Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 23 APRIL 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0770r0p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b077jp0z)
A House Full of Daughters

Episode 5

Juliet Stevenson reads Juliet Nicolson's journey through seven generations of women, including her Flamenco dancing great great grandmother Pepita, her grandmother Vita Sackville West and her mother Philippa - all of whom have shaped and formed, in extraordinary ways, exactly who she has become today.

We journey through the slums of 19th century Malaga to the political elite of Washington, from English boarding schools during the second world war, to London in the 60s and New York in the 80s.

It is one woman's investigation into how her past forms and informs her future.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0770r0r)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0770r0t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0770r0w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0770r0y)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b077jqsr)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Kirsty Thorpe, URC Minister.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b077jqst)
Having children: selfish or selfless?

Two iPM listeners who knew from an early age how they felt about having children and took two very different courses of action.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0770r10)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0770r12)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b077jb6m)
Old Oswestry Hillfort

Helen Mark visits the Iron-Age Hillfort in Oswestry, Shropshire to discover why it's the "Stonehenge of the Iron Age" and how plans for housing might affect the landscape. Dr Rachel Pope tells Helen why the size and scale of the Western entrance ramparts help make the Hillfort one of the most important Iron-Age monuments in England, and why it's a symbol for community and trade rather than defence. Dr George Nash explains how the site was used to train soldiers in trench warfare and mortar practice during World War One. John Waine links this to soldier and poet Wilfred Owen who returned to his home-town of Oswestry for training and may have written 'Storm' in the shadow of the Hillfort. Helen meets Sarah Gibson of the Shropshire Wildlife Trust and goes in search of Yellowhammers and Linnets which nest in the ramparts, and finds out how the Violet Oil Beetle hitches a lift on the backs of bees. Following Shropshire Council's decision to include a piece of land near the Hillfort in their plan for development, Bill Klemperer of Historic England explains how they hope to minimise its impact should an application for housing be made. But for Rachel Pope the Hillfort has so many tales to tell that any erosion to the landscape around it would devalue its setting.

Producer: Toby Field.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0780jwj)
Farming Today This Week: Poultry industry

Charlotte Smith is at a new intensive chicken farm in Bedfordshire to explore the UK poultry industry. The sheds have been designed and built by the Applied Group, which then helps to manage the business on behalf of the farmer.
We look at how the industry is tackling campylobacter and the over-use of anti-biotics, and what role new technology will play in the future of the industry.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0770r16)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0780jwl)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0780jwn)
Saturday Live with James Nesbitt

With Aasmah Mir and the Rev Richard Coles

James Nesbitt talks about going back to his childhood home to play Colin Howell in real life drama The Secret, the return of Cold Feet and his Shakespearean roles.

Edward Wilson-Lee has just published the book Shakespeare in Swahililand, he talks about growing up in Kenya and the bard's legacy in parts of Africa.

Composer and musician William Lyons will be bringing Shakespearean music to life- bringing the shawm, bass dulcian, recorder and renaissance flute and bagpipes to play live in the studio.

Listener Paul Kynaston is Assistant Head Teacher at Malvern Primary School in Liverpool. He invited JP Devlin to meet the schoolchildren in the drama club to hear what they think about Shakespeare.

And offering a distinctive celebration of Shakespeare from Stratford-upon-Avon, JP Devlin will be hearing listener stories about their Shakespearean triumphs and tragedies, and talking to a Codpiece expert Victoria Bartels. She'll be explaining why this particular pouch was de rigueur in the 15th and 16th centuries and why it went out of fashion. Actor Kingsley Glover takes centre stage to be our codpiece model.

BBC 6 Music breakfast presenter Shaun Keaveny shares his Inheritance Tracks: The Isley Brothers, This Old Heart of Mine and Purple Rain by Prince.

The Secret staring James Nesbitt begins on April 29 on ITV at 9pm.
Shakespeare in Swahililand is out now.

Producer: Claire Bartleet
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 World War One: The Cultural Front (b0780jwq)
Series 3

Dada and Defiance

That endless, terrible year of '16. Francine Stock explores the struggle for meaning, freedom, sanity and possibility.

The supreme talent of Franz Marc is snuffed out in the first days of the battle of Verdun. In Berlin you can have a day out and knock a nail into a gigantic statue of war leader Hindenburg. On a street in Stepney they are knocking up a parody of him. In a Zurich night club strange sounds are conjured up by the weird magicians of a new movement - Dada. Shouting defiance of the madness of war. Britain's still disturbed by the losses at the Battle of Jutland are stunned by the death of Kitchener, icon, recruiting poster and war hero. An omen of terrible things to come in the months ahead? Sir Hubert Parry takes on a commission to put the words of Blake to music for The Fight to Right movement and Jerusalem sounds for the first time.

For the Jewish civilians of Eastern Europe there is no escape from war. Drafted into the armies of the Czar in disproportionate numbers, surrounded by anti-Semitism, displaced either by their own side or by invading German or Austro-Hungarian armies. The writings of Sholom Alecheim had brought the old world of the Shtetl to new, international audiences. His passing that year is marked by thousands in a grand funeral in New York. But back home all is disaster. Ethnologist S.Ansky travels from St Petersburg to the Pale of Settlement in a desperate attempt to document this disappearing world and bring aid and relief. Back in St Petersburg Maxim Gorky, Russia's senior literary figure, gathers together a host of writers in The Shield, to condemn the continued persecution of the Jews & celebrate their role in helping create the possibility of a new Russia to emerge from the chaos of the old.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0785hhy)
Isabel Hardman of The Spectator looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

What difference can Barack Obama's intervention make on the EU debate? Plus problems with implementing the minimum wage, possible intervention in Libya, and is the government about to water down its policy on all schools in England becoming academies?

The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0770r18)
On Board Air Force One

The plane where even the paper napkins sport the presidential seal, and where exclusive little boxes of chocolate sweets feature a picture of Barack Obama: it's America's presidential Air Force One, and you're only allowed on board if you're in "the bubble". In the West Bank a roundabout encapsulates what's going on, and going wrong, in the Israel-Palestinian conflict.
Libya has seen much chaos and suffering in the last five years. But one family now wants to embrace the future optimistically again, despite losing several of their relatives in the fighting. The beautiful trekkers' destination with tea houses and stunning mountain landscapes that was turned into a sea of rubble. For the survivors of the Nepalese village obliterated by the earthquake a year ago, the suffering is still raw.
And on a trip to China to take tea in a picturesque garden and haggle with antiques dealers, our correspondent's local guide lets slip more than she had perhaps planned.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b0770r1b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0770r1d)
Tree investments felled, Selling your pension annuity - will it be a good deal?

A so-called 'ethical' investment into sustainable forests in Costa Rica is in trouble. The firm promoting it is in liquidation after paying the directors millions of pounds. The trees are harder to liquidate and may still be there. But the promised returns of up to 18% a year have vanished in the forest mist. What now for the 3000 very green investors who put up to £18,000 each into it?

Brexit and your personal finances. As part of a regular series, Money Box jumps into the muddy waters of the EU Referendum. First up: we examine the Chancellor's claim that leaving the EU would cause interest rates to rise. Former Bank of England economist, David Tinsley, joins the programme.

This week HM Treasury launched further details for those who want to cash in their pension annuity from next Easter for a lump sum. Paul Lewis asks the Pensions Minister Baroness Altmann how it will work. It's estimated that The Chancellor will be the big winner taking an estimated £1.25 billion over 4 years from tax on the payments. But will the 300,000 people expected to cash in their income for life and spend it on a cruise get good value for their guaranteed money?

A not for profit scheme to lend money to low income people is about to close down. Sponsored by 19 social housing associations Myhomefinance.co.uk charged 98%APR but still could not make enough money to keep going. A meeting is imminent to wind it up and transfer its business to another social lender. National Housing Federation chief executive David Orr explains what's likely to happen.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b077jqpx)
Series 90

Episode 2

Jeremy Hardy, Rebecca Front, Edwina Currie and Francis Wheen are Miles' guests in the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production
Producer: Richard Morris.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0770r1g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0770r1j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b077jqq1)
Hilary Benn MP, Mick Cash, Nigel Farage MEP, Justine Greening MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Tunbridge Wells in Kent with a panel including the Shadow Foreign Secretary Hilary Benn MP, the General Secretary of the RMT Mick Cash, the Leader of UKIP Nigel Farage MEP and the Secretary of State for International Development Justine Greening MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0770r1l)
Obama and the EU, Junior doctors' strike

Anita Anand takes your calls on Obama and the EU and the Junior Doctors' strike.
Q; How Long does it take to negotiate a trae deal if you're at the back of the queue?
Q; What should the government do to prevent an indefinite walkout by junior doctors?

Call 03 700 100 444. Lines are open from 1230-1430 on Saturday.The email address; any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Hashtag BBCAQ for those of you who are Tweeting. And you can follow us @bbcanyquestions.

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 John Galsworthy - The Forsyte Saga (b0780jy8)
The Forsytes Continues

Episode 7

John Galsworthy's epic family saga of love, money and betrayal.
Dramatised for radio by Lin Coghlan

Faced with the consequences of flirting with danger, Fleur must make a choice. In the changing world of high finance where honesty no longer appears to be in fashion, Soames decides to make a stand. Away from the glittering lights of London's smart set, Bicket and Victorine's dreams of escaping to a better life in Australia are no closer to coming true.

Original music composed by Neil Brand

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins

Over the next 2 years, BBC Radio 4 is broadcasting a new dramatisation of all 9 books in John Galsworthy's The Forsyte Saga. An epic tale of sex, money and power in the lives of an upper middle-class family in London, it spans 50 years from 1886 to 1936.

Today's play concludes the fourth novel in the series, The White Monkey. We pick up the story again in September.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b077gd5b)
Series 22

The Way You Look Tonight

'The Way You Look Tonight' was written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields for the 1936 film 'Swing Time'. Sung by Fred Astaire to Ginger Rodgers while she was washing her hair, the song won an Oscar. It's been recorded by Frank Sinatra and Billie Holiday. Sarah Woodward, daughter of actor Edward, recalls how age seven, she watched him sing it on The Morecambe and Wise Christmas Show with his 'angelic' voice; theatre director Michael Bawtree remembers the song being his father's favourite, and being distraught when he broke the gramophone record as a five year old; and Glaswegian singer Eddie Toal describes making an album of jazz songs, including 'The Way You Look Tonight' to remember his late wife, Irene.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0770r1n)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Divorce mediation, Sylvia Day, #whomademyclothes

An assessment meeting for mediation during divorce process became law two years ago - why do so few couples attend? Jane Robey the CEO of National Family Mediation and Emma Nash a solicitor with The International Family Law Group discuss.

When the assistant editor of the Spectator, Isabel Hardman, was called 'totty' by an MP she complained to the Whips. Former MP Edwina Currie and the writer Laura Bates discuss how to deal with sexist behaviour.

Wakefield MP Mary Creagh, the Chair of Fashion Question Time for Fashion Revolution at the Houses of Parliament and Liz Leffman the Director of Cothesource talk about where the responsibility for ethics on the high street lies and the launch of #whomademyclothes.

Why do women prisoners seem to contravene prison rules more often than men? Martha Gill the Home Affairs Correspondent at The Economist and author of a recent report on women's behaviour behind bars argues women should not face the same rules as men in prison and she's joined by Tania Bassett from NAPO the trade union for probation and family court staff.

Sylvia Day is the best-selling author of the Crossfire series. She talks about the sex and romance in her novels.

As the birthday celebrations for the Queen who turned 90 this week continue, we hear from two nonagenarians about their lives. Jackie Marcus is 90 and Honour Harlow is 99 - what is their secret to a long life?

39 per cent of those running the London Marathon 2016 will be female compared to just five per cent when it first took place in 1981. So why are women attracted to the sport of running? Runner and writer Bridget Minamore and Elizabeth Hufton the editor of Women's Running discuss.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0770r1q)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b077jqst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0770r1s)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0770r1v)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0770r1x)
President Obama has told young people in Britain to reject pessimism and isolationism.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0780jzv)
Clive Anderson, Sara Cox, Donna Leon, Phil Davis, Devon Glover, The Rosellys, Richmond Fontaine

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Donna Leon, Phil Davis and Devon Glover for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Richmond Fontaine and The Rosellys.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0783kvs)
Sir Martin Sorrell

Sir Martin Sorrell has spent the last three decades transforming a maker of wire shopping baskets into the world's largest advertising firm. The self-proclaimed workaholic bought a stake in Wire and Plastic Products plc in 1985 and has since taken the advertising world by storm with a string of major acquisitions.

His meteoric rise is not without controversy. He is known for his relentless work ethic, punishing schedule, and ruthless approach to business. He has engaged in bitterly hostile takeovers, falling out with his competitors along the way.

The business has made Sorrell a wealthy man. This year his salary is expected to hit £70m, a sum which he has no qualms defending. Sir Martin believes he is "worth every penny".

Mark Coles speaks to Sir Martin Sorrell's childhood friend Simon Schama, his wife Cristiana Falcone and his colleagues and competitors, to reveal how he became the world's most powerful ad man.

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0770r1z)
Arabian Nights, The Flick, Garth Greenwell, Sicily at the British Museum, All the World's a Screen

Portuguese film director Miguel Gomes has created a trilogy based on The Arabian Nights. We've watched the first volume of the 6 hour epic

The Flick is a transfer from Broadway to London's Dorfman Theatre. Set in a rundown movie theatre, it explores the dynamics of the relationships among an increasingly unmotivated staff

Garth Greenwell describes his novel What Belongs To You like this; "I'm a queer writer writing in the queer literary tradition for queer people". Is it a straightforward book?

The British Museum in London has a new exhibition: Sicily, Culture and Conquest. It looks at the island at the toe of the boot of Italy, whose strategic position and rich soil means that - over the centuries - it has been ruled by many different nations and absorbed many different cultures

BBC TV's All The World's a Screen is an Arena special on the global history of Shakespeare's work as seen on the silver screen

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Christopher Frayling, Helen Lewis and Lynn Nead. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0783kvv)
Rising Voices

On Easter Monday 1916, the teacher and poet Patrick Pearse stood on the steps of the General Post Office in Dublin and delivered the Proclamation of the Irish Republic to a bemused public. It was a moment prepared for not just through military drills and revolutionary conspiracy. From late in the previous century a cultural revival was underway in Ireland.

For Archive on 4, renowned journalist and broadcaster Fergal Keane explores the roots of a cultural revival which stoked the fires of revolutionary fervour among a small group of poets, musicians, and political activists, many of whom went on to lead and fight in the Rising.

Using rarely broadcast archive of men and women who witnessed and fought in the Rising, Fergal examines the sources of their revolutionary ambitions.

He discovers a Dublin bristling with ideas, where a new passion for Irish language, music and mythology sat alongside the literary revival of W.B Yeats and Lady Gregory. Fiery plays like Cathleen Ni Houlihan evoked emotions of noble sacrifice. The city crackled with debates on feminism, pacifism and equality.

Fergal explores the work of the men known as the Rising's Poets - Pearse, Plunkett, MacDonagh - and uncovers themes of blood sacrifice, Celtic mythology and Catholic mysticism. He examines the seismic shift in Ireland after the Rising, immortalised in W.B Yeats' poem 'Easter 1916' and Sean O'Casey's play 'The Plough and the Stars', which challenged notions of romantic idealism and led to riots.

With contributions from Prof Declan Kiberd, Dr Lucy Collins and Prof Roy Foster, and archive recordings from the BBC and the Irish National Bureau of Military History, Fergal demonstrates how language, poetry, drama and song helped to shape both the Rising and its legacy.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b0773ldq)
Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit

Episode 2

Adapted for radio by Jeanette Winterson from her acclaimed novel.

A unique coming of age story and a darkly funny tale of religious excess and human obsession.

Now 16, Jeanette’s future as a budding missionary is called into question when she falls in love with one of her converts, Melanie. It’s not long before Mrs Winterson discovers her daughter’s ‘unnatural passions’. As the congregation determine to exorcise her demons, Jeanette is forced to choose between her church, home and family or the woman she loves.

Mrs Winterson ….. Lesley Sharp
Jeanette ….. Katie West
Pastor Spratt …..Vincent Franklin
Miss Jewsbury ….. Pauline Lynch
Melanie ..... Nicola Ferguson
Mrs White ….. Susan Jameson
May ….. Adie Allen
Elsie Norris ….. Angela Pleasence
Louie ….. Claire Cage
Mrs Arkwright ….. Vicky Licorish
The demon ….. Sam Rix
Piano performed by David Thomas

From the award winning novel by Jeanette Winterson
Dramatised for radio by Jeanette Winterson

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is Jeanette Winterson’s semi-autobiographical novel.

Lesley Sharp is an award-winning stage, film and television actress, particularly well known for her variety of British television roles including Clocking Off, Scott & Bailey, Bob & Rose and Afterlife.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0770r21)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Agree to Differ (b077gtvz)
Series 2

Artificial Intelligence

We are witnessing a momentous speed up in Artificial Intelligence - in the power of machines to learn, communicate and interact with us. On any day, AI provides hundreds of millions of people with search results, traffic predictions, translations in real time and it speeds up the operation of our laptops by guessing what we'll do next. Several companies are working on cars that can drive themselves? and AI techniques are playing a major role in science and medicine.
While the potential benefits of AI are thought to be huge, there have been increasing warnings from prominent figures in science and technology about the potential dangers. Just how 'intelligent' might the machines become? Will they be able to 'think' for themselves? Could they ever be 'conscious' - or is that just the stuff of science-fiction? And would we want them to be? Matthew Taylor is joined by Murray Shanahan, Professor of Cognitive Robotics at Imperial College and Mark Bishop, Professor of Cognitive Computing, Goldsmiths, University of London.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b07756bb)
Semi-Final 3, 2016

(15/17)
The third of this year's semi-finals features competitors from London, Merseyside, Lincolnshire and the West Midlands. Russell Davies asks the questions.

