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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 05 MARCH 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b071ld6b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 The Real Henry James (b072n0zp)
Childhood and Family

Henry James was not only a great novelist - he also wrote a great deal of entertaining non-fiction, producing reviews and essays on a wide variety of subjects. To mark the centenary of his death, these five anthologies reveal James through his letters, memoirs, essays and private notebooks.

Episode 5: Childhood and Family
It may seem paradoxical to end a series on Henry James by going back to his childhood - but that's what James himself did in old age. As he approached 70, James began to look back over his life and career - by then he was the only one of five siblings to survive - and found that his early memories and associations multiplied with an almost uncontrollable vividness.

We hear memories of how he roamed free as a young boy on the streets of New York, and of his father, an eccentric religious philosopher who detested 'prigs'.

We hear too a moving and intimate account of a visit James paid towards the end of his life to the family grave-plot near Harvard - where his parents, his sister Alice, and Wilky, one of his brothers, were buried. James wrote about this only in his private notebooks, which speaks revealingly about the importance of family for him. The programme ends with a passage about the quest for religious faith, and with James's great motto in life, "e kind, be kind, be kind..."
The anthology has been selected by Professor Philip Horne of University College London, who is founding General Editor of a major scholarly edition of James's fiction and has re-transcribed the notebooks for an authoritative new edition.

Reader: Henry Goodman
With introductions by Olivia Williams

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071ld6d)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071ld6g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071ld6j)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b071ld6l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b071x8d4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day Shirley Jenner, Lecturer at the University of Manchester.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b071x8d6)
How Not to Get Burgled

We hear from a listener who had his house broken into, and from a woman who's spent 20 years studying burglars. She says faking occupancy is the single best security measure you can take.

Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b071ld6n)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b071ld6q)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b071vlms)
Series 32

Samaritans

Clare Balding walks from the famous dragon at Bures on the Essex/Suffolk border to Assington in Suffolk. Joining her is a group of volunteers from the Colchester branch of the Samaritans charity. It's a supportive walking-group which helps volunteers to bond and decompress, something that's necessary in an emotionally challenging although rewarding role.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0729rqj)
Farming Today This Week

For the last week, Farming Today has been based on a sheep farm in Wales. Newton Farm near Brecon is owned by the Roderick family, and during this week the programme has been finding out about life during what is the busiest time of the year for them - lambing. In this edition, Charlotte Smith discovers how busy life gets when you've got 1800 lambs to deliver in the space of just a few weeks. She talks to Richard Roderick, who was born on the farm, his wife Helen, and their 18 year old son Tudor - who has been responsible for the night shifts in the lambing shed. She also talks to industry experts about the market for lamb, hears about the controversy surrounding the environmental impact of sheep farming, and asks what the future holds for this family farm in the beautiful Brecon Beacons.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b071ld6s)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0729rql)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0729rqn)
Rebecca Front

Aasmah Mir and the Reverend Richard Coles are joined by Bafta award winning actor Rebecca Front to talk about being funny, playing dislikeable characters and claustrophobia.

Chef and writer Allegra McEvedy has been cooking professionally for over 20 years, in London and the USA. She set up food chain LEON, is a Patron of the Fairtrade foundation, writes food columns and cookery books and last year was a judge on CBBC's Bafta winning Junior Bakeoff. She'll be cooking up something for Mothering Sunday (recipe below) and reflecting on her own mother who passed away when she was 17.

Listener Henry Iddon contacted us about his term as artist in residence at Forton Services on the M6 in Lancashire. He joins us to share his love and fascination of this essential and iconic landmark.

Listener Hannah Velten's brother Christian went missing in Africa 13 years ago whilst following in the footsteps of Mungo Park, the Scottish explorer. Wanting to keep his memory alive, Hannah started a blog where friends and family could share their memories. This inspired her to set up a company to record memories for people. She'll tell her story to Richard and Aasmah.

We'll hear the inheritance tracks of The Archers actor David Troughton who chose Elgar's variations on an original theme, opus 36, the enigma Nimrod and It must be Love by Labi Siffre.

We hear your Thankyous, and JP meets a couple who met over mutual admiration for Ipswich Town Football Club.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island (b0729rqq)
Series 1

Living by Water

The music writer Laura Barton visits four corners of Britain and listens closely to the music found in different landscapes.

In this first episode, Laura visits parts of the rugged countryside of Northumberland and the coastal city of Sunderland on Tyne and Wear to explore how music and landscape are intimately related.

In an environment defined by a beautiful coastline and great northern rivers, Kathryn Tickell, the violinist and Northumbrian piper, and Adrian McNally of the folk group The Unthanks share their experiences of performing and arranging traditional tunes that seem to have emerged from the sea and been hewn from the soil.

Members of the Sunderland band Frankie and the Heartstrings take Laura on a tour of the shop they established in the heart of the old industrial city to sell coffee, artworks and records, as well as to provide a rehearsal and gig space. They also perform acoustically in the famous Watch House, from which volunteer lifeboatmen would keep an eye on the Roker seashore.

And Peter Brewis of Field Music, based in a former industrial unit on the banks of the River Wear, tells Laura about the distinctive accents of music from this part of the North-East.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0729rqs)
Isabel Hardman of the Spectator hears how the Labour Party tracked a Tory donor's plane. When will retirement ever come? A row over the referendum. And the risk to privacy of keeping us all safe.

The Editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b071ld6v)
Donald Trump 2.0

They are coiffed, lacquered, expensively attired and perfumed - and that's just the men in a Donald Trump audience in Florida. And while our North America editor expects the unexpected from Donald Trump, he is surprised to find him in a conciliatory mood.

Spending four months on a single page of A4 - the art of calligraphy and other skills are being revived in Kabul, and now exhibited in Washington. They're both in their nineties, and now the former Auschwitz guard comes face to face with an Auschwitz survivor in a German courtroom. Germany confronts its past just as violent anti-migrant attacks are on the rise. In Pakistan, thousands turn out at a funeral to mourn their hero, a killer. He was executed for murdering a provincial governor who had wanted to reform the harsh blasphemy laws. And the road to Mandalay - in a right-hand drive taxi, on a left-hand drive road. So what were the passengers talking about?


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b071ld6x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b071ld6z)
Fund Fee Rip-Off

A recent report has revealed that 20% of 'actively' managed equity funds are doing no more than track the stock market. That's even though investors are paying huge fees to fund managers to use their skill to buy shares in companies they thought would go up. It's a problem across Europe and consumers in Norway are so fed up with being ripped off they have launched a class action.

The UK Government has just launched a consultation into baffling Terms and Conditions (T&Cs), how they can be made more user-friendly. But the commercial radio sector is lobbying Europe to change the rules so we hear less small print gobbledegook on the radio. We speak to Siobhan Kenny Head of the Radiocentre, commercial radio's industry body.

This week there's been something of a pensions bonanza. Papers have been full of headlines warning of radical changes to come in the Budget in a few weeks time, the Pensions Minister Ros Altman launched a State Pension Age review and the Labour commissioned Independent Review of Retirement Income was published, suggesting that workers need to double the amount they are saving into workplace pension. But how does the UK compare with other countries when it comes to pensions?

In January - right at the height of the market volatility - individual investors pulled the most out from equity funds ever. Again and again the evidence is that people sell when the market is falling towards lows and buy when the market is rising and reaching its peak. Greg Davies, Head of Behavioural Finance at Barclays, explains these biases and what we are all getting wrong.

Presenter: Louise Cooper
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b071x885)
Series 48

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Mae Martin, Marcus Brigstocke and Gemma Arrowsmith to present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

This week the gang take a look at the impending EU Referendum and discuss the fallout from Super Tuesday with Channel 4 News' Chief Writer Felicity Spector.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b071ld71)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b071ld73)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b071x889)
Juliet Davenport, Clive Lewis MP, Mark Littlewood, Jacob Rees Mogg MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate Thornbury in Gloucestershire with a panel including the CEO of Good Energy Juliet Davenport, Labour Energy Minister Clive Lewis MP,the Director General of the Institute of Economic Affairs Mark Littlewood, and the Conservative MP Jacob Rees Mogg MP. Questions include EU referendum, migration from EU V Non EU countries, legalisation of prostitution, renewable energy and government subsidies and should the tackle be banned from the game of rugby at secondary schools?


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b071ld75)
Engaging in the EU Referendum debate. Should sex work be decriminalised?

Anita Anand takes your calls on a couple of the issues discussed on Any Questions? The EU referendum and whether or not sex work should be decriminalised.

The Questions.
I'm finding the debate around the EU referendum really boring. How would you make it more interesting for someone who is otherwise politically engaged?

My company produces highly sophisticated software used by some of the world's most complex companies. We can't find people we need with the right skills and 30% of my staff are from eastern Europe. Would Brexit be good for my company?

Where in our monogamous British culture would a decriminalised sex industry fit?

Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b04c9gsl)
Peter Brough - His Master's Voice

By James Maw and Tim Sullivan. Rob Brydon is ventriloquist Peter Brough and his doll Archie Andrews in a new play that tells the true story behind one of the most successful radio shows of all time. With Fenella Woolgar as Peggy Brough.

The 1950s BBC Radio show Educating Archie - with 16 million listeners - catapulted the ventriloquist Peter Brough from suburban obscurity to the heights of high society. The Royal Family were fans. His show introduced the world to Eric Sykes (writer), Tony Hancock (Archie's Tutor), Max Bygraves (another tutor) and Julie Andrews (Archie's girlfriend).

After eight years on radio, Educating Archie transferred to television. And yet, one day in 1961, Peter Brough locked the dummy in a suitcase and left him on the top of a wardrobe for forty years until, six years after the ventriloquist's death, Archie Andrews was put up for auction.

His Master's Voice tells the true story of what went wrong in the world of Archie Andrews and Peter Brough.

Written by James Maw and Tim Sullivan

Director and Producer: Jeremy Mortimer
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Black, White and Beethoven (b071tgbk)
Britain's music scene today is a rich, multi-cultural feast that draws on talent from all corners of society. Unless, that is, your passion is classical music. In Britain, and across Europe, performers, composers, teachers and institutions remain resolutely, predominantly white.

Why should this be, and is this a concern? Many believe steps to redress this imbalance are now long overdue, and that urgent action is required. But what should these actions be, and would they be successful?

Chi-chi Nwanoku and members of her Chineke! Orchestra, Europe's first professional Black and Minority Ethnic orchestra, talk about their lives in classical music: we also hear from other Black classical musicians about the circumstances of their work.
In Black White and Beethoven, Joseph Harker explores these issues - taking stock of where we are, and exploring some ideas that could help classical music to engage and reflect the full diversity of contemporary society.

Producer: Lyndon Jones for BBC Wales.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b071ld77)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Would a so called 'period policy' be a good idea for women allowing them to work flexibly and take time off around their menstrual cycle? We discuss why the idea has proved so controversial with broadcaster and columnist Julia Hartley-Brewer and writer Tanya Gold.

The pottery designer Emma Bridgewater tells us why her whole business is a homage to her mum how it feels to be a designer turned industrialist.

Jennifer Yuh Nelson is the director of the film Kung Fu Panda 3 and is one of the highest earning women directors in Hollywood. She tells us what it's like to be a woman leading the field in animation.

We hear from two teenagers Zoe and Emily and their mothers Rachel and Ann Marie on what it's like to grow up with disabilities as part of a television programme Born to Be Different.

The Orthodox Jewish Academic Lindsay Simmonds and the Muslim Activist Humera Khan tell us about the female voice in Judaism and Islam.

Louise Brooks was never one of the best known or highly paid actresses in Hollywood. She has transcended silent movies to become an iconic figure due to her unique look. Pamela Hutchinson a writer on silent film and Melody Bridges a director and writer discuss her career.

And we have music from the platinum selling, Grammy-winning and triple Brit nominated Jess Glynne

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Rebecca Myatt.


SAT 17:00 PM (b071ld79)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b071whgb)
Tax Avoidance

Global firms like Amazon, Google and Starbucks have been criticised for using clever accounting tricks to reduce their tax bills in the UK. But how much tax should they be paying? Evan Davis and guests discuss the whys and wherefores of the international tax regime, including the role of tax havens. Along the way, they'll digest the "Dutch sandwich" and the "double Irish" tax avoidance devices used by some multinationals. And given the widespread perception that many firms don't pay their fair share of tax, they'll assess efforts by the world's major economies to rewrite the rules on corporate tax.

