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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 MAY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07b9r83)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07bfxhj)
Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea

Episode 5

Teffi was a famous Russian writer in the early 1900s, forced to flee her country. And this is the story of her eventful flight, which is newly translated by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler, Anne Marie Jackson and Irina Steinberg. It is abridged for radio by Katrin Williams.

Sliding down the map, far from Moscow.. the author ends up in Novorossiisk.. where's that? Then she thinks about places even further afield, as the homeland 'slips away from us'.

Reader Tracy-Ann Oberman

Reader Duncan Minshull.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07b9r85)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07b9r87)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07b9r89)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07b9r8c)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07bfzlx)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the former moderator of the Church of Scotland's General Assembly, the Very Rev John Chalmers.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b07bfzlz)
Dopamine: How it can cause havoc

After one iPM listener told us about his father's experience of Parkinson's disease medication turning him into a compulsive gambler, Professor Paula Piccini explains what's happening in the brain to cause such a significant change in behaviour.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07b9r8f)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b07b9r8h)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b07bft89)
Series 33

Glyndwr's Way with Ursula Martin

Clare Balding gets serious in this new series of Ramblings as she discovers what it takes to be a more adventurous walker. Today she joins Ursula Martin who walked over three thousand, seven hundred miles, around Wales in an eighteen month period. After being treated for ovarian cancer she decided to walk to her medical appointments from her home in mid-Wales to the hospital in Bristol. Ursula then just carried on walking, raising money for research into the condition and spreading the word about diagnosis. Today she takes Clare on small section of her favourite walk, along Glyndwr's Way in Powys, Mid Wales, starting just outside Llangadfan, they walk for about eight miles to Llanbrynmawr, just west of Welshpool , a few miles south of Snowdonia National park. The route takes them through farmland, onto open moorland and into a pine forest, where the moss covered trees allow their imaginations to run wild. Ursula spent many nights rough sleeping but she also describes the incredible kindness and generosity she received from total strangers who offered her meals, accommodation and the greatest gift of all; transporting her backpack to her next destination. She explains to Clare the joy and pain she found in walking day after day across the country she has adopted as her own.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07bpq1n)
Farming Today This Week: Beef industry

Charlotte Smith is at the annual showcase of the British beef industry - the Beef Expo - at Bakewell in the Peak District. We find out what makes a good breeding bull; which new cuts the butchers are trying out to entice consumers; and what state the industry is in.
We also follow agricultural students competing in a challenge to be named best young farmer at the show.
Produced by Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b07b9r8k)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b07bpwbb)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07bpv3b)
John Sergeant, Juliet Sargeant, Freya Rodger, Mikael Lindnord

Former political correspondent, pasa doble specialist and now narrow boat enthusiast John Sergeant celebrates 50 years of broadcasting and reveal show he got his break into the industry

Garden designer Juliet Sargeant tells us about her preparations for the pinnacle of the horticultural year - the Chelsea Flower Show.

Saturday Live listener Freya Rodger reveals why she is attempting to do all 41 Olympic Sports before the closing ceremony in this year's Games

Swedish elite athlete Mikael Lindnord took part in endurance race across the Ecuador. After taking pity on a stray dog and feeding him some meatballs, the dog then followed Mikael hundreds of miles across mountains rivers and the jungle. Mikael named him Arthur and eventually took him back to live with his family in Sweden.

Plus the singer, actor and now writer, John Barrowman shares his Inheritance Tracks

And the school teacher and his pupils who were so inspired by Saturday Live guest Liesbeth Langford, that they made an award winning film of her life.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07bpv3d)
Series 13

Durham

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary programme from Durham Town Hall. Professor Peter Barham, Rachel McCormack and Rob Owen Brown are this week's panellists.

The panel begins by discussing their most embarrassing moments when cooking for important guests, before moving onto advising the audience on recipes for leftover lamb, the 'must have' features of a dream kitchen, and what to do with thirty eggs.

Gemma Lewis and Norman Emery shed light on the eating habits of old at Durham Castle and Durham Cathedral respectively.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Hannah Newton

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b07bpv3g)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The shadow of the EU referendum hung over the Queen's Speech this week, leaving parliamentarians to wonder how much of the Prime Minister's legislative programme will see implementation.
A former ambassador talks about the art of diplomacy in the new digital age. And has the tone of political discourse become more ugly and strident?
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07b9r8m)
The Kurdistan Tapes

People in the news: it's a hundred years since the signing of the secret Sykes-Picot agreement under which the British and French agreed to divide up the Middle East, and now the President of the autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan, Masoud Barzani, says it's time for outright independence for the Iraqi Kurds. Jim Muir considers the Kurds' flight from Saddam Hussein 25-years ago and what has happened to some of the people he encountered back then. Bethany Bell is in Austria where voting could result in the country getting Europe's first far right president. The French leader Francois Hollande's again said he wants the new nuclear plant in the English county of Somerset to go ahead. It's to be built by the French. David Shukman's been to a construction site in Finland where the French are building a similar reactor - amid some controversy. Have you had a 'camelccino' yet? Hannah McNeish in Kenya tells us camel milk could be the next big thing and that could mean huge benefits for the country's economy, and its camel herders. And vitriol from the presidential campaign might have given people reasons to be discouraged about America, but Robert Hodierne tells a story which he says illustrates the basic goodness of folks in that country.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07b9r8p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07b9r8r)
All that glisters. But should you invest in it?

All that glisters. Investors have snapped up gold at a record pace in the first three months of 2016, according to the World Gold Council. It says global growth fears and worries that the UK may vote next month in favour of leaving the EU, are a factor. Paul Lewis visits a new gold bullion dealer in London. The programme also hears from an investment expert about the different ways of investing in gold.

Banks should cap unarranged overdraft fees and warn customers before they go overdrawn, the competition watchdog has said. But the study by the Competition and Markets Authority didn't go as far as ordering banks to make our current accounts portable to make customer switching easier. Consumer groups say it's been a missed opportunity. Alasdair Smith, who chaired the CMA's investigation, answers his critics.

If the UK votes to leave the EU, will the statutory compensation we get if our flight is delayed at an airport for more than three hours still apply? At the moment we are entitled to a payout of up to 600 Euros, depending on the length of the flight. But this rule was brought in by the EU not by UK legislative bodies. Money Box continues its series looking at the personal finance implications of a Brexit.

The Bank of England's chief economist, Andy Haldane, has admitted that despite being "moderately financially literate" he is not able to make "the remotest sense of pensions". Money Box sets out to help him, by collecting the top pension gripes of experts and how they would make retirement saving more simple.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b07bfzj7)
Series 90

Episode 6

Hugo Rifkind, Kerry Godliman, Bridget Christie and Andrew Maxwell are Miles' guests in the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b07b9r8t)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b07b9r8w)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07bfzjf)
Andrea Leadsom MP, Dave Nellist, Lord Patten, Emma Reynolds MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Royal Grammar School in Jesmond, Newcastle, with the Energy Minister Andrea Leadsom MP, Dave Nellist the chair of TUSC the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition, the conservative peer Lord Patten and the Labour MP Emma Reynolds.

Together they debated the future of the NHS in the light of the news about the deficits; whether the UK should vote to leave or remain in the EU; the recent vote to retain the men only policy at Muirfield Golf Club; the latest ruling on the unnamed celebrity threesome; and who should be the next James Bond.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07b9r8y)
NHS Deficit, EU Referendum

Anita Anand takes your calls on two of the questions raised in last night's Any Questions?

The Questions;
In the light of today's announcement of substantial NHS trust deficits, is the NHS sustainable without tax increases or patient contributions?
In the light of the Brexit debate, is the credibility of our political class helped by historic references to a plausible World War III or, indeed, Adolf Hitler?

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email is any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Or tweet, the hastag is BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b07bpv3j)
School Drama

Romeo and Juliet

The re-branded Deer Park Academy has brought in has-been TV star, Geoff Cathcart, to stage a student production of Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet. In this the final episode, the curtain finally rises and the students take to the stage... Romeo & Juliet, as performed by the pupils of Deer Park Academy. With Tom Hollander.

All other parts played by students from Portsmouth Grammar School:
Douglas James, Joe McAuley, Freddie Fenton, Jay Pasricha, Thomas Locke, Floss Willcocks, JM Hopkinson

Written by William Shakespeare
Adapted by Andy Mulligan

Music by Jon Ouin
Sound by Steve Bond
Produced by Emma Hearn

Directed by John Dryden
A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Field Notes: The Irishman Who Invented the Nocturne (b07bbk4g)
Alistair McGowan travels to Dublin to explore the sensational life of his musical hero - the 19th century Irish pianist and composer John Field. Born in Dublin in 1782, Field was a child prodigy who left Ireland at an early age to become apprentice to the great Italian composer and piano maker Clementi. Clementi took Field on a tour of Europe and Russia, demonstrating his considerable talents and showcasing Clementi's pianos.

Field was to live in Russia for the rest of his life and Russia welcomed Field with open arms - he became the darling of high society, as well as one of the most celebrated and influential pianists of his day. His playing and his invention of a new kind of piano piece, the nocturne, were to influence Chopin, Liszt, Schumann and Mendelssohn.

Interviewees include pianists John O'Conor, Finnuala Moynihan, Finghin Collins and architectural historian Finola O'Kane.

Produced by Emma Harding.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07b9r90)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Corinne Bailey Rae, Christine Lagarde, Brix Smart Smith

Corinne Bailey Rae performs her latest single Stop Where You Are.

We hear from the Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde on corruption and what feminism means to her.

The American singer, guitarist and presenter Brix Smith Start best known for being a member of the Post Punk band The Fall discusses her new memoir The Rise, The Fall and The Rise.

We explore what it's like for women who work abroad leaving their children behind for months at a time. Andrea is from Romania and works as a cleaner in the UK for several months at a time while her daughter is looked after by her grandparents. Dr Umut Erel from the Open University has been researching transnational motherhood.

The MP Caroline Lucas on her frustration that a promise by the Prime Minister, David Cameron in 2014 to modernise the law so that mothers can appear on marriage certificates in England and Wales, has so far failed to lead to any change and what she'll be doing next.

The novelist Maggie O'Farrell on her new novel This Must Be the Place about a New Yorker living in the wilds of Ireland with his wife Claudette a reclusive ex film star.

Fell runner Nicky Spinks tells us about completing the double Bob Graham Round Challenge running the 66-mile route twice back to back in a new record time of 45 hours and 30 minutes. Why did she decided to take up fell running after being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2001?


SAT 17:00 PM (b07b9r92)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b07bfzlz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07b9r94)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b07b9r96)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07b9r98)
Investigators form a picture of the final moments of the crash that killed 66 people.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07brygz)
Clive Anderson, Arthur Smith, Hairy Bikers, George Monbiot, Katharine Round, George Egg, Meilyr Jones, Michele Stodart

Clive Anderson and Arthur Smith are joined by Hairy Bikers, George Monbiot, Katharine Round and anarchist cook George Egg for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Meilyr Jones and Michele Stodart.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b07bryh1)
Ruth Davidson

Ruth Davidson, leader of the Scottish Conservatives, is credited with detoxifying the Tory brand in Scotland. A kick-boxing, Territorial Army-trained, gay Christian with working-class roots, she's not your typical Tory.

This month she's led a Conservative resurgence in Scotland. The Scottish Conservatives are now the largest opposition party in Holyrood, kicking Labour into third place. David Cameron has tipped her as a potential successor.

At just 37 her rise has been meteoric. She joined the Conservative Party only 7 years ago after a career in broadcasting. How has she done it? Mark Coles finds out.

Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07b9r9b)
Heart of a Dog, Don DeLillo, Blue/Orange, Going Forward, Seeing Round Corners

Laurie Anderson's film Heart of a Dog explores death and longing through the story of her terrier
Don DeLillo's novel new Zero K explores death and longing and cryogenic suspension
The revival at London's Young Vic of Joe Penhall's 2000 play Blue/Orange manages to deal in a darkly comic way with paranoid schizophrenia.
Jo Brand returns to TV as Kim Wilde - a community nurse coping with financial cuts and family crises in Going Forward. It's dark but is it comic?
Seeing Round Corners is a new exhibition at Turner Contemporary in Margate which celebrates the centrality of the circle in art.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Sarah Crompton, Alex Clark and Robert Hanks. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07bryh3)
The Camera Never Lies

Does documentary ever really tell the truth?

BAFTA award winning filmmaker Molly Dineen examines the concept of truth and the creation of narrative in documentary film making. Robert Flaherty's 'Nanook of the North' is considered the first documentary ever made, and much of it was specially set up for the cameras. We think that modern 'Scripted Reality' is a new phenomenon, but does it have its roots in the earliest days of documentary? We look at the making of a documentary, from idea, to casting, filming and editing to find out how documentary makers craft their story.

Molly Dineen looks at nearly 100 years of documentary making from the archives, as well as looking back on her own career. Her first film 'Home from the Hill' followed retired Solider Hilary Hook returning to England after a career in Kenya, and she has also filmed the London Zoo in crisis, in her BAFTA award winning series 'The Ark', modern celebrity in her portrait of ex-Spice Girl Geri Halliwell, and a Prime Minister in waiting in the 1997 Party Political Broadcast for the Labour Party. Molly's observational style sees her immersing herself in the worlds she shoots, but we also take a look at modern 'Fly on the Wall' programming, speaking to TV producer Jonathan Stadlen about his series 'GP's: Behind Closed Doors'. There's more factual programming around now than ever; but is this a good thing? Are the schedules clogged with cheap programming that sacrifices the truth for style, using fast cutting, music and voice over rather than allowing people to speak for themselves?

We also hear from Kim Loginotto, whose films examine the lives of women worldwide, Radio Producer Simon Elmes and TV Critic AA Gill.

Presenter: Molly Dineen
Producer: Jessica Treen.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b050z2v9)
Cloud Howe

Episode 2

Lewis Grassic Gibbon's powerful sequel to Sunset Song dramatised by Donna Franceschild.

Atmospheric drama about Grassic Gibbon's best-loved character, Chris.

Now married to Robert, a young and idealistic minister, Chris and her family move from the crofting village of Kinraddie to the mill town of Segget in Aberdeenshire. Living in the wake of the Great War and during the build up to the General Strike, they find themselves instrumental in the small town's epic class struggle.

Tensions within the town grow as Chris and Robert help the spinners prepare for strike action. But nothing can prepare the family for the tragic events that are about to unfold.

Starring Amy Manson and Robin Laing.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07b9r9d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 FutureProofing (b07bdfmg)
Memory

New research points to a future where we can artificially create and manipulate memory inside our own heads. What are the implications when we can control memory in this way, and why is it so important to our future?

FutureProofing travels to California to meet the neuro-scientists creating the means for us to make and control memories inside the human brain, and to hear what the future holds when we can manipulate the process of forming and storing memories.

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson also explore the implications of having our memories distributed in many places - a development that is gathering pace as we increasingly use the internet as the repository of our lives - from social media to cloud storage and all our online shopping data.

And the programme visits Jerusalem to discover how both Israelis and Palestinians are meeting the challenge of creating and maintaining memorials and museums which not only preserve their history but also offer a relevant guide to future generations.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b07bbbjp)
Series 6

The University of Gloucestershire

Steve Punt hosts the battle of wits as three students from the University of Gloucestershire take on their professors.

A funny and dynamic quiz show with specialist subjects including Biosciences, Media and Religious Studies and questions ranging from Betjeman to BB King via Botham and brass instruments.

Producer: David Tyler.

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in May 2016.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b07bb1z7)
Groups of Poets

Roger McGough looks at the poetry produced by groups of friends throughout history, from the Scriblerus club to the Mersey poets, by way of the Lakes and Rose Street. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 22 MAY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07bt4gk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Stories from Songwriters (b042l2xw)
Sunset to Break Your Heart, by Barb Jungr

The first in a series of three specially commissioned short stories from songwriters Barb Jungr, Eliza Carthy and You Are Wolf (also known as Kerry Andrew).

Three songwriters turn their hand to short story writing for the first time for BBC Radio 4.

Suranne Jones reads Barb Jungr's heartbreaking story set on the Shetland Islands which takes its title from one of Barb's songs, 'Sunset to Break Your Heart'. Singer-songwriter Barb Jungr has been described as "the best thing to come out of Rochdale since Gracie Fields". She draws on her Czech and German heritage to blend European style with her English roots. Billy Bragg described Jungr as our greatest living interpreter of Dylan songs, and Jeremy Irons chose a Barb Jungr song as one of his Desert Island Discs.

Hattie Morahan reads Eliza Carthy's unusual and playful fairy tale, 'The Announcer's Daughter'. Eliza has been nominated for the Mercury Prize twice and grew up immersed in the world of traditional music - her parents are folk legends Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson. She approaches the tradition in new and innovative ways creating utterly contemporary work.

You Are Wolf - the artist also known as Kerry Andrew - is a singer, songwriter and composer who specialises in experimental vocal music and uses a loop machine to layer her astonishing voice. For her debut short story she interweaves song and story, singing traditional inspired counterpoints to her story 'One Swallow'.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4gm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07bt4gp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4gr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07bt4gt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07bt72c)
St Thomas' Church, Norbury

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from the Parish Church of St Thomas, Norbury in Hazel Grove, Stockport. Originally cast as a peal of 6 bells in the late 17th century, they were augmented to 8 with the addition of 2 new trebles in 1925. This week we hear them ringing Cambridge Surprise Major.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b07bryh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07bt4gw)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07bt72f)
Deterrence

Mark Tully ponders why deterrence often fails to deter, whether globally, at home, or in the Garden of Eden. He examines the different ways it is used - including to discipline children, to reduce breaches of the law, to prevent people endangering themselves or others and, perhaps most successfully, to stop the Cold War getting hot.