As well as being a football ground, Stamford Bridge is a village where a battle took place in 1066 - in which present-day English county? What was the name of the US Air Force base in California where Space Shuttle landings took place from 1981-2001? Which building was described in the Architectural Review in 1932 as 'the new Tower of London'?

Today's winner will go through to the 63rd Brain of Britain Final in two weeks' time. There'll also be a chance for a listener to win a prize by devising questions to stump the competitors.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b0773msq)
Poetry by Heart

Roger McGough is back with the first in a new series of the poetry requests show. This programme comes from the annual Poetry by Heart competition. Students learn and recite a variety of poems, from Sylvia Plath's Morning Song to A Satirical Elegy by Jonathan Swift. There's a wealth of talent on display, but who will be crowned winner?
If you fancy making a request then get in touch at poetryplease@bbc.co.uk or tweet us @bbcpoetryplease. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 24 APRIL 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0783l8c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Shorts (b03vzwc1)
Series 13

Bethlehem House

Scottish Shorts, the best writing from Scotland
Bethlehem House by Merryn Glover
A return to a childhood location brings back painful memories for an ex-pat. Reader Ann Louise Ross. Produced by Eilidh McCreadie

Australian by passport, born and brought up in South Asia and now living in Scotland, Merryn Glover's stories have been widely published and her plays have been performed on stage and on radio. Her debut novel A HOUSE CALLED ASKIVAL is set in India and spans 70 years of its recent history. More information can be found at www.merrynglover.com.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0783l8m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0783l8t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0783l92)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0783l96)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0783m41)
All Saints Church, Harpole in Northamptonshire

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from All Saints Church, Harpole in Northamptonshire. There are 6 bells, the back 5 were cast in 1930 to replace the original 5 bells. In 1995 a treble was added. This week we hear them ringing Beverley Surprise Minor.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b0783kvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0783l9j)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0783m43)
Changing the Climate

Mark Tully asks if climate change offers an opportunity for us to improve our lives - not just by consuming less and respecting nature more, but by finding a deeper relationship with nature and each other.

Mark discusses the prevailing economic wisdom of ever increasing growth, and ever increasing demand to feed that growth, with leading Indian economist Rajiv Kumar who believes that economics can and must change to reduce our impact on the climate.

But Mark also acknowledges the benefits of human ingenuity and curiosity which have led to so many technological advances, as well as enhancements in our lives. He considers how a move towards a new way of life might be evolutionary, rather than revolutionary, while reminding us with the help of a Native American
Cree proverb that "only when the last tree has been cut down, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will man finally realise we can't eat money."

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0783m45)
Future Food: Our Cow Molly

Dan Saladino visits a dairy farm that's on one of Sheffield's seven hills. Our Cow Molly is run by Eddie Andrew and his brother Dan, and the milking is overseen by their father Graham. After milking each evening, when many dairy farms would be finishing for the day, the on-farm bottling plant is getting to work, processing the day's milk ready for delivery the next morning.

The Our Cow Molly label on each bottle makes a point of emphasising the freshness and local origins of this 'Sheffield milk'. Eddie had a light-bulb moment when a barista explained the benefits of using fresher milk when making coffee - and realised that by controlling the supply chain and shouting about freshness and local production, that this could be a real selling point and give his product more value. Through a contract with the University and new facilities on farm, he hopes this could be a blueprint for other dairy farms - so many of which are struggling.

This is the last in a special series of programmes, profiling the three finalists in the 'Future Food' category in the 2016 BBC Food and Farming Awards. Joining Dan are this year's judges, farmer Mike Gooding and Managing Editor of The Grocer magazine, Julia Glotz.

Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0783l9s)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0783l9z)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0783lb5)
Is sushi permitted at Passover? Prince the Jehovah's Witness, The row over religious education in the UK

For 1000 years, Ashkenazi Jews have been forbidden to eat foods classed as 'Kitniyot' (e.g. rice, corn, beans, legumes) during Passover. But now authorities in the US have lifted this ban which means that Ashkenazi Jews can eat a variety of foodstuffs from Sushi to Popcorn. Charles Carroll reports.

This week, the Foreign Office issued advice for LGBT people travelling to the US because of new 'religious freedom' laws allowing individuals and institutions to deny services to LGBT customers on religious grounds.

Concerns have been raised about the All Party Parliamentary Group on RE which has removed the promotion of non religious world views from its remit. Kevin Bocquet investigates.

For a number of years, he was referred to as 'The artist formerly known as Prince' but did you know that he was also formerly known as a Jehovah's Witness? Not many people in the UK were aware that pop superstar Prince - who died this week - was a member of this church or that his music reflected his Christian faith.

The Vatican has suspended the audit of its finances by PricewaterhouseCoopers because it says that "certain aspects" of the auditing arrangements need to be analysed. Does this signal the end of the Pope's attempt to make Vatican finances more transparent? Edward Stourton talks to the Pope's biographer, Paul Vallely.

ISIS has stunned the world with its savagery but how can its rise be explained? In his new book - 'ISIS: A History' - Fawaz Gerges sheds new light on these questions. He talks to Edward Stourton.

Producers:
Helen Lee
Catherine Earlam

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b0783m47)
Renewable World

Levison Wood presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Renewable World
Registered Charity No 1119467
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Renewable World'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Renewable World'

Photo Credit: Tom McShane.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0783lb9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0783lbc)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0783m49)
From Grief to Glory - Shakespeare 400

'From Grief to Glory' - On the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, Sunday Worship visits Holy Trinity Church, Stratford upon Avon, where the playwright is buried. The Revd Patrick Taylor, Vicar of Holy Trinity, and the Revd Dr Paul Edmondson, Shakespeare scholar, lead a service which reflects on Shakespeare's profound sense of relationship with the divine, including a specially composed Sonnet set to music by Philip Stopford. With members of the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Choir of Holy Trinity Church and the Chamber Choir and Orchestra of the Swan directed by David Curtis and Benedict Wilson. Producer Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b077jqq3)
Reading Renaissance Art

Taking a tour of some recent blockbuster art exhibitions, Sarah Dunant reflects on the importance of context for us to properly appreciate art.

She argues that increasingly we're sold art as a list of superstars. "To grab the headlines, put big numbers through the turnstiles, means focusing on the stars" she writes.

But understanding the great Renaissance masterpieces demands an understanding of the intellectual climate that produced them.

A scantily clad Ursula Andress emerging from the sea holding a conch will not really help us understand Botticelli's Birth of Venus.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zr1zj)
Common Whitethroat

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the common whitethroat. Whitethroats are warblers which winter in the Sahel region south of the Sahara desert and spend spring and summer in Europe. When they arrive in April the males establish a territory by singing that scratchy song from hedgerow perches or by launching themselves into the air.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0783lbf)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0783m5m)
There is just no pleasing Lynda, and the Brookfield Archers raise a glass.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b0783m5p)
Maastricht Treaty

Former Ministers, backbench rebels and government advisors join Sue MacGregor to recall the dramas of the Maastricht Treaty negotiations.

The Maastricht Treaty is one of the most famous and controversial pieces of European legislation, forming the blueprint for economic and monetary union, and granting free movement to the citizens of the countries who signed it. But its path to signing was tortuous, causing deep divisions within the Conservative Party, turmoil on the economic markets, and friction between member states.

The summit at Maastricht was one of the first and most important tasks facing John Major when he took over the Premiership from Margaret Thatcher in 1990. Europe was already a highly divisive issue within the party, but Major was keen to be pragmatic, and less combative than his predecessor. But it cost him dear. Two-and-a-half years later he had twice considered resigning over the issue, faced severe rebellion from his own backbenches and crashed out of membership of the Exchange Rate Mechanism amid turmoil on the financial markets on Black Wednesday. But finally the legislation was signed.

Sue MacGregor is joined by two former Chancellors of the Exchequer - Lord, then Norman, Lamont who, after losing his job, became a fierce critic of Government policy, and Kenneth Clarke who replaced him. The guests also include the Government Whip responsible for Europe, David Davies, and Conservative backbencher Sir Bill Cash, a prominent Euro-rebel, as well as John Major's Private Secretary for Foreign Affairs and later the Official Historian on Britain's Relationship with Europe, Sir Stephen Wall.

Producer: Deborah Dudgeon
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0783lbh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b07756bj)
Series 16

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Elis James, Reginald D Hunter, Maeve Higgins and David O'Doherty are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as the 1970s, toys, the moon and electricity.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0783m9w)
Bristol: The Story of a City Through Its Food

What does Bristol have that other cities don't when it comes to food? It's gained something of a reputation for being a 'food hub' so what has it done to deserve that title? Sheila Dillon is no stranger to the city but is invited to delve a bit deeper with resident and Food Writer Genevieve Taylor to uncover some of its secrets.

From its history as a bustling port city bringing in sugar, chocolate and coffee and exotic fare to today's vast range of restaurants, cafes and start ups with a 'come one come all' atmosphere, residents and visitors are spoilt for choice. It's even been nicknamed 'bread city' for its range of quality bakeries which still can't meet the high demand. Food Critic Mark Taylor says its approach to collaboration, community and doing things its own way mirrors its music scene.
But beyond pleasure, taste and innovation, Bristol has researched carefully how its people eat and where its 1.5 million meals a day come from and set out a 'Good Food Plan'. Sheila meets the young people who've designed an interactive fridge to find out what people need from their city to eat better and joins the 91 Ways project (named after the 91 languages, including Bristolian, which are spoken in the city) to see how shared food leads to shared stories and understanding.

The forthcoming 'Bristol Food Connections' festival aims to capture the essence of inclusiveness and collaboration to reach across class and generations, Sheila and Genevieve ask how they plan to do this and mirror the 'come one, come all' its food venues claim.

Presented by Sheila Dillon with Genevieve Taylor
Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0783lbk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0783lbm)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Why I Changed My Mind (b078hlsz)
Series 2

Trevor Phillips

Trevor Phillips was for nine years head of the Commission for Racial Equality and then the Equality and Human Rights Commission. But he became deeply unpopular with some former colleagues and supporters after he revealed he had become convinced there were deep problems with the policy of multi-culturalism.

Dominic Lawson asks him why he altered his views and what he felt about the reaction it provoked. In an emotional interview they discuss child protection and the murder of Victoria Climbie, trans-racial adoption, the expression of prejudice, the use of racial epithets, Britishness and integration.

"Why I Changed My Mind" is a series in which Dominic explores how and why prominent individuals have modified their views on controversial topics.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b077jq34)
Bushey

Peter Gibbs hosts the horticultural panel programme from Bushey in Hertfordshire. Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Pippa Greenwood answer the questions from an audience of local gardeners.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0783n0z)
Sunday Omnibus - Nepal Earthquake

Fi Glover introduces two conversations about the reverberations of last April's earthquake in Nepal on some who experienced it, and one about failing to reach a fund-raising goal. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b07856ls)
Missing Presumed Dead: The Odyssey

Episode 1

In Simon Armitage's fresh version of Homer's Odyssey, a high ranking government minister with a colourful past is sent on a delicate diplomatic mission to Istanbul.

When his trip ends up in a horrific bar room brawl, social media explodes and the enigmatic darling of a political party becomes Europe's most wanted man overnight. Chased by the authorities, damned by religious leaders, pursued by those looking for vengeance and head-hunted by fanatics, his Odyssey begins.

Plunged into the ancient past Odysseus must now contend with all the unworldly beings and unnatural phenomena that stand in his way. In part one, The Lotus Flowers, Cyclops and Circe must all be overcome in the struggle for survival and the long voyage back to the present day. Here reality and mythology are blurred

At home, with her husband missing presumed dead, his wife Penelope and their young son are besieged by the press, ravenous for the full story.

Smith/Odysseus ...... Colin Tierney
Prime Minister/Cyclops ...... Simon Dutton
Anthea/Athene ...... Polly Frame
Penelope ...... Susie Trayling
Magnus ...... Lee Armstrong
McGill/Eurylochus ...... Roger Evans
Kite ...... David Hartley
Reynolds ...... Ranjit Krishnamma
Fenton/Perimedes ...... Chris Reilly
Soli/Polites ...... Sule Rimi
Circe/Briseis ...... Danusia Samal

Music composed by James Fortune.

Missing Presumed Dead was originally directed for the stage by Nick Bagnall and co-produced by The Liverpool Everyman and the English Touring Theatre.

Directed at BBC Salford by Susan Roberts.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2016.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07856lv)
Being a Man: David Szalay and Ted Hodgkinson

On Open Book - men and fiction: award winning writer David Szalay's new book, All That Man Is, is a collection of stories about men, young to old, all living away from home and struggling to make sense of their lives. He, and Ted Hodgkinson literature programmer at London's Southbank, talk to Mariella Frostrup about what it is to be a man in the the 21st century, and how that's currently being explored in fiction.
Dr Sarah Dillon examines the prose of that most masculine of novelists - the hard boiled detective fiction writer Raymond Chandler and, in our Reading Clinic, John Mullan offers advice to a listener who wants to read novels about 'doing the right thing'.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b07856lx)
Time, Memory and Remembrance

Roger McGough marks a series of poetic anniversaries with a programme on the theme of time, memory and remembrance. Shakespeare, of course, makes an appearance, as does Charlotte Bronte. It's also a century since the Easter Rising in Dublin inspired WB Yeats and others to put pen to paper. More reflections on time and memory come from poets including TS Eliot and Thomas Hardy. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 Held Hostage in Syria (b077kkgn)
Speaking together for the first time, four European hostages of so-called Islamic State talk to Lyse Doucet about their period of incarceration between March 2013 and June 2014. Aid worker Federico Motka, journalists Didier Francois and Daniel Rye, and blogger Pierre Torres were all held for between 10 and 14 months each.

Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0783kvs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0783lbp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0783lbr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0783lbt)
Vote Leave dismiss President's warning it could take a decade to agree a US trade deal.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07856lz)
Gerry Northam

In part of Shakespeare week, we hear about troupes of travelling actors that used to perform in saloons for gunslingers in the Wild West - and that Hollywood put a production of Hamlet into a film of the shootout at the OK Corral, with Victor Mature tackling the famous soliloquy... rather well. We also heard:two momentous encounters on the London tube;four people who survived being held captive by Islamic terrorists;two groundbreaking comedians, Lenny Bruce and Spike Milligan;
and the man who beat David Mitchell in a trial by pedantry.

Production team Kevin Mousley, Kay Bishton & Elodie Chatelain.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07858b7)
Pip has a lead from a friend on some young beef cattle but her parents warn her that the farmer in question is a bit of a shark. Rex is interested in looking at Pip's work with the plate meter. Rex is evasive when Pip asks him what happened to his own plans to graze some cows. Rex declares he will be going with Toby to get the geese this year, because he doesn't want a repeat of the over-buying disaster of last year. Pip's distracted by her phone - it might be Matthew. Rex is crestfallen.
Rob arrives home from hospital with Ursula, irritated by her fussing. Ursula collects Henry from Bridge Farm for a visit. Henry has made a card for Rob, and is glad to see his daddy. Rob declares they'll get to do fun things together now he is off work. Henry wonders when mummy's coming home. Ursula distracts Henry by suggesting they go and look for some spare pyjamas.
Henry isn't delivered back at the agreed time. Pat calls Ursula, who announces Henry will be staying at Blossom Hill Cottage. Now that his father is back home, there is no need for him to be at Bridge Farm any more, is there?


SUN 19:15 The Rest is History (b07858bs)
Series 2

Episode 4

Frank Skinner loves history, but just doesn't know much of it. So he's devised a comedy discussion show in order to find out more about it.

Along with his historian in residence, Professor Kate Williams, Frank is joined by Chris Addison and Alun Cochrane, who discuss the three wise men, Jack Straw (not that one), Henry Austen and a weaponry timeline.

Producers: Mark Augustyn and Justin Pollard

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2016.


SUN 19:45 Border Crossing (b0785gjw)
A Good Soldier & Handsome Daddy

A series of programmes that sets up a unique pairing between writers from countries challenged by refugee and migration issues with short story writers from Britain. Each foreign story was given to a British writer who wrote their own response, in an exchange of fiction that aims to explode myths, explore shared concerns and extend the boundaries of the short story.

In A Good Soldier by Maaza Mengiste, the brutality of the past pursues an Ethiopian father into exile and shockingly marks his relationship with his young son. The reader is Amir El Masry.

In Helen Dunmore's response, Handsome Daddy, an alert dinner lady notices worrying signs of abuse as a young boy lines up in the lunch queue. The reader is Sara Markland.

Maaza Mengiste is an Ethiopian-American novelist, essayist and photographer whose debut novel Beneath the Lion's Gaze was one of The Guardian's ten best contemporary African books. Helen Dunmore is a prize-winning British novelist, short-story writer and poet whose latest novel, Exposure, was published in January.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b077jqps)
Brexit Numbers

EU Treasury report

This week there was much debate over the Treasury report which modelled how leaving the EU would affect the economy. Tim Harford speaks to the Spectator's Fraser Nelson about how the document was presented to the public, and how it was reported. Chris Giles of the Financial Times explains that there are useful points to take from the Treasury's analysis.

Hinckley Point nuclear power station

What is the most expensive "object" ever built? The environmental charity Greenpeace has claimed it is set to be the most expensive object on Earth. But could it really cost more to build than the Great Pyramids? We take a look at some of the most costly building projects on the planet.

Chances of serving on a jury

A listener in Scotland is curious to know what the chances are of being selected for jury service. Several of his family members have received summons, but he has not. We look at who is eligible to serve, and what your odds are of receiving a summons.

European Girls Maths Olympiad

Last week we told the story of how the European Girls Maths Olympiad (EGMO) came into being. We followed the UK team on their recent journey to Romania to compete against 38 other teams from Europe and around the world.

