downloads on All Four this week.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Ellah Alfrey, Linda Grant and Nikesh Shukla. The producer is Harry Parker.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07h2v3y)
Pevsner: Through Outsider's Eyes

Tom Dyckhoff goes in search of Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, the art historian and perennial outsider who did more than anyone else in recent memory to open our eyes to the art and architecture of Britain.

"Englishness is the purpose of my journey," Nikolaus Pevsner wrote to his wife in 1930 on his first trip to this country at the age of 28.

It might stand as an emblem for the rest of his working life.

Pevsner was an arch-classifier - rigorous and systematic - and when he turned his gaze towards architecture he saw not just buildings but a morality play – a story of identity, of imagined pasts and possible futures.

Arguably his greatest achievement - and the one for which he's best remembered - is the Buildings of England series of guidebooks.

For nearly thirty years Pevsner buckled up and took to the highways and by-ways on an obsessive architectural stock take that covered the whole of England, county by county. The 46 volumes he put together combine into a kind of an architectural Domesday Book – the most detailed inventory of British architecture ever published. The Buildings of Scotland and Wales would follow. The series is still on-going, still being revised and updated.

Guidebooks, churches, country houses. Cosy stuff. But there are bigger things at stake when we look back at Pevsner's life and work. It provides a lens through which to view ourselves - and to think about how others see us. And Pevsner may seem like a nostalgic, tweedy figure from a distance, but up close we can see - and hear - someone much more interesting than that.

Sir Nikolaus worked his way to the centre of British society, living through a testing of what it meant to be English and British, during the Second World War. But he never stopped being an outsider.

Featuring writer and cultural historian Ian Buruma; Pevsner's biographer Susie Harries; writer and architect Charles Jencks; David Matless, geographer and author of Landscape and Englishness; media historian Jean Seaton; and Neil Stratford, one-time driver and assistant to Pevsner on three of his journeys for the Buildings of England.

Producer: Martin Williams


SAT 21:00 Drama (b07gczrx)
Graham Greene - The Power and the Glory

1. On The Run

Tabasco, Mexico in the 1930s. The last priest is on the run from the anti-Catholic authorities, who put any priests they find before the firing squad.

Stephen Rea and Hugo Speer star in Graham Greene's masterpiece

Dramatised in two parts by Nick Warburton.

The Whisky Priest ..... Stephen Rea
The Lieutenant ..... Hugo Speer
The Narrator ..... Danny Sapani
Tench ..... James Lailey
The Chief of Police ..... Brian Protheroe
Luis ..... Milo Parker
Luis' mother ..... Nicola Ferguson
Padre José/ Beggar ..... Sean Baker
Maria/ José's Wife ..... Adie Allen
Grandmother ..... Elizabeth Bennett
Captain Fellows/ The Governor's Cousin ..... Nick Underwood
Coral ..... Kirsty Oswald
The Mestizo ..... Jason Barnett
Brigitta ..... Amy Jayne

Director: Emma Harding.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07gctfx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:30 The Bottom Line (b07gh583)
How to Negotiate

Most of us negotiate in some form or other every day - whether it's about who walks the dog, how much screen-time the kids can have or when to visit the in-laws. But too often we treat it like a competitive sport, with only one aim: to win. Which can backfire, especially when you need co-operation later on. It's much the same in business - negotiating to win at all costs is unlikely to result in a long-term, sustainable business relationship. So how to achieve a win-win situation when both sides leave satisfied and ready to do business with each other again? Evan Davis and guests explore the skills that can help settle disputes between individuals, companies and even nations. They'll discuss when to walk away from the negotiating table and they'll find out what happens when doing a deal is literally a matter of life and death.

Guests:

Tim Cullen, Director, Oxford Programme on Negotiation, Said Business School

Bridie Warner-Adsetts, COO, Naylor Industries

Sue Williams, Hostage Negotiator

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b07gf9kv)
Series 30

Heat 1, 2016

(1/13)
Paul Gambaccini returns with the 30th anniversary series of the perennial music quiz, with questions ranging across every musical genre.

Whether your interest is in the Baroque, opera, choral music, the romantic symphony, the golden age of Hollywood, traditional and modern jazz, film music and TV themes or the rock and pop greats of the past fifty years, there's always something in Counterpoint to suit your taste. In this series 27 competitors from around the UK will be showing off the breadth of their musical knowledge, as well as hoping for some specialist questions that suit their expertise. After the knockout rounds, three of them will end up in the Final, which will come from the 2016 BBC Proms to mark the programme's 30th birthday.

This year's first heat comes from the BBC's Maida Vale studios and features music lovers from Essex, Kent and Lancashire.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 The Slow Machine (b07gdlk9)
Jo Bell's 67ft narrowboat 'Tinker' has been her floating, roving home for 13 years. As she prepares to leave Tinker for a new boat, she writes a poem series about her years afloat. Elderflower, coal smoke and diesel. Ducks, engines and ratcheting locks.

A new commission from former Canal Laureate Jo Bell, The Slow Machine weaves soundscape and words into a documentary poem of canal life.

What's a canal to you? An interruption
to dry business - an obstacle that wants a bridge.
To us, the road; the long wet answer
to the only question every day; where to?
The way on. The way through. The water way.

'Jo Bell is one of the most exciting poets now writing and no time is wasted in the company of her work.' - Carol Ann Duffy

Produced by Mair Bosworth.
With music by The Cabinet of Living Cinema.



SUNDAY 26 JUNE 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07h2v7h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 After Milk Wood (b044jh71)
London Choral Celestial Jazz

'After Milk Wood': three stories by acclaimed writers which take their inspiration from Dylan Thomas's 'Under Milk Wood'. The stories have been commissioned to commemorate the centenary of the birth of the great Welsh writer, Dylan Thomas, and were recorded at the Laugharne Festival in Wales.

Today, from the Laugharne Festival, Bernardine Evaristo reads her own short story in verse set in the high-octane, adrenaline-charged streets of contemporary London, which takes its inspiration from Dylan Thomas's 'Under Milk Wood'.

The Reader is Bernardine Evaristo. Writer and poet Bernardine Evaristo's awards include: the EMMA Best Book Award, Big Red Read, Orange Youth Panel Award, a NESTA and the Arts Council Writer's Award. Her books have been a 'Book of the Year' twelve times in British newspapers and magazines and The Emperor's Babe was a Times 'Book of the Decade'. She was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2004, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2006, and she received an MBE in 2009. Her most recent novel is Mr Loveman.

The producer is Justine Willett.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07h2v7k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07h2v7m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07h2v7p)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07h2v7r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07h60ld)
St Margaret's Church, Dunham Massey

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St Margaret's Church, Dunham Massey in Altrincham, Cheshire. There are ten bells all cast in 1854 specifically for the church, whilst it was still under construction. They were rehung in 1974 with only minimal retuning and the Tenor remains a "maiden" or untuned bell. We hear them ringing, Bristol Surprise Royal.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b07h2v3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07h2v7t)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07h60lg)
In the Slipstream of God

Mark Tully meets an artist and a scientist who argue that religion and science have always been entangled, and that our quest for knowledge follows in the wake of spiritual curiosity.

Andrew Briggs, Professor of Nanomaterials at the University of Oxford, and the artist, poet and writer Roger Wagner, renowned particularly for his religious paintings, explain to Mark why they believe that it's been religion which has led the seminal developments in our empirical understanding of the world we live in. Together they challenge the perception that the two disciplines are at loggerheads.

With the help of music from Beethoven and Charles Ives, and words from John Keats, George Herbert and Albert Einstein, Mark joins his guests in seeking the underlying principles which have bound religion and science together in the past, and might do so again in the future.

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07h60lj)
Scottish Tea

Sun-kissed hillsides in India, China, Kenya and Sri Lanka may produce the bulk of the world's tea but Scottish tea drinkers now have the opportunity to sample a home-grown brew. In Dumfries and Galloway Angela Hurrell is defying the climactic odds to produce a single-leaf tea that's served at London's Dorchester Hotel.

Caz Graham helps with one of Britain's smallest harvests and meets Tam O'Braan the agronomist who first noticed that a hardy plant that thrives in the foothills of the Himalayas could find friendly soil in the Scottish glens.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b07h2v7w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07h2v7y)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07h2v80)
Bob Holman, Lindisfarne dig, Referendum and beyond

William Crawley talks two people from the world of religion who campaigned to leave the EU about their vision for the future of Britain. Adrian Hilton from Christians for Britain and Saqib Bhatti from Muslims for Britain.

He gave up a successful academic career to go and live on a council estate in Glasgow in order to help people living there. We hear about the life of Christian Socialist Bob Holman who died last week.

100 years ago Europe was gripped in war and the Battle of the Somme began. The Catholic Archbishop of Armagh, Eamon Martin and Richard Clarke, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of all Ireland, talk to William Crawley about their pilgrimage to the battlefields of the Somme this week.

Monsignor Hector Henao reveals his role in helping to negotiate peace between the Colombian Government and the FARC Guerrillas.

Winner of Israel's 2014 Masterchef Arab Israeli Dr Nof Atamna-Ismaeel talks about how she's bringing Arab and Israelis together through food.

Geoff Bird has been to join the world's first crowd funded archaeological dig on Lindisfarne to uncover its buried religious history.

It's been National Refugee Week and Kevin Bocquet has been to see what its like to be a refugee in Britain today.

David Walker, Bishop of Manchester, joins William Crawley live to discuss issue of asylum seekers, immigration and the referendum result.

Producers:

Catherine Earlam
Peter Everett

Series producer:

Amanda Hancox

Photo: Photograph Courtesy of DigVentures.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07h60ll)
Theodora Children's Charity

Kerry McCarthy, whose daughter Ava had cancer, presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Theodora Children's Charity
Registered Charity No 1094532
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Theodora'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Theodora Children's Charity'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b07h2v82)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07h2v84)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07h60ln)
Change and Transformation

American writer and preacher Mark Yaconelli and the Rev. Mary Stallard explore how paying attention to the stories of our lives can help us understand the temptations and fears that hold us back from discovering what is real. This live service from St. Collen's Church, Llangollen, North Wales features music by The Sirenian Singers, directed by Jean Stanley Jones with accompanist Christopher Enston. Producer: Karen Walker.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07glx87)
The power of language

AL Kennedy reflects on how being able to communicate clearly is the work of a lifetime. She argues that the present school testing regime could have a catastrophic effect on our children's ability to find their voice.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x45tq)
Ring Ouzel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the ring ouzel. Ring ouzels are related to blackbirds and because they nest in the uplands, they’re sometimes known as the ‘mountain blackbird’. The male ring ouzel is a handsome bird, sooty black with a broad white ring called a ‘gorget’ right across his chest that stands out like a beacon. Unfortunately these summer visitors are becoming harder to find even in their strongholds, which include the North York Moors and several Scottish and Welsh mountains.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07h2v86)
News presented by Paddy O'Connell including latest developments on the UK's EU exit. Reviewing the Sunday papers: Guardian columnist Gabby Hinsliff, historian Andrew Roberts and businesswoman Margaret Mountford.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07h60lq)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07h60ls)
Sara Khan

Kirsty Young's castaway is Sara Khan.

A British Muslim human rights activist, she's the director of Inspire, a counter-extremism and women's rights organisation which she co-founded in 2009.

Born in Bradford in 1980 to Pakistani parents, she decided to wear the veil when she was thirteen changing her mind eighteen years later. She studied Pharmacy at the University of Manchester but never felt she was fulfilling her potential, and set up Inspire in her home. She has been at the heart of various campaigns to raise awareness of her cause from Jihad Against Violence to #MakingAStand which encouraged women in particular to stand up against extremism.

In 2009 she was listed in the Equality and Human Rights Commission Muslim Women's Power List and in 2015 was included in BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour Power List. She is currently sitting on the Department for Education's Due Diligence and Counter-Extremism Expert Reference Group and on the Government's Community Engagement Forum.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07h2v88)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07dklgk)
Series 75

Episode 6

Josh Widdicombe, Marcus Brigstocke, Holly Walsh and Paul Merton join Nicholas Parsons to attempt to speak on the subject of his choosing for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition.

On the cards this week: The Garden of England, and Sellotape.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b07h60lv)
That Gut Feeling: Part Two

Dan Saladino returns to the world of the gut microbiota, the vast array of microbes within us all. From the Amazon Basin to East Africa to the life underneath our feet; food will never be quite the same again.

Featuring Tim Spector, author of The Diet Myth, Jeff Leach, co-founder of the American Gut Project, microbiome scientist Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, food professor and author Ken Albala, and DJs Lisa and Alana Macfarlane - aka The Mac Twins.

Presenter: Dan Saladino
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b07h2v8b)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07h2v8d)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07glx7q)
RHS Wisley Correspondence Edition

Peter Gibbs and the panel answer questions from the postbag at RHS Wisley in Surrey. Pippa Greenwood, Anne Swithinbank and Bob Flowerdew solve the horticultural queries this week.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07h60lz)
Sunday Omnibus - Learning to Live Somewhere New

Fi Glover introduces conversations between families who had to leave their home country to settle in the UK and one that chose to make the shorter move from town to country, for the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b07h65by)
Graham Greene - The Power and the Glory

2. The Last Priest

Tabasco, Mexico in the 1930s. The last priest is on the run from the anti-Catholic authorities, who put any priests they find before the firing squad.

The Lieutenant remains determined to track down the whisky priest...

Stephen Rea and Hugo Speer star in the conclusion of Graham Greene's masterpiece.

The Whisky Priest.....Stephen Rea
The Lieutenant.....Hugo Speer
The Narrator.....Danny Sapani
Tench.....James Lailey
The Chief of Police.....Brian Protheroe
Luis.....Milo Parker
Luis' mother.....Nicola Ferguson
Padre José/ Beggar.....Sean Baker
Maria/ José's Wife.....Adie Allen
Grandmother.....Elizabeth Bennett
Captain Fellows/ The Governor's Cousin.....Nick Underwood
Coral.....Kirsty Oswald
The Mestizo.....Jason Barnett
Brigitta.....Amy Jayne

Dramatised by Nick Warburton.

Director: Emma Harding.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07h65c0)
Ruth Gilligan, Vietnam novels, Kenneth Baker

Ruth Gilligan talks to Mariella Frostrup about her new novel, Nine Folds Make A Paper Swan, a story of the Irish Jewish community at the turn of the last century, in the fifties and in the present day.
And Kenneth Baker discusses the strange and sad history of book burning, for political, personal and religious reasons.


SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b07h65c2)
Series 7

Simon Armitage in the Somme

One hundred years after the beginning of the catastrophic battle of the Somme, Paul Farley crosses the battlefield in north-eastern France with Simon Armitage to hear his new poems inspired by wartime aerial photographs of the area and Virgil's ancient Georgics (quasi-didactic texts on good land use and husbandry). Taking these new poems back to their source involves travelling along an old Roman road that runs through open farmland. One hundred years ago a paltry mile or two along this road were the scene of horrendous carnage as British and Allied troops attempted to attack and overrun the German lines. Months after the battle began in July 1916 only a mile or so of ground had been won. An appalling price had been paid. In one of the many wartime cemeteries now chequering the French farmland is the grave of a William Shakespeare. Many others and much else died in those months and Simon Armitage and the Echo Chamber have been to listen. His poem sequence is called 'Still' and was commissioned by 14-18 NOW, the UK's arts programme for the First World War centenary, the Writer's Centre Norwich, and Norfolk and Norwich Festival.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07gfjhr)
Whose Right to Buy Is It Anyway?