Guests:

Heather Self, Tax Partner, Pinsent Mason

Rolf Rothuizen, Partner, RPS Legal, Amsterdam

Anthony Travers, Chairman, Cayman Islands Stock Exchange

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b071ld7k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b071ld7m)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071ld7p)
Labour has accused the Chancellor, George Osborne, of putting Prime Ministerial ambitions before policy, after he dropped plans to end or alter tax relief on pension contributions.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0729t61)
Clive Anderson, Danny Wallace, Bridget Christie, Dennis Morris, Luke Wright, Carla-Marie Williams, Emilie & Ogden, The Eskies

Clive Anderson and Danny Wallace are joined by Bridget Christie, Dennis Morris, Luke Wright and Carla-Marie Williams for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Emilie & Ogden and The Eskies.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0729t63)
Jenny Beavan

For more than 30 years Jenny Beavan has been designing beautiful and historically accurate costumes, for film and stage. But though she cares intensely how the costumes look on the actors and on screen, she has little interest in fashion or dressing up herself. So despite being called a bag lady at the Baftas she went along to collect her second Oscar in comfortable clothes.

Presenter - Becky Milligan
Producer- Shabnam Grewal and Elizabeth Cassin.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b071ld7t)
Hail Caesar, Don Quixote, Ta Nehisi Coates, Botticelli, Thirteen

Hail Caesar is the Coen Brothers' newest film - recalling the Golden Age of Hollywood: the scandal, the vice and the Studios' men who handled the catastrophes.
The RSC has adapted Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quixote in a new production in Stratford. Can they do justice to a book, more than 4 centuries old, which is often hailed as the The Greatest Work Of The Spanish Language?
Ta Nehisi Coates writes about the experience of young black America. His work is admired by the likes of Barack Obama and he's been described as The Young James Joyce of the hip-hop generation. We look at his latest work: The Beautiful Struggle
Botticelli Reimagined at The V+A examines the enduring impact of the Fifteenth century Florentine genius,
BBC Three's first online only drama is Thirteen, a kidnap thriller about a girl who escapes her captor 13 years after being abducted
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Liz Jensen, Crystal Mahey Morgan and Nicholas Rankin. The producer is Oliver Jones.

Main Image: Ivy Moxam (played by Jodie Comer), from Thirteen, BBC Three. Credit: BBC/Todd Anthony.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0729t65)
A Brief History of Disobedience

"Oh my goodness, look at that sign over there. Keep Off The Grass. Makes me wonder who put it there. Makes me wonder why I should keep off the grass. And it makes me want to go on the grass!"

American satirist Joe Queenan presents A Brief History of Disobedience, the follow up to his programmes on Blame, Shame, Anger and Irony. He travels in time from the Old Testament to Tarrytown, his home in suburban New York. He aims to discover the importance of not doing what we are told. So let your life be a counter friction to stop the machine.

With notable contributions from the archive - Gandhi, the Suffragettes, the Greenham Common Peace protestors. Our Heroes of Disobedience include Martin Luther, Geronimo, Woody Guthrie and The Doors. Plus Matthew Parris on Margaret Thatcher, Bill Finnegan on his barbarian days as a surfer and Karen Moline on writing dirty books. And finally, helpful hints about how to be usefully disobedient in everyday life.

Joe Queenan is an Emmy award winning broadcaster and writer.

Produced in Bristol by Miles Warde.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2016.


SAT 21:00 Riot Girls (b071s6nz)
The Life and Loves of a She Devil

Episode 2

by Fay Weldon, adapted by Joy Wilkinson. A darkly comic fairy tale about revenge, sex and power.

Ruth's campaign to punish her husband and his mistress is well-advanced, and now she will still stop at nothing to get the life, and the body, she desires.

'The Life and Loves of a She Devil', written in 1983, is a gleefully bawdy satire on the war of the sexes, and a fable about the rewards and dangers of our capacity for transformation.

It is part of Riot Girls on Radio 4, a series of no-holds-barred women's writing that includes Erica Jong's 'Fear of Flying' and original plays following three generations of women by Lucy Catherine and Ella Hickson.

Adapted by Joy Wilkinson
Directed by Abigail le Fleming.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b071ld7w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b071vjrm)
Historical Sex Abuse

The idea that we shouldn't speak ill of the dead has an ancient heritage dating as far back as 600BC. It's attributed to the Greek philosopher Chilon of Sparta, but judging by recent headlines around allegations of historic sex abuse it might not have much more of a shelf life. Police forces keen to redress claims that in the past they haven't treated victims fairly and to demonstrate they're not part of a an establishment cover up, are devoting huge resources to cases often dating back many decades and even when the alleged perpetrator is dead. Combine that with a press hungry for salacious gossip knowing that the dead can't sue for libel and it's open season on people who are not only unable to defend themselves, but who will never be brought to trial. The most famous example is the former Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath, but there are numerous others. Should the dead have the same rights as the living? Should they be presumed innocent until proven guilty? Is this just vindictive muck raking or do we owe the many victims of child abuse a duty to try to expose the truth, even after so many years have passed? If we aren't willing to expose what really happened 50 years ago, then what are the chances that we will ever face up to the truth of what happens today? There are those who argue that for too long the victim's voice has been ignored in our legal system and that these investigations help them get closure. But is that the same as justice? Should we hear these cases in court, or would they be better suited to some kind of truth and justice commission? In an increasingly victim-focused climate is our pursuit of historic crimes distorting the meaning of justice?
Chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Anne McElvoy and Mathew Taylor. Witnesses are Barbara Hewson, Peter Hitchens, Mark Watts and Malcolm Johnson.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b071sn2c)
Heat 8, 2016

(8/17)
Russell Davies puts another four would-be Brains of Britain through the toughest general knowledge test of them all. Which is the hottest planet in the solar system? Who painted the notorious 80th birthday portrait of Sir Winston Churchill, which he hated and which his widow destroyed after his death? What type of well is named after a region of France near the modern border with Belgium?

The winner today is assured a place in the semi-finals which begin after Easter - but all of the competitors will be going for as many points as they can, as the top-scoring runners-up across the series also go through.

A listener will also be challenging the competitors with his or her own questions, in an attempt to Beat the Brains.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b071s6pd)
Fox Running

Roger McGough presents the late Ken Smith's reading of his long poem, Fox Running. The recording of this urgent, driving poem about a man adrift in the city was made on cassette tape and given to the programme by Ken's wife Judi Benson. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 06 MARCH 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b072hlgv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Modern Welsh Voices (b03m3nv0)
The Eyas

The Eyas by Jim Perrin. The second of our original stories by modern Welsh writers.
When a young boy becomes obsessed with taming wild birds nature finds a way of retaliating.

Read by Stefan Rhodri
Directed by Helen Perry

A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b072hlgx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b072hlgz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b072hlh1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b072hlh3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b072hs5l)
St Francis Xavier's Cathedral in Adelaide

Bells on Sunday, which this week comes from St Francis Xavier's Cathedral in Adelaide, Australia. Founded in 1856, The Roman Catholic Cathedral lies in the heart of the city in Victoria Square. The church's bell tower was completed in 1966. The tower contains a peal of twelve bells from the Whitechapel Foundry. Seven were cast in 1881, three in 1995 and the tenor weighing twenty-eight and a half hundredweight in the key of D was cast in 1992. This week ringing 'Cambridge Surprise Maximus.'.


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (b071vjrp)
The Dining Room

The Lent Talks are a series of essays on different perspectives of the passion story. This year the theme is "Lent in the Landscape". Michael Banner visits reflects the famous Dining Hall at Trinity College Cambridge to reflect on the Last Supper and betrayal. Producer: Phil Pegum.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b072hlh5)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b072hs5n)
On Reflection

John McCarthy is joined by painter Ken Currie to explore the act of encountering our own self-image.

This craving to come face to face with ourselves - to see what we really are at the bottom of our souls, to discover our identity and meaning - is perhaps the work of our lives.

Sometimes pleasurable, occasionally surprising or reassuring, often strangely disconcerting, this act of looking at oneself in a reflective surface is so fundamental in our ongoing assessment of ourselves. It might be just a quick glance to check, "Do I look OK in this jacket? Do I look as tired as I feel?" Or a longer stare to assess the progress of the wrinkles around the eyes or emergence of grey in one's hair.

But sometimes we take a long look. Perhaps at times when we're disconcerted by life - apprehensive, frightened or ill. Then we ask questions like, "Is this what the world sees when it sees me? Is this really me?"

The programme includes readings from works by Angela Carter, Ted Hughes, and Elizabeth Jennings. There's music by Britten, Bill Evans and Debussy. The readers are Michael Lumsden and Chetna Pandya.

Produced by Rosie Boulton
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b072hs5q)
Goat Curry

As a child Adam Wright asked for farm toys every Christmas, his sole ambition was always to become a farmer. For a working class boy with no land, no connnections and no experience it's proven to be a tough task but with his partner, Vicky he now runs a thriving online business, raising goats and selling their meat all over the country.

Nancy Nicholson visits Adam and Vicky's farm at Keith in the North-East of Scotland.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b072hlh7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b072hlh9)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b072hs5s)
Plight of migrant children, Rabbi Lord Sacks, St Paul's Mosaic and Darwin

The clearance of the migrant camp in Calais has raised concerns about the welfare of unaccompanied minors there. Kevin Bocquet reports on the efforts being made to offer young migrants a home in the UK.

Lord Jonathan Sacks, the former Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth, has been awarded the 2016 Templeton Prize. He tells Edward how he plans to use the award.

A Chinese court has sentenced a Christian pastor to 14 years in jail for embezzlement after he protested about the forced removal of crosses from buildings. Martin Palmer discusses China's relationship with organised religion.

There has been uproar in Pakistan after the government executed Mumtaz Quadri, for the killing in 2011 of the Governor of Punjab for his criticism of the country's blasphemy laws. Shaaima Khalil reports from Islamabad and author Innes Bowen explains how some Muslims in the UK have reacted to the death of Quadri.

New high resolution images of the three mosaic domes of St Paul's Cathedral's Quire ceiling have gone online. Do they contain images that support Darwin's Theory of Evolution as some suggest? Darwin expert Nick Spencer has had a look.

A book out this week suggests students of applied sciences such as engineering are over represented in violent extremist groups in some Muslim countries. Steffen Hertog is co-author of 'Engineers of Jihad'.

For many families, Mothering Sunday will be a sad reminder of a stillborn baby. The Rev Lorna Hood is the former Moderator of the Church of Scotland and was a hospital chaplain for 22 years. She tells Edward why it was her work with women who had a stillborn baby that was the most challenging to her faith.

Producers:
David Cook
Helen Lee

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b072hs5v)
All We Can

Dr Jill Barber presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of All We Can
Registered Charity No 291691
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'All We Can'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'All We Can'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b072hlhc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b072hlhf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b072hs5x)
Lent Pilgrimage 4: Alone and Together

On Lent pilgrimage, Mothering Sunday's service comes live from St Martin-in-the-Fields, taking the theme from the CTBI Lent resources: 'Alone and Together.' On the great pilgrimage of life, it is often necessary to journey alone, whilst at other times, we share our path with others. Never is this more apparent than within the family setting where there is a delicate balance between community and independence. Reflecting on the line "A Sword will Pierce your own Soul Too", the Revd. Dr. Anna Poulson considers her own experience of motherhood. The service is led by the Rev. Dr. Sam Wells with music from St. Martin's Voices, directed by Andrew Earis.

Producer: Katharine Longworth.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b071x88c)
The Love of Honours

Adam Gopnik reflects on our age old love of honours and prizes in every walk of life.

"We want honours not to prevent others from having them but to hold them ourselves. People kill each other for power; but they merely ridicule each other for prizes."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpd)
Great Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Great Tit. That metallic 'tea-cher, tea-cher' song of the great tit is instantly recognisable and you can hear it on mild days from mid-December onwards. It's the origin of the old country name, 'Saw-Sharpener'.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b072hlhk)
News programme presented by Paddy O'Connell. Including guess the Radio 4 mother, the new camp for migrants in Dunkirk and detecting diesel during your day. Reviewing the Sunday newspapers - financial wiz Nicola Horlick, cartoonist Paul Thomas and Any Answers presenter Anita Anand.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b072ht0m)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b072ht0p)
Dr Dame Sue Ion

Kirsty Young's castaway is the engineer and nuclear scientist Dr Dame Sue Ion.

The first woman to be awarded the highly prestigious President's Medal by the Royal Academy of Engineering, she has worked her way to the heart of an industry that remains very contentious.

Her passion for understanding how and why the world works the way it does first began as she tinkered for hours at her parents' kitchen table with a little chemistry set.

