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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 JUNE 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07djvw4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07f4yrr)
Only in Naples

Episode 5

Fresh out of college in 1996, Katherine arrives in Naples from America to intern at the United States Consulate. "There is a chaotic, vibrant energy about Naples that forces you to let go and give in," writes Katherine, who meets handsome, studious Salvatore and finds herself immediately enveloped by his elegant mother, Raffaella, and the rest of the Avallone family. From that moment, Katherine's education begins: Never eat the crust of a pizza first, always stand up and fight for yourself and your loved ones, and consider mealtimes sacred-food must be prepared fresh and consumed in compagnia.
Immersed in Neapolitan culture, traditions, and cuisine, slowly and unexpectedly falling for Salvatore, and longing for Raffaella's company and guidance, Katherine discovers how to prepare meals that sing, from hearty, thick ragù to comforting rigatoni alla Genovese, to name but two.
Through courtship, culture clashes, Sunday services, marriage, and motherhood (in Naples, a pregnancy craving must always be satisfied!), Katherine comes to appreciate carnale, the quintessentially Neapolitan sense of comfort and confidence in one's own skin. Raffaella and her famiglia are also experts at sdrammatizzare, knowing how to suck the tragedy from something and spit it out with a great big smile. Part travel tale, part love letter, Only in Naples is a sumptuous story that is a feast for the senses.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07djvwd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07djvwl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07djvwn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07djvwq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07dp2jb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b07dp2jd)
'Learn the art of patience'

One iPM listener's story of becoming a full time carer for his grandfather with dementia.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07djvws)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b07djvx1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b07dnqjl)
Series 33

Severn Way with Lucy Newcombe

Clare Balding continues this series of epic walks by meeting up with a retired RAF officer, Lucy Newcombe, who started walking round the coast of Britain last summer. By the time her journey ends she expects to have covered over six thousand miles. Lucy and Clare discuss the kindness of strangers, their love of the British countryside, home-made cake and the best way to deal with dogs. They walk for six miles along the Severn Way and are joined by Lucy's sister in law, Laura, who, as she lives locally, has been operating as landlady, laundress and taxi driver for the past two weeks. She tells Clare about the changes this journey has made to Lucy, once a loner, now discovering that she likes the company of her fellow man. Lucy however insists she's not walking alone to discover herself, find her inner voice or to make plans for a new career. Lucy walks for the joy of it and the chance to see more of the country she loves.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07djvx8)
Farming Today This Week: Royal Welsh Grassland Event

Caz Graham finds out about all things green and grassy, from fresh hay and forage to the making of next winter's silage at the Royal Welsh Grassland Event, which took place on Thursday at the Rhug Estate in North Wales. Caz meets local farmers who're eyeing up the latest machinery, and tries one for size, a mere £250,000 for a forage harvester, with a seat that can be either heated or air-conditioned. Estate farm manager Gareth Evans is just relieved that the sun's shining, given that the first such grassland event was a total washout, and one month ago his acres of pasture still hadn't started growing. But it all came good in the end.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b07djvxg)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b07f8q9t)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07djvxt)
Freddie Fox

Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir are joined by

Actor Freddie Fox starred in TV drama Cucumber, has played Romeo, and is currently performing the parts of both Demetrius and Bottom in a madcap production of A Midsummer Night's dream.

Rescued from Kolkata riverside by Mother Theresa, Gautam Lewis went on to carve a career in the music industry working with bands like The Libertines. He joins us on Saturday Live to tell us his extraordinary story.

Referee Mary Harmer is a football referee. She talks about her love of football, her path to becoming a referee and how volunteering helped her.

A jelly version of Buckingham Palace has popped up on social media this week, and Tim Simpson is the man responsible for this and other strange concoctions such as a lifesize chocolate Benedict Cumberbatch and a tweed suit for a horse. He'll tell us how and why.

JP meets record producer John Schroeder who worked with Status Quo, Cliff Richard and Helen Shapiro, and whose cat, Treasure, could predict a number one hit.

We have the inheritance tracks of hairdresser to the stars Nicky Clarke who chooses Starman by David Bowie and Beautiful Boy by John Lennon, and your thank yous.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07f8q9w)
Series 13

Birmingham

Jay Rayner hosts the last programme in this series from Birmingham. Catalan cook Rachel McCormack, Japanese-inspired Masterchef winner Tim Anderson, Chinatown Kitchen's Lizzie Mabbott and expert in all things material Zoe Laughlin answer the culinary questions.

This week, the panel learn about the history of chocolate making in the city as well as offering their own tips on the best chocolates to use in different types of cooking. And Tim Anderson ups the ante by brandishing his blowtorch in order to extol the virtues of cheap chocolate!

The panel also considers how best to use coffee in cooking - giving Rachel McCormack the opportunity to get some coffee gripes off her chest. And there's advice on which dishes work best with a dash of lime.

We also hear from the chocolate historian Deborah Cadbury and Irene De Boo, Curator of Industry and Transport at The Black Country Living Museum.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Hannah Newton

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b07f8q9y)
Isabel Hardman of the Spectator explores the art of select committee interrogation with an expert practitioner, the Labour MP Margaret Hodge, and a leading barrister, John Cooper QC. She also discusses the troubled question of how to define Englishness with MPs Jamie Reed, Douglas Carswell and Tommy Sheppard. And is parliament still plagued by a culture of boozing to excess? The sketchwriter Quentin Letts and Tory MP Dr Dan Poulter discuss.
The editor is Leala Padmanabhan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07djvy2)
Old Habits Die Hard

Around the world in less than half an hour. A slump in global oil prices has hit Angola hard but still, there are glimpses of wealth everywhere while abject poverty's still never far away. The Iraqi city of Basra is governed by hardline Iranian-backed Islamist politicians but that doesn't stop its citizens enjoying themselves at a brand new shopping mall they call Times Square. What happens to the clothes you give away to charity shops? Many are beginning a journey which could lead to countries in Asia or Africa - but first stop, we learn, might be a giant warehouse in Hungary. The quality of the air in Hong Kong has reached new lows and people are becoming ill with respiratory problems and cancers - we're off in search of the one spot in the city that usually escapes the smog. And, in the primary schools of France they take poetry very seriously indeed. That can mean a homework nightmare for the children - and for their parents too.

PHOTO: People shop at a street market in Luanda on July 3, 2015. (ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07djvyd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07f8qb0)
Energy switching - How many suppliers does it take to change your provider?

Details of how the UK's largest sports retailer Sports Direct pays some of its workers were revealed to MPs this week. The Business Innovation and Skills Committee is looking into working practices at the company. It heard evidence from the Unite union that prepaid debit cards are used to pay some workers from Eastern Europe their wages. They come with a £10 a month fee for workers who are also charged for cash withdrawals and associated texts. Lesley Curwen speaks to Craig James, Chairman of the Prepaid International Forum, a trade association that represents the prepaid card industry.

As industry body Energy UK launches a Switch Guarantee which aims to help households change providers in 21 days instead of four to six weeks, Audrey Gallacher, Director of Energy Supply at Energy UK, outlines how they plan to achieve that and Money Box listener Angie shares her switching story. It didn't go to plan...

The state pensions of 472,000 British retirees who now live in another EEA country receive a yearly increase. Could that change if the UK votes to leave the EU? We hear from Tom Selby, Senior Analyst with AJ Bell.

There's concern from the Financial Services Consumer Panel, which advises the regulator, the FCA, that millions of people will miss out on receiving impartial financial advice after the Money Advice Service closes. MAS was set up in 2010 to provide debt and financial advice. Questions over whether it was delivering value for money were raised in a National Audit Office report. A March 2016 budget announcement confirmed plans to abolish the service and replace it with a smaller advice body. Sue Lewis is Chair of the Financial Services Consumer Panel.

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Reporter: Kevin Peachey
Producer: Charmaine Cozier
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b07dp051)
Series 90

Episode 9

Jeremy Hardy, Sarah Kendall, Camilla Long and Lucy Porter are Miles' guests in the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.

A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b07djvyg)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b07djvyj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07dp055)
Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh MP, Lord Forsyth, Ian Murray MP, Merryn Somerset Webb

Ritula Shah presents political debate from George Watson's College in Edinburgh with the SNP MP Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh, Conservative peer Lord Forsyth, the Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland Ian Murray MP, and Editor-in-chief of MoneyWeek Merryn Somerset Webb.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07djvyl)
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email is any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Or tweet, the hastag is BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b07f8qh8)
Dorothy Baker - Cassandra at the Wedding

Hayley Atwell stars in Dorothy Baker's whip-smart family drama about a headstrong student hell-bent on sabotaging her identical twin sister's wedding day.

Published in 1962, Baker's touching, witty and sharp character study is an over-looked 20th century American literary classic, featuring a protagonist easily as headstrong, vulnerable and compelling as Catcher in the Rye's Holden Caulfield.

Cassandra Edwards is a clever, popular and attractive 24-year-old grad student at California's Berkeley University. But she is missing one thing - her much loved identical twin sister, Judith. Cassandra's seemingly gilded life is sent into a tailspin when she finds out that Judith is marrying someone she has only just met, a nice young doctor from Connecticut.

Cassandra heads home to her family ranch to stop the wedding by any means at her disposal - namely a clutch purse full of pills, a taste for brandy and her own biting wit. She plunges herself back into the heart of a family still reeling from the death of the mother, and finds herself having to face the challenge of finding out who you really are when you think you're only one half of a complete person.

Adapted by Peter Flannery, the multi-award-winning stage and television writer who created Our Friends in the North, The Devil's Whore and who adapted the George Gently novels for BBC One.

Sound Design: Eloise Whitmore
Written by Dorothy Baker
Adapted by Peter Flannery

Director/Producer: Melanie Harris
Executive Producer: Jo Meek
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07djvyn)
Fawcett Society 150 years, Patricia Clarkson, Isabelle Huppert

150 years of the Fawcett Society. On June 7th 1866 John Stuart Mill and Henry Fawcett handed the first petition to parliament demanding the vote for women. So what has been the impact of feminism on women's lives? We hear from Helen Pankhurst the great granddaughter of Emmeline and granddaughter of Slyvia, Laura Perrins the co-editor of the Conservative Women's website, Leyla Hussein psychotherapist and the founder of the Dahlia Project and Yvonne Roberts the journalist and novelist.

Patricia Clarkson stars in the new film Learning to Drive about a woman who finally takes lessons following the break up of her marriage. She tells us what it's like to be Hollywood hot property at the age of 56.

With less than two weeks to go before the EU Referendum, how important are the votes of those still to make up their minds and what are the issues that will sway women voters? Dr Michelle Harrison of the global market research organisation Kantar discusses.

The Radium Girls painted dials with radium in 1920s America. Licking the brushes they used to sharpen the point unaware of the risks to their health, they soon had problems with their teeth, gums, and limbs. We hear from the writer Kate Moore on how they fought to get their employers to admit liability.

Hillary Clinton is almost certain to be claimed the Democratic presidential nominee after decisive victories in the California, New Jersey and New Mexico primaries. But what do US women make of Hillary Clinton? Kelly Dittmar, a scholar at the Centre for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, and black feminist writer Tiffanie Drayton, discuss.

Isabelle Huppert on her latest role as one of Greek's mythology's most controversial female figures, Phaedra.

Music journalist Sylvia Patterson shares the highlights of 30 years writing about pop music starting at Smash Hits magazine in the 1980s.


SAT 17:00 PM (b07djvyq)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b07dntkc)
Old Dog, New Tricks

It is not easy to teach new tricks to the business world's old dogs. The latest fashionable solution for big corporations slowed down by bureaucracy and traditional ways of thinking is to incubate tech start-ups. The idea is that the big corporation benefits from the creativity and "can do" attitude of the start-up. In return the start-up gets funding, professional advice and help navigating the corporate world to reach the top decision makers. The model is known as "corporate acceleration" and it is growing in popularity. Evan Davis hears how it works.

GUESTS:

Jess Williamson, Director, Techstars with Barclays FinTech Accelerator

David Fogel, Head of Accelerator & Deputy Director at Wayra UK

Emily Forbes, Founder, Seenit

Producer: Julie Ball.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07djvys)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b07djvyv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07djvyx)
Jeremy Corbyn has been out on the campaign trail urging Labour supporters to vote to stay in the European Union - amid claims that huge numbers of them are preparing to back Brexit.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07f8qk3)
Sara Cox, Arthur Smith, Karl Hyde, Stuart Skelton, Emma Kennedy, Jack Carroll, Nadine Shah, Bombino

Sara Cox and Arthur Smith are joined by Underworld's Karl Hyde, opera singer Stuart Skelton, author and actress Emma Kennedy and comedian Jack Carroll for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Nadine Shah and Bombino.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b07f8qk5)
Mike Ashley

This week the Sports Direct founder Mike Ashley gave evidence to a Business Select Committee inquiry into working conditions at his firm. In a rare public appearance, he admitted that the company had been paying employees less than the minimum wage. But how much do we really know about this secretive billionaire? He is one of the most intriguing characters in British business but also one of the most elusive. He is the driving force behind the Sports Direct empire, entrepreneur, owner of Newcastle United and once a possible saviour of BHS. In this programme Edward Stourton searches for the secret behind Mike Ashley's huge retail success and asks how much control he really has over his business.

This programme contains material from a previous episode of Profile about Mike Ashley first broadcast on Saturday 23 Feb 2013.

Producer: Laura Gray.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07djvyz)
Deep Blue Sea, Fire At Sea, Edmund White, Winifred Knights, Outcast/Preacher

Terrence Rattigan's post-war classic Deep Blue Sea opens in a new production at London's NationalTheatre; dealing with need, loneliness and long-repressed passion. Directed by Carrie Cracknell with Helen McRory as Hester
Fire At Sea is the Italian documentary which won The Golden Bear at this year's Berlin Film festival. Set on the Sicilian Island of Lampedusa, it examines the lives of the locals and the migrants who land there.
Edmund White's novel Our Young Man is a work of gay fiction set in the world of modelling in 1980s New York, with an apparently-ageless central character and the spectre of AIDS on the horizon.
Dulwich Picture Gallery is staging an exhibition of the works of early 20th century painter British Winifred Knights
We consider a couple of recent supernatural/horror TV dramas - Outcast and Preacher.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Bidisha, Shahidha Bari and David Benedict. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07f8qkk)
The Bomb That Made Manchester?

The massive regeneration of Manchester has happened so rapidly - arguably outstripping that of any other British city in recent years - that it's only natural that its population looks for a reason to explain it. The simplest, and the one that's taken hold most profoundly, is that the 1996 IRA bomb that destroyed a large section of the city centre provided the essential catalyst for the renaissance that has subsequently taken place. Although nearly two hundred people were injured, there were no fatalities on the day; combined with the fact that much of the damage centred on the widely disliked Arndale Shopping Centre, people soon began to talk of this as an opportunity rather than a tragedy. Michael Symmons Roberts sets out to investigate whether it was in fact the bomb that did it, or whether the changes that have happened would have done so anyway, just at a slower rate - after all, bold projects were already underway in Manchester, most notably the successful bid to host the Commonwealth Games. Michael goes back over the archive, listening to not just reports from the day but also the debates around city planning more generally that were triggered by the devastation wreaked by the bomb - and finds out the extent to which Manchester's success offers a template for other cities, like Detroit and Christchurch, that have faced devastating blows.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b07dk01s)
George Bernard Shaw - Major Barbara

Episode 1

Barbara's mission is to save East End souls in the West Ham Salvation shelter. A tale of rich privilege and a battle of wills. All wrapped up in a romance, the return of a long lost father and a little matter of finding a foundling to carry on the Undershaft arms and gunpowder empire.

Starring Eleanor Tomlinson and Rebecca Front.

Written in 1905, George Bernard Shaw’s classic is funny, enjoyable and crafty in dividing opinion and it leaves you pondering whether anything has changed over the years.

At its heart - a simple and intriguing conflict: the struggle between arms manufacturer Andrew Undershaft and his Salvationist daughter Barbara. Can a father win his daughter's heart and mind?

All the best things about Shaw are here - the humour, the teasing paradoxical thinking and the sense of life being both absurd and deadly serious. How should people be ruled and how should they be helped? And who is really pulling the strings in the struggle for power - politicians or money?

Barbara ...... Eleanor Tomlinson
Adolphus (Dolly) ...... Jack Farthing
Lady Britomart ...... Rebecca Front
Andrew Undershaft ...... Matthew Marsh
Stephen ...... Joel MacCormack
Sarah ...... Scarlett Brookes
Charles (Cholly) ...... Kieran Hodgson
Morrison ...... Brian Protheroe
Mrs Baines ...... Susan Jameson
Jenny Hill ...... Nicola Ferguson
Bill Walker ...... Ewan Bailey
Snobby Price ...... Sargon Yelda
Rummy Mitchens ...... Adie Allen
Peter Shirley ...... Sean Baker

Concertina played by Colin Guthrie and Cornet by Peter Ringrose.