Around 2.5m council tenants across the UK have bought their homes since Right to Buy started in 1980. The scheme is now being extended to more than a million housing association tenants in England with the first homes expected to be sold in pilot areas next month.
The popularity of right to buy has risen sharply since greater discounts were introduced four years ago, but so too have cases of fraud as people seek to exploit discounts of up to nearly £104,000.

Simon Cox goes on the trail of the fraudsters and the companies seeking to make big bucks out of right to buy. He discovers people trying to buy homes they're not entitled to and criminals attempting to launder drugs money.

He investigates companies who offer tenants help to buy their home in order to get their hands on valuable properties.

He also hears concerns from experts that many housing associations do not have the resources and skills to prevent fraud which could potentially result in the loss of millions of pounds worth of much needed homes

Reporter: Simon Cox
Producer: Paul Grant.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b07h2v3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07h2v8g)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b07h2v8j)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07h2v8l)
Recriminations from the referendum continue to reverberate at Westminster


SUN 18:30 Pick of the Week (b07h2v8n)
Hardeep Singh Kohli

Pick Of The Week,
The best of BBC Radio in Pick of the Week chosen and presented by Hardeep Singh Kohli
This week's programme features Yoking - an ancient ritual of the Sami people of the Artic in Nature, some wise words on worry in Radio 3's The Essay, an excellent drama from Radio 4 involving a Victorian Man in a wall, and Sara Pascoe sharing her teenage diary.

Production team: Pauline Harris, Kay Bishton, Pete Liggins.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07h65c4)
Back from their Orient Express trip, Brian and Jennifer relax by the pool and discuss what has been happening at Home Farm in their absence. Jennifer spots a photo of Lilian and Justin in a copy of Borsetshire Life and worries that they look rather intimate. Brian mentions that Justin is looking at the market site in Borchester for a new development idea he has.

Adam shows Brian and Jennifer the no-till drill he would like to buy. Brian reminds Adam he still needs to persuade the board that no-till is the way to go but in the meantime he will try to get Justin on side. Adam joins heads off to play cricket and finds Richard and Alistair already there. After the match, the three head to The Bull. Ambridge lost again and Alistair is despondent; he decides to call an EGM.

Pat and Tony take Henry to the play area at Lower Loxley. They are relieved to see him happier after his bad mood on Friday. Pat covers her frustration when Henry refers to his younger brother as Gideon. Henry asks when his mummy is coming home. After dropping Henry back to Blossom Hill Cottage, Pat and Tony talk over what they should be saying to Henry. They want to agree an approach with Rob but can't seem to get him on his own. Pat's hopeful that after the FHDRA they will have Henry safely home with them.


SUN 19:15 Rumblings from the Rafters (b07h65c6)
Death Watch Beetle and Queen Wasp

Alison Steadman and Bill Paterson star as a bossy queen wasp and a death watch beetle as they reveal the truth about life in a draughty old attic in a house in Amersham.

The first of three tales, written and introduced by Lynne Truss.

Death Watch Beetle ...... Bill Paterson
Queen Wasp ...... Alison Steadman

The Death Watch Beetle is a wood-boring beetle. Having spent twelve years as a larva boring through a single rafter in the house with no one to talk to, our beetle is now an adult with about 5 weeks left to live. He has just three aims in life:

Firstly, to find a mate, which he does by banging his head on the timber "Oh Come on girls, .. I know you're out there ... Don't tell me this attic has ever seen such a specimen before. This lovely compact dark brown capsule of hard cuticle covered with yellowish scale-like hair and just under a centimetre long - it could all be yours!

Secondly, to make as much noise as he can.

And finally, to live long enough to see the roof cave in.

The Queen Wasp is very, very bossy, and very, very stressed. She carries the entire responsibility for the wasp colony and its thousands of inhabitants, all of whom are her own progeny. There is an enormous amount of work to be done.

"They call themselves workers, these girls, but quite frankly, none of them knows what real work actually is." It is lonely at the top too," I did consider leaving all this, at one point. None of them knows this; they'd be heartbroken to think I might have left them" and she is just beginning to lose her grip. "Bring me my list" she constantly yells.

Life doesn't get much more stressful than this.

Wildlife sound recordings Chris Watson

Producer Sarah Blunt.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


SUN 19:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01g65gz)
Swordplay and Swagger

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 5. SWORDPLAY AND SWAGGER - The essential accoutrements of any self-respecting gentleman illustrate the extent of violence in Elizabethan London - both onstage and off.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07glx7x)
The long-awaited decision day has finally arrived. Votes have been cast and campaigns have come to an end. But that hasn't halted your questions, comments and queries on how the BBC has reported on and covered the EU Referendum. In this special edition of Feedback, listeners put forward their views on whether BBC news as a whole has been an aid in your decision making.

Throughout the campaign, the Feedback inbox has received numerous questions as listeners have flagged up the areas in which they feel the BBC could have reported the campaign season differently. How did impartiality affect the coverage? Was the news too focused on individual personalities? Have certain issues been missing from the BBC reports? These are just a handful of questions that have been put to the BBC's Chief Political Adviser, Ric Bailey.

Amongst the points on the campaigns as a whole, listeners also share their views on how the tragic passing of MP Jo Cox has affected BBC output.

Produced by Kate Dixon.
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07glx7v)
Dr Sylvia Meek, Sam King MBE, Chips Moman, Ethel Bush GM, Harry Rabinowitz

Matthew Bannister on

The parasitologist Sylvia Meek who led the fight to reduce deaths from malaria.

Harry Rabinowitz who conducted the music for many films and TV series, including the English Patient and Upstairs Downstairs.

Ethel Bush who was one of the two first policewomen to be awarded the George Medal for bravery.

Sam King, the RAF veteran from Jamaica who later travelled to Britain on the Empire Windrush and became Mayor of Southwark.

And Chips Moman, the record producer who worked with Elvis Presley, Aretha Franklin and Willie Nelson.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07h2v30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07h60ll)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07gf9l7)
Marxism Today

Journalist Robin Aitken comes from a conservative political viewpoint to a man who has inspired mass movements on the left: Karl Marx. Robin who was a BBC reporter for 25 years thinks Marx was always in the background discourse of politics, an influence he partly feared and didn't fully understand. He takes a walk through central London in the footsteps of the great revolutionary. And in conversation with the likes of Paul Mason, Judith Orr, Marc Stears and Peter Hitchens he tries to find out what political and economic influence Marx retains today.
Producer: Nina Robinson.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07h2v8q)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07gh57x)
Poor Cow

With Francine Stock.

Nell Dunn talks about her screenplay for Ken Loach's ground-breaking drama Poor Cow, which is back in cinemas only weeks after Loach won the Palme D'Or at this year's Cannes Film Festival

Francine hears from the makers of two documentaries about the different ways that smart technology is killing us. The director of Death By Design, Sue Williams, reveals the damage that the production and destruction of phones and laptops is doing to the planet. Patrick Shen and Poppy Szkiler discuss In Pursuit Of Silence, which demonstrates how our addiction to technology contributes to the noise and stress of our daily lives, which can have fatal consequences.

The director of Cameraperson, Kirsten Johnson, talks about the impact that filming in war zones and recording victims' harrowing testimonies has had on her personal life.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07h60lg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 27 JUNE 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07h2vbh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:34 Dr Broks' Casebook (b07h15zt)
The Boy Whose Hand Had a Mind of Its Own

Paul Broks continues his detective hunt in search of the self. Today he considers anarchic limbs and split brains.

Anarchic limb is a rare condition in which the patient feels that they have no control of one of their limbs, but that the limb is still "theirs". It poses a challenge to the idea of the unified self. Even more perturbing are the cases of patients whose brains have been split in two by surgery (usually to treat epilepsy). A series of groundbreaking experiments by psychologist Michael Gazzaniga shows that the two halves of the brain in many respects function independently, unaware of each other. But that the left brain contains an "interpreter" that tries to make sense of it and rationalise what has happened after the event. So maybe the self is just something that the interpreter invents as it goes along?

Presenter: Paul Broks
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vbk)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07h2vbm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vbp)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07h2vbr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07h69n3)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with a director of Christian charity Foolproof Creative Arts, Fiona Stewart.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07h69n5)
The future of UK agriculture, environmental farming and incomes outside the EU

What does the future hold for British farmers after Brexit? The environmental journalist George Monbiot says he has real concerns for UK waterways and wildlife without a guarantee of safeguards from Brussels. Meanwhile the Country Land and Business Association insists that landowners and farmers could prompt better environmental laws for Britain in the long term.
At the Royal Agricultural University in Cirencester, the vote to leave is the only topic under discussion at the moment. The next intake of students will have to face the reality of working in a post-Brexit industry. Senior Economics Lecturer Dr Allan Butler has been assessing how the markets and farm incomes could be affected by leaving the EU.
During the referendum campaign, Farming Today heard a range of opinions on how agriculture would fair in or out of the European Union. Now we know we're turning away from Brussels, UKIP's Agriculture spokesman Stuart Agnew claims that British producers will have the 'whip hand' on the global markets.
Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Vernon Harwood.


MON 05:56 Weather (b07h2vbt)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x45m5)
Egyptian Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the Egyptian goose. Although Egyptian geese are common throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa and in Egypt, they are now officially a British bird. These striking birds attracted the attention of wildfowl collectors and the first geese were brought to the UK in the 17th century. By the 1960's it became obvious that the geese were breeding in the wild in East Anglia and since then they've spread in south and eastern England.


MON 06:00 Today (b07h9xd8)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b07h69n9)
Food: From Bread Riots to Obesity

On Start the Week Andrew Marr explores food and politics. Churchill charged Lord Woolton with the daunting task of feeding Britain during WW2. The food writer William Sitwell looks at the black markets and shop raids Woolton had to battle as the country teetered on the edge of anarchy. Economist Jane Harrigan argues that it was rising food prices that sowed the seeds for the Arab Spring Uprisings, and food historian Bee Wilson asks what governments can do now to control what we eat.

Producer: Hannah Sander.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07h6fmf)
White Sands

Pilgrimage

Many people love the books of Geoff Dyer (and author William Boyd calls him 'a true original'); be they novels, ruminations or travel essays. White Sands is his latest travel book and today he writes about his new home in Los Angeles and makes a pilgrimage to visit the house of an intellectual hero. With characteristic wit and a keen eye for detail, he writes beautifully about place and always acknowledges that travel can be as much about disappointment as it is about elation and discovery. In White Sands he makes a series of pilgrimages like this one and then wonders why they don't quite live up to their reputation.

Read by Alex Jennings who recently played Alan Bennett in The Lady in the Van and Willy Wonka in the musical version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Julian Wilkinson.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07h2vby)
Phone-In: Infidelity

If your partner's been unfaithful, how did you deal with it? Did you stay or did you go? If you've been unfaithful, did the relationship survive? If you've moved on, how did you do it? We asked for your stories....

“One of the criticisms levelled at me by my now ex-husband was that I was boring and unadventurous so after the divorce I decided to learn to scuba dive. I have always wanted to do this - and now I’m a PADI rescue diver”

“I did meet my husband when I was married and we had an affair for 3 months so in one way it’s quite poetic. You can’t explain how infidelity affects you until you’re in that position”

“He said to me he wasn’t going to stop seeing her, so I left him. After a long marriage breaks up you do feel like your arms and legs have been cut off, you’re adrift. It takes a very long time to adjust. You’re miserable during it, but I’m glad I did it.”

“I started a dialogue with him via email, I was being empathic towards him. Through the dialogue and meeting up he said he fell in love with me all over again, he left her and eventually we renewed our vows. In a way it was the best thing that happened to us, and the best thing that happened to me. It takes two to make a marriage work”

“There was very little affection in my marriage. I had an affair after 5 years together. He was so shocked he became a more affectionate person. I managed to see how much more worthy he was than this other person.”

“If you can use strategies to take control it is possible to not feel completely bruised and bullied by the situation. I took the decision to live apart from my husband for 6 months, so we didn’t have that daily hostility – and so we could both decide what we wanted.”

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Anne Peacock.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07h6fmh)
How to Have a Perfect Marriage

Episode 1

Can Karen and Jack stay married, even though he's openly gay? They're living their lives, getting on with their work, the kids seem to be fine - and then Jack drops a bombshell.

He wants to buy his own flat and move on - but that means the family house must be sold. Karen is outraged. After all he's put them through, he now wants to uproot them as well?

In this third series of writer Nicholas McInerny's autobiographical look at modern relationships, Jack and Karen are at a crossroads. Two years after he came out, they're still married, still close, have a regular date night each week and are both involved in steering their girls through their teenage years.

But time doesn't stand still and Jack wants to live openly as a gay man. He wants to find out what that could mean. He also wants to be a good dad and keep his family healthy and safe. So it's time for more negotiations with Karen and the girls to see how they can remain a close and loving family and allow each other to grow in their own different ways.

Writer: Nicholas McInerny
Sound Designer: Alisdair McGregor
Director/Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b07h6fmk)
I Hope I Get It

Teenagers Mohammed and Jess are both auditioning for the National Youth Theatre - with just a one in ten chance of success.

And the stakes are especially high for them, because they're a couple. Both are desperate to progress with their acting careers: Jess won a drama scholarship to her boarding school, while Mohammed attends a performing arts Academy.

Grace Dent follows their story, from the auditions to the nail-biting wait on results day.


MON 11:30 The Break (b07h6fmm)
Series 1

Occupied

Andy has found a level of contentment with the world - reading books, watching films, and generally repairing his wounded psyche.

Uncle Jeff is having none of this and reveals a hitherto unknown secret to Andy, that the dusty shop downstairs from his seaside flat belongs to Jeff. When necessary, it seems, he offers the community of Flamford a valuable service as an electrical repair person.

Jeff lures Andy into the shop and shows him how to use the till. Andy realises it's another of his uncle's ploys, and refuses this oblique yet unsubtle job offer. But Jeff, never the one to say "die", takes his nephew on a job search in which Andy is an unwilling participant.

Visits follow to Fish Shop Frank, the Tourist Information Office run by the uniformed and uninformed Steph and Pippa, and Flamford's as-yet-unlicensed zoo.

Jeff ...... Philip Jackson
Andy ...... Tom Palmer
Frank ...... Mark Benton
Corinne ...... Alison Steadman
Joyce ...... Alison Steadman
Mr Truepenny ...... Rasmus Hardiker

Writers: Ian Brown and James Hendrie

Director: Gordon Kennedy

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b07h2vc0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Witness (b07hrzf1)
Date Rape

25 years ago, in June 1991, a young American college student, Katie Koestner, became a talking point across the USA when she appeared on the front cover of Time Magazine after refusing to let a 'date rape' go unchallenged. She has been speaking to Claire Bowes about the rape, and the notoriety that followed it.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07h2vc2)
Breast implants, Sara Eden, Consumers and Brexit

Breast implants in France carry a warning about the link between silicone implants and a rare type of cancer - anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Now senior doctors here are calling for a similar warning. We talk to women who've had the cancer and surgeons who put in implants for reconstructive and cosmetic reasons.