Today she goes into schools to encourage more girls to take up engineering and her enthusiasm for the subject has galvanised many to take up the discipline.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b072hlhs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b071sn2k)
Series 74

Episode 2

Gyles Brandreth, Tim Rice & Esther Rantzen join Paul Merton and Nicholas Parsons as they try to speak without deviation, hesitation or repetition on such diverse subjects as Bubble & Squeak, Kiwis and A Leap Year in the classic panel game.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b072ht0r)
BBC Food and Farming Awards 2016: The Finalists

Sheila Dillon unveils the list of this year's BBC Food & Farming Awards finalists.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b072hlhv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b072hlhx)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Back to the Ice (b072htqp)
In 1979, as a 21-year-old graduate, BBC weather presenter Peter Gibbs was sent to the end of the Earth, spending more than two years at the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station. It was an experience that shaped his life. Half a lifetime later, he's returning for the first time.

Halley is celebrating its 60th anniversary. First established in 1956 on the Brunt Ice Shelf - a floating mass of ice hundreds of metres thick in parts, which flows off the Antarctic continent to the sea - Halley is the cornerstone of the British Antarctic Survey's scientific research on the white continent.

At Cape Town, Peter boards the Royal Research Ship 'Ernest Shackleton' for a two-week voyage across the vast Southern Ocean. Docking beside the ice shelf, he rides a snowcat to the Halley site to find out more about how the science being done today compares with the observations he took himself three decades ago, and how a new generation is coping with life in the coldest, driest, windiest, most isolated place on Earth.

Peter talks to scientists including space weather expert Richard Horne, glaciologist Hilmar Gudmundsson, and polar mapping specialist Andrew Fleming to understand more about Halley's vital role in data collection and analysis. He explores Halley's architecture - a bold new design of linked modules elevated above the snow on hydraulic legs fitted with giant skis - and asks whether the millions spent at Halley is money well spent.

Finally, for old times' sake, Peter repeats an experiment he himself performed hundreds of times during his Antarctic posting, working with meteorologist Amy Valach to launch a weather balloon loaded with scientific instruments into the chilly Antarctic skies.

Producer: Matthew Teller
A Whistledown Production.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b071x87m)
Hadlow College, Kent

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Hadlow College in Kent.

Matt Biggs, Anne Swithinbank and Pippa Greenwood answer the questions from the audience on trees suitable for small gardens, making peace with pests, and plants fit for a queen. They also take time to reminisce on their own days as horticultural students.

And Eric takes a look around Down House, home of keen botanist Charles Darwin and where he penned On the Origin of Species.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b072htqr)
Sunday Omnibus: Migration

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the reasons for migration, the impact on those left behind and the question of identity in your new homeland, in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b072htqt)
Sylvia's Lovers by Elizabeth Gaskell

Episode 1

Sylvia Dobson's cousin, Philip, lives for her, he loves her totally but Sylvia is in love with seafaring whaler, Charlie Kinraid.

Set in 1790s Yorkshire.- the time of the Napoleonic wars. It takes place in Monkshaven (ie.Whitby).

The Press Gangs were always lurking when the whale boats were returning from Greenland with their cargo. They intercepted the boats, seized the men and pressed them into service with the Royal Navy to fight the French.

Elizabeth Gaskell last (completed) novel dramatised by Ellen Dryden

Elizabeth Gaskell ...... Barbara Flynn
Sylvia ...... Jodie Comer
Philip ...... Graeme Hawley
Charlie Kinraid ...... Chris Connel
Bell ...... Siobhan Finneran
Daniel ..... Paul Copley
Kester/Donkin ...... Jonathan Keeble
Molly ...... Nichola Burley
Mrs. Corney ....... Olwen May

Director: Pauline Harris

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2016.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b072htqw)
Michael Holroyd - A Strange Eventful History

Michael Holroyd is one of our leading biographers. He discusses A Strange Eventful History, his revealing biography of some of British theatre's most influential figures, Ellen Terry and Henry Irving.

Henry Irving - a merchant's clerk who became the saviour of British theatre - and Ellen Terry, who made her first theatre appearance as soon as she could walk, were the king and queen of the Victorian stage. Creatively interdependent, they founded a power-house of arts at the Lyceum Theatre, with Bram Stoker as business manager, where they recast Shakespeare's plays on an epic scale and took the company on lucrative and exhilarating international tours.

In this 2009 group biography Michael Holroyd explores the public and private lives of the two actors, showing how their artistic legacy and their brilliant but troubled children came to influence the modern world.

Presented by James Naughtie.

April's Bookclub choice : Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout (2009)

Interviewed guest : Michael Holroyd
Presenter : James Naughtie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b072htxz)
Women Poets

Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry written by women including Charlotte Mew, Wendy Cope and Kathleen Jamie. Maya Angelou reads her own work in a recording from the archives. Other readers are Lucy Black and Fiona Shaw. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b071tgc6)
Special Guardianships: Keeping Things in the Family?

Special guardianship orders are a way of giving legal status to those - usually grandparents, aunts and uncles, brothers and sisters - who come forward to care for children when their parents can't. SGOs were designed to let children grow up with family, instead of in care - once a relative is granted special guardianship, the council steps backs and the guardian can raise the child without social services interfering.
The use of special guardianship orders has been rising-last year more than 3,000 of them were made.
But special guardianship breaks down more often - and more quickly - than adoption.
And in some cases children have been neglected, abused, or murdered.
The family court service Cafcass and the Association of Directors of Children's Services have warned that weak assessments of the risks of family placements are a 'real risk' for children.
The government has re-written the law on how special guardians are assessed. But with court deadlines and growing pressure on social workers and budgets, will it make children safer? Jane Deith investigates.
Producer: Emma Forde.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0729t63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b072hlhz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b072hlj1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b072hlj3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b072hvmy)
Liz Barclay

The radio highlights of the last week as chosen by Liz Barclay: the value of books, art, and music came under scrutiny this week; heart breaking tales reached us from Syria, and Ian Hislop recalled many experiences of court appearances in libel cases. It's all topped off with a fishy tale from Susan Calman. Pick of the Week this week is stuffed with news and drama, food and philosophical discussion -

PoTW production team: Kevin Mousley, Kay Bishton and Elodie Chatelain.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b072hvn0)
It's Mothers' Day, and The Bull is busy. The Brookfield Farm Archers celebrate with a meal. Jill is miffed that Pip is distracted by texting Matthew. David reassures Pip that absence will make the heart grow fonder - that is what happened when Ruth was in New Zealand after all. Ruth finds the day difficult because it is the first Mothers' Day since her mum passed away.
Helen mistakes Rob's card and flowers as being for her - they are for Ursula. Rob makes a fuss of Ursula while asking Helen to clear up after Henry, to give Ursula a break. Helen decides not to join the family at The Bull. Over their meal, Ursula says Helen can't be trusted to look after one child, let alone two. She says Helen is too attached to Henry, which is a problem that boarding school would solve. Ursula says it was the making of Rob, and he remarks that things weren't great at home when he was young. Henry and Ursula take part in Clean for the Queen. David takes a family photo of them - without Helen.


SUN 19:15 Wordaholics (b01rvptv)
Series 2

Episode 3

Gyles Brandreth chairs the word-obsessed comedy panel show.

Lloyd Langford and Susie Dent compete against Dave Gorman and Natalie Haynes to find out who has the most word know-how.

Dave Gorman guesses the meaning of the phrase 'living on Queen Street' from the late 1800s; Natalie Haynes unravels the word 'autodysomophobia'; Lloyd Langford guesses the meaning of the Yiddish word 'farpotshket'; and Susie Dent shares her love of the current Liverpool word 'twirlies' and explains the meaning of the word 'quockerwodger'.

Both teams also have a go at coming up with modern phrases to replace the old cliches 'When life give you lemons, make lemonade' and 'Beauty is only skin deep'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


SUN 19:45 Leap (b072hvn2)
Our Italics

The idea of 'leap' can include conceptual leaps of faith, or hope, as well as the crossing over from one side to another. Stuart Evers explores the stages or leaps in a child's development and in particular that first momentous occasion when a parent recognises that his child has told a deliberate untruth.

From then on, the parent learns about the lies and loves of their offspring and, in this story, a single parent father reflects on what he has learned from his daughter.

Written by by Stuart Evers
Read by Anton Lesser

Produced by Lizzie Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b071x87y)
Fear of Flying, Evan Davis

Roger Bolton discusses audience comments about The Bottom Line with Evan Davis, finds out about Radio 4's new comedy commissions, and hears listener reactions to an explicit drama.

It's been ten years since Evan Davis started presenting The Bottom Line, Radio 4's business chat show which aimed to bring senior and expert voices from the City to a broader audience. Evan reflects on the programme with Roger Bolton and addresses listener concerns that the focus of the programme is too narrowly aimed at the City's highest echelons, that business reporting has been trying to gloss over the city's failures in the financial crash, and about the number of women appearing on the programme.

Last week, some listeners were shocked to turn on their radios at 10:45am and hear four letter words and explicit content in Fear of Flying, Radio 4 dramatisation of Erica Jong's novel about sexual liberation. Was Radio 4 right to air the drama directly after Woman's Hour? Should radio have a watershed, like TV?

Sioned Wiliam is Radio 4's new commissioning editor for comedy and has just released her first full set of commissions. She joins Feedback for the first time since her appointment to discuss the future of comedy on the network. What kind of new voices will she bring to the network? Will she try and put her own stamp on old favourites? And do shrinking budgets mean Radio 4 comedy is under threat?

And the Government has recently released a number of reports, ahead of the White Paper expected to outline their plans to reform the BBC. Colin Browne from The Voice of the Listener and Viewer joins Feedback to explain what the reports reveal and what the implications might be for BBC radio.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b071x87t)
Tony Warren, Louise Rennison, Lord Chorley, George Kennedy, John Chilton

Reeta Chakrabarti on
Tony Warren, who created the long-running TV soap Coronation Street, embedding a working-class north of England cast of characters in the national consciousness.
Louise Rennison, comedian and author of young adult fiction, whose frank and funny books won her a loyal following amongst teenage girls.
Lord Chorley, a parliamentarian and conservationist, whose many public roles included former chairman of the National Trust.
George Kennedy, the versatile American character actor, who won an Oscar for his role in the film Cool Hand Luke.
And John Chilton, the trumper


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b071ld6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b072hs5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b071sx1h)
Labour and the Bomb

Jeremy Corbyn's opposition to the renewal of Britain's nuclear deterrent has opened up divisions within the Labour Party that run very deep. The issue will come to a head when Parliament votes on whether to replace the Trident weapons system, following a recommendation from the Government. While Labour formally reviews its position, will Corbyn be able avoid a damaging split that beset the party in the 1980s?

It was a Labour government which decided to make Britain a nuclear power. "We've got to have this thing, whatever it costs. We've got to have a bloody Union Jack on top of it," declared Ernest Bevin, Foreign Secretary in the postwar Labour government. Ever since that decision in 1946, the question of whether to keep 'the bomb' has divided the party between those who believe it is the cornerstone of Britain's defence policy within NATO and others who have long campaigned to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Twice before in Opposition the party has opted for unilateral disarmament, only for the policy to be reversed after a period of acrimonious debate and electoral defeat.

In this programme, the veteran political reporter John Sergeant examines Labour's troubled relationship with the bomb. Former party leader Neil Kinnock and other senior figures reflect on how the party discarded unilateralism in the late 1980s and offer advice on what lessons can be learned. Can Jeremy Corbyn overcome opposition with the Parliamentary Labour Party to changing the official policy of multilateral disarmament? Does his recent suggestion of maintaining submarines without nuclear missiles satisfy those who want Britain to disarm come what may?

Producer: Peter Snowdon.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b072hlj7)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b072hvn4)
George Parker of The Financial Times looks at how the newspapers are covering the big stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b071vlmv)
The Coen brothers on synchronised swimming and communism

The Coen Brothers talk to Antonia Quirke about Hail Caesar, a parody of Hollywood in the early 50s and explain why they believe there were Reds under the beds in the film industry at the time.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b072hs5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 07 MARCH 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b072hlkn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b071vjrk)
The debt collection industry, Spousal job loss

The debt collection industry: Laurie Taylor explores what happens when everyday forms of borrowing, such as credit cards, personal loans and store cards, spiral out of control. He talks to Joe Deville, Lecturer in Mobile Work at the University of Lancaster, and author of a study which offers a vivid account of consumer default and the evolution of agencies designed to collect people's debts. He's joined by Adrienne Roberts, Lecturer in International Politics at the University of Manchester, who has researched the growing reliance of households on borrowed money.