Director: Tracey Neale

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07djvz1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b07dm2ps)
The Morality of Business

The sales signs are going up in 163 BHS shops around the country as the liquidators try to salvage something from the wreckage of this once proud company. When Sir Philip Green bought BHS in 2000, it was making a profit. By the time he sold it in 2015, for £1, to a three-times bankrupt with no retailing experience, it was making a loss and the company pension fund was more than £400m in deficit. Exactly what went wrong at BHS is the subject of no fewer than four separate inquires. What is certain is that it's you and I, the tax payers, who will pick up the bill for the redundancy payments for the 11,000 staff and responsibility for the 20,000 members of the BHS company pension scheme. The head of the Institute of Directors described the affair as deeply damaging to the British business world. It's all a far cry from the days of Quaker philanthropy that inspired so many Victorian entrepreneurs. The study of business ethics is one of the few growth areas of the economy. You might be forgiven for wondering how effective such courses are when we see so many headlines about companies avoiding tax, walking away from pension liabilities, using legal loopholes to make excessive profits, zero hours contracts, falsifying data, mis-selling... The list goes on. Do companies have any moral duty beyond the bottom line? Is the only duty of a company to make money for its shareholders within the law? Where and how do we draw the line between legal duty to shareholders and moral duty to society? The individuals that run companies have moral agency, but is there such a thing as a collective, corporate moral agency? Can we impose a set of moral values, or a social licence, on a company? Or will that create a climate of "What can we get away with?" rather than "What is right?"?
Chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Mathew Taylor and Melanie Phillips. Witnesses are Dr Steve Davies, Dawn Foster, Prof Chris Cowton and John Morrison.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b07dklgc)
Series 6

Birmingham City University

Steve Punt hosts the battle of wits as three students from Birmingham City University take on their professors.

A funny and dynamic quiz show with specialist subjects including Visual Communication, English Literature and Sociology.

Questions range from Squash and Stretch to Roger McGough via Clement Attlee and the Duckworth-Lewis Method.

Producer: David Tyler.

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b07dk0y3)
Attila the Stockbroker's Mum

Roger McGough with listeners' requests, including a moving poem by Attila the Stockbroker reflecting on his mother's rich life before Alzheimer's gradually robbed her of her memory.
The readers this week are Simon Armstrong, Rosie Cavaliero, Attila the Stockbroker and Radio 4 announcer and poetry lover, Zeb Soanes.

Producer Christine Hall.



SUNDAY 12 JUNE 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07fdxnw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 After Milk Wood (b04368ff)
Polly Garter Was My Great Gran

In 'After Milk Wood', three acclaimed writers take their inspiration from Dylan Thomas's greatest work, 'Under Milk Wood'. The stories have been commissioned to commemorate the centenary of the birth of the great Welsh writer, Dylan Thomas, and were recorded at the Laugharne Festival in Wales.

Today Ruth Jones reads her own story, 'Polly Garter Was my Great Gran' - celebrating a colourful life of love.

The Reader is Ruth Jones - Ruth Jones is an acclaimed comedy actor and writer, known best for the BAFTA Award-winning series Gavin and Stacey which she co-wrote and starred in with James Corden. Jones was judged the Best Female Comedy Newcomer at the 2007 British Comedy Awards, and was also nominated for Best Television Comedy Actress. She received an MBE in 2014.
The producer is Justine Willett.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxny)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07fdxp0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxp2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07fdxp4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07fdyq1)
St David's, Moreton-in-Marsh

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from the Parish Church of St. David, Moreton in Marsh, Gloucestershire. The church's west tower and spire is over 35 metres high and houses eight bells. The tenor weighs ten hundredweight and is tuned to G. We hear them ringing, "Kent Treble Bob Major".


SUN 05:45 Profile (b07f8qk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07fdxp6)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07fdzjs)
Heresy

The poet Michael Symmons Roberts explores the subject of heresy and puts some surprising names under the spotlight including the Sex Pistols and that unlikely heretic George Herbert. Michel explains, "I'd always thought that John Donne was the metaphysical poet who really 'wrestled with God', but now I think it's George."

He starts his journey though by referencing the 500th anniversary of Thomas Moore's Utopia, "a remarkable vision, progressive and impressive in its openness to different beliefs" and tries to square the author of that with the more familiar Thomas More we know through dramas like Wolf Hall. "...maybe those two Thomas Mores are like before and after shots, with the seismic events of the reformation, Luther's challenge to historic orthodoxy, causing More's radical change of heart."

But a main focus of Michael's thinking are the various witch trials and witch hunts that take him through the heart wrenching Salem witch trials, the injustice inflicted on Isobel Gowdie and the extraordinary visions of Margery Kempe, "she was accused of Lollardy, of siding with the heretical anti-clerical reform movement known as the Lollards, and she made some pretty powerful enemies, like the then Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Arundel. But it's safe to say that her legacy is a lot more impressive than Thomas Arundel's." Michael's journey is accompanied by the music of James MacMillan, Aaron Copland and Radiohead whose recent release, "Burn the Witch" begins the programme.

Presenter: Michael Symmons Roberts
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b07fdzjv)
Sticklebacks

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

Sunlight reflecting through a jam-jar of small fish - collected from a local stream is often a golden childhood memory and one which can open the door to a lifetime of wildlife observation. Those 'tiddlers' in the jar were often the three-spined stickleback - one of the most common of British fishes and a voracious predator to boot. In this programme from 2005, Lionel Kelleway joins stickleback biologist Dr Iain Barber in a mid-Wales lake to relive his boyhood nature rambles and with his net in hand.

For such small fish, sticklebacks have an impressive reputation as models for scientific research. They have aided our advancement and understanding of many diverse fields from behaviour to evolution, biology to disease, propelling this little fish to the forefront of modern biological research.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b07fdxp8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07fdxpc)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07fdxpf)
Football, 1975 referendum, The Queen

As the nation celebrates the Sovereign's 90th Birthday, Mark Greene - co-author of 'The Servant Queen and the King She Serves' - talks to Edward Stourton about the Queen's faith.

There is currently a campaign in Australia to repeal a law which allows people to use a so-called 'gay panic' defence in murder cases; if someone makes a sexual advance, you can claim that was the reason you lost control and killed them. The growing demand to change this law is being led by Roman Catholic priest Fr Paul Kelly.

Hazel Southam visits St Luke's Church in Wolverhampton - which is on the Church of England's top ten endangered buildings list - to investigate the problems faced by congregations who find themselves in charge of historic buildings.

The Pan-orthodox Council taking place on Crete next week has been in the planning since the 1920s. In fact, the last one was held over 1000 years ago. Russian Orthodox priest Fr Cyril Hovorun explains why the alliance between the orthodox churches is so fragile.

Rosie Dawson speaks to Libby Lane and Philip North who have been the bishops of Stockport and Burnley for 18 months. They discuss their friendship, which has not always been easy as they hold opposing views on the ordination of women.

As EURO 2016 gets underway, three football fanatics discuss their faith and the beautiful game.

Historian Dr Robert Saunders talks to Edward about the churches' role during the 1975 EEC referendum campaign.

A UN committee has called on the British government to repeal a law that school children in the UK to take part in a daily act of Christian worship. Dr Alison Mawhinney analyses the UN's concerns.

Producers:
Helen Lee
David Cook

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancock.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07fdzjx)
Partnership for Children

Marcus Brigstocke presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Partnership for Children
Registered Charity No 1089810
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Partnership for Children '
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Partnership for Children'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b07fdxph)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07fdxpk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07fdzjz)
Sandringham

A service of Matins according to the Book of Common Prayer from the Church of St Mary Magdalene, Sandringham, where Her Majesty the Queen and the Royal Family spend every Christmas. The service is led by the Rector of Sandringham, Canon Jonathan Riviere, with the Bishop of Norwich, the Rt Revd Graham James. The music is directed by Claire Stewart and the organist is Derek Thomas. Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07dp057)
How Should We Build?

Roger Scruton says we should protect the English countryside by making beauty our priority when we build new houses while in towns we should reverse the damage done in previous decades.

"Surely the time has come to tear down the post-war estates, and to recover the old street lines that they extinguished."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x45bg)
Sand Martin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the sand martin. The flickering shapes of sand martins over a lake or reservoir are a welcome sign of spring. After winging their way across the Sahara Desert, the first birds usually arrive in the UK in March. They're smaller than house martins or swallows, and they're brown above and white below with a brown band across their chest. Often you can hear their dry buzzing calls overhead before you see them.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07fdxpy)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07ff0hg)
It is a busy day at Brookfield, and Lynda eyes up the competition.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07ff0hj)
Warwick Davis

Kirsty Young's castaway is the actor Warwick Davis.

His career began thanks to his grandmother who heard a radio advert calling for short people to be in the latest of George Lucas's Star Wars films.
He played his first role as an Ewok in Star Wars when he was 11 years old and found himself on set with his childhood heroes. Since then he's worked on all the Harry Potter films, appeared in TV sitcoms, documentaries, horror movies, quiz shows and Christmas pantomimes.

Born with Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita (SED), a rare disorder of bone growth which results in dwarfism, the view of his doctors was that he'd be wheelchair bound and unlikely to live beyond his teens. Now in his mid-forties, he is married with two children of his own.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07fdxq0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07gf9l1)
Series 75

Episode 4

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 75th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

In this episode Paul Merton, Josh Widdicombe, Holly Walsh and Marcus Brigstocke join Nicholas Parsons as they try to shine discussing such diverse topics as The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, The Bard, and A Nice Cup of Tea.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.
Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b07ff0hl)
That Gut Feeling: Part One

Dan Saladino discovers the world of the gut microbiota, the vast array of microbes within us all. From East Africa to the White House, it's a story that'll change the way you eat.

Dan is joined by Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's College London, and author of The Diet Myth - The Real Science Behind What We Eat. Tim tells the story of how he became fascinated by the gut microbiome and our diet.

The programme also features a Dutch draper named Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, co-founder of the American Gut Project Jeff Leach, evolutionary biochemist Dr Nick Lane, and Alexandre Meybeck - a Senior Officer at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation.

Presenter: Dan Saladino
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b07fdxq2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07fdxq4)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 In Wales the Ball Is Round (b07ff0hn)
A Welsh Football Future

Football is the Welsh national sport. Yes, you read that right. Comedian and writer Elis James gives a polemical appraisal of football's role in constructing modern Welsh identity. (2/2)

The story of football in Wales tells a richer, geographically-wider, more socially-inclusive national story than rugby, the country's much vaunted "national sport". The Welsh football story has long embraced crosspollination from ethnic communities, the influx and growth of industries other than coal and steel, and the myriad geographical, social and linguistic divisions that crisscross Wales. In 2016, more Welsh people watch football and follow their local team than rugby; six times as many Welsh women play football than its oval-balled cousin.

But no-one's listening. Across Offa's Dyke and within the Welsh media, we're being sold a myth. Rugby articulates a set of comfy, uninterrogated clichés about a fabled Welsh national psyche (Poetry! Coal mines! Celts! Oppressed by the English!) that's ossified. Only in the story of Welsh football - virtually ignored by British sporting media - does one find laid bare the difficult, rich tapestry of Wales today.

As the Welsh national football team embarks on its first major tournament for nearly sixty years, Elis James examines why sport plays such a key role - within Wales and to all of us - in constructing different kinds of national, ethnic and personal identities. What are the difficulties and myths that are generated when a sport is elevated to "national" status? And for small nations like Wales taking confidence from the patriotism their national teams generate - how much does a national sport help them stand on their own two feet - and how much does it distract from the hard questions of what it means to be a nation?

In the second and final episode, Elis James explores the reality of Welsh identity in 2016. He argues that football offers a route to understanding Wales now and in the future - and explores the economic and philosophical value of the global reach of football offers to Wales.

With contributions from Martin Johnes, Sarah Dunant, Laura McAllister, Dai Smith and Simon Kuper.

Producer: Steven Rajam.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07dnyvz)
Keswick

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Keswick. Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Bunny Guinness answer the questions from the audience.

The panel offer advice on wormeries, how to avoid Phytophthora, and a sure-fire way of growing Peonies. They also help an audience member with a question on how to grow vegetables in winter and reveal their Topical Tips for this time of year.

Eric Robson takes a tour round the nearby Wordsworth House and Gardens.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07ff0hq)
Sunday Omnibus - Saying Goodbye

Fi Glover introduces conversations that reflect on loss and also prepare for it, in this special Omnibus Edition from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b07ff197)
George Bernard Shaw - Major Barbara

Episode 2

While Barbara is out in the East End trying to save souls and raise money for the Salvation Army, Undershaft tells Dolly the two things neccessary for Salvation are money and gunpowder and once he's got the Army he'll have Barbara too.

Is he, as Dolly suspects, an infernal old rascal?

The conclusion of George Bernard Shaw’s classic starring Matthew Marsh and Eleanor Tomlinson.

Barbara ..... Eleanor Tomlinson
Adolphus (Dolly) ..... Jack Farthing
Andrew Undershaft ..... Matthew Marsh
Lady Britomart ..... Rebecca Front
Stephen ..... Joel MacCormack
Sarah ..... Scarlett Brookes
Charles (Cholly) ..... Kieran Hodgson
Morrison ..... Brian Protheroe
Mrs Baines ..... Susan Jameson
Jenny Hill ..... Nicola Ferguson
Bill Walker ..... Ewan Bailey
Snobby Price ..... Sargon Yelda
Man ..... Sean Baker
Woman ..... Adie Allen

Concertina played by Colin Guthrie and Cornet by Peter Ringrose.

Director: Tracey Neale.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07ff199)
Historical Fiction

Mariella Frostrup talks to Icelandic novelist Sjon. His new book Moonstone The Boy Who Never Was won both the Literary Prize and the Booksellers' Novel of the Year in his home country and is now being published in the UK. It's set in 1918 and tells the story of a teenage boy, obsessed by films, who witnesses huge changes in Iceland when a flu epidemic sweeps through the population.
And what is historical fiction? Mariella and guests look at the changing face of the genre, from swashbuckling adventures to fictionalizing our recent past.


SUN 16:30 Adelia Prado: Voice of Brazil (b07ff1n1)
A rare encounter with one of Brazil's most extraordinary poets. Adélia Prado has shunned the spotlight since her discovery in 1976 - then a 40-year-old mother of five living in the interior state of Minas Gerais. Now aged 80, her sensual, devout, sometimes provocative poetry is read and admired around the world.

For this programme, in the company of her long-time translator and fellow poet Ellen Doré Watson, she invites us into her home to talk about her life and work.

Adélia Prado was discovered by Brazil's foremost modern poet, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, who launched her literary career with the announcement that St Francis was dictating verses to a housewife in the backwaters of the interior state of Minas Gerais. She writes about the transcendent in ordinary life, of how the human experience is both mystical and carnal. She has been called one of the major voices of the Americas, who 'would remind you of Emily Dickinson if she didn't keep reminding you of Walt Whitman'.

With Poetic Licence, Denouement, Seduction, Neighbourhood and Day from The Alphabet in the Park: Selected Poems of Adélia Prado, published by Wesleyan. Copyright 1990 Adélia Prado and Ellen Doré Watson. The Mystical Rose and Spiritual Exercise from Ex-Voto: Poems of Adélia Prado, published by Tupelo Press. Copyright 2013 Adélia Prado and Ellen Doré Watson. Adélia Prado, The Mystical Rose: Selected Poems, translated by Ellen Doré Watson (Bloodaxe Books, 2014). Used with permission.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07dlxxt)
The Cancer Drugs Fund

Over the past five years thousands of patients in England have been given access to new but expensive cancer drugs through a special Cancer Drugs Fund. But critics argue that hundreds of millions have been spent on drugs that offered poor value for money with sometimes limited effects. The Fund is now being reformed but cancer charities have written to the Prime Minister to express deep concern that drugs will now struggle to gain approval. Phil Kemp investigates the record of the Cancer Drugs Fund and asks if the proposed changes will offer better value for money or access for patients.

Reporter: Phil Kemp
Producer: Anna Meisel.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b07f8qk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxq6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b07fdxq8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07fdxqb)
Dozens shot dead at a gay nightclub in Orlando in Florida; US declares state of emergency


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07ff2ks)
Ian McMillan

The poet and broadcaster Ian McMillan presents Pick of the Week: There's a musical theme and variations to Pick of the Week this week: I hear the bleeps and bloops of computer music or, as the aficionados call it, ChipChune and I hear a well-known novelist's encounter with a saxophone, or as my Uncle Frank called it The Devil's Piccolo. I eavesdrop on two middle-aged men chuntering from bunk beds and I overhear a child planning the comedic murder of her mid-life crisis of a dad though the medium of concrete and gravity.

There's tragedy, too, and a kind of rebuilding, in the story of the aftermath of a car accident and there's a reflective and poetic look at a terrible journey in the Antarctic that ended with cold eggs in a warm hand and sweet ice in a child's mouth.

Teenage diaries make me blush and there's a piano in the corner of an impressionist's house, presumably doing an impersonation of a spinet. And I return to the 12-inch singles that formed the soundtrack of me storming out of my girlfriend's house because she didn't understand me, and then creeping back in again just as she scribbled in her teenage diary.

Production team Kevin Mousley & Kay Bishton.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07ff2kv)
Jill and Carol take in the celebrations for the Queen's birthday. Carol is impressed with the turn out. Jill thinks the village is also celebrating the end of the threat of Route B. Fallon tells them she had to do an emergency cake delivery to The Bull; the picnic hampers have been selling so well they ran out. Bert joins Jill and Carol and samples the picnic Jill made. Bert tells them Rob and Henry came to his garden yesterday and he didn't know what to say to him.