It's biggest consumer decision of our lives - Britain leaving the European Union. We talk to Martin Lewis of MoneySavingExpert and economist Ruth Lea about the potential impact on UK consumers? Petrol prices could rise shortly. What other products could become more expensive? Will some prices come down? Are there advantages to look forward to?

We investigate complaints about a matchmaking service that leaves customers with no dates. How much can you expect from a dating service and who can you complain to when things go wrong?


MON 12:57 Weather (b07h2vc4)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b07h2vc6)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 Voices of the First World War (b07h6frq)
Verdun

Before the last survivors of the First World War passed away, the memories of many of those who fought it were captured in sound recordings. Speakers recall in great detail the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, and their psychological state in the face of trauma. The Imperial War Museum's holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, the two sound archive collections are brought together for the first time in this Radio 4 series. 'Voices of the First World War', a fifty-part series which began in Autumn 2014, broadcasts many of these recordings for the first time, and will run in short seasons throughout the commemorative period, tracking the course of the war.

The first five programmes of this year's series of Voices of the First World War explore the events of 1916 from the point of view of those who experienced them, from descriptions of the huge and costly battles that engulfed all Armies on the Western Front to the fall-out of the introduction of conscription in Britain, with Conscientious Objectors revealing the consequences of their decision not to fight.

Dan Snow begins the week hearing the experiences of French soldiers who fought at the Battle of Verdun. In interviews recorded in 1964 for the BBC Great War series, they recall the hellish conditions for those who took part in the drawn-out battle.

In the second programme we hear vivid recollections from those who were caught up in and narrowly survived the dramatic and fast-paced Battle of Jutland, which took place across the course of a few hours and determined the outcome of the war at sea.

The third programme features first-hand accounts from those who were called up to replenish the British Army but refused to fight - Conscientious Objectors, who talk about their imprisonment, and also the ostracism their families were exposed to as a result of their decision.

The last two programmes of the week cover the Battle of the Somme. On 30th June we hear about the build up to the battle exactly 100 years ago, with descriptions of the seven day bombardment of the German lines, and the men's optimism and even excitement as the noise built to a crescendo. They remember what they were doing and how they were feeling from sunrise to zero hour on 1st July as they waited to go over the top. The final programme focuses on the first catastrophic ten minutes of the Battle of the Somme, with glimpses of the devastation on the battlefield, and the surviving soldiers' feelings about the heavy losses by the end of the day on 1st July.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b07h65c4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b03phpg2)
Ambiguous Loss

477 Days

Aidan Stephens is missing. No-one knows where he is or why he went. Michael Butt's drama tells the story of the family left behind. 16 months later, do they get on with their lives or continue to await his return? Made with the assistance of the charity Missing People.

Directed by Toby Swift.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b07h6gwy)
Series 30

Heat 2, 2016

Three more music lovers join Paul Gambaccini for the second heat of the 2016 tournament, from the historic Maida Vale studios of the BBC. Paul will be putting the breadth and depth of their musical knowledge to the test, as they compete for a place in the semi-finals later this summer.

The questions and extracts range from Russian opera to 1960s TV themes and big band jazz - and that's just in the first round. As always, the competitors also have to select a special musical topic for their own individual round, from a list of five which they've been given no previous sight of, and no chance to prepare.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b07h60lv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 David Hockney - Back in LA (b07h6hft)
In June 2013, art critic Martin Gayford received a message from David Hockney. It said that he was leaving Yorkshire to return to Los Angeles and he might be staying there for some time.

Hockney's relocation to LA came after a disastrous few months in the artist's personal life. In autumn 2012 he suffered a minor stroke and temporarily almost lost his speech. A tree that he often painted was felled in an act of vandalism that sent him into depression. In March, one of his assistants, Dominic Elliott died as a result of misadventure when he drank acid after taking a range of drugs. Hockney almost gave up painting.

The artist found inspiration in Los Angeles again, painting his assistant John-Pierre with his head in his hands. This image of deep despondency, which Hockney calls a self-portrait, was the catalyst for a new ambitious phase of work.

He began painting figures sat on the same chair against the same plain backdrop. The sitters' variety of figures, poses and clothes reinvigorated Hockney, as he recruited more and more characters for his "Human Comedy." The results would become a single series of portraits to be displayed at Hockney's second show at the Royal Academy in four years, '82 Portraits and One Still Life,' opening in July.

As the series began to take shape, in December 2013, Martin flew to California to sit. He'll re-visit the process of being painted by Britain's most famous artist and he'll interview Hockney about his life in Los Angeles, portraiture and this astonishing new chapter in his career.

Producer: Paul Smith
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4

David Hockney painting Martin Gayford, Los Angeles, 5 December 2013 (c) David Hockney
Photo Credit: Jean-Pierre Goncalves de Lima.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b07h6n1q)
Battle of the Somme

The Battle of the Somme, fought in northern France between 1st July and 18th November 1916, was one of the bloodiest of World War One. The British and French armies engaged the Germans in a brutal battle of attrition on a 15-mile front. In total, there were over one million dead and wounded on all sides. The slaughter was on an unprecedented scale. How did individuals and society grieve? How did faith institutions respond to the traumatic loss of life? What was its effect on the spiritual psyche of Britain in the immediate aftermath and in subsequent decades? Ernie Rea and guests discuss the religious response to the Battle of the Somme.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b07h2vc8)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07h2vcb)
27/06/16 Markets plunge despite Osborne's efforts to ease Brexit concerns

A further £40 billion has been wiped off the value of Britain's biggest firms, despite attempts by the Chancellor and the Prime Minister to reassure the markets about Brexit.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b07h6qsp)
Series 65

Episode 1

The 65th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the Royal Court Theatre in Liverpool where regulars Barry Cryer, Jeremy Hardy and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Rory Bremner, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b07h6qsr)
Joe drops in on Susan in the Bridge Farm shop after picking up some carrots from Tom. Neil joins them and Joe asks him about the next parish council meeting. Neil is surprised at his interest. Joe leaves and Neil tells Susan that he and Hayley have decided not to continue with the free-range hens. Susan is indignant about Upper Class Eggs and Josh's behaviour. She suggests Neil should buy Hayley out but Neil says the passion has gone. He rings David before speaking to Josh.

Eddie tells Joe the sycamore tree at Grange Farm is being felled. Joe is aghast but Eddie says the Sterlings can do whatever is needed to sell the farm house. Later, Eddie finds Joe looking for problems at the property. As far as Joe's concerned the Grundys aren't finished with Grange Farm yet.

David tells Josh he will have to use all of his savings to buy out Neil and Hayley. He and Ruth will lend him the rest of the money that's needed which Josh will have to pay back. Josh takes Neil a bottle of whisky and apologises for taking hens from Willow Farm. Neil tells him he's disappointed about how things have turned out. When Josh admits he was trying to impress Toby, Neil tells him Toby should be his last choice of a role model. He tells Josh to ask himself what sort of business partner he wants to be.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b07h2vcd)
Jessie Burton, Stanley Spencer exhibition, York Art Gallery, From Afar

After the success of The Miniaturist, author Jessie Burton discusses her second novel, The Muse, which is set between 1930s Spain, at the beginning of the civil war, and 1960s London, and explores the idea of the artist's muse.

The painter Stanley Spencer is the subject of a new exhibition at The Hepworth Wakefield. Curator Eleanor Clayton discusses why writing about his painting was as important to Spencer as painting itself.

The York Art Gallery is one of five museums and galleries in the UK to make the shortlist for this year's Museum of the Year Award. In the fourth of our reports from the shortlisted venues, Samira visits the gallery which has recently undergone a multi-million-pound refurbishment of its Grade II listed building, creating a space for the new Centre of Ceramic Art in the Victorian roof void, which had been hidden from public view for more than 50 years.

Set in Caracas, From Afar explores the shifting relationship between an older man and the young working-class teenage boy he picks up in a tense, homophobic society. The film won a Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival last year. Briony Hanson, Director of Film at the British Council, reviews.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Ella-mai Robey.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07h6fmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Greece: Warehouse of Souls (b07h6zg5)
The Balkan route is closed, the fragile EU-Turkey deal is in effect, the Pope has been and gone, the traffickers are turning their attention to Italy & so is much of the media. But Greece continues to be the epicentre of a slow emergency. In a country in advanced economic meltdown more than 50,000 refugees & migrants, 'people on the move', are stuck. On the islands, the asylum processing "hotspots" funded by the EU are often grim affairs, like the one on Chios made out of repurposed shipping containers. Outside Thessaloniki, in a place where the railroad tracks run into grass, stands an abandoned toilet paper factory: no windows, no light, and tents huddled under the low roof. But, for a desperately stretched Greek government, this is better than the dark anarchy of the recently cleared camp at Idomeni, or the petrol station where children play in the still-working forecourt & the car wash has tents inside.

The deportations back to Turkey of some 8,500 people who came since the deal was done have started (as have the suicide attempts). For the more than 40,000 refugees and migrants who arrived before March 20th and now have no place to go, another long, gruelling story is beginning. The left-wing Syriza government is having to contemplate just how long these refugees will be stuck there. Minister of Migration Yannis Mouzalas knows that the much criticised EU-Turkey deal is the only thing preventing another wave of refugees reaching the shores of Greek islands that are already struggling to cope: "This is not Greece's crisis, this is Europe's crisis." Maria Margaronis explores the hopes & fears of refugees, islanders & Greek politicians & asks whether Greece is becoming Europe's "warehouse of souls.".


MON 20:30 Analysis (b07h6zg7)
The Charitable Impulse

Charity is big business. In the UK, over £9 billion is donated to charitable institutions each year. But fundraising can also be controversial as recent news stories about expensive electricity tariffs, elderly donors receiving incessant requests for donations and the tactics of some "chuggers" have confirmed.

So studies in experimental psychology that reveal which approaches persuade people to be more generous are timely and could offer charities a neat way to raise more money. David Edmonds explores the results of this research - including findings published for the first time. He asks if, by adopting techniques already used by the marketing and advertising industries, charities could transform their fortunes - but at what cost?

Producer Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07gfgv5)
Oyster

Eat them alive straight from their shell. Or deep fry them. Or remember them - with their little feet - addressing Lewis Carroll's Walrus and Carpenter - the oyster plays a rich and varied part in British life. Brett Westwood eats his subject for the very first time and takes ship to catch some more in the muddy tidal creeks of the Essex North Sea coast. The world may not quite be his oyster but in this programme the oyster is definitely his world. With Richard Haward, Philine zu Ermgassen, and Peter Marren and poems from Simon Armitage, Sean O'Brien and Carol Ann Duffy. Reader: Niamh Cusack. Producer: Tim Dee.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b07h69n9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b07h2vcg)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07h2vcj)
Anti-Corbyn MPs 'battle for soul of Labour'

Pressure grows on Jeremy Corbyn as some Labour MPs argue he should resign. We speak to former Culture Secretary Ben Bradshaw. And Roy Hodgson has resigned as England manager after the team lost 2-1 to Iceland. Former FA boss David Davies tells us the defeat was "embarrassing, heart-breaking and inexplicable".

(Picture: Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks in Parliament Square. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire)


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07h6zg9)
Graham Greene: The Third Man

Heard of Harry Lime?

Samuel West reads from the classic Graham Greene novella that inspired one of the most acclaimed films of all time, starring Orson Welles.

In this episode, as snow falls on a ravaged postwar Vienna, penniless pulp Western writer Rollo Martins arrives, hoping to meet his old school chum and hero, Harry Lime. But why isn't Harry there to greet him? Rollo is about to learn the first of many shocking truths about his greatest friend...

Greene's novella was published the year after the film, The Third Man, was released, but formed the basis of Greene's screenplay. The Oscar-wining film, directed by Carol Reed, is now considered a masterpiece, and was chosen by the BFI as the best British film of the 20th century in 1999.

Author: Graham Greene, 1904-91, is one of the most acclaimed and most popular writers of the 20th century. He won several awards for his work including the 1948 James Tait Black Memorial Prize. His novels include: Brighton Rock, The End of the Affair, The Power and the Glory, and The Honorary Consul.

Reader: Samuel West
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett
Music from the original soundtrack written and performed by Anton Karas.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


MON 23:00 Don't Log Off (b07h6zgc)
Series 7

Taking Flight

Alan Dein embarks on a new series of nocturnal excursions via Facebook and Skype, hearing the real life dramas of random strangers.

Alan holes himself up in a studio through the night and invites the online world to talk to him. Knowing nothing about the people he is about to talk to, he settles down for an evening of intriguing encounters.

Tonight he connects with a Nigerian trapped in Abu Dhabi, a Hungarian woman who found salvation in the birth of her son, a Dutch man who believes he's a reincarnated slave and a grounded Canadian test pilot coming to terms with the fact he'll never fly again.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07h6zgf)
The turbulence that's followed the referendum when Britain voted to withdraw from the EU has been reflected in the Commons. Susan Hulme hears the response of David Cameron to the victory for the Leave campaign and follows the reaction of MPs from around the House.

Also on the programme:
* The Bill known as the "snooper's charter" comes under more scrutiny.
* There are mass resignations by members of the Shadow Cabinet...leading to cutting remarks from MPs on the Government side.
* Peers debate what a British exit from the EU means.



TUESDAY 28 JUNE 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07h2vf4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07h6fmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vf6)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07h2vf8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vfb)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07h2vfd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07ht2rc)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with a director of Christian charity Foolproof Creative Arts, Fiona Stewart.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07h9xd6)
DEFRA Secretary On The Future of Agriculture Post Brexit

DEFRA Secretary of State, Liz Truss, discusses the future of agriculture post Brexit.

Anna Hill visits the John Innes Centre in Norwich, a research institute which receives millions of pounds each year from the European Central Fund to pay for projects and scientists working at the cutting edge of agricultural science.

We hear listeners' views about the future of farming, the one industry in Britain which is governed by regulations set out by the European union.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbz1g)
Sedge Warbler

David Attenborough presents the Sedge Warbler. Sedge warblers like tangled vegetation near water. They're summer visitors here but seek out similar habitats in Africa where they spend the winter. Before leaving our shores in autumn, they gorge on insects, often doubling their weight.


TUE 06:00 Today (b07h69n7)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b07ffxsc)
Hazel Rymer on volcanoes

Hazel Rymer has journeyed closer to the centre of the earth than most, regularly peering into the turbulent, fiery world than makes up the earth's core. By taking measurements of micro-gravity on, and inside, volcanoes all over the world, she hopes to better understand why they erupt and what happens when they do. Having lost a close colleague to a random volcanic eruption, she appreciates the risks involved and, at the same time, insists that they are no greater than driving on the M25. She talks to Jim Al-Khalili about learning to think like a geologist after studying physics; the joys and frustrations of doing fieldwork on volcanoes; and why she loves gravity meter, G513.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b07h9xdd)
Tim Samuels Meets Helen Croydon

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy. He meets those making their own rules in a world less constrained by religion and gender norms and where we are evolving and adapting to changing times.