Life expectancy of a Pope

In 2014 Pope Francis alluded to the fact he didn't expect to live more than another two or three years. A group of statisticians have taken a look at the life expectancy of popes over the centuries and decided that he may have been rather pessimistic.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b0770qy6)
Prince, Ray Fitzwalter, Victoria Wood, June Jolly, Phil Sayer

Matthew Bannister on

Rock superstar Prince - we recall his intimate gig for a handful of people here in Broadcasting House.

Ray Fitzwalter the Editor of ITV's World In Action who championed investigative journalism.

Victoria Wood - we have a tribute in song from the young comedian she inspired.

The nurse June Jolly who transformed the treatment of children in hospital - she once brought a baby elephant and a lion on to the ward to entertain her patients.

And - Mind The Gap - the voice of hundreds of station announcements Phil Sayer.


Interviewed guest: Fergus Dudley
Interviewed guest: Paul Gambaccini
Interviewed guest: Roger Corke
Interviewed guest: Vikki Stone
Interviewed guest: Margaretta Jolly
Interviewed guest: Sue Burr
Interviewed guest: Elinor Hamilton.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0770r1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0783m47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b077jb7j)
Selling Shakespeare

As part of the festivities for the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death, In Business asks how the Bard has had an impact on the corporate world. As well as being a profitable part of the British economy, particularly for the tourist sector in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare's plays have been exported to almost every country there is. In Neuss, Germany, a replica of the Globe has stood since 1991. In Bollywood, Shakespeare's stories have been retold since the dawn of Indian cinema, and become major money-spinners courtesy of movies such as Omkara (Othello) and Haider (Hamlet). In corporate America, his plays have been seized upon by executive training teams. And in China, Shakespeare's works are being marketed to a new generation of domestic consumers, eager for a taste of historical culture.
Author and critic Andrew Dickson goes on a globe-trotting journey to find out how the Bard is still very much in business - and discovers one of the most successful and flexible cultural brands there is. Produced by Nina Robinson.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0783lbw)
Diane Abbott and others join Carolyn Quinn to discuss Obama, foreign aid and other topics.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0770qv5)
Bastille Day, Flatpack Film Festival

Francine Stock visits the Flatpack Festival in Birmingham and tries out Blind Cinema, where she is blindfolded as a small child whispers in her ear, describing the action on the screen.

The director of the record-breaking Woman In Black, James Watkins explains why the release of his new film, Bastille Day, a violent thriller set in Paris, was delayed after the terrorist attacks in the French capital.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0783m43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 25 APRIL 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0783ldd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b077gt3g)
Happiness and government, Good parenting

Happiness - Should the government promote it? Danny Dorling, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford, talks to Laurie Taylor about the necessity to inspire a better politics with new measures of what matters most to us. These would include the avoidance of misery, the gaining of long term life satisfaction, the feeling of fulfilment, of worth, of kindness, of usefulness and love. Politicians, he contends, should promote a collective good which incorporates these priorities. They're joined by Paul Ormerod, economist and Visiting Professor at UCL Centre for Decision Making Uncertainty, who contends that policymakers should not claim that they can increase happiness through public policy decisions.

Also, do dominant ideals of 'good' parenting contain a class bias? Esther Dermott. Professor of Sociology, argues that the activities of the most educationally advantaged parents are accepted as the benchmark against whom others are assessed.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0783m41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0783ldg)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0783ldj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0783ldl)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0783ldn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0791qt7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Kirsty Thorpe, URC Minister.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0785mzp)
Flood Relief Delays in Cumbria, Mental Health, Food and Farming Awards

Flood relief delays in Cumbria, as farmers report problems applying for much needed grants. Isolation and mental health problems addressed by a rural charity in North Yorkshire. And the first of our reports into the Food and Farming Awards, the winners to be announced later this week.

Presented by Charlotte Smith

Produced by Alun Beach.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0783ldq)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp38)
Puffin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Puffin. Far better-known for its comical looks than its calls, the puffin is a bird that that is recognised by many and has earned the nickname "sea-parrot" or "clown of the sea".


MON 06:00 Today (b0785nl5)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0785nl7)
Anish Kapoor on Light and Dark

On Start the Week the sculptor Anish Kapoor talks to Andrew Marr about his fascination with voids and black holes, and his excitement at the latest technological advances in deepest black: vantablack. The astrophysicist Martin Ward explains his research into supermassive black holes and why we're finding more of them, while the solar physicist Lucie Green journeys to the centre of the sun where each photon takes hundreds of thousands of years to reach the surface, but just eight minutes to shine as light on the Earth. Writer Ann Wroe walks on the Downs to experience how light affects Nature, and she turns to the artists to meditate on the nature of light.
Producer: Katy Hickman

Picture credit: Anish Kapoor.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0785nl9)
Respectable

This Is My Truth

Journalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades.

"Changing class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other, where you have to rescind your old passport, learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if you are not to completely lose touch with the people and habits of your old life, even if they are the relationships and things that are dearest to your heart."

Class is a subject we're all aware of but rarely talk about - aside from the insidious line that 'we're all middle class now'. Hanley examines class aspiration and social mobility through the lens of her own life; providing a fascinating insight into what it took to leave her home in Chelmsley Wood, a vast council estate near Birmingham, and make her way against the odds through sixth form college, university and on into the world of professional journalism.

Received wisdom tells us social mobility is an unequivocally positive phenomenon, for individuals and for society. Yet changing class can be a lonely, anxious, psychologically disruptive process, which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get on.

Written and read by Lynsey Hanley

Abridged by Sian Preece.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0783lds)
Robin Wright, Chetna Makan

Jane speaks to Golden Globe winner and activist Robin Wright about her life, career and pyjama range which aims to change the lives of women in Congo that are victims of sexual violence.

Today is the first anniversary of the earthquake that devastated Nepal. Dr Kate Yarrow, Founder of charity, 'Doctors For Nepal', has worked in the country training doctors to work in rural areas. She was in Nepal two weeks before the earthquake and returned five months later to see for herself the impact it had on those who live there.

According to the 2013 National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles, the average number of sexual partners a person will have is 11.7 for men and 7.7 for women. But does your sex count matter at all? In a frank and honest conversation, Emma Barnett spoke to three other young women in their 20's & 30's about their experiences.

Women now account for more than half of UK undergraduates but the first university degree obtained by a woman in this country was awarded in 1880. Who were these pioneering women students and what was it like attending the first female colleges? Jane talks to recent graduate Ellie Cawthorne presenting, Scenes from Student Life, a R4 documentary, and to Annabel Valentine , college archivist at Royal Holloway.

Former Great British Bake Off contestant Chetna Makan is known for her unique bakes which incorporate Indian herbs and spices into traditional British recipes. She joins Jane in the studio to Cook the Perfect...Peach and Strawberry Swiss roll.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0785pdt)
A Girl Called Jack

Episode 1

Jack Monroe is an unusual food writer, gaining celebrity from her unique blog about existing on the breadline. During that time, she hit rock bottom but kept fighting to eat well and give her son proper food, rather than live on processed, cheap products. Now successful and no longer on the breadline, she continues to campaign passionately for decent food and standards of living.

This new drama, starring Jaime Winstone and June Whitfield, revisits her past and her relationship with her beloved Grandma.

Jack's blog started in 2012 after a Southend local councillor attacked single mothers. Jack lived in a small flat with her young son. Having been made redundant from a well-paid job, she found herself struggling to get by on benefits while applying unsuccessfully for jobs. Her blog documented the difficulties of living on welfare and, particularly, how to feed her son a nutritious and enjoyable diet on just £10 a week. It became a huge hit, Jack became a journalist, published food writer and social campaigner.

Sarah Daniels is an award winning radio writer. In 2014, she dramatised Nigel Slater's food memoir, Eating for England, for BBC Radio 4. She has drawn on Jack Monroe's written recipe books, blogs and direct conversations to reveal the personal story behind Jack's years of struggling and subsequent fame.

"Poverty isn't just having no heating, or not quite enough food, or unplugging your fridge and turning your hot water off. It's not a tourism trade, it's not cool, and it's not something that MPs on a salary of £65k a year plus expenses can understand, let alone our PM who states that we're all in this together.

Poverty is the sinking feeling when your small boy finishes his one weetabix and says 'more mummy, bread and jam please mummy' as you're wondering whether to take the TV or the guitar to the pawn shop first, and how to tell him that there is no bread or jam."
Jack Monroe, 30 July 2012 Hunger Hurts blog

Episode 1:
We find out why Grandma isn't talking to Jack and why soda bread is her favourite recipe.

Guitar playing by Dan Cocker
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Kenny
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 The Business of Music with Matt Everitt (b0785ppx)
The Stream Age

In the final part of this series, journalist and broadcaster Matt Everett asks what life is like for an artist making music in the streaming age. With so many ways to create, listen to and distribute music, why are artists doing so badly? We hear from Primal Scream's Bobby Gillespie, Radiohead's Ed O'Brien and The Kindness's Adam Bainbridge.

For those artists who have built a fan base, the live music industry can be healthy, but promoters and managers complain of a diminishing number of headline acts. Many of the UK's small music venues are under threat and, while the British music industry is worth £3.8bn, much of that money comes from artists stepping on to the stage. If the music industry is broken, who is going to save it?

Launched in Sweden in 2008, we talk to Spotify about how it managed to make piracy unfashionable but why it still faces accusations of ripping off artists. Faced with such criticism, we hear how they have paid out some $3bn of royalties. But how is that money shared out? Why do some artists receive small royalty cheques for songs that have been streamed thousands of times?

Last year, music sales in the UK rose for the first time in more than a decade, but how much of the growth can be attributed to Adele? We hear how CDs still make up half of the market and talk to Adele's label boss, Richard Russell from XL.

YouTube is now the world's most popular digital music service, used frequently by hundreds of millions. But the viability of free, on-demand streaming services is facing increasing scrutiny. We ask YouTube's Robert Kyncl why the UK labels make less money from his company than from vinyl sales.

Producer: Barney Rowntree
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b0785pts)
Series 6

Schrodinger's Birkenstock Interface Situation

Tempers are frayed as Lovely Sue and Mrs Birkett set up competing choirs for The West of Scotland community choir-off, and Sanjay and his mate Grebo make Mrs Begg an internet star.

More Scots-Asian corner shop shenanigans written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli.

The staff are back for their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of over 30 years and is a firmly entrenched, friendly presence in the local area. He is joined by his shop sidekick, Dave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business. Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not!

Ramesh ...... Sanjeev Kohli
Dave ...... Donald Mcleary
Sanjay ...... Omar Raza
Alok ...... Susheel Kumar
Lovely Sue ...... Julie Wilson Nimmo
Mrs Birkett ...... Stewart Cairns
Bishop Briggs ...... Michael Redmond
Mrs Begg ...... Marjory Hogarth
Grebo ...... Manjot Sumal
Terry Wogan ...... Lewis Macleod
Duncan Norvelle ...... Lewis Macleod

Producer: Gus Beattie

A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2016.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b0783ldv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b076c009)
25 April 1916 - Adam Wilson

On this day in 1916, German cruisers bombarded Lowestoft, damaging 200 homes, and an unexpected visitor shatters the peace at Halecot Farm.

Written by Lucy Catherine
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b0783ldx)
Degree fraud, Amazon grocery, Nuisance callers

The job applicants using fake degree certificates to mislead employers - we ask why the certificates are freely available online for just a few pounds.

The giant online retailer Amazon has started selling groceries in the UK. It's new competition for Britain's big four supermarkets, when they are already engaged in a tough battle for customers. We ask if Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons have anything to fear from Amazon.

Few things annoy You & Yours listeners as much as nuisance calls. We hear about a change in the law, which the government believes could really help to crackdown on unscrupulous companies who bombard people with calls.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Melanie Abbott.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0783ldz)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0785q28)
The High street retailer BHS has collapsed into administration, putting 11,000 jobs at risk and threatening the closure of up to 164 stores. We hear more.

Is the government planning a climb-down on its pledge to turn all English schools into academies?

And after reports of a nasty smell in Bristol parks, the joys of vinegar as a weed killer.


MON 13:45 Scenes from Student Life (b0785q2b)
Stuffed Crocodiles and the Chrysler Building

Royal Holloway College 1896 and 2016. What does the choice of interior design of a student bedroom there reveal about who the students are and how they behave? Or were supposed to behave?

Presenter Ellie Cawthorne examines a remarkable set of nineteenth century photographs of student study rooms with college archivist Annabel Valentine, and visits some of the students living in exactly the same study rooms in the 21st century.

She discovers how fears of female education and emancipation affected the design of student living quarters, and how students past and present transformed their private living quarters into public display spaces.

Hand made lightshades, Japanese fans, taxidermy, generic posters of Pulp Fiction and the New York Skyline, the student bedroom was - and still is - the canvas for generations of students to construct and communicate their new student identities.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
Series Producer: Nick Baker
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b07858b7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0785r0q)
The Sensitive

Heart of Darkness, Part 1

1/2. By Alastair Jessiman.

A religious retreat in the Scottish Highlands becomes the venue for the final investigation by the psychic Thomas Soutar. He travels north, accompanied by his girlfriend Kat, but they discover that the extreme views of their host have alienated many people in the community, and a quiet few days away become unexpectedly life-changing when Thomas feels the full force of local resentment and has a fateful reckoning with his psychic abilities.

Other parts played by the cast.

Producer/director: Bruce Young

BBC Scotland.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b0785r0s)
Semi-Final 4, 2016

(16/17)
The last of the 2016 Finalists will be decided this week as Russell Davies welcomes the last four semi-finalists of the tournament. They're from Stirling, Southampton, Tunbridge Wells and Sheffield.

Which Israeli political party has a name meaning 'consolidation'? In which year did divorce become legal in the Republic of Ireland? Which country's national flag includes a stylised representation of a yurt?

The semi-finalists will also be pooling their knowledge to tackle questions from a Brain of Britain listener, who'll win a prize if they can't answer them successfully.

Producer Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0783m9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics (b0785rmr)
Series 2

Plato

Join Natalie Haynes and guests for half an hour of comedy and the Classics from the BBC Radio Theatre in London.

Natalie is a reformed comedian who is a little bit obsessive about Ancient Greece and Rome.

Today she stands up in the name of one of the world's greatest thinkers, Plato, with the help of psychotherapist Philippa Perry and classicist Professor Edith Hall.

Plato wasn't perfect, even though he talks about perfection all the time. Turns out he was on the chunky side and had bad eyesight. On the other hand, he was very good at wrestling.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b0785rmt)
Series 9

Wayfinding

Aleks Krotoski compares our intuitive way-finding skills to those of the digital world and finds out why describing the best way from A to B still poses problems for tech.

Simon Wheatcroft is an adventurer who's run all over the world and at distances that would make marathon runners shudder, he's also blind, he explains how he combined the sensations he gets underfoot with notifications from his fitness app to learn to run solo.

Combining cues from the world around you to find your way is Tristan Gooley's passion. As the Natural Navigator he uses anything natural or man made not only to find out where he is but where he's going. He eschews all navigational tools; maps compasses as well as digital devices in the belief that the head down follow the dot mentality they foster impoverishes our experience of the journey itself.

Thora Tenbrink from Bangor University explains why the directions we receive from our devices often feel so alien that we really have to focus to make sense of them. While tech can use street names and exact distances, humans are vague navigators heading in the general direction and using landmarks. The two approaches aren't always that compatible.

Our natural way-finding abilities can let us down though when we're under stress. Professor David Canter has been studying behaviour in emergency evacuations for much of his career, he explains the sometimes odd and contradictory things we resort to when trying to escape a disaster. So should we look to technology to come to the rescue? We hear from researchers at Georgia tech who explored how far participants would trust a robot to save them from a burning building - apparently quite a lot!

Producer: Peter McManus.


MON 17:00 PM (b0783lf1)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0783lf3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b078xpfg)
Series 16

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Joe Lycett, Sam Simmons, Richard Osman and Aisling Bea are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as the jokes, ghosts, LEGO and reality TV.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith

A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0785sv4)
Tom and Johnny are sorting stock in the shop, working out what to do with the surplus while they are closed. Tom is snowed under, although Johnny is pitching in. Jazzer turns up asking for help, but after Jazzer's feud with Tom, Johnny refuses to get involved. Some pigs run amok in a polytunnel as Tom had left a gate open. Generous Johnny offers to tidy up - and there's still time to replant. Tom doesn't want Pat seeing any of this - she has enough to deal with. Jazzer tries again with Johnny, but Johnny refuses again.
Pat is distraught. Ursula collects Henry from school and reminds his teachers that no-one else can pick him up except her. She tells Rob to stop worrying - as far as Henry's concerned, his mother's just on a long holiday. Rob insists on speaking to Pat. He reminds her of his full parental rights: Henry will stay with him. Helen is no longer responsible for Henry after what she has done. "It's not her story anymore." Solicitor Dominic advises Pat they need to file an application to the family court. They might get a hearing in a couple of days, but there are no guarantees they will win. When Pat tells Ursula they're talking to a lawyer about Henry's custody she replies "we'll see you in court!".


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0783lf5)
Hugh Grant, Wellcome Prize winner, Lisa Jen, Pablo Bronstein

Kirsty Lang talks to Hugh Grant about his new film Florence Foster Jenkins based on the true story of an out of tune singer and philanthropist. Hugh plays her common law husband and manager and their extraordinary relationship.

We announce the winner of the Wellcome Prize for books that engage with medicine, health or illness.