To consider whether persuasion might be a better option than deterrence, Mark chooses readings on the prohibition of alcohol in the United States in the 1920s, the psychological effects of the notion of sin and hell, and the mixed success of corporal and capital punishment.

While accepting that deterrence can be effective sometimes, Mark maintains that it often prevents us pursuing better options, and can be detrimental - not least for Conrad who ignores his mother's warning that "the great tall tailor always comes", armed with his "great sharp scissors", to "little boys that suck their thumbs." Conrad is undeterred. "Snip! Snap! Snip!"

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b07bt72h)
Playing the Field

Natural history programme broadcasting intimate encounters with British wildlife.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b07bt4gy)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07bt4h0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07bt4h2)
Becket relic, Transgender Christians, Humanitarian Summit

A fragment of bone believed to have come from the body of St Thomas Becket is to return to England from Hungary for the first time in more than 800 years in what's being hailed as a vivid symbol of reconciliation between Anglicans and Roman Catholics. Trevor Barnes reports.

Ahead of the first ever World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul next week Sandrine Tiller explains why Medecins Sans Frontieres will be boycotting the event after the organisation branded it 'a fig-leaf of good intentions'. Matthew Carter from Catholic relief agency CAFOD discusses why he will be attending the summit with Mehmet Ugu, Professor of Economics and Institutions, University of Greenwich.

Konstantin Von Eggert joins Mike Wooldridge to explore what President Putin's pilgrimage to the monastic community of Mount Athos says about Church/State relations in post-communist Russia.

Sunday is joined by members of the 'Mixed Up Chorus' - the multi-faith choir closing this Sunday's London Interfaith Music Festival.

Very Rev John Chalmers, Principle Clerk to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland discusses the Church of Scotland vote on Saturday to allow its ministers to be in same sex-marriages.

Rev Rachel Mann reviews a new book giving voice to transgender Christians and the editor of 'This is My Body', Rev Christina Beardsley, tells Mike Wooldridge why it was a project whose time had come.

The Rev Colin Chambers was prison chaplain on South Africa's Robben Island for eight years and Nelson Mandela was one of the prisoners he visited. William Crawley spoke to Colin about the former president's spiritual side.

Producers:
Catherine Earlam
Peter Everett
Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07bt72k)
SolarAid

Ian McEwan presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of SolarAid
Registered Charity No 1115960
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'SolarAid'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'SolarAid'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b07bt4h4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07bt4h6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07bt72m)
The Holy and Undivided Trinity

A mass for Trinity Sunday live from Leeds Cathedral. How does this complex doctrine of the unity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, affect the way Christians celebrate faith? Celebrant: The Revd Mgr Philip Moger (Cathedral Dean); Sermon: Fr Timothy Swinglehurst; Holy, holy, holy! (Nicaea); Gloria and Agnus Dei (Victoria, Missa quarti toni); Proverbs 8: 22-31; John 16: 12-15; Come praise the Lord, the Almighty (Lobe den Herren); Ave verum (Duggan); Firmly I believe and truly (Stuttgart); Benjamin Saunders - Diocesan Director of Music; David Pipe - Director of the Organists Training Programme and Cathedral Organist.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07bfzjh)
Psy Wars

Will Self - with a nod to the "valetudinarian pop-person, Morrissey" - poses the question "Does the mind rule the body or the body rule the mind?"

Before 1960, he says, "a Briton could probably go their entire life without encountering a psychiatrist or a psychoanalyst - let alone a modish psychotherapist". But not any more.

Will ponders what role these "psy-professions" play in contemporary Britain.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tnrx)
Nightjar

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Nightjar. Take a walk on a heath on a warm summer evening and you may hear the strange churring sound of the nightjar.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07bt4h8)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07bt72p)
Peggy has made up her mind, and there is an awkward moment at The Bull.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07bt72r)
Berry Gordy

Kirsty Young's castaway is the producer Berry Gordy.

He founded the Motown record label and his musical empire made worldwide stars of Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross & The Supremes, The Jackson 5 and Marvin Gaye.

The second youngest of eight children, he was brought up in Detroit. He left school at sixteen to become a Featherweight boxer, and served as a soldier in the Korean war before making music his career. His first foray into the music business was a jazz record store in Detroit but he was out of step with popular taste and he became bankrupt.

It was whilst working on a a car production line that he came up with the idea of setting up a record label. The combination of his song-writing skills and entrepreneurial spirit took Motown music to the top of the charts on both sides of the Atlantic and to the centre of American culture during a pivotal moment in America's civil rights history. He was friends with Dr Martin Luther King and recorded some of his speeches on the Motown label.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07bt4hb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07bbd50)
Series 75

Episode 1

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 75th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Paul Merton, now the second most prolific player of the game after Kenneth Williams, will be joined by guests including series regulars Josie Lawrence, Sheila Hancock, Marcus Brigstocke and Gyles Brandreth. Comedian Alexei Sayle, and Broadcaster of the Year John Finnemore make their first appearances.

Episode one features Paul Merton, John Finnemore, Gyles Brandreth and Sheila Hancock talking about such diverse topics as Halley's Comet, Carbon Dating and Answering the Telephone.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.
Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b07bt7n5)
Diana Henry: A Life Through Food (Part 1)

Food writer Diana Henry has just collected a James Beard Award in America for her latest book 'A Bird in the Hand'. Straight from the plane she joined Sheila Dillon at the Bristol Food Connections Festival.
In this first part of the interview Diana talks about her beginnings in Antrim and how a revelatory French exchange and a move to London opened her eyes to new styles of cooking and fascinating ingredients.
While at University she was mocked for her love of cooking - in the 80s politics was the passion of the day - but the new 'fashionability' of food is not necessarily a good thing, according to Diana.

She's selected a number of excerpts of writing about food - which she feels capture a feeling or describe a moment with beauty and explains why they stand out from others. Her choices include poetry, novels, online articles and restaurant reviews.

The podcast including both parts of this interview are available from the Monday (Part 2) edition of the programme page.
Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock
Readers: Rebecca Ripley and Sam Woolf.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b07bt4hg)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07bt4hj)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Jutland: The Battle that Won the War (b07bt7n7)
Lord West explains why Jutland was the most important battle of the First World War on land or sea, a dramatic strategic victory and an inflection point which directly paved the way for allied victory.

He argues that the major British contribution to winning the war came at sea, and that it was the ancient British tactic of blockading and starving out a continental foe which eventually won the day, and shows how central the naval war, and the Battle of Jutland in particular, was to bringing America into the First World War on the allied side.

Lord West visits the German naval base in Wilhelmshaven, former home of the German Imperial navy and the place from which German naval commanders looked out on a North Sea which they could not safely navigate and from which they could not escape. He travels on a boat close to the site of the battle itself to imagine the scene when the sea was filled with giant 'castles of steel', firing huge shells and belching out coal smoke. And after meeting British and German historians, he travels to a new memorial in Jutland to weigh the human cost that day.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07bfzhj)
Ness Botanic Gardens - Correspondence Edition

Eric Robson hosts a correspondence edition of the programme from Ness Botanic Gardens. Christine Walkden, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood are this week's panellists, answering questions sent in by letter, email and social media.

The questions include ways to rescue dying plants, using coffee grounds as compost and how to win a sunflower growing competition.

Also, Peter Gibbs meets with Charlotte Smith from BBC Radio 4's Farming Today to discuss Glyphosate's future in our gardens.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07bt7n9)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with conversations from Bangor about the person, not the diagnosis, Exeter about finding one's words again, and Birmingham about punctuation and humour in art, all in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Dangerous Visions (b07bt9qj)
Brave New World

Episode 1

by Aldous Huxley

Radio 4's Dangerous Visions Season of dramas that explore uneasy reflections of the future opens with a Classic. It's 2116 and Helmholtz Watson and Bernard Marx are token rebels in an irretrievably corrupted society where promiscuity is the norm, eugenics a respectable science, and the drug Soma freely available. Dramatised by Jonathan Holloway.

Director: David Hunter.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07bt9ql)
Kit de Waal, Researching novels, Counter-factual fiction.

Kit de Waal's new novel My Name Is Leon is a heartbreaking tale of two loving brothers who are separated by well meaning social workers, and the impact of this separation on their futures lives. She talks to Mariella about why she has become an author relatively late in life and why this is the book she needed to write.

Also, the website which tracks readers' behaviour to identify potential bestsellers, three novelists reveal the lengths they go to to get the details right: from civil war enacting, to poetry translation to moving to a foreign city and, in our reading clinic, we offer a guide to counter factual fiction.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b07bt9qn)
Wounds and Scars

Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry requests on the theme of wounds and scars, both literal and metaphorical. Including poems specially recorded for the programme by Hollie McNish, work by Siegfried Sassoon and Rumi, and an archive recording of Juliet Stevenson reading Edna St Vincent Millay's Time Does Not Bring Relief. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07bbysl)
Police Firepower

Police forces in England and Wales are to get an additional fifteen hundred firearms officers to help protect the public from terrorism and organised crime.
Most of the new officers will be trained within the next two years after the Prime Minister, David Cameron, set aside £143m to boost the country's armed response capability.
But is it enough to meet the challenges they face?
The number of firearms officers fell from nearly seven thousand in 2009/10 to under six thousand in 2013/14.
And, despite the extra funding, the Police Federation is concerned the new firearms teams will have to come from existing staff. They say that will deplete the number of officers available for other duties.
BBC Home Affairs Correspondent Danny Shaw investigates - and he examines growing unease at the way in which those who discharge their weapons are dealt with.
Concern has been highlighted by the suspension and arrest of the officer suspected of shooting dead Jermaine Baker in Wood Green in December.
Police representatives tell the programme that while they expect their actions to be investigated, people will not come forward to train as firearms officers if they believe they will be treated like a criminal who fires an illegal weapon.
The Independent Police Complaints Commission acknowledges that firearms officers work in challenging circumstances but maintains that police shootings resulting in death or serious injury should be independently investigated.
So, can the system for holding them to account be improved?
Reporter: Danny Shaw Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b07bryh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4hl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b07bt4hn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07bt4hq)
22/05/16 Turkey in EU: Cameron calls colleague's claim 'misleading'

The increasingly bitter referendum debate has intensified with David Cameron accusing a Conservative frontbench colleague of misleading claims about Turkey's future in the EU.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07bt9qq)
John Waite

John Waite presents the best of BBC radio in the past seven days with his Pick of the Week which features the story of an Irishman with an English name who spent most of his life in Russia, speaking in French and inventing the piano nocturne ; tells us why 'the saints might go marching out'; we learn that the camera does indeed lie and why Florence Nightingale by rights ought to be called "the lady with the pie chart". Also a 'treat' for music lovers with the Beast of Bolsover , otherwise known as the MP Dennis Skinner.

Production team: Kevin Mousley & Sally Richardson.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07bt9qs)
Peggy phones Pat from the hospital. Helen is in the early stages of labour and Pat worries about her strength. Kirsty phones Pat, she can't sleep for worrying about Helen. Rob is trying to get through to Pat but the number is engaged. He's frustrated he can't find out what's happening and he's angry his son will spend his first months of life in prison. Ursula tries to calm him. Henry joins them saying he had a bad dream about mummy. Helen worries about how the labour will go; her face feels puffy, could she be getting pre-eclampsia? Peggy rings for the midwife.

Kirsty joins Pat at Bridge Farm. Pat can't believe she didn't see that Helen was being manipulated, she will never forgive herself. Kirsty also laments about how she could have been a better friend. As Pat answers the phone, it's Tony calling from the hospital, Ursula arrives. Ursula points out to Kirsty that her and Rob have something in common: both of them have had their lives wrecked by one of Pat's children. Pat comes off the phone - Helen has pre-eclampsia and she's gone for an emergency caesarean.

As she comes round from the anesthetic, Peggy tells Helen the baby is fine and everything is alright. Helen bursts into tears; no it's not, she replies. Back at Blossom Hill Cottage, Ursula is touched when Rob names the baby Gideon; it's the name of her father. They raise a toast to Gideon Robert Titchener.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b02lyb11)
Series 16

William Blake

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton, with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests John O'Farrell and Jane Thynne.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SUN 19:45 Dangerous Visions (b07btcbg)
Dark Vignettes

Blackout

The first of four specially-commissioned stories in the Dangerous Visions series.

Blackout by Julian Simpson
“Yesterday was the day when the phones stopped working.”
But the phones are only the start, as London is plunged into an internet and power blackout. A woman starts a diary of the first days as she watches first the infrastructure and then the civilisation of her city begin to collapse.

Writer: Julian Simpson
Director: Julian Simpson
Reader: Nicola Walker
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07bfzhx)
World on the Move

Roger Bolton hears listener concerns about the timing of Radio 4's World on the Move day during the EU Referendum, Soul Music brings back childhood memories and there's discussion about the end of What the Papers Say.

On Monday, Radio 4 and BBC News dedicated a day to the topic of migration - World on the Move. Plenty of listeners welcomed the focus and admired the ambitious programming, including a special edition of the Today programme with Sarah Montague in Vietnam and a lunchtime address from Angelina Jolie Pitt the who also took questions in the Radio Theatre. But some listeners have accused the BBC of bias in favour of open borders and of airing emotive stories about migrants, questioning the timing of the day in the lead-up to the EU Referendum. The Editor of Today, Jamie Angus, addresses their questions.

There's a fond farewell to What the Papers Say - a Radio 4 programme that looked across the British press coverage of various stories, exposing the best and worst journalism, often in humorous ways. Listeners ask why a programme they valued for its news analysis has been axed and Kevin Maguire of the Daily Mirror - the programme's first and last presenter - recalls some of his favourite moments, discussing whether the programme has had its day in the digital age.

And listeners remember their childhoods with misty eyes after listening to Soul Music's programme about Feed the Birds - Julie Andrews' haunting song about charity from the Disney film Mary Poppins.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07bfzhv)
Professor Robert McNeill Alexander, Reg Grundy, Sally Brampton, Tony Cozier, Madeleine LeBeau

Matthew Bannister on

Professor Robert McNeill Alexander - the father of animal biomechanics, who revealed how fast dinosaurs could run.

The Australian TV producer Reg Grundy who was behind a string of popular hits, including Neighbours, Wheel of Fortune and Prisoner Cell Block H.

Sally Brampton, the founding editor of British Elle magazine who wrote a powerful book about her struggle with depression.

And Tony Cozier, the West Indian cricket commentator who was a much loved member of the Test Match Special team.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07b9r8r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07bt72k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b07bft8k)
Steel in the UK

Amid concern about the future of the Port Talbot steel works - and fear for the jobs of workers there - Peter Day looks at the history of the industry in Britain. When was the heyday of British steel, and what went wrong? Peter visits Port Talbot and also delves into the archives to hear stories from a time when manufacturing dominated the British economy.
Presenter: Peter Day
Producer: Caroline Bayley.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07bt4hs)
Carole Walker and guests discuss the week ahead in politics. We ask why the government keeps being defeated in the Lords & whether press regulation should go further.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07bft8c)
Tom Hanks

With Francine Stock.

Tom Hanks talks about A Hologram For The King, why America is still great, and Hollywood's relationship with China. He reveals the advice he was given about what you need to have a hit film in the People's Republic.

Director Pablo Larrain discusses The Club, his controversial drama set in a safe house for disgraced priests in Chile and the reaction of the Catholic church to the film.

Film reviewer Tim Robey and film buyer Clare Binns assess the hits and misses of this year's Cannes festival, including Ken Loach's first movie since he announced his retirement two years ago.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07bt72f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 23 MAY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07bt4k6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07bdd2f)
Glasgow gangs - Russian gangs

Glasgow & Russian gangs: Laurie Taylor explores their origins, organisation and meaning in two strikingly different cultures. He talks to Alistair Fraser, Lecturer in Criminology and Sociology at the University of Glasgow, whose fieldwork with young Glaswegian men, demonstrates that gangland life is inextricably bound together with perceptions of masculinity and identity and the quest to find a place in the community. They're joined by Svetlana Stephenson, a Reader in Sociology at London Metropolitan University, who found that Russian gangs, which saw a spectacular rise in the post Soviet, market economy in the 1990s, are substantially incorporated into their communities, with bonds and identities that bridge the worlds of illegal enterprise and legal respectability.

Alistair Fraser was in the final shortlist of six for this year's BSA/Thinking Allowed Ethnography Award.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07bt72c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4k8)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07bt4kb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4kd)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07bt4kg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07flc9w)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the former moderator of the Church of Scotland's General Assembly, the Very Rev John Chalmers.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07btd1m)
Cheap meat and superbugs, Chelsea Flower show trends, is the customer always right?

Does the pressure to produce cheap meat fuel the rise in antibiotic resistant superbugs? Tom Heap tells Charlotte Smith about his investigations for tonight's Panorama.

The Chelsea flower show begins tomorrow. Show gardens, champagne and beautiful plants everywhere you look. But it's more than just a day out as the themes on display prove highly influential, inspiring gardeners and growers everywhere. Howard Shannon has been to London's Covent Garden Flower Market in the company of horticulturalist Guy Barter to find out how traders anticipate the Flower Show's trends, so they can meet the public's demand.

Is the customer always right? Over the past decade, public demand for transparency about what we eat and drink has soared. And all this week on Farming Today, we're looking at the impact and influence of consumers on the food supply chain - from farmers and growers right through to retailers. So we're joining with radio 4's daily consumer show You & Yours to find out what shoppers want. Presenter Winifred Robinson tells Charlotte that really it all comes down to the bottom line

Produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b07bt4kk)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0423j3r)
Pied Flycatcher

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the pied flycatcher. The pied flycatcher is the voice of western woods, as much a part of the scenery as lichen-covered branches, mossy boulders and tumbling streams. When they arrive here in spring from Africa the black and white males, which are slightly smaller than a house sparrow, take up territories in the woodland and sing their lilting arpeggios from the tree canopy.