For Tim the idea of getting married and settling down with one person for the rest of your life brings him out in a cold sweat and he is not alone. In his last programme for One to One, he meets Helen Croydon who has been expounding the idea of part-time love for ten years. So is this the best model for loving and living? And is it viable in practice?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07h9xdg)
White Sands

Space in Time and Time in Space

Many people love the books of Geoff Dyer ('a true original' William Boyd): be they novels, ruminations or travel essays. White Sands is his latest travel book and today he visits two iconic land art installations in America: The Spiral Jetty in Utah and The Lightning Field in New Mexico. With characteristic dry humour, and a keen eye for detail, he vividly recreates both experiences. His essays offer meditations on landscape, time and humanity, but Dyer never shirks from asking himself what exactly 'is the point of it all.'
Read by Alex Jennings who recently played Alan Bennett in The Lady in the Van and Willy Wonka in the musical version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Julian Wilkinson.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07h2vfg)
Woman's Hour looks at the current political situation and how women are shaping the debate

Woman's Hour looks at the current political situation. We discuss women's involvement in the Brexit debates: what impact could leaving the EU have on women's lives? And with the major parties in disarray, which women could be in contention for leadership roles and how will they influence their parties' policies

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Interviewed Guest: Labour MP Seema Malhotra
Interviewed Guest: Conservative MP Sarah Wollaston
Interviewed Guest: Helen Lewis, New Statesman
Interviewed Guest: Alice Thomson, The Times
Interviewed Guest: Conservative MP Andrea Leadsom.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07h9xdj)
How to Have a Perfect Marriage

Episode 2

Jack is excited about the success of his book and wants to celebrate. Karen is furious that he wants to sell the house and force her and the girls to move. Seventeen year-old Naomi is fed up with both of them and anyway, she's got other things on her mind - an older boyfriend with a car.

In this third series of writer Nicholas McInerny's autobiographical look at modern relationships, Jack and Karen are at a crossroads. Two years after he came out, they're still married, still close, have a regular date night each week and are both involved in steering their girls through their teenage years.

But time doesn't stand still and Jack wants to live openly as a gay man. He wants to find out what that could mean. He also wants to be a good dad and keep his family healthy and safe. So it's time for more negotiations with Karen and the girls to see how they can remain a close and loving family and allow each other to grow in their own different ways.

Writer: Nicholas McInerny
Sound Designer: Alisdair McGregor
Director/Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07h9xdl)
Ant

For centuries we've peered at them, delighted and terrified at seeing our best and worst traits in miniature. Brett Westwood investigates why we see ourselves in the Ant.

With contributions from the Ant Lab of Nigel Franks, giant ants as seen by Judith Buchanan, slave-making ants as interpreted by John Clarke and Tom Waits, and the robot swarm of Sabine Hauert. Plus St Paul's Cathedral and a whole ant colony between 2 microscope slides.

Readings by Nicola Ferguson and Brian Protheroe: poems by John Clare, Peter Kane Dufault and Matthew Francis; and the works of Ovid, Adam Smith, William Gould and César Vallejo. Plus the fearsome threat of H G Wells' The Empire of the Ants, and the films Antz, and THEM!

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 11:30 Tales from the Stave (b07h9xdn)
Series 13

The Lark Ascending - Vaughan Williams

Frances Fyfield is joined by former BBC Young Musician of the Year Jennifer Pike, her father Jeremy, head of Composition at Cheetham's school of music in Manchester, and composer David Matthews to examine the only manuscript of Ralph Vaughan Williams' enduringly popular British Classic - 'The Lark Ascending'.
The score for Orchestra and Violin has been lost but the British Library have the manuscript for piano and violin, the form in which the piece was first heard at Shirehampton, near Bristol with the Violinist Marie Hall. Her autograph appears on the score but not the composer's.

There's debate about whether the manuscript is in the hand of the composer or a copyist. The guests agree that it's probably a copyist but there are so many corrections, paste-overs and rewrites that the composer's penmanship makes up almost half the score.

The beauty of the piece, a response in 1914 to George Meredith's Poem 'The Lark Ascending', is undisputed. What surprises and intrigues the team is just how much work went into what appears a very fluid, easy depiction of the Lark high above a landscape rich in Vaughan Williams folk inspired melodies. He'd put it aside over the war years and it was only in 1920, while staying near Bristol that he worked on it again. It's thought that Marie Hall was alongside him in that process of refinement and, as many people agree, perfection. Jennifer plays detailed passages that have been crossed out and, occasionally re-introduced into the score.
And there's a discovery concerning the cover leaf that it appears might go some way to explaining why the orchestral score has been lost and might yet be found.

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07h2vfj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Witness (b07hrzgd)
Soviet Imaginary Heroes

It is 75 years since the German invasion of the Soviet Union during World War 2. Millions of Soviet soldiers and citizens would lose their lives in the struggle that followed, and many of their stories of heroism and self-sacrifice were absorbed into war propaganda. But one story raised questions right from the beginning..the tale of the so-called 'Panfilov heroes' who were reported to have committed an almost impossible feat of bravery in the face of the Nazi advance against Moscow. Dina Newman reports.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07h2vfl)
Call You and Yours - How is Brexit affecting you?

It's just a few days since the UK's historic vote to leave the EU. We want to know how it is affecting you.

Has it made a difference to the amount of work you are getting or how much you earn from your work? If you run a business, have you seen an impact? Are you putting off or bringing forward any projects? Are your customers behaving differently?

There has been much talk about the uncertainty caused by the vote. We want to hear how that is making a difference to you.

Has Brexit changed things for your personal finances? What about holidays, buying a house or plans for the future?

Has it made a difference to your relationships with friends, family or within your local community?

Email and tell us how the Brexit decision is changing things for you - youandyours@bbc.co.uk and don't forget to leave a phone number, so we can get back to you.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b07h2vfn)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b07h2vfq)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 Voices of the First World War (b07hb1y2)
Jutland

The first five programmes of Voices of the First World War 1916 explore the events of the year from the point of view of those who experienced them, from descriptions of the huge and costly battles that engulfed the British and French Armies on the Western Front to interviews given by Conscientious Objectors and their families.

In this, the second programme we hear vivid recollections from those who were caught up in and narrowly survived the dramatic and fast-paced Battle of Jutland, which took place across the course of a few hours.

Before the last survivors of the First World War passed away, the memories of some of those who fought it were captured in sound recordings. Speakers recall in great detail the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, and their psychological state in the face of trauma. The Imperial War Museum's holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, the two sound archive collections are brought together for the first time in this Radio 4 series. 'Voices of the First World War', a fifty-part series which began in Autumn 2014, broadcasts many of these recordings for the first time, and will run in short seasons throughout the commemorative period, tracking the course of the war.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07h6qsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b03pjf43)
Ambiguous Loss

No Man's Land

16 months ago Sally Stephen's husband Aidan disappeared, leaving a note saying he was going for a walk. No-one knows where he is or why he went. Then Sally receives a phonecall that will turn her family's lives upside down once again. Made with the assistance of the charity Missing People.

Directed by Toby Swift.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b07hfwrf)
Series 9

The Stranger

An innocent encounter tips from flirtation to danger, the professional stranger you never want to see on your door step and a partner whose revelation turns him in an instant into a stranger. Josie Long delves into stories of brushes with the unknown - flirtations, deceptions and the kindness of strangers.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b07hfwrh)
Series 8

That Post-Referendum Feeling

The series that looks at current events through the lens of psychology. Michael Blastland explores the quirky ways in which we humans think, behave and make decisions.

In this episode, that morning-after feeling - the aftermath of the EU referendum. We put our 'X' in a box and, one way or the other, committed. What happened in that moment and what are the consequences? Are we different now?

Do we have doubts or regrets, or will we stubbornly stick to our decision? The Zoo team investigate the curious psychology of being consistent and how we make ourselves feel better about the decisions we make in life.

Michael Blastland is joined by resident Zoo psychologist Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, and roving reporter Timandra Harkness.

Contributors this week include Professor Ralph Hertwig, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin; Professor Greg Maio, Cardiff University; Carol Tavris, social psychologist and author; Lee Jones, Queen Mary University of London and Lois Pryce, travel writer and journalist.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b07kdsdl)
Brexit: The Legal Minefield

Brexit: the Legal Minefield

How will the UK achieve its new status? Will the referendum result lead to real legal independence? Joshua Rozenberg and a panel of guests discuss the legal journey Britain must now take. They examine practical questions like workers' rights, the free movement of people and goods, as well as the constitution and human rights.


Producer Simon Coates
Editor Penny Murphy.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07hfwrk)
Martin Lewis and Tanita Tikaram

Martin Lewis, founder of MoneySavingExpert.com and singer songwriter Tanita Tikaram join Harriett Gilbert to talk about books they love. Martin reads to relieve stress, is a lover of historical fiction and has picked Dissolution, the first in CJ Sansom's Shardlake series. Harriett chooses spy thriller Slow Horses by Mick Herron and Tanitas's choice, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes by Anita Loos is the only book this week not to feature a beheading. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (b07h2vfs)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07h2vfv)
Labour MPs back Corbyn 'no confidence' motion. EU politicians insist there'll be no talks before formal process of departure triggered. Andy Murray through to Wimbledon 2nd round.


TUE 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b07hfwrm)
Series 7

Samira Ahmed

Journalist Samira Ahmed reads from her teenage diaries penned in 1980s London, when she was obsessed with school work, Dallas and learning to drive.

She discusses her formative years with Rufus Hound.

Producer: Harriet Jaine.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07hfwrr)
Lilian has a call from Justin who is on his way to Ambridge. They agree to meet later at the Dower House and go for dinner. Adam brings round a birthday present for Phoebe and he and Lilian reflect on the EU Referendum result. Adam remembers it's the FHDRA tomorrow and Lilian says it sounds like Rob has turned really nasty. They both hope the court decides that Henry should go back to Pat and Tony and Jack will stay with Helen.

Pip helps Rex with the goslings and Rex moans to her about Toby's obsession with his film and how he and Josh took hens from Willow Farm. He apologises to Pip for messing her family around. She tells him to stop beating himself up and assures him her parents don't bear any grudges. When Toby shows up at Hollowtree, Pip asks him and Rex for a favour. She's transporting three heifers her mum has sold and she'd like some company. Toby pushes forward Rex to join her.

Outside the village shop, Adam chats Justin who has just bought some Home Farm strawberries. Justin has been researching no-till and Adam is impressed by what he knows. Later, on their way home from dinner, Justin and Lilian bump into Toby and Rex. Toby thinks it's obvious that Lilian and Justin are having an affair. He tells Rex to make his move with Pip but Rex reckons she's not interested in him like that. Toby thinks he should to get out of his negative mind set and go for it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07h2vfx)
David Hockney at Royal Academy, Choreographer Sir Peter Wright, Tenor Gregory Kunde, Updating album covers

David Hockney's new exhibition is 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life at the Royal Academy in London. The artist asked friends to sit for him in Los Angeles over the last two-and-a-half years, each portrait created within the same three-day time frame, in the same chair, with the same background, and every canvas the same size. Critic William Feaver gives his response to the brightly-coloured acrylic works. The exhibition runs from 2nd July until 2nd October.

The tenor Gregory Kunde, winner of Best Male Singer at this year's International Opera Awards and about to make his debut at the Royal Opera House in two Verdi operas, on a remarkable change of direction so late in his career.

The choreographer Sir Peter Wright reflects on his remarkable career, spanning nearly seven decades, founding the Birmingham Royal Ballet and working along greats like Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn. He joins us to look back at ballet stars behaving badly and his new memoir Wrights And Wrongs, published 18th July.

With Phil Collins updating three of his early album sleeves by replacing the cover photo of his face then with that of how he looks now, writer Ben Wardle wonders why brand updating - so common in books, DVDs and food packaging, among others - so rarely happens in the music industry.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Elaine Lester.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07h9xdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 One Day in Entebbe (b07hg4vg)
Forty years ago, the world gasped as it witnessed one of the most outlandish rescue missions ever undertaken. Israeli commandos flew 2,500 miles to free more than a hundred hostages, passengers whose plane had been hijacked and diverted to Entebbe. In the dead of night, they were plucked out from under the nose of Uganda's larger-than-life dictator, Idi Amin.

The operation would become a template for special forces operations, taught at military colleges around the globe. It would change the calculus in the Middle East, altering the way Israel was seen and the way it saw itself. And it would set one young man on the path to eventual power.

Through exclusive and intensely personal interviews with those involved, including Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu and two of his predecessors - Ehud Barak and Shimon Peres - as well as former hostages, ex-commandos and the one-time Palestinian hijacker Leila Khaled, writer and broadcaster Jonathan Freedland tells the remarkable story of that day in July 1976.

He hears Netanyahu confess that he would not be prime minister today had it not been for Entebbe where his brother led the commando unit and was killed in action - proof that the impact of that one day in Entebbe lives on.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07h2vfz)
Glastonbury: Just how easy is it for us to join in?

Glastonbury likes to be inclusive, but how easy is it if you're blind or visually impaired? Two of our listeners, Dave Kent and Hazel Dudley, test it out for us. Listen to how they get on camping, getting around the muddy site, and enjoying the hundreds of performances. They investigate how accessible Glastonbury really is and find out whether they'll ever go again.

Producer: Anna Bailey
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b07hg4vl)
All in the Mind Awards Ceremony from Wellcome Collection in London

Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards Ceremony from Wellcome Collection in London and meets all the All in the Mind Award Finalists.

Back in November we asked you to nominate the person, professional or group who had made a difference to your mental health.

Throughout the current series we've been hearing the individual stories of the nine finalists, and this edition offers the chance to recap the people and organisations who've made a huge difference to other people's lives - and of course to hear comments from the judges and winners from each of the three categories.

Winner in the personal category was Jane Clement nominated by her friend and neighbour Charlotte Forsyth. Charlotte's daughter died in the hospital where Charlotte worked. She was grateful for the down to earth approach of Jane who has helped her cope with grief and depression.

Glasgow's Common Wheel project won the group or project award. They use bicycle building as a therapy to help people with a range of mental health issues. By learning to strip, service and rebuild bicycles, clients gain a new skill and a sense of achievement. By concentrating on bicycle building they dwell less on their mental health issues.

The professional category winner was case worker Amy Wollny from Turning Point. After spending half his life in prison 'John' was helped to turn his life around. For the first time in his life he has regular employment and is in control of his own behaviour.

The event is hosted by Claudia Hammond.

Judges are author Matt Haig, clinical psychologist Linda Blair, mental health campaigner Marion Janner, and Kevan Jones MP.

Produced by Adrian Washbourne and Julian Siddle.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b07ffxsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b07h2vg1)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07h2vg3)
Carnage after Istanbul airport attack

We talk to our Istanbul correspondent stuck on a plane at the airport. After the no confidence vote against Jeremy Corbyn the writer Robert Harris tells us about his plan to galvanise Labour members opposed to his leadership. And can Brexit be averted? We consider possible scenarios.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07hg4vq)
Graham Greene: The Third Man

Everybody's in a Racket

Second-rate thriller writer Rollo Martins has arrived in a snow-bound postwar Vienna to meet his old school chum Harry Lime – only to find that Harry has recently been killed in a car accident.