Also, how do couples react to spousal job loss? Karon Gush, Senior Research Officer at the University of Essex, considers the ways in which couples re-configure their lives and finances in response to one person losing paid employment.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b072hs5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b072hlkq)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b072hlks)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b072hlkv)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b072hlkx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b073mhmm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day Shirley Jenner, Lecturer at the University of Manchester.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b072hwfw)
Farmers for and against the EU; Livestock and dog fouling

As forty leading UK farmers publicly weigh in behind EU membership, with an open letter challenging those in favour of Brexit, we debate the pros and cons. Borders farmer and vet Nigel Miller speaks in favour of Bremain, while Berkshire farmer Colin Rayner argues in favour of Brexit.

One of the most contentious issues that can arise between farmers and dog walkers is that of dog fouling, which carries the risk of spreading disease among livestock. One such disease, for example, can cause miscarriages in cattle. We hear why NFU Scotland has been carrying out a poster campaign to educate dog walkers about these risks.

The nominations for the BBC's Food and farming Awards have been revealed. Farming Today is taking a particular interest in the 'Future Food' category. Julia Glotz, managing editor of The Grocer magazine, who's judging this category discusses the shortlist.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b072hlkz)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03wphhd)
Blackbird (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the blackbird. Blackbirds are thrushes and the brown female often has a few speckles on her throat to prove it. Velvety, black and shiny, the males sport an eye-ring as yellow as a spring daffodil and a bill glowing like a buttercup. Happily blackbirds aren't doing too badly. There's so many of them that their territories often overlap so that where one song leaves off, another song begins.


MON 06:00 Today (b072j0mj)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b072j0ml)
Scotland

Start the Week comes from Glasgow this week. As the debate over the EU Referendum continues Kirsty Wark looks back at the Scottish Referendum with the historians Tom Devine and Chris Whatley. How much did the history of the union from 1707 and Scotland's sense of identity play a role in the public vote and imagination? The poet Kathleen Jamie wrote a poem a week to mark the momentous changes taking place in Scotland last year. Jamie is well-known for her celebration of the country's wild landscape, but the artist Angus Farquhar is focused on transforming a very different piece of Scottish heritage - the 60s modernist ruin, St Peter's Seminary.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b072j0mn)
Seamus Heaney's Aeneid Book VI

Episode 1

Seamus Heaney was working on a translation of book VI of Virgil's Aeneid in the last months of his life .

Ian McKellen reads the poet's posthumously published final work in which Aeneas travels into the underworld to meet the spirit of his father. It's a story that had captivated Seamus Heaney from his schooldays. But the work took on a special significance for him after the death of his own father, becoming a touchstone to which he would return as an adult. His noble and moving translation of Book VI bears the fruit of a lifetime's concentration upon it: he began translating passages in the 1980s, and was finalising the work right up to the summer of his death.

Given the themes of the posthumously released Book VI, there is added poignancy in this final gift to his readers - a work which marks the end of Heaney's poetic journey.

Then as her fit passed away and her raving went quiet,
Heroic Aeneas began: 'No ordeal, O Sibyl, no new
Test can dismay me, for I have foreseen
And foresuffered all. But one thing I pray for
Especially: since here the gate opens, they say,
To the King of the Underworld's realms, and here
In these shadowy marshes the Acheron floods
To the surface, vouchsafe me one look,
One face-to-face meeting with my dear father.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b072j0mq)
Black Women and mental-health services; Jude Kelly

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

According to the latest figures by the Mental Health Foundation, Black and Minority Ethnic groups are more likely to be diagnosed with mental health problems and more likely to be diagnosed and admitted to hospital. The 2015 Mental Health Bulletin found that more women than men use mental health services. We discuss how fitting into these demographics effects Black women's mental health specifically.

Jude Kelly, Artistic Director of the Southbank Centre, discusses the highlights of this year's Women of the World Festival starting Tuesday.

A new campaign from political group the Women's Equality Party is encouraging victims of sexual assault in London to pinpoint where their attack took place on an interactive online map so they can create a map of violence against women in the capital.

Helen Stevenson's memoir Love Like Salt documents her life with her daughter Clara who was diagnosed as a baby with cystic fibrosis. She talks to Jane about raising Clara in France and why she moved back to the UK.

Glasgow-born Janey Godley turned an extraordinary and traumatic background and propensity for chaos into best-selling autobiography and a career in comedy. Her daughter Ashley has followed in her footsteps as a comedian and both of them are appearing at the Glasgow International Comedy Festival this month. They join us to talk about what their mother-daughter and working relationships are like, given the candid and outspoken nature of both of their stand-up.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b072j325)
Jane Eyre

Episode 6

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Romance, passion and danger wrapped up in a
glorious love story.
Episode Six
When Jane returns to Thornfield she realises she has
never loved Rochester more. But she knows he will
marry Blanche and she will leave and
never see him again.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b06yr7ft)
Be My Baby

Grace Dent presents untold stories of 21st century Britain.

After a week-long fling with a girl he met on Tagged, 21 year old Thomas is shocked to hear she is pregnant.

He stands up to the mark, offering support and going with her to the scans, but she suddenly cuts off all communication. She doesn’t return his calls or messages and Thomas can only guess what is going on. Has he done something wrong? Does she just want to do this on her own? The ex- boyfriend has moved back so perhaps the child isn’t actually his?

In October he sees a baby girl being pushed around town. He sees her photos on Facebook. He knows his life will change forever if he is found to be the father, but Thomas can’t cope with not knowing.

He is going to court to force a DNA test to find out one way or another.

Producer: Sarah Bowen


MON 11:30 Dot (b072j327)
Series 1

The Mystery at St Horribly-Vulture's School for Boys

Dot's sent to St Horribly Vulture's School for Boys to enlist a teacher for 'Shhhh Bletchley Park'.

But is he the right sort of chap for the job?

Comic adventures with Dot and the gals from personnel in the rollicking wartime comedy by Ed Harris.

Dot ..... Fenella Woolgar
Myrtle ..... Kate O'Flynn
Millicent ..... Jane Slavin
Peabody ..... David Acton
Mr Belltower ..... Brian Protheroe
Apsley ..... Sam Rix

Director: Jessica Mitic

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b072hll1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b072j329)
Mar Elian Monastery

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

This monastery in the remote Syrian town of Qaryatayn held the 1,000 year old tomb of a saint, Mar Elian, who was revered by Christians and Muslims alike. After the Islamic State group took Palmyra, they came to the monastery of Mar Elian, kidnapped its priest and later bulldozed the site. A British archaeologist who lived and worked there for many years tells the legends of Mar Elian and her close relationship with the community.

This episode was first broadcast on 7 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Doorway to Mar Elian
Credit: Emma Loosley

Contributors: Emma Loosley, University of Exeter; Father Jacques Murad, formerly priest at Mar Elian

With thanks to Shadi Atalla


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b072hll3)
Lip fillers, Personal telephone fundraising

Consumer affairs programme.


MON 12:57 Weather (b072hll5)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b072j32c)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b072j32f)
Amrita Sher-Gil: This Is Me

Sunil Khilnani tells the story of the painter Amrita Sher-Gil - 20th century India's first art star - who died under shrouded circumstances in 1941 at the age of just 28.

Sher-Gil left a vortex of stories behind her: about her narcissism and her love affairs. But even more compelling than the stories are the canvasses she left behind.

Drawing from European artists like Cezanne, Gauguin, and Brancusi, and from Indian ones - the makers of the Buddhist wall paintings in the caves of Ajanta, and the miniature painters of the Pahari tradition - Amrita Sher-Gil managed to do something radical within Indian culture: to declare her own vision - a woman's vision - vital in the history of art.

She endowed successive generations of Indians with something scarce in the culture: an example of an autonomous, creative female.

Featuring interviews with artists Bharti Kher and Vivan Sundaram.

Readings by Sheenu Das.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith
Original music composed by Talvin Singh.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b072hvn0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Tony McHale - Dead in the Water (b03nt8n9)
In a bustling fairground best friends Holly and Nicole are recording sounds for a school science project. Amongst the melee of people, rides and music Holly overhears snippets of a conversation between two men, the words "poison...shooting...dead in the water". Could she have just stumbled on a murder plot? With Nicole's help Holly sets out to investigate and when the girls identify the voices on the recording, they have their first clue. But can they stop the murder in time? As Holly and Nicole try and discover the intended victim before time runs out they begin to realise they might just have stumbled on something even more sinister than they could ever have imagined.

A thriller from Tony McHale starring Yasmin Paige (Submarine, Pramface) as Holly and Lily Lovelace (The Fades, Skins) as Nicole.

Holly ..... Yasmin Paige
Nicole ..... Lily Loveless
Vickers ..... Gary Amers
Joel ..... Jody Latham
Kay ..... Jo Hartley,
Maria ..... Kacey Ainsworth
Police Officer ..... Paul Stonehouse
Keely ..... Sinead Michael.

Writer ..... Tony McHale
Director ..... Heather Larmour


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b072j34f)
Heat 9, 2016

(9/17)
The quest for the 63rd BBC Brain of Britain reaches heat nine, with Russell Davies in the question master's chair and four contestants from the Home Counties and the West Midlands.

What name for a type of seafarer or pirate is thought to derive from a Caribbean word meaning 'to dry meat on a barbecue'? Which was the first western to win an Oscar for Best Picture?

The contestants face these and many other tough teasers on their way to a possible semi-final place. A Brain of Britain listener also stands a chance of being a winner by providing fiendish questions with which to try and 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b072ht0r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Greatest Ever Faker (b072j3fy)
He was a 19th century historian, poet and activist. He founded the modern Eisteddfod - at a gathering atop London's Primrose Hill - uncovered medieval poems, an ancient alphabet and numerous manuscripts that stand as a lodestone of Welsh literary culture and decisively shaped modern Wales's idea of itself.

The thing is: it was mostly fiction - lies and forgeries.

Gareth Gwynn sets out on the trail of Ned of Glamorgan, aka Iolo Morganwg, to find out whether a modern Welsh man can really be an honest Welshman when his national traditions are based on falsehood. Along the way he can't resist the temptation to create a few traditions of his own, leading down some blind and dangerous philosophical alleys.....


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b072j3g0)
Storytelling in Christianity

In a special programme recorded at the the Bloxham Literary Festival, William Crawley and guests explore the rich history of Judeo-Christian storytelling. How old are some of the most popular and familiar biblical stories and where did they come from? How important has the telling, re-telling and adaptation of stories been throughout the history of Christianity? What challenges do they pose to people of faith?

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b072hll7)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b072hll9)
A Brussels summit on tackling the largest refugee crisis since the Second World War is extended. EU diplomats say the Turkish government is asking for billions of pounds of extra money in return for taking back migrants who are denied asylum.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b072j3g2)
Series 74

Episode 3

Stephen Fry, Jenny Eclair, Josie Lawrence and Nish Kumar join host Nicholas Parsons to play Britain's longest running and best loved panel game. Topics tackled without deviation, hesitation or repetition include Salvador Dali, The Great Fire of London and The Easter Bunny.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b072j3g4)
Eddie and Clarrie discuss how clean the village has been since the Clean for the Queen event. Lynda comes to inspect the shepherd's hut and finds it scruffy. When Lynda's plans get too elaborate for Eddie, he complains that those requirements were never part of the plan. Her new demands include a fold down bed. Still not satisfied, Lynda asks for even more - she would like Eddie to work on the garden as well.
Meanwhile, Ed, Joe and Clarrie discuss plans for Eddie's 65th birthday. Clarrie suggests a surprise barn dance, and they elect to ask David if they can have it at Brookfield. Clarrie wants to invite Alf Grundy (Eddie's long lost half-brother) to the party, but Joe is hesitant given their bad blood in the past.
Lynda shows Robert the designs for her garden. Robert is impressed, but Lynda is anxious about the shepherd's hut that Eddie is building. Will he deliver on his promise? Robert feels quite inspired by Lynda's innovations, and comes up with the idea of opening the garden on the Queen's official birthday. Lynda is concerned because that doesn't give them long...


MON 19:15 Front Row (b072hllc)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b072j325)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Brexit: What Happens to Scotland? (b072w537)
Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has already signalled that a BREXIT carried on English votes would trigger a second Scottish independence referendum, but that raises a whole host of fascinating questions. Would Scots actually have an appetite to leave the Union with England so soon after being bounced out of the Union with Brussels? If they did, would Brussels, smarting at the ignominious withdrawal of the UK, fast-track Scottish membership of Europe as a snub to London? If Scotland was let (back) in, how would it sit with regards to the single currency and the Schengen area?
Sarah Smith explores the impact of Brexit on Scotland.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0736vv8)
Power to the People?