At Ambridge Hall Eddie, along with Joe who is dressed as a shepherd, promote their shepherd hut building expertise. No one has shown any interest so far. They are there without Lynda's knowledge and Fallon, who's serving teas, covers for them. Lynda tells Fallon one of the visitors asked her if the Resurgam stone was the gravestone of a dead pet.

Jill and Carol think Bert has done wonders with his garden. Carol points out the Romany caravan which Jill says has been transformed. Lynda compliments Bert on his work. When she spots the caravan Bert says it doesn't have any residents unlike her shepherd's hut. Lynda doesn't understand, Bert says he's only repeating what people have told him. Lynda returns to her garden and confronts Eddie. They hear a cry - Carol has tripped over the Resurgam stone and hurt her wrist. Jill thinks they should go to A&E.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b02119cq)
Series 16

Dorothy Parker

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton, with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Sue Limb and Mark Watson.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SUN 19:45 Dangerous Visions (b07bzjxm)
Dark Vignettes

Inertia

The last of four specially-commissioned stories in the Dangerous Visions series.

Inertia by Melissa Lee-Houghton
Somewhere in a near-future Britain, Mr McManus wakes up in hospital and discovers that the healthcare provision he’s been paying for is not at all as expected.

Writer: Melissa Lee-Houghton
Reader: Tim McInnerny
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07dnyw3)
Roger Bolton explores listener reaction to BBC radio.

The death of boxing legend Muhammad Ali blazed across BBC output in the last week - but did this coverage fail to portray the two sides of his character? Listeners questioned whether the reporting focused too heavily on his success and iconic image and neglected his more controversial moments. Controller of daily news programmes Gavin Allen explains how these decisions are made in the editorial process and what he feels the news programmes achieved.

In the age of audiences having streaming websites and personal playlists at their fingertips, is there a place for music presenters to curate our listening? BBC 6 Music believe there is as it broadcasts its annual 6 Music Recommends Day. Reporter Rob Crossan goes behind the scenes with musicians and presenters to find out how they put together a 12 hour playlist of brand new music that will please a diverse set of listeners. He speaks to presenters Cerys Matthews, Steve Lamacq and Shaun Keaveny, as well as Head of Music Jeff Smith and Head of Programmes Paul Rogers.

Roger Bolton also puts listener questions to BBC 6 Music Controller Bob Shennan, asking the station has evolved since its launch in 2002 and where it fits into the range of music radio stations.

And in last week's Feedback, the BBC's assistant political editor Norman Smith explained how he feels the corporation's impartiality may affect reporting of the EU Referendum. It's a debate that many Feedback listeners felt compelled to join in.

Produced by Kate Dixon.
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07dnyw1)
Sir Peter Shaffer, Sir Denys Wilkinson, Peggy Spencer and Muhammad Ali

Julian Worricker on:

The playwright Sir Peter Shaffer, most famous for 'The Royal Hunt of the Sun, 'Equus' and 'Amadeus'...

The physicist, Sir Denys Wilkinson, considered an expert on the electromagnetic properties of nuclear isotopes...

The dancer, Peggy Spencer - also a choreographer, adjudicator and dance event organiser...

And the man voted the sportsman of the last century, heavyweight boxer and civil rights campaigner, Muhammad Ali.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07f8qb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07fdzjx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07dknlv)
Silicon Valley Values

David Baker explores the identity and values of Silicon Valley - and what they mean for the rest of us. He talks to entrepreneurs, investors, academics and activists about how those values are permeating the world and what to do when they clash with other priorities down on the ground.
Producer: Peter Snowdon.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07fdxqd)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07dnqjp)
Embrace Of The Serpent; I Am Belfast

With Francine Stock.

Film-maker Mark Cousins and composer David Holmes discuss their documentary I Am Belfast and reveal why they rarely went to the cinema at the height of The Troubles.

How virtual reality puts us in the shoes of someone with epilepsy, a migrant living in the so-called Calais Jungle, and an Irishman caught up in the Easter Rising in 1916. These are three of the films nominated for the first VR awards at this week's Sheffield Documentary Festival.

The Amazon makes up almost half of Columbia and yet very much is known about the jungle in the rest of the country. Film-maker Ciro Guerra has tried to put that right with his drama Embrace Of The Serpent, and he tells Francine how he taught indigenous people to act and why his leading man is one of the last people in the world to speak his particular language.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07fdzjs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 13 JUNE 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07fdxs1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07dm2pj)
Engineers of Jihad. Orange jumpsuits

Laurie Taylor asks why so many Islamist extremists come from an engineering background. He talks to Steffen Hertog, Associate Professor of Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics, about a new study which finds that Islamist and right-wing extremism have more in common than either does with left-wing extremism, in which engineers are absent while social scientists and humanities students are prominent. Is there a mindset susceptible to certain types of extremism? They're joined by Raffaello Pantucci, Director of International Security Studies at the Royal United Services Institute.

Orange prison jumpsuits: Elspeth Van Veeren, Lecturer in Political Science at the University of Bristol, discusses the US prisoner uniform which took on a transnational political life due to the Global War on Terror. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07fdyq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxs3)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07fdxs5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxs7)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07fdxs9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07gm1hz)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07ffb1v)
EU views in Wales, edible flowers and cereal growing

With just over a week to go to the EU Referendum, workers in the fishing industry of North Wales are divided over whether membership of the European Union is good or bad for business. It's British Flowers Week but a little known sector of the industry is the growing of blooms for eating. Jan Billington grows a range of edible flowers in mid-Devon for use in everything from cakes to restaurant cuisine. Cereals earned British farmers £3 billion last year with wheat dominating the home market. As farmers gather in Cambridgeshire for the Cereal 2016 event, there's uncertainty about this year's harvest and concerns about global prices.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Vernon Harwood.


MON 05:56 Weather (b07fdxsc)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tyk25)
Little Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the little tern.

Little terns are our smallest terns. You can pick them out from our other terns by their smaller size, white forehead and yellow bill with a black tip. They look flimsy and delicate but move too close to one of their colonies, and you'll unleash a tirade of grating shrieks as they try to intimidate you out of their territory.


MON 06:00 Today (b07ffb1x)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b07ffb1z)
New Artistic Director of the ENO, Daniel Kramer

On Start the Week Andrew Marr explores the state of the arts. The English National Opera has lost £5 million of funding and its chorus recently went on strike, but the newly appointed Artistic Director Daniel Kramer, hopes to turn it around. He's directing a new production of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde, and the philosopher Roger Scruton celebrates the mastery of Wagner to express truths about the human condition. The biographer Franny Moyle looks at the life and career of Britain's most famous landscape painter, JMW Turner. Born as the Royal Academy was founded and British art was deemed inferior to its Continental counterpart, his work pushed the boundaries of what was accepted as art at the time. Julia Peyton-Jones looks back at a quarter of a century at the Serpentine Gallery in London, and makes a case for London as the centre of the art world.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07ffb21)
Negroland

Episode 1

Margo Jefferson was born in 1947 to a successful black, middle-class couple in Chicago. Her memoir looks back on her childhood and the black bourgeois upbringing that 'made and maimed me'.

She explains the title of her book, "Negroland is my name for a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty."

But the material comforts provided by a father who was a paediatrician and a mother who was formerly a social worker were circumscribed by all the painful and baffling assumptions of racial prejudice. To be a child in Negroland you had to learn the rules. But who was making those rules? And what exactly were they?

Margo Jefferson went on to become an arts and theatre critic on the New York Times and Newsweek. She won a Pulitzer for her journalism and now teaches at Columbia University.

Written and read by Margo Jefferson
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07fdxsf)
Takeover week: Guest Editor Mary Berry

Mary Berry looks back with fondness at being a Girlguide in the 1940s and explains why she thinks it makes her the woman she is today. Jane Garvey talks to Julie Bentley, Chief Executive of Girlguiding UK about how the organisation has changed since Mary's day.

Doctors should prescribe gardening for patients more often, according to research by the King's Fund health think tank. The hobby can help people with physical and mental health problems. Jane is joined by Dr Sam Everington, a GP in Tower Hamlets who helped set up Bob's Park, in The Bromley by Bow Centre and Tara, member of gardening group Sage Greenfingers in Sheffield. Should gardening be prescribed on the NHS? How does it benefit women's mental health?

When was the last time you handwrote a thank you note, or made a gift? Do we take the easy way out when we just send a happy face emoji in a text message as thanks, or buy gifts from the high street? Jane asks craft bloggers Momtaz Begum-Hossain and Clare Albans about the joys of giving and receiving presents (or cards) that are home-made.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Editor: Mary Berry.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07ffb25)
Unsuitable Men with Familiar Smiles

Episode 1

by Caroline and David Stafford

Christine has hidden her past from her family. But now she must reveal her extraordinary history of relationships with unsuitable men and their adventures together. Today, the coronation and the kidnapping of a very important horse.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b07ffb27)
The Sailor Who Lost Everything

Grace Dent tells the story of an 82 year old sailor, forced to rebuild his life from scratch after a disaster at sea leaves him with nothing.

From the Norwegian lifeboat that had plucked him from the waves, 82 year old Julian watched his uninsured sailing boat that was his home sink to the bottom of the North Sea - with it, all of his belongings.

For most of his life he had lived conventionally - working as an architect, bringing up children - but in the back of his mind was always the feeling there was more to life.

Taking early retirement he put all his money into pursuing his dream - sailing. Living on a 26 foot boat, he circumnavigated the globe, visiting some of the wildest places of the world.

Forced back on land, with no home or belongings, Julian must pause and reflect on what he wants from life.

As he considers whether he is too old to continue the nomadic seafaring lifestyle that is his dream, he also faces up to something he has been putting off for decades - how to reconnect with the daughter he has not seen since a bitter divorce 30 years before.

Producer Georgia Catt.


MON 11:30 The Break (b07ffb29)
Series 1

Dead Man's Dinner

Jeff and his nephew Andy are contacted by the editor of The Flamford Bugle. They have won a slap-up dinner for two at Flamford's poshest eaterie, The Royal Albion Hotel.

Eagerly anticipating the night out of a lifetime, Andy and Jeff's dreams of gourmet heaven quickly deteriorate into the nightmare of a lifetime. The prize had been promised to local citizen Wally Metcalfe, but he died just after the draw. Now his widow is on the warpath with her two burly sons.

Social media doesn't help either, and in no time there is a mob baying for Jeff and Andy's blood.

Andy ...... Tom Palmer
Jeff ...... Philip Jackson
Frank ...... Mark Benton
PC Clark ...... Mark Benton
Corinne ...... Alison Steadman
Joyce ...... Alison Steadman
Morag ...... Alison Steadman
Kevin ...... Rasmus Hardiker
Mira ...... Shobna Gulati
Chris ...... Gordon Kennedy

Writers: Ian Brown and James Hendrie

Director: Gordon Kennedy

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b07fdxsj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 More or Less (b07gv98b)
The Referendum by Numbers

The Cost of EU Membership

If it seems the EU referendum debate just involves two politicians shouting contradictory statistics at each other - then we are here to help.
In this series, we're giving you a break from the politicians and we're going to try to figure out the truth. Bracing concept, isn't it? We'll be looking at some of the big questions - immigration, lawmaking, regulations and trade.
But in this first program, Tim Harford tackles two very basic questions: how much would we save if we left the EU? And what would we lose if we did?


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07fdxsl)
Psychology of money, Move or improve, Future of grocery delivery

Home improvement applications are up all over the UK, with the exception of Scotland and DIY sales are at a level not seen since the downturn began. At the same time there are fewer houses for sale and fewer buyers around according to RICS. Does this mean we are becoming improvers rather than movers? What are the pitfalls to doing up your house. Should you go it alone or call in the professionals? TV Property expert Kirstie Allsopp has the answers.

The shift to internet shopping seems irreversible now, with more of us buying online all the time. But new technology will influence how and where we do that shopping. Our reporter Samantha Fenwick got exclusive access to online grocery retailer Ocado's new distribution centre. She'll be reporting on how your tea-bags and breakfast cereal will be chosen and delivered in the future.

And All in the Mind presenter and lecturer Claudia Hammond will discuss her new book Mind Over Money. She's looked at more than 250 pieces of research about the psychology of money to come up with tips on how to get control of your finances.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Olive Clancy.


MON 12:57 Weather (b07fdxsq)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b07fdxss)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01dp526)
England Goes Global

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, returns to Radio 4 with a new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 1. ENGLAND GOES GLOBAL - How Sir Francis Drake's circumnavigation of the globe changed the way Shakespeare's audiences viewed the world and their country's place on it. For the first time, England was engaging with the whole world.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b07ff2kv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Behind Closed Doors (b07ffd8d)
Behind Closed Doors: Series 3

Contact

The first in a series of three dramas following London barrister Rebecca Nyman.

Today’s drama is set in the Family Courts where Harry, a sperm donor, is trying to get a court order to allow him to see 'his' daughter. Barrister Rebecca Nyman is representing Beth - the mother - who is now in a lesbian relationship and would prefer Harry to keep his distance.

Harry offered to donate sperm so his lesbian friend and work colleague, Beth, could have a baby. After the birth Harry visited Beth and got to know baby Molly. For a time Beth was happy for Harry to visit but she never intended to have a relationship with him or for him to become involved with Molly as a father. Things went from bad to worse when Beth formed a relationship with Melanie and Harry felt he was completely excluded from seeing Molly. Now a judge has to decide whether Harry should have any contact rights.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS SERIES 3:
Contact
by CLARA GLYNN

Barrister Rebecca Nyman …………………… CLARE CORBETT
Harry Venton ………………………..……… SAM ALEXANDER
Judge ………………………………………………… SEAN BAKER
Beth Sinclair …………………………….……… ROBIN WEAVER
Melanie Otway/Miss Haslow ……………… JOANNA McCALLUM

Producer/Director: David Ian Neville


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b07ffd8g)
Series 6

The University of Bath

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Bath, with specialist subjects including Biology, Politics and Maths, and questions ranging from Sierpinski Gaskets to Scottish Nationalism via Francois Mitterand and Adele.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Gloucestershire, Chester, Birmingham City, Glasgow and York.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b07ff0hl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 A Portrait Of... (b07ffhf1)
Imtiaz Dharker

We follow artist Fiona Graham-Mackay as she paints the portrait of poet, artist and documentary film-maker Imtiaz Dharker.

Born in Pakistan and raised in Glasgow, Imtiaz was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 2014. She writes about freedom, cultural intolerance, gender politics, love and loss. Fellow poet Carol Ann Duffy has said, "If there were to be a World Laureate, then for me the role could only be filled by Imtiaz Dharker."

Fiona Graham-Mackay has painted hundreds of portraits, including Seamus Heaney and Sir Andrew Motion. Drawing is, she says, "the flow of life, the soul of life," and "you have to fall a little in love with your subject".

It's a revealing, intimate experience, peeling away the layers to capture the essence of the sitter as seen through the artist's eye. And in this, conversations meander in unexpected places.

Features readings of 'The Conversation' and 'Invisible' from Over the Moon; 'This room' from I Speak For the Devil, both published by Bloodaxe Books. With permission.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b07ffj3h)
Freedom of Expression

50 years ago this week, the Vatican's list of banned books was finally abolished by Pope Paul VI. The aim of the Index Librorum Prohibitorum was to protect the faith and morals of Catholics by preventing the reading of what the Church deemed to be heretical and immoral books. The final list reads as a who's who of some the greatest writers, philosophers and thinkers in Western culture. But religious censorship is not just part of the Christian story; it has been practiced in many societies and by many religions. Ernie Rea explores the relationship between religion and freedom of expression with Ed Condon, a canon lawyer and a writer for the Catholic Herald; Barry Kleinberg, a lecturer at the London School of Jewish Studies and an Orthodox Jew; and Khola Hassan, an Islamic scholar who sits on the Islamic Sharia Council for London.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b07fdxsv)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07fdxsx)
Police in Orlando say they battered a hole in the wall to rescue terrified clubbers


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b07ffj3k)
Series 75

Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 75th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Alexei Sayle and Graham Norton join Nicholas Parsons, and try to avoid hesitation, deviation or repetition as they talk about diverse subjects like Virginia Wade, Beef Wellington, and Physics for Beginners.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.
Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b07ffj3m)
Toby is on the phone to Josh but cuts it short when Pip arrives at Hollowtree. Toby explains to Pip how he's been re-working his film about pastured eggs, broadening the scope of it. He asks her if she will do the voiceover and offers to cook her dinner on Thursday in return.

Helen and Kaz chat while Helen feeds Jack, who continues to be hard work to breastfeed. Later, in the garden of the mother and baby unit Helen hears a Robin and points it out to Kaz. Helen says in the garden you can almost forget it's a prison. Apart from the 15ft walls, adds Kaz. They laugh.

Jill tells Pip how Carol broke her wrist when she tripped over the Resurgam stone in Lynda's garden. Thankfully Dr Locke was there and he drove them both to the hospital.