And now the police are accusing him of racketeering. Rollo is desperate to clear his old friend’s name, and already the circumstances of Harry’s death are proving suspicious…

Samuel West reads from the classic Graham Greene novella that inspired one of the most acclaimed films of all time, starring Orson Welles.

Author: Graham Greene
Reader: Samuel West
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett
Music from the original soundtrack written and performed by Anton Karas.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


TUE 23:00 Tim Key Delves Into Daniil Kharms And That’s All (b072n5xc)
Writer Daniil Kharms (1905-1942) is one of Russia's great lost absurdists.

His world still alarms, shocks and bewitches well over half a century after he died in prison during the siege of Leningrad.

In his short, almost vignette-like writings, nothing is sacred or as it seems. His narrators dip in and out of moments, describing curious, often disturbing events before getting bored and leaving his characters to their fates.

Old ladies plummet from windows, townsfolk are bludgeoned to death with cucumbers, others wander around in search of glue, sausages or nothing. By turns pointless and harrowing, they are funny. Very funny. And they are funny now.

Comedian, Russophile and crumpled polymath Tim Key has been entranced by Kharms' beautiful, horrible, hilarious world for years. But is there more to Kharms than a series of curious happenings cooked up by an eccentric mind in a troublesome world? Key suspects there is. And he's prepared to delve.

As he delves, he encounters Noel Fielding, Alice Nakhimovsky, Matvei Yankelevich, Peter Scotto, Tony Anemone and Daniil Kharms.

Producer: Steven Rajam

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2016.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07hg4vx)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster on the parliamentary fallout from the EU referendum result and the inquiry into the future of the BBC.



WEDNESDAY 29 JUNE 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07h2vhz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07h9xdg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vj1)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07h2vj3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vj5)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07h2vj7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07hg5vm)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with a director of Christian charity Foolproof Creative Arts, Fiona Stewart.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07hg5vp)
Agricultural trade post-Brexit

We ask what post-Brexit agricultural trade with the EU might look like. Trade expert Chris Horseman from the global body Agra Europe says the lower the trade barriers, the more European rules we'll need to adhere to - including some kind of free movement of people.
We hear from two food producers who are worried for their own businesses. Dr Matthew O'Callaghan is chair of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie Association, and fears EU rules protecting named geographical foods could be lost. And farmer Johnny Crickmore, who runs a raw milk business in Suffolk, buys and sells into Europe and worries how changes in the relationship between the pound and the euro might impact him.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5bk0)
Water Rail

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the water rail. Water rails are very secretive and live in thick vegetation in marshes and fens where the birds breed. The adult birds look rather like small moorhens but with chestnut on top, a blue-grey face and a zebra-stripe patch on their sides. They have long blood-red bills used for probing for insects.


WED 06:00 Today (b07hgb49)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b07hgb4c)
Liz Pichon, Melvyn Tan, Dan Richards, Meera Sodha

Libby Purves meets illustrator and author Liz Pichon; pianist Melvyn Tan; travel writer Dan Richards and food writer Meera Sodha.

Dan Richards is a travel writer. In his book Climbing Days, he is on the trail of his great-great aunt, Dorothy Pilley, a pioneering mountaineer of the early twentieth century. Using Dorothy's 1935 memoir Climbing Days as a guide, Dan begins to travel and climb across Europe, ending up at the serrate pinnacle of his aunt's climbing life, the mighty Dent Blanche in the high Alps of Valais. Climbing Days is published by Faber.

Meera Sodha is a food writer and cook. In her book Fresh India she celebrates Indian vegetarian dishes. Many of the recipes were passed down through her family, her mother in particular who was brought up in Uganda but came to the UK after Idi Amin ordered the expulsion of the Asian minority in 1972. The recipes in Fresh India are inspired by Meera's childhood in Lincolnshire: by the rainbow chard that her aunt and uncle used to grow on their allotment, the cabbage that grew in fields behind her house and the mushrooms that were plentiful in her garden. Fresh India is published by Penguin.

Melvyn Tan is British Singaporean-born pianist. To celebrate his 60th birthday this year he is exploring a new spectrum of compositions including a new score written for him by Jonathan Dove which he is including in his Cheltenham Music Festival recital. Born in Singapore, Melvyn came to study at the Yehudi Menuhin School at 12. In 1980 he made the decision to specialise in fortepiano and more recently began exploring works on the modern concert grand piano. Melvyn is performing at the Cheltenham Music Festival.

Liz Pichon is an illustrator and author. Her 10th book in the Tom Gates series, Super Good Skills (Almost...), is a colourful doodle-your-own extravaganza. After studying graphic design Liz started her career in the music industry, working as an art director before turning her hand to the world of children's books. She later went on to create the bestselling Tom Gates series which has sold over 2m books in the UK alone and has been translated into more than 40 languages. Super Good Skills (Almost...) is published by Scholastic Children's Books.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07hgb4f)
White Sands

Northern Dark

Many love the books of Geoff Dyer who has been described by author William Boyd as a 'true original.' White Sands is his latest collection of travel essays. Today, he and his wife make a pilgrimage to see the Northern Lights in Norway and find the experience to be not quite as enlightening as they had hoped.

With characteristic wit and a keen eye for detail, he vividly recreates the experience of the 'Northern Dark' and a misguided attempt at dog mushing. His essays offer meditations on landscape, time and humanity, but acknowledge that travel is as much about disappointment as it is about elation.

Read by Alex Jennings who recently played Alan Bennett in The Lady in the Van and Willy Wonka in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Julian Wilkinson.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07h2vj9)
Sheffield Women of Steel, Lauren Weisberger, Debbie Bestwick

A new statue has been unveiled in Sheffield city centre recognising the work of the Sheffield women who worked in the factories and steel mills during the First and Second World Wars. Our reporter Caz Graham attended the event and spoke to some of the women about their experiences.

Lauren Weisberger author of the international bestseller, The Devil Wears Prada, on her new book, The Singles Game, which looks at the world of professional tennis.

Natalie Reynolds a negotiator who has advised the UN, the UK Government and big business on strategies for negotiation gives her advice and experience on negotiating big deals

Debbie Bestwick, the CEO of gaming label Team17 who this month was awarded an MBE for her services to the computer gaming industry, on her thirty years career and her involvement in classic computer games such as the Worms franchise.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07hgb4h)
How to Have a Perfect Marriage

Episode 3

Just when Jack thought he was getting somewhere with Karen, her father's health scare stops them in their tracks. Jack realises he's out of touch with the girls. And how did his ex-boyfriend Tom get so involved in Jack's own family? That wasn't part of the plan.

In this third series of writer Nicholas McInerny's autobiographical look at modern relationships, Jack and Karen are at a crossroads. Two years after he came out, they're still married, still close, have a regular date night each week and are both involved in steering their girls through their teenage years.

But time doesn't stand still and Jack wants to live openly as a gay man. He wants to find out what that could mean. He also wants to be a good dad and keep his family healthy and safe. So it's time for more negotiations with Karen and the girls to see how they can remain a close and loving family and allow each other to grow in their own different ways.

Cast:
Jack..................Greg Wise
Tom..................Daniel Crowder
Karen................Julia Ford
Miranda.............Mary Doherty

Writer: Nicholas McInerny
Sound Designer: Alisdair McGregor
Director/Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07hgb4k)
Alex and Chris – Just Friends

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who have differing views about their direction of travel, but who still arrive at the same place. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


WED 11:00 Greece: Warehouse of Souls (b07h6zg5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Plum House (b07hgb4m)
Series 1

Trust the Trust

A mysterious visitor arrives.

Being visited is an unusual event in itself, but when he shows genuine interest in how the place is run our team immediately suspect he has been sent from the Trust to spy on them.

Why else would a man, on his own, turn up at a museum unannounced?

Ben Cottam and Paul Mckenna's comedy about the inept staff at an historic house starring Simon Callow and Miles Jupp.

Every year thousands of tourists flock to the Lake District. But one place they never go to is Plum House - the former country home of terrible poet George Pudding (1779-1848). Now a crumbling museum, losing money hand over fist, it struggles to stay open under its eccentric curator Peter Knight.

Can anyone save Plum House from irreversible decline?

Kevin Eldon guest stars as the visiting man of mystery.

Peter ...... Simon Callow
Maureen ...... Jane Horrocks
Julian ...... Miles Jupp
Tom ...... Tom Bell
Alan ...... Pearce Quigley
Emma ...... Louise Ford
Martin ...... Kevin Eldon

Directed and Produced by Paul Schlesinger

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b07h2vjc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Witness (b07hs0c5)
Space Crash

In June 1997 a resupply vessel crashed into the Mir space station. Alex Last has been speaking to Michael Foale, one of the 3 astronauts on board, about what happened next.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07h2vjf)
Green deal mis-selling, Shoplifting, Breast implants

We investigate how hundreds of home owners were mis-sold a government solar panel scheme through a company called Home Energy Lifestyle Management Services Ltd (HELMS). It's left people saddled with debts they'll be repaying for the next 20 years.

Marks & Spencer has barred one of its customers for life after she was caught shoplifting. She insists it's a misunderstanding - but will M&S lift the ban?

We speak to the parents of a woman who died from a rare form of cancer linked to breast implants. In France all medics have to warn women of the risk. Her parents are calling for the same to happen here.

At Christmas 2015 we reported on the major floods that hit the Calder Valley in West Yorkshire, causing millions of pounds of damage. We revisit Hebden Bridge to speak to the residents and shop owners as they celebrate their Christmas Day in June because they missed out at the time.

Some of the biggest house builders are meeting at a national conference in Manchester today - they tell us how they think Brexit may affect housebuilding.


WED 12:57 Weather (b07h2vjh)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b07h2vjk)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 Voices of the First World War (b07hgbj6)
Conscientious Objectors

By mid-1916 conscription had been introduced to replenish the forces of the British Army, which was now engaged in huge and costly battles on the Western Front. Dan Snow hears first-hand accounts from those who were called up, but refused to fight. Conscientious Objectors talk about their trials, imprisonment, the ostracism their families were exposed to, and even lasting divisions within families, as a result of their decision.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b07hfwrr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b03pmb50)
Ambiguous Loss

Home

In May 2011, Aidan Stephens walked out on his life and his family. Unlike the majority of the 250,000 people who go missing in the UK each year, he didn't return within days. It is now Autumn 2012 and out of the blue the Stephens family hear that Aidan wants to come home. The third of three plays by Michael Butt made with the assistance of the charity Missing People.

Directed by Toby Swift.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b07h2vjm)
Money Box Live: Brexit - what does it mean for your finances?

What would you like to know about Brexit and your personal finances? Paul Lewis and guests will be ready to answer your questions about investments; savings; pensions; EU citizenship application issues; and the housing market.

On the expert panel are: Russ Mould, Investment Director AJ Bell; Michelle Cracknell, chief executive, TPAS; David Hollingworth, Associate Director, London and Country mortgage brokers; and Rose Carey, Head of immigration at solicitors Charles Russell Speechlys.

Let us know what's on your mind, call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b07hg4vl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07hgcq0)
Good neighbours, The connection between sport and domestic abuse

Good Neighbours and the democracy of everyday life. Our neighbours do small favours and greet us on the street. They also, on occasion, startle us with noises at night and even betray us to the authorities. Laurie Taylor talks to Nancy Rosenblum, the Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government at Harvard University, about her study into our many and varied encounters with the people 'next door' - from suburbia to popular culture; in peaceful times & during disasters and across time and culture. They're joined by Graham Crow, Professor of Sociology at the University of Edinburgh.
Also, the connection between sporting events and violence against women. Jodie Swallow, Post Graduate Research Student at Chester University, discusses her research into women's experience of domestic abuse in the context of the FIFA World Cup and the Six Nations Rugby Union Tournament.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07h2vjp)
Top EU referendum journalists, Brexit's impact on media industry, Lord Puttnam inquiry

The EU referendum has been a defining political moment in the UK's history. For top political journalists, it's presented its own set of challenges - balancing claims, giving parity to arguments, and staying across the latest lines from all parties has been key for reporters on TV and radio. Steve Hewlett talks to three broadcast journalists who've been on the coal face during this campaign; Allegra Stratton, National Editor for ITV News, Faisal Islam, Political Editor for Sky News, and Channel 4 News Political Editor Gary Gibbon.

News of Brexit has created uncertainty in the media industry. The financial repercussions began immediately after Thursday's vote, with stocks in the media sector falling further than the wider market on Friday. Analysts predict that advertising and marketing budgets will undoubtedly be cut if there's an economic slowdown. There's also concern that changing current EU broadcasting regulations, which experts say makes doing business easier, will no longer apply. To discuss, Steve Hewlett is joined by John Enser, partner specialising in media issues at law firm Olswang.

An influential inquiry into the future of broadcasting in the UK is published today. Led by film-maker and Labour peer Lord Puttnam, The Future for Public Service Television Inquiry suggests that ITV should increase its commitment to current affairs programming, Channel 4 should not be privatised, and a fund should be established to pay for public service content. Steve Hewlett talks to Lord Puttnam as he concludes his eight month inquiry, and asks him what happens now
Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b07h2vjr)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07h2vjt)
Corbyn defiant despite growing calls to quit

Jeremy Corbyn is remaining defiant in the face of mounting calls from senior Labour figures to resign as leader. He insists he has the support of the wider party membership.


WED 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b04vkl9j)
Series 6

Ann Widdecombe

Marcus Brigstocke persuades his guests to try new experiences - starting with politician Ann Widdecombe.

Ann tries camping in a tent for the first time and watches as much of The Thick Of It as she can stand on TV.

Marcus also offers Ann the chance to drink a Jagerbomb - but will she accept?

Director: Bill Dare

First broadcast on BBC Radio in December 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b07hgg2f)
Anna leaves Glebe Cottage for the FHDRA forgetting her purse. Carol rushes after her with it. Meanwhile at court, Pat and Tony go through security and see Rob. Tony observes that he is using a walking stick even though they never see him with it when he's dropping off Henry.

Tony and Pat see Helen via the video-link and are impressed with her appearance although she looks very pale. The hearing begins and Anna, getting off to a shaky start, puts Helen's side of things across. Rob's barrister outlines Rob's point of view. The judge then invites Rob to tell the court about his recovery. When the judge asks Helen if she has heard everything, Helen is shaken but insists she would never hurt her children, they mean everything to her.

The judge decides to keep the situation as it is until after the trial: Jack to stay with Helen, and Henry to stay with Rob to avoid further disruption. Anna sees Tony briefly and tells him they shouldn't give up hope. When she gets back to Glebe Cottage, Anna finds Carol has dropped a lasagne she has made. Anna is tearful and Carol pours them glasses of wine. She asks what's bothering her and Anna says it could be happening again but this time she has got to stop it.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b07h2vjw)
Michael Kiwanuka, War movies, Lyndon B Johnson, Scotty Moore

John Wilson talks to the soul musician Michael Kiwanuka, whose new album Love and Hate is inspired by the feeling of being separated from the world around him.

Film critic Tim Robey and historian Jeffrey Richards consider the depiction of war on film from The Battle of the Somme to Restrepo, reflected in a new exhibition at the Imperial War Museum.