Will devolution bring back the power to England's cities and regions that they once had? And, if so, will all local authorities fare equally? Michael Robinson explores the history of local government and asks if old freedoms are now set to return under the new deal promised by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne.

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


MON 21:00 Cancer Moonshot (b0725d18)
Episode 2

US Vice President Joe Biden is leading a Cancer Moonshot with $1 billion injection of cash. He is asking researchers to work more closely together and share their data to develop better ways of detecting cancer and to come up with new treatments. On this side of the Atlantic, Cancer Research UK has announced a series of Grand Challenges to find innovative therapies.

Even veterans of false dawns in the war against cancer believe that these campaigns have arrived at a good time. They say that we're on the cusp of a new era of a brighter outlook for cancer patients. This new era depends on earlier diagnosis, more accurate surgery and radiotherapy, and some new kinds of drugs.

Dr Graham Easton talks to doctors and scientists about how technology now allows them to read the genetic signature of each individual cancer, which can lead to personalised treatments. He finds out about how treatments that harness the body's immune system are leading to some remarkable recoveries for a handful of patients with some specific cancers, such as melanoma.

Graham also asks if prevention could be better than cure, and if the extra funding going into cancer research is enough to make a difference.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b072j0ml)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b072hllf)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b072hllh)
EU leaders discuss Turkey's request for billions more in aid to help ease the migration crisis

Will the money make a difference to refugees already there?
The former tennis world number one, Maria Sharapova, has revealed that she failed a drugs test at the Australian Open.
We cast for views on the EU among Scotland's fishermen..


MON 22:45 15 Minute Drama (b04lpsbx)
The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

The Letter

In Rachel Joyce's best selling novel, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, Queenie Hennessy is told she has days to live. She sends a letter of rose pink paper in which she bids goodbye to Harold Fry. It is a letter that inspires a walk, a cast of well-wishers, a journey of its own. Harold will save her.

Harold's story began its life as an award winning Radio 4 play so it only seems apt that this companion novel should grace the airwaves too.

In this novel there is a second letter - a quieter, longer, more complicated letter. It is in this one that Queenie reveals the shocking and beautiful truth of her life. It is Queenie's story and it is a love song to the man she loves.

'It's all very well for a man to step out of his front door and tell his friend to wait while he walks the length of England. It's an entirely different kettle of fish when you are the woman at the other end.'

Directed by Tracey Neale.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b071tgc0)
Tip of the Tongue

It's an experience we've all had - desperately trying to recall a word. You might know the letter it begins with, the letter it ends with, but it just won't pop into your head. So how will Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright cope as we try and induce this most frustrating state: Tip of the Tongue?

They are put under the spotlight by psychologist Dr Meredith Shafto, and try to find ways round it with the help of somebody who can memorise a 1000-digit number in an hour - memory Grandmaster Ed Cooke.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b072j4cd)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 08 MARCH 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b072hln3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b072j0mn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b072hln5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b072hln7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b072hln9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b072hlnc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b073m7nq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day Shirley Jenner, Lecturer at the University of Manchester.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b072jdq9)
RPA damning report, Forage Aid for Cumbria, Land access

DEFRA Secretary of State still supports the work of the Rural Payments Agency despite a damning report.
Forage from across the UK is being delivered to Cumbrian farmers recovering from the floods.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby29)
Grey Heron

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Grey Heron. The Grey Heron makes a loud croaking sound, often standing in an ungainly way on a tree-top which it might share with many others for nesting - the heronry.


TUE 06:00 Today (b073m7ns)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b072jdqc)
Venki Ramakrishnan on ribosomes

All the information that's needed for life is written in our DNA. But how do we get from DNA code to biological reality? That's the job of the ribosomes - those clever molecular machines that are found in every living cell. And in 2008 Venki Ramakrishnan was awarded the Nobel Prize for determining their structure. Jim talks to Venki about the frantic race to crack the structure of the ribosome, probably the most important biological molecule after DNA; why he thinks the Nobel Prize is a terrible thing for science; and his new job as President of the Royal Society.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b072jdqf)
Mark Lawson talks to Marvin Gaye Chetwynd

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter.

Here he talks to the artist and Turner Prize nominee, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd.

Producer Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b072jdqh)
Seamus Heaney's Aeneid Book VI

Episode 2

Seamus Heaney was working on a translation of book VI of Virgil's Aeneid in the last months of his life .

Ian McKellen reads the poet's posthumously published final work in which Aeneas travels into the underworld to meet the spirit of his father. It's a story that had captivated Seamus Heaney from his schooldays. But the work took on a special significance for him after the death of his own father, becoming a touchstone to which he would return as an adult. His noble and moving translation of Book VI bears the fruit of a lifetime's concentration upon it: he began translating passages in the 1980s, and was finalising the work right up to the summer of his death.

Given the themes of the posthumously released Book VI, there is added poignancy in this final gift to his readers - a work which marks the end of Heaney's poetic journey.

Then as her fit passed away and her raving went quiet,
Heroic Aeneas began: 'No ordeal, O Sibyl, no new
Test can dismay me, for I have foreseen
And foresuffered all. But one thing I pray for
Especially: since here the gate opens, they say,
To the King of the Underworld's realms, and here
In these shadowy marshes the Acheron floods
To the surface, vouchsafe me one look,
One face-to-face meeting with my dear father.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b072hlnf)
Carrie Underwood, EU Campaigns and Women, Clemence Poesy

Carrie Underwood is an American country music singer, songwriter and actress. She rose to fame as the winner of the fourth season of American Idol in 2005, and has since become one of the most successful artists in any musical genre. She performs live on the programme.

We ask how well are women's voices and interests being represented by arguments on either side of the leave/remain debate ahead of the referendum in June?

Jane speak to actor Clemence Poesy and the producer, Nikki Parrot, about a new film, The Ones Below, a psychological thriller in which maternal ambivalence is cleverly explored.

Professor Edit Morley became the first female professor at an English university when she was appointed
Professor of English Language at Reading University in 1908. Her memoir is being published for the first time on International Women's Day. We discuss her legacy and how much life has changed for women academics over the last one hundred years.

What is disruptive innovation and why does it create excellent opportunities for women? Romaney O'Malley, general manager for AIG Belgium & Luxembourg, explains.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b072jdqk)
Jane Eyre

Episode 7

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Episode Seven
Mr Rochester has a wife. And where is the Jane Eyre
of yesterday?

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


TUE 11:00 Saving Science from the Scientists (b072jdqm)
Episode 1

Is science quite as scientific as it's supposed to be?

After years of covering science in the news, Alok Jha began to wonder whether science is as rigorous as it should be, and in this two-part series, he will try to find out.

Many of us might be forgiven for assuming that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is a precise and controlled process, one that involves detailed experiments, careful analysis, peer review and demonstrable evidence. But what if it's not as simple as that?

Scientists are human beings after all, so what if they are prone to the same weaknesses, failings and uncertainties as everyone else? And what would that mean for their findings?

Alok delves into dodgy data, questionable practices and genuine ambiguity to ask if human decision making is impeding scientific progress, and if anything can be done about it.

Along the way he hears from academics who think almost all science is wrong, scientists who think the system is in crisis and those who say error and uncertainty are actually an integral part of science's creative process. He'll also talk to a former professor caught out after going to the ultimate extreme - faking his data - to find out what drives someone to betray their entire field.

Producer: Faizal Farook.


TUE 11:30 Turntable Tales (b072jfcr)
Berliner to Gramophone

In the first of two programmes telling the story of the record-playing turntable, Colleen Murphy spins through its early history and the dramatic take-up of this new technology in Edwardian society. It was an enthusiasm as spectacular as the computer's rise at the end of the same century and its impact on the music industry was profound.

Colleen talks to John Liffen of the Science Museum and Christopher Proudfoot of the British Phonograph and Gramophone Society about the earliest machines arriving from the United States by way of the German Emigre inventor Emile Berliner. She finds out why the HMV (His Master's Voice) image wasn't initially created for the Gramophone at all, and most important of all she gets to hear the sound qualities of the machines that developed in the first two decades of the 20th century.

As the Gramophone company took hold the potential for preserving singers, performers, speech makers but above all music was eagerly realised. Colleen discovers that by the outbreak of the First World War some forty percent of households had some sort of Gramophone, however primitive, and not surprisingly, travelling versions went with the troops to the bunkers behind the front lines.

That capacity to bridge the performer with the audience when the two were hundreds of miles apart was the great miracle of the early years and allowed the easy spread of musical styles from Ragtime to Jazz to the first superstars of the Turntable world - the Opera stars. And yet, as ever, it was popular culture that dominated the market and drove sales.

She also touches on the new opportunities for the Blues and Ragime musicians of African-American society to be heard beyond their geographical centres in the Southern States, and the preservation of performances which would go on to inspire British Rhythm and blues half a century later.

And Antiques Roadshow expert Paul Atterbury talks about the Gramophone as a blend of home furnishing and status symbol and why what appear to be exotic survivors of the period are actual part of a massive number of machines that were on sale from bike shops to music emporia.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Photo: Camilo Fuentealba


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b072hlnh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b072jfct)
Al-Ma’arri the Poet

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

In 2013, Islamic militants decapitated the statue of an 11th Century Arabic poet that stood in his hometown of Maarat al-Nu’man, a city that’s seen heavy fighting during the Syrian conflict. The poet al-Ma’arri was one of the most revered in Syria, and poetry enthusiasts tell his story – he was blind, vegetarian, atheist, and some even claim that his work inspired Dante’s Divine Comedy.

This episode was first broadcast on 8 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Contributors: Nasser Rabbat, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Mahmoud al-Sheikh, BBC Arabic; the reading is by Susan Jameson

Picture: Statue of al-Ma'arri with the sculptor Fathi Mohammed in the 1940s, and the statue after its decapitation in 2013


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b072hlnk)
Call You and Yours - Have you been nagged by the nanny state into changing for the better?

Winifred Robinson asks have you ever been nagged by the nanny state into changing for the better? Have public campaigns to live healthier, "Klunk Klick" every trip, use the "Green Cross Code", or not drink and drive had a real impact on you?


TUE 12:57 Weather (b072hlnm)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b072jfcw)
The Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney has said that Britain's membership of the EU has reinforced the "dynamism of the UK economy." His comments have been welcomed by those in favour of remaining in the EU but one leading member of the leave campaign has described them as "beneath the dignity of the Bank of England." We speak to a former deputy governor of the bank and leading Eurosceptic Jacob Rees-Mogg.

Is the new EU deal with Turkey legal? We discuss the plan to send all irregular migrants back.


TUE 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b072jfcz)
Subhas Chandra Bose: A Touch of the Abnormal

Sunil Khilnani explores the life of political leader and freedom fighter Subhas Chandra Bose.

When Bose's father named his ninth child Subhas - "one of good speech" - he wasn't imagining the boy applying an oratorical gift to fervent radicalism.

Just over forty years later - after numerous stays in British jails, a daring escape followed by appeals to ally his own forces with Nazi Germany and then Japan - George Orwell wrote that the world was well rid of him. Nonetheless, in India today he rates as a national hero, his name affixed to airports, schools, and stamps. The vitality of his hold on the national imagination is manifest in other ways too: after his death he was periodically "discovered" alive, as a prisoner in a Soviet concentration camp, as a Chinese military officer, or as an Indian sadhu, a holy man with miraculous powers. It took three official commissions, the last one in 2006, to certify that Subhas Chandra Bose actually died in 1945.

His own life ended in failure, but his legacy would come to shape India's relationship with the world, in ways he could not have predicted.

Producer: Martin Williams.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b072j3g4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b072jlgn)
An Open Return

Anne Reid and Vincent Franklin star as mother and son in Daniel Thurman's new comedy. It's been 30 years since they last saw each other when Ian suddenly turns up at the parental home. A man on a mission, he soon finds out that things have changed in ways he could never have imagined.

Directed by Toby Swift.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b072jlgq)
Tom Holland is joined by Professor Louise Jackson from the University of Edinburgh and journalist Sarah Ditum.

Dr Naomi Paxton explores how sex trafficking and moral panic thed to the birth of the Women's Police Service in 1914.

Dr Fiona Watson explains why 1302 is her favourite year in history - and, in particular, one day when, at a battle on the Continent, the mounted knight was rumbled.

Helen Castor explores the origins of Marriage Banns and Dr John Gallagher argues that historians should be concerned about style as well as substance.