MON 06:00 Today (b07btd1p)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b07btdbc)
Lost and Found: Ancient Egypt to Modern Art

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to the artist Cornelia Parker about the secrets revealed in found objects. Parker's latest exhibition at the Foundling Museum is inspired by the 18th Century tokens left with babies by their mothers. Simon Armitage finds a new way of telling the medieval poem Pearl, an allegorical story of grief and lost love. Archaeologist Cyprian Broodbank explains how Must Farm, the first landscape-scale investigation of deep Fenland, is transforming our understanding of Bronze Age life, while British Museum curator Aurelia Masson-Berghoff celebrates the finding of two lost Egyptian cities submerged at the mouth of the Nile for over a thousand years.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07btdbf)
In the Bonesetter's Waiting Room

Episode 1

Aarathi Prasad explores the ancient and modern in Indian medicine. Read by Sudha Bhuchar.

Indian Medicine is a fascinating mix of the ancient and the modern. From Ayurvedic treatments, which predate the Common Era, to the allopathic (Western) medicine which now operates in parallel. Aarathi Prasad takes us through the myriad medicinal worlds - from a bonesetters' clinic in Hyderabad, where breaks but not fractures are reset, via a shrine in the Dharavi megaslum (just outside of Mumbai) where the goddess Kali rules, to a fish doctor in Secunderabad who makes patients swallow live fish and a remarkable neuroscientist, Pawan Sinha, whose venture 'Project Prakash' has helped thousands of Indian children to see for the first time.

Episode 1: The basic seven types of Medicine in India.

Aarathi Prasad is a writer and geneticist. Her PhD was in molecular genetics at Imperial College and she is currently based at University College, London. Prasad has written for The Guardian, The Telegraph and Prospect Magazine, and her first book, Like A Virgin: How Science is redesigning the rules Of Sex, was published in 2012. She has written and presented TV and radio programmes, including Rewinding the Menopause and Quest for Virgin Birth for Radio 4, and Brave New World with Stephen Hawking for Channel 4 and the Discovery Channel.

Writer: Aarathi Prasad
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Sudha Bhuchar

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07bt4kn)
Toni Myers, Protecting vulnerable witnesses, Can we change ourselves?

Film director Toni Myers on her latest project Beautiful Planet showing earth as seen from the International Space Station. She looks back at a career that's spanned fifty years.

A look behind the scenes in the criminal justice system - what protection is there for vulnerable witnesses? We hear from two Registered Intermediaries, Jo Parton and Nicola Lewis.

Can we change ourselves and the way we live if we want to enough? Polly Morland, author of Metamorphosis, has interviewed 19 individuals who have made significant changes to their lives. She describes what the experience has taught her about the mechanisms of human change.

Sandie Okoro is one of the City's most influential women and kick-starts our third series of The Chain. Who was her inspiration?


MON 10:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07btfg3)
Mary Ann in Autumn

Episode 1

Mary Ann in Autumn by Armistead Maupin

Episode One

Mary Ann returns to San Francisco with some big news to share with Michael.

Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Producer Susan Roberts
Director Charlotte Riches

For more than three decades, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City series has blazed a trail through popular culture-from ground-breaking newspaper serial to classic novel. Radio 4 are dramatising the full series of the Tales novels for the very first time.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b07btfg5)
The Funeral

Mandy was shocked to discover how much the funeral for her ex-husband was going to cost. But she was also determined that her three children should not be forced to carry the cost alone. Matt the eldest is her carer, and legally liable for all costs, but his carer's allowance was never going to cover the costs - embalming, cremation, flowers, the hearse. So the idea of a fundraising day at the local pub slowly emerged. But despite the best efforts of the community, Mandy and Matt still struggle to settle the bill.

And more bills keep coming in.

Grace Dent presents one family's struggle to grieve for their dead father while dealing with the spiralling price of his death.

The producer is Miles Warde.


MON 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b07btfg7)
Series 6

Operation Voldemort Scrape-Away

Malcolm and Ramesh's relationship steps up a gear, and Dave dips his toes into the delight of online dating apps.

The staff are back for their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of over 30 years and is a firmly entrenched, friendly presence in the local area. He is joined by his shop sidekick, Dave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business. Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not!

Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kohli
Dave ...... Donald McLeary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Malcolm ...... Mina Anwar
Hilly ...... Kate Brailsford
Mrs Birkett ...... Stewart Cairns

Producer: Gus Beattie

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in May 2016.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b07bt4kq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b076cglw)
23 May 1916 - Emily Colville

On this day in 1916, the Devon and Exeter Gazette advertised the training of women in the lighter branches of farm work. And Lord Colville takes his daughter to the theatre.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07btgkv)
Personal independence payment appeals, Make-up

We investigate why nearly two thirds of claimants of Personal Independence Payments are successful when they appeal the decision at independent tribunals. The Shadow Minister for Disabled People, Debbie Abrahams, joins us.

Big cosmetics companies are reporting a surge in sales of makeup. We speak to beauty fans and Make-Up Artist Lisa Eldridge about why we're spending more.

In a week-long partnership with Radio 4's Farming Today, we report on how Dairy Farmers are having to diversify to make other products than just produce milk.

Charities are spending 20% more on TV Advertising now than two years ago. In light of the recent bad publicity, we discuss if they're spending the money wisely.

And, we have the latest news on the sale of BHS and look at where its customers would go if it does disappear from the High Street.


MON 12:57 Weather (b07bt4ks)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b07btgtl)
The President of the World Bank tells us that the biggest threat to developing countries is if the UK leaves the EU.

Treasury analysis released today shows that up to 820 000 jobs could be lost if Britain votes to leave the EU. We examine the Treasury's modelling, and Treasury Minister Harriet Baldwin supports the outlook. Cabinet minister and Leave campaigner Chris Grayling disputes the findings.

Also...could the new head of state in Austria be from the far right?

And Manchester United have sacked manager Louis van Gaal, despite the team winning the FA Cup this week.


MON 13:45 England: Made in the Middle (b07bthdr)
Episode 1

Historian Helen Castor examines the role of Mercia in the creation of England.

There's something reassuringly eternal and inevitable-sounding about 'this England', as John of Gaunt famously describes it in Shakespeare's Richard II. He says it was, 'Built by Nature'. And of course England does have a landscape that was shaped by nature, but 'this realm' - the kingdom, England as a political entity - is, and already was in Gaunt's time, a human construction.

That being the case, Helen Castor asks where was England made, and who made it? And the answers come back - in its undersung middle parts, by Midlanders. Though we tend to think of it in terms of North and South, England was in significant part dreamt into being in the imaginations of the men and women of the country's heartland, harvested in its intensively laboured enclosures, forged in the fiery industrial furnaces of the Midlands.

In this first programme, Helen examines the conventional idea that England's history as a single, indivisible unit began in Wessex, precursor of the modern English South, under King Alfred. Major sources for early English history - including the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, written in the South - underscore this notion. But actually much of the work essential to unification happened in the kingdom of Mercia, precursor of the modern Midlands. It's just as well that the Staffordshire Hoard recently dug itself out of the earth after a millennium and more, in order to refocus historical attention. The Hoard, consisting of over 1,500 items, was discovered in a field a few miles south-west of Lichfield in Staffordshire in 2009 and offers irrefutable proof of the power and influence of the Midlands in the medieval world.

Produced by Robert Shore and Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b07bt9qs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b07c2w7k)
Produce

by Joseph Wilde. Unsettling drama set in the near future.
When a couple discover that they can't have a healthy baby naturally, Zenith Genomics seems to offer the solution: they can create a perfect, bespoke child, with every gene hand-picked. For a price. But the parents soon find that perfection brings its own problems...

A dark fable about parental expectation and the pressures of parenting in a competitive and commodified world.

Anita .... Laura dos Santos
Tom .... Joseph Kloska
Dr Ahmed .... Seeta Indrani
Beth .... Amy-Jayne Leigh
Mr Dean .... Ewan Bailey

Writer .... Joseph Wilde
Director .... Abigail le Fleming

The Writer
Joseph is a young writer for stage, screen and radio. His breakout play CUDDLES was originally produced in 2013 and revived in 2015 for a UK tour and New York transfer. Joseph has also written plays for Hightide Festival Theatre and Ovalhouse, and in 2014 he worked as an assistant director at the Royal Shakespeare Company. His first radio play THE LOVING BALLAD OF CAPTAIN BATEMAN won the 2014 Imison Award, and for television, he currently writes for DOCTORS and completed the CASUALTY shadow scheme in 2015.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b07bthdt)
Series 6

The University of Chester

Steve Punt hosts the battle of wits as three students from the University of Chester take on their professors.

A funny and dynamic quiz show with specialist subjects including Archaeology, English and Computer Science and questions ranging from looms to Lemmy via Oscar Wilde and Microsoft Windows.

Producer: David Tyler.

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in May 2016.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b07cbxjf)
Diana Henry: A Life Through Food (Part 2)

Food writer Diana Henry has just collected a James Beard Award in America for her latest book 'A Bird in the Hand'. Straight from the plane she joined Sheila Dillon at the Bristol Food Connections Festival.
In Part 1 of the interview she shared about growing up in Antrim, how a revelatory French exchange fuelled her excitement about cooking and starting out in TV. She shared works by Naguib Mahfouz and Seamus Heaney.
In this second part, she shares more of her chosen excerpts on food - including memoirs, online journalism and restaurant reviews - and explains what each of the authors bring that inspires and excites her.
The podcast including both parts of this interview are available from this programme page.

Readers: Rebecca Ripley and Sam Woolf
Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


MON 16:00 Spanish Steps (b06l1yp7)
In the 1970s the Spanish tourist board was happy to use flamenco, the traditional dance of the south, as a way to tempt chilly northerners on to the beaches on the Costa del Sol. And it worked - giving a much needed economic boost to an ailing economy. Back home, in Brighton and Bremen alike, crumpled posters featuring swirling skirts were rescued from luggage and left in upstairs bedrooms along with a raffia donkey stuffed with dates.

Behind the swirl of skirts, however, was a dictatorship which despised the gitanos, or gypsies, who refused to give up republican beliefs, leading many into exile. A tame version of flamenco was the one delivered to foreigners - joining the clichéd image of Spain on the shelf next to the castanets.

So did real flamenco survive Franco's dictatorship? It's a puzzle Chris Stewart, author of the best-selling series of books about his life as a sheep-shearer in Spain, and ex-member of Genesis, sets out to unravel on the streets of Granada.

As a young man Chris left the UK to join a flamenco guitar class in Seville. He quickly realised his skills as a guitarist were lacking, but fell under the spell of Spain, and flamenco for ever, returning to live there as a farmer 27 years ago.

Now he takes Radio 4 listeners on a trail through the scorching white alleyways of the Albaicin, into back room bars and caves, to find out how the music most powerfully identified with the gitanos, is now exported throughout the world. There are now more flamenco classes in Japan than in Spain. The music has made a come back, although gitano life is still often one of the outsider. Local prisons contain significantly high proportions of the gitanos, although the authorities allow flamenco workshops for those in jail as a basic human right, whilst families still pass down their skills from generation to generation.

Chris meets the youngest in a long line of gypsy guitarists - Juan Habichuela Nieto performing in the open air courtyard of the Alhambra; the much lauded singer Juan Pinilla; the dancer Chua Alba, who also teaches his own daughter Chloe; the grand old man of Sacramonte, Curro Albaicin; and learns the poetry of flamenco from Steven Nightingale. Drinking more red wine than a wise man should n a hot night, he listens to the wavering song of a 99 year old Juan Mesa, accompanied by Alvaro, his 19 year old accompanist, in the dust riddled guitar shop of Rafa Moreno; before bumping into the proud bohemian, the gypsy singer, Cristobal Osorio, under the stars, concluding that flamenco is indeed the 'Blues of Europe'.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b07btlm7)
Original Sin

The Catholic Church still affirms the doctrine of original sin. For more than 1,500 years the Church has maintained that the sin of Adam in the Garden of Eden was passed on to every subsequent human being. This meant that every baby was born bad, with its inherent human nature corrupted and attracted to sin. This was not a marginal teaching; it has underpinned Christianity. Ernie Rea and guests discuss the religious, social and cultural legacy of the doctrine of original sin.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b07bt4kv)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07bt4kx)
23/05/16 Treasury warning of Brexit impact on UK jobs triggers row

David Cameron says a Treasury assessment of the impact of a UK exit from the EU shows it would be a "self-destruct option". Leave campaigners call it "deeply-biased propaganda".


MON 18:28 EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts (b07byv6f)
Vote Leave

23/05/2016

Referendum Campaign Broadcast by the Vote Leave campaign for the Referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union on 23rd June 2016.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b07btlmc)
Series 75

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 75th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Alexei Sayle and Graham Norton join host Nicholas Parsons and the topics on the cards include Clock-watching, Cardigan Bay, and A Hot Potato.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.
Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b07btlmf)
Tony phones Pat to tell her about the new baby. The manager of the mother and baby unit can take pictures for the family. The baby has the toy rabbit with him that Pat sent up. Helen is having difficulty breastfeeding. It's hard to relax when she knows a guard is sitting outside. She thinks she should feed the baby with a bottle but Peggy encourages her to keep trying. Tony thinks the baby looks like Pat's father while Peggy thinks he's all Archer. Helen thinks he looks like Rob.

Kirsty takes lunch out to Tom. She is helping to staff the shop when it re-opens on Friday. The farm is stretched with no Jazzer and no Tony. Tom sees he has no choice but to get rid of the pigs. They talk about what happened between them. Tom apologises to Kirsty for leaving her at the altar and running away. Kirsty accepts his apology and reminds him that it was her mistake as well.

Peggy and Tony have lunch while Helen rests. Tony notices that Helen doesn't seem to be very interested in the baby. Peggy says it may take time for her to bond. They need to keep telling her the baby is hers as much as Rob's.

Fallon tells Kirsty about the party at Grange Farm to celebrate Emma and Ed's first wedding anniversary. Ed wrote Emma a poem; it was sweet but not very good. There was drinking and dancing and now Clarrie is really worried because there's a huge crack in one of the walls. Kirsty and Fallon discuss Tom and Jazzer's falling out and plot to talk sense into both of them.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b07bt4kz)
Russell T Davies, Love and Friendship review, Rufus Norris, Thelma and Louise 25 years on

Russell T Davies first encountered A Midsummer Night's Dream as an 11 year old cast in the role of Bottom. Now the man who relaunched Dr Who and who has been described as the saviour of British television drama, discusses his desire to make his own production of Shakespeare's most exuberant play for TV with Kirsty Lang.

Jane Austen is back on the big screen - this time based on her novella Lady Susan and adapted on film as Love and Friendship, starring Kate Beckinsale. The scheming Lady Susan Vernon dedicates herself to a hunt for a husband both for herself and her daughter Frederica, with implacable determination. Viv Groskop reviews.

Rufus Norris, the artistic director of the National Theatre in London, talks about his new production of The Threepenny Opera. With a new translation by Simon Stephens, who also adapted The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, it stars Rory Kinnear as the amoral, antiheroic criminal Macheath, and Haydn Gwynne as the vengeful Mrs Peachum.

On the eve of the 25th anniversary since the release of Ridley Scott's road movie Thelma & Louise - starring Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis - the novelist, game designer and self-professed feminist, Naomi Alderman celebrates the cult classic.

Presenter : Kirsty Lang
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07btfg3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Born in Bradford (b07btlmh)
Support for new mothers

Winifred Robinson has returned to Bradford every year to report on mothers like Ruba, who is now 27. When they first met Ruba had a son, Hassam, and had just given birth to a little girl, Alishbah. Tragically both children were diagnosed with a rare condition, I-cell disease and have since died. Ruba is pregnant again and Winifred talks to her about genetic screening and the difficult choices she must make. She is married to her cousin and there is a one in four chance of her next baby being born with this fatal condition.

Researchers in Bradford have documented the incidence of genetic abnormalities linked to cousin marriage, which doubles the risk of passing on the recessive genes that lead to abnormalities. Cystic fibrosis is the one we all know about, where two healthy parents carry a recessive gene: in Bradford doctors have identified more than 200 rare conditions. Data collected by the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit has shown since 1997 there have been 902 British children born with neurodegenerative conditions, with 8% of these in Bradford, which only has 1% of the population.

"Everything we do gets translated into practice so that our work on congenital anomalies has led to a city register for these children and also a Yorkshire register" explains Professor Wright, the Director of the Bradford Institute for Health Research. On the face of it the risk is not great - a 4% risk of having a child with an abnormality if you marry a cousin, compared with 2% among the general population. But with repeated cousin marriage, the risks stack up in families with sometimes devastating results.

The Born in Bradford researchers are determined that theirs should be an applied health research study with results leading to better services. They have just secured £49 million of lottery funding to intervene in the lives of a new cohort of mothers as part of the Better Start initiative: "We want everything we find out in the research studies to be translated into practices that improve the health and well-being of people in Bradford and further afield" says Professor Wright.

The study was launched in 2007 and provides great insight health and lifestyle in the city. About 46 per cent of mothers in the study are from Pakistan, providing a fascinating insight into a new multi-ethnic generation. The impetus for research came from high infant mortality rates - double the national average - and so far the data has resulted in changes in national policy. Bradford now screens all pregnant women for gestational diabetes and Winifred meets those being encouraged to change their diet and habits to give their babies the best start in life.