Lisa Jen from the group 9Bach, who won Best Album at last year's Radio 2 Folk Awards, discusses their new album Anian, which is rooted in the Welsh song tradition

Pablo Bronstein is the artist chosen this year by Tate Britain, in London, to respond to its collection of art. Previous works have been by Mark Wallinger and Phyllida Barlow, and many will remember Martin Creed's athlete running through the galleries every 30 seconds. This year there's a return to that element of live performance as Bronstein has incorporated a continuous live dance performance in his work; Historical Dances in an Antique Setting. He explains why.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Elaine Lester.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0785pdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Are Human Rights Really Universal? (b0785sv6)
Episode 2

In the aftermath of the Second World War, the 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed a set of rights for all humankind, belonging to each of us, simply by virtue of being human. Universalism - that they belong to everyone, everywhere - is the key idea that grounds human rights, it gives them meaning, application and authority.

Talking to legal philosophers, historians, sceptics and advocates, Helena Kennedy QC explores the philosophical and historical foundations of human rights. Are they really universal - or is this just moral posturing on a grand scale, a legal fiction, a philosophical sleight of hand?

Human rights are routinely ignored by states around the world. They may aspire to be universal in their application but, instead, they are universally broken.

There are lots of claimed universalisms in the world - religions, political creeds, ideas of the common good - why should this one, the language of universal human rights, be adhered to above all others? What are universal human rights, really - are they a moral, legal or political idea? And where did they come from - were they created or discovered?

Going back to ideas of justice in the ancient world, Helena Kennedy explores the case for the defence - that human rights tap into the deeper threads that bind us, a universal humanity that finds its expression as political community through the idea of human rights and that, far from being a post-war Western construct, their roots are indeed universal, embedded across space and time.

Presenter: Helena Kennedy
Producer: Simon Hollis

A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b077j4z1)
'Islamic State's' Most Wanted

Chloe Hadjimatheou tells the astonishing story of a group of young men from Raqqa in Syria who chose to resist the so-called Islamic State, which occupied their city in 2014 and made it the capital of their "Caliphate". These extraordinary activists have risked everything to oppose IS; several have been killed, or had family members murdered. IS has put a bounty on the resistance leaders' heads. But the group continues its work, under the banner 'Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently'. Chloe meets the group's founders, some of whom are now organising activists in Raqqa from the relative safety of other countries.


MON 21:00 All in the Womb (b077gd58)
Can Post Traumatic Stress Disorder be passed from mother to child? Evidence is growing that the anxiety and mood disorders of PTSD can indeed be passed on from mothers to their offspring. In other words, the environment in which a child is raised - including the environment in the womb - can affect that child's stress response, hard-wiring it for life.

This idea challenges one of the cornerstones of biology - that inheritance is controlled solely by genes. Welcome to the field of "epigenetics" (meaning literally "beyond the genes"), the mechanism by which chemical switches control how the genes actually work, turning them on or off as appropriate and moderating how strongly they act.

Science writer Sue Armstrong explores the phenomenon as it relates to stress with researchers on the front line in Edinburgh and New York, and with the people who are the focus of their studies - survivors of the Holocaust and the collapse of the World Trade Center on 9/11 and their families. She asks what prospects our greater understanding of the physical impact of mental trauma holds for better treatment of PTSD, and whether there are lessons here for addressing the needs of people caught up in the traumatic events of today.

Producer: Ruth Evans
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0785nl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b0783lf7)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0783lf9)
Pension scheme at heart of BHS woes

Should owners be allowed to take out dividends if their company has a pensions deficit? Academy plan for schools in England - will the latest compromise satisfy the critics on the government's own side? Corruption, Brazilian style and how can public spaces be improved for people with autism?


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0788c8q)
10 Days

Episode 6

A gripping thriller by Orange Prize-shortlisted author Gillian Slovo. Ten unpredictable days of violence erupt from a stifling heat wave. And, as Westminster careers are being made or ruined, lives are at stake.

Ten Days is about what happens when politics, policing and the hard realities of living in London collide.

Episode 6:
On a dark and stormy night, matters come to a head when the police finally discover where their missing officer is hiding - just as Cathy Mason does the same.

Read by Jasmine Hyde and Ben Onwukwe
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b077ggvc)
Metaphors for the Past: From Dinosaurs to Victorian Values

Michael Rosen and Dr. Laura Wright talk to Dr Ross Wilson about how we talk about historical eras in order to define the way we live now, and how we've progressed. Ross Wilson is a historian at the University of Chichester who's written a book called The Language of the Past delving into the origins of terms about periods in history - Stone Age, mediaeval, Victorian Values - when we came up with them and why we use them. How historically accurate are they and does it matter?
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0785sv8)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster where the Health Secretary calls on juniors doctors not to strike and MPs question ministers as the retailer BHS goes into administration threatening 11,000 jobs.
The Government suffers more defeats over its housing plans in the House of Lords and the Education Secretary faces more pressure over her policy of forcing all schools in England to become academies.



TUESDAY 26 APRIL 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0783lgt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0785nl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0783lgw)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0783lgy)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0783lh0)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0783lh2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07877d2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Kirsty Thorpe, URC Minister.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07861qf)
Sexing chicks before they hatch, BBC Food & Farming Awards finalist McDonald's, Salmon conservation

Scientists at Dresden University in Germany are working on new technology to detect the sex of chicks before they hatch, to end the practice of culling.
BBC Food and Farming Awards finalist McDonald's has developed a new digital tool to help beef farmers work more sustainably.
A project, funded by Associated British Ports, plans to reintroduce salmon to a tributary of the River Ure in North Yorkshire.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp50)
Razorbill

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Razorbill. Smart as a dinner-jacketed waiter and with a deep blunt patterned bill, the razorbill is a striking bird - though its looks could be compensation for its voice.


TUE 06:00 Today (b07862q5)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Shakespeare and the American Dream (b078641s)
Shakespeare in Obama's America

Robert McCrum goes in search of Shakespeare in 21st century America, what does he mean to Americans today? He visits the US seat of power Washington DC to discover that Shakespeare's plays are used to discuss ideas of power and politics among Washington's elite. He meets Stephen Sondheim and talks to Alec Baldwin about the prevalence of Shakespeare in American popular culture

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 09:30 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v30zq)
Series 3

Psyche

Bettany Hughes examines her psyche in her archaeology of philosophy.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double espresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award--winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programme Bettany investigates her psyche and those of philosopher Angie Hobbs, Byzantinist
Dr Dionysios Stathakopoulos, writer and broadcaster Lisa Appignanesi and neuroscientist Patrick Haggard. Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Other ideas examined in series include idea, desire, agony, fame, justice, wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace, hospitality, charisma, irony, nemesis and virtue.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07865gz)
Respectable

Respectable in the Eighties

Journalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades.

"I can draw an outline of the landscape that shaped us with words such as Nice biscuits, pornography, underpasses, 2p bus fares."

Hanley's childhood spanned the 1980s; when she discovered early on the joys and consolations of music, and gained political awareness by observing the ways in which different newspapers covered the Miners' Strike.

She offers a fascinating insight into what it took to leave her home in Chelmsley Wood, a vast council estate near Birmingham, and make her way against the odds through sixth form college, university and on into the world of professional journalism.

Written and read by Lynsey Hanley.

Abridged by Sian Preece.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0783lh4)
Beyonce and the politics of Lemonade

The politics of Lemonade - Beyonce's new release. With Emma Dabiri and Sekai Makoni

Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock on her new book The Smell of Other People's Houses, set in 1970s Alaska.

Utopias have been mostly written about by men - but many women have also dreamed of better worlds and fought for change. Examining the works of Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Shulamith Firestone, writer Margaret Heffernan explores the utopias women have imagined.

The women of Rojava - an autonomous region along Syria's northern border, with a female army and where women hold key decision making posts. Journalist Rahila Gupta on this experiment in gender equality.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07865h1)
A Girl Called Jack

Episode 2

Jack Monroe is an unusual food writer, gaining celebrity from her unique blog about existing on the breadline. During that time, she hit rock bottom but kept fighting to eat well and give her son proper food, rather than live on processed, cheap products. Now successful and no longer on the breadline, she continues to campaign passionately for decent food and standards of living.

This new drama, starring Jaime Winstone and June Whitfield, revisits her past and her relationship with her beloved Grandma.

Jack's blog started in 2012 after a Southend local councillor attacked single mothers. Jack lived in a small flat with her young son. Having been made redundant from a well-paid job, she found herself struggling to get by on benefits while applying unsuccessfully for jobs. Her blog documented the difficulties of living on welfare and, particularly, how to feed her son a nutritious and enjoyable diet on just £10 a week. It became a huge hit, Jack became a journalist, published food writer and social campaigner.

Sarah Daniels is an award winning radio writer. In 2014, she dramatised Nigel Slater's food memoir, Eating for England, for BBC Radio 4. She has drawn on Jack Monroe's written recipe books, blogs and direct conversations to reveal the personal story behind Jack's years of struggling and subsequent fame.

"Poverty isn't just having no heating, or not quite enough food, or unplugging your fridge and turning your hot water off. It's not a tourism trade, it's not cool, and it's not something that MPs on a salary of £65k a year plus expenses can understand, let alone our PM who states that we're all in this together.

Poverty is the sinking feeling when your small boy finishes his one weetabix and says 'more mummy, bread and jam please mummy' as you're wondering whether to take the TV or the guitar to the pawn shop first, and how to tell him that there is no bread or jam."
Jack Monroe, 30 July 2012 Hunger Hurts blog

Episode 2:
Jack meets one of Southend's few on-off vegetarians, while her Grandma despairs of her granddaughter ever settling down.

Guitar playing by Dan Cocker
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Kenny
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 The Impostors' Survival Guide (b07865h3)
Oliver Burkeman explores why so many of us spend our working lives feeling like impostors on the brink of being found out. Where do these feelings come from and are we alone?

The impostor phenomena has been known about for decades and while its better known by the media label 'impostor syndrome' its not a mental health problem at all. Its more of a psychological state we all experience to a greater or lesser degree. When it bites people feel that they're a total fraud and at any moment they'll be exposed. This fear can stop them from taking satisfaction from their successes as they feel they'll only have further to fall.

Oliver talks to individuals who've reached the top of their field whether in the arts, business or medicine about how they all feel like impostors from time to time. He'll also examine the latest research that suggests its more prevalent than ever. What's changed about how we live and work today that leaves so many of us with these feelings. And what can be done about them? Is just admitting to one another that we all feel same way enough?

Producer: Peter McManus.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b07865h5)
Series 22

Mozart's Requiem

How Mozart's Requiem, written when he was dying, has touched and changed people's lives.

Crime writer Val McDermid recalls how this music helped her after the loss of her father. Hypnotist Athanasios Komianos recounts how the piece took him to the darker side of the spirit world. And a friend of ballet dancer Edward Stierle, Lissette Salgado-Lucas, explains how Eddie turned his struggle with HIV into a ballet inspired by Mozart's music.

Basement Jaxx used the Requiem in their live shows and on their album Scars - Felix Buxton reveals his love for Mozart and the divine nature of the Requiem.

And Mozart expert Cliff Eisen takes us inside the composer's world: how the orchestra and choir conjure visions of funerals, beauty, hellfire and the confusion of death. He recounts how Mozart was commissioned to write the piece by a nobleman who may have intended to pass off the work as his own. The stern challenge faced by people trying to complete the piece are described by composer Michael Finnissy, who himself wrote a completion of the work.

The Requiem was performed at the funerals of many heroic figures - Beethoven, Napoleon and J F Kennedy, among others. Gordana Blazinovic remembers one extraordinary performance during the horrors of the Bosnian war - a show of defiance and grief from the ruins of Sarajevo City Hall.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0783lh6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b076c036)
26 April 1916 - Emily Colville

On this day in 1916 the Conference of the Independent Labour Party resolved that 'socialists of all nations should refuse support to every war entered into by any government.' And in Ashburton, Emily is losing her resolve under Edwin's spell.

Written by Lucy Catherine
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b0783lh8)
Call You and Yours: The Junior Doctors' Strike

Today: we're asking if you've been affected by the junior doctors' strike - whether you're a patient or if you're striking yourself. Ring 03700 100 444 or email youandyours@bbc.co.uk and please leave us a phone number.
The first all-out doctors' strike in NHS history has begun in England.
At 8am this morning, thousands of junior doctors walked out - not just from routine appointments, but from emergency care.
They're protesting at the imposition of a new contract from the summer - and this is the first time A&E, maternity and intensive care have been hit.
Have you had a cancellation? Are you struggling to get emergency care? Or are you a medical professional on strike?
We want to hear from you.
The phone number to call is 03700 100 444. E-mail you and yours at BBC dot CO dot UK, text 84844, or tweet using the hashtag #youandyours.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0783lhb)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b07865h7)
Full coverage with Shaun Ley of the Hillsborough inquest conclusions that the 96 Liverpool football fans who died in a stadium crush were unlawfully killed.

Junior doctors in England have started another strike over pay and conditions, withdrawing from emergency work for the first time. There's no sign either the British Medical Association or the government will back down.

After Theresa May's warning about Albanians joining the EU, and Michael Gove's praise of life for Albania outside of it, its Prime Minister tells us what he thinks.


TUE 13:45 Scenes from Student Life (b07865h9)
The Curious Incident of the Brown Dog

The seemingly innocuous statue of a small dog, in Battersea Park in London, was the focus of some of the most vocal and violent anti-vivisection protests. Ellie Cawthorne explores the infamous Brown Dog Riots, when anti-vivisectionists fought students in a row over the methodology of training medical students.

On 10 December 1907, 1,000 medical students marched through London waving effigies of a brown dog, clashing with suffragettes, trade unionists and police. The protest was triggered by allegations that, in February 1903, William Bayliss of the Department of Physiology at University College London cruelly performed an allegedly illegal dissection, before an audience of 60 medical students, on an inadequately anaesthetised brown terrier dog.

This was just one of the series of infamous and influential Brown Dog riots which continued over seven years. They changed the shaped of scientific education and research, and transformed how medical students are trained.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
Series Producer: Nick Baker
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0785sv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b07865hc)
The Sensitive

Heart of Darkness, Part 2

2 / 2. By Alastair Jessiman.

During a visit to a religious retreat in the Highlands, psychic Thomas Soutar is seriously injured by a hit-and run driver. He's convinced that the hit-and-run was attempted murder but that it was his host, Rollo Caldwell, who was the real target. When Rollo later goes missing, Thomas fears the worst and starts enquiries into what will prove to be his final case.

Other parts played by the cast.

Producer/director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


TUE 15:00 The Design Dimension (b0787336)
Series 3

Panic Button

Tom Dyckhoff considers how we protect our personal space through design.

He asks whether increasingly sophisticated security makes us feel more fearful or more secure, looking at virtual systems which can let us see everything from who is at our front door using our smart phone to an alarm which alerts the police and neighbours to exactly what is happening if we are attacked. But at what cost?

Tom also looks at systems which monitor chronic illnesses, alerting health professionals if treatment is needed - and asks whether we really need the security of the Smart Home to keep us feeling safe when the mechanism of an 18th century lock invented by Joseph Bramah is still virtually unpickable.

Produced by Sara Parker
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b07875z3)
After Chernobyl

When radioactive particles from the Chernobyl disaster landed in Germany's Black Forest one woman decided to change her country's relationship with nuclear energy forever.

Julian Rush meets Ursula Sladek, founder of EWS Energy and prime mover in Germany's abandonment of nuclear energy.

Following the story from the first detection of radioactive particles, through the persistent impact of radioactive caesium in the soil to the rapid development of renewable energy after the Fukushima disaster of 2011, Julian tells the story of the transformation that's known in Germany as the Energiewende. With Ursula's son, Sebastian he discusses the future for renewable energy in a nuclear-free nation and considers the influence Germany may have on the rest of Europe.

Produced by Alasdair Cross and Melanie Brown.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b07875z5)
PR - How Not To Do It

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk PR with Public Relations practitioner Hamish Thompson. He's collated examples of the words and phrases used in PR that people find most annoying, and is on a mission to root them out. Epic..or epic fail?
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b07875z7)
Series 39

Sudha Bhuchar chooses the life of Zohra Sehgal

She was known as 'the grand old lady of Indian cinema' who starred in many Bollywood films famous in India, but not at first in Britain. We got to know her best in her later years when Zohra Sehgal starred in the TV series – 'The Jewel in The Crown' and films such as 'Bend it like Beckham'. When interviewed aged 101 and asked what she had enjoyed most in her life she said 'Sex, sex and more sex '.

Nominating this week's Great Life is actress and playwright Sudha Bhuchar who along with the expert witness, Film Historian Lalit Mohan Joshi, tell the presenter Matthew Parris, how Sehgal broke boundaries to become the first Indian actor to have an international career.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0783lhd)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0783lhg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Clare in the Community (b0650619)
Series 10

Party On

The Sparrowhawk team hold a leaving do, and take the opportunity to reminisce.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Clare continually struggles to control both her professional and private life In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden.

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Megan ...... Nina Conti
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Helen ...... Pippa Haywood
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Joan ...... Sarah Thom

Producer: Alexandra Smith.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07875z9)
Lilian has found Justin the perfect table for the Dower House dining room. He loves it. She has also added a bronze velvet chair of her own as a statement piece. Justin thinks Miranda will be impressed when she visits next week. Lilian shows Jennifer her interior design. She's worrying about that chair - what will Miranda think? Jennifer can see the real reason for her worrying: Lilian is making personal choices that usually a wife would make.
Adam shows Brian a new handling system for the incoming cattle. Jennifer says it will be nice to have cattle at Home Farm again. Jennifer claims she has seen fairies in a little elfin grotto in the Millennium Wood! Brian thinks she has been on the magic mushrooms. Jennifer fills Brian and Adam in on the situation with Henry which they all lament.
Anna interviews Helen to prepare a defence statement. Helen is fixating on Henry, insisting he is not safe with Rob. Helen can only recall hazy details of the night of the incident, but she needs to decide how to plead. She is facing two separate charges: one of attempted murder, and one of wounding with intent. She panics when Anna suggests that even if she's found guilty of the lesser charge, she would face four to six years in prison, of which she would serve half. Anna says if Rob was violent and Helen acted in self-defence, she must not plead guilty to either charge. Helen feels like whatever she does, she could end up in prison.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0783lhj)
Alain de Botton, Son of Saul, Josie Rourke and Nick Payne, Jazz biopics

Alain de Botton discusses his first novel in twenty years. The Course of Love centres on the story of a couple called Rabih and Kirsten who meet, fall in love, and get married. The philosopher, author and presenter tells John why he wanted to explore the later chapters of a relationship, and why he has taken such a long break from fiction.