Producer Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b072jlgs)
New York's Big Green Clean

Tom Heap visits New York to find out how the city is cleaning up its dirty waterways and bringing back oysters to the harbour.

New York is highly populated. The 8 and a half million inhabitants of the five boroughs of Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, The Bronx and Staten Island use a lot of water and create a lot of waste. As a result the myriad of waterways, streams and creeks that all flow around the city, the network of 'sewersheds' that meander below the sidewalks, not to mention the vast rivers: the Hudson and the East River have all, over several centuries become increasingly dirty, polluted with litter, oil and worst of all raw sewage. Each time rainfall exceeds around half an inch, the aged Combined Sewage Overflow systems discharge into the rivers.

But in light of 'Super Storm' events such as Sandy and Irene, New York has begun to tackle the problem.

The city's Department of Environmental Protection has embarked on on a 'Green Infrastructure Plan'. Over the next 15 or so years $2.4 billion dollars will be spent on rebuilding the city to help it deal with high rainfall. There are 'green roof' projects, tree-planting programmes, and 'bioswales' are being constructed: all measures to try and reduce the impact of a storm of a similar ferocity wreaking such havoc in the future.

Meanwhile a group of plucky scientists are attempting to bring oysters back to New York harbour: once home to the largest oyster beds in the world, New York produced more oysters than the rest of the world combined. New Yorkers rich and poor alike dined on the shellfish. The waters of the harbour became so polluted that they no longer thrive there, but scientists from the Billion Oyster Project aim to have a billion oysters living in the harbour by 2030, so convinced are they that the water quality will have improved sufficiently by then.

Recent storms in the UK have shown that basic infrastructure struggles to cope when facing a deluge of heavy rain and strong winds, and so when a major storm event hits a major urban centre the results can be devastating.

Tom Heap discovers what knowledge could be gained from the New York project and whether similar sorts of measures could be taken in towns and cities in the UK.

Presenter: Tom Heap
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b072jlgv)
Drones and the Law

Britain's best-known legal journalist and broadcaster, Joshua Rozenberg, with the first of a new series of Law in Action, the UK's specialist legal affairs programme, featuring reports and discussion.

This week, after concerns voiced by pilots about drones potentially crashing into planes, how effective is the law at dealing with this new technology?

We hear from two senior Judges about the digital revolution taking place in our court rooms. But is the new system working or will it be another costly public sector digital disaster?

And ahead of the first substantive hearing of Dame Lowell Goddard's Inquiry into child abuse Sir Ian Kennedy, who oversaw the inquiry into the scandal at Bristol Royal infirmary, offers her some advice on how to run a major public inquiry.

Producer: Jim Frank.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b072jlgx)
Joe Dunthorne and John O'Farrell

Writers Joe Dunthorne and John O'Farrell recommend great books with Harriett Gilbert.

John O'Farrell has written for Have I Got News for You, as well as novels like The Best a Man Can Get. His choice of book is less comic, a powerful memoir about life with a brother in a coma: The Last Act of Love by Cathy Rentzenbrink.

Joe Dunthorne's novel Submarine was adapted for film by Richard Ayoade, and he recommends a slim collection of evocative short stories, Jesus' Son by Denis Johnson.

Harriett introduces them both to a modern classic: Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson, and asks why it is that men don't seem to read one of the greatest living novelists..

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b072hlnp)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b072hlnr)
Bank of England Governor says an EU exit is the biggest financial risk facing the UK


TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b05xglm4)
Series 10

Moby Dave

Ed's fortunes have taken a turn for the better as he's been given an advance to write a projected television series perfect for Sunday night viewing. He has comfortable lodgings, money in his pocket and a warm glow, in fact all is going very well indeed until Suzan decides that her new assistant, Jonathan, should help Ed with 'the scripty stuff'. At which suggestion someone loses their temper, and for once it isn't Ed.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.

Producer: Dawn Ellis.

A BBC Radio Comedy production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b072jmpp)
Pip and Josh drive to meet the Fairbrothers, to discuss the pastured egg business. When Pip questions the wisdom of Josh "bothering to apply" for university, he hits back that she is taking her love-life frustration out on him. Josh brings this up again in front of Toby. Josh haggles his percentage-stake in the business - he drives a hard bargain! They settle on a fifty-fifty deal, without Rex's approval.
Ursula is cooking. Helen has misplaced her maternity notes, and it transpires that Ursula has moved them. Henry questions how healthy Ursula's recipe is, and Ursula takes offence. She nips out and leaves Helen watching the dinner. Upstairs, Rob phones a prospective boarding school for Henry, which Helen overhears. She asks who he is making secret calls to, but the smell of burning interrupts them. Helen insists she set the timer and asks Rob if he touched it. Ursula implies that ruining meals is a trait of anorexics. For a second time, Helen eavesdrops. She insists that she didn't burn the dinner deliberately, and asks what they were talking about. Rob doesn't admit to Helen who he was on the phone to, but instead reiterates how concerned they are about her current state.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b072hlnt)
Anomalisa, Seamus Heaney's The Aeneid, Handel at Vauxhall, In the Age of Giorgione

Radio 4's Book of the Week is Seamus Heaney's translation of Book VI of The Aeneid, read by Ian McKellen. Samira Ahmed speaks to Catherine Heaney, the poet's daughter, and his editor, Matthew Hollis, about her father's love of the poem, the place of Latin in his life, and bringing the poet's final work out of the underworld of his study and into the light of day.

Anomalisa, the Academy Award nominated stop-motion animation from Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson is a darkly comedic and surreal journey into the mind of a self-help author who is crippled by the mundanity of his life until he meets a sales rep whilst on a business trip. Jenny McCartney reviews

Historian David Coke and conductor and harpsichordist Bridget Cunningham discuss a new recording of Handel's music by London Early Opera, focused on London's famed Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens.

The master Venetian painter Giorgione paved the way, in the early 1500s, to the golden age of luminous colour and even the first landscape in the history of art, however since he died young we actually don't know much about him. Curator Per Rumberg shows us round the Royal Academy exhibition which brings together Giorgione's key masterpieces with works by Titian, Giovanni Cariani, and Tullio Lombardo to pay tribute to his revolutionary influence.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Jack Soper.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b072jdqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b072n9s7)
UK Asylum: A Systems Failure?

As more and more migrants seek asylum in the UK, is the system for processing their applications reaching breaking point? Allan Urry investigates the impact of a drastic reduction in the numbers of courts hearing cases. At the same time, appeals are going up and key rulings against Home Office decisions to return people to other countries are also piling on the pressure.
With Europe now bracing itself for a fresh wave of refugees fleeing conflict, why is it taking so long and costing so much to decide who should be granted asylum here?
Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: David Lewis.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b072hlnw)
Kelsey from Watford Boys Grammar

As part of BBC News School Report, Kelsey from Watford Boys Grammar tells us what it's like to be the only blind pupil at his school. Kelsey also interviews one of the UK's leading eye surgeons who is currently performing experimental operations which give a small amount of sight back to his patients. Kelsey discusses the pros and cons of the procedures with him but sticks to his guns that he's happy just the way he is.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b072hlny)
Dementia advice, Antidepressants, Transplant organs, Vaginal seeding

Millions of anti-depressants are prescribed every year and more than half of people taking them have been doing so for two years or more. But how do you know when you're better and how can you tell that the time is right to stop taking them? Withdrawal symptoms are often confused with a return of the original depression so careful tapering of medication is crucial. Tony Kendrick, Professor of Primary Care at the University of Southampton gives Dr Mark Porter a run down of what to do, and what not to do, when it comes to coming off medication.

If you're 40 or above you're to receive dementia awareness as part of the latest Prime Minister's Challenge on Dementia 2020, just announced. The plans to include dementia education for middle aged people in future NHS Health Checks are aimed at making England - no plans as yet to replicate this in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland - the best country in the world for dementia care.
Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the new proposals.

Seven thousand people in the UK are currently waiting for life saving organ transplants - and every year 1200 die because there's a critical shortage of donor organs. It's meant that the transplant community has had to consider using organs that aren't quite as perfect as they would like. Poorer quality, older or damaged organs are now being considered when they would have been rejected in the past. Mark visits Rutger Ploeg, Professor of Transplant Biology at the University of Oxford at the Oxford Transplant Centre to find out about the pioneering work to treat, heal and re-condition organs using normothermic perfusion devices - essentially mini-life support machines that work at body temperature.

Frederique Rattue was the first woman at her local hospital to use "vaginal seeding" when her fourth child was born by caesarean section a year ago. It's a practice that involves taking a swab from the mother's vagina and rubbing it over the baby's mouth, face and skin after birth and the theory is that vaginal seeding will restore the microbiota of infants born by caesarean section, boosting their gut bacteria and reducing the risk of allergies or obesity. Dr Margaret McCartney discusses the theory of vaginal seeding and the evidence that the practice leads to health benefits for the baby.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b072jdqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b072hlp0)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b072hlp2)
EU-Turkey migrant-exchange plan 'illegal'

The head of the Council of Europe voices concerns over the legality of plans to exchange 'migrants' arriving in Greece for refugees in Turkey. Also what is the 'world passport' as used by Mos Def? And why did it take so long for the Mexican President to respond to Donald Trump?
(Photo: Refugees in Idomeni, Greece. AFP/Getty Images).


TUE 22:45 15 Minute Drama (b04m0q75)
The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

Harold Fry

By Rachel Joyce

While Harold Fry walks from Devon to the hospice in Berwick-upon-Tweed, Queenie makes notes and Sister Mary Inconnue types them up. They won't stop until he arrrives and that is how Queenie will keep waiting.

Queenie ..... Sophie Thompson
Harold ..... Paul Venables
Sister Mary Inconnue ..... Roslyn Hill
Sister Catherine ..... Elaine Claxton
Sister Lucy ..... Hannah Genesius
Finty ..... Jane Slavin
Mr Henderson ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Napier ..... Shaun Mason

Directed by Tracey Neale


TUE 23:00 Andrew O'Neill: Pharmacist Baffler (b04vf439)
Episode 2

Comedian Andrew O'Neill looks at what makes up our sexual identity and why some people are so offended by homosexuality.

What lies underneath their hostility and what other sorts of sexuality there might be?

Andrew is a married, heterosexual transvestite. As such he totally confuses some people who assume he's gay, offends some who can't cope with the outfits and baffles people who aren't sure what he's all about.

Written and performed by Andrew O' Neill with Stephen Carlin.

Producer; Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b072n9s9)
The Governor of the Bank of England is quizzed on the impact of UK membership of the EU. On International Women's Day, the experience of female prisoners is considered at Justice Questions in the Commons. In the Lords, peers consider what can be done about laser pointers aimed at planes. Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 09 MARCH 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b072hlrj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b072jdqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b072hlrl)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b072hlrn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b072hlrq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b072hlrs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b073m7g9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day Shirley Jenner, Lecturer at the University of Manchester.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b072mls7)
Future of Dairy

We talk to the new chair of the NFU's Dairy Board Michael Oakes, taking over at a time of high volatility and low prices for farmers. Suppliers on certain contracts with the processor Arla have been given 12 months' notice that their milk will no longer be needed - Anna Hill asks what chance they have of selling their milk elsewhere.
Sybil Ruscoe has been out with an access expert to get advice for dog walkers coming across livestock on farm footpaths.
And Conor McCauley reports on a project to help revive the fortunes of the secretive Corncrake bird which has seen its habitat change due to farming practices.
The producer is Sally Challoner.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03wpzmk)
Chiffchaff

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the chiffchaff. Chiffchaff are small olive warblers which sing their name as they flit around hunting for insects in woods, marshes and scrubby places. Chiffchaffs are increasing in the UK and the secret of their success is their ability to weather our winters. Many stay in the milder south and south-west of England where the insects are more active.


WED 06:00 Today (b073m7gc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b072mls9)
Henry Blofeld, Emma Johnson, Pedro Algorta, Davis Miller

Libby Purves meets commentator Henry Blofeld; clarinettist Emma Johnson; journalist Davis Miller and Pedro Algorta who survived a notorious plane crash in 1972.

Davis Miller is a journalist who struck up a 30-year friendship with the heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali. He is co-curator of the exhibition, I Am The Greatest, at London's O2, which showcases Muhammad Ali's life. The exhibition features more than 100 artefacts and rare personal memorabilia including a full size boxing ring and gold boxing gloves given to Elvis Presley and signed by Muhammad Ali in 1973. Davis is also the author of Approaching Ali about his friendship with Ali. I Am The Greatest is at the O2 in London.