Produced by Sue Mitchell.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b07btlmk)
Beyond Binary

In communities around the globe, genderqueer, gender-variant and gender-fluid people are rejecting the categories of male and female, and attempting to re-define gender identity. Linda Pressly asks if being non-binary breaks the last identity taboo, and explores the challenges it creates for the law, society and conventional concepts about the very nature of gender.
Producer: Lucy Proctor
(Photo: Pips Bunce, the global head of Fixed Income & Derivatives IT engineering at Credit Suisse, who identifies as gender-fluid, or gender-variant).


MON 21:00 The Power of... (b07bbjhv)
The Power of Cute

Zoologist and broadcaster Lucy Cooke explores the science behind our seeming obsession with all things adorable. There has been an explosion in interest in cuteness, particularly online, with an ever growing number of websites dedicated to pandas, kittens, puppies and of course babies. If you are feeling a bit down in the dumps, what better way to brighten your day then looking at some cute baby animal frolicking about. But what is it that makes these creatures so darn attractive to us and can you be addicted to cute? Lucy investigates the latest scientific research looking at just what makes babies cute, and what looking at them does to our brain, with some surprising results. She visits London Zoo to visit her number one cute creature of choice, the sloth, to find out why sloths hit the top of the cute charts, but the Chinese giant salamander definitely doesn't, and why in terms of conservation, that matters.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b07btdbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b07bt4l1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07bt4l3)
IS targets Assad heartland

Scores of Syrian civilians have been killed in a series of attacks on two cities in President Assad's coastal heartland. Islamic State said the blasts were in retaliation for air strikes by Russian and Syrian government forces. Also: a council in North Yorkshire votes to allow fracking. And why the phrase "piggy eyes" has acquired a whole new meaning.

Photo: Cars destroyed by bomb attacks. Credit AFP/Getty Images.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07byv7l)
The Bricks That Built the Houses

Monsters and Slimeballs and Showgirls

Award-winning poet and rapper Kate Tempest reads her debut novel, a tale of desire, ambition and untamed hedonism in London's beating heart.

In today's episode, Harry, Becky and Leon are fleeing London with a suitcase full of cash, leaving behind jealous boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and irate drug dealers. They're leaving because of what happened a year ago, when Becky's and Harry's worlds first collided together...

Written and read by Kate Tempest. Tempest is a poet, rapper, playright and novelist. She was awarded the Ted Hughes Prize for poetry in 2013 for her epic narrative poem, Brand New Ancients. The following year, her narrative-led hip hop album, Everybody Down, was nominated for the Mercury Prize.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Julian Wilkinson.


MON 23:00 Don't Make Me Laugh (b07byv6h)
Series 2

Episode 6

David Baddiel hosts the second series of the provocative panel show where some of the funniest comedians have to go against all their instincts and try not to make an audience laugh.

Featuring Ross Noble, Mark Watson, Felicity Ward, Danny Baker.

A So Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07byv6k)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster on a Treasury report about the impact of leaving the EU - is it an informative, economic forecast or an attempt to scare the public witless?



TUESDAY 24 MAY 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07bt4n1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07btdbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4n3)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07bt4n5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4n7)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07bt4n9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07d7qfr)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the former moderator of the Church of Scotland's General Assembly, the Very Rev John Chalmers.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07byv9j)
Russian dairy industry, English vineyards, Consumer week.

Russia no longer needs our cheese even if the import ban is lifted, warns Russian dairy expert.

A British dairy farmer is making skyr, a fat free, high protein yoghurt that's widely found in Iceland.

Charlotte Smith visits a wine estate in Kent to help plant 10 hectares of vines.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv8n)
Grey Wagtail

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the grey wagtail. Grey wagtails are supremely graceful birds which boost their appeal by nesting in photogenic locations. They revel in shaded spots near swift-flowing water and will also nest by canal lock-gates or mill-races.


TUE 06:00 Today (b07byvdc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Europeans - The Roots of Identity (b07byvdf)
Amsterdam

What's really shaped Europeans' identity? Historian Margaret MacMillan visits Amsterdam, exploring how a place bound to the sea and the globe developed its idea of Europe. Trade and consumption built up liberal values and the European 'way of life'. But how did a European colonial power relate to the outside world, and how does that history echo today?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Bridget Harney.


TUE 09:30 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v5pgf)
Series 3

Virtue

Bettany Hughes considers virtue at a club for the English aristocracy, with a former Greek Minister of Finance, and with an aid worker just back from an ebola zone in Sierra Leone.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double espresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award--winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programme Bettany explores virtue with experts from the humanities and sciences, people who see these big philosophical ideas playing out in their own lives including philosopher Angie Hobbs, writer and historian Stella Tillyard, former Greek Finance Minister Petros Doukas, and Oxfam's Head of Water and Sanitation Andy Bastaple. Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Ideas examined in the first series, in September 2013, were idea, desire, agony, fame and justice. The second series, in January 2014, considered wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace and hospitality. Other ideas in this series are psyche, charisma, irony and nemesis.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07byvdh)
In the Bonesetter's Waiting Room

Episode 2

Aarathi Prasad explores the ancient and modern in Indian medicine. Read by Sudha Bhuchar.

Indian Medicine is a fascinating mix of the ancient and the modern. From Ayurvedic treatments, which predate the Common Era, to the allopathic (Western) medicine which now operates in parallel. Aarathi Prasad takes us through the myriad medicinal worlds - from a bonesetters' clinic in Hyderabad, where breaks but not fractures are reset, via a shrine in the Dharavi megaslum (just outside of Mumbai) where the goddess Kali rules, to a fish doctor in Secunderabad who makes patients swallow live fish and a remarkable neuroscientist, Pawan Sinha, whose venture 'Project Prakash' has helped thousands of Indian children to see for the first time.

Episode 2: At the shrine of Subawa, where the bhoots (ghosts) rule.

Aarathi Prasad is a writer and geneticist. Her PhD was in molecular genetics at Imperial College and she is currently based at University College, London. Prasad has written for The Guardian, The Telegraph and Prospect Magazine, and her first book, Like A Virgin: How Science is redesigning the rules Of Sex, was published in 2012. She has written and presented TV and radio programmes, including Rewinding the Menopause and Quest for Virgin Birth for Radio 4, and Brave New World with Stephen Hawking for Channel 4 and the Discovery Channel.

Writer: Aarathi Prasad
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Sudha Bhuchar

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07bt4nc)
What do American women make of Donald Trump? Food writer Sabrina Ghayour

Lord of the Flies is a text often chosen by teachers for pupils to study at GCSE. It has an all male cast. Woman's Hour explores the book's appropriateness for girls and boys alike and how boys would fare with a novel comprised exclusively of female characters.

In a recent poll 70 per cent of women in America had an unfavourable image of the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. So who are the women who are voting for Trump?

Chef, food writer and supper club host Sabrina Ghayour specialises in Persian and Middle Eastern food. For Cook the Perfect, she prepares Stir Fried Tangy Prawns from her new book, Sirocco.

Yesterday we heard from the lawyer at the top of the tree at HSBC, Sandie Okoro and Sandie nominated her heroine, actress, writer and stand-up comedian Angie Le Mar.

A Radio 4 documentary, Life Under Glass, tells the extraordinary story of how a sideshow doctor changed the course of medical science and saved the lives of 6,500 babies.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07byvdk)
Mary Ann in Autumn

Mary Ann in Autumn

Mary Ann in Autumn by Armistead Maupin

Episode Two

Mary Ann begins to adapt to life with Michael and Ben. Jake meets a new man at Pier 39.

Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Producer Susan Roberts
Director Charlotte Riches

For more than three decades, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City series has blazed a trail through popular culture-from ground-breaking newspaper serial to classic novel. Radio 4 are dramatising the full series of the Tales novels for the very first time.


TUE 11:00 Life Under Glass (b07byvlq)
At Coney Island amusement park between 1903 and 1943 there was an extraordinary exhibit: tiny, premature babies. 'Dr. Martin Couney's infant incubator' facility was staffed by nurses in starched white uniforms and if you paid a quarter, you could see the babies in their incubators.

Journalist Claire Prentice has been following the story and tracked down some of those babies, now in their 70s, 80s and 90s, who were put on show. She discovers how Dr. Couney brought the incubator to prominence in the USA through World's Fairs and amusement parks, and explores how a man who was shunned by the medical establishment changed attitudes to premature babies and saved countless lives.

(This programme was produced in Scotland by Mark Rickards and first broadcast on BBC Radio 4.).


TUE 11:30 Punk, the Pistols and the Provinces (b07byvp2)
To mark its 40th anniversary, Mark Hodkinson looks at the impact of punk rock outside of London and, in particular, in Yorkshire where the Sex Pistols played their first and last gigs outside the capital.

Punk is viewed principally as a London phenomenon. The Sex Pistols in particular are synonymous with the capital, but their UK touring career outside the capital was book-ended by two shows more than 200 miles away.

On Wednesday 19 May 1976, six months before the release of their first single, the Sex Pistols performed at Sayer's nightclub in the sleepy market town of Northallerton in North Yorkshire. Just 19 months later, on Christmas Day 1977, the band made their last UK appearance, at Ivanhoe's, a small club in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

Music fan and experienced journalist/broadcaster, Mark Hodkinson, visit both towns and speaks to people who were at the gigs. He plots the impact of punk in the provinces where thousands of disgruntled teenagers heeded The Clash's entreaty to the 'faraway towns' to 'come out of the cupboard, you boys and girls' ("London Calling").

Brian Simpson was the DJ at Sayer's which, in the weeks leading up to the Sex Pistols visit, had played host to Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders and The Searchers. Along with Steve Williams, who was also at the gig, he remembers people leaving the club in droves when the Sex Pistols began playing. ''We had no idea who they were,'' he says. ''Northallerton was suddenly at the forefront of punk rock but we had no idea that we were. It was about two weeks later when I saw their picture in one of the music papers that I realised I'd seen them play.''

A Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07bt4nf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b07byvp4)
24 May 1916 - Dieter Lippke

On this day in 1916, the Union Jack was to be flown from every public building for Empire Day, and Dieter feels increasingly isolated.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07bt4nh)
Call You and Yours: How much does it matter to you where your food comes from?

Winifred Robinson presents Call You & Yours: How much does it matter to you where your food comes from? Email us youandyours@bbc.co.uk Please add your phone number to that email so we can call you back. The number to call during the programme is 03700 100 444. Guests include the man behind the Red Tractor logo - the UK's biggest farm and food standards scheme.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b07bt4nk)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b07byvp6)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 England: Made in the Middle (b07byvp8)
Episode 2

Many people think of the Industrial Revolution as a Northern phenomenon - but historian Helen Castor argues it was actually dreamt up and devised in the English Midlands. If Britain left the eighteenth century the world's foremost industrial power, it was almost entirely thanks to Midlanders.

In this programme, Helen tells the story of the Lunar Society - a group of Midland entrepreneurs, enthusiasts and inventors who met up at a location in or near Birmingham once a month, on the Monday nearest the full moon. There they discussed ideas that would revolutionise societies across the world, from Boulton and Watt's steam engine to Erasmus Darwin's early intuitions of evolutionary theory, which he wrote up in rhyming couplets.

The Lunar Society counted among its members many of the most innovative thinkers of a particularly innovative age - major figures of the wider Enlightenment whose individual contributions were at least as significant as those of Voltaire in France, Goethe in Germany, and Benjamin Franklin in the United States.

Distance from saltwater is a defining feature of the landlocked Midlands, but if the entrepreneurs of the Lunar Society lacked a natural waterway to carry their wares to market, they didn't despair about their natural disadvantages. Instead they set about creating an artificial sea. Josiah Wedgwood got Parliament to approve a new canal from the East Midlands to Liverpool.

Without the new canal network, Birmingham could never have emerged as the leader of the Industrial Revolution.

Produced by Robert Shore and Ashley Byrne.
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07btlmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b07byvpb)
Your Perfect Summer, On Sale Here

Ben Tavassoli, Oliver Chris and Claudie Blakley star in Ed Harris's twisted romance.

What will happen when VR games can deliver real love?

Theo has been booked to give twenty-four hour care to a gamer who's in an elective coma. The new immersive game he's playing simulates your first love affair.

But is it a simulation? Not to Theo...

Ben Tavassoli stars as Rash in Anthony Horowitz's new police drama, 'New Blood', on BBC One. He played Alpha in 'No Offence', and has recently appeared in 'Silent Witness' and 'Tyrant'.

Oliver Chris has starred in great British comedies from Bluestone 42 to Green Wing and The Office. He was the original Stanley Stubbers opposite James Corden in 'One Man, Two Guv'nors', played the Assistant Commissioner opposite Billie Piper in Richard Bean's 'Great Britain', and Prince William in Mike Bartlett's 'King Charles III'.

Claudie Blakley became well-known for her roles in period dramas 'Cranford', 'Lark Rise to Candleford' and 'Gosford Park'. More recently she's starred with David Threlfall and Steven Macintosh in 'What Remains', with David Morrissey in 'The Driver', and recently theatre roles include 'The Painkiller' with Rob Bryden and Kenneth Branagh.

Ed Harris's writing for radio has included winning the Audio Drama Award for BILLIONS, Sony Gold for THE RESISTANCE OF MRS BROWN, the Writer's Guild Award for TROLL, and THE WALL nominated for the Prix Europa. He writes the Radio 4 comedy DOT.

The music for the game is by Abi Fry

Theo ..... Ben Tavassoli
Saskia ..... Claudie Blakley
Paul ..... Oliver Chris
Sophie ..... Scarlett Brookes
Theresa ..... Adie Allen
Game ..... Nicola Ferguson
Human ..... Nick Underwood

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07bpv3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Shared Experience (b07bzdbx)
Series 5

Don't call us Barry Poppins. We're stay-at-home dads

There's nothing heroic about a man giving up work to look after the children while his wife goes out to work, say Sam, Richard and Josh, and yet as these three Dads tell Fi Glover, people often perceive them as being somehow remarkable for electing to be the primary carer. House husband or Barry Poppins are two terms that annoy them. Why wouldn't any man want to spend time with his children given the choice? Does 'providing for your children' have to mean sitting in an office for 8 hours a day? They discuss the highs and lows and differences of being a stay-at-home-Dad with candour and humour.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b07bzdbz)
Punctuation

Michael Rosen talks to Keith Houston about punctuation symbols and how they came to exist. Keith is the author of Shady Characters: Ampersands, Interrobangs and Other Typographical Curiosities.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b07bzdc1)
Series 39

George Fox

George Fox, born in 1624 in Leicestershire, is best known as the founder of the Quakers. In early life he was apprenticed to a shoemaker, and for a while he worked as a shepherd as well. But it was as a preacher travelling widely across the land that he made his name, and also received the most abuse. As he writes: "... the people fell upon me in great rage, struck me down and almost stifled and smothered me. And I was cruelly beaten and bruised by them with their hands, Bibles and sticks."

Nominating the dissenting George Fox is Ann Limb, chair of the Scout Association. Also in studio, Jonathan Fryer, editor of George Fox and the Children of the Light.

Matthew Parris presents, and the producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


TUE 17:00 PM (b07bt4nm)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07bt4np)
The Council says it's a fresh start for the department looking after vulnerable children. Iraqi offensive against IS in Falujjah. An NHS doctor who joined jihadis in Syria.


TUE 18:28 EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts (b07bzdc3)
Stronger IN Europe

24/05/2016

Referendum Campaign Broadcast by the Stronger IN Europe campaign for the Referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union on 23rd June 2016.


TUE 18:30 Isy Suttie's Love Letters (b01s8cp3)
Series 2

George and Louise

Isy Suttie recounts the tale of George and Louise, set against the backdrop of the Matlock Ceilidh over Christmas and New Year 2014.

Another love story, told partly through song.

Sometimes Isy has merely observed the lives of others; quite often she's intervened, changing the action dramatically - for better or worse.

Intertwined within these stories are related real life anecdotes from her own, often disastrous, love life.

With her award-winning multi-character and vocal skills, and accompanied by her guitar, Isy creates a hilarious and deeply moving world, sharing with us her lessons in life and love.

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2014.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07bzdc5)
Pip is not very hungry, she's nervous about what the day holds. Matthew is coming to visit, even though he's already said they should end their relationship. Before that, with help from Josh, Pip moves her cattle from Brookfield to Home Farm.

The mob-grazing herd is now complete. It's a big moment that David, Ruth and Jennifer turn out to see. Josh is sceptical whether it will make any money. Pip hopes to prove him wrong. Adam says they never pretended it anything other than experiment and it might looked back on as a game changer. As they watch the cattle settle, Adam tells Pip that Brian and Will are not happy about the elves in the Millennium Wood. They're concerned about the impact the visitors they are attracting are having on the pheasants.

Back at Brookfield, David and Ruth notice the awkward atmosphere on Matthew's arrival. David suggests Pip takes Matthew to see the herd she'll be managing at Home Farm. Matthew is impressed with the herd. He tells Pips she's a great farmer. Their relationship won't work because they're both so committed to their work. Pip insists there must be a way but Matthew points out that Brookfield is more important to her future than he is.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07bt4nr)
Sue Johnston, Burt Kwouk remembered, Yayoi Kusama, Simon Stone, Philip Venables

Sue Johnston, best known for her TV portrayal of The Royle Family's matriarch Barbara, on reuniting with Craig Cash from the series in Rovers, a new TV comedy about lower-league football team Redbridge Rovers and their oddball set of fans.

Actor Burt Kwouk, famous for playing Cato in the Pink Panther films and for his role in TV drama series Tenko, is remembered by film historian Matthew Sweet.