The Hungarian feature film Son of Saul closely follows one inmate of the Auschwitz concentration camp who is a member of the Sonderkommando, responsible for disposing of the bodies of the victims murdered in the gas chambers. Jason Solomons reviews the film that won the Oscar and the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film this year, as well as the Grand Prix at Cannes.

Playwright Nick Payne and director Josie Rourke discuss the inspiration behind Elegy, a new play set in a world where medical advances mean that life can be extended at the expense of our memories.

With Miles Ahead, starring Don Cheadle as jazz master Miles Davies, currently in our cinemas, and film depictions of Nina Simone and Chet Baker on the way; the music journalist and self-professed jazzhead, Kevin Le Gendre explores the challenges of the jazz movie.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Ella-mai Robey

Main image: Alain de Botton Image credit: Vincent Starr.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07865h1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Force of Google (b07875zc)
Google dominates internet searching across most parts of the globe. The algorithm which produces its search results is highly secret and always changing, but is crucial in influencing the information we all obtain, the viewpoints we read, the people we find out about, and the products we buy.

It dominates the market because it's so effective. Rivals find it difficult to compete. But however good the algorithm, however carefully crafted to give us what Google thinks we actually want, is it really healthy for one search engine, and one company, to have so much impact?

Rory Cellan-Jones explores Google's uniquely powerful role at the centre of today's information society.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0783lhl)
150 years of New College Worcester, Guide dogs and Uber

We visit New College Worcester as it marks 150 years of educating blind teenagers. The secondary school has been through many changes, going from a single-sex school, to being co-educational. We speak to teachers and pupils about the school's ethos and curriculum. We also hear from Jade Sharp, who complained to Transport For London when a number of Uber drivers refused to take her and her guide dog. Five of them have been successfully prosecuted and fined.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b078774b)
All in the Mind Awards Finalists - Common Wheel, Psychology Replication Crisis, Gender Stereotyping in Babies.

In the first of a new series Claudia Hammond meets the finalists for the All in the Mind Awards. Claudia meets group finalists The Common Wheel in Glasgow and discovers why bicycle maintenance helps mental health.

Plus, the so-called replication crisis that's plaguing psychology at the moment - why is it proving so difficult to repeat some long-established experiments and to get the same results? First the crisis happened with something called priming, and now 23 labs around the world led by Professor Martin Hagger have tried to replicate an effect involving willpower first described by Professor Roy Baumeister.

How early does gender stereotyping begin? New research from David Reby at Sussex University shows it may start as early as three months.


TUE 21:30 Shakespeare and the American Dream (b078641s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0783lhn)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0783lhq)
Hillsborough families' 'fight for justice vindicated'

As families of the 96 people who died in the Hillsborough disaster react to the inquest's conclusion of unlawful killing, we speak to survivor John Davies and we ask if such a failure of policing could happen again? Also on the programme Lord Dubs on his efforts to get European child migrants rescued, and have we reached 'Peak Apple'?
Photo: Memorial wreath for the Hillsborough victims (Photo by Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images).


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0787338)
10 Days

Episode 7

A gripping thriller by Orange Prize-shortlisted author Gillian Slovo. Ten unpredictable days of violence erupt from a stifling heat wave. And, as Westminster careers are being made or ruined, lives are at stake.

Ten Days is about what happens when politics, policing and the hard realities of living in London collide.

Read by Jasmine Hyde and Ben Onwukwe
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Radio 4 at the Machynlleth Comedy Festival with Elis James (b078774d)
As the seventh Machynlleth Comedy Festival approaches, comedian Elis James takes a look back at the first six years and asks what makes the intimate festival in the ancient capital of Wales such a special event in the comedy calendar.

With interviews and stand-up from Josh Widdicombe, Tim Key, Josie Long, Rhod Gilbert, Nick Helm, Isy Suttie, Pappy's, Nish Kumar, David Elms, Stuart Laws and Henry Widdicombe.

A Little Wander production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b078733b)
Labour attack plans to put fire services under the control of police and crime commissioners, but the government insists services won't suffer. The Lords challenge the government again over allowing unaccompanied refugee children into the UK. And there's a call to make our cities quieter.



WEDNESDAY 27 APRIL 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0783lk4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07865gz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0783lk6)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0783lk8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0783lkb)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0783lkd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b078dc11)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Kirsty Thorpe, URC Minister.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07877j4)
Report on agricultural air pollution, Pero the sheepdog, BBC Food and Farming Awards finalist Our Cow Molly, Hops as garnish

The agriculture sector must step up action to reduce its contribution to air pollution, says an EFRA Committee report released today on air quality.
Pero the sheepdog from Aberystwyth in Wales managed to find his way home - 240 miles- after being placed with a farmer in Cumbria, to work on their farm.
A waste product from hop farming could become an unexpected money maker for a craft brewery in Norfolk
Sheffield's last remaining dairy, called Our Cow Molly, is a finalist in the BBC Food and Farming Awards 'future foods' category.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyzk)
Guillemot

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Guillemot. Guillemots breed on cliff ledges and the chick is encouraged to make its first flight at the pointing of fledging by being encouraged to jump by its mother or father calling from the sea below.


WED 06:00 Today (b078781j)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b0787c25)
Chris Rea, Rosa Hoskins, Chris Dobrowolski, Graham Satchwell

Libby Purves meets singer and songwriter Chris Rea; artist Chris Dobrowolski; former railway detective Graham Satchwell and actor Rosa Hoskins, daughter of Bob.

Chris Dobrowolski is an artist and sculptor who spent three and a half months in Antarctica as artist in residence for the British Antarctic Survey. Chris lived and worked alongside scientists, medical professionals, researchers and crew members. Armed with boxes of Antarctic-themed toy figures, including plastic penguins, he set out across the polar ice to capture the essence of this southern wilderness. In his show Antarctica, he tells of his adventures. Antarctica is on tour.

Chris Rea is a singer and songwriter and blues guitarist. Born in Middlesborough to an Anglo-Italian family who ran an ice-cream business, he didn't take up the guitar until he was 21. His hits include Fool If You Think It's Over, The Road To Hell and Josephine. He has released a new edition of La Passione, a film and soundtrack based loosely on his dreams as a young boy growing up in the industrial North East and his love of Formula 1. La Passione - Artist's Edition box-set is released on Jazzee Blue.

Actor and writer Rosa Hoskins is the daughter of the actor Bob Hoskins, star of The Long Good Friday and Mona Lisa. In her memoir, It's All Going' Wonderfully Well, she recalls some of the life lessons her father taught her such as laugh, be yourself, get angry and love with all your heart. It's All Going Wonderfully Well - Growing Up with Bob Hoskins is published by Hutchinson.

Graham Satchwell is a former detective superintendent with the British Transport Police. In his memoir, An Inspector Recalls, he writes about his early days in the police force in the Sixties and Seventies and some of the prevailing attitudes he brushed up against. He describes investigating the Southall Rail crash in 1997 and a highly charged encounter with John McVicar, one time convicted armed robber. An Inspector Recalls - Memoirs of a Railway Detective is published by The History Press.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0787c27)
Respectable

Respectable in the Nineties

Journalist Lynsey Hanley's personal exploration of the experience of class in Britain over the past four decades.

Growing up in Chelmsley Wood, a vast council estate near Birmingham, she found school to be a mostly disappointing experience. Instead, she found solace in the local library and gained knowledge through the pages of music magazines and broadsheet newspapers.

"Getting hold of the NME for the first time was one of the best investments in my future cultural capital I could have made: another of those threads I'd grabbed unwittingly, making a connection between the world I lived in and another world of which I was barely aware."

Hanley struggled with the move from comprehensive school to a well-regarded suburban sixth-form college and had to fight the urge to drop out. Received wisdom tells us social mobility is an unequivocally positive phenomenon, for individuals and for society. Yet changing class can be a lonely, anxious, psychologically disruptive process, which leaves people divided between the place they left and the place they have to inhabit in order to get on.

Written and read by Lynsey Hanley.

Abridged by Sian Preece.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0783lkg)
Coercive control, Wiki-food, Antonia Hayes

Research shows the vast majority of men who abuse their partners stop their physical and sexual violence if they attend a domestic violence perpetrator programme. But if you want help how can you access these courses and can they be as effective with coercive controlling behaviour? Professor Liz Kelly from London Metropolitan University and Liz Ostrowski from the Domestic Violence Intervention Project discuss.

There's a conference next week to try to encourage young women to pursue a career in football. Jane is joined by Roisin Wood, the Director of 'Kick It Out' who have organised the event.

Polly Russell, curator at the British Library, and Carolin Young from the Oxford Food Symposium on their project to encourage people to add new pages to Wikipedia to explain and document the role of women within the history of food.

Australian writer Antonia Hayes on her debut novel, Relativity. The book starts with a tiny baby being rushed to hospital after being injured from an abusive head trauma, and is based on the experience of Antonia and her son.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b0787c29)
A Girl Called Jack

Episode 3

Jack Monroe is an unusual food writer, gaining celebrity from her unique blog about existing on the breadline. During that time, she hit rock bottom but kept fighting to eat well and give her son proper food, rather than live on processed, cheap products. Now successful and no longer on the breadline, she continues to campaign passionately for decent food and standards of living.

This new drama, starring Jaime Winstone and June Whitfield, revisits her past and her relationship with her beloved Grandma.

Jack's blog started in 2012 after a Southend local councillor attacked single mothers. Jack lived in a small flat with her young son. Having been made redundant from a well-paid job, she found herself struggling to get by on benefits while applying unsuccessfully for jobs. Her blog documented the difficulties of living on welfare and, particularly, how to feed her son a nutritious and enjoyable diet on just £10 a week. It became a huge hit, Jack became a journalist, published food writer and social campaigner.

Sarah Daniels is an award winning radio writer. In 2014, she dramatised Nigel Slater's food memoir, Eating for England, for BBC Radio 4. She has drawn on Jack Monroe's written recipe books, blogs and direct conversations to reveal the personal story behind Jack's years of struggling and subsequent fame.

"Poverty isn't just having no heating, or not quite enough food, or unplugging your fridge and turning your hot water off. It's not a tourism trade, it's not cool, and it's not something that MPs on a salary of £65k a year plus expenses can understand, let alone our PM who states that we're all in this together.

Poverty is the sinking feeling when your small boy finishes his one weetabix and says 'more mummy, bread and jam please mummy' as you're wondering whether to take the TV or the guitar to the pawn shop first, and how to tell him that there is no bread or jam."
Jack Monroe, 30 July 2012 Hunger Hurts blog

Episode 3:
Jack's first blog about life on the breadline goes viral.

Guitar playing by Dan Cocker
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Kenny
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b0787djp)
Ray and Paul - Chrysanthemums and Pumpkins

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about growing prize flowers and vegetables, and the lengths to which some gardeners go to ensure the prize is theirs. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


WED 11:00 Are Human Rights Really Universal? (b0785sv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Chain Reaction (b03s71cz)
Series 9

Graham Linehan talks to Adam Buxton

The final episode in this series sees Father Ted and IT crowd writer Graham Linehan talking to comedian, actor and one half of Adam and Joe, Adam Buxton.

Chain Reaction is the long running host-less chat show where last week's interviewee becomes this week's interviewer.

Producer: Carl Cooper

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2013.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b0783lkj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b076c07v)
27 April 1916 - Johnnie Marshall

On this day in 1916, Irish rebels stormed the town of Enniscorthy, and in Buckfast, Johnnie is a man on a mission.

Written by Lucy Catherine
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b0783lkl)
McKenzie friends, The sugar tax, Online banking

The Bar Council, The Law Society and groups representing lawyers would like to see McKenzie who charge fees regulated and even banned from helping people who defend themselves in court. Is this a case of protectionism or upholding standards in the British legal system?

Tenant farmers who rent their land from local councils face losing out as councils plan to sell off many sites in order to raise funds. We hear from farmers who say it would end their livelihoods.

And the bank that says branches are a thing of the past and that customers are better served via smartphone apps.

Producer: Rajeev Gupta
Presenter: Shari Vahl.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0783lkn)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0787djr)
Analysis of news and current affairs with Shaun Ley.


WED 13:45 Scenes from Student Life (b0787djt)
A Letter from the Trenches

Ellie Cawthorne looks at student life during wartime. The experience of students as soldiers, and soldiers as students, transformed individuals and institutions.

Herbert Eckersley, a Manchester history undergraduate, writes a letter to his professor from the trenches. He was killed in action near Ypres in November 1917 and the last letter he wrote to Professor Tout just 15 days before he died expresses the hope that he will soon be back in Manchester and working on his thesis. An irony - this history student died making history.

Professor Trout was especially close to his students. We have unrivalled access to this rare archive of letters to him from the front lines, from male and female students serving in the forces and support services in World War I. It gives an insight into the impact of war on students, the aspirations of individuals, and the bonds within their communities in the institutions they were part of.

Remarkably, the letters escaped the censor's pen, so reveal details of World War I scrubbed out from much other correspondence.

Learning from its mistakes, and the disproportionate loss of life and scientific and academic talent in WW1, the government had a more strategic approach to the use of students and university premises in the Second World War. A veteran shares his memories of the post-war university boom, and historian William Whyte explains how higher education was part of a post-war Allied plan for the 'deNazifacation ' of education.

A new breed of universities began to emerge, designed to prevent a World War III.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
Series Producer: Nick Baker
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b07875z9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0787dm6)
All Mouth and Trousers

Between 1966 and 1971, TV's first ecclesiastical comedy, All Gas and Gaiters was regularly enjoyed by over 10 million viewers. The series starred veteran farce actor Robertson Hare as the sherry-tippling Archdeacon, William Mervyn as the bombastic Bishop wedded to his comforts, Derek Nimmo in the role that made him a star as the Bishop's twittish Chaplain Noote, and John Barron as the stern, rule-bound Dean.

Mark Burgess's comedy features Pauline Devaney (78) and Edwin Apps (84) playing themselves. They recall being asked to submit a script to BBC TV's Comedy Playhouse slot by their friend, fledgling TV director Stuart Allen, and their subsequent struggle to create the fictional world of St. Ogg's Cathedral Close and its eccentric inhabitants. The pilot episode of what was to become All Gas and Gaiters was titled The Bishop Rides Again.

Not least of Pauline's problems was her concern that the almost exclusively male-dominated world of BBC Television in the 1960s would not take the comedic writing talents of a young woman seriously. For this reason (and the fact that both she and Edwin wished to keep acting careers and writing work separate), The Bishop Rides Again was submitted to the BBC under the pseudonym, John Wraith.

Frank Muir - then Head of Comedy - knew Wraith's true identity, but the eventual revelation of Pauline's significant contribution to the creative process was greeted with surprised amazement by BBC Light Entertainment executives and cast members alike.

Written by Mark Burgess
Director: David Blount

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2016.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b0787dm8)
Money Box Live: The future of free financial guidance

What is the future for free money guidance with the big shake-up of how it will be delivered? Paul Lewis and guests explore what type of guidance or paid for advice people most need. Who do you turn to when you want help on money matters? Do you prefer face-to-face, phone or on-line guidance? Would you be prepared to pay for regulated advice for more complex decisions?

The much criticised Money Advice Service is going to be replaced by a leaner money guidance body by April 2018. At the same time, the two free Government pension advice services are going to be rolled into one. The Government wants to make it easier for people to access free money guidance and is concerned that many of us struggle to understand our finances, leading to real problems.

Money Box hears from a housing association project in Manchester about exactly the sort of help people want on money matters.

Share your ideas and questions with Paul Lewis and guests. Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply.

Joining Paul will be:

Caroline Rookes, chief executive, Money Advice Service
Nick Bamford, chartered financial planner, Informed Choice
Tom McPhail, Head of Retirement Policy, Hargreaves Lansdown
and Jane Tully, Head of Insight and Engagement Money Advice Trust.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b078774b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0787dmb)
The Flaneur - Walking in the City

Walking in the city: The flaneur and flaneuse. Laurie Taylor presents a themed programme which explores the history and meaning of the urban stroller, past and present.
Keith Tester, Adjunct Professor at the Thesis Eleven Centre for Cultural Sociology, LaTrobe University, Melbourne, charts the origins of the 'Flaneur'; the "man of the crowd" of Edgar Allan Poe and Charles Baudelaire, and one of the heroes of Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project.
Matthew Beamont, co-director of University College London's Urban Lab, contends that the city idler isn't simply a by product of modernism, illuminating London's past via the nocturnal wanderings of poets, novelists and thinkers.
And Lauren Elkin, lecturer in the department of English and Comparative Literature at the American University of Paris, counters the implicit assumption that the city belongs to a figure of masculine privilege and leisure. She introduces us to the transgressive 'flaneuse' who claims the right to city space.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0783lkq)
The reporting of Hillsborough, 'Constructive' journalism, BBC Chinese service move

The jury at the new inquests into the deaths of fans at Hillsborough has this week concluded that they played no part in the tragedy. The press coverage following the event in 1989 included damning headlines about fans' behaviour, including that they'd stolen from the dead and urinated on police. Bob Westerdale, now sports editor at the Star Newspaper in Sheffield, was working as a crime reporter on the newspaper at the time and went down to the Hillsborough stadium on that tragic day. He talks to Steve Hewlett about his coverage of the story, and how the versions of the 'truth' unravelled.