Toby and Josh crate up 24 hens at Willow Farm. Toby learns that Josh hasn't yet cleared taking the hens with Neil. They offload the hens at Hollowtree and Josh assures Toby he will let Neil and Hayley know about the move. Toby says the transferred hens will be laying like troopers in no time and Rex will be singing their praises.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b07fdxsz)
Tom Odell, Ove Arup, Theatre's response to the Battle of the Somme

Wrong Crowd is Tom Odell's second album, the follow-up to his number one album Long Way Down. The singer-songwriter talks about avoiding writing about luxury hotel rooms since his success, and drawing more on childhood memories for inspiration.

The structural engineer Ove Arup is the subject of a new exhibition at the V&A in London. The co-curators discuss the work of the philosopher and designer, who was responsible for the construction of a number of high-profile buildings including the Penguin Pool at London Zoo and Sydney Opera House.

July marks the hundredth anniversary of the first day of the Battle of the Somme. It's an event that playwrights have often grappled with and there are three plays on stage now; Frank McGuinness's Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme, Furious Folly, an immersive, outdoor piece, co-created by Mark Anderson, and First Light which tells the story through the lives of two young soldiers shot at dawn for deserting. The writers and directors explain how they approached this the bloodiest battle in history.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Angie Nehring.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07ffb25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Borders of Sanity (b07ffkhx)
Hearing Voices in the UK

For years, hearing voices served as a symbol of a fear we all share - losing our minds.

But voice hearing is now known to be an experience of almost limitless range, from cruel distress to creativity and meaning.

The UK is at the forefront of a movement that has changed the way patients and psychiatrists view the voices that some people hear.

Christopher Harding is in his adopted homeland of Scotland to explore how our ideas about the mind, and about reality shape these experiences and what life is like for voice hearers in the UK today.

Producer: Keith Moore.

(Photo credit:Shutterstock)


MON 20:30 Analysis (b07ffkhz)
The New Young Fogeys

Young people today drink and smoke much less than previous generations. The rates of teenage pregnancy and youth crime have fallen dramatically. New Statesman editor Jason Cowley talks to experts to find out what is shaping the attitudes and choices of young people today. He grew up in Harlow in Essex during a time of particular social unrest. He returns to his former sixth-form college where he meets a group of students who are markedly more conformist and disciplined than his generation, but more anxious too. So what accounts for this change in young people's behaviour? Is it economic pressures, government policy or the fear of transgressors being shamed on social media? Will we continue to see the rise of a generation of New Young Fogeys?
Producer: Katie Inman.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07dlwwb)
Fly

Houseflies, bluebottles, fruit flies - Brett Westwood explores how these flies that live close to us have buzzed in our imagination but have also taught us much about who we are. A scholar of literature, a genetic investigator, a naturalist, a forensic entomologist and a plain fly-lover come together to talk flies: Steve Connor, Peter Lawrence, Peter Marren, Martin Hall, and Erica McAlister. Readers: Anton Lesser and Niamh Cusack. Producer: Tim Dee


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b07ffb1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b07fdxt1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07fdxt3)
Orlando killer 'not linked' to wider plot

As the US grapples with the Orlando killings we examine the struggle to cope with home grown islamist terror and reform gun laws. Also on the programme Andy Hosken reports from Israel on how the response to the 'knife intifada' has pointed up rifts between political leaders and the military. And as Microsoft buys LinkedIn Sathnam Sanghera tells us it's a marriage of two uncool companies.

Picture: Memorials laid for the victims of the Orlando massacre.


MON 22:45 Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler (b07ffkj1)
Episode 1

Anne Tyler's contemporary response to Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew follows the story of college drop-out Kate Battista, who keeps house for her widowed father and 15 year old sister, Bianca.

Kate also works at a preschool nursery where her forthright ways win her the affection of the children but are not appreciated by the school's principal who would prefer her to exercise a little tact, restraint and diplomacy when dealing with the parents.

When her obsessively dedicated scientist father makes uncharacteristic use of his mobile phone to summon her to his lab, she is not prepared for what he has in mind.

Anne Tyler's previous novels include Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (1983), The Accidental Tourist (1985) and Breathing Lessons (1988). All three were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with Breathing Lessons winning the prize for 1989. She has also won the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize, the Ambassador Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 2012 she was awarded The Sunday Times Award for Literary Excellence.

Read by Liza Ross

Abridged by Isobel Creed
Producer: Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


MON 23:00 Self's Search for Meaning (b07ffkj3)
Philosophy

Will Self asks some of Britain's key opinion-makers to share, in simple terms, their conclusions about the nature - and meaning - of our existence.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07ffkj5)
MPs respond to the mass shooting at a gay club in Orlando, Florida. The Home Secretary condemns England supporters involved in violence in France. And in the House of Lords, peers consider support for elderly carers. Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 14 JUNE 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07fdxvr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07ffb21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxvt)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07fdxvw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxvy)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07fdxw0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07gbg3m)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07ffxs5)
Lord Plumb on the 1975 referendum, Decline in land used for organic farming, Monitor farms

Former NFU president Lord Plumb remembers the 1975 referendum. He voted 'in' then and will again this time. But beef farmer and former NFU committee chairman Michael Seals wants out of what he describes as the "European straight jacket".
The latest government figures show a decline in land used for organic farming in the UK, despite the fact that we're buying more organic food.
The AHDB's Monitor Farm Scheme brings like-minded arable farmers together to share their knowledge and expertise. This summer will see the launch of nine new monitor farms - commercial farms which open up their businesses to groups of farmers who become involved in the decision making process.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03szw62)
Avocet

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the avocet. With its black and white plumage, blue-grey legs and delicate upturned bill, the avocet is one of our easiest birds to identify. They are a conservation success and are now breeding in Norfolk, Lincolnshire, Kent and elsewhere.


TUE 06:00 Today (b07ffxs9)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b07h9xdb)
Sheila Rowan on gravitational waves

Half a century after the search for gravitational waves began, scientists confirmed that they had finally been detected in February 2016. Physicists around the world were ecstatic. It was proof at last that Einstein was right: the tiny ripples in the fabric of spacetime that he predicted a hundred years ago are real. And now that we can detect them, a new era for astronomy is anticipated. Traditional telescopes rely on light for information. No good when you want to find objects that are dark. Now for the first time we can 'see' black holes colliding.

Sheila talks to Jim at the Cheltenham Science Festival about her part in this momentous discovery.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b07ffxsf)
Tim Samuels talks to Helen

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy in favour of part-time, polygamous and pragmatic love.

Tim recently wrote about the challenges of being a 21st century man, including how monogamy can be a struggle. He's not the first man to feel it could run counter to men's biological make-up. And these days, in heterosexual couple break ups, female infidelity is just as likely to be cited as a cause for divorce as the male half of the partnership straying.

Tim says we are now living in a world where religion has lost its grip, women are freer than ever before to express their sexuality without male diktats, and we are continually evolving and adapting to changing times. He's long been interested in alternatives to monogamy, and now he wants to hear about some actual examples.

In the first of his three programmes for One to One, Tim meets Helen who has ripped up the relationship rules to find a model that works for her. She is a mother of two, but partner of none.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07ffxsh)
Negroland

Episode 2

To be born into a black , relatively wealthy family in Chicago, in the late 1940s, was to be born into a world of contradictions. Margo Jefferson describes this world of 'privilege and plenty' as 'Negroland'.

But despite their comfortable home and private education she and her sister still had to navigate the rules that determined what made a black woman attractive. The shade of their skin, the texture of their hair, the shape of their noses.

In prose that is always intellectually incisive and often powerfully vulnerable Margo Jefferson reads from her own memoir.

Written and read by Margo Jefferson
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07fdxw2)
Takeover week: Guest Editor Eniola Aluko

The England and Chelsea footballer on sport's key role in building confidence and how football has shaped her. Journalist and writer, Anna Kessel and football coach, Annie Zaidi discuss the importance of sport in raising ambition and aspiration in girls.

Eni tells Jane about her passion for social justice. Solicitor and human rights activist, Gareth Peirce and political campaigner Helen Steel discuss the issues involved in legal challenges to large corporations and institutions.

Eni talks about the difficulty of fitting a social life into only three free days a month, and the challenge of finding a man not intimidated by either her career as a lawyer or her football skills.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Editor: Eniola Aluko
Producer: Jane Thurlow.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07ffxsk)
Unsuitable Men with Familiar Smiles

Episode 2

by Caroline and David Stafford

Christine continues to tell her daughter extraordinary stories from her past. Today she relives her time in the folk and jazz clubs of London and her unsuitable relationship with blues giant Chicago Slim.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07ffxsm)
Owl

Owls are lovable cuddly creatures and wicked associates of witches and the dark: what prompted such contradictions? Brett Westwood investigates. With contributions from a host of hoots and the poetry of William Wordsworth and George Macbeth and Mike Toms of the British Trust for Ornithology, writers Mark Cocker and Richard Mabey, biologist and man-watcher Desmond Morris, a husband and wife team of owl keeper and collector of ceramic figurines, and the museum curator David Waterhouse. Plus a stuffed specimen of the extinct laughing owl of New Zealand. Producer: Tim Dee.


TUE 11:30 Tales from the Stave (b07ffxsp)
Series 13

The Dream of Gerontius - Elgar

When Elgar was commissioned to write a new work for the Birmingham Music Festival of 1900 he eventually lighted on a poem by the late Cardinal John Henry Newman, The Dream of Gerontius. The resulting piece, neither Oratorio nor Cantata, has remained a favourite in this country for over a century in spite of a disastrous first performance.
When Novello's eventually decided to print the orchestral score Elgar presented his handwritten manuscript, which had been used to conduct the work for two years, to Cardinal Newman's library at the Birmingham Oratory.

Frances Fyfield and her guests, the internationally acclaimed Mezzo-Soprano and singer of the role of the Angel, Sarah Connolly, the choral conductor and head of music at Gloucester Cathedral, Adrian Partington and the music scholar and conductor Nigel Simeone make the pilgrimage to Birmingham to see this extraordinary work which Elgar himself declared in the score was 'the best of me'.

As ever the musician's eye is drawn to the details, the nuances, the refinements in the composer's own hand, and they're not disappointed. Although the famous conductor Hans Richter used the score to conduct the work in Birmingham and elsewhere, Elgar's neat markings mean there's little more than the composer's hand on display.
There are, however, tell-tale additions by Elgar's publisher August Jaeger (The Nimrod of the Enigma Variations) and just occasionally Richter does call upon the chorus and orchestra not to rush.

The setting of Cardinal Newman's Library, the sheer beauty and complexity of the music and the sense of a composer working at the very peak of his powers make this a compelling manuscript with a moving response from the musicians lucky enough to see it.

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07fdxw4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 More or Less (b07gv9c7)
The Referendum by Numbers

Immigration

If it seems the EU referendum debate just involves two politicians shouting contradictory statistics at each other - then we are here to help.
In this series, we're giving you a break from the politicians and we're going to try to figure out the truth. Bracing concept, isn't it? We'll be looking at some of the big questions - The cost of the EU, lawmaking, regulations and trade.
In th secomd of these programmes Tim Harford asks what might happen to migration if we left the EU, and what are the benefits and costs of EU migrants to the UK economy?


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07fdxw6)
Call You & Yours - What's Your Experience of the EU?

With just nine days to go before the EU Referendum, in a special edition of Call You & Yours, we are examining the big EU question through the lives of our listeners.
In recent weeks, there has been no shortage of claims and counter-claims about Britain in Europe, as the campaigns do their best to secure your vote.
But we want to hear your experience of the EU - good or bad. How has Britain's membership of the EU affected your life, your family, your work or business?
Email us - youandyours@bbc.co.uk and don't forget to leave your phone number, so we can get back to you. And join Winifred Robinson at 12.15pm.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b07fdxw8)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b07ffxsr)
Will there be a black hole in our public finances or extra cash for the NHS? We look at competing claims in the EU debate and talk to both sides.

As a senior police officer and his partner are killed in France, we look at the terrorist threat there.

The latest instalment in our series Body on the Moor.

The chair of John Lewis tells why the UK lags behind in productivity and gives us his views on brexit.


TUE 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01g61vf)
Communion and Conscience

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, returns to Radio 4 with a new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 2. COMMUNION AND CONSCIENCE - The communion cup that Shakespeare may well have used sheds light on the dramatic religious changes that came in the aftermath of the Reformation

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07ffj3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Behind Closed Doors (b07ffxst)
Behind Closed Doors: Series 3

Section

The second in a series of three dramas set inside legal hearings.
Today Barrister Rebecca Nyman is representing a client at a Mental Health Tribunal. Andrew has been in a High Security Mental Hospital for seven years, now he thinks he’s fit to be released. But will the Tribunal agree?

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS SERIES 3:
Section
by CLARA GLYNN

Barrister Rebecca Nyman …………………… CLARE CORBETT
Andrew Caston ……………………….………………… JOE SIMS
Judge.………………………………………………… DAVID HOLT
Dr Ruckman…………………………………… KATHERINE IGOE
Dr Reynolds……………………………………… DAVID TIMSON
Wendy Caston ……………………………………… ADIE ALLEN
Charlotte Workman…………………………… KIRSTY OSWALD
Margosha Day……. ……………………… NICOLA FERGUSON

Producer/Director: David Ian Neville


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07f8q9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b07ffxsw)
Series 8

As a matter of fact...

The series that looks at current events through the lens of psychology - Michael Blastland explores the quirky ways in which we humans think, behave and make decisions.

In this first episode of a new series, we look at facts and the EU referendum. We are bombarded with statistics and projections about how the UK will benefit or suffer, depending on whether or not we are in or out of Europe. And we, the public, clamour for even more. How do we respond and use these facts, if at all, to formulate a reasoned opinion?

To what extent do we make a judgment first and then collect the evidence afterwards? Do we simply seek out facts that confirm our original belief - are we simply self-justification machines? As we near ballot time, the Human Zoo team investigate how emotions - such as fear and anger - may shape the way we think and act.

Michael Blastland is joined by resident psychologist Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, and roving reporter Timandra Harkness.

Contributors this week include Professor Jennifer Lerner, Harvard University; Historian Lucy Robinson, University of Sussex; Professor Peter Johansson, Lund University, Sweden; and James Fisher, Cut-Throat London.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b07ffxsy)
Coercive and Controlling Behaviour

Six months ago, new laws on coercive and controlling behaviour were introduced, targeting those who subject spouses, partners and family members to psychological and emotional torment - but stop short of violence.

The type of abuse covered by the new offence could include a pattern of threats, humiliation and intimidation, or stopping someone from socialising, controlling their social media accounts, surveillance through apps and dictating what they wear.

It's an issue featured in Radio 4's The Archers, in a story-line which saw character Rob Titchener's long-term emotional abuse of wife Helen slowly drip fed to listeners over two-and-a-half years, bringing wide public attention to the problem. But what about the women who this affects in real life?

Joshua Rozenberg speaks to Gemma Doherty about the physical and emotional abuse she suffered while living with her partner Mohammed Anwar. Mr Anwar sought to control every aspect of Gemma's life, from who she socialised with, her diet, and an enforced exercise regime. Mr Anwar became one of the first men jailed for the new offence.

He also speaks to Women's Aid - one of several charities which campaigned for the new law, which hopes that the threat of a conviction will help bring in cultural changes in how some people conduct themselves in relationships.

Also: Joshua interviews Peter Clarke, the Chief Inspector of Prisons, to find out what he has learned six months into taking up his new post.

Producers: Ben Crighton and Richard Fenton-Smith.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07ffxt5)
Judge Rinder and Stella Duffy

Barrister Robert Rinder, TV's Judge Rinder, and novelist Stella Duffy talk to Harriett Gilbert about the books that matter deeply to them.
Robert Rinder loves Hons and Rebels by Jessica Mitford so much that he says he couldn't be friends with anyone who didn't.
Stella Duffy shares her thoughts about facing mortality with Staring at The Sun: Overcoming the Dread of Death by Irvin D. Yalom.
Harriett introduces them to what she thinks is a dark comedy: A Matter of Death and Life by Andrey Kurkov, set in Kiev - but there is some dispute over its comedic value..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b07fdxwb)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07fdxwd)
Jeremy Corbyn launches new push to persuade wavering voters to stay in the EU


TUE 18:28 EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts (b07byv6f)
Vote Leave

23/05/2016

Referendum Campaign Broadcast by the Vote Leave campaign for the Referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union on 23rd June 2016.


TUE 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b07ffxtj)
Series 7

Michael Rosen

Poet and broadcaster Michael Rosen reads from his teenage diaries which focus on growing up as a naughty schoolboy in the 1960s, his early enthusiasm for politics and his warm, loving and unusual family life.

He discusses his formative years with Rufus Hound.

Producer: Harriet Jaine
Executive Producer: Aled Evans

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07ffxtm)
Susan keeps pestering Clarrie with questions about yoghurt and ice cream. Pat wonders if she should have a word but Clarrie says it's just Susan being the way she is - a bit bossy. Tony arrives back from visiting Helen, who is looking well for sitting out in the garden. Helen has been able to nominate Tony and Tom as the two people who can take Jack out of the mother and baby unit which means Pat can meet her grandson.