Yayoi Kusama had the highest global exhibition attendance of any artist in 2014, and this year she was named one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People. Now, at 87, she has an exhibition of new work in London, featuring pumpkin sculptures and her continuing preoccupation with polka dots and finely-scalloped 'infinity net' patterns. Louisa Buck reviews.

Simon Stone discusses directing The Daughter, starring Geoffrey Rush and Sam Neill. The film is a re-imagining of Ibsen's The Wild Duck and is based on Stone's own critically-acclaimed adaptation for stage.

Composer Philip Venables tells Samira about his operatic adaptation of Sarah Kane's play 4.48 Psychosis which deals with the late writer's experience of depression.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07byvdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07bzdfn)
An Unsafe Conviction?

For the past 22 years Thomas Bourke has been in prison for a double murder he says he didn't commit.
The killings made national headlines in 1993 when two MOT inspectors, Alan Singleton and Simon Bruno, were shot dead at a garage in Stockport, in Greater Manchester.
The evidence produced in court against Bourke seemed compelling. Two mechanics at the garage said they had seen him carry out the shooting which the prosecution claimed was motivated by a dispute about his licence to carry out MOT tests.
As the jury began their deliberations, a gun was found inside Strangeways prison where Bourke was on remand. Amid subsequent heightened security around the court, he was found guilty and given a minimum 25 year sentence. But protesting his innocence all these years means that he may never be eligible for parole so could remain in prison for the rest of his life.
His sister Jo has been tirelessly fighting his case. A chiropodist with no connections to criminals, she began visiting notorious drug dealers and suspected killers to try to gather new evidence that would help clear his name.
Through the work of Jo and other campaigners, Bourke's case is now back with the Criminal Cases Review Commission which they hope will lead to an appeal.
So has Thomas Bourke been the victim of a shocking miscarriage of justice? Simon Cox investigates.
Producer: Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07bt4nt)
How can air travel be made easier for blind people?

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted. Over the past few months, the programme has featured a number of stories where people have faced unforeseen difficulties when travelling by air. David Adams was told he needed a letter on letterhead from the Guide Dogs Association UK to be able to take his guide dog on a flight, even though he already had official documentation identifying his dog as a guide dog.
Catalina Montesinos Debrooker felt totally ignored by KLM airline staff when the bag in which she carries her essential medication, was not allowed on board. Staff made arrangements with a relative, with whom she was travelling, for some medication to be removed from the bag before it was stowed as checked luggage. She was never asked her opinion.
Mark Fielding and his new wife booked a honeymoon in Tenerife. They made all the arrangements through a trusted travel agent. On the flight out, they were given no safety briefing onboard the plane, and indeed were not acknowledged by the cabin crew until they landed at their destination.
Sue Bott, deputy chief executive of Disability Rights UK says these are stories her organisation hears a lot. She thinks the airline regulator, the Civil Aviation Authority, could be doing more to work with airlines to ensure a better experience for blind and visually impaired passengers.
Peter White puts all of these concerns to Richard Moriarty, director for consumers and markets, for the Civil Aviation Authority.

We hear views from sighted listeners about the previous programme which was all about asking for, and receiving assistance.

Mike Lambert, who has recently become unemployed, talks about his feelings after going through the process of completing an application form to obtain the government benefit Employment Support Allowance, and how the process leaves him feeling confused.

Producer: Lee Kumatat.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b07bzdjy)
Exams and the mental health of children, A community approach to suicide prevention

As every summer, exams are in the news. We look at whether the pressure to do well in exams is having an effect on children's mental health.
We speak to experts from Education, Psychology and Economics who are now working together to address the wider issue of the effect of Britain's current education system on our children's wellbeing.

Looking beyond anecdotal evidence, we ask why, when considering education, is it so difficult to find firm data from which to draw conclusions and make recommendations?

And we hear from Today's finalist in the All in the Mind Awards.

The Tomorrow Project is a suicide prevention project established in response to the needs and concerns of local communities, in Nottinghamshire affected by suicide.

We meet people who have been helped by the project and discuss the kind of services it provides.


TUE 21:30 Europeans - The Roots of Identity (b07byvdf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b07bt4nw)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07bt4ny)
EU debate - a turn-off for women?

We discuss whether the EU debate, noisy and intemperate, has become a turnoff for women. What do social workers need to do their job better? Donald Trump wants to build a wall on US border - but is it as porous as he says? And the new Stronger In campaign video - the perils of making a political advert that tries to appeal to younger voters.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07bzffd)
The Bricks That Built the Houses

A World-Shrinking Gut-Smashing Kiss

Award-winning poet and rapper Kate Tempest reads from her novel, a tale of desire, ambition and hedonism, set in south-east London now.

Today, we meet Pete, one of London's over-qualified twenty-somethings living on dead-end jobs, but wanting more. And then there's Becky, still dreaming of dancing but whose reality is waitressing by day and giving massages in hotels by night. And Harry's still getting by nicely by dealing drugs to the elite of the city, but she can't forget the girl she opened up to in the club to the other night. Soon all three of their worlds will collide together.

Written and read by Mercury Prize-nominated Kate Tempest, who won the Ted Hughes Prize for poetry in 2013.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Julian Wilkinson.


TUE 23:00 Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar (b07ctlnq)
Pilot

We all like to think we know about the news and yet, whilst jokes about George Osborne's new haircut are all well and good, do you still have that nagging suspicion there's important things going on beneath the headlines you'd like to know about?

Well, help is at hand! Nish Kumar is here to cast his spotlight on the week's most talked about news items, taking an in-depth look at the biggest stories from the past seven days to scrutinise what's actually going on beneath the bluster.

In tonight's show, Nish gets to grip with the EU and the scaremongering coming from both sides, press regulation in light of Paddling Pool-gate, and the seemingly impenetrable TTIP. Meanwhile, intrepid reporter Diane Steer puts the Remain campaign's predictions to the test.

Starring Nish Kumar, Kieran Hodgson, Cariad Lloyd, and Freya Parker.

Written by Liam Beirne, Sarah Campbell, Max Davis, Gabby Hutchinson-Crouch, Nish Kumar, and Tom Neenan.

The research producer was Rachel Wheeley.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

It was produced by Matt Stronge and was a BBC Studios Production.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07bzdk0)
Conservative MPs who want Britain to leave the EU say the Bank of England Governor is getting too involved in politics. Susan Hulme watches a heated committee session.
Also on the programme:
* Allegations are made that British-built cluster bombs are being used in the killing of civilians in Yemen.
* MPs quiz French energy chiefs on whether the projected 18 Billion pound Hinkley Point nuclear power station will go ahead.
* The Defence Secretary updates MPs on progress made to defeat so-called Islamic State.
* The strange story of the cat called 'Palmerston' recruited to eliminate rodents in the Foreign Office.



WEDNESDAY 25 MAY 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07bt4qc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07byvdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4qf)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07bt4qh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4qk)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07bt4qm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07d7hzy)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the former moderator of the Church of Scotland's General Assembly, the Very Rev John Chalmers.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07c2n8k)
Food fraud and traceability, Grading beef carcasses

Traceability and food fraud are the issues we're looking at today, alongside Radio 4's consumer programme, You and Yours. We hear the kinds of issues that Staffordshire County Council's Trading Standards have been dealing with recently. This includes
the prosecution of some people for breaking animal health laws, including the repackaging and placing of unsafe food on the market, which resulted in a £6,000 fine and a 2 year suspended sentence.

Also, Nancy Nicholson finds out why British abattoirs are installing electronic imaging equipment to grade carcasses. It's to give consistent feed back, and pay farmers accordingly for supplying the sort of cattle that are in demand with consumers. But most beef farmers still rely on "eye" and experience rather than precise technical information to judge when animals are ready to go for slaughter - and that can cost them dearly if they supply a product that's too lean or too fat. However that could be about to change - as a new product could go some way towards giving producers more information about their livestock before they're sold.
Nancy Nicolson has been to meet one of the researchers involved in the project, at the Scottish Rural College, south of Edinburgh.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thvvc)
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the lesser spotted woodpecker. Lesser spotted woodpeckers are the smallest of our three woodpeckers and about the size of a house sparrow. They have horizontal white stripes across their backs, hence their old name of 'barred woodpecker'. The lesser spotted woodpecker is one of our most elusive birds. For most of the year it's relatively silent but in late February and March, males begin to stake out their territories in old woods and orchards by calling loudly and drumming softly.


WED 06:00 Today (b07c2nrc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b07c2nrf)
Martha High, Chris Lemmon, The Reverend Robin Griffith-Jones, Jamie Squibb

Libby Purves meets soul singer Martha High; Chris Lemmon, son of the actor Jack; the Reverend Robin Griffith-Jones of the Temple Church in London and motocross rider Jamie Squibb.

Soul singer Martha High was one of James Brown's most regular backing singers. She performed with him at the concert given on the night of Martin Luther King's assassination in 1968 and at the Rumble in the Jungle boxing match in Zaire in 1974. Her debut solo album, Singing for the Good Times, is released on Blind Faith Records.

The Reverend Robin Griffith-Jones is the reverend and valiant master of the Temple Church in London. Temple Church was built by the Knights Templar in the 12th century and served as King John's London headquarters in 1214-5 in the lead up to Magna Carta. The church, which features in Dan Brown's book The Da Vinci Code, is the venue for the premiere of a newly commissioned opera to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London. Temple Church Choir can be heard at evensong every Wednesday and mattins every Sunday. The Da Vinci Code and the Secrets of the Temple by Robin Griffith-Jones is published by Canterbury Press.

Jamie Squibb is one of the UK's top freestyle motocross riders. A three time British champion, he performs radical airborne motorcycle aerobatics and ground-based stunts. He is the only British rider taking part in Nitro Circus Live - an extreme sports show featuring jaw-dropping feats and choreographed riding routines. Nitro Circus Live is on tour.

Chris Lemmon is an actor and composer. His biographical play, Twist of Lemmon, celebrates the loves, times, trials and tribulations of his father, the Hollywood actor and Oscar winner, Jack Lemmon. Known for his films including Some Like It Hot, Missing, The Odd Couple, Mister Roberts and Glengarry Glen Ross, Jack Lemmon died in 2001. Twist of Lemmon is at St James Studio, London SW1.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07c2nrh)
In the Bonesetter's Waiting Room

Episode 3

Aarathi Prasad explores the ancient and modern in Indian medicine. Read by Sudha Bhuchar.

Indian Medicine is a fascinating mix of the ancient and the modern. From Ayurvedic treatments, which predate the Common Era, to the allopathic (Western) medicine which now operates in parallel. Aarathi Prasad takes us through the myriad medicinal worlds - from a bonesetters' clinic in Hyderabad, where breaks but not fractures are reset, via a shrine in the Dharavi megaslum (just outside of Mumbai) where the goddess Kali rules, to a fish doctor in Secunderabad who makes patients swallow live fish and a remarkable neuroscientist, Pawan Sinha, whose venture 'Project Prakash' has helped thousands of Indian children to see for the first time.

Episode 3: It all began with a rabbit, so the bonesetter's story goes.

Aarathi Prasad is a writer and geneticist. Her PhD was in molecular genetics at Imperial College and she is currently based at University College, London. Prasad has written for The Guardian, The Telegraph and Prospect Magazine, and her first book, Like A Virgin: How Science is redesigning the rules Of Sex, was published in 2012. She has written and presented TV and radio programmes, including Rewinding the Menopause and Quest for Virgin Birth for Radio 4, and Brave New World with Stephen Hawking for Channel 4 and the Discovery Channel.

Writer: Aarathi Prasad
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Sudha Bhuchar

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07bt4qp)
Jodie Foster talks about fame, her relationship with her mum and her latest film project

Jodie Foster on her latest movie project , how she's coped with fame over the past 50 years and how her relationship with her mother has mellowed over the years.

Hillary Margolis from Human Rights Watch and Farhan Haq from the UN talk about allegations again United Nation Peacekeepers of sexual abuse. What is the extent of the problem, why is it happening and what is being done to tackle it?

Plus the third link in The Chain Chain Grace Ononiwu Chief Crown Prosecutor for the West Midlands, Crown Prosecution Service.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer Beverley Purcell.


WED 10:41 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07c2nrk)
Mary Ann in Autumn

Episode 3

Mary Ann in Autumn by Armistead Maupin

Episode Three

Mary Ann heads up to Pinyon Canyon with Michael and Ben for some time-out before her operation. Encouraged by Mrs Madrigal, Jake takes a chance on Jonah.

Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Producer Susan Roberts
Director Charlotte Riches

For more than three decades, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City series has blazed a trail through popular culture-from ground-breaking newspaper serial to classic novel. Radio 4 are dramatising the full series of the Tales novels for the very first time.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07c2nzm)
Tim and Michael - Living on the Border

Fi Glover with a conversation about how a random postcode can change a national identity. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Born in Bradford (b07btlmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Polyoaks (b07c2p2z)
Series 4

Back in the NHSS

Care provision in Bristol is restructured ‘in order to liberate the fiscal horizon’. Will the surgery submit to supervision from the private sector or will it go under?

Meanwhile one of the patients is sitting on a sensitive problem.

Nigel Planer and Simon Greenall star in the Health Service satire by Dr Phil Hammond and David Spicer.

Neil Dudgeon and John Schwab make guest appearances.

The Polyoaks surgery is plagued by strikes, endless new management initiatives, staff shortages, militant patients, eight day weeks, privatisation – and all these things are entirely their fault, apparently.

The dysfunctional Bristol surgery run by warring doctors, brothers Roy and Hugh Thornton alternates between embracing and collapsing under reforms. They’re a nurse down, they’ve got to slash their budget and there’s a new Head of the local Clinical Commissioning Group who eats GPs for breakfast.

The practice’s calamitous ‘celebrity’ Dr Jeremy who doesn’t know what a Clinical Commissioning Group is, continues to dodge alimony payments, malpractice suits and the new scary practice Nurse Monica

Hugh..........................Simon Greenall
Jeremy.......................David Westhead
Monica.......................Polly Frame
Roy............................Nigel Planer
Mr Beckman................Neil Dudgeon
Stephanie Simons........Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Mr Eisenburger............John Schwab

Director: Frank Stirling

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in May 2016.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b07bt4qr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b07c2pgr)
25 May 1916 - Oswald Dyer

On this day in 1916, Sir Neville Chamberlain opened the Royal commission on the Irish Rebellion in Dublin, and Oswald Dyer attends tribunal in Exeter.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07bt4qt)
NHS continuing care, Gay bars, Hotel Chocolat

We reveal how thousands of people are still waiting to find out if their relatives were wrongly charged for their care. You and Yours has found that more than 11,000 mainly older people have still not been told if they were entitled to what is called NHS Continuing Care. It entitles patients with a health need to get all their care and accommodation costs funded by the NHS. But many did not know, so their homes were sold to pay for care that should have been free. We hear from some who think they are owed thousands of pounds. We also hear from NHS Clinical Commissioners who are wading through a backlog of almost 60,000 cases.

Is there any need these days for gay clubs and bars? There is now much less prejudice against gay people and the internet and dating apps have provided new ways for people to meet. Research suggests that eight out of ten gay men met their long term partner online. In 2001 it was closer to one in ten. Dating apps and online dating have become hugely popular and the owners of some gay bars and clubs say it is reducing business. We report on how the gay community is affected when venues close, and how some bars are finding that they need to work harder to attract customers.

There is money to be made in selling luxury chocolates, and there's no better proof of that than the success of the British company, Hotel Chocolat. The firm was co-founded by Angus Thirlwell, who is now the Chief Executive. He tells us about the idea behind the company, the secret of its success, and why it was recently floated on the stock exchange.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b07bt4qw)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b07c2q30)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 England: Made in the Middle (b07c2q32)
Episode 3

Where do you think of when you hear the words 'quintessential English countryside'? Probably somewhere in the sublime North or the beautiful South. Rarely - despite the odd exclamation over the splendours of Warwickshire or Shropshire - does anyone speak up for the magnificence of the Midlands generally. But historian Helen Castor claims it is the Midlands, rather than Kent, deserves the title The Garden of England.

For many, the Midlands consists of little more than service stations on the M1 or nodes on the rail network. But the middle band of the country has actually given birth to many of the myths associated with England's green and pleasant land.

Why don't more people know this? Helen argues the answer is bound up with the Industrial Revolution, and Midlanders' commitment to innovation. In order to serve as the nation's testing ground for new technologies, Midlanders have consistently sacrificed their surroundings. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the Industrial and Agricultural Revolutions reconfigured the Midland landscape and brought passionate responses from the region's greatest writers, including the great Northants 'peasant poet', John Clare, outraged by the enclosure movement, and the Notts radical D H Lawrence, who scorned the ruination of his native woods and fields by the coal mines.

The Midland landscape has continued to cast a spell on the nation's greatest writers and composers all the same. Edward Elgar took his musical cue from the West Midlands, while in the imagination of JRR Tolkien the same landscapes gave rise to the notion of Hobbits and Middle-earth.

Produced by Robert Shore and Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b07bzdc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b07c2svl)
News from Nowhere

News from Nowhere is a classic piece of futuristic writing, first published in 1890 by artist, designer and socialist William Morris. Its central tenet - that society should refind the value of work and thrive on beauty, rather than consumerism - is timely. This updated drama revisits Morris' vision of a new society for now.

Our Will Guest is a modern day, 21st Century man, travelling from 2016 to a future Utopia. The word utopia comes from the Greek ou-topos, meaning 'no-place' or 'nowhere'. There is uneasy antagonism between Will's 21st Century values and those of 'Nowhere'. But there is also love......Will goes on a time travelling voyage of discovery, finding a new love for society, as well as a woman.

Part of the Dangerous Visions BBC Radio 4 season.