Veteran journalist and TV news anchor Sir Martyn Lewis is helping spearhead a UN backed campaign encouraging journalists to take a more 'constructive' approach to news stories. Linked to reports that indicate negative news stories can affect the psyche, the move is aimed at tackling a perceived apathy and feelings of disempowerment amongst news audiences. He joins Steve Hewlett and journalist Joan Smith to discuss whether it's the really the role of journalists to balance reporting positive and negative coverage of stories.

The BBC World Service has announced it will be moving the bulk of its London based Chinese Service to Hong Kong. The move is aimed at improving the reach and impact of the BBC in China. However, there's concern that the move risks putting the BBC's integrity and journalists safety at risk, as well as diminishing UK soft power abroad. BBC Chinese service journalist and NUJ representative Howard Zhang discusses with Liliane Landor, Controller, Languages, BBC World Service.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b0783lks)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0783lkv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Welcome to Our Village, Please Invade Carefully (b04n6010)
Series 2

Ctrl-Alt-Del

The Computer catches a virus - in fact, it's probably the most common virus on Earth. With Uljabaan's sole method of control, analysis and communication now compromised, the invasion is doomed in more ways than one.

Series two of Eddie Robson's sitcom about an alien race that have noticed that those all-at-once invasions of Earth never work out that well. So they've locked the small Buckinghamshire village of Cresdon Green behind an impenetrable force field in order to study human behaviour and decide if Earth is worth invading.

The only inhabitant who seems to be bothered by their new alien overlord is Katrina Lyons, who was only home for the weekend to borrow the money for a deposit for a flat when the force field went up.

So along with Lucy Alexander (the only teenager in the village, willing to rebel against whatever you've got) she forms The Resistance - slightly to the annoyance of her parents Margaret and Richard who wish she wouldn't make so much of a fuss, and much to the annoyance of Field Commander Uljabaan who, alongside his unintelligible minions and The Computer (his hyperintelligent supercomputer), is trying to actually run the invasion.

Katrina Lyons ...... Hattie Morahan
Richard Lyons ...... Peter Davison
Margaret Lyons ...... Jan Francis
Lucy Alexander ...... Hannah Murray
Field Commander Uljabaan ...... Charles Edwards
The Computer ...... John-Luke Roberts
The Virus ...... Cerrie Burnell

Script-edited by Arthur Mathews
Producer: Ed Morrish.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0787dmd)
Johnny has rearranged his days at college to replant lettuces for Tom, after the pigs ran amok. Tony tells them that he and Pat are heading to Felpersham for the family court hearing. Fingers crossed. Johnny tells Tom about Jazzer begging for his job back and giving a sob story - Tom doesn't care. Johnny makes good progress with the replanting and grateful Tom says he's doing a great job.

In the waiting room at court, Ursula gens up on the process with solicitor Stephen. Rob is too ill to attend. Stephen rates Helen's barrister Anna Tregorran. Ursula says she will not sit and listen to a pack of lies, but Stephen advises her to stay quiet. Anna opens the proceedings. Afterwards, Stephen presents the counter-case in favour of Rob and Ursula, pointing out the serious nature of Rob's injuries. Ultimately, Rob has parental responsibility, as opposed to Pat and Tony who do not.

As Tom throws away out of date yoghurt and cream from the shop, Pat and Tony return from the hearing. Pat breaks the terrible news that Henry has to stay with Rob. Bridge Farm can have Henry one day a week. It is a temporary measure however, pending a review of the evidence. Tom says Helen will be devastated.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0783lkx)
Hugh Bonneville on Ibsen, Captain America directors, Juliet Stevenson

As Hugh Bonneville returns to the stage after twelve years in Chichester Festival Theatre's new production of An Enemy of the People by Ibsen, Samira Ahmed talks to Hugh and director Howard Davies.

Brothers Anthony and Joe Russo on directing the acclaimed Marvel superhero film Captain America: Civil War.

As part of our Shakespeare's People series, Juliet Stevenson chooses Rosalind from As You Like It.

Alan Kitching has been at the forefront of typographical design for nearly six decades. With the publication of A Life in Letterpress and a retrospective at Somerset House, Alan shows Samira round his workshop.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0787c29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b0787dyz)
Ageing

Should we retire the concept of 'ageing'?

The first episode of the new series of FutureProofing explores the technology and demography which herald a revolution in our ideas about ageing, and a fundamental shift in the expectations we all have for the course our lives might take.

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson travel to California to meet the scientists at the cutting edge of the quest to stop age-related illness and decline. And they explore the ideas that will have to change if we all live to 150 and beyond.

Even conservative estimates now place human lifespan for new-borns today in a developed country at more than 100. FutureProofing examines the fundamental changes to our expectations, hopes and dreams which ensue from the scientific work taking place now to postpone, or even end, ageing.

FutureProofing is a six part series which explores the ideas that will shape our future. Episodes in the second series for April-June 2016 include programmes on the future of Ageing, Crime, Energy, Memory, Language and War.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


WED 20:45 Why I Changed My Mind (b078hlsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:30 on Sunday]


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b07875z3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b0787c25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0783lkz)
Trump Foreign Policy Speech

Republican front-runner outlines his global ambitions
Liverpool remembers the Hillsborough 96.
Papua New Guinea to close Australian detention centre for asylum seekers.

(picture: Donald Trump).


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0787j2d)
10 Days

Episode 8

A gripping thriller by Orange Prize-shortlisted author Gillian Slovo. Ten unpredictable days of violence erupt from a stifling heat wave. And, as Westminster careers are being made or ruined, lives are at stake.

Ten Days is about what happens when politics, policing and the hard realities of living in London collide.

Read by Jasmine Hyde and Ben Onwukwe
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Nurse (b0787j2g)
Series 2

Episode 4

A bittersweet comedy drama about a community mental health nurse created by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings.

Liz (played by Esther Coles), the community psychiatric nurse of the title makes her rounds to visit "service users" in their homes. Most of those patients are played by comedy chameleon Paul Whitehouse himself – with supporting roles for Rosie Cavaliero, Vilma Hollingbery and Cecilia Noble.

Whitehouse brings us an obese bed-bound mummy's boy, an agoraphobic ex-con, a manic ex-glam rock star, ageing rake Herbert who hoards his house with possessions and memories, a Jewish chatterbox in unrequited love with his Jamaican neighbour, and a long-suffering carer and his Alzheimer's-afflicted mother.

There are new characters too in the guise of a self-proclaimed DJ and a Geordie struggling with his wife's job in the world's oldest profession.

We follow their humorous, sometimes sad and occasionally moving interactions with Liz, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense medication and offer support.

Nurse gives a sympathetic insight into the world of some of society's more marginalised people in a heartfelt and considered way.

Written by David Cummings and Paul Whitehouse, with additional material by Esther Coles.

Paul Whitehouse
Esther Coles
Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Rosie Cavaliero
Sue Elliott-Nichols
Charlie Higson
Vilma Hollingbery
Jason Maza
Cecilia Noble

A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2016.


WED 23:15 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b03szv8f)
Series 2

Music

Comedian Tim Key explores the concept of music with a poem about an ambitious songbird called Patrick.

Tom Basden attempts to accompany the poet, but Tim threatens to hire a proper musician.

Written and presented by Tim Key

With Tom Basden, Katy Wix and Diane Morgan

Producer: James Robinson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0787j30)
The Hillsborough inquest verdicts dominate discussion - as Sean Curran reports from Westminster. Also in the programme: passionate pleas to David Cameron to think again on refugee children, the latest on the anti-semitism row, concessions on the Trade Union Bill in the Commons, more defeats on the Housing and Planning Bill in the Lords. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



THURSDAY 28 APRIL 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0783lmh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0787c27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0783lmk)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0783lmm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0783lmp)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0783lmr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b078d479)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Kirsty Thorpe, URC Minister.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b0791ppt)
Transatlantic Trade Deal Concerns

The environmental campaign group Friends of the Earth is warning that a transatlantic trade deal currently being negotiated between the US and the EU would be disastrous for UK farmers. The charity says the United States has the benefit of large-scale, intensive farms with lower standards, which means our markets could be flooded with cheaper food including beef and chicken. But Acting Deputy Secretary of the US Department of Agriculture, Michael Scuse, says farmers on both sides of the Atlantic will benefit.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyh9)
Shag

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Shag. Perhaps the least vocal of all British birds they hiss and belch to warn off interlopers getting too close to their nest. They are seabirds and their name comes from the shaggy crest on the top of their head.


THU 06:00 Today (b078d47c)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07881kn)
Euclid's Elements

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Euclid's Elements, a mathematical text book attributed to Euclid and in use from its appearance in Alexandria, Egypt around 300 BC until modern times, dealing with geometry and number theory. It has been described as the most influential text book ever written. Einstein had a copy as a child, which he treasured, later saying "If Euclid failed to kindle your youthful enthusiasm, then you were not born to be a scientific thinker."

With

Marcus du Sautoy
Professor of Mathematics and Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford

Serafina Cuomo
Reader in Roman History at Birkbeck University of London

And

June Barrow-Green
Professor of the History of Mathematics at the Open University

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07881kq)
Respectable

Snakes and Ladders

Lynsey Hanley explores the experience of class and social mobility in Britain over the past four decades. She provides a personal insight into the psychological cost of leaving her working-class upbringing behind to pursue further education; moving from her home in Chelmsley Wood, a vast council estate near Birmingham, to sixth-form college, to university and on to a career in journalism.

In this episode, Hanley looks at the process of applying for university - and of how many students make educational decisions based on their backgrounds: 'old' universities for the middle-class, 'new' for the working-class, limiting potential advantages for the latter.

Written and read by Lynsey Hanley.

Abridged by Sian Preece.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0783lmt)
Surrogacy, 1920s BBC, Dementia care, Abergavenny, Shakespeare's women

UK Surrogacy laws are over 30 years old. A conference next week will ask whether they need to be updated. Jenni speaks to one of the conference speakers, Emily Jackson, Professor of Law from the London School of Economics about how the current system is working.

Women played a crucial role at the BBC when it first started in 1923, according to Dr Kate Murphy, Senior History Lecturer at Bournemouth University. She has written a history of women who worked for the corporation from its earliest days to the outbreak of war in 1939, an era when broadcasting was brand new. Dr Murphy tells Jenni about "Behind the Wireless."

A quarter of a million working mothers care for a relative with dementia. We hear from two people whose loved ones have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Morella Kayman's experience of caring for her husband led to the formation of the Alzheimer's Society and Rosie Stevens has just given up work to care for her father.

Abigail Hollick goes to Abergavenny to talk to local women about their lives for the Woman's Hour series "Women in One".

Who is the strongest female Shakespearean character? In her new book, author, Angela Thirlwell, champions Rosalind, actors Tanya Moodie and Dame Janet Suzman endorse Volumnia and Cleopatra respectively. The three debate their chosen characters with Jenni.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07881kv)
A Girl Called Jack

Episode 4

Jack Monroe is an unusual food writer, gaining celebrity from her unique blog about existing on the breadline. During that time, she hit rock bottom but kept fighting to eat well and give her son proper food, rather than live on processed, cheap products. Now successful and no longer on the breadline, she continues to campaign passionately for decent food and standards of living.

This new drama, starring Jaime Winstone and June Whitfield, revisits her past and her relationship with her beloved Grandma.

Jack's blog started in 2012 after a Southend local councillor attacked single mothers. Jack lived in a small flat with her young son. Having been made redundant from a well-paid job, she found herself struggling to get by on benefits while applying unsuccessfully for jobs. Her blog documented the difficulties of living on welfare and, particularly, how to feed her son a nutritious and enjoyable diet on just £10 a week. It became a huge hit, Jack became a journalist, published food writer and social campaigner.

Sarah Daniels is an award winning radio writer. In 2014, she dramatised Nigel Slater's food memoir, Eating for England, for BBC Radio 4. She has drawn on Jack Monroe's written recipe books, blogs and direct conversations to reveal the personal story behind Jack's years of struggling and subsequent fame.

"Poverty isn't just having no heating, or not quite enough food, or unplugging your fridge and turning your hot water off. It's not a tourism trade, it's not cool, and it's not something that MPs on a salary of £65k a year plus expenses can understand, let alone our PM who states that we're all in this together.

Poverty is the sinking feeling when your small boy finishes his one weetabix and says 'more mummy, bread and jam please mummy' as you're wondering whether to take the TV or the guitar to the pawn shop first, and how to tell him that there is no bread or jam."
Jack Monroe, 30 July 2012 Hunger Hurts blog

Episode 4:
Jack and Grandma clash, despite Jack's improving fortunes as her blog begins to earn her money.

Guitar playing by Dan Cocker
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Kenny
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b07881kx)
Forgetting Igbo

Nkem Ifejika cant speak the language of his forefathers. Nkem is British of Nigerian descent and comes from one of Nigeria's biggest ethnic groups the Igbo. He's one of the millions of Nigerians, who live in the diaspora - almost two hundred thousand of them living here in Britain. Nkem wants to know why he was never taught Igbo as a child and why the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation, UNESCO, has warned that Igbo faces extinction in the next fifty years.

In this week's Crossing Continents, Nkem travels to the Igbo heartland in the southeast of Nigeria to explore the demise of a once proud language. He discovers that recent history has had profound effects on Igbo culture and identity. He discovers too that some Igbos are seeking to reassert their language and culture. Part of this is a resurgence of Igbo identity under a new 'Biafran' movement. Is this likely to find traction or will it ignite painful divisions from the past and lead to renewed tensions across Nigeria. From Nkem's own London-based family - where his wife is teaching both him and their son to speak Igbo - to the ancestral villages of Anambra State, 'Forgetting Igbo' reveals shifting perspectives on Nigeria's colonial past, emerging new ambitions for its future - and deep fault lines at the heart of its society.

Produced by Michael Gallagher.


THU 11:30 Will Gompertz Gets Creative (b063xz5j)
Hit Songs and Love Songs

For the final programme in the series, the BBC Arts Editor drops in on songwriting group in the Midlands to see how easy it is to create a hit love song. Plenty try but few succeed - so joining him for a special masterclass are the Mercury and Brit nominated artists Kathryn Williams and Tom McRae who have both written songs with and for other artists - ranging from John Martyn and Marianne Faithful to Nadine Coyle and Matt Cardle. Can they help the members of the Coventry Singer Songwriting group create a hit of their own?

If you are inspired to get involved in songwriting - or indeed any other areas of artistic endeavour - there's lots to discover at the BBC's Get Creative website http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/sections/get-creative

Series produced by Clare Walker, Kate Lamble and Paul Kobrak.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b0783lmw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b076c06y)
28 April 1916 - Isaac Cox

On this day in 1916, all men between 33 and 41 who had attested were called to report for service, and in Ashburton, Isaac discovers Lewis hasn't been working at Halecot Farm.

Written by Lucy Catherine
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b0783lmy)
WeRe Bank, VW emissions, Free range milk

A website called WeRe Bank is telling people it can pay off their debts using its own currency. The Financial Conduct Authority is concerned that it could lead vulnerable people into deeper debt.

Today, Volkswagen holds a news conference announcing further details of its "fix" to cars affected by the emissions scandal. We speak to the VW owners who say they're fed up of waiting.

In 2018 a sugar tax will be introduced on some soft drinks. It's part of broader efforts to tackle the problem of obesity in children. Other countries have tried sugar taxes, and in the second part of our series, we report from Finland on why the authorities there have decided to phase out part of their levy.

And, we are used to the idea of free range eggs, but how about free range milk? A farmer has set up a membership organisation to set a standard for free range milk. We ask if other farmers will join and if consumers would like to see it in supermarkets?

Producer: Lydia Thomas
Presenter: Shari Vahl.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0783ln0)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b07881kz)
News with Martha Kearney, including the Labour anti-Semitism row.


THU 13:45 Scenes from Student Life (b07881l1)
A Very Essex Protest

Ellie Cawthorne tells the story of the Inch Affair at Essex University in 1968. Its impact influenced generations of students and how universities treated them.

In 1968, a series of guest lectures led to vocal and violent protests in the newly established University of Essex. Enoch Powell's visit lit the touch paper, but it was the visit of Dr Inch, a scientist at Porton Down specialising in chemical weapons, which led to a full scale riot, arrests, expulsions and an occupation of the university by students and staff.

The unexpected protest and its resolution had a big effect on student politics, and the futures of the individuals concerned - some of whom went into radical politics, direct action and jail, others into big business and the House of Lords.

One of the key protest instigators, Peter Archard, recalls the incident and its lasting impact in Britain and abroad. We trace how the events in Essex linked with the bigger political picture of 1968, and changed the outlook and make up of student politics, eventually reshaping how universities were run.

We also speak to student activists today to explore how much the so-called consumerisation of universities has affected students' politicisation, and changed the focus, if not the fervour, of many student protests in 2016.

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
Series Producer: Nick Baker
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0787dmd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b07882k7)
Jennifer Schlueter - North

Written by Jennifer Schlueter & conceived by Christina Ritter

When her husband asks her to meet the author of "The Little Prince", celebrated aviator Anne Morrow Lindbergh is terrified. But the two form a connection which will affect the rest of their lives.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh ..... Christina Ritter
Antoine de Saint Exupery ..... Samuel West
Charles Lindbergh ..... Ian Conningham

Director: Marion Nancarrow

Constructed entirely from the writings of "The Little Prince" author, Antoine de Saint Exupery and the celebrated aviators Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, this off-Broadway hit is the story of their meeting and its consequences and has been re-imagined for radio. It stars its original cast member, Christina Ritter, in her radio debut with actor Samuel West, who saw the production off-Broadway. Delicate and touching, it tells the behind-the-scenes story of one the most celebrated couples in America, the famous and shocking kidnap of their baby and the conflicts which flying, family and writing brought to their lives. This was further complicated by their meeting with one of France's most iconic writers.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b07882k9)
Southwell Races, Nottinghamshire

Helen Mark spends a day at Southwell Races in rural Nottinghamshire. It's one of the smallest and most rural racetracks in Britain, but it's also one of the busiest.