Tom helps Ed and Jazzer with a shearing job in Wales. They talk about Oliver and Caroline's return to Ambridge. Ed tells Tom his tenancy of the land at Grange Farm will continue and he is thinking about developing a breeding stock of Texel sheep.

At Grange Farm Clarrie finds Emma mopping up water that has come through the ceiling. Joe left the water running in the free-standing bath that doesn't have a proper overflow. Emma has held off the Sterlings visit to Grange Farm until the end of the week. They find the water has spread further than they thought and a rug and furniture are put outside to dry.

Rob unexpectedly turns up at Bridge Farm with a proposition: He wants to spend Father's Day - a Sunday - with Henry. In return, Henry can stay over with Pat and Tony one night next week. Rob leaves before they make a decision. Pat says they have to stand up to him; she's not going to let Rob push them around.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07fdxwg)
Tate Modern's new Switch House gallery, Pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Debut novelist Emma Cline

Tate Modern opens its new £260m extension to the iconic former power station on London's South Bank on Friday. Architect Amanda Levete, who has remodelled the V&A, and the art critic Andrea Rose visit the Switch House to discuss the opportunities the new space offers for international and female artists.

Pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard is performing Messiaen's two-hour celebration of birdsong, Catalogue d'Oiseaux, at the Aldeburgh Festival this Sunday from dawn to dusk. We join him in front of the piano for a tour of the different bird calls in the piece and he reveals how Messiaen's personal connection to nature informed his work.

Emma Cline discusses her debut novel The Girls which is tipped to be the summer bestseller. It follows teenager Evie Boyd who gets caught up in cult that will eventually lead to murder, in a narrative loosely based on the Manson murders of the '60s.

As the publishers Penguin prepare to relaunch their series Modern Poets for the first time this century, Samira takes soundings on the state of contemporary poetry with the series editor Donald Futers.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Dymphna Flynn.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07ffxsk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07ffxtr)
Child Protection

The recent deaths of children at the hands of family members have revealed some children's social work departments are still failing children some nine years after the death of Baby P. In some regions the reaction of the Government has been to take social workers out of the hands of councils and put them into independent trusts.

So what's been going wrong - and will the radical solution coming out of Whitehall really work? Jenny Chryss investigates.

Producer: Rob Cave.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07fdxwj)
Going to the gym, Tandem riding

Gyms aren't always good news for blind people because they can be hard to find your way around and can be noisy, but two of our listeners are standing up for them. That's because they've had a great experience with them and find them a good way to keep fit and make friends. Our listeners share some tips about the best way to manage gyms when you can't see. We also get into the fresh air with the blind cyclists who belong to a tandem group. And we get your reaction to our recent piece about filling out government disability benefit forms.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b07ffxtt)
Supertaskers, Technology to Replace Exams and the All in the Mind Awards

Could you be one on the 2.5% of the population psychologists have dubbed "supertaskers". These are people who are able to deal with a multitude of different tasks all at the same time? Now a team in Australia has put together an online test so that you can find out for yourself.

We've had a lot of response to our discussion on education and exam stress. Claudia Hammond looks at a radical system designed to end exam stress forever - by doing away with exams and using artificial intelligence to carry out much more nuanced assessments. The research is being done at the University College London Knowledge Lab, and Claudia went along to see how it all works.

And a strong bond between mother and daughter is at the heart of our latest interview with a finalist in the All in the Mind awards. We hear from the daughter who has nominated her mother for an award. Ellie, who's 20, explains why she thinks her mother should get an award for the support she's given her since her diagnosis with depression, psychosis and a personality disorder at the age of 14.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b07h9xdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b07fdxwl)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07fdxwn)
EU referendum - immigration dilemma for Labour

Has Labour left it too late to convince voters they're serious about immigration? We talk to former Labour Culture minister Ben Bradshaw. We explore the link between Russian football and politics. And why do some Israelis fear Iran more than IS - we have a report from Golan Heights.


TUE 22:45 Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler (b07gbc1k)
Episode 2

Kate has been introduced to her father's research assistant Pyotr, in a somewhat staged encounter.

Already her forthright manner has caused him to describe her as 'rude-spoken', but nonetheless Pyotr manages to bump into her on her way home from the nursery school where she works.

Kate and Bunny's mother died when Bunny was a baby, and since she dropped out of college (after a disagreement with her biology lecturer) Kate has managed the household for her father and teenage sister.

Anne Tyler's contemporary response to Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is set in Baltimore where Dr Battista, an obsessively dedicated scientist, lives with his two daughters Kate and Bunny.

Read by Liza Ross.

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


TUE 23:00 What Does the K Stand For? (b0510ftl)
Series 2

Sister Dearest

Guests not welcome.

Stephen K Amos's sitcom about growing up black, gay and funny in 1980s south London.

Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.

Stephen K Amos … Stephen K Amos
Young Stephen … Shaquille Ali-Yebuah
Stephanie Amos … Fatou Sohna
Virginia Amos … Ellen Thomas
Vincent Amos … Don Gilet
Miss Bliss … Michelle Butterly
Jayson Jackson … Frankie Wilson
Jocelyn Jee Esien … Princess

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07ffxtw)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster on a committee inquiry into anti-Semitism and a statement on violence by British fans at the Euro 2016 football tournament.



WEDNESDAY 15 JUNE 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07fdxy7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07ffxsh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxy9)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07fdxyc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07fdxyf)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07fdxyh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07gm2xq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07fg1x0)
Brexit or Bremain, Agriculture and the law, 'Field of Wheat' group in Lincs, Diamond-back moths in East Anglia

If there's a vote to leave the EU, how quickly would legal disentanglement be achieved? Anna Hill hears from agricultural QC Hugh Mercer who says it's far from straightforward, and Dr Mary Abbott of Farmers for Britain.

We all know the saying that "many hands make light work". However, one farmer in Lincolnshire is experiencing the ultimate in job sharing. Peter Lundgren is allowing a large group of people from all over the world to decide how one of his crops is grown. It's all part of an art project called 'A Field of Wheat'. Environment Correspondent Paul Murphy has been to see how it works.

A plague of moths could seriously affect this year's brassica crops. An infestation has blown in from the continent with a 2 mile wide cloud of the Diamondback moths reported in parts of Eastern counties, where the majority of brassica vegetables are grown. There are millions more than normal and they are resistant to common insecticides. Doctor Stephen Foster, Senior Scientist at Rothamsted Research, describes the problem.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thswl)
Canada Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the Canada goose. These large black-necked geese with white cheeks and chinstraps are native to Canada and the USA. The first reference to them in the UK is in 1665 when English diarist, John Evelyn, records that they were in the waterfowl collection of King Charles II at St. James' Park in London.


WED 06:00 Today (b07fg1x2)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b07fg1x4)
Adam Henson, Tracey Curtis-Taylor, Paul Spike, Joe Langdon.

Libby Purves meets farmer and broadcaster Adam Henson; writer Paul Spike; pilot Tracey Curtis-Taylor and theatre student Joe Langdon.

Tracey Curtis-Taylor is a pilot who last year followed Amy Johnson's flight from the UK to Australia in her classic open cockpit biplane, Spirit of Artemis. Earlier this year the self-styled bird in a biplane attempted a round-the-world flight which ended when her vintage biplane lost power and crashed after take-off in the Arizona desert. She plans to be back in the skies when her plane is fully repaired.

Paul Spike is a writer and journalist. His book Photographs of My Father was first published in 1973, seven years after his father, The Reverend Robert - Bob - Spike, was murdered. Bob Spike was a US church minister who was active in the civil rights movement in 1960s America alongside Martin Luther King Jr. His murder was never solved. Published by Knopf, Photographs of my Father has been reissued to mark 50 years since Bob Spike's death.

Joe Langdon is studying theatre studies at Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts in London. His interest in drama was piqued when he was an inmate at a young offenders' institution. He attended workshops organised by the Bristol Old Vic as part of its outreach programme which helps young and disenfranchised people express themselves. This year the Bristol Old Vic celebrates its 250th anniversary.

Adam Henson is a farmer and presenter of Adam's Farm on the BBC's Countryfile programme. He took over the Cotswold farm from his father, Joe, who as a champion of rare breeds, opened the Cotswold Farm Park in 1971 and was founder chairman of the Rare Breeds Survival Trust. In his memoir, Like Farmer, Like Son Adam delves into his family's theatrical lineage - his grandfather was comedian and actor Leslie Henson and his uncle is the actor Nicky Henson. Like Farmer, Like Son is published by BBC Books.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07fg1x6)
Negroland

Episode 3

To be born into a black, relatively wealthy family in the late 1940s was to be born into a world of contradictions. Margo Jefferson describes this world of 'privilege and plenty' as 'Negroland'.

As her father became increasingly successful as a leading black paediatrician, he and her mother moved the family into a neighbourhood that had been exclusively white. Change was coming but it wasn't always welcome. As a young girl, Margo had to learn who amongst her white friends she could trust and who came from families which really despised them.

Margo Jefferson went on to become an arts and theatre critic on the New York Times and Newsweek; she won a Pulitzer for her journalism and now teaches at Columbia University.

Written and read by Margo Jefferson
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07fdxyk)
Takeover week: Guest editor Jackie Kay

The newly appointed Makar - Scottish National Poet - guest edits the programme. The subjects she has chosen are

Writing poems to order - Jackie and fellow poet Imtiaz Dharker on writing commissioned poems. Both have recently written poems inspired by bookshops which are published this week in the Off the Shelf anthology and will form part of the Shore to Shore tour in which they and other poets will be touring the UK giving poetry readings in independent bookshops. Shore to Shore starts on the 19th June in Falmouth and ends on the 2nd July in St Andrews.

Vitiligo and hyperpigmentation - What causes these skin conditions and what it's like to live with them? with dermatologist Dr Sunil Chopra and Natalie Ambersley who has had vitiligo since she was a toddler.

Refugee Tales - Refugee Tales are a series of poems and stories based on the real experiences of refugees in the UK interpreted by writers and poets and published to bring attention to the situation of people held in long term detention. Refugee Tales was set up by the action group Gatwick Detainees Welfare Group who are campaigning for a 28 limit to detention. Reporter Catherine Carr talks to poet Patience Agbabi and 'Farida' who came to this country as a refugee. Anna Pincus, of the GDWG joins Jackie live in the studio to talk about Refugee Tales and their modern interpretation of the Canterbury Tales walk.

Complicated grief - Psychotherapist and agony aunt Philippa Perry on how to deal when the grieving process is complicated by a difficult or unresolved relationship with the deceased.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07fg1x8)
Unsuitable Men with Familiar Smiles

Episode 3

by Caroline and David Stafford

Episode Three

While Sally worries about her daughter in Mexico, Christine reveals her unlikely involvement in the Profumo Affair. But is she telling the truth?

Directed by Marc Beeby.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07fg1xb)
Ian and Chikodi - Sharing in a Different Way

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple reflecting on the differences that bind them together. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Borders of Sanity (b07ffkhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Plum House (b07fg2q7)
Series 1

Why Why WI?

Comedy about the inept staff at an historic house. Starring Simon Callow and Jane Horrocks.

Every year, thousands of tourists flock to the Lake District. But one place they never go to is Plum House - the former country home of terrible poet George Pudding (1779-1848). Now a crumbling museum, losing money hand over fist, it struggles to stay open under its eccentric curator Peter Knight (Simon Callow).

Can anyone save Plum House from irreversible decline?

Tom Collyer, sent from the Trust to do just that, seems to be the most likely candidate but the challenge is huge as he confronts the reality of winning round Peter Knight's handpicked team - the hopelessly out of touch deputy Julian (Miles Jupp), the corner-cutting gift shop manager Maureen (Jane Horrocks) intent on making profit from extremely cheap plum-themed merchandise, and maintenance man Alan (Pearce Quigley) who has heard the words "health" and "safety" but never in the same sentence.

In this opening episode, the museum's preparations for the annual WI visit include hiding away valuable artefacts as, according to Peter, some members are prone to stealing them. And Julian gives a disastrous lecture on the life and work of George Pudding.

Written by Ben Cottam and Paul McKenna

Peter ...... Simon Callow
Maureen ...... Jane Horrocks
Julian ...... Miles Jupp
Tom ...... Tom Bell
Alan ...... Pearce Quigley
Emma ...... Louise Ford
Mary ...... Kate Anthony
Jean ...... Sandra Maitland

Directed and Produced by Paul Schlesinger

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b07fdxym)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 More or Less (b07hjvk4)
The Referendum by Numbers

Law

If it seems the EU referendum debate just involves two politicians shouting contradictory statistics at each other - then we are here to help.
In this series, we're giving you a break from the politicians and we're going to try to figure out the truth. Bracing concept, isn't it? We'll be looking at some of the big questions - the cost of being a member, immigration, regulations and trade.
But today we're looking at lawmaking. Tim Harford asks how much UK law comes from the EU and are we always being outvoted on what to implement?


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07fdxyp)
Make-up tutorials, Charity marketing

A Charity Commission investigation finds ten charities spend up to 90% of their income sending out mailshots and gifts. We look at who the charities are and whether they have links with each other.

We speak to the older women following in the footsteps of the younger Youtube stars like Zoella and Tanya Burr, by making money from posting online make up tutorials. We interview one of the most popular, Tricia Cusden from Look Fabulous Forever.

New research by Paul Lewis of Radio 4's Moneybox shows investing in cash savings brings more returns than investing in shares.

We report from a housing block in Peckham that's having to be demolished because the quality of building work is so poor.

We follow the latest developments from the Select Committee hearing with the former owner of BHS, Sir Philip Green.

The government proposes to sell off Land Registry to private companies. Campaigners against the idea say Land Registry is the only system we have of property registration, and to allow that data into private hands would be deeply dangerous. We discuss the pros and cons with a housing expert.

And, how the rising cost of vet fees and treatments are driving up the cost of pet insurance, and what insurers are willing to offer in terms of cover.


WED 12:57 Weather (b07fdxyt)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b07fg2qb)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01drtc2)
Snacking through Shakespeare

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, returns to Radio 4 with a new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 3. SNACKING THROUGH SHAKESPEARE - A luxury fork discovered on the site of the Rose theatre helps explain what people were nibbling on when they first heard: "Is this a dagger I see before me?"

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b07ffxtm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Behind Closed Doors (b07fg2qd)
Behind Closed Doors: Series 3

Protection

The last in a series of three dramas set inside legal hearings.

Today’s drama is set at the Court of Protection. Mary has been in a Minimally Conscious State for over three years following a road accident. Barrister Rebecca Nyman is representing her husband who feels it is time to allow his wife to die.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS SERIES 3:
Protection
by CLARA GLYNN

Barrister Rebecca Nyman ………………… CLARE CORBETT
Mr Buchar………………………………… VINCENT EBRAHIM
Justice Rainer …………..…………… ELIZABETH BENNETT
Gavin Howell ………………………..………… EWAN BAILEY
Emily Howell ………………………………… AMY SHINDLER
Dr Raplock/Mrs Forest.…………………… CLARE PERKINS
Professor Rushmore …….…………… BRIAN PROTHEROE
Megan Trantor……………………………… BETTRYS JONES

Producer/Director: David Ian Neville


WED 15:00 Money Box (b07fg6tm)
Money Box Live: The Modern British Workplace

The modern British workplace. Flexible working - is it too much in the employer's favour?

Zero hours contracts, short hours contracts and self-employment are all on the rise in Britain, giving workers less job security and less automatic entitlement to paid holidays or paid sick leave. Mike Ashley, the founder of Sports Direct was criticised by a committee of MPs earlier this month over working practises at one of his warehouses. MPs heard how workers were fined for being late and subject to searches and surveillance. Mr Ashley admitted that in the past some workers had not been paid the legal minimum wage. But employers - both in the private and public sector - say they have to keep costs low in a competitive global market and that means having flexibility over hiring and shedding staff quickly.

Join Adam Shaw and guests to explore the position of the modern worker. We want to hear your experiences as a worker or as an employer.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b07ffxtt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07fg6tp)
Secrecy at Work, Drugs and Employment

Secrecy at Work: the hidden architecture within our organisations. Laurie Taylor talks to Christopher Grey, Professor of Organization Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London, about his study into the secrecy which is woven into the fabric of our lives at work - from formal secrecy, as we see in the case of trade and state secrets based on law and regulation; informal secrecy based on networks and trust; and public or open secrecy, where what is known goes undiscussed.

Also, drug taking and employment: how does the UK anti drugs policy shape our concept of 'employable citizens'? Charlotte Smith, Lecturer in Management at the University of Leicester, argues that drug consumption, in neo liberal times, is positioned as the antithesis of economic potential.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07fdxyw)
Reporting the refugee crisis, Accessing news online, Achieving 'balanced' EU coverage.

The International News Safety Institute is launching a survey into the psychological impact on journalists covering the migrant crisis, following anecdotal evidence that some journalists are finding it is taking a high emotional toll on them. INSI Director Hannah Storm discusses the challenges of reporting the crisis, and Steve Hewlett is also joined by Channel 4 News International Editor Lindsey Hilsum, who has spent decades reporting around the world on conflicts and who, more recently,has been reporting first-hand on the refugee crisis.