Cast

Will Guest.......................Ron Cook
Ellen...............................Catrin Stewart
Dick.................................Keiron Self
Clara...............................Claire Cage
Old Hammond.................Richard Nichols
Grumbler.........................Roger Evans
The girl...........................Kristy Phillipps
Chinese worker.............Crystal Yu

Dramatist Sarah Woods
Producer Polly Thomas
Sound design Nigel Lewis
Production co ordination Lindsay Rees

A BBC Cymru/Wales production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (b07c2sww)
Money Box Live: Understanding the New State Pension

It's been billed as a simpler, easier to understand flat rate State Pension. You could receive up to £155.65 per week if you've reached retirement age from April 6th this year. But Government figures show that only 45% of people retiring under the new system in the first five years will actually receive the full amount. It all depends on your National Insurance record, and whether you paid into a good pension at work.

Do you understand what you'll get? Can you improve it? And when can you claim it?

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Lesley McAlpine + Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b07bzdjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07c2t5k)
'Queer' wars, Nigerian beauty pageants

'Queer' Wars: The claim that LGBT rights are human rights meets fierce, sometimes deadly opposition in many parts of the world. Politicians and religious leaders invoke tradition to deflect such universal claims, accusing Western activists of neo colonial interference. Laurie Taylor talks to Dennis Altman, Professorial Fellow in Human Security at La Trobe University, Melbourne, who has examined the international polarisation over sexual rights. He asks how best we can advocate for change in contexts where people face violence and imprisonment for their sexuality and gender. They're joined by Lama Abu- Odeh, Professor in Law at Georgetown University, Washington.

Also, Nigerian Beauty Pageants. Juliet Gilbert, Teaching Fellow in African Studies and Anthropology at the University of Birmingham, reflects on the popularity of such spectacles in a country where crowned winners use pageantry as a 'platform' for success, hoping to overcome the double bind of gender and generation in a deeply religious and patriarchal society.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07bt4r0)
Press bias, Police and the media, Digital media

How has the media been covering the EU referendum debate? Is the press bias towards leave, Reuters report thinks so. If it is bias, is that making a difference? Does the press set the broadcasters agenda? Why are we seeing so few women in the debate and have the public really engaged with the referendum campaign so far, what difference might the upcoming debates make?

Draft media guidelines published by the College of Policing impose a number of new controls on police contact with journalists. They say that off the record (or non reportable) conversations between police officers and journalists should only happen in "exceptional circumstances". And they set out wide-ranging circumstances in which officers are urged to involve Corporation Communications Departments (press officers) rather than speak to journalists directly. The new guidelines replace a similar document published by the Association of Chief Police Officers in 2010 and appear to go further in restricting direct contact between police and journalists. A successful working relationship between the police service and the media is vital. Working with the media to communicate to the public can help solve crimes, bring offenders to justice and keep communities safe."

Presenter: Andrea Catherwood
Producer: Maire Devine.


WED 17:00 PM (b07bt4r2)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07bt4r4)
25/05//2016 Institute for Fiscal Studies criticised in EU referendum debate

Vote Leave accuses IFS of bias after it warned about the financial impact of Brexit


WED 18:30 Heresy (b07c2t5p)
Series 10

Episode 2

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents another edition of the show which dares to commit heresy .

Her guests this week are Alex Horne, Jonny Woo and Richard Osman. Together they discuss money, dress codes and sexy TV dramas.

Producer: Daisy Knight

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in May 2016.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b07c2t5t)
Matthew finds Ruth in the middle of milking. They agree Pip is very proud of her new herd. Ruth asks how things are between him and Pip. As right as we can be, he replies. He heads off before she can ask if he wants a cup of tea. Matthew joins Pip who's looking over the cattle at Home Farm. Pip says he's right about their relationship, it can't continue. They kiss one last time. Matthew says it will be a lovely way to remember her, with her herd, surrounded by her future.

Rex goes to Brookfield looking for Josh to moan about Toby who is off filming. He finds Ruth, Josh is at college, and David is doing Bridge Farm's silage. Ruth lets Rex know that Matthew has left so Pip might need cheering up. Later, Rex tells Pip he's taken her advice on the goslings. They're going to get 200 this year. Rex sympathises with Pip over her break up with Matthew. Pip remarks Rex is such a good friend.

Fallon invites Jazzer for lunch at The Bull and asks what's going on between him and Tom. Jazzer is indignant; he's got his P45 to prove Tom's strength of feeling. Fallon tells Jazzer he can come to Bridge Farm to help her with preparations for the Jumble Trail. When Jazzer goes to the bar she phones Kirsty. If Kirsty can work on Tom hopefully the Bridge Farms pigs won't have to go.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b07bt4r6)
Neil Gaiman, Liz Lochhead, Roy Williams

Four of writer Neil Gaiman's short stories have been adapted for television. Likely Stories stars the likes of Johnny Vegas, Rita Tushingham and Kenneth Cranham, and has an original score by Jarvis Cocker. Neil Gaiman talks to John about his journey from writing rock biographies to becoming a million-selling author.

Earlier this year Liz Lochhead stepped down as Makar, or National Poet of Scotland, As her new play opens in Edinburgh, she discusses Thon Man Moliere, and her new collection of poetry, Fugitive Colours.

Plus award-winning writer Roy Williams on his new play Soul, which tells the story of the legendary musician Marvin Gaye. Son of Reverend Marvin Gaye Snr, it was in the church where young Marvin fell in love with music. But sadly, it was the tempestuous relationship between the two men which led to Marvin being shot by his father at point-blank range on April 1st 1984.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Ella-mai Robey.


WED 19:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07c2nrk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b07c2t5y)
Language

Will technology enable us to communicate in all languages in future, or will we all be using just one? FutureProofing discovers the future of language and finds out how we may not need it all.

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson explore the growing influence that technology exerts on the evolution of language, and discover the new words we may be using, and the new ways we might be using them in the 21st century and beyond.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


WED 20:45 Why I Changed My Mind (b07c2t62)
Series 2

Peter Hitchens

Peter Hitchens is a prominent and trenchant conservative writer. But as a young man, he was a deeply committed Trotskyist. Dominic Lawson talks to him about how and why his political views have changed over the years, and whether in fact his old and new beliefs have something in common.

"Why I Changed My Mind" is a series in which Dominic explores how and why prominent individuals have modified their views on controversial topics.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b07c2t9d)
Series 3

Chaucer's Astrolabe - The Medieval GPS

Philip Ball tells the story of Chaucer's Astrolabe and why the famed poet came to write the world's first scientific instruction manual. In the Middle Ages, no self respecting astronomer would be without an Astrolabe, a pocket sized device for working out the movements of the planets and stars. So how did a poet come to write the first user booklet? This story shows Chaucer in a new light: as a pre-eminent astronomer, and offers a new key to unlocking his most famous literary works.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b07c2nrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b07cbwr9)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07bt4r8)
Latest on future of Tata Steel in UK

Latest in the future of Tata steel in the UK, the rights of transgender people in America - and how ticket touts are pushing up ticket prices.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07c2v2m)
The Bricks That Built the Houses

None of It's Real

Award-winning poet and rapper Kate Tempest reads from her novel, a tale of desire, ambition and hedonism, set among south-east London's millennials today.

Harry and Leon are feeling edgy about a big drug deal as their usual contact is in jail. Meanwhile, Becky's still trying to make it as a dancer, but knows that Pete won't be happy about how she'll have to fund it.

Written and read by Mercury Prize-nominated Kate Tempest, who won the Ted Hughes Prize for poetry in 2013.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Julian Wilkinson.


WED 23:00 Lenny Henry's Rogues Gallery (b07c2v2p)
Series 1

The Birthing Project

An alien updates his governing council on a research trip to Earth that ended in disaster.

Series of comic monologues with twists-in-the-tale, written and performed by Lenny Henry.

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2016.


WED 23:15 Death and Taxis (b07c2v2r)
Sometimes I Feel

Adapted by Sean Grundy and starring Scott Capurro as Andy Warhol. Also starring Ronni Ancona, Jon Culshaw and Kerry Shale.

Everyone who is anyone in New York from 1976 to 1987 is in Warhol's diary - from Mick Jagger to Donald Trump.

"Friday, August 30, 1978: The doorbell rang and it was Liza. She said, 'give me every drug you've got.' I gave them some coke, Valium and four Quaaludes. A little figure in a white hat came up, and it was Marty Scorsese, hiding around the corner. He and Liza went off to have their affair on all the drugs. (Valium $1)"

Beginning in the fall of 1976, America’s most famous artist Andy Warhol talked to his secretary by phone at 9:00 AM, every Monday to Friday morning, for ten years. He would talk about the events of the previous day, and his office would transcribe his monologues into diary pages.

The diary began as a careful recording of his use of money, from phone calls to nickels for bag-ladies to cab rides (lots of cab rides), but quickly evolved into Warhol’s personal observations. It was posthumously published in 1989 - a condensed version of Andy’s more-than-20,000 page, phoned-in audit/diary.

The core themes to the dramas are Warhol’s loves (art, men, fame, money, mainly money) and his fears (failure, embarrassment, death, mainly death).

The episodes follow four key themes, using four people in Andy’s life from 76-87 - homeless Crazy Matty, Warhol’s boyfriend Jon Gould, writer Truman Capote and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Woven into this world are buddies Mick and Bianca Jagger, Jerry Hall, Liza Minnelli and Donald Trump.

Nobody escapes his sharp tongue.

Cast:
BIANCA JAGGER/ JERRY HALL/ IVANA TRUMP................RONNI ANCONA
ANDY WARHOL.............................................................SCOTT CAPURRO
MICK JAGGER/ DONALD TRUMP.....................................JON CULSHAW
FRED HUGHES / LEWIS ALLEN.......................................KERRY SHALE
JON GOULD..................................................................MARTIN T SHERMAN

Based on The Andy Warhol Diaries, edited by Pat Hackett
Writer: Sean Grundy
Producer: David Morley
Director: Dirk Maggs

A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07c2v2t)
The splits in the Conservative Party over Europe are exploited by Labour at Prime Minister's Question time, when George Osborne deputises for David Cameron. Sean Curran reports on some lively exchanges.
Also on the programme:
* How could a Leave outcome to the EU Referendum affect the future of Scotland?
* The latest in the inquiry into what went wrong at British Home Stores.
* Peers voice their concerns at plans to replaces bursaries for nurses with a system of student loans.
* Labour criticises the Government's latest proposals on education.



THURSDAY 26 MAY 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07bt4st)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07c2nrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4sx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07bt4sz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07bt4t1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07bt4t3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07d7hqd)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the former moderator of the Church of Scotland's General Assembly, the Very Rev John Chalmers.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07c2w4s)
Microbeads harming marine life, woodcock decline and fruit packaging

There are renewed calls for a ban on the use of plastic microbeads, which harm marine life. The microscopic beads are used in many cosmetics, such as face and body scrubs, and don't biodegrade. The Environmental Audit Commission has been taking evidence from campaigners who say they should be banned outright, and a representative from the plastics industry who believes we should try a voluntary ban first to phase them out. We speak to the chair of the Committee.
And Anna Hill asks why, when it's in serious decline, the woodcock is still being shot legally for sport.
Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx2x8)
Marsh Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Marsh Tit. The marsh tit is badly-named. It doesn't live in marshes, and is most at home in older broad-leaved woodlands. "Oak tit" might be a better name. Unlike some other tit species they don't travel far, holding and defending their woodland territories throughout the winter.

ProducerBrett Westwood,MRS SARAH PITT,Sarah Blunt.


THU 06:00 Today (b07c2w5g)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07c2w5j)
The Gettysburg Address

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, ten sentences long, delivered at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg after the Union forces had won an important battle with the Confederates. Opening with " Four score and seven years ago," it became one of the most influential statements of national purpose, asserting that America was "conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal" and "that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." Among those inspired were Martin Luther King Jr whose "I have a dream" speech, delivered at the Lincoln Memorial 100 years later, echoed Lincoln's opening words.

With

Catherine Clinton
Denman Chair of American History at the University of Texas and International Professor at Queen's University, Belfast

Susan-Mary Grant
Professor of American History at Newcastle University

And

Tim Lockley
Professor of American History at the University of Warwick

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07c2w5l)
In the Bonesetter's Waiting Room

Episode 4

Aarathi Prasad explores the ancient and modern in Indian medicine. Read by Sudha Bhuchar.

Indian Medicine is a fascinating mix of the ancient and the modern. From Ayurvedic treatments, which predate the Common Era, to the allopathic (Western) medicine which now operates in parallel. Aarathi Prasad takes us through the myriad medicinal worlds - from a bonesetters' clinic in Hyderabad, where breaks but not fractures are reset, via a shrine in the Dharavi megaslum (just outside of Mumbai) where the goddess Kali rules, to a fish doctor in Secunderabad who makes patients swallow live fish and a remarkable neuroscientist, Pawan Sinha, whose venture 'Project Prakash' has helped thousands of Indian children to see for the first time.

Episode 4: They come in their thousands to eat live fish.

Aarathi Prasad is a writer and geneticist. Her PhD was in molecular genetics at Imperial College and she is currently based at University College, London. Prasad has written for The Guardian, The Telegraph and Prospect Magazine, and her first book, Like A Virgin: How Science is redesigning the rules Of Sex, was published in 2012. She has written and presented TV and radio programmes, including Rewinding the Menopause and Quest for Virgin Birth for Radio 4, and Brave New World with Stephen Hawking for Channel 4 and the Discovery Channel.

Writer: Aarathi Prasad
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Sudha Bhuchar

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07bt4t7)
Kate Beckinsale, Facebook, Catholic priests and marriage, Baroness Scotland

Kate Beckinsale joins Jenni to talk about her new period drama 'Love and Friendship' which is based on Jane Austen's novella 'Lady Susan'. She plays the deliciously scheming and manipulative widow, Lady Susan Vernon, who visits her in-laws to wait out the colourful rumours about her flirtations circulating through polite society.

Nicola Mendelsohn is Facebook's most senior employee outside the US and the figurehead of a new campaign which aims to give more UK women the practical support they need to start a business. Nicola talks about her career, the inner workings of Facebook and why 1 in 10 women in the UK want to start a business but don't.

In the fourth link of the series 'The Chain' Jane Garvey talks to Baroness Patricia Scotland, Secretary-General of the Commonwealth. She was nominated by Chief Crown Prosecutor Grace Ononiwu. Baroness Scotland and Grace worked together to tackle the issue of domestic violence when Baroness Scotland was Attorney General.

There are approximately 130 married Catholic priests in the UK who were once Anglicans. We hear from the wife of one who is concerned at how ill-equipped the church is to deal with families when the majority of their clergy are single men. Caroline Farrow and Father Alexander Lucie-Smith join Jenni.


THU 10:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07c2w5n)
Mary Ann in Autumn

Episode 4

Mary Ann in Autumn by Armistead Maupin

Episode Four

DeDe accompanies Mary Ann to her surgery. Jake makes a big decision.

Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Producer Susan Roberts
Director Charlotte Riches

For more than three decades, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City series has blazed its own trail through popular culture-from ground-breaking newspaper serial to classic novel. Radio 4 are dramatising the full series of the Tales novels for the very first time.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07c2w5q)
Death From Above

Insight, analysis, description and colour. Today, death on a dusty highway in Baluchistan and what that might mean for neighbouring Afghanistan; how the people of Hiroshima, where America set off an atomic bomb in 1945, feel about the imminent visit by President Obama; the Swiss have never joined the European Union so why are they so interested in the result of the in/out referendum in Britain next month? We hear how Turkey's Kurdish population fits into the President Erdogan's plan to continue being the dominant force in the country's politics and finally there's an account of a day delightfully wasted on a slow train journey across the south-eastern tip of Australia.


THU 11:30 Blue Canvas: The Artist Miles Davis (b07c2w62)
Miles Davis remains one of the most influential musicians from the last century, despite his death 25 years ago. But what's less well known is that he dedicated the final years of his life to painting with the same fervent energy he had devoted to music.

"A painting is music you can see, and music is a painting you can hear." Miles Davis

To mark what would have been his 90th birthday, the New York artist Jo Gelbard, who became Miles Davis's companion during the last years of his life, tells the story of his little known life as a painter, alongside interviews with his friends and family.

The story begins with Davis' sudden stroke in 1982, when he took up art as a therapy after his illness. Soon after, he met Gelbard who was 24 years his junior and they embarked on a turbulent relationship which resulted in an extraordinary artistic collaboration.

Davis' son Erin recalls how his father always carried two things - his trumpet case and his paint brushes - and he sat surrounded by canvases in the apartment they shared, painting with a furious energy. We also hear from musician and painter Robert Wilburn III who spent alot of time with Davis during his final decades, discussing the relationship between art and music, rhythm, colour and space in his performances and his paintings. And the author George Cole, who wrote a book about the final years of the trumpeter's life, talks about the importance of his art.

Woven into the programme is a soundtrack of Davis' music, and clips from a never-before-broadcast interview with the writer Scott Gutterman, the author of a book about the trumpeter's art, and who recorded with Davis over several months shortly before he died in 1991.

Producer : Jo Wheeler
A Freewheel production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b07bt4t9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b076cgjz)
26 May 1916 - Adam Wilson

On this day in 1916, the Bishop of Liverpool told conscientious objectors that they should leave the country if they refused to fight, and the Wilsons prepare to leave Halecot Farm.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07bt4tc)
FRSB, Bad gardeners

The collapse of the call centre GoGen led to an investigation by the Fundraising Standards Board, after reporters from the Daily Mail uncovered systematic pressuring of donors and a worrying attitude to vulnerable people. Macmillan, the British Red Cross, NSPCC and Oxfam were all failing to monitor the firm and have been criticised by the regulator. We'll talk to the chief executive of the FRSB and ask if self-regulation by charities is failing.