Richard Hawley pays tribute to the pioneering rock guitarist Scotty Moore, from Elvis Presley's original band, whose death was announced today.

All The Way is a feature-length political drama starring Bryan Cranston as Lyndon B Johnson in his early days as US President. Kit Davis reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07hgb4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07hgh5f)
Morality of Victors and Vanquished

Pundits and politicians alike are struggling to capture the enormity of the consequences of the result of the referendum vote. It's at times like these people often turn to George Orwell for inspiration. He likened our nation to "a family with the wrong members in control" - "that" he said "perhaps, is as near as one can come to describing England in a phrase." Who'll be left standing and in charge after all the political recriminations and bloodletting have ended is still not clear. It's been described as the worst peace-time constitutional crisis this country has faced. So this week on the Moral Maze we're asking what should now be the moral priority for the victors and the vanquished? Has the democratic will of the people been clearly expressed so that the victors must now deliver Brexit at any price? Is it the moral duty of those who championed Brexit to deliver on all their promises made during the campaigning? Or, once normal politics has resumed, should the utilitarian principle of cutting the best possible deal triumph - even if that means forgetting campaign promises on immigration and the single market? Should the vanquished now support Brexit and work towards it with all the enthusiasm they can manage? Or was this a mistake by the British people that means they have a moral duty to go on fighting to keep Britain in the EU and campaign for a second referendum? Or should the priority, above all others, be to find a way to heal a divided nation?


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07hgh5h)
A Lonely Society

Lucy Hurst-Brown asks why so many learning disabled people are so lonely.

Having worked with learning disabled people for 25 years, Lucy describes a system which has moved a very long distance from the impersonal, institutional care of the twentieth century, but which still has a long way to go before learning disabled people are properly integrated into their communities.

And in describing how she and her colleagues realised they may be causing the problem, and how they set about finding a solution, she also challenges all of us to play our part.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Nature (b07hhqtd)
Series 9

James and the Peregrines

James Aldred will be familiar to many Radio 4 listeners as 'the tree climber'. As a tree canopy access expert, James spends much of his life travelling across the world and climbing up into tree canopies to film the wildlife there, but in his spare time when he's home, James loves to head through the woods behind his house and up to the disused quarry to watch the peregrines that have bred here. In 2015 he decided to keep an audio diary and follow the lives of these birds in his spare time. Historically Peregrines were prized for falconry and it's from here that we get the names falcon for the female bird and tiercel for the male. On a freezing cold day in early February, James set off for the quarry with his recorder and microphones for the first time, and watched the adult birds patrolling back and forth marking their territory, prior to courtship. Over the coming weeks, James returned to his ringside seat as often as he could to watch these magnificent birds and determine which ledge they would choose to nest on. He followed the birds from winter through spring and summer as they bred and raised their young, as you can hear in this intimate audio diary about one of the world's most iconic birds of prey. Producer Sarah Blunt.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b07hgb4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b07h2vjy)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07h2vk0)
Angela Eagle to stand against Jeremy Corbyn

Angela Eagle is expected to announce tomorrow that she's challenging Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership.

We'll hear how that's causing unhappiness in her constituency

Stephen Crabb and Liam Fox have confirmed they will run to be the next leader of the Conservative party

We hear from one of the Turkish ruling party's MPs about the Istanbul suicide attack

And the Archbishop of Westminster - on the spate of attacks and abuse against immigrants since the EU referendum result.

(Picture - Angela Eagle; credit - Carl Court/Getty Images).


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07hhqtk)
Graham Greene: The Third Man

I'd like to hear him squeal

In a snow-bound postwar Vienna, writer Rollo Martins is still the on hunt for evidence to clear Harry Lime’s name.

But the web of lies and deceit surrounding his old friend’s death is growing ever more intricate.…And who is the mysterious third man, said to be present at Harry's death?

Samuel West continues reading from the classic Graham Greene thriller that inspired the acclaimed 1949 film.

Author: Graham Greene
Reader: Samuel West
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett
Music from the original soundtrack written and performed by Anton Karas.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


WED 23:00 The Lach Chronicles (b07hhqtq)
Series 3

A Trip To The Strip

Lach was the King of Manhattan’s East Village and host of the longest running open mic night in New York. He now lives in Scotland and finds himself back at square one, playing in a dive bar on the wrong side of Edinburgh.

His night, held in various venues around New York, was called the Antihoot. Never quite fitting in and lost somewhere lonely between folk and punk music, Lach started the Antifolk movement. He played host to Suzanne Vega, Jeff Buckley and many others; he discovered and nurtured lots of talent including Beck, Regina Spektor and the Moldy Peaches but nobody discovered him.

In this episode, Lach remembers a time when he used to live in Las Vegas. There were parties, parties and you guessed it… more parties. But the good times didn’t last.

Written and performed by Lach
Executive Producer: Richard Melvin
Sound design: Al Lorraine and Sean Kerwin
A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 23:15 Bunk Bed (b07hhqv2)
Series 3

Episode 4

Award-winning actor and director Kathy Burke has given life to some of our best-loved comedy characters on screen.

She won Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival for her harrowing performance in the film Nil By Mouth.

Now, sadly, she has to spend the night with a pair of middle-aged men - Peter Curran and Patrick Marber - who can't stop talking.

Together they discuss fatness, smoking in the bath, and the horror of Hollywood stars who improvise.

A Foghorn Company production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07hhqv7)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster, where simmering divisions over Brexit continue but politicians unite to condemn hate crime.



THURSDAY 30 JUNE 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07h2vlq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07hgb4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vls)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07h2vlv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07h2vlx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07h2vlz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07hhsjy)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with a director of Christian charity Foolproof Creative Arts, Fiona Stewart.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07hhsk0)
Glyphosate relicenced, Fishing industry and farming business reaction to Brexit

The weedkiller Glyphosate - more commonly known by its brand name of Roundup - has been relicenced for use in Europe. The chemical's licence was due to run out today but the European Commission has granted an 18 month extension. The decision is controversial because scientists have disagreed over whether it is a possible carcinogen and harmful to human health. We speak to those for and against it's continued use.
We hear from the Scottish Fishermen's Federation following the UK's vote to leave the EU. Much of the fishing industry was keen to leave because of the Common Fisheries Policy.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkf9f)
Bearded Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Bearded Tit. Bearded Tit live in reed-beds, eat mainly reed-seeds in winter and build their nests using reed leaves and flower-heads. The males do have a flamboyant black moustache which would be the envy of any Chinese mandarin.


THU 06:00 Today (b07hhvxv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07hhvxx)
Sovereignty

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of the idea of Sovereignty, the authority of a state to govern itself and the relationship between the sovereign and the people. These ideas of external and internal sovereignty were imagined in various ways in ancient Greece and Rome, and given a name in 16th Century France by the philosopher and jurist Jean Bodin in his Six Books of the Commonwealth, where he said (in an early English translation) 'Maiestie or Soveraigntie is the most high, absolute, and perpetuall power over the citisens and subiects in a Commonweale: which the Latins cal Maiestatem, the Greeks akra exousia, kurion arche, and kurion politeuma; the Italians Segnoria, and the Hebrewes tomech shévet, that is to say, The greatest power to command.' Shakespeare also explored the concept through Richard II and the king's two bodies, Hobbes developed it in the 17th Century, and the idea of popular sovereignty was tested in the Revolutionary era in America and France.

With

Melissa Lane
Class of 1943 Professor of Politics at Princeton University

Richard Bourke
Professor in the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London

and

Tim Stanton
Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of York

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07hhvxz)
White Sands

The Hitchhiker

White Sands is Geoff Dyer's vivid and entertaining new collection of travel essays. Today, he and his wife are driving to El Paso on Highway 54 when they stop to pick up a hitchhiker. All goes well and the hitchhiker proves to be good company until they pass a large road sign. With characteristic dry humour and a keen eye for detail, Dyer recounts the journey and never shirks from turning the spotlight on himself and questioning how far, as a fully fledged travel writer, he is prepared to step out of his comfort zone.

Read by Alex Jennings who recently played the part of Alan Bennett in The Lady in the Van and Willy Wonka in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07h2vm1)
Mary Seacole, High heels, Cricket, Midlife blues, Sheffield

After 12 years of campaigning by the Mary Seacole Memorial Statue Appeal, the Crimean War heroine's statue will be unveiled outside St Thomas' Hospital, London. Professor Elizabeth N Anionwu, Vice chair of the appeal talks to Jenni about the life and work of this pioneering nurse, who as a woman of mixed race overcame a double prejudice.

The first recorded match of women's cricket was reported in The Reading Mercury in 1745 as 'between eleven maids of Bramley and eleven maids of Hambledon, all dressed in white'. Things are changing, though the game still has a long way to go before it will be recognised in equal terms alongside the men's. Reporter Henrietta Harrison went to a training session run by The Redbridge East London Cricket Project which helps young women access the sport.

The government has launched an inquiry into office dress. This follows a petition signed by nearly 150,000 people protesting the decision to send receptionist Nicola Thorp home from work for refusing to wear stiletto heels. So what are our rights when it comes to office dress? Jenni speaks to employment lawyer Yvonne Gallagher, Financial Times journalist and former trader Lucy Kellaway, and philosopher Shahidha Bari.

In our series Women in One reporter Abigail Hollick travels the UK speaking to women in the street. In Sheffield she met a woman selling her pyrographic art inside the winter garden at the 'Out of this world' festival a celebration of sci-fi, magic and horror.

Miranda Sawyer author of 'Out of Time,' and Rose Rouse, co-founder of online magazine 'Advantages of Age' discuss why women need to take a mid-life crisis seriously as well as embrace the pleasures that the second half of life can offer.

Presenter: Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07hhvy1)
How to Have a Perfect Marriage

Episode 4

Karen's doing a fun run, Naomi's bunking off to meet her boyfriend and Jack's discovering the joy of random sex with strangers - an itch that's difficult to ignore.

In this third series of writer Nicholas McInerny's autobiographical look at modern relationships, Jack and Karen are at a crossroads. Two years after he came out, they're still married, still close, have a regular date night each week and are both involved in steering their girls through their teenage years.

But time doesn't stand still and Jack wants to live openly as a gay man. He wants to find out what that could mean. He also wants to be a good dad and keep his family healthy and safe. So it's time for more negotiations with Karen and the girls to see how they can remain a close and loving family and allow each other to grow in their own different ways.

Writer: Nicholas McInerny
Sound Designer: Alisdair McGregor
Director/Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07h2vm3)
The Brexit Wind Tunnel

Kate Adie introduces correspondents stories. Our man in Budapest, Nick Thorpe, hears how the Brexit vote has created fear and insecurity across eastern Europe. With Leave campaigners saying that Britain has a bright future trading with the rest of the world, Sanjoy Majumder is in Delhi, where Indian businesses and students think they could profit; Lizzie Porter visits the old aiport-turned Olympic site which is now home to thousands of Afghans in Greece; James Jeffrey is fascinated by fasting and marvels at how dock workers in Djibouti just keep carrying on under the baking sun - even during Ramadan; And Steve Rosenberg remembers his favourite Soviet cartoon as he explores Russia's hurt sporting pride.


THU 11:30 They Call Us Viet Kieu (b07hhvy3)
Anna Ngyuen, a second-generation British Vietnamese theatre producer, has always associated fear and unexplained inherited traumas with Vietnam. Her parents fled the war-torn country in 1975, as part of the mass exodus, and were resettled in London along with 20,000 other Vietnamese.

Forty years later Anna returns to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City to rediscover Vietnam and its vibrant arts scene for herself.

She finds out that the local Vietnamese call people like her, ethnic Vietnamese born or living abroad, Viet Kieu. And she discovers that many of those who have returned to Vietnam are on a similar journey - to find out who they are. Foreign but not foreign, Vietnamese but not Vietnamese. Among the burgeoning creative community they are using art to make sense of their identity.

Does the Vietnam her mother feared still exist? What are local Vietnamese like her doing? And what would the Vietnam Anna be like if her parents hadn't left?

Producer: Fabiola Büchele
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b07h2vm5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Witness (b07hs0h0)
Angela Merkel

As Britain begins to negotiate its exit from the European Union we're looking back at the early career of one of the key players in those negotiations, the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel. She started her career, not in politics, but as a chemist in a laboratory in Communist East Germany. Lucy Burns has spoken to someone who worked alongside her in the days before she took up politics.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07h2vm7)
Legal highs ban, Stamp duty confusion, Shopping local

Earlier this year so-called legal highs were hit with a nationwide blanket ban. It's now an offence to produce, sell, import or export new psychoactive substances and anyone convicted can get up to seven years in prison. When the new Bill was introduced there were fears it would create a black market with the drugs still being sold on the streets. Now, some charities say that's exactly what's happening. The charity Changing Lives in Newcastle says they're still being sold despite the ban, affecting the most vulnerable people. The Home Office says arrests are being made and many head shops, selling the drugs, have now closed down.

In an effort to help first time buyers the Government has introduced changes to Stamp Duty. Since April anyone buying a home that is not their main residence has had to pay a 3% Stamp Duty surcharge. There are some exemptions but the Residential Landlords Association says they're causing confusion which could result in some buyers being overcharged. HMRC says the guidance is easy to use.

How often do you shop local? A YouGov survey of two thousand people has suggested over half of shoppers buy local produce at least once a year. They listed quality, the creation of local jobs and benefit to the local economy as the main reasons for doing so. But why is that important? The research was commissioned by the East of England Co-op - one of ten big regional co-operatives in the UK - and it says good relationships with local suppliers are key to its business.


THU 12:57 Weather (b07h2vm9)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b07h2vmc)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 Voices of the First World War (b07hhvy5)
The Somme: From Sunrise to Zero Hour

The last two programmes of the week cover the Battle of the Somme. On 30th June we hear about the build up to the battle exactly 100 years ago, with descriptions of the seven day bombardment of the German lines, and the men's optimism and even excitement as the noise built to a crescendo. They recall what they were doing and how they were feeling from sunrise to zero hour on 1st July, as they waited to go over the top.

Drawing on the sound archives of the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, survivors of the First World War recall their experiences of the events of 1916. With Dan Snow.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b07hgg2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Tommies (b07hhwyf)
30 June 1916

Tommies reveals a hidden true story, based on secret German documents, of how a British signalling blunder contributed to the terrible death toll on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

By 30th June 1916, the German lines have been under constant bombardment for days. An attack is coming, but it's vital that the enemy don't know exactly when.

As vast numbers of men, machinery and armaments move to their final jumping-off points, the Indian cavalry of the 34th Poona Horse face their battle plan. And Mickey Bliss is training the signallers of the Tyneside Scottish - according to his unique methods. Mickey has every last point of preparation covered.

But there's one tiny detail he has missed.

Lee Ross stars in this story by Nandita Ghose.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

And through it all, we'll follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle
Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b07hhwyh)
Midsummer Music in Orkney

Orkney has a great heritage of music so for this weeks Open Country Helen Mark visits the St Magnus International Festival of Music and Arts. Now in its 40th year St Magnus was founded by the late Orkney-based composer, and Master of the Queen's Music, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. This years festival will celebrate his legacy as well as shining a light on new talent from the islands.