A survey by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has revealed that more than half of online news consumers are turning to social networking sites such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter ahead of traditional media groups. The trend is aided by the acceleration of smartphone use, as 53 percent of those surveyed reported using their handheld device to access news content. Steve Hewlett talks to lead author Nic Newman about Facebook's growing influence, and what it means for traditional publishers.

There have been calls for broadcasters to do more to fact check claims made in EU referendum coverage. Writing in the Guardian, columnist Peter Preston thinks the BBC in particular is being restricted by fairness and balance rules, leaving interviewers unable to robustly refute claims politicians make. But what can broadcasters do to ensure every fact is correct, in a situation where one sides 'fact' may be the other sides 'lie'? Steve Hewlett discusses with Peter Preston, and Stewart Purvis, former editor in Chief at ITN, and Jamie Angus, editor of the Today programme.
Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b07fdxyy)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07fdxz0)
Attempts by George Osborne to make the economy the decisive issue in the referendum, by saying a vote to leave the EU would be followed by an austerity budget, have resulted in a direct challenge to his authority.

More than 60 Tory MPs have said his position as Chancellor would become untenable. He's been backed by David Cameron, who said Brexit would leave a "huge hole" in the public finances.


WED 18:28 EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts (b07dm2pl)
Stronger IN Europe

08/06/2016

Referendum Campaign Broadcast by the Stronger IN Europe campaign for the Referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union on 23rd June 2016.


WED 18:30 Heresy (b07fg6tt)
Series 10

Episode 5

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents the show which dares to commit heresy.

With comedians Lee Mack and David Baddiel and performer and QI elf Andrew Hunter Murray.

Together they discuss Netflix, father figures and Katie Hopkins.

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b07fg6tw)
Jennifer asks Lilian to look after Phoebe, who is in the middle of A-Level exams, while she and Brian are away. Alice drops by to say bye to Jennifer before she leaves. And Lilian and Kate wave off the couple on their ruby wedding anniversary holiday. Kate is relieved to have Brian off her back while she organises the launch of her new venture, Spiritual Home.

Pip and Rex go to a farm-tech event together and Rex asks Pip if she wants to go for a meal on the way home but Pip is non-committal. To her surprise, Pip spots Alice who is there to introduce herself to an agricultural technology company. Pip can't believe that Alice is showing an interest in farming. Pip offers Alice a lift home, scuppering Rex's plan for him and Pip to have a meal together.

Kate talks through her plans for Spiritual Home with Lilian who has chased up the decorators for the studio on Kate's behalf. They retire to the house to open some wine. Phoebe complains they're making too much noise and Lilian tries to hush Kate. Kate says Lilian has been rather boisterous lately and wonders why that would be. Lilian says she couldn't possibly comment.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b07fdxz2)
Ashley Pharoah, Novels in verse, Chris Watson

Ashley Pharoah, writer of Life on Mars and Ashes to Ashes, discusses his latest creation for BBC TV - The Living and the Dead. Set in rural Somerset in 1894, this supernatural drama follows Nathan Appleby, a reluctant gentleman farmer who is obsessed with proving the existence of the afterlife, as he investigates hauntings, paranormal happenings and ghostly visitations.

Writer Sarah Crossan has won the 2016 Bookseller YA prize for her novel One. It's the story of conjoined twins, written in verse. Ros Barber's debut novel The Marlowe Papers is a fictional account of the life of Christopher Marlowe, also written in verse. They talk to Kirsty about writing novels which take the form of series of poems.

Sound artist Chris Watson, who has worked alongside David Attenborough on many of his BBC nature series, discusses his new project The Town Moor - A Portrait in Sound. Over the course of a year he documented the sounds of the ancient and vast grazing common at the heart of Newcastle, and will be presenting the audio portrait as a 'dark' cinema experience at the Tyneside Cinema.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07fg1x8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07fg6ty)
Assisted Dying

Every year thousands of terminally ill patients are being helped to die by their doctors, according to Baroness Molly Meacher, the new chairwoman of Dignity in Dying. She claims doctors are prepared to risk their own freedom rather than see their patients continue to suffer unbearably. Her assertion comes as the British Medical Association next week prepares to discuss the results of its 18 month long survey in to the public and medical professionals' attitudes on end-of-life care and physician-assisted dying. For 26 years now this programme has charted the moral and ethical life of the nation and this subject, above all others, has been the one we've returned to most often. And little wonder as it's an issue that combines moral dilemma, religious principle, human compassion and fear in equal measure. As a prelude to the BMA debate, this week we're going to invite back witnesses who've appeared on our programme over the years to explore how the debate has developed over time. In 1991 we started out discussing the morality of suicide manuals. Advances in medical technology since then have transformed our expectations of what we demand from life. We've seen a growth of the "me generation" that prizes and demands individual choice and rights above collective responsibility. While as a society we have increasingly recognised the rights of disabled people, there is also growing support for legalising assisted suicide, which may give comfort to some, but could put many more vulnerable people at risk. And there has also been our changing relationship with religion. The moral maze that is the debate on assisted dying, live at 8pm Wednesday. Chaired by Michael Buerk with Mona Siddiqui, Anne McElvoy, Giles Fraser and Claire Fox. Witnesses are Dr Michael Irwin, Lesley Close, Dr Kevin Yuill and Prof David Cook.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07fg6v2)
Citizen Diplomacy

Tom Fletcher, former British Ambassador to Lebanon and known as the 'naked diplomat' for his direct, unvarnished approach, argues that the future of diplomacy will be citizen-led.

Speaking at the Hay Festival, the 'ex-Excellency' explains how in the digital age most people doing diplomacy - what he describes as a basic human reflex to find common ground - will never have crossed the threshold of a Foreign Ministry. Instead, they will be working for NGOs, the media, in business, elsewhere in government or in communities.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b07fg6v6)
Blood Banks

Blood and Fire: the segregation and racialisation of blood

The development of plasma transfusion for masses of people was born of urgent necessity during WW2. In 1940, Britain struggled to treat thousands of civilians injured in the Blitz and many more soldiers at Dunkirk. Into that desperate maelstrom Charles Drew, an African American doctor, came to the rescue. Dr Drew was the key driving force behind a project called Plasma for Britain which saved many lives.

But when a similar project was rolled out in the USA the authorities insisted that the blood be segregated. Charles Drew resigned and returned to work at a black establishment.

A few years later Dr Drew was involved a catastrophic car accident; he was taken to a segregated (whites only) hospital but died of his injuries. For decades afterwards, the myth persisted, especially amongst African Americans, that the man credited with saving the lives of so many through transfusion was denied blood (because of his colour) that would have spared him. Naomi Alderman explores the pivotal moment in the history of blood transfusion and its legacy in the controversy over race-based medicine.

Producer: Colin Grant


WED 21:30 Midweek (b07fg1x4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b07fdxz4)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07fdxz6)
How Rotterdam views the EU referendum

In a special programme, James Coomarasamy reports from Rotterdam on how a possible Brexit is viewed in the Netherlands. And Paul Moss reports from Rotterdam's twin town of Hull.
Photo: the port of Rotterdam; credit Reuters.


WED 22:45 Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler (b07gb74k)
Episode 3

Dr Battista spends most of his waking hours at the lab where he is assisted by a brilliant young researcher called Pyotr.

But Pyotr’s three year visa is set to expire in a few weeks and, fearful that it will not be renewed, Battista has suggested that his eldest daughter Kate might marry Pyotr and resolve the situation to everyone’s satisfaction – except hers.

After all it’s not as if Kate has a boyfriend or a bevy of admirers like her pretty sister, Bunny.

Kate responds with anger and humiliation, but her father is still determined to pursue his plan.

Anne Tyler's contemporary response to Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is set in Baltimore where Dr Battista, an obsessively dedicated scientist, lives with his two daughters Kate and Bunny.

Read by Liza Ross

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 23:00 The Lach Chronicles (b07fg6v8)
Series 3

Goodnight Tokyo

Lach was the King of Manhattan’s East Village and host of the longest running open mic night in New York. He now lives in Scotland and finds himself back at square one, playing in a dive bar on the wrong side of Edinburgh.

His night, held in various venues around New York, was called the Antihoot. Never quite fitting in and lost somewhere lonely between folk and punk music, Lach started the Antifolk movement. He played host to Suzanne Vega, Jeff Buckley and many others. He discovered and nurtured lots of talent including Beck, Regina Spektor and the Moldy Peaches- but nobody discovered him.

In this episode, Lach remembers a time he played a gig in Tokyo. Things didn’t go to plan.

Written and performed by Lach.

Sound design: Al Lorraine and Sean Kerwin

Producer: Richard Melvin

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 23:15 Bunk Bed (b07fln54)
Series 3

Episode 2

Everyone craves a place where their mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts, which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air.

Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander.

This is the nearest faraway place for Patrick Marber and Peter Curran. Here they try to get the heart of things in an entertainingly vague and indirect way. This is not the place for typical male banter.

From under the bed clothes, they play each other music and archive of Angela Carter, ex-prime ministers, a castrato singer and an elephant playing the piano. Work, family, literature and their own badly-scuffed dreams are the funny, if warped, conversational currency.

A Foghorn Company production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in June 2016.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07fln56)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster where Parliament holds its final debates on the UK's membership of the EU ahead of next week's referendum. It was the last chance for the Leave and Remain camps to put their arguments in Parliament because it is now going into recess to make way for the remaining days of the campaign. Also on the programme: an apology from the former owner of BHS, Sir Philip Green. Sir Philip also promises that the shortfall in the BHS pension fund will be addressed.



THURSDAY 16 JUNE 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07fdy0q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07fg1x6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07fdy0s)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07fdy0v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07fdy0x)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07fdy0z)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07gbp3l)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07fl5b9)
Bluetongue, Biotechnology, Sheep shearing, Farm subsidies

Farmers across the UK are being warned to vaccinate against the highly infectious disease Bluetongue, which experts say is likely to arrive here later this summer. The midge-born disease causes serious problems in ruminants. Now Defra, vets and others are taking the message out in a roadshow starting next week.

MEPs have voted through a report calling for Europe to stop blocking progress in areas such as genetic modification and new pesticides and herbicides. The report, by Conservative MEP Anthea McIntyre, says if European farmers aren't allowed to use new technology, they'll be left behind in the global market. But not all MEPs agreed.

And we go back to a Welsh hill farm where we spent a week lambing back in the Springtime. Richard Roderick and his 18 year old son Tudor are now shearing their 150 ewes ready for the summer.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02twnw4)
Herring Gull

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the herring gull.

Herring gulls now regularly breed inland and that's because of the way we deal with our refuse. Since the Clean Air Acts of 1956 banned the burning of refuse at rubbish tips, the birds have been able to cash in on the food that we reject: And our throwaway society has provided them a varied menu. We've also built reservoirs around our towns on which they roost, and we've provided them with flat roofs which make perfect nest sites.


THU 06:00 Today (b07fl5bc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07fl5bh)
The Bronze Age Collapse

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Bronze Age Collapse, the name given by many historians to what appears to have been a sudden, uncontrolled destruction of dominant civilizations around 1200 BC in the Aegean, Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia. Among other areas, there were great changes in Minoan Crete, Egypt, the Hittite Empire, Mycenaean Greece and Syria. The reasons for the changes, and the extent of those changes, are open to debate and include droughts, rebellions, the breakdown of trade as copper became less desirable, earthquakes, invasions, volcanoes and the mysterious Sea Peoples.

With

John Bennet
Director of the British School at Athens and Professor of Aegean Archaeology at the University of Sheffield

Linda Hulin
Fellow of Harris Manchester College and Research Officer at the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology at the University of Oxford

And

Simon Stoddart
Fellow of Magdalene College and Reader in Prehistory at the University of Cambridge

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07fl5bk)
Negroland

Episode 4

A fiercely intelligent account of race and class by writer and critic Margo Jefferson. She was born in 1947, the daughter of a paediatrician and a fashionable socialite, and grew up surrounded by the comforts of a well off family who were part of Chicago's black elite. This is the world she terms 'Negroland' - 'a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty'.

In episode 4, Dr and Mrs Jefferson take their two young daughters on a holiday trip, but in Atlantic City not everything goes to plan.

Written and read by Margo Jefferson
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07fdy11)
Takeover week: Guest Editor Professor Sunetra Gupta

Acclaimed scientist and novelist Professor Sunetra Gupta guest edits the programme. These are the subjects she has chosen:

Can we be good at more than one thing? Should we stick to a specialism or embrace multitasking in all elements of our life?

Can writing about food be a high literary form? If so, who are the great writers?

Who were the Stettheimer sisters? How do they fit into the Avant-Garde movement of the USA? And why did one of the sisters spend over twenty years working on a doll's house?

In the 1970s women's presses flourished in the UK and around the world. Today their numbers are greatly reduced. So what was the purpose of women only publishers? And what is their relevance today?


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07fl5bm)
Unsuitable Men with Familiar Smiles

Episode 4

by Caroline and David Stafford

When Sally unearths a set of old rosary beads, Christine tells her daughter about her time in Rome - an adventure with life-changing results.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07fl5bp)
Departures

Leaving's the theme of this edition. Bridget Kendall, the BBC's Russia specialist, is hanging up her headphones but not before she talks about secret agents and considers what the past can tell us about that country's future. Past and present are on Kevin Connolly's mind too. He's off to a new BBC posting and points out that within half an hour's walk of his home in Jerusalem some of the defining dramas of the ancient world played themselves out. He also talks of the pleasures and pitfalls of Middle East reporting today. And Gabriel Gatehouse hums the theme tune from 'The Great Escape' while considering departures in his essay about the EU referendum and the Euro2016 football tournament in France.

Image: How to ford a river in groups - instructional diagram from the USSR's Armed Forces Ministry 1946 'Essential Manual for Spies & Scouts'


THU 11:30 Manto: Uncovering Pakistan (b07fl5br)
Sa'adat Hassan Manto was a writer who confronted social taboos in Indio-Pakistani society. Even though he died in 1955, an alcoholic and penniless, his work still speaks to 21st century Pakistan.

"If you find my stories dirty, the society you are living in is dirty. With my stories, I only expose the truth" (Manto)

Born in Punjab in what was then British India on 11th May 1912, Manto died aged only 42 in Punjab, by then Pakistan. As a film and radio script writer, a journalist and most significantly as short story writer in Urdu, he chronicled the chaos that prevailed in the run up to, during and after the Partition of India in 1947. Manto was tried for obscenity six times - three times in British India and three times in Pakistan, but he was never convicted.

"A writer picks up his pen only when his sensibility is hurt" (Manto)

Often compared with DH Lawrence, Manto (much like Lawrence) wrote about topics considered to be social taboos in Indio-Pakistani society. With stories such as 'Atishparay' (Nuggets of Fire), 'Bu' (Odour), 'Thanda Gosht' (Cold Meat) and 'Shikari Auratein' (Women of Prey), he portrayed the darkness of the human psyche and the collective madness of the social and political changes around him.

"If you cannot bear these stories then society is unbearable. Who am I to remove the clothes of this society, which itself is naked. I don't even try to cover it, because that is not my job. That is the job of dressmakers" (Manto)

With the help of Manto's three daughters, Nusrat, Nighat and Nuzhat, as well as writers and scholars like Ayesha Jalal, Suniya Qureshi, Preti Taneja and Mohammed Hanif, presenter Sarfraz Mansoor tells Manto's story and assesses his legacy.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b07fdy13)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 More or Less (b07hjy4z)
The Referendum by Numbers

Regulation

If it seems the EU referendum debate just involves two politicians shouting contradictory statistics at each other - then we are here to help.
In this series, we're giving you a break from the politicians and we're going to try to figure out the truth. Bracing concept, isn't it? We'll be looking at some of the big questions - the cost of being a member, immigration, law-making and trade.
But today we're looking at EU regulation. Tim Harford asks how much red tape from the EU is costs the UK and what might happen if we leave?


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07fdy15)
Fertility treatment postcode lottery, Super-gentrification

For many couples, IVF offers their best or only hope of having a baby. In Scotland, couples will soon be entitled to three cycles of the treatment funded by the NHS. In Wales, two cycles are funded, but in England the provision is patchy and depends on decisions made locally by clinical commissioners. Fertility experts are concerned that a postcode lottery in the UK is becoming more pronounced.

We investigate a surprising fraud that starts with thieves breaking into a mailbox.

Is it now socially unacceptable to hang your washing out to dry? We hear that some residential areas have become "super-gentrified", with a new generation of incomers bringing with them surprising expectations of how others should behave.

Producer: Kevin Core
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b07fdy17)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b07fl5bt)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01g637c)
Life without Elizabeth

Radio 4 with a new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 4. LIFE WITHOUT ELIZABETH - Painted in 1571 to justify and celebrate Elizabeth I's position in the Tudor succession, by the 1590s, with no direct Tudor heir, this image had very different implications.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b07fg6tw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Tommies (b07fl5bw)
16 June 1916

Lee Ross, Indira Varma, Fay Castelow and Justin Salinger star in this story by Jonathan Ruffle.

When Mickey Bliss is summoned to advise on signals at the Bureau Centrale Interallie in Paris he comes across both an impressive young woman and a disturbing figure from his past.

Meticulously based on war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war exactly 100 years ago.

Through this series of TOMMIES we follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers. They are cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of war, over 4 long years.