Helen follows a day in the life of the race-track, meeting some of the people who make it happen. She talks about dreams and 'babies' (two year old horses) with trainer David Brown as one of his horses has a swim in the pool.

There are the Travelling Stable Lasses, jockey Andrew Mullen (no, he hadn't eaten anything all day), racehorse trainer Ollie Pears, who has several legs of horses for sale if you'd like one.

There's drama, as Helen joins the race-course vet as they race alongside the horses just in case one of them takes a fall. And she learns how to choose a horse to put your money on. Or not.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0783m47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b07856lv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0783ln2)
Son of Saul, The Sound Barrier, 1916 v 2016

With Francine Stock

Laszlo Nemes discusses Son Of Saul, his Oscar winning film about life and death in a Nazi concentration camp.

Sir Christopher Frayling takes us behind the scenes of The Sound Barrier, David Lean's celebration of British engineering and innovation that was somewhat economical with the facts.

1916 was the year that the pictures got big, but with Snow White, Sherlock Holmes and special effects blockbusters taking over cinemas, what has really changed 100 years later. Historians Matthew Sweet and Kevin Brownlow explain.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0783ln4)
Chernobyl, Drones, Tree crickets, Cern

30 years ago this week an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. A fire raged for 10 days, spewing radioactive materials on the surrounding area and was detected throughout much of a continent. Yet, so many decades on, why is it so difficult to accurately measure the impacts on human health? Richard Wakeford of the University of Manchester is an epidemiologist who has looked at the research done over the years, and he explains why making definitive connections between the Chernobyl explosion and long-term illnesses or premature deaths is so very difficult.

In the last few days there have been reports that a drone hit a plane on its way into Heathrow. Investigators say there is so little evidence either way it is not possible to say whether it really was a drone, but either way, the story has raised concerns. BBC Inside science spoke to Dr Sue Wolfe of ARPAS, to find out how our increasingly crowded air space is regulated. And Adam goes drone flying with BBC innovations producer, Derrik Evans, to see how easy these things are to use.

If the hum of drones is annoying, imagine the constant din of the rain forest, especially tricky if you're a cricket and you're trying to find a mate. We have a listen to the strategies they use to be heard above the cacophony in the company of Dr Tim Cockerill.

Scientists at CERN have also been trying to sort out the wheat from the chaff, continuing their efforts to understand a blip in their data identified and scrutinised over the last few months. Jon Butterworth of UCL and CERN dons the Cloak of Speculation and talks about the possible implications for physics if it does indeed turn out to be a new, unpredicted, particle.


THU 17:00 PM (b0783ln6)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0783ln8)
One of Jeremy Corbyn's closest allies, Ken Livingstone, has been suspended by Labour for bringing the party into disrepute during the increasingly bitter row about anti-Semitism.


THU 18:30 Don't Start (b06tvc3t)
Series 3

The Bath

Cardamon scented candles, kumquats and a debate over the virtues of shared bathing compared to shared showering occupy Neil and Kim.

Frank Skinner's sharp comedy starring Frank and Katherine Parkinson.

What do long term partners really argue about?

Don't Start is a scripted comedy with a deceptively simple premise - an argument. Our couple fall out over another apparently trivial flashpoint and the stakes mount as Neil and Kim battle with words. But these are no ordinary arguments. The two outdo each other with increasingly absurd images, unexpected literary references and razor sharp analysis of their beloved's weaknesses. Underneath the cutting wit, however, there is an unmistakable tenderness.

The first two series of Don't Start met with instant critical acclaim:

"That he can deliver such a heavy premise for a series with such a lightness of touch is testament to his skills as a writer and, given that the protagonists are both bookworms, he's also permitted to use a flourish of fine words that would be lost in his stand-up routines." Jane Anderson, Radio Times

"Frank Skinner gives full rein to his sharp but splenetic comedy. He and his co-star Katherine Parkinson play a bickering couple exchanging acerbic ripostes in a cruelly precise dissection of a relationship." Daily Mail

"...a lesson in relationship ping-pong..." Miranda Sawyer, The Observer

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2016.


THU 18:45 The Pin (b06j5bjs)
Series 1

Episode 1

Join Alex and Ben in their weird twist on the double-act sketch show.

Strap in for a 15 minute delve in to a world of oddness performed in front of a live studio audience.

The Pin are an award-winning comedy duo, and legends of Edinburgh festival. They deconstruct the sketch form, in a show that exists somewhere between razor-sharp smartness and utterly joyous silliness.

After a sold-out run in Edinburgh, and a string of hilarious performances across BBC Radio 4 Extra, BBC 3, Channel 4, and Comedy Central, this is The Pin's debut solo show for Radio 4. Join them as they celebrate, make, collapse and rebuild their jokes, each other, and probably the radio too.

Producer: Sam Bryant.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b07882z8)
At the village shop Shula tells Lynda she thinks the outcome of Henry's custody hearing must be so upsetting for Pat and Tony. Lynda supposes the court did what they thought was best for Henry. She shows some sympathy for what Rob has been through. They move on to more cheerful topics - May Day and the jumble sale. Shula says the latter is not looking good because some of the regulars now sell online instead.
Lynda collars Eddie. She reminds him to fix the leaking roof on her shepherd's hut. Eddie heaves the Resurgam stone into position, while Lynda fusses. Joe suggests Eddie offers her an extended warranty of ten pounds a month for a couple of years. Eddie thinks it is genius and broaches the subject to Lynda. Lynda says what he can do with his warranty.
Jazzer corners Jim over his housing troubles. Jim makes an excuse - he can't talk right now... Jim goes to the Stables just to pick up his book collection. Shula says that Jim can't avoid Jazzer forever, but Jim would rather live on his own. Jazzer lays it on thick about how he has missed Jim and Greenacres, and promises to turn over a new leaf. Jim's resolve crumbles, and he says Jazzer can move back in. Jazzer is triumphant.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0783lnb)
Mark Gatiss on Doctor Who, Brideshead Revisited, Pleasure, Demolition

Mark Gatiss, the writer, actor and Doctor Who fan, gives his response to the re-issue of seven Doctor Who novelisations from the original range by Target Books, and visits the Cartoon Museum's display of original artwork for the books' covers.

Evelyn Waugh's classic novel Brideshead Revisited has previously been made for television and the cinema, and has now been adapted for the stage. Playwright Bryony Lavery discusses her new version for the York Theatre Royal.

Composer Mark Simpson talks about his new opera set in a gay nightclub. Pleasure stars Lesley Garrett as a toilet attendant, and is premiered tonight by Opera North in Leeds.

In Demolition, actor Jake Gyllenhaal plays an investment banker who responds to his wife's death by writing bizarre letters of complaint to a vending company. These lead to an unlikely friendship with a customer service employee, played by Naomi Watts. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Angie Nehring.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07881kv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Borders, An Odyssey (b078834c)
The Return

Do borders enhance or diminish our lives? In this final episode, as Homer's Odysseus reaches Ithaka at last, Frances Stonor Saunders examines the impact of the borders we cross and asks, how we prepare for death, the final border crossing. With Judith Kerr, Juliet Mitchell, Jonathan Meades, Edith Hall, Helen Sharman. Readings by Sam West.

Producer: Fiona Leach
Researcher: Ruth Edwards.


THU 20:30 In Business (b0788889)
Colorado's Big Marijuana Experiment

Marijuana is now legal in some US states and a fast-growing industry has emerged, especially in Colorado which was the first state to embrace the drug. But according to federal law marijuana is still illegal. This means that many companies can't get banking services, advertise their wares or pay tax in the way that other companies do.

So how do they survive and thrive? And in what direction is the US moving? Will marijuana soon become a legal drug, like alcohol, across the US? Or will law-makers decide that Colorado's big marijuana experiment has gone too far? And what is it like to run a company in one of the world's riskiest business sectors?

Presenter : Peter Day
Producer: Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0783ln4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07881kn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b079vmrt)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0783lnd)
Livingstone suspended by Labour Party

What constitutes anti-semitism, are doctors being deliberately targeted in Syria, and hopes for a cure for blindness. Picture: Ken Livingstone; credit: AP.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b078888f)
10 Days

Episode 9

A gripping thriller by Orange Prize-shortlisted author Gillian Slovo. Ten unpredictable days of violence erupt from a stifling heat wave. And, as Westminster careers are being made or ruined, lives are at stake.

Ten Days is about what happens when politics, policing and the hard realities of living in London collide.

Episode 9:
The aftermath of the storm requires a clean-up - not only of the London's streets but of the mess created by political schemes and broken hearts.

Read by Jasmine Hyde and Ben Onwukwe
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Down the Line (b02yjbx2)
Olympic Legacy Special

The ground-breaking Radio 4 phone-in show presents a one-off special on the Olympics, hosted by the legendary Gary Bellamy and brought to you by the creators of The Fast Show.

Starring Rhys Thomas, with Amelia Bullmore, Simon Day, Felix Dexter, Charlie Higson,
Lucy Montgomery and Paul Whitehouse.

Special guests: Esther Coles, Robert Popper and Adil Ray

Producers: Charlie Higson and Paul Whitehouse
A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b078888h)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster on claims that the Government has made concessions on trade union legislation in order to gain union support for the EU Remain campaign.



FRIDAY 29 APRIL 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0783lpz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07881kq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0783lq1)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0783lq3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0783lq5)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0783lq7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b079vp1d)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Kirsty Thorpe, URC Minister.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0791b37)
Food and Farming Awards, Farm borrowing, Neonicotinoids, Share farming

The results of the Future Food category at the BBC Food and Farming Awards are revealed. New research suggests that not all neonicotinoids are harmful to bumble bees. Farm borrowing has doubled in the last ten years, what effect is this having on the countryside? And Farming Today visits a so-called share farm to find out how it works.

Presented by Charlotte Smith

Produced by Alun Beach.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tpqx)
Gannet

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Gannet. The North Atlantic is the international stronghold for this impressive seabird - with its wingspan of nearly 2 metres, remorseless expression and dagger-like bill.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0791b39)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b0783m5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07889g4)
Respectable

Who's Respectable Now?

Lynsey Hanley explores the experience of class and social mobility in Britain over the past four decades. She offers a personal insight into the psychological cost of leaving her working-class upbringing behind; moving from her home in Chelmsley Wood, a vast council estate near Birmingham, to sixth-form college, to university and on to a career in journalism.

In this final episode, she looks at the divisive notion, encouraged by politicians of all parties over the past two decades, that we're all middle-class now.

Written and read by Lynsey Hanley.

Abridged by Sian Preece.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0783lq9)
Kim Cattrall On Insomnia

Kim Cattrall is well-known for roles in Sex and the City, Sensitive Skin, and in recent years her work in theatre. What's not been public until now is a private struggle with insomnia - something that came to dominate her life, and her work. She speaks exclusively on Woman's Hour in a narrative, based on diaries she wrote at the time that convey her state of mind when suffering sleep deprivation. Her personal battle with sleeplessness would eventually lead to her being forced to pull out of a London stage production. The process of coming to terms with insomnia involved re-examining her own life, the impact of her father's death and her own mortality. It ultimately proved life-changing.
With readings by Dame Janet Suzman.

Presenter: Kim Cattrall
Producer: Anne Peacock.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07889g6)
A Girl Called Jack

Episode 5

Jack Monroe is an unusual food writer, gaining celebrity from her unique blog about existing on the breadline. During that time, she hit rock bottom but kept fighting to eat well and give her son proper food, rather than live on processed, cheap products. Now successful and no longer on the breadline, she continues to campaign passionately for decent food and standards of living.

This new drama, starring Jaime Winstone and June Whitfield, revisits her past and her relationship with her beloved Grandma.

Jack's blog started in 2012 after a Southend local councillor attacked single mothers. Jack lived in a small flat with her young son. Having been made redundant from a well-paid job, she found herself struggling to get by on benefits while applying unsuccessfully for jobs. Her blog documented the difficulties of living on welfare and, particularly, how to feed her son a nutritious and enjoyable diet on just £10 a week. It became a huge hit, Jack became a journalist, published food writer and social campaigner.

Sarah Daniels is an award winning radio writer. In 2014, she dramatised Nigel Slater's food memoir, Eating for England, for BBC Radio 4. She has drawn on Jack Monroe's written recipe books, blogs and direct conversations to reveal the personal story behind Jack's years of struggling and subsequent fame.

"Poverty isn't just having no heating, or not quite enough food, or unplugging your fridge and turning your hot water off. It's not a tourism trade, it's not cool, and it's not something that MPs on a salary of £65k a year plus expenses can understand, let alone our PM who states that we're all in this together.

Poverty is the sinking feeling when your small boy finishes his one weetabix and says 'more mummy, bread and jam please mummy' as you're wondering whether to take the TV or the guitar to the pawn shop first, and how to tell him that there is no bread or jam."
Jack Monroe, 30 July 2012 Hunger Hurts blog

Episode 5:
Jack is nominated for the Fortnum and Mason Food and Drink Awards and invites her Grandma to be her guest.

Guitar playing by Dan Cocker
Production Co-ordinator: Sarah Kenny
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 The Anglo-Irish Century (b07889g8)
Shadow Language and Shape Shifting

In the second programme in his series looking at the last hundred years of Anglo-Irish history historian Diarmaid Ferriter covers the period following the Anglo-Irish agreement of 1921 which brought into being the Irish Free State and saw then saw it descend, within a year, into a bitter civil war. Although the British were now observers from the sidelines letters from Churchill to Michael Collins reveal that there was an understanding between the two men that had survived the settlement negotiations of the previous year. In the event Collins was the most significant casualty of the war which ended with the anti-treaty forces defeated and their leader Eamon de Valera in the political wilderness.
Under a new leader W.T.Cosgrave the Free State established a degree of stability in its dealings with Britain, although it was a period described by one of his ministerial colleagues, Kevin O'Higgins as "simply eight young men in city hall standing amidst the ruins of one administration with the foundations of another not yet laid and with wild men screaming through the keyholes.."
Diarmaid carries the story through the Irish engagement with the other Dominions in forging new freedoms in the form of the Statue of Westminster of 1931. And then, a year later, de Valera's return and subsequent progress towards complete Irish independence which saw changes in the country's name, the return of Irish ports to Irish control and, with an agreement in 1938, all but the most minimal British involvement. It would allow de Valera to achieve his ambition in the war that threatened Europe, to maintain Irish neutrality.
The results of that stance, Churchill's reaction to it at the end of the war and de Valera's response bring this period of The Anglo-Irish Century to a close.

Producer: Tom Alban.


FRI 11:30 Barry's Lunch Club (b07889gb)
Travel

Alex Lowe is 82 year old Barry, who invites an audience to his weekly lunch club where he scrutinises themes close to his heart.

With club secretary Hilary to rein him in, and club treasurer Peter providing support on the civic hall piano, this is the ultimate life-style guide for an ageing nation.

In this opening session, Barry responds to a question about travel for the over 60s and relates his disastrous holiday experiences on a cruise ship and at an activity holiday.

Barry is a cockney moved to the suburbs during the war. He is not given to looking at the old days through rose coloured spectacles, and is well up to speed with current trends. A seemingly harmless old boy, he lures people into a false sense of security, delivering hilariously stinging rebukes or erudite assessments of how the world is treating the over 60s.

Stand-up comedy crossed with sitcom, the show plays out in real time as if we are eavesdropping on a civic hall meeting group.

Written by Alex Lowe and Alex Walsh-Taylor

Barry ...... Alex Lowe
Hilary ...... Stephanie Cole
Peter ...... Philip Pope

Producer: Alex Walsh-Taylor
Executive Producer: Kevin Dawson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2016.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0783lqc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b076c070)
29 April 1916 - Alexander Gidley

On this day in 1916, General Townshend surrendered, ending the Siege of Kut, and in Deanscombe Quarry, Alexander gets his first taste of being foreman.

Written by Lucy Catherine
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b0783lqf)
BHS suppliers - what next?

This week BHS and Austin Reed became the latest high street casualties.
We've heard how this affects their workers and their customers - rather less about the suppliers who depend on them for their livelihood. Nearly 1,000 BHS suppliers face being left unpaid by a total of £52m. You & Yours has been hearing from some them.

And some of Britain's biggest high fashion names are warning of tough times ahead on the high street too.
Next has already reported that its profits may be down. M&S has been famously struggling with its clothing sales. House of Fraser has reported a return to profit but all thanks to online sales.
Figures from the British Retail Consortium show that, in March, the number of shoppers on the high street fell by nearly 4% compared with last year. Alex Fullerton, Fashion Director at Stylist magazine, and Tamara Sender, Senior Fashion Analyst at Mintel, join the programme.

Checkatrade is a website for finding tradespeople. But, who checks them out and what's the process for negative feedback? We hear from the CEO Kevin Byrne and Jeff Howell, former builder and Telegraph columnist.

The winner of the 16th BBC Food and Farming Awards has been announced at a prestigious ceremony held in Bristol last night. The Radio 4 'You & Yours' Best Independent Food Retailer award celebrates the local shops making a positive difference to our lives, our high streets and communities by selling great quality, delicious and affordable food.

And, a Your & Yours listener who complained to her energy supplier about a faulty boiler and an inaccurate bill but got an unexpected response.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Helen Roberts.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0783lqh)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b078d599)
Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 Scenes from Student Life (b07889gd)
Home and Away

Ellie Cawthorne finds out about the changing experiences of students studying away from their native countries on the global campus - foreign students in the UK, and UK students abroad.