During the summer months Orkney enjoys 'Twilight All Night' due to its latitude, Helen discovers what this means for the people who live there and the festival. She meets local musicians and composers to find out how the unique landscape, history and wildlife of Orkney inspire individual creativity and how music contributes to the community spirit so integral to island life.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07h60ll)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b07h65c0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07hwxs9)
Notes on Blindness

Francine Stock talks to James Spinney and Peter Middleton, the makers of a ground-breaking documentary, Notes On Blindness, that's also showing in Virtual Reality.

Composer Neil Brand on the chord that defined film noir, which made its first appearance in Double Indemnity.

In a season of sequels, prequels, remakes and re-boots, critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh are on hand to help us watch better movies this summer.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07h2vmf)
Juno, Nanotech art conservation, Robots fix the city, Eel conservation

NASA's Juno Probe arrives at Jupiter on 4th July, where it will execute a daring loop-the-loop in order to get closer to the giant planet than any other spacecraft in history. Juno is constructed like an armoured tank, because Jupiter is surrounded by a belt of very intense radiation that can quickly fry most spacecraft electronics. On July 4, Juno's engines will attempt to slow the probe down so it can be sucked into Jupiter's orbit. The slightest error could mean Juno misses this window, putting an end to the $1.1 billion mission. The man in charge is Dr Scott Bolton, and he speaks to Adam from Pasadena in California.

Traditional art conservation tends to focus on paintings - how to stop paint from peeling. But contemporary art uses a much broader range of materials; plastics, rubber; pickled sharks. This means that an ever-increasing array of techniques are needed to conserve those materials. A new project is looking at the role nanotechnology can play, as Rob Thompson reports.

It's National Robot Week. There is a fear that robots will replace many of the jobs done by humans. But what if robots just stuck to emptying the gutters and fixing potholes; the chores that humans find tedious? Professor Phil Purnell from Leeds University has just launched a project that aims to use robots to fix bits of the city - finding and patching tiny defects before they turn into massive sinkholes.

The European eel may be mysterious, and delicious but it is also critically endangered.
The only reason we know this is because of organisations like the Zoological Society of London. They do the unglamorous job of monitoring these fish caught in traps in rivers around the UK. Marnie Chesterton went along to count eels in rainy Brentford with ZSL's Joe Pecorelli, who shares his knowledge of this creature's epic life journey.


THU 17:00 PM (b07h2vmh)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07h2vmk)
30/06/16 Boris out of Tory race

Front-runner Boris Johnson withdraws from Tory leadership race, Gove and May launch bids


THU 18:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (b07hj0q6)
Series 1

Episode 1

Internationally acclaimed master of the one-liner Tim Vine interviews members of his live audience as he embarks on a quest to hear the life stories of the Great British public while simultaneously showcasing his trademark gleeful wordplay and preposterous songs.

In this opening episode, Tim talks to a death-defying parachutist, hears about a hair-raising brush with a Royal Protection Officer and tells at least two jokes about chickens.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Studios production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016. .


THU 19:00 The Archers (b07hj3xf)
Kate is feeling the pressure, and Pip learns more about Matthew.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b07h2vmm)
Ab Fab director Mandie Fletcher, Phill Jupitus on Trumpton's creator, Olivia de Havilland turns 100

Director Mandie Fletcher discusses the challenges of taking Joanna Lumley, Jennifer Saunders and Absolutely Fabulous from the small to the big screen.

Comedian Phill Jupitus remembers Gordon Murray, the creator and puppeteer of the Trumpton series of children's TV animations - Camberwick Green, Trumpton and Chigley - whose death was announced today.

Matthew Sweet celebrates the 100th birthday of Olivia de Havilland, one of last great stars of Hollywood's golden era, whose films include Gone with The Wind and The Heiress.

Penelope Wilton and Sophie Rundel star in a new six-part comedy-drama, Brief Encounters. Set in Sheffield in 1982 - and loosely based on the memoir of the CEO of Ann Summers, Jacqueline Gold - the story centres on the lives of four women whose lives are turned around when they start running parties selling exotic lingerie. Julia Raeside reviews.

As arts organisations around the country begin assessing how the vote to leave the EU might affect their funding and freedom of movement for artists, Darren Henley, chief executive of Arts Council England, discusses what he calls the 'dividends' of a healthy cultural scene for wider society.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07hhvy1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07hj0q8)
Immigration: Why Did it Rise?

Immigration to the United Kingdom remains at a near-record high - but what are the political decisions and global trends which led to its rise in the first place?

Unprecedented levels of immigration motivated many Leave voters in the EU referendum and in this week's programme David Aaronovitch charts a short history of immigration over the past two decades.

Joined by a panel of experts bringing unique insight into the issue, they explore claims that the Labour party wanted to increase immigration to build support, through to the causes of the asylum spike in the early 2000s, and the impact of an expanding European Union.

CONTRIBUTORS

Ed Owen, Former Special Advisor to Labour Home Secretary Jack Straw

Madeleine Sumption, Director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford

David Goodhart, Journalist and commentator, former director of the thinktank Demos

Tony Smith, former Director General of the UK Border Force

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07hj0qb)
Life after Brexit

How will the vote to leave the EU affect big and small businesses in the UK? Evan Davis and guests discuss trade deals, tariffs and 'passporting' rights that allow UK-based firms to sell financial products and services from Britain to EU customers. They'll also explore how companies can turn the current economic uncertainty into business opportunities.

Guests:

Anne Richards, CEO, M & G Investments

Juergen Maier, CEO Siemens UK

Julia Gash, Founder and CEO, BIDBI

Jan Atteslander, EconomieSuisse

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07h2vmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07hhvxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b07h2vmp)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07h2vmr)
Boris Johnson quits leadership race

Shock decision means former London mayor won't be PM
Bank of England Governor says UK suffering from economic post traumatic stress disorder
and Brexit - the view from Ireland


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07hj3xh)
Graham Greene: The Third Man

Do you believe in ghosts?

Faced with the harsh fact that his old friend Harry Lime wasn’t the hero he thought him to be, Rollo is drowning his sorrows.

Doubting he’ll ever track down the third man present at Harry’s death, or even get Harry’s girl to fall in love with him, Rollo's desperate to leave the war-torn city. But the elusive Harry Lime is about to shock him one more time….

Samuel West continues reading Graham Greene's classic thriller, which was the inspiration for the 1949 film, starring Orson Welles.

Author: Graham Greene
Reader: Samuel West
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett
Music from the original soundtrack written and performed by Anton Karas.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


THU 23:00 The Now Show (b07hj3xk)
The Now Show 1916

The Now Show: 1916 is a non-topical show in which Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis and their very special guests look back exactly 100 years; from wartime humour and art to the politics and propaganda, the show that will be informative, funny, and a good degree more tasteful than the jokes told in the trenches.

Presenter ... Steve Punt
Presenter ... Hugh Dennis

Producer ... Ed Morrish

A BBC Studios Production.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07hj3xm)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster as the Government delays a decision on airport expansion until "at least October" after a new Prime Minister is installed in Number 10.
MPs line up to oppose plans to privatise the Land Registry for England and Wales. Peers urge action on obesity and call for changes in the way that allegations of historical sex abuse are investigated.



FRIDAY 01 JULY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07ht5sx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07hhvxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07ht5sz)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07ht5t1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07hwdgk)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07hwdgm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07ht5t3)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with a director of Christian charity Foolproof Creative Arts, Fiona Stewart.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07hwdwj)
Migrant workers, Rural development, Welsh environment secretary

We ask who will replace the European migrant workers picking UK fruit and veg post Brexit? And what happens to rural development projects funded by Brussels?


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwy14)
Black-Headed Gull

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Black-Headed Gull.
Black-Headed Gulls are our commonest small gull and throughout the year you can identify them by their rather delicate flight action, red legs and the white flash on the front edge of their wings.


FRI 06:00 Today (b07hwdgp)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07h60ls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07hj59r)
White Sands

Beginning

Much loved author Geoff Dyer has been described as a 'true original' by William Boyd. White Sands is his latest travel book and is a collection of travel essays that go beyond the logistics of getting from A to B and offer mediations on landscape, time and humanity all relayed with characteristic wit and sharp observation. In this last episode Dyer is back in Los Angeles, but an episode in hospital provokes a more internal journey.

Read by Alex Jennings who has recently played Willy Wonka in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Alan Bennett in The Lady in the Van.

Abridged by Katrin Williams
Produced by Julian Wilkinson.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07h2vns)
Gone with the Wind's Olivia De Havilland celebrates her 100th birthday.

Olivia De Havilland, Hollywood's golden age actress celebrates her 100th Birthday. BFI Southbank is screening a dozen of her films including the epic Gone with the Wind (Dir Victor Fleming). Isabel Stevens, curator at the BFI and Jennifer Smythe Professor of History at Warwick University discuss the life of the screen actor with reference to The Dark Mirror (Dir Robert Siodmak), The Snake Pit (Dir Anatole Litvak), The Heiress (Dir William Wyler), To Each His Own (Dir Mitchell Leisen).

The largest ever study to sequence the whole genomes of breast cancers has uncovered five new genes associated with the disease and 13 new mutational signatures that influence tumour development. It has been described as a milestone moment. Dr Serena Nik-Zainal from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute explains what it could mean for the future of breast cancer treatment.

As the nation marks the Centenary of the Battle of the Somme we find out what it was like to be a nurse on the front line during World War One. Jenni talks to Sara Robinson, the Great Niece of Edith Appleton, whose diaries from 1916 detail the day to day life in the nursing station during the battle, and Professor Alison Fell, who specialises in French and British women's experiences of World War I.

And experimental composer and turntablist Shiva Feshareki on electronic music pioneer Daphne Oram - co-founder of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop on recreating her 'lost work' Still Life, and how she's influenced her own work.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07hj65f)
How to Have a Perfect Marriage

Episode 5

Jack's risk-taking in his sexual encounters leave him feeling scared and contrite. Karen's best friend Miranda helps her to see there is a future with or without Jack. And Karen's parents' golden wedding anniversary help her and Jack to appreciate their own honest, tough-love kind of marriage.

In this third series of writer Nicholas McInerny's autobiographical look at modern relationships, Jack and Karen are at a crossroads. Two years after he came out, they're still married, still close, have a regular date night each week and are both involved in steering their girls through their teenage years.

But time doesn't stand still and Jack wants to live openly as a gay man. He wants to find out what that could mean. He also wants to be a good dad and keep his family healthy and safe. So it's time for more negotiations with Karen and the girls to see how they can remain a close and loving family and allow each other to grow in their own different ways.

Writer: Nicholas McInerny
Sound Designer: Alisdair McGregor
Director/Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 Who Are You Again? (b07hj65h)
Every day Mary Ann Sieghart blanks friends and colleagues in the street - some people think she is the rudest woman they know. She also claims to be the 'worst lobby correspondent in the world'.

She has prosopagnosia, more commonly known as face blindness. Sufferers have problems perceiving or remembering faces. It's thought around 1 in 50 of us has the condition- the chances are you or someone you know will have it - but many people don't even realise they have it.

Stephen Fry and former Health Secretary Patricia Hewitt are two of the well known people who have the condition and here they share how they've found ways of coping with it to get by in their careers.

In extreme cases, some sufferers don't recognise family members or even their own reflection. Concerns are rising that it could lead to issues in security, justice and misdiagnoses. Psychologists and psychiatrists are trying to learn more about the condition and its effects, calling for it to be recognised formally and screened for in schools and in jobs.

Mary Ann has long dreamed of a solution - could technology or even hormonal treatments help improve her ability? Or will the best solution simply be to make people more aware?

Presented by Mary Ann Sieghart
Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.


FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b04n6432)
Series 4

Episode 4

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, records a fourth series of his hit sketch show.

4/6: In the fourth edition of the series, John tries to present a classic sketch, but the others aren't going to help him. We also hear a speech from someone who followed their dream, and induct a new employee at Vicarstown train station, on the Island of Sodor.

The first series of John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Radio Academy award. The third series actually won a Radio Academy award.

In this fourth series, John has written more sketches, like the sketches from the other series. Not so much like them that they feel stale and repetitious; but on the other hand not so different that it feels like a misguided attempt to completely change the show. Quite like the old sketches, in other words, but about different things and with different jokes. (Although it's a pretty safe bet some of them will involve talking animals.)

Written by and starring ... John Finnemore
Also featuring ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.
Original music by ... Susannah Pearse & Sally Stares.
Producer ... Ed Morrish.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07h2vnv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Witness (b07hs0qp)
The Trial of Saddam Hussein

On July 1st 2004 the former Iraqi leader, Saddam Hussein made his first appearance in an Iraqi courtroom. Farhana Haider has spoken to his American defence lawyer, Ramsey Clark, about the trial and about his relationship with the former dictator.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07h2vnx)
Pensions, Car hire, Sibling sharers

Radio 4's consumer affairs programme. Is Brexit hitting pensioners already? And a government watchdog is to order greater transparency on car hire terms and conditions.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b07h2vnz)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b07h2vp1)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 Voices of the First World War (b07hj8b6)
The Somme: Over the Top

The final programme in this instalment of Voices of the First World War focuses on the first catastrophic ten minutes of the Battle of the Somme, with men recalling the orders they were given, the reality on the ground as it became clear the German wire hadn't been cut by the British bombardment and their memory of those around them being mown down by machine gun fire as they attempted to cross No Man's Land. Dan Snow brings together first hand accounts drawn from the sound archives of the IWM and the BBC, some vivid and detailed and others clearly clouded by the trauma of their experience and the intervening years, to reveal the devastation on the battlefield, and surviving soldiers' feelings about the heavy losses suffered by the British by the end of the day on 1st July.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07hj3xf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b07hj8b8)
Lance

A one-man show about growing up, hero-worship, betrayal and cycling, written and performed by Kieran Hodgson. It was nominated for the 2015 Edinburgh Comedy Award, receiving five star reviews and selling out tours across the country.

It is 2003 and the teenage Kieran is training for the Scouts Holme Valley Mountain Bike Challenge in West Yorkshire. Inspired to 'Just Do It' by his hero Lance Armstrong, a signed poster of the cycling superstar is his most precious possession. So how is he going to cope when he discovers his hero has betrayed him?

Kieran plays all the parts in this heartfelt story recorded in front of an audience by one of the country's up and coming comedy writers and performers. Kieran's recent television work includes playing the role of Ian Lavender in the BBC 2 drama We're Doomed! The Dad's Army Story.

Written and performed by Kieran Hodgson
Produced by Caroline Raphael
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07hj8bb)
Braintree and Bocking Public Gardens

Eric Robson and the panel pay a visit to Braintree and Bocking Public Gardens in Essex. Matthew Wilson, Christine Walkden and Pippa Greenwood answer the horticultural queries this week.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Christening (b07hj8bd)
A new short storyfrom the writer and former Blue Peter presenter Janet Ellis.

It is nearly the end of the school summer holidays. A young girl is invited to go to the local pool by a boy she likes. She's not keen on swimming and nervous around games and horseplay. Surviving an unexpected dunking, and bolstered by his concerned reaction, she feels older and stronger than before, and begins to shed her childish uncertainty and leave her childhood behind.