As the Chelsea Flower Show ends - what's available for less-skilled gardeners? One big supermarket is releasing a new line of easy care plants for busy people with roof gardens and terraces. We'll speak to Diarmuid Gavin live from the flower show and see if you can garden easily for less cash.

We'll also look at a New York-led idea to tackle the key cyber threats and a report into new build housing - what can you do if your property is badly built?

And we'll talk to the top thriller writer Mark Billingham about a crime that hasn't yet made its way into his work - the illegal downloading of ebooks.


THU 12:57 Weather (b07bt4tf)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b07c2w64)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 England: Made in the Middle (b07c3l52)
Episode 4

Historian Helen Castor looks at the radical middle - the revolutionary political gestures that have emanated from England's Midlands and redefined the rest of the country.

When some people hear the word Midlands, they think of Middle England, a socio-political label applied to people of traditional, rather conservative views. But despite lying geographically in the middle of the country, Midlanders as a tribe are not at all middling in character. The middle of England is far from Middle England.

The West Midlands was the engine of parliamentary and civic reform in the 19th century. Birmingham, proclaimed the Congregational minister Dr Robert Dale, was capable of deeds "as great as were done by Pisa, by Florence, by Venice in their triumphant days". One of those great deeds was the 1832 Reform Act, which created our modern electoral system. The foremost public campaigner in securing the reform of the franchise was the visionary, Brum-based economist Thomas Attwood. "The country owed Reform to Birmingham," declared Lord Durham, "and its salvation from revolution."

The East Midlands, home to the nation's great individualists - from Robin Hood via Arthur Seaton, the anti-hero of Alan Sillitoe's Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, to Margaret Thatcher - presents a different case. The beginnings of the USA can be traced to the East Midlands' tradition of gritty, cussed individualism, and the Separatists who later sailed to the untamed expanses of North America aboard the Mayflower. The Notts-led Pilgrim Fathers established a colony there in 1620 and bequeathed several defining legacies to the modern nation - not least the so-called 'Mayflower Compact', which laid the basis for the first democratically elective government in the New World.

Produced by Robert Shore and Ashley Byrne.
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b07c2t5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 The Headline Ballads (b07c4m8j)
The Island, the Sea, the Volunteer and the Refugee

The Headline Ballads .

A new series in which Poets respond to stories underneath the world news headlines

1. The Island, the Sea, the Volunteer and the Refugee with poetry by Louise Wallwein

As the pressure in Greece from the humanitarian refugee crisis subsides, Poet Louise Wallwein who has a long-standing relationship with the Island of Kos, travels back to Kos Town where she worked as a volunteer helping arriving refugees during the past year . In the wake of an agreement with Turkey, as the numbers of migrants crossing the sea from Bodrum to Kos falls dramatically, she travels back to find out how the humanitarian crisis played out on their doorstep has affected the Islanders and to meet the refugees who are left behind.

The trip inspired Louise to write a ballad based on what she has heard and seen

Producer. Susan Roberts.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b07c4m8l)
Series 33

The Essex Way

Clare Balding continues her series exploring epic walks, by joining four women as they take their final training walk before they set off to complete the eighty-two mile Essex Way, in just three days. Rebecca Rose and her friends have been training since Christmas to walk from Epping to Harwich. They're walking in aid of a local charity close to their hearts, Essex and Herts Air Ambulance. Four years ago Rebecca's daughter Katy's fiancé was involved in an accident at work, he was treated and air lifted to a London hospital by the local air ambulance. Although he sadly died, the family remain very grateful that they attended, as they know he received the best possible care. Katy was pregnant at the time and grandson, Oscar will be there to encourage the walkers at the beginning and end of the walk.

Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07bt72k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b07bt9ql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07c4m8n)
Whit Stillman and Jane Austen

With Francine Stock.

The director of Love And Friendship, Whit Stillman reveals why, of all Jane Austen's novels, he decided to adapt her unfinished novella Lady Susan. And why he's written a novel of his own screenplay.

The co-creator of Ali G and The Flight Of The Conchords TV series, James Bobin discusses the difficult of adapting Alice Through The Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll's well known but little read sequel.

Composer Neil Brand tells us the score about another classic opening scene - how Roy Budd's jazz soundtrack gave Michael Caine the edge in Get Carter.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07bt4th)
GM plants; Svalbard Seed Vault; Directed Evolution; Dolphin Snot

The topic of GM plants raises strong opinions and many questions. This week, the Royal Society published answers to some of those questions. Adam speaks to Professor Ottoline Leyser, plant science expert and Head of the Sainsbury Lab in Cambridge. She was involved in writing the responses and Adam quizzes her on the possible issues with GM crops.


Institutes from around the world made deposits to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault this week. More than 8,000 varieties of crops from Germany, Thailand, New Zealand, and the World Vegetable Center arrived at the Vault, located on a remote Norwegian archipelago, to be stored deep within the permafrost. Reporter Marnie Chesterton was there to see it happen, and take a tour of this normally inaccessible place. The Vault is located within the Arctic Circle, and helps to protect the biodiversity of some of the world’s most important crops against climate change, war and natural disaster.

This week Professor Frances Arnold was awarded the Millennium Technology Prize; the Finnish version of the Nobel Prize. Her work is a process called Directed Evolution, and involves creating batches of mutant proteins to see if the mutations make them better at certain functions.

Dolphins use ultrasound to echolocate. Until recently, scientists did not quite know how. Making ultrasonic noises normally requires some hard surfaces such as metal, and dolphins don’t have metal in their blowholes. Acoustic scientists Aaron Thode at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in San Diego thinks he’s solved this conundrum, and it involves snot.


Producer: Jen Whyntie


THU 17:00 PM (b07bt4tk)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07bt4tp)
Focus of EU referendum campaign shifts to immigration


THU 18:30 Paul Sinha's History Revision (b07c4tq7)
Series 2

Women

Paul looks at the forgotten women of history. From warriors to inventors to civil rights activists, Paul unearths some stories, that for reasons of sexism and patriarchy, we never got told about at school. You're welcome, ladies.

Paul Sinha returns for a second series of the show that uncovers the fascinating stories that we've forgotten in our onward march of progress. In the last series we learned how Alexander Graham Bell did NOT invent the telephone, and that the World Cup final of 2014 could only have happened because of the 1415 invasion of Morocco.

"Sinha's gift for finding humour in it all makes him worth a listen" - The Telegraph

Written and performed by Paul Sinha
Produced by Ed Morrish

A BBC Radio Comedy Production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b07c4tq9)
Kenton and Jolene are looking forward to a busy bank holiday weekend. Kenton's order of "The Elves of Ambridge" t-shirts have arrived. He's hoping they'll sell well but Jolene has heard from Eddie that the elves' days in the Millennium Wood may be numbered. Jolene notes that being on the shortlists for Best Use of Local Ingredients and Family Dining at the Borchester Food and Drink Awards will boost trade. They're up against Fallon's Tea Room in the former category. Jolene says making the shortlists is entirely thanks to Wayne. She asks Kenton is they should make him permanent but Kenton is not sure.

Jennifer and Lilian go dress shopping in Cheltenham for Brian and Jennifer's ruby wedding anniversary party. On their way the sisters think about Helen, her new baby and the burden on Pat and Tony. Their thoughts turn to Jennifer and Brian's fortieth wedding anniversary party. Miranda is unable to attend and they wonder on Justin and Miranda's relationship. Jennifer says it's wonderful to see the old Lilian back; Justin has brought a sparkle back to her eye.

Kenton is flustered by Wayne's constant talk of his new girlfriend Beverley. He quizzes Jolene about her. What does Jolene think about the relationship? Does Beverley look like Jolene? What's her surname? Jolene is caught on the hop and tells Kenton Beverley's surname is - Drains! Kenton continues to be curious about Beverley. As soon as she has a moment Jolene tells Wayne he needs to drop the Beverley story, Kenton's on to him.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b07bt4tz)
Wilko Johnson, Romeo and Juliet review, Walter de Maria

Wilko Johnson, the former Dr Feelgood guitarist and songwriter, was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2013. In his new book, Don't You Leave Me Here: My Life, he takes stock of his life following an 11-hour, life-saving operation and looks forward to a future he wasn't expecting. Wilko Johnson discusses his extraordinary and unexpected change of fortune.

Kenneth Branagh's latest play in his year-long season at the Garrick Theatre is Romeo and Juliet. Lily James and Richard Madden star as the eponymous lovers, with Derek Jacobi as Mercutio and Meera Syal as the Nurse. Susannah Clapp reviews.

The late American artist Walter De Maria is best known for his large-scale works, including The Lightning Field, a grid of 400 stainless steel poles in the New Mexico desert, and The Vertical Earth Kilometer, a brass rod that extends 1 kilometre into the ground in the German city of Kassel. John Wilson talks to De Maria's assistant and former studio manager Elizabeth Childress and curator Kara Vander Weg about the artist's first solo exhibition in the UK.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Rachel Simpson.


THU 19:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07c2w5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07c4tqc)
The New IRA

Northern Ireland-related terrorism now represents a “substantial” threat to Great Britain, according to MI5 - the security service. It believes that a terrorist attack is a "strong possibility" in Britain and "highly likely" in Northern Ireland itself. This reflects the continuing threat from dissident republicans.

This week David Aaronovitch asks who are the New IRA?

Joining him in The Briefing Room:
Suzanne Breen - journalist at the Belfast Telegraph
Henry McDonald - Ireland correspondent at The Guardian
Peter Taylor - the writer and veteran BBC journalist

Producer: Joe Kent, Researcher: Alex Burton, Editor: Innes Bowen
(Image: Nationalist youths protest in their home town of Lurgan, Northern Ireland. Credit: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty)


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07c4tqf)
EU Referendum

What does EU membership mean for UK business and how might that change if Britain votes to leave? Business leaders join Evan Davis to discuss how trade agreements and red tape can both help and hinder corporate success. What can Switzerland teach us about trading with Europe and beyond, despite being outside the EU?

Guests:

Jan Atteslander, EconomieSuisse

Julia Gash, CEO, Bidbi

Christopher Nieper, Managing Director, David Nieper

Jayne-Anne Gadhia, CEO, Virgin Money

Jon Moynihan, Chairman, Ipex Capital

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07bt4th)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07c2w5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b07bt4v1)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07bt4v3)
Trump 'clinches Republican nomination'

As Donald Trump clinches the Republican Party nomination for the Presidential election we speak to a delegate who's tipped the property tycoon over the line. Also are UK special forces in Libya. If so do the Libyans want them there and why has Parliament not been told? And as the family of the French racing driver, Jules Bianchi, sue Formula One, saying his death was avoidable, we speak to their lawyer.

Pic: John Trandem, North Dakota Republican delegate, and Donald Trump. (Credit: AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast).


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07c4vt4)
The Bricks That Built the Houses

The Heist

Award-winning poet and rapper Kate Tempest reads from her novel, a tale of desire, ambition and hedonism, set among south-east London's millennials today.

Harry and Leon are on their way to a big drug deal, hoping it'll be one of their last. But their usual contact is in jail, and things don't feel quite right.

Written and read by Mercury Prize-nominated Kate Tempest, who won the Ted Hughes Prize for poetry in 2013.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Julian Wilkinson.


THU 23:00 52 First Impressions with David Quantick (b07c4vt6)
Series 2

Episode 4

Journalist and comedy writer David Quantick has met and interviewed hundreds of people – what were his first impressions, how have they changed and does it all matter?

This week, stories about Paul Welller, soap operas and Sting, among others.

Written and Presented by: David Quantick
Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07c4vtb)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster as MPs raise concerns over a plan to cut pension benefits to help save Tata Steel's UK operations and there is a clash over the state of the economy.
Ministers face pressure for the threat of deportation to be lift from an Australian family who have lived in Scotland since 2011 and the Defence Secretary faces questions over British airstrikes on the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria.



FRIDAY 27 MAY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07bt4w8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07c2w5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07d2z8d)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07d2z8g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07d2z8j)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07d2z8l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07d7b2m)
Spiritual reflection to start the day with the former moderator of the Church of Scotland's General Assembly, the Very Rev John Chalmers.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07d3211)
Norway - farming without EU subsidies, Scottish tea at Chelsea, Anaerobic digesters

Whatever the political arguments for being in or out of Europe, much of the debate boils down to money. And nearly 40% of the entire European Union budget is spent on supporting farmers in the form of subsidies. So would leaving the EU mean the cash would stop flowing? And if it did, how might farmers get on? Paul Murphy, who's the BBC's Rural Affairs Correspondent in the North East of England, has been to visit Norwegian farmers to find out how they fare without EU subsidies.

Most of the tea we drink is imported from China and India but there's a burgeoning British tea industry. It's grown from Devon and Cornwall in the south up as far as Mull and Perthshire in Scotland, and there are now five commercial tea gardens or plantations in the UK. With growers celebrating a bumper harvest this year, Caz Graham has been to south west Scotland to find out why this year's crop has been so good - and how a tea called Garrocher Grey is the flavour of the week in Chelsea.

Also, anaerobic digesters - loved by some, opposed by others. As part of Farming Today's collaboration with Radio 4's You and Yours programme, Rajeev Gupta meets North Yorkshire cattle farmer John Douglas to see the plant which he says helps him stay in business.

Produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k6rrj)
Dipper

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the dipper. On a cold winter's day when few birds are singing, the bright rambling song of a dipper by a rushing stream is always a surprise. Dippers sing in winter because that's when the males begin marking out their stretch of water, they're early breeders.


FRI 06:00 Today (b07ctm1d)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07bt72r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07c56hs)
In the Bonesetter's Waiting Room

Episode 5

Aarathi Prasad explores the ancient and modern in Indian medicine. Read by Sudha Bhuchar.

Indian Medicine is a fascinating mix of the ancient and the modern. From Ayurvedic treatments, which predate the Common Era, to the allopathic (Western) medicine which now operates in parallel. Aarathi Prasad takes us through the myriad medicinal worlds - from a bonesetters' clinic in Hyderabad, where breaks but not fractures are reset, via a shrine in the Dharavi megaslum (just outside of Mumbai) where the goddess Kali rules, to a fish doctor in Secunderabad who makes patients swallow live fish and a remarkable neuroscientist, Pawan Sinha, whose venture 'Project Prakash' has helped thousands of Indian children to see for the first time.

Episode 5: Project Prakash, named after the Sanskrit word for light, has helped to bring vision to thousands of children.

Aarathi Prasad is a writer and geneticist. Her PhD was in molecular genetics at Imperial College and she is currently based at University College, London. Prasad has written for The Guardian, The Telegraph and Prospect Magazine, and her first book, Like A Virgin: How Science is redesigning the rules Of Sex, was published in 2012. She has written and presented TV and radio programmes, including Rewinding the Menopause and Quest for Virgin Birth for Radio 4, and Brave New World with Stephen Hawking for Channel 4 and the Discovery Channel.

Writer: Aarathi Prasad
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Sudha Bhuchar

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07bt4wd)
Meera Syal, Khadija Ismayilova

And for the final part of our Chain Baroness Scotland has chosen Italian writer and lawyer, Simonetta Agnello Hornby. Renowned for starting a pioneering solicitors' firm in Brixton in 1979, Simonetta has made a huge impact in the fields of child care. We'll hear how, after thirty years in the law, she then became a successful novelist.

The list of Meera Syal's professions include comedian, writer, playwright, singer, journalist, producer and actor. Meera talks about her latest theatre role in London's West End as Nurse in Romeo and Juliet.

Khadija Ismayilova was released from prison on Wednesday. She was an investigative journalist known for her revelations of corruption in the Azerbaijani government and presidential family. In March of this year, Amal Clooney filed a case to the European Court of Human Rights on her behalf. Khadija speaks to Jenni.

We speak to Human Rights Watch leading researcher in Nigeria, Mausi Segun, about the ongoing fight against Boko Haram, the commitment of the Nigerian government to return the girls who were kidnapped from Chibok in 2014, and the treatment they recieve when they return home.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


FRI 10:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07c56hv)
Mary Ann in Autumn

Episode 5

Mary Ann in Autumn by Armistead Maupin

Episode Five

Mary Ann has an unwelcome encounter with a presence from her past. Shawna is upset by Michael's revelation.

Dramatised by Lin Coghlan
Producer Susan Roberts
Director Charlotte Riches

For more than three decades, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City series has blazed a trail through popular culture-from ground-breaking newspaper serial to classic novel. Radio 4 are dramatising the full series of the Tales novels for the very first time.


FRI 11:00 St Helena - Joining the Rest of Us (b07c56hz)
The Sea

No quick way in or out - until the construction of the new airport, there was only one way in and out of St Helena, the Royal Mail Ship - six day voyage from Cape Town. So what happens when someone is sick on the island?
As the island's first airport nears completion, Joe Hollins, is also reaching the end of his contract as Chief Veterinary Officer. He concludes his record of the last days of the lonely island - diving its pristine waters, completing his final surgical operations, and talking to the 'Saints' who work on the retiring boat about the changes that will come as the island is connected to the rest of the world for the first time.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


FRI 11:30 Michael Fabbri's Dyslexicon (b07c56j3)
School Days

Comedian Michael Fabbri is dyslexic, but this programme is not a message of hope and encouragement.

This programme is a catalogue of mistakes and challenges that Michael has faced throughout his life.

This hilarious account of his school years details the mental scarring of being forced to play Romeo and being confronted with surprise bible readings.

First of two programmes written by Michael Fabbri.

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in May 2016.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07bt4wg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b076cgks)
27 May 1916 - Kitty Lumley

On this day in 1916, President Wilson advocated the formation of an Association of Nations to ensure future peace, and at Halecot Farm, relations are troubled.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07bt4wj)
Care home inspections, Pension fees, Energy from sweets

Are the checks on care homes going the way the Care Quality Commission had planned?