With Ewan Bailey, Nick Underwood and Maksim Mijovic.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle
Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: David Hunter.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b07fl5by)
Series 33

The Cotswold Way

Clare Balding joins Graham Hoyland and his partner, Gina Waggott, as they retrace the steps they took in 2015 along the Cotswold Way as part of their three month epic walk of 500 miles, following the progress of the spring as it spread up England from the south coast to Gretna Green.

They planted an acorn every mile and are thrilled to discover some of them have grown. They talk to Clare about the joy they felt in sharing this journey, their favourite rucksack snacks and their future walking plans.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07fdzjx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b07ff199)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07fl5c0)
Toby Jones, Virtual reality

With Francine Stock

Toby Jones reflects on his new role, a king who becomes obsessed by a flea, in the historical drama Tale Of Tales.

When David Bowie announced the retirement of Ziggy Stardust to a stunned audience in 1973, D.A. Pennebaker was there to catch that historic moment on his camera. As he was when Jimi Hendrix set alight to his guitar at the Monterey festival and Germaine Greer verbally jousted with Norman Mailer at a town hall debate. Pennebaker and his partner Chris Hegedus discuss their five decades of film and history making.

Francine talks to the winner of the first awards for Virtual Reality at this year's Sheffield Documentary Festival.

Dominique Nasta reveals why film-going was compulsory in communist Romania and a few other things you might not have known about cinema in the Eastern Bloc.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07fdy19)
More gravitational waves; Ocean floor mapping; Selfish Gene 40th; Spoonies

Gravitational waves have been detected for a second time. These waves are ripples in the curvature of space time, predicted by Einstein in his General Theory of Relativity in 1916. Back in February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (better known as LIGO) announced that they had detected the signal of gravitational waves from the collisions of two big black holes. The detection in February was the first observation of these waves, and confirmed General Relativity. This week, LIGO confirm a second detection. BBC Science Correspondent Jonathan Amos explains what is new about these new gravitational waves.

We know more about the surface of the moon than we know about the ocean floor. Admittedly, the sea is much more dynamic, the scene of many chemical and biological processes, about which scientists would like to learn more. This week, cartographers meet in Monte Carlo, to discuss their plan to map the ocean floor by 2030. Roland Pease reports on the ocean-mapping options.
40 years ago, The Selfish Gene, by Richard Dawkins was published. Since then, it has been a perpetual bestseller. In it, Dawkins explains that the gene is the unit of natural selection, an idea that has become central to all biology. Adam Rutherford speaks to Richard Dawkins, and his co-author on ‘The Ancestor’s Tale’ Yan Wong, at the Cheltenham Science Festival, to discuss the impact of The Selfish Gene.

The spoonbilled sandpiper is standing on the edge of extinction, but in good news, Adam hears about of a clutch of eggs laid not in their native Russia but in Slimbridge in Gloucestershire. BBC producer Andrew Luck-Baker visited the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust’s population back in April, and describes these birds to Adam.


THU 17:00 PM (b07fdy1c)
Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07fdy1f)
The Labour MP, Jo Cox, has died after being attacked in the street in her constituency in West Yorkshire.

She was stabbed and shot outside a library in Birstall, where she was holding an advice surgery. A man has been arrested.

Campaigning in the EU referendum has been suspended.


THU 18:30 Paul Sinha's History Revision (b07fl6sk)
Series 2

Planes, Trains and Automobiles

Paul Sinha returns for a second series of his History Revision, the show that uncovers the fascinating stories that we've forgotten in our onward march of progress. In the last series we learned how Alexander Graham Bell did NOT invent the telephone, and that the World Cup final of 2014 could only have happened because of the 1415 invasion of Morocco.

In this episode, Paul asks "How did we get here?", quite literally, getting the studio audience to tell him how they got to the BBC Radio Theatre, and then regaling them with stories from the history of transport. From the area of London that became a Russian train station, to the man who revolutionised both the motor industry and the music charts, to the names of airports around the world, this programme about the world of planes, trains and automobiles will provide fascinating facts and surprising stories (unless you listen on a weekend, when a bus replacement service is in operation).

"Sinha's gift for finding humour in it all makes him worth a listen" - The Telegraph

Written and performed by Paul Sinha
Produced by Ed Morrish

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b07fl6sw)
Alice is keen to see Pip at work with the mob-grazing herd. She also tells Pip she reckons Rex fancies her rotten, Pip insists they are just good mates. Alice is on her way to give Phoebe a lavender pillow to ease her exam stress and at Home Farm, they find Phoebe stressed and clearing up after Lilian and Kate. Kate has put an open invitation on Facebook to her summer solstice event and Phoebe's worried too many people will come. Alice tells her to stop clearing up and invites her to The Nest where she can study in peace.

Pat is angry that Rob is pictured and called a hero in the Echo's coverage of the weekend's events. Tony says she can't expect other people to see through him if they never did. He thinks they should agree to Rob's request of altering the arrangement with Henry for Father's Day. It will show they are co-operative people which could serve them well at the FHDRA hearing. Plus, they can spend the Sunday visiting Jack.

Toby serves Pip dinner at the Bungalow - Bert has gone to the pub and Rex is away. Pip is impressed with the quality of the cooking. Toby shows her the updated film and Pip's not impressed by the lack of mention of the wider Brookfield farm. She points out his business would never have got off the ground without a lot of help from her mum and dad. Pip leaves, thanking him for dinner but it was a shame about the rest of the evening.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b07fdy1h)
Mike Bartlett on Wild, Tale of Tales film review, Georgiana Houghton exhibition review, Suburra director Stefano Sollima

The film Tale of Tales is a fantastical interweaving of fairytales, based on a collection of stories published by the 17th Century poet Gianbattista Basile. It stars Salma Hayek, Toby Jones, Vincent Cassel and John C Riley and is directed by Matteo Garrone, who previously made Gomorrah. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

Playwright Mike Bartlett, who won Olivier Awards for his plays King Charles III and Bull, discusses his new play Wild, based on an Edward Snowden-like character who faces the consequences of leaking thousands of classified documents about US operations at home and abroad.

Charlotte Mullins reviews the exhibition of drawings by 19th Century spiritualist Georgiana Houghton at the Courtauld Gallery in London. Layers of watercolours and gouache, painted, she believed, under the influence of a spirit, Houghton's work has long been neglected. Now her abstract works have been reexamined as precursors of the work of artists such as Kandinsky and Mondrian.

Suburra portrays a dark and rain-soaked Rome, where mafia families plot to turn the city's waterfront into the next Las Vegas. The scheme involves shady deals with politicians, the Vatican and warring organised crime gangs. Director Stefano Sollima explains why he is drawn to the underworld of Italy and why he thinks Italian film is enjoying a renaissance.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07fl5bm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b07ffxsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07fl6t6)
The Finance of Films

The business of film. Evan Davis follows the money trail from script to screen. With the help of a top independent film producer, a film distributor and the head of a top cinema chain, Evan discovers who takes the risks and who makes the money behind the scenes.

Guests

Alex Hamilton, Managing Director, Entertainment One UK

Elizabeth Karlsen, Producer and co-founder, Number9 Films

Tim Richards, CEO, Vue International.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07fdy19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07fl5bh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b07fdy1k)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07fdy1m)
Labour MP Jo Cox shot dead in the street

Labour MP Jo Cox has died after being shot in the street. Paul Moss reports from Birstall, in her constituency, and we hear from her friend Brigid McConville, and senior labour colleague Harriet Harman. Also the UN has declared efforts by so-called Islamic State to wipe out the Yazidis 'genocide'. And what does China think of a potential British exit from the EU?

Photo: Jo Cox. Credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire.


THU 22:45 Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler (b07gb89g)
Episode 4

Dr Battista, an obsessively dedicated scientist, lives with daughters Kate and Bunny in Baltimore.

He spends most of his waking hours assisted in his lab by brilliant young researcher, Pyotr. But Pyotr’s visa is set to soon expire and fearful that it won’t be renewed Dr Battista has suggested Kate might marry him and resolve the situation to everyone’s satisfaction – except hers.

After all it’s not as if Kate has a boyfriend or a bevy of admirers like her pretty sister, Bunny.

Pyotr has paid a visit to Kate at home and apologised for offending her. Dr Battista is determined to see the fact that she responded graciously to his apology as progress, and is still keen to persuade her to at least consider his plan.

Without Pyotr he’s convinced that he would be unable to successfully complete his research, which he believes to be at a crucial stage.

Written by Anne Tyler

Read by Liza Ross

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


THU 23:00 The World of Simon Rich (b07fl6t9)
Series 1

Episode 3

Simon Rich has been Saturday Night Live's youngest writer, a staff writer for Pixar and a regular contributor to The New Yorker - as well as one of the funniest short story writers of his generation.

Now the American brings his enchanting, absurd world to radio with his first British comedy show.

The series takes us across time and space, from the design of the universe and prehistoric love triangles to the terrors of life as an unused condom inside a teenager’s wallet.

Performing the stories alongside Simon is a cast of UK comic talent:

Peter Serafinowicz
Tim Key
Cariad Lloyd
Jamie Demetriou
Joseph Morpurgo
Claire Price.

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


THU 23:30 Sugar, Saris and Green Bananas (b06b36w4)
Sugar in My Blood

When you reach for the sugar bowl do you ever think where those sweet granules come from? In the first of two programmes, London-born journalist Lainy Malkani embarks on a quest to uncover her family's Indo-Guyanese roots on the sugar plantations of the Caribbean.

She learns how her ancestors were among the tens of thousands of poor indentured labourers shipped from India to work on the British-owned sugar estates - a practice that began after slavery was abolished in 1838 and continued well into the 20th century. They lived and laboured on plantations with quintessentially English names like Rose Hall and Albion.

When Jock Campbell, the Eton-educated son of the owners of Albion, first visited in 1932 he was shocked by the conditions he found. He asked the fearsome Scottish manager James Bee why the workers' lodgings were so much worse than those of the mules. He was told "Because mules cost money to replace."

Lainy hears firsthand accounts of life on the sugar plantations and the intense nostalgia workers felt for their Indian homeland. She also learns how some of the most famous West Indies cricketers, such as Alvin Kallicharran and Rohan Kanhai, began their careers on the cricket grounds of the Guyanese sugar estates.

And in a south London suburb, she joins numerous other Indo-Guyanese families as they commemorate the first generation of indentured labourers who went to the Caribbean.

She says, "It was sugar that brought my Indian ancestors to the Caribbean. It was the sugar plantations that defined their daily lives. And eventually it was what drove so many of my parents' generation to seek better lives abroad, such as here in Britain."

Producer Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 17 JUNE 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07fdy31)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07fl5bk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07fdy33)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07fdy35)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07fdy37)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07fdy39)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07gbqs0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi Jonathan Wittenberg.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07fl7c4)
EU Fisheries, Cereals 2016, Young Farmers Debate Brexit

Two young farmers at Cereals 2016 debate the future of UK farming & the EU, confirming that the topic is animating the next generation of farmers.

Dr Bryce Stewart from the University of York, assesses the success of European fisheries management.

The British Film Institute has launched the latest batch of archive films - Britain on Film : Rural Life includes 750 films from silent black and white movies to full colour videos spanning the 20th Century. Andrew Dawes has been taking a look with the BFI's senior archivist, Patrick Russell.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ty530)
Lesser Black-backed Gull

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the lesser black-backed gull.

These smart gulls are charcoal grey on top and white beneath. Like herring gulls, their close relatives LBBs have moved into urban areas and now breed on flat roofs in the centre of cities. It seems almost any flat surface will do. In just three hours, one bird in Gloucester built a nest on a car roof and laid an egg in.


FRI 06:00 Today (b07flbs3)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07ff0hj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07flbsd)
Negroland

Episode 5

The writer and critic Margo Jefferson was born in 1947, the daughter of a paediatrician and a fashionable socialite, and grew up surrounded by the comforts of a well off family who were part of Chicago's black elite. This is the world she terms, 'Negroland' - 'I call it Negroland because I still find 'Negro' a word of wonders, glorious and terrible. ... because I lived with its meanings and intimations for so long.'

In the 1960s, as the Black Power movement in America gained momentum, the young Margo Jefferson had to find a way of resolving the internal conflicts arising from being educated to be better than the white people who occupied positions of power. Growing up with the advantages of class and money had somehow resulted in 'an excess of white-derived manners and interests'. Negotiating rules, entitlements and prejudices made it increasingly difficult to find her place and her self in the fractured world around her.

Written and read by Margo Jefferson
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07fdy3c)
Takeover week: Guest Editor Angelina Jolie Pitt

Guest editor Angelina Jolie Pitt brings her focus to health in refugee camps. How do women cope with something like a difficult pregnancy or everyday conditions like asthma? We hear from Esther Nyambu, who works in emergency reproductive health with the IRC (International Rescue Committee), an international aid organisation. She's worked most recently in South Sudan. We also speak to Dr Renee Bou Raad from the medical charity MSF who works with women in camps in Lebanon.

Sexual violence in conflict is a feature of many current and past wars. What's being done to help those who survive what's often described as conflict rape, then find themselves stigmatised and shunned by their communities? How do they speak out about what's happened to them? Jenni talks to Helen Durham from the International Committee of the Red Cross about what they're doing on the ground in areas like Syria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Afghanistan, and to the Kosovan/British artist Alketa Xhafa Mripa who uses the symbol of dresses aired on a washing line to raise awareness and fight stigma.

Any mother of a teenage son might welcome the chance to collaborate on a project. What's it been like for Angelina to work with her 14 year old son Maddox, adopted from Cambodia, on a film about the home of his birth?


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07flbsn)
Unsuitable Men with Familiar Smiles

Episode 5

by Caroline and David Stafford

With Sally frantic with worry about her daughter in Mexico, Christine reveals her biggest - and most surprising - secret.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


FRI 11:00 The Secret History of Yoga (b07flbst)
As UN International Yoga Day approaches, Mukti Jain Campion sets out to explore the roots of modern yoga practice.

Like millions of people across the world, Mukti attends regular yoga classes and enjoys its many physical and mental benefits while believing it to be the "timeless Indian discipline" so often described in yoga books.

But recent research challenges this common assumption. Could modern yoga classes, as now taught all around the world, actually be the product of 19th century Scandinavian gymnastics as much as ancient Indian philosophy?

Startled by this possibility, Mukti sets out to explore the roots of modern yoga practice and uncovers an extraordinary multicultural history in which early 20th century European ideas of health, fitness and the cult of the Body Beautiful became intertwined with Indian nationalism and the revival of Indian interest in its own traditions of physical culture. Out of this heady mix emerged a new generation of yoga innovators who transformed an obsolete and frowned-upon practice of Indian holy men into something that would appeal to masses of ordinary people.

Contributors include Dr Mark Singleton, author of Yoga Body: The origins of modern posture practice, Dr Jim Mallinson, a Yoga historian from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, Dr Manmath Gharote, Director of the Lonavla Yoga Institute in India and Dr Suzanne Newcombe from The London School of Economics who has studied the development of yoga in Britain.

Readers: Tim Pigott-Smith and Denise Stephenson

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b04lss87)
Series 4

Episode 2

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, records a fourth series of his hit sketch show.

2/6: This second edition of the fourth series has a sketch that you'll never really own; the rudest of awakenings for one particular pet; and a look at the often ignored positive side of stereotyping.

The first series of John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Radio Academy award. The third series actually won a Radio Academy award.

In this fourth series, John has written more sketches, like the sketches from the other series. Not so much like them that they feel stale and repetitious; but on the other hand not so different that it feels like a misguided attempt to completely change the show. Quite like the old sketches, in other words, but about different things and with different jokes. (Although it's a pretty safe bet some of them will involve talking animals.)

Written by and starring ... John Finnemore
Also featuring ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.
Original music by ... Susannah Pearse.
Producer ... Ed Morrish.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07fdy3f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Across the Board (b05sxv7t)
Series 3

Antony Beevor

Across The Board is a series of interviews conducted over a game of chess. In this programme Dominic Lawson talks to the best-selling military historian Antony Beevor. What are the parallels between chess and warfare?


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07fdy3h)
Convenience stores, Storecard PPI claims, Green homes, BHS Suppliers

Peter White hears about new figures suggesting the number of convenience stores may have peaked on our high streets.
Could your old storecard owe you some PPI cash back?
A major supplier to BHS tells us what he's doing to stay afloat without his biggest customer.
And, if you want to make your home more energy efficient - but don't know where to start - we'll have advice from some of those who've done it themselves.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b07fdy3k)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b07flbt3)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 Shakespeare's Restless World (b01gf5t0)
Europe: Triumphs of the Past

Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, continues his new object-based history. Taking artefacts from William Shakespeare's time, he explores how Elizabethan and Jacobean playgoers made sense of the unstable and rapidly changing world in which they lived.

With old certainties shifting around them, in a time of political and religious unrest and economic expansion, Neil asks what the plays would have meant to the public when they were first performed. He uses carefully selected objects to explore the great issues of the day that preoccupied the public and helped shape the works, and he considers what they can reveal about the concerns and beliefs of Shakespearean England.