Written and read by Janet Ellis
Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07hj8bg)
Amjad Sabri, Lorna Kelly, Jerome Bruner, Bob Holman, Scotty Moore

Matthew Bannister on

The Pakistani qawwali singer Amjad Sabri. A huge star in his homeland, he was shot dead in his car in Karachi.

The auctioneer Lorna Kelly who turned her back on a glittering New York lifestyle to work with Mother Teresa.

The psychologist Jerome Bruner whose work brought new insight into how children learn.

Bob Holman who gave up his academic career to live and work with people on housing estates.

And Scotty Moore who played guitar on many of Elvis Presley's biggest hits.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07hj8bj)
Following the confirmation that the UK had voted to leave the European Union, BBC Radio 5Live cancelled their planned schedules and extended their phone-ins after being contacted by thousands of listeners. But some Feedback correspondents question whether the result merited the such comprehensive coverage and why some sports coverage was shelved. Other listeners have also queried the benefit of hearing "outlandish claims" being made by callers. Gill Farrington, 5Live's Breakfast programme editor answers these listeners' queries.

Feedback listeners also have concerns with how Radio 4 has been reporting on Brexit. Many feel that the station has a post-referendum tone of "doom and gloom".

And over the next two weeks, Feedback is exploring the pioneering world of visual radio. What's in the pipeline for your viewing? Is it taking resources away from other areas? What works best for each station's audience? It begins in 5Live where the Head of Digital Will Cooper details his plans.

And it's not often that we have an inbox full of audience members admitting to having cried at the radio, but narrative series The Boy Who Gave His Heart Away moved many listeners. The story unfolded over five days telling of two families faced with losing their children. Cole Moreton, who wrote and presented the series, gives the inside story of how it was made.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07hj8bl)
Victoria and Rosie - Looking After Martha

Fi Glover with a conversation in which a mum has the chance to thank her daughter for the tremendous support she's been in caring for her younger sister who has severe eczema. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b07h2vp3)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07h2vp5)
Gove says he's the "candidate for change"; ministers are trying to get him to stand down


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (b07hj8bn)
Series 16

Episode 3

The main political parties are in meltdown, Britain's future is uncertain, the currency has been in free fall. So it's probably time to relax and have a laugh at it all.
The show attempts to make sense of one of the busiest news weeks since... well, since last week.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07hj8bq)
Brian and Neil chat before the parish council meeting. Neil could hear the bongos from Kate's launch half the night. Lynda was apparently on them a lot and she sends her apologies for not attending the meeting. Eddie turns up which surprises Neil and Brian as he doesn't normally attend.

Kaz and Helen spend time in the garden at the mother and baby unit. Kat remarks that Helen has been subdued since Wednesday's hearing and when Jack cries Kaz makes Helen take him. Helen can't get her mind off the hearing and she opens up to Kaz about what it was like and her fear of what will happen to Henry while he's in Rob's care. Later, Helen discovers self-harm markings on Kaz's arm. Kaz reckons Helen has never done that but Helen says there are other ways of hurting yourself.

Brian gives the conclusions of the Wildlife Trust report to the parish council meeting. Neil raises the benefits that the elves have brought the village. Eddie stands up and suggests that the elves stay in Ambridge but not in the Millennium Wood. After the meeting Brian congratulates Eddie on his business acumen for his ElfWorld idea. At The Bull, Eddie reveals his plans for the elf migration and ElfWorld to Neil: Ambridge has got a new attraction and there's no reason why the Grundys shouldn't make the most of it.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07h2vp7)
Artistic Responses to the Battle of the Somme, from Jeremy Deller to the Caribbean

100 years to the day after the artillery bombardment ceased and the first whistle was blown, we remember those who took part in the Battle of the Somme, and how artists then and now have represented the costliest day in British military history.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07hj65f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07hj8bs)
Graham Brady MP, Caroline Flint MP, Paul Nuttall MEP, Matt Wrack.

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from St Nicholas Parish Church in Fleetwood, Lancashire, with a panel including the Chairman of the 1922 Committee Graham Brady MP, the former Labour Minister Caroline Flint MP, the Deputy Leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall MEP, and the General Secretary of the Fire Brigades Union Matt Wrack. They discuss topics including - whether there's been a rise in xenophobia post Brexit; the Conservative leadership contest; how long can can Jeremy Corbyn "hold on", and whether Nigel Farage should be involved in Brexit negotiations; and lastly whether a second referendum would produce the same results.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07hj8bv)
On Brexit

The philosopher John Gray argues that Brexit will have a greater impact on the EU than it will on the UK. And he predicts the British experience is likely to be repeated across much of continental Europe over the next few years.

But, he says, rather than recriminating about what is past, we should be looking to the future. "We find ourselves in a new world", he writes. "Why not make the best of it?"

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b042z1g4)
Pulped Fiction

The writer DJ Taylor examines the question of literary reputations and how they rise and fall. Is talent alone enough to ensure survival? Taylor argues that what allows a writer's work to endure is not straightforward merit, but something far more complex: an immensely subtle calibration of talent with the preoccupations of the age that follows. Tone, taste, fashion and luck all play a part. Taylor speaks to the writers Louis de Bernieres, Tracy Chevalier and David Lodge as well as to Professor Dame Hermione Lee, the critic Peter Kemp and to Simon Winder, the Publishing Director of Penguin Press. Along the way he'll discuss writers whose reputation have waxed and waned. He'll ask which writers deserve to be brought back and which ones are on the slide...


FRI 21:58 Weather (b07h2vp9)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07h2vpc)
Gunmen 'take 20 hostages' in Bangladesh cafe

Gunmen in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka have killed two policemen and taken a number of hostages in a café in the diplomatic quarter of the city. We get the latest. As Adnan Syed, the central character in the hit podcast Serial, is granted a retrial, we speak to his biggest supporter, Rabia Chaudhury. And BBC 6Music's Cerys Matthews on Wales' historic Euros victory.

Picture: Police in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Credit: EPA/STRINGER.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07hj93g)
Graham Greene: The Third Man

Bloody fool

Harry Lime is very much alive, but no longer the heroic figure from Rollo Martins’ school days. In a snow-covered, war-torn Vienna, Rollo decides to confront his old friend over the terrible crimes he’s said to have committed. But, first he has to track him down....

Samuel West reads the final part of Graham Greene's classic thriller - the inspiration for the 1949 film, starring Orson Welles.

Author: Graham Greene
Reader: Samuel West
Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett

Music from the original soundtrack written and performed by Anton Karas.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07hfwrk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07hj93j)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07hs855)
Jason and Sam - Sex and Social Media

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about how social media has changed the way we search for and find partners, between friends who regret the absence of romance in the new network. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b07h6fmh)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b07h6fmh)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07h9xdj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07h9xdj)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b07hgb4h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b07hgb4h)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07hhvy1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07hhvy1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07hj65f)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07hj65f)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b07hfwrk)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b07hfwrk)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07glx87)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b07hj8bv)

After Milk Wood 00:30 SUN (b044jh71)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b07hg4vl)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b07hg4vl)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b07gf9l7)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b07h6zg7)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07gctff)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07glx85)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b07hj8bs)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07h2v3y)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b042z1g4)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07h2vmf)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07h2vmf)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07h60ld)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b07h6n1q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07h6zg9)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07hg4vq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b07hhqtk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b07hj3xh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b07hj93g)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07h6fmf)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07h6fmf)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07h9xdg)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07h9xdg)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07hgb4f)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07hgb4f)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07hhvxz)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07hhvxz)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07hj59r)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07h2v86)

Bunk Bed 23:15 WED (b07hhqv2)

Christening 15:45 FRI (b07hj8bd)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b07gf9kv)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b07h6gwy)

David Hockney - Back in LA 16:00 MON (b07h6hft)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (b07glx81)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (b07hj8bn)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b07h60ls)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b07h60ls)

Don't Log Off 23:00 MON (b07h6zgc)

Dr Broks' Casebook 00:34 MON (b07h15zt)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b07h2v3d)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07gczrx)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07h65by)

Drama 14:15 MON (b03phpg2)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b03pjf43)

Drama 14:15 WED (b03pmb50)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b07hj8b8)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07gctdz)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07h69n5)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07h9xd6)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07hg5vp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b07hhsk0)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b07hwdwj)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b07glx7x)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b07hj8bj)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07gfjhr)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b07hgh5h)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b07h2vm3)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b07h2vcd)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b07h2vfx)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b07h2vjw)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b07h2vmm)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b07h2vp7)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07glx7q)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b07hj8bb)

Greece: Warehouse of Souls 20:00 MON (b07h6zg5)

Greece: Warehouse of Souls 11:00 WED (b07h6zg5)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b07h6qsp)

I've Never Seen Star Wars 18:30 WED (b04vkl9j)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07hhvxx)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07hhvxx)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07h2vfz)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 11:30 FRI (b04n6432)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b07dklgk)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07glx7v)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07hj8bg)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b07kdsdl)

Loose Ends 18:30 SAT (b07h2v3q)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b07gctdj)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b07h2v7h)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b07h2vbh)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b07h2vf4)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b07h2vhz)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b07h2vlq)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b07ht5sx)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b07hgb4c)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b07hgb4c)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07h2v30)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b07h2v30)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b07h2vjm)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b07hgh5f)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 TUE (b07hfwrm)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b07gfgv5)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b07h9xdl)

Nature 21:00 WED (b07hhqtd)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b07gctds)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b07h2v7r)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b07h2vbr)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b07h2vfd)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b07h2vj7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b07h2vlz)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b07hwdgm)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b07h2v7t)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b07gctf7)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b07h2v88)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b07h2vc0)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b07h2vfj)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b07h2vjc)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b07h2vm5)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b07h2vnv)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b07gctdv)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b07h2v7y)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b07h2v84)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b07gctfx)

News 13:00 SAT (b07gctfc)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b07h60lj)

One Day in Entebbe 20:00 TUE (b07hg4vg)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b07h9xdd)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b07h65c0)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b07h65c0)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b07hhwyh)

PM 17:00 SAT (b07gctfk)

PM 17:00 MON (b07h2vc8)

PM 17:00 TUE (b07h2vfs)

PM 17:00 WED (b07h2vjr)

PM 17:00 THU (b07h2vmh)

PM 17:00 FRI (b07h2vp3)

Pick of the Week 18:30 SUN (b07h2v8n)

Plum House 11:30 WED (b07hgb4m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07glxfg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b07h69n3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07ht2rc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b07hg5vm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b07hhsjy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b07ht5t3)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b07h2v3s)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b07h2v3s)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b07h2v3s)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07h60ll)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07h60ll)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07h60ll)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b07gh57v)

Rumblings from the Rafters 19:15 SUN (b07h65c6)

Saturday Live 09:30 SAT (b07gctf3)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07gctfv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07gctdn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07h2v7m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b07h2vbm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b07h2vf8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b07h2vj3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b07h2vlv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b07ht5t1)

Shakespeare's Restless World 19:45 SUN (b01g65gz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b07gctdl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b07gctdq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b07h2v7k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b07h2v7p)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b07h2v8g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b07h2vbk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b07h2vbp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b07h2vf6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b07h2vfb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b07h2vj1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b07h2vj5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b07h2vls)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b07h2vlx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b07ht5sz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b07hwdgk)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b07hfwrf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07gctfr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b07h2v8l)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b07h2vcb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b07h2vfv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b07h2vjt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b07h2vmk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b07h2vp5)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07h60lg)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b07h60lg)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b07h69n9)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b07h69n9)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07h60ln)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07h2v80)

Tales from the Stave 15:30 SAT (b07gfgv7)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 TUE (b07h9xdn)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07h60lq)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07h65c4)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07h65c4)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07h6qsr)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07h6qsr)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07hfwrr)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07hfwrr)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b07hgg2f)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b07hgg2f)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07hj3xf)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07hj3xf)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b07hj8bq)

The Bottom Line 22:30 SAT (b07gh583)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b07hj0qb)

The Break 11:30 MON (b07h6fmm)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b07hj0q8)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b07h65c2)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b07gh57x)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b07hwxs9)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b07h60lv)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b07h60lv)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b07hfwrh)

The Lach Chronicles 23:00 WED (b07hhqtq)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b07ffxsc)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b07ffxsc)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b07h60lz)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b07hgb4k)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b07hj8bl)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b07hs855)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b07h2vjp)

The Now Show 23:00 THU (b07hj3xk)

The Slow Machine 23:30 SAT (b07gdlk9)

The Tim Vine Chat Show 18:30 THU (b07hj0q6)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b07h6fmk)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b07h2v2y)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07h2v8d)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07h2vcj)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b07h2vg3)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b07h2vk0)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b07h2vmr)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b07h2vpc)

They Call Us Viet Kieu 11:30 THU (b07hhvy3)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b07hgcq0)

Tim Key Delves Into Daniil Kharms And That’s All 23:00 TUE (b072n5xc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b07h6zgf)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b07hg4vx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b07hhqv7)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b07hj3xm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b07hj93j)

Today 07:00 SAT (b07h2v2t)

Today 06:00 MON (b07h9xd8)

Today 06:00 TUE (b07h69n7)

Today 06:00 WED (b07hgb49)

Today 06:00 THU (b07hhvxv)

Today 06:00 FRI (b07hwdgp)

Tommies 14:15 THU (b07hhwyf)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03x45tq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03x45m5)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b01sbz1g)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03k5bk0)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03bkf9f)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03dwy14)

Voices of the First World War 13:45 MON (b07h6frq)

Voices of the First World War 13:45 TUE (b07hb1y2)

Voices of the First World War 13:45 WED (b07hgbj6)

Voices of the First World War 13:45 THU (b07hhvy5)

Voices of the First World War 13:45 FRI (b07hj8b6)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b07gctdx)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b07gctf1)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b07gctf9)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b07gctfp)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b07h2v7w)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b07h2v82)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b07h2v8b)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b07h2v8j)

Weather 05:56 MON (b07h2vbt)

Weather 12:57 MON (b07h2vc4)

Weather 21:58 MON (b07h2vcg)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b07h2vfn)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b07h2vg1)

Weather 12:57 WED (b07h2vjh)

Weather 21:58 WED (b07h2vjy)

Weather 12:57 THU (b07h2vm9)

Weather 21:58 THU (b07h2vmp)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b07h2vnz)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b07h2vp9)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b07h2v8q)

Who Are You Again? 11:00 FRI (b07hj65h)

Witness 12:04 MON (b07hrzf1)

Witness 12:04 TUE (b07hrzgd)

Witness 12:04 WED (b07hs0c5)

Witness 12:04 THU (b07hs0h0)

Witness 12:04 FRI (b07hs0qp)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b07gctfh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b07h2vby)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b07h2vfg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b07h2vj9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b07h2vm1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b07h2vns)

World at One 13:00 MON (b07h2vc6)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b07h2vfq)

World at One 13:00 WED (b07h2vjk)

World at One 13:00 THU (b07h2vmc)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b07h2vp1)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b07h2vc2)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b07h2vfl)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b07h2vjf)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b07h2vm7)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b07h2vnx)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b07glxfj)