Pedro Algorta is one of 16 people who survived a plane crash in the Andes in 1972. The Uruguayan Air Force Plane, chartered by an amateur rugby team and their friends and families, came down in the Andes and was lost without a trace. 70 days later the world discovered that 16 of the 45 passengers were still alive. In his book, Into the Mountains, Pedro Algorta gives his first-hand account of human survival. Into the Mountains is published by LID Publishing.

Henry Blofled OBE - aka Blowers - is best known as a cricket commentator. He has been a regular on Test Match Special for the last 40 years. He is famous for his love of buses and pigeons as well as his great passion for the game of cricket. He is currently touring the UK in Blofeld and Baxter - Rogues on the Road which features tales from the commentary box and beyond from TMS with his former producer, Peter Baxter. Blofeld and Baxter - Rogues on the Road is on tour.

Emma Johnson MBE is a clarinettist whose career was launched in 1984 when, at the age of 17, she won the BBC Young Musician of the Year. She is the first woman to have a portrait commissioned by the University of Cambridge's Pembroke College since the college was founded over 650 years ago. Her new album An English Fantasy features recordings of four clarinet concertos written especially for her by four English composers. An English Fantasy is released on Nimbus Records.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b072mlsc)
Seamus Heaney's Aeneid Book VI

Episode 3

Seamus Heaney was working on a translation of book VI of Virgil's Aeneid in the last months of his life .

Ian McKellen reads the poet's posthumously published final work in which Aeneas travels into the underworld to meet the spirit of his father. It's a story that had captivated Seamus Heaney from his schooldays. But the work took on a special significance for him after the death of his own father, becoming a touchstone to which he would return as an adult. His noble and moving translation of Book VI bears the fruit of a lifetime's concentration upon it: he began translating passages in the 1980s, and was finalising the work right up to the summer of his death.

Given the themes of the posthumously released Book VI, there is added poignancy in this final gift to his readers - a work which marks the end of Heaney's poetic journey.

Then as her fit passed away and her raving went quiet,
Heroic Aeneas began: 'No ordeal, O Sibyl, no new
Test can dismay me, for I have foreseen
And foresuffered all. But one thing I pray for
Especially: since here the gate opens, they say,
To the King of the Underworld's realms, and here
In these shadowy marshes the Acheron floods
To the surface, vouchsafe me one look,
One face-to-face meeting with my dear father.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b072mm0c)
Toilets and gender equality, Domestic violence against men, Female squash player who competed as a boy

Professor Clara Greed, a specialist in urban planning, on her belief that women's true position is society is reflected in its toilets and why inequality in their provision remains one of the last frontiers to be conquered.

The story of Maria Toorpakai, Pakistan's top female squash player, and why she competed as a boy until the age of 16.

After the conviction of Sharon Edwards for murdering her husband, we discuss domestic violence against men with Professor Marianne Hester, Chair in Gender and Violence at Bristol University and Mark Brooks, chair of trustees for the domestic violence charity Mankind.

Midwife Kim Morley, who specialises in supporting women with epilepsy through pregnancy, on her award as Royal College of Midwives 'mum's Midwife of the Year'.



Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Anne Peacock.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b072mq8n)
Jane Eyre

Episode 8

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Episode Eight
Jane has run from Thornfield and Rochester. She
has barely eaten and has been sleeping on the
moors in the pouring rain. Her strength is failing fast.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b072mq8q)
Jason and Kim - The Person, Not the Disability

Fi Glover with a conversation between an employer and employee about how a 6 month placement turned into a permanent job; once Kim's confidence increased her ability shone through. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Out of the Ordinary (b072mq8s)
Series 4

The Red Pill

Jolyon Jenkins reports on the men fighting a liberation war against what they see as female tyranny, and the separatist "men going their own way" - who've given up on women.

Such men take their principles from the film "The Matrix", in which only those who take the "red pill" see the true nature of reality, while those who take the "blue pill" live in ignorance of the true state of affairs - which, in this case, is that society is organised for the benefit of women, and that men are seen as disposable and worthless. We live, they think, in a "gynocracy", thanks to the remorseless march of feminism.

But the movement is split. Some of them think that there is still time to organise and fight back. They think that the system can be changed, and that relationships between men and women recalibrated. But others are more radical. They believe that male/female relationships are inherently toxic, the system is unbeatable, and that the only sane strategy for a man is to exit from the gynocracy while he still can, even if this means "living as a ghost" within broader society.

Producer/presenter: Jolyon Jenkins.


WED 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b070htsr)
A Decent Interval

Episode 1

Charles, bit part actor and amateur sleuth, returns to the stage as the Ghost in Hamlet, but rehearsals are fraught as both Ophelia and Hamlet are being played by reality TV stars.

Soon it's not only Shakespeare's lines that are being murdered. As the body count rises so do Charles suspicions.

Whilst at home his ex-wife Frances fears she may have come to the end of allowing her semi-detached husband to remain as her lodger.

Jeremy Front continues his successful adaptations of Simon Brett's novels starring Bill Nighy .

Charles ...... Bill Nighy
Frances ...... Suzanne Burden
Maurice ...... Jon Glover
Geraldine ...... Amelia Bullmore
Milly ...... Rebecca Hamilton
Sam ...... George Watkins
Ned ...... Brian Protheroe
Jared ...... Leo Wan
Will ...... Caolan McCarthy
Katrina ...... Katie Redford

Director: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2016.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b072hlry)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b072mq8v)
The Genie of Nimrud

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

The ancient Assyrians were fond of protective spirits. They had sculptures of all manner of mythological creatures lining the walls of their palaces. One such sculpture was a stone relief of a genie. This was a powerful male figure - a bountiful beard and muscular thighs but with huge wings sprouting from his back. Three thousand years ago, it adorned the walls of Nimrud, one of the great strongholds of Mesopotamia, near Mosul in modern day Iraq. During the 1990s, this genie disappeared - believed to have been taken during the chaos of the first Gulf war - and ended up in London around 2002 - just before the mire of the second Gulf war. It’s been kept by Scotland Yard for these last 14 years - locked in legal limbo, and unlikely to ever reemerge or return to Iraq. We explore the cost of looting to a country’s cultural heritage, and tell the story of another valuable Mesopotamian antiquity that was looted, eventually uncovered, but managed to stay in Iraq. This is a tablet, and holds a new chapter from the oldest tale ever told - the Gilgamesh epic.

This episode was first broadcast on 9 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Assyrian winged-genie from Nimrud
Credit: Brooklyn Museum

Contributors: Mark Altaweel, Institute of Archaeology UCL; Augusta McMahon, University of Cambridge; Mina al-Lami, BBC Monitoring; the readings are by Martin Worthington, George Watkins, and Susan Jameson

With thanks to Vernon Rapley, V&A; Sarah Collins, British Museum; Andrew George, SOAS; and John Russell Massachusetts College of Art and Design


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b072hls1)
Anti-pollution cosmetics, Fundraising Preference Service, Pitching a novel

Charities in the UK have faced huge pressure in recent months after the death of 92 year old poppy seller Olive Cooke, who took her own life after being plagued by 450 letters a year from charities. A series of reports on You & Yours and elsewhere revealed that some charities were using high pressure fundraising techniques on vulnerable people and some shared and sold donors' details. Now proposals have been released for a "Fundraising Preference Service", with an opt-out which would allow people to refuse all charity marketing. The service would be part of a new system of self-regulation by the charity sector. We ask how the proposals would affect the work of charities and if they are tough enough to restore public confidence.

Cosmetics that promise to protect your skin from the effects of air pollution are becoming big business. Research suggests that exposure to pollution can harm skin and many of the big cosmetics manufacturers are offering creams and moisturisers that promise to reduce the damage and improve how the skin looks. We ask a leading dermatologist about the effectiveness of these products and how they differ from other cosmetics.

Is it possible to sum up a novel in just a few words? Last summer, You & Yours reported how a literary agency was inviting new writers to pitch their idea for a novel in just 140 characters on Twitter. You & Yours listener Laura McVeigh did just that and she is now looking forward to the release of her first novel. She tells us about the book and how that short pitch made all the difference.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b072hls3)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b072w6jh)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b072mvvr)
Gandhi: In the Palm of Our Hands

Professor Sunil Khilnani explores the life and legacy of the Mahatma Gandhi: lawyer, politician and leader of the nationalist movement against British rule in India. He is generally admired outside India, but is the subject of heated debate and contention in his homeland. Some view him as an appeaser of Muslims, and blame him for India's partition. Others regret Gandhi's induction of Hindu rhetoric and symbols into Indian nationalism, revile him for his refusal to disavow caste, believe he betrayed the labouring classes, and are appalled at his views on women. "It's unsurprising that Gandhi provokes such a barrage of attacks," says Professor Khilnani. "His entire life was an argument - or rather, a series of arguments - with the world."
Producer: Mark Savage.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b072jmpp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b072my2h)
The Reserve Rope

The Reserve Rope - Episode 1

The Matterhorn was conquered on 14th July 1865 by Edward Whymper. But four men died on the descent. Damian Lewis stars as Whymper, forever tormented by the tragedy.

Jonathan Myerson's drama speculates on what went wrong and why. The climbing team were roped together on the way down but at least two were inexperienced and - for reasons never fully explained - attached together with rope that was unsuitable for holding the weight of a man.

A swift inquest was held and Whymper was exonerated. But some people never forgave him - especially the 8th Marquess of Queensbury, father to Douglas Hadow, one of the dead.

Cast:
Edward Whymper...................Damian Lewis
Zipporah.................................Olivia Darnley
Douglas / Guide......................Jacob Fortune Lloyd
Queensbury / Pession /
Taugwalder / McCormick.........Joseph Kloska
Josiah / Club man 3 /
Favre / Seiler..........................Christian Rodska
Hudson / Meynet.....................Dominic Rye
Wills / Croz / Robertson /
Tyndall / Club man 2 /
Macdonald..............................Tom Gordon
Hadow....................................Sean Delaney
Carrel / Peter..........................Gabriel Lo Guidice

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (b072my2k)
Money Box Live: Rethinking the State Pension

The state pension is one of the cornerstones of the welfare state and we all expect to get it. In April, there'll be a brand new State Pension, running alongside the old system. In addition, the Govt has ordered a review of the State Pension Age, looking beyond the year 20-28, which could have consequences for anyone under 55. So what age is a fair age to start receiving your state pension, given that today's promises to pay pensions may turn out to be unaffordable? Will younger people end up getting a raw deal, compared to the babyboomer generation?

In this Money Box Live we're looking at some 'blue-sky' thinking about the way the pension system works - and asking you - in what ways could we, should we re-think, re-design the state pension?

Call us with your comments and questions on 03 700 100 444 - geographic charges apply.

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Alex Lewis + Diane Richardson
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b072hlny)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b072my2m)
Small towns, Patient rescue and resuscitation

Small towns: Laurie Taylor talks to Steve Hanson, Associate Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Lincoln, and author of an ethnographic study of Todmorden in 'austere' times. Dr Hanson returned to his home town, on the border of Lancashire and Yorkshire, to immerse himself in the life and times of a place which has almost halved since its industrial heyday. He finds micro worlds that never encounter each other, debunking the myth that people in small towns all know each other's business. They're joined by Katherine Tyler, Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Exeter.

Rescuing 'acute' patients: what happens when patients in a hospital ward become acutely unwell? Nicola Mackintosh, Research Fellow at Kings College, London, interviewed doctors, nurses, health care assistants and managers at two UK hospitals, in order to explore the practice of 'rescue' and patient safety on the front line.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b072hls7)
Charlotte Moore, Turkish press crackdown, Concern about BBC independence

We hear from the new Controller of BBC TV Channels (BBC 1,2 and 4) and iPlayer Charlotte Moore about her vision for the future. She also gives her response to claims (from Culture Secretary John Whittingdale and a recent report from consultants Oliver & Ohlbaum and Oxera Consulting), that BBC TV has become less distinctive.

We hear from Sevgi Akarcesme, Editor in Chief of Today's Zaman about the Turkish state takeover of the anti-government newspaper for which she works, and from the BBC's Turkey correspondent Mark Lowen on the context of this crackdown on press freedom.

A recent report by Sir David Clementi into the governance and regulation of the BBC recommended that the government appoint about half of a reformed future BBC's operational board. The Director General of the BBC, Lord Hall, said this recommendation could undermine the BBC's independence from government. So where should the balance lie between BBC freedom from government influence and the public's ability, via the democratically elected government, to have a say in how the BBC licence fee is spent? We hear from "the insider's insider" Tim Suter. He's been a BBC TV executive,worked for the broadcasting regulator Ofcom, is on the board of the Press Recognition Panel, advised the House of Lords Communications Select Committee and is one of the leaders of the European Broadcasting Union's project for developing a vision for European Public Service Broadcasting.