Programme 6. EUROPE: TRIUMPHS OF THE PAST - As a tourist attraction in Westminster Abbey, Henry V's instruments of battle reflect the view of English history as depicted on the Elizabeth stage.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07fl6sw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b07flhl7)
Reasons for Leaving

Reasons for Leaving by Peter Whalley
Lauren thinks someone is breaking into her house and calls the police, only to discover it's Ian, her estranged husband who walked out and disappeared eleven months ago. When we discover the woman, lying in hospital in a coma,s is Ian's lover, Ian's reasons for leaving and why he's back, become more allusive. The real reason is finally realised but is it too late?

Produced and directed by Pauline Harris.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07flhl9)
Stonehenge - Midsummer Special

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Stonehenge. Anne Swithinbank, Pippa Greenwood and Matt Biggs join him to answer the audience questions.

This week the panel share ideas for a scented pergola, discuss how to create a camomile seat and help a gardener with banana-shaped blackthorn berries.

Matt Biggs finds out how snails can help trace our neolithic ancestors, and how a rare crop of lichen has given archaeologists at Stonehenge yet another puzzle to solve.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Hank of Black Hair by Sebastian Barry (b07flhlc)
It’s 1922 and in a Dublin park, Matt Kirwan is enjoying his Sunday afternoon painting a landscape when a young woman approaches his easel to watch him work.

He knows from this day forward his life will never be the same.

Liam O'Brien reads Sebastian Barry's short story.

Sebastian Barry is one of Ireland’s finest and most celebrated writers. He's twice been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize for his novels A Long Long Way (2005) and The Secret Scripture (2008), the latter of which won the 2008 Costa Book of the Year and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. His 2011 novel On Canaan's Side was longlisted for the Booker. Days Without End was published in 2016.

Producer: Gemma McMullan

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07flhlf)
Jo Cox MP, Dave Swarbrick, Viktor Korchnoi, Wendy Leigh

Reeta Chakrabarti on:

The MP Jo Cox , who was brutally killed in the street, after meeting local people in the West Yorkshire constituency she represented

The musician Dave Swarbrick, who found fame with the folk group Fairport Convention - and who celebrated the premature publication of his obituary by a newspaper, 17 years before his death.

The chess player Viktor Korchnoi, a grandmaster of the international circuit, who defected from the Soviet Union and whose career became enmeshed in Cold War politics.

And the showbiz writer Wendy Leigh, who produced racy celebrity biographies and steamy novels, and who had a long affair with the publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07flhlh)
Radio 4's Today Programme on Monday morning focused largely on the shooting at a gay club in Orlando. Unfolding details were assessed by a variety of interviewees, but some listeners felt the discussions failed to explore questions around homophobia. They called for Radio 4 aficionado Luke Howard tells Roger Bolton why he felt particularly let down and calls for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender views to be discussed as much as topics on gun laws, terrorism and IS.

The Queen's 90th birthday inspired a more traditional and simple service from Radio 4's Sunday Worship. The broadcast from the church in Sandringham evoked reactions of joy and delight from those listening - as they ask for services in this style to be aired more often. Series producer Philip Billson explains the decisions behind this and whether it's an approach the team will take again.

And, while the latest series of award-winning comedy Fags, Mags and Bags has recently come to an end, listeners have been in touch throughout to declare it a unique, hilarious and addictive listen. Comedy writers Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary respond to praise over the multi-ethnic cast - as well as to criticism over possible stereotypes and complicated language.

Produced by Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07flhlk)
Ian and Chikodi - People Stare At Us

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple whose different ethnic origins, ages and the visual disability one of them has elicit stereotypical reactions from the public. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b07fdy3m)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07fdy3p)
Police investigating the killing of the MP Jo Cox have revealed that they are looking into whether a 52-year-old man arrested yesterday had links to right-wing extremism. Officers say the man's mental health is also a line of inquiry.

David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn have paid tribute to Mrs Cox during a joint visit to the West Yorkshire village where she was stabbed and shot.


FRI 18:30 The Missing Hancocks (b06qht29)
Series 2

The Red Planet

Tony Hancock takes up astronomy, and discovers something terrible among the stars.

Between 1954 and 1959, BBC Radio recorded 102 episodes of Galton & Simpson's comedy but 20 went missing from the BBC archives, and had not been heard since their original transmission… until these faithful re-imaginings.

After a highly acclaimed first series, another five were lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at London's BBC Radio Theatre.

The Lad Himself …. Kevin McNally
Bill Kerr …. Kevin Eldon
Sid James …. Simon Greenall
Kenneth Williams …. Robin Sebastian
Andree Melly …. Susy Kane

Newly recorded score by the BBC Concert Orchestra

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson

Produced by Ed Morrish and Neil Pearson

Originally broadcast on the BBC Light Programme in November 1955.

Recreated for broadcast by BBC Radio Comedy for BBC Radio 4 and first broadcast in November 2015.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07flhlp)
Back in Ambridge, Caroline and Oliver are impressed how the village has recovered from the flood. They're pleased with business at Grey Gables, Caroline insists she doesn't miss it - Roy, Kathy and Ian are doing a tremendous job. On their arrival at Grange Farm, Oliver and Caroline are surprised to see pigs in the garden. Ed says they will move them and lay new turf. Inside, Clarrie insists they will fix the damage from the over-flowing bath. Oliver is sure the insurance will cover it.

In the mother and baby unit garden, Helen tells Kaz her parents are taking Jack out but Helen won't see her mum and she misses her a lot. While Helen starts to feed Jack, Kaz recounts seeing one of the staff members wearing an unmatched pair of shoes. This makes Helen laugh and then she realises that Jack is feeding happily for the first time. She thanks Kaz for her help but Kaz says it's Helen who should take the credit.

Oliver confirms Ed's tenancy on the Grange Farm land will continue despite the state of the house. Ed explains Eddie, Clarrie and Joe will be moving to No 1, The Green and he and Emma and the kids will live with Susan and Neil. Oliver announces they plan to sell Grange Farm and the Grundys will have three months' notice. Eddie worries what Joe will think. Clarrie says he will have to face reality, like the rest of them.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07fdy3r)
Trevor Nunn, Natasha Walter, Jake Bugg

John Wilson talks to Sir Trevor Nunn, as he returns to his hometown of Ipswich to direct A Midsummer Night's Dream. With this new production Nunn will have directed all of Shakespeare's 37 plays.

Singer-songwriter Jake Bugg talks about his third album, On My One, and plays his new song The Love We're Hoping For live in the studio.

Natasha Walter, known for her non-fiction books The New Feminism and Living Dolls, discusses her first novel, A Quiet Life, inspired by the wife of Cambridge spy Donald Maclean.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07flbsn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 One to One (b07jndjx)
Interview series in which broadcasters follow their personal passions.


FRI 20:45 The Listening Project (b07flhlk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:55 today]


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01rrd9c)
Science, Magic and Madness

What is the difference between magic and science? What is the difference between Galileo and his contemporary, the famous Elizabethan astrologer and alchemist John Dee? According to Adam Gopnik it's the experimental method - the looking and seeing and testing that goes with true science. But when he wrote about this recently he found that fervent members of the John Dee fan club disagreed.


FRI 21:00 Five Hundred Years of Friendship (b03zdm6g)
Five Hundred Years of Friendship: Omnibus

Episode 2

Dr Thomas presents this omnibus edition of his history about the changing meaning and experience of friendship over the centuries

He explores working class Friendly Societies - pre-Welfare State, grassroots insurance schemes - in the 18th and 19th centuries; children's friendships and the invention of the idea of the best friend; the idea of dogs being "man's best friend"; the Victorian borderland between platonic and homosexual love; and the tragic impact of the First World War on male friendships.

Producer: Beaty Rubens.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b07fdy3t)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07fdy3w)
MP killer 'may be right-wing extremist'

We have the latest on the Jo Cox murder investigation and interviews with the Canadian MP, Nathan Cullen, who broke down when he spoke about her in parliament, and Yasmine Nahlawi, a UK-based Syrian activist who'd worked closely with her. Also Cass Pennant a former football hooligan tells us why there's been so much trouble at Euro 2016.

Photo: A picture of Jo Cox at a memorial in Parliament Square. Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.


FRI 22:45 Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler (b07gbb1m)
Episode 5

Dr Battista, an obsessively dedicated scientist, lives with daughters Kate and Bunny in Baltimore.

He’s desperate to keep his brilliant young researcher Pyotr, whose visa is set to expire in weeks.

Pyotr has now apologised over the Doctor’s plan for him to marry Dr Battista’s daughter Kate in order to get a visa.

This has left Kate wondering what she should do next...

Written by Anne Tyler.

Read by Liza Ross

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2016.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07ffxt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Sugar, Saris and Green Bananas (b06c48pj)
Indo-Guyanese and Proud

A cutlass once used for chopping sugar cane, a collection of old Indian music albums and a pair of shiny red stiletto shoes. Can these objects help a daughter better understand her mother's past?

Since her mother died, London-born journalist Lainy Malkani has been trying to make sense of her family's history of double migration. In the first programme she uncovered the epic story of her ancestors who came from India to work as indentured labourers on the sugar plantations of British Guyana in the 19th and early 20th century. In this programme she discovers how difficult it was to forge an Indo-Guyanese identity for the migrants who came to build new lives in Britain during the 1960s.

"No-one knew what to make of us when we came to England. We looked Indian but we didn't speak any Indian language or dress in Indian clothes. If we said we were from the Caribbean people didn't understand because, to most British people, Caribbean just meant being black. So we became sort of invisible."

When her parents were alive they didn't speak much about the past. But by going through her mum's belongings with her siblings and speaking to other immigrants of that period Lainy has begun to reconnect with her Indo-Guyanese heritage. And as she reflects on the life her mother created for herself and her children in north London, Lainy learns that migration can be motivated by many things other than money.

Producer Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07flm1r)
Ian and Chikodi - Leaving Things Where You'll Trip Over Them

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about being aware of your partner's needs... or not... Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b07ffb25)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b07ffb25)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07ffxsk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07ffxsk)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b07fg1x8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b07fg1x8)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07fl5bm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07fl5bm)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07flbsn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07flbsn)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b07ffxt5)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b07ffxt5)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07dp057)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b01rrd9c)

A Portrait Of... 16:00 MON (b07ffhf1)

Across the Board 12:04 FRI (b05sxv7t)

Adelia Prado: Voice of Brazil 16:30 SUN (b07ff1n1)

After Milk Wood 00:30 SUN (b04368ff)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b07ffxtt)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b07ffxtt)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b07dknlv)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b07ffkhz)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07djvyl)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07dp055)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07f8qkk)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07fdy19)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07fdy19)

Behind Closed Doors 14:15 MON (b07ffd8d)

Behind Closed Doors 14:15 TUE (b07ffxst)

Behind Closed Doors 14:15 WED (b07fg2qd)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07fdyq1)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b07fdyq1)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b07ffj3h)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b07f4yrr)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07ffb21)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07ffb21)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07ffxsh)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07ffxsh)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07fg1x6)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07fg1x6)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07fl5bk)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07fl5bk)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07flbsd)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07fdxpy)

Bunk Bed 23:15 WED (b07fln54)

Dangerous Visions 19:45 SUN (b07bzjxm)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b07ff0hj)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b07ff0hj)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b07f8qh8)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07dk01s)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07ff197)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b07flhl7)

EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts 18:28 TUE (b07byv6f)

EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts 18:28 WED (b07dm2pl)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07djvx8)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07ffb1v)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07ffxs5)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07fg1x0)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b07fl5b9)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b07fl7c4)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b07dnyw3)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b07flhlh)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07dlxxt)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b07ffxtr)

Five Hundred Years of Friendship 21:00 FRI (b03zdm6g)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b07fg6v2)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b07djvy2)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b07fl5bp)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b07fdxsz)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b07fdxwg)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b07fdxz2)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b07fdy1h)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b07fdy3r)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07dnyvz)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b07flhl9)

Heresy 18:30 WED (b07fg6tt)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07fl5bh)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07fl5bh)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07fdxwj)

In Wales the Ball Is Round 13:30 SUN (b07ff0hn)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 11:30 FRI (b04lss87)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b07gf9l1)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b07ffj3k)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07dnyw1)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07flhlf)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b07ffxsy)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b07ffxsy)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b07fdzjv)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b07f8qk3)

Manto: Uncovering Pakistan 11:30 THU (b07fl5br)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b07djvw4)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b07fdxnw)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b07fdxs1)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b07fdxvr)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b07fdxy7)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b07fdy0q)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b07fdy31)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b07fg1x4)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b07fg1x4)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07f8qb0)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b07f8qb0)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b07fg6tm)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b07dm2ps)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b07fg6ty)

More or Less 12:04 MON (b07gv98b)

More or Less 12:04 TUE (b07gv9c7)

More or Less 12:04 WED (b07hjvk4)

More or Less 12:04 THU (b07hjy4z)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 TUE (b07ffxtj)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b07dlwwb)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b07ffxsm)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b07djvwq)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b07fdxp4)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b07fdxs9)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b07fdxw0)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b07fdxyh)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b07fdy0z)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b07fdy39)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b07fdxp6)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b07djvyd)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b07fdxq0)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b07fdxsj)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b07fdxw4)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b07fdxym)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b07fdy13)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b07fdy3f)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b07djvws)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b07fdxpc)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b07fdxpk)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b07djvz1)

News 13:00 SAT (b07djvyj)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b07ffxsf)

One to One 20:00 FRI (b07jndjx)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b07ff199)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b07ff199)

PM 17:00 SAT (b07djvyq)

PM 17:00 MON (b07fdxsv)

PM 17:00 TUE (b07fdxwb)

PM 17:00 WED (b07fdxyy)

PM 17:00 THU (b07fdy1c)

PM 17:00 FRI (b07fdy3m)

Paul Sinha's History Revision 18:30 THU (b07fl6sk)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07ff2ks)

Plum House 11:30 WED (b07fg2q7)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b07dk0y3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07dp2jb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b07gm1hz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07gbg3m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b07gm2xq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b07gbp3l)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b07gbqs0)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b07f8qk5)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b07f8qk5)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b07f8qk5)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07fdzjx)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07fdzjx)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07fdzjx)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b07dnqjl)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b07fl5by)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b07djvxt)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07djvyz)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b07fg6v6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07djvwl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07fdxp0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b07fdxs5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b07fdxvw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b07fdxyc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b07fdy0v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b07fdy35)

Self's Search for Meaning 23:00 MON (b07ffkj3)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 MON (b01dp526)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 TUE (b01g61vf)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 WED (b01drtc2)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 THU (b01g637c)

Shakespeare's Restless World 13:45 FRI (b01gf5t0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b07djvwd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b07djvwn)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b07djvys)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b07fdxny)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b07fdxp2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b07fdxq6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b07fdxs3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b07fdxs7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b07fdxvt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b07fdxvy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b07fdxy9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b07fdxyf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b07fdy0s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b07fdy0x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b07fdy33)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b07fdy37)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07djvyx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b07fdxqb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b07fdxsx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b07fdxwd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b07fdxz0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b07fdy1f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b07fdy3p)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07fdzjs)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b07fdzjs)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b07ffb1z)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b07ffb1z)

Sugar, Saris and Green Bananas 23:30 THU (b06b36w4)

Sugar, Saris and Green Bananas 23:27 FRI (b06c48pj)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07fdzjz)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07fdxpf)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 TUE (b07ffxsp)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b07dklgc)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b07ffd8g)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07ff0hg)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07ff2kv)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07ff2kv)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07ffj3m)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07ffj3m)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07ffxtm)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07ffxtm)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b07fg6tw)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b07fg6tw)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07fl6sw)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07fl6sw)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b07flhlp)

The Borders of Sanity 20:00 MON (b07ffkhx)

The Borders of Sanity 11:00 WED (b07ffkhx)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b07dntkc)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b07fl6t6)

The Break 11:30 MON (b07ffb29)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b07dnqjp)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b07fl5c0)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b07ff0hl)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b07ff0hl)

The Hank of Black Hair by Sebastian Barry 15:45 FRI (b07flhlc)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b07ffxsw)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b07f8q9w)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b07f8q9w)

The Lach Chronicles 23:00 WED (b07fg6v8)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b07h9xdb)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b07h9xdb)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b07ff0hq)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b07fg1xb)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b07flhlk)

The Listening Project 20:45 FRI (b07flhlk)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b07flm1r)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b07fdxyw)

The Missing Hancocks 18:30 FRI (b06qht29)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b07dp051)

The Secret History of Yoga 11:00 FRI (b07flbst)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b07ffb27)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b07f8q9y)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07fdxq4)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07fdxt3)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b07fdxwn)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b07fdxz6)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b07fdy1m)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b07fdy3w)

The World of Simon Rich 23:00 THU (b07fl6t9)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b02119cq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b07dm2pj)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b07fg6tp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b07ffkj5)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b07f8q9t)

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Tommies 14:15 THU (b07fl5bw)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03x45bg)

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Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler 22:45 MON (b07ffkj1)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b07fdxqd)

What Does the K Stand For? 23:00 TUE (b0510ftl)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b07djvyn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b07fdxsf)

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Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b07fdxyk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b07fdy11)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b07fdxss)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b07fdxsl)

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You and Yours 12:15 THU (b07fdy15)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b07dp2jd)