A British student abroad in 2014 describes his first day at his Dutch University. Indira describes the culture shock of the 'real' Britain outside the international student halls. The culture shock.

The number of British students studying abroad is rising rapidly, as the increase in tuition fees makes the prospect of studying at European universities increasingly attractive. Simultaneously, international students who gain degrees at British Universities enjoy increased status in their home country.

This ebb and flow within academic communities is not new. Travel and the exchange of ideas and of students, says academic Hillary Perraton, has been one of defining factors of university education since the 12th century.

We compare the experiences of foreign students today with those of their predecessors, documented through diaries, letters and autobiographies. Why have so many world leaders of the 20th Century, from Nehru to Bill Clinton, emerged from British universities?

Producer: Lucy Dichmont
Series Producer: Nick Baker
A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07882z8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b03zby8c)
The Great British Bridge Scandal

By Deborah Davis
It is 1965, at the World Bridge Championships in Buenos Aires, and the American team believe they have cracked a code. Could it be true that two British players are guilty of cheating?

Directed by Tracey Neale

The Story:

In 1965, at the World Bridge Championships in Buenos Aires, the American team led by Dorothy Hayden observed Britain's top players, Terence Reese and Boris Schapiro, using finger signals during bidding. Hayden cracked the code: the British pair were signalling the number of cards they held in their hearts suits. Ralph Swimer, Britain's non-playing Captain, was informed. He observed his team playing and confirmed Hayden's suspicions. They reported their findings to the World Bridge Federation. Reese and Schapiro were summoned to defend the accusations and chose to remain silent. The WBF found them guilty of cheating. Swimer conceded the championship on behalf of Great Britain. Reese and Schapiro returned to London, their international reputations destroyed.

But for the four participants, the drama had only just begun. The British Bridge League set up its own inquiry under Sir John Foster QC who imposed a criminal burden of proof; the prosecution was required to prove its case beyond reasonable doubt.

Deborah Davis picks up the story as the case unfolds and the battle for the truth begins.

The Writer:

Deborah Davis, a qualified lawyer and freelance journalist, has written five plays for Radio 4 and a stage play, Court Pastoral, selected for the International Playwriting Festival. Her radio drama, Balance of Power, was selected for the Brit List in 2009 coming in joint 4th place. The script is now in film development.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0788bc6)
York

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from York.

Christine Walkden, Matthew Wilson and Bob Flowerdew answer the questions from the audience, discussing the purposes and positives of show gardens and advising on how to get the most out of supermarket herbs. They also recommend climbing plants fit for adorning a child's climbing frame and unusual plants to put in raised planters.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Tips for the Barmaid, by Claire Powell (b0788bc8)
A 40-something single mum works behind the bar at the local sports club. The members of the veterans football team are her favourites, and one player in particular. What starts as smiles across the bar turns into something more.

Read by Lorraine Ashbourne.

Claire Powell was born and brought up in south-east London. She graduated from UEA's Creative Writing (Prose) MA in 2012, where she received the year's highest mark for a dissertation, and was awarded the Malcolm Bradbury Memorial Bursary and Malcolm Bradbury Continuation Grant. Her first radio story, Marathon, appeared as part of The Time Being (Series 6) in 2013.

Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b0783lqk)
Lord Peston, Ruth Prideaux, Patricio Aylwin, Professor Sir David Mackay, Gareth Thomas

Matthew Bannister on

The economist Lord Peston who advised the Labour governments of the 60s and 70s. His son Robert Peston and Lord Hattersley pay tribute.

The women's cricket coach Ruth Prideaux who steered England to victory at the 1993 World Cup.

The Chilean President Patricio Aylwin who is credited with restoring democracy after nearly 17 years of military dictatorship.

The physicist Professor Sir David Mackay, known as 'the cleverest man in Cambridge' and a debunker of myths about climate change.

And the actor Gareth Thomas best known for his leading role in the TV series Blake's Seven.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b0788bcb)
EU Migration

EU migrants in the UK
How many people have come from the EU to live in the UK? Can we trust the numbers? And if the UK leaves the EU, what would it mean for immigration controls and the future of the economy? We tackle these questions with the help of Jonathan Porte, director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, and Matthew Pollard, Executive Director, Migration Watch.

Fire death shock
Recently the Guardian somewhat alarmingly reported that the number of fire deaths jumped 21% in one year - the biggest rise in a decade. This comes against a background of shrinking Fire Brigade budgets, and Labour says the figures show the cuts have already gone too far. But something about the story didn't smell right to us...

Simpson's Paradox
A Dutch statistician recently became suspicious by headlines in the Dutch news that women were being discriminated against when it came to getting science research funding. Professor Casper Albers of the Heymans Institute for Psychological Research, Groningen, helps explain what is known as Simpson's Paradox with the aid of a choir metaphor, performed by the BBC Singers.

Fermat's last theorem
What could connect British mathematician Sir Andrew Wiles and the makers of the Simpsons TV show? Science author Simon Singh explains that both have a love of Fermat's Last theorem. A sketch of the famous equation appears on the American cartoon, while next month Professor Wiles will go to Oslo to collect the Abel prize, widely regarded as the Nobel for mathematics, for his work in proving Fermat's Last theorem. We explore why it draws so much interest.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b0788bcd)
Joyce and Bill - We're Really Alright

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple who find retirement isn't all they'd hoped it would be, but who recognise things could be a lot worse. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b0783lqm)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0783lqp)
Following the suspension of Ken Livingstone for saying Hitler supported Zionism, Labour has promised it will get to grips with anti-Semitism.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b0788bcg)
Series 90

Episode 3

Susan Calman, Zoe Lyons, Vicki Pepperdine and Andy Hamilton are amongst Miles' guests in the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0788bcj)
Pat is trying to be patient about the Henry situation. Helen still refuses to see her. David says Ruth has sent Helen a couple of letters. Pip goes to view some crossbreds belonging to a friend's dad. She reports back that the cattle were nice looking animals and she drove a hard bargain with Ashley's dad. She's buying them! David wants to see the photos she took and the facts and figures before he and Ruth decide whether to lend her the money she needs. Rex picks Pip's brains about a brand name for the eggs. He proposes "Upper Class Eggs: Laid by Landed Poultry". Pip thinks it's genius. David confirms they will provide Pip a loan for the cattle. Pip's first thought is to ring Matthew with the good news, leaving Rex deflated.
Helen still isn't saying much. It will be hard to prepare a proper defence when she's not giving Anna all the details. Pat absolutely believes her daughter acted in self-defence. Anna thinks Helen partly blames herself. She must be terrified of facing Rob, and is dealing with a whole mix of emotions. Pat can't think Helen will consider pleading guilty. She's frustrated that she can't speak to her. Anna suggests she keeps writing to Helen. Later, Anna tells Helen about Henry living back at Blossom Hill Cottage. Helen despairs, but Anna continues to press her. Anna says it's not too late, but Helen cries that it is, that she has lost Henry for good.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0783lqr)
Ricky Gervais, The Secret, Mark Elder, The return of the repertory company

Ricky Gervais has written, directed and stars in the feature-length film Special Correspondents for Netflix. Kirsty talks to the comedian about celebrity, David Brent and returning to stand-up.

The Secret is a new ITV drama set in Northern Ireland starring James Nesbitt. It tells the true story of a couple who embark on an affair and then plot to murder their spouses. Jenny McCartney reviews.

Sir Ian McKellen has called for the National Theatre to have a resident company of actors, and the Liverpool Everyman has plans to trial one. Theatre writer and critic Lyn Gardner considers whether the old rep model of theatre can be resurrected.

As The Hallé prepares for its Dvorák Festival, the orchestra's conductor Sir Mark Elder discusses his affinity for the music of the Czech composer.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07889g6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0788bcl)
Jon Ashworth MP, Claire Fox, Chris Grayling MP, John Nicolson MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Corby in Northamptonshire with Shadow Minister without Portfolio Jon Ashworth MP, Claire Fox from the Institute of Ideas, the Leader of the House of Commons Chris Grayling MP and the SNP's Westminster Spokesman on Culture Media and Sport John Nicolson MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0788bcn)
The Power of the Pen

On a visit to her local flea market in Florence, Sarah Dunant stumbles across a love letter. The date: November 1918. There's the challenge of the Italian of course....but the biggest hurdle, she says, was the handwriting. It was "as if a conscientious ant had climbed out of the ink pot and then wound its way across every millimetre of the page".

Admiring the tiny handwriting with hardly any space between the lines, Sarah reflects on the modern day demise of handwriting.

"Regimented key strokes in various type fonts" are no substitute, she argues, for the beauty and emotion contained in handwriting.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b076c0cj)
25-29 April 1916

In the week that General Townshend surrendered, ending the Siege of Kut al Amara, there are calls to courage throughout the social scale in Ashburton.

Written by Lucy Catherine
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Richard Monks
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0783lqt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0783lqw)
MSF: US hospital attack was "a war crime"

The aid agency Medecins Sans Frontieres says the attack by a US warplane on a hospital in Afghanistan - which killed forty-two people - was "a war crime." The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has announced new measures to combat anti-Semitism in the party. And an appreciation of the writer Jenny Diski, who's died at the age of 68, from her agent Peter Strauss.

Photo: MSF Kunduz hospital burning after air strike. (Credit: MSF).


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0788bcq)
10 Days

Episode 10

A gripping thriller by Orange Prize-shortlisted author Gillian Slovo. Ten unpredictable days of violence erupt from a stifling heat wave. And, as Westminster careers are being made or ruined, lives are at stake.

Ten Days is about what happens when politics, policing and the hard realities of living in London collide.

Episode 10:
The riots and the political storm are over and order has been restored - but at what cost to careers, parents and children from all walks of London life?

Read by Jasmine Hyde and Ben Onwukwe
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Woman's Hour (b0788bcs)
Late Night Woman's Hour - Clothes

From the shock value of punk to Muslim modesty codes, via clothes as art and how police officers personalize their uniforms, Lauren Laverne and guests discuss what we wear and what it means.

With punk pioneer Jordan, fashion designer Barjis Chohan, philosopher Shahidha Bari, and former police officer and blogger Ellie Bloggs

Producer: Luke Mulhall.


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0791b3c)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b0788bcv)
Russ and Louise - What's in a Name?

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between prospective parents about the weighty considerations required when naming a baby. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b0785pdt)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b0785pdt)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07865h1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07865h1)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b0787c29)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0787c29)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07881kv)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07881kv)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07889g6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07889g6)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b077jqq3)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0788bcn)

Agree to Differ 22:15 SAT (b077gtvz)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b078774b)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b078774b)

All in the Womb 21:00 MON (b077gd58)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0770r1l)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b077jqq1)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0788bcl)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0783kvv)

Are Human Rights Really Universal? 20:00 MON (b0785sv6)

Are Human Rights Really Universal? 11:00 WED (b0785sv6)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0783ln4)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0783ln4)

Barry's Lunch Club 11:30 FRI (b07889gb)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0783m41)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0783m41)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0788c8q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0787338)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0787j2d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b078888f)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0788bcq)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b077jp0z)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0785nl9)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0785nl9)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07865gz)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07865gz)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0787c27)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0787c27)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07881kq)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07881kq)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07889g4)

Border Crossing 19:45 SUN (b0785gjw)

Borders, An Odyssey 20:00 THU (b078834c)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b07756bb)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b0785r0s)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0783lbf)

Chain Reaction 11:30 WED (b03s71cz)

Clare in the Community 18:30 TUE (b0650619)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b07875z3)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b07875z3)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b077j4z1)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b07881kx)

Don't Start 18:30 THU (b06tvc3t)

Down the Line 23:00 THU (b02yjbx2)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b0773ldq)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07856ls)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0785r0q)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b07865hc)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0787dm6)

Drama 14:15 THU (b07882k7)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b03zby8c)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 MON (b0785pts)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0780jwj)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0785mzp)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07861qf)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07877j4)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b0791ppt)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0791b37)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0770r18)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0783lf5)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0783lhj)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0783lkx)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0783lnb)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0783lqr)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b0787dyz)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b077jq34)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0788bc6)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b07875z7)

Held Hostage in Syria 17:00 SUN (b077kkgn)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b076c0cj)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b076c009)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b076c036)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b076c07v)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b076c06y)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b076c070)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b077jb7j)

In Business 20:30 THU (b0788889)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07881kn)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07881kn)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0783lhl)

John Galsworthy - The Forsyte Saga 14:30 SAT (b0780jy8)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b0770qy6)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b0783lqk)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0780jzv)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0770r0p)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0783l8c)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0783ldd)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0783lgt)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0783lk4)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0783lmh)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0783lpz)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0787c25)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0787c25)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0770r1d)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0770r1d)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b0787dm8)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b077jqps)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b0788bcb)

Natalie Haynes Stands Up for the Classics 16:00 MON (b0785rmr)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0770r0y)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0783l96)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0783ldn)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0783lh2)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0783lkd)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0783lmr)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0783lq7)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0783l9j)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b0770r1b)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0783lbh)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0783ldv)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0783lh6)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0783lkj)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0783lmw)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0783lqc)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0770r10)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0783l9z)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0783lbc)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0770r21)

News 13:00 SAT (b0770r1j)

Nurse 23:00 WED (b0787j2g)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0783m45)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b07856lv)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b07856lv)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b077jb6m)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b07882k9)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0770r1q)

PM 17:00 MON (b0783lf1)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0783lhd)

PM 17:00 WED (b0783lks)

PM 17:00 THU (b0783ln6)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0783lqm)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07856lz)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b0773msq)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b07856lx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b077jqsr)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0791qt7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07877d2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b078dc11)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b078d479)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b079vp1d)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0783kvs)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0783kvs)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0783kvs)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b0783m47)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0783m47)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0783m47)

Radio 4 at the Machynlleth Comedy Festival with Elis James 23:00 TUE (b078774d)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0780jwn)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0770r1z)

Scenes from Student Life 13:45 MON (b0785q2b)

Scenes from Student Life 13:45 TUE (b07865h9)

Scenes from Student Life 13:45 WED (b0787djt)

Scenes from Student Life 13:45 THU (b07881l1)

Scenes from Student Life 13:45 FRI (b07889gd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0770r0t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0783l8t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0783ldj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0783lgy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0783lk8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0783lmm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0783lq3)

Shakespeare and the American Dream 09:00 TUE (b078641s)

Shakespeare and the American Dream 21:30 TUE (b078641s)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0770r0r)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0770r0w)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0770r1s)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0783l8m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0783l92)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0783lbp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0783ldg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0783ldl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0783lgw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0783lh0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0783lk6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0783lkb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0783lmk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0783lmp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0783lq1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0783lq5)

Shorts 00:30 SUN (b03vzwc1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0770r1x)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0783lbt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0783lf3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0783lhg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0783lkv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0783ln8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0783lqp)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0783m43)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0783m43)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b077gd5b)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b07865h5)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0785nl7)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0785nl7)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0783m49)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0783lb5)

The Anglo-Irish Century 11:00 FRI (b07889g8)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0783m5m)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07858b7)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07858b7)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0785sv4)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0785sv4)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07875z9)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07875z9)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0787dmd)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0787dmd)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07882z8)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07882z8)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0788bcj)

The Business of Music with Matt Everitt 11:00 MON (b0785ppx)

The Design Dimension 15:00 TUE (b0787336)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b0785rmt)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0770qv5)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0783ln2)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0783m9w)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0783m9w)

The Force of Google 20:00 TUE (b07875zc)

The Ideas That Make Us 09:30 TUE (b04v30zq)

The Impostors' Survival Guide 11:00 TUE (b07865h3)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0783n0z)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b0787djp)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b0788bcd)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b0788bcv)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0783lkq)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b077jqpx)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b0788bcg)

The Pin 18:45 THU (b06j5bjs)

The Rest is History 19:15 SUN (b07858bs)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b0783m5p)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b0783m5p)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b07756bj)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b078xpfg)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0785hhy)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0783lbm)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0783lf9)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0783lhq)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0783lkz)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0783lnd)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0783lqw)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b077gt3g)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0787dmb)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:15 WED (b03szv8f)

Tips for the Barmaid, by Claire Powell 15:45 FRI (b0788bc8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0785sv8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b078733b)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b0787j30)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b078888h)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b0791b3c)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0780jwl)

Today 06:00 MON (b0785nl5)

Today 06:00 TUE (b07862q5)

Today 06:00 WED (b078781j)

Today 06:00 THU (b078d47c)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0791b39)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zr1zj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b020tp38)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b020tp50)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b01sbyzk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b01sbyh9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b020tpqx)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b0770r12)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b0770r16)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b0770r1g)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b0770r1v)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0783l9s)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0783lb9)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0783lbk)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0783lbr)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0783ldq)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0783ldz)

Weather 21:58 MON (b0783lf7)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b0783lhb)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b0783lhn)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0783lkn)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0783ln0)

Weather 21:58 THU (b079vmrt)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0783lqh)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b0783lqt)

Welcome to Our Village, Please Invade Carefully 18:30 WED (b04n6010)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0783lbw)

Why I Changed My Mind 13:30 SUN (b078hlsz)

Why I Changed My Mind 20:45 WED (b078hlsz)

Will Gompertz Gets Creative 11:30 THU (b063xz5j)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0770r1n)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0783lds)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0783lh4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0783lkg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0783lmt)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0783lq9)

Woman's Hour 23:00 FRI (b0788bcs)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b077ggvc)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b07875z5)

World War One: The Cultural Front 10:30 SAT (b0780jwq)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0785q28)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b07865h7)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0787djr)

World at One 13:00 THU (b07881kz)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b078d599)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b0783ldx)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b0783lh8)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b0783lkl)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b0783lmy)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b0783lqf)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b077jqst)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b077jqst)