Have you updated to windows 10? We hear from people who says they've been 'tricked' into updating?

The man who took on parking charges - and is now a local hero.

Are pension fees as fair as they could be?

And the UK is becoming a world leader in turning waste into energy. Hear how it's being done.

PRESENTER: PETER WHITE

PRODUCER: RAJEEV GUPTA.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b07bt4wn)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b07clktf)
Analysis of news & current affairs with Mark Mardell. Both sides in the EU referendum campaign are using misleading figures, according to a scathing Treasury Committee report. We visit the front line in Ukraine, where fighting still rages. And are Muslim women in England and Wales facing discrimination if they abide by the rulings of Sharia law councils?


FRI 13:45 England: Made in the Middle (b07c56j6)
Episode 5

Historian Helen Castor Helen Castor on why the action in Shakespeare's history plays takes place in the Midlands.

Generations of children have learned much English history from the great Midlander William Shakespeare. Much of the action in his history plays takes place in the Midlands. That's only to be expected, since much of our history has been made there.

Many of the decisive battles in English history were fought on Midland soil. In the Civil War, Charles I raised his standard at Nottingham and the conflict was settled to all military intents and purposes at Naseby in Northamptonshire. The climax of Shakespeare's Richard III - the culmination of the Wars of the Roses, fought between the Houses of York and Lancaster but which, geographically, had little to do with the North - famously takes place at Bosworth Field, in South Leicestershire.

Helen Castor puts the middle back in England's history by looking at figures such as Richard III, whose bones were recently discovered under a car park in Leicester. Newspapers were full of the arguments to have the bones of this 'vilified Yorkshireman' returned to 'God's own country'. But Richard was a Midlander. As one linguistic expert points out, evidence suggests that he spoke with a Brummie accent.

And then of course there's the foremost Midlander, Shakespeare, who from John of Gaunt's 'this England' speech in Richard II to King Harry's pre-Agincourt rallying cry in Henry V, has provided us with the most resonant language in which to express ourselves in times of both tragedy and delight. The Midland Bard, in all his variety, is England.

Produced by Robert Shore and Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07c4tq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b07c56j8)
Brotherhood

Brotherhood by Furquan Akhtar
Yousaf returns North after five years away. He wants to repair his relationship with his brother and mother. But his brother Kasim has changed. He's come under the influence of a charismatic friend with radical views. Why is Yousaf back? And why is he so interested in Kasim's friend? A contemporary thriller which asks the question when does dissent tip into support for terrorism.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

Furquan Akhtar is a former winner of the Alfred Bradley Bursary Award for new writing in the North. He has recently written two episodes of the acclaimed children's series 'Wolfblood' and is currently developing series for TV.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07c56jb)
Chelsea Special - Geffrye Museum

Eric Robson hosts a Chelsea Special from the Geffrye Museum, London. Joining him on the panel are Bunny Guinness, Anne Swithinbank, and Matt Biggs

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Life at Absolute Zero (b07c56w7)
Series 1

There's No Need to Shout

Lynne Truss reads the first of eight stories about the inhabitants of Meridian Cliffs, a morose and wind-battered town on the South coast of England which lies, curiously, at longitude 0 degrees 0 minutes west, and also 0 degrees 0 minutes east.

Due to rampant coastal erosion, the town is literally shrinking in size. One longstanding resident is Sarah Birkett, who dreams of a small improvement in her life, involving shiny bobbins and a Daniel Craig calendar, open at August.

Written by Lynne Truss

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07c56w9)
Burt Kwouk, Michael Ratner, Sarah Corp, Mullah Akhtar Mansour, Jock Scot

Matthew Bannister on

The actor Burt Kwouk, best known for playing Inspector Clouseau's manservant Cato in the Pink Panther films.

The human rights lawyer Michael Ratner, who won the right for detainees at Guantanamo Bay to challenge their imprisonment in court.

Sarah Corp, the ITN producer who organised coverage of many significant international events,

Mullah Akhtar Mansour, leader of the Taliban

And Jock Scot, punk poet, Bohemian and friend of the Clash. Their former manager Kosmo Vinyl pays tribute.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07ctlxv)
Too much Mourinho

Roger Bolton discusses listener reaction to programmes on BBC radio.

This week, sports journalists have been kept particularly busy with speculation over Jose Mourinho's arrival as the new manager of Manchester United. But should the story have been headline news on BBC Radio 4? The Editor of the BBC Radio Newsroom, Richard Clark, responds to listeners' complaints.

Radio 4's School Drama has earned a huge amount of praise - and also generated a degree of drama. The four-part series, starring Tom Hollander, concerned a failing state school trying to turn around its prospects with a production of Romeo and Juliet. The drama was recorded at a real school, with pupils and teachers playing roles. But some listeners are asking why this so-called failing school was actually staged at a fee-paying grammar. Director John Dryden discusses that decision.

Every three months, the broadcast media goes slightly mad over RAJAR. It stands for Radio Joint Audience Research and they measure live radio listening across the UK. The quarterly figures can be good or bad news for BBC Radio controllers but are they still relevant as more and more of us engage with audio through podcasts, catch up and YouTube? Roger speaks to Lyndsay Ferrigan from RAJAR.

For 20 years, BBC Radio 3 has kept listeners across 12 European countries company with its Through the Night programme. The programme has the same music but with different presenters speaking their own languages to local listeners. Feedback speaks to its Slovenian presenter and one of its Romanian listeners, as well as to the Radio 3 editor Paul Frankl.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07c59lk)
Sarfraz and Bridget - A Family Festival

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple who met 8 years ago on the train home after the Festival and who have been back every year since, now with their daughter. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b07bt4ws)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07bt4wv)
Treasury Select Committee criticises claims made by both Remain and Vote Leave


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b07c59lm)
Series 90

Episode 7

Susan Calman, Dane Baptiste, Holly Walsh and Francis Wheen are Miles' guests in the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.

A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07c59lp)
Peggy and Tony visit Helen before she is transferred back to the mother and baby unit from hospital. Breastfeeding continues to be a struggle for Helen and when Peggy suggests she gives it another try Helen snaps at Peggy and then is immediately remorseful. Later, Peggy tells Tony she thinks Helen is finding it hard to bond with the baby. They must convince her that her son is more Archer than Titchener.

Kirsty and Tom make the final touches to the shop and open it for the first time in almost two months. She mentions that Jazzer is around helping Fallon prepare for the Jumble Trail but he was nervous about setting foot on Bridge Farm. Tom says it's not a lifetime ban. Kirsty points out that making fun of a situation is Jazzer's way of coping. Can Tom let sleeping pigs lie? Jazzer finds Tom feeding the pigs. They talk awkwardly about the pigs being sold and Jazzer suggests there might be a way to keep them. They make up and Jazzer gets straight back to work.

Helen puts her baby in a colourful sleep suit that Pat sent for his first journey into the outside world. Helen can register the birth at the mother and baby unit. And she has decided on a name. He will be John Anthony Archer, after Helen's older brother and father and he'll be known as Jack, like her gran's late husband Jack Woolley: The names of three good men.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07bt4wx)
From Hay: Charlotte Church, Tracy Chevalier and Lionel Shriver, YA Fiction, Welsh-Appalachian Music Mashup

Singer-songwriter Charlotte Church discusses her 'musical fairy tale' which receives its premier next weekend at the inaugural Festival of Voice in Cardiff. The Last Mermaid is inspired by The Little Mermaid and tackles the challenging issues facing our world.

Tracy Chevalier has just edited a collection of short stories inspired by the line, 'Reader I Married Him' from Jane Eyre. She and Lionel Shriver, who's contributed, discuss the importance of one of the most famous lines in literature.

The Young Adult fiction genre has been a major growth area in publishing over the last decade and as more titles flood the market this year, 3 of the top selling YA authors, Juno Dawson, Patrick Ness, Holly Smale join John Wilson to discuss what defines this area of fiction and where it allows them to go as writers that adult fiction and children's doesn't.

Welsh folk musician and BBC Wales presenter, Frank Hennessy, teams up with fellow Hennessys band mate, Iolo Jones, and Appalachian musicians Rebecca Branson Jones and Trevor McKenzie to play the world premier of a song that began life as a Welsh hymn and morphed into a Bluegrass Gospel song.


FRI 19:45 Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City (b07c56hv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07c59lr)
Bronwen Maddox, Tim Martin, Vicky Pryce, Bruno Waterfield

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the BBC Radio Theatre in London. On the panel are the Editor of Prospect magazine Bronwen Maddox, the founder and chairman of the pub chain J D Wetherspoon Tim Martin, the Greek born economist Vicky Pryce, and Bruno Waterfield the Brussels correspondent for The Times. Together they discuss a range of topics related to the forthcoming EU Referendum.
Producer Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07c59lt)
I Gave It All Away

Will Self argues that instead of holding onto money until old age, we should give children their inheritance when they're most in need of it.

"Forget the old right/left, rich/poor division" he says, "nowadays the greatest divergence lies between the old and the young".

And he asks how can we in conscience go on denying the young the opportunity to clear up the mess we've ? for the most part quite inadvertently ? created for them. "Give it all away!" is his plea.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b076cgwr)
23-27 May 1916

In a week when President Wilson advocated the formation of an Association of Nations to ensure future peace, relations in Ashburton are very troubled.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b07bt4wz)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07bt4x1)
Health experts call for Rio Olympics to move

The risk of Zika to athletes; Operation Condor and the Christian view of Brexit. Picture: Worker at Olympics, Credit: Reuters.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07c59lw)
The Bricks That Built the Houses

Everybody Down

Award-winning poet and rapper Kate Tempest reads the final part of her novel. Set among the disenfranchised but still dreaming 20-somethings of London now, it's a tale of desire, drugs and ambition.

Today: threats and revelations at Pete's surprise party as Harry, Pete and Becky, not to mention her uncles Ron and Rags, are turn up to celebrate.

Written and read by Mercury Prize-nominated Kate Tempest, who won the Ted Hughes Prize for poetry in 2013.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Julian Wilkinson.


FRI 23:00 Woman's Hour (b07c59ly)
Late Night Woman's Hour

Lauren Laverne and guests discuss the origins and pitfalls of stereotypes of women.

With Joanne Harris, best-selling author of Chocolat who has written about myth and fairy tales.

Lisa Mckenzie, a sociologist at the London School of Economics, who has explored portrayals of working class women

Emma Dabiri, teaching fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, who has studied what people mean by the term 'mixed-race' in Britain today.

Jane Cunningham, founder of advertising and marketing consultancy Pretty Little Head.

The broadcast edition of this programme will be available on Iplayer soon after transmission. A longer version is available now as a podcast.


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07d484d)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07c59m2)
Clara and Matthew - Art and Life

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between artists revelling in the freedom of the 'imaginarium' and the spontaneity afforded by the Festival. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

52 First Impressions with David Quantick 23:00 THU (b07c4vt6)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07bfzjh)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b07c59lt)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b07bzdjy)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b07bzdjy)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b07btlmk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07b9r8y)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07bfzjf)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b07c59lr)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07bryh3)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 10:45 MON (b07btfg3)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 19:45 MON (b07btfg3)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 10:45 TUE (b07byvdk)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 19:45 TUE (b07byvdk)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 10:41 WED (b07c2nrk)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 19:45 WED (b07c2nrk)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 10:45 THU (b07c2w5n)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 19:45 THU (b07c2w5n)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 10:45 FRI (b07c56hv)

Armistead Maupin - Tales of the City 19:45 FRI (b07c56hv)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07bt4th)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07bt4th)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07bt72c)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b07bt72c)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b07btlm7)

Blue Canvas: The Artist Miles Davis 11:30 THU (b07c2w62)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07byv7l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07bzffd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b07c2v2m)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b07c4vt4)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b07c59lw)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b07bfxhj)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07btdbf)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07btdbf)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07byvdh)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07byvdh)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07c2nrh)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07c2nrh)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07c2w5l)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07c2w5l)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07c56hs)

Born in Bradford 20:00 MON (b07btlmh)

Born in Bradford 11:00 WED (b07btlmh)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07bt4h8)

Dangerous Visions 15:00 SUN (b07bt9qj)

Dangerous Visions 19:45 SUN (b07btcbg)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 MON (b07c2w7k)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 TUE (b07byvpb)

Dangerous Visions 14:15 WED (b07c2svl)

Death and Taxis 23:15 WED (b07c2v2r)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b07bt72r)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b07bt72r)

Don't Make Me Laugh 23:00 MON (b07byv6h)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b07bpv3j)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b050z2v9)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b07c56j8)

EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts 18:28 MON (b07byv6f)

EU Referendum Campaign Broadcasts 18:28 TUE (b07bzdc3)

England: Made in the Middle 13:45 MON (b07bthdr)

England: Made in the Middle 13:45 TUE (b07byvp8)

England: Made in the Middle 13:45 WED (b07c2q32)

England: Made in the Middle 13:45 THU (b07c3l52)

England: Made in the Middle 13:45 FRI (b07c56j6)

Europeans - The Roots of Identity 09:00 TUE (b07byvdf)

Europeans - The Roots of Identity 21:30 TUE (b07byvdf)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 MON (b07btfg7)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07bpq1n)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07btd1m)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07byv9j)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07c2n8k)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b07c2w4s)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b07d3211)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b07bfzhx)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b07ctlxv)

Field Notes: The Irishman Who Invented the Nocturne 15:30 SAT (b07bbk4g)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07bbysl)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b07bzdfn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b07b9r8m)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b07c2w5q)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b07bt4kz)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b07bt4nr)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b07bt4r6)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b07bt4tz)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b07bt4wx)

FutureProofing 22:15 SAT (b07bdfmg)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b07c2t5y)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07bfzhj)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b07c56jb)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b07bzdc1)

Heresy 18:30 WED (b07c2t5p)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b076cgwr)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b076cglw)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b07byvp4)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b07c2pgr)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b076cgjz)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b076cgks)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b07bft8k)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07c2w5j)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07c2w5j)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07bt4nt)

Isy Suttie's Love Letters 18:30 TUE (b01s8cp3)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b07bbd50)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b07btlmc)

Jutland: The Battle that Won the War 13:30 SUN (b07bt7n7)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07bfzhv)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07c56w9)

Lenny Henry's Rogues Gallery 23:00 WED (b07c2v2p)

Life Under Glass 11:00 TUE (b07byvlq)

Life at Absolute Zero 15:45 FRI (b07c56w7)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b07bt72h)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b07brygz)

Michael Fabbri's Dyslexicon 11:30 FRI (b07c56j3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b07b9r83)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b07bt4gk)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b07bt4k6)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b07bt4n1)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b07bt4qc)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b07bt4st)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b07bt4w8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b07c2nrf)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b07c2nrf)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07b9r8r)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b07b9r8r)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b07c2sww)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b07b9r8c)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b07bt4gt)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b07bt4kg)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b07bt4n9)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b07bt4qm)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b07bt4t3)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b07d2z8l)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b07bt4gw)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b07b9r8p)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b07bt4hb)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b07bt4kq)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b07bt4nf)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b07bt4qr)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b07bt4t9)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b07bt4wg)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b07b9r8f)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b07bt4h0)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b07bt4h6)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b07b9r9d)

News 13:00 SAT (b07b9r8w)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b07bt9ql)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b07bt9ql)

PM 17:00 SAT (b07b9r92)

PM 17:00 MON (b07bt4kv)

PM 17:00 TUE (b07bt4nm)

PM 17:00 WED (b07bt4r2)

PM 17:00 THU (b07bt4tk)

PM 17:00 FRI (b07bt4ws)

Paul Sinha's History Revision 18:30 THU (b07c4tq7)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07bt9qq)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b07bb1z7)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b07bt9qn)

Polyoaks 11:30 WED (b07c2p2z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07bfzlx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b07flc9w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07d7qfr)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b07d7hzy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b07d7hqd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b07d7b2m)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b07bryh1)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b07bryh1)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b07bryh1)

Punk, the Pistols and the Provinces 11:30 TUE (b07byvp2)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07bt72k)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07bt72k)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07bt72k)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b07bft89)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b07c4m8l)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b07bpv3b)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07b9r9b)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b07c2t9d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07b9r87)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07bt4gp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b07bt4kb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b07bt4n5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b07bt4qh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b07bt4sz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b07d2z8g)

Shared Experience 15:30 TUE (b07bzdbx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b07b9r85)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b07b9r89)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b07b9r94)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b07bt4gm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b07bt4gr)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b07bt4hl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b07bt4k8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b07bt4kd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b07bt4n3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b07bt4n7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b07bt4qf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b07bt4qk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b07bt4sx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b07bt4t1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b07d2z8d)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b07d2z8j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07b9r98)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b07bt4hq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b07bt4kx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b07bt4np)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b07bt4r4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b07bt4tp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b07bt4wv)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07bt72f)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b07bt72f)

Spanish Steps 16:00 MON (b06l1yp7)

Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar 23:00 TUE (b07ctlnq)

St Helena - Joining the Rest of Us 11:00 FRI (b07c56hz)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b07btdbc)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b07btdbc)

Stories from Songwriters 00:30 SUN (b042l2xw)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07bt72m)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07bt4h2)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b07bbbjp)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b07bthdt)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07bt72p)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07bt9qs)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07bt9qs)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07btlmf)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07btlmf)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07bzdc5)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07bzdc5)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b07c2t5t)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b07c2t5t)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07c4tq9)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07c4tq9)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b07c59lp)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b07c4tqf)

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The Power of... 21:00 MON (b07bbjhv)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b07btfg5)

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The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07bt4hj)

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