WED 17:00 PM (b072hls9)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b072hlsc)
Buckingham Palace has formally complained about a Sun story saying the Queen backs Brexit


WED 18:30 Chain Reaction (b072my2p)
Series 11

Ian Hislop interviews Victoria Coren-Mitchell

Comedian and satirist Ian Hislop turns interviewer as he talks to the writer and presenter Victoria Coren-Mitchell about her wide and varied career in writing, quizzing and cards.

Chain Reaction is the long running hostless chat show where this week's interviewee becomes next week's interviewer.

Ian Hislop is a long-standing team captain on 'Have I Got News for You' and the editor of the satirical magazine Private Eye. As a dedicated fan and student of history, he has made several acclaimed documentaries on wide-ranging subjects including conscientious objectors and The Beeching Report.

Victoria Coren-Mitchell is a columnist for The Observer and GQ amongst other publications and has presented myriad documentaries on subjects as varied as The Bohemians and Mary Poppins. As well as a prolific writing career, she keeps order on the popular and fiendishly difficult television quiz, 'Only Connect'. She is also well-known as one of the world's top professional poker players and has achieved huge success at the card table.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in March 2016.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b072mz5p)
Jennifer and Susan gossip about Helen in the village shop, and a young girl enters. Elizabeth catches Jennifer on her way out and asks if she recognises the girl - because Elizabeth does, vaguely.
Elizabeth realises it is Sasha, Dr Richard Locke's daughter. Sasha was visiting her father, but he's not at home. Elizabeth says she can drive Sasha to Felpersham as the buses are infrequent, but they should check with her dad first. It transpires that Sasha ran away after a fight with her mother. Sasha arrives back home to a telling off from Richard. Later, Richard arrives at Lower Loxley with flowers for Elizabeth as a thank you. Flattered, Elizabeth reassures him that every family has their problems and invites him in for a drink. He declines.
Lilian passes by the shop, reporting she still doesn't know who to nominate for Borsetshire Businesswoman of the Year. It is an event that Justin is now sponsoring. Lilian tries to get Jennifer to write about Justin's investments on the website, and ignores Jennifer's attempts to suggest nominees. Lilian finally comes up with a nominee: Elizabeth!


WED 19:15 Front Row (b072hlsf)
Remembering George Martin, Anna Meredith, Motown the Musical, The Witch

Record producer Sir George Martin was known as the "fifth Beatle" but he also produced comedy records with the likes of Flanders and Swan and The Goons, as well as inventing creative production techniques that changed the sound of popular music. Comedian Bernard Cribbins and composer David Arnold remember the musical genius who has died, aged 90.

The Witch is a new horror film set in New England in the 1630's. When their crops fail and their new born son vanishes a devout Christian family, living on the edge of a wilderness, is enveloped by fear and paranoia. Deborah Hyde, editor of the Skeptic magazine, reviews Robert Eggers' directorial debut.

Motown the Musical, based on the American record producer Berry Gordy's memoirs, tells the story of how the music label transformed the sound of America. Featuring songs by Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross, Jackson 5, and Stevie Wonder it shows how these artists came to make the uplifting and enduring popular music in history. Music journalist Jacqueline Springer reviews.

Anna Meredith is one of our most versatile composers whose work straddles the worlds of classical, pop, electronica and experimental rock. Until now, much of her time has been spent composing for commissions, but now she's recorded a debut album with her band. She explains how this was a very different working process and reveals what inspired the 11 tracks on Varmints.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Angie Nehring.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b072mq8n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b072mz5r)
Is Science Morally Neutral?

In 1816, when Mary Shelley sat down to write her Gothic novel Frankenstein, it was a time of social, political and scientific upheaval. It has given us the archetypal image of the mad scientist single-mindedly pursing his grotesque experiments whatever the cost. "Frankenstein Science" has even become its own category, especially beloved by tabloid headline writers. 200 years on and the pace of scientific development has increased exponentially; the fact that Shelley's Frankenstein still has such a hold reflects the powerful role science plays in modern life and also, perhaps, the fear that we don't understand it or know how to control it. Now the head of the Science Council has said that scientists need their own version of the Hippocratic Oath and a regulation system of ethical standards and principles similar to doctors. Would more control give us better, more ethical scientists, or just restrain creativity and academic freedom? If we control scientists more closely, is there a case for arguing that we should exercise more control over the research they carry out? Is science morally neutral? Is it just the choices about how to apply scientific knowledge that are truly moral? In a world where advances in science have the power to profoundly change our lives and the lives of future generations, can scientists still rely on that distinction? This week scientists are meeting in America to discuss the controversial "gain-of-function" research on highly infectious viruses such as avian flu. Do we need more moral, ethical and democratically accountable oversight of research? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Mathew Taylor and Michael Portillo. Witnesses are Belinda Phipps, Prof Terence Kealey, Prof Andy Stirling and Bryan Roberts.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b072mz5t)
The Garden

Madeleine takes a night-time walk along the River Lea and the "edgelands" of the Hackney Marshes in east London as she reflects on Jesus' last night in the garden of Gethsemane for "Lent in the Landscape" a series of talks from six writers on different aspects of the passion story. Producer: Phil Pegum.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b072jlgs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b072mls9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b072hlsh)
Why have there been "significantly high" death rates in 19 of England's NHS Trusts?

We have a special investigation.

As Commonwealth Trade Ministers gather in London, a call for Whitehall to broaden its horizons as it prepares for Brexit.

The new head of the US Environmental Protection Agency has said he doesn't believe carbon dioxide is a primary factor in global warming.


WED 22:45 15 Minute Drama (b04m0rzf)
The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

David

By Rachel Joyce

As Harold walks, Queenie writes. She tells of how she fell in love with Harold twenty four years ago and the day she met his son, David.

Queenie ..... Sophie Thompson
Harold ..... Paul Venables
Sister Mary Inconnue ..... Roslyn Hill
David ..... Monty d'Inverno
Sister Catherine ..... Elaine Claxton
Sister Lucy ..... Hannah Genesius
Finty ..... Jane Slavin
Mr Henderson ..... Michael Bertenshaw

Directed by Tracey Neale


WED 23:00 The Croft & Pearce Show (b072mz5w)
Episode 1

A sketch show from award-winning duo Croft and Pearce, rising stars of the UK comedy scene.

These Edinburgh Fringe favourites were the break-out hit of BBC Radio 4’s Sketchorama and have performed sell-out shows in London, New York and around the UK.

Packed with sharply observed characters, this debut from writer-performers Hannah Croft and Fiona Pearce is not to be missed.

In the opening episode we meet June and Jean, two middle-class ladies driven to the brink by the strain of village life in the Home Counties, as well as a rowdy Geordie Brown Owl and an over-excited work experience girl.

Written and performed by Hannah Croft and Fiona Pearce
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in March 2016.


WED 23:15 History Retweeted (b03w18g1)
The Premiere of Romeo and Juliet

History Retweeted sends us back in time as we hear people from the past comment on a series of major world events, in 140 characters or fewer.

It's the opening night of Romeo and Juliet and you are cordially invited to the premiere of a brand new play by the up-and-coming playwright Billy Shakespeare. Much the same as any other playwright, Shakespeare ponders how the play will be received. He needn't worry anymore as the 16th century now comes complete with wifi.

Bloggers review the show, fan-made plays are rife and the stars are interviewed on YouTube as one of Shakespeare's greatest blockbusters is 're-tweeted'.

Turning statuses into sounds, History Retweeted transports us to timelines gone by, feeding hashtags, trolls and trending topics into moments from history.

Featuring the voices of Tim Barnes and Simon Berry, Wayne Forester and Annabelle Llewellyn, Peter Temple and Jelly Macintosh - with Lucy Beaumont as the voice of The Computer.

Written by Tim Barnes and Simon Berry.

Produced by Sally Harrison
A Woolyback production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b072mz5y)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster, where it is a day of defeats for the government.



THURSDAY 10 MARCH 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b072hlvn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b072mlsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b072hlvq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b072hlvs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b072hlvv)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b072hlvx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0747d8t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day Shirley Jenner, Lecturer at the University of Manchester.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b072n5x1)
Inquiry into basic payments

The head of the Rural Payments Agency Mark Grimshaw has faced a committee of MPs to answer questions about how EU payments to English farmers have been processed and paid. In Scotland the Government is paying £200 million to tide farmers over after problems with the payments system there. Conservative MSPs have demanded an inquiry.
And Anna Hill meets two ex-servicemen who have joined a scheme to help members of the armed services find jobs in farming.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03ws7gc)
Nuthatch

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the nuthatch. Nuthatches are the only UK birds that can climb down a tree as fast they can go up and you'll often see them descending a trunk or hanging beneath a branch. Nuthatches are unmistakable: blue-grey above, chestnut under the tail and with a black highwayman's mask.


THU 06:00 Today (b072w4bf)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b072n5x3)
The Maya Civilization

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Maya Civilization, developed by the Maya people, which flourished in central America from around 250 AD in great cities such as Chichen Itza and Uxmal with advances in mathematics, architecture and astronomy. Long before the Spanish Conquest in the 16th Century, major cities had been abandoned for reasons unknown, although there are many theories including overpopulation and changing climate. The hundreds of Maya sites across Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico raise intriguing questions about one of the world's great pre-industrial civilizations.

With

Elizabeth Graham
Professor of Mesoamerican Archaeology at University College London

Matthew Restall
Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Latin American History and Anthropology at Pennsylvania State University

And

Benjamin Vis
Eastern ARC Research Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Kent

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b072n5x5)
Seamus Heaney's Aeneid Book VI

Episode 4

Seamus Heaney was working on a translation of book VI of Virgil's Aeneid in the last months of his life .

Ian McKellen reads the poet's posthumously published final work in which Aeneas travels into the underworld to meet the spirit of his father. It's a story that had captivated Seamus Heaney from his schooldays. But the work took on a special significance for him after the death of his own father, becoming a touchstone to which he would return as an adult. His noble and moving translation of Book VI bears the fruit of a lifetime's concentration upon it: he began translating passages in the 1980s, and was finalising the work right up to the summer of his death.

Given the themes of the posthumously released Book VI, there is added poignancy in this final gift to his readers - a work which marks the end of Heaney's poetic journey.

Then as her fit passed away and her raving went quiet,
Heroic Aeneas began: 'No ordeal, O Sibyl, no new
Test can dismay me, for I have foreseen
And foresuffered all. But one thing I pray for
Especially: since here the gate opens, they say,
To the King of the Underworld's realms, and here
In these shadowy marshes the Acheron floods
To the surface, vouchsafe me one look,
One face-to-face meeting with my dear father.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b072n5x7)
Caitlin Moran, Why men need feminism, Yasmin Kadi

Caitlin Moran: on getting political in her new book Moranifesto, her writing, her TV series, and her feminism.

Plus, men and feminism: Dr Michael Kimmel on why feminism is good for men too.

Yasmin Kadi: the Sierra Leonean singer talks to Jenni and performs live in Woman's Hour studio.

And BBC School Report: we hear from a young carer about the reality of life looking after her mother.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b072n5x9)
Jane Eyre

Episode 9

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Episode Nine
Has St John discovered Jane's secret?

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b072hlvz)
China's corruption clampdown

In China, customers are staying away from the pearl and jewellery shops, but lingerie sales are soaring. The strange effects that the clampdown on corruption is having on the country's economy.

Fighting elephant poachers can a dangerous business in the Democratic Republic of Congo where part of who you're up against appears to be a neighbouring country's army. We travel on the ancient Via Egnatia that used to join two great empires. Though on the modern Greek version of the route, you don't get quite as far as you hope. Though it's nothing to do with closed borders. And, with the zika virus outbreak in Brazil, would you want to try for a baby there now? What if you're at an age where you can't afford to wait too much longer?


THU 11:30 Tim Key Delves Into Daniil Kharms And That’s All (b072n5xc)
Writer Daniil Kharms (1905-1942) is one of Russia's great lost absurdists.

His world still alarms, shocks and bewitches well over half a century after he died in prison during the siege of Leningrad.

In his short, almost vignette-like writings, nothing is sacred or as it seems. His narrators dip in and out of moments, describing curious, often disturbing events before getting bored and leaving his characters to their fates.

Old ladies plummet from windows, townsfolk are bludgeoned to death with cucumbers, others wander around in search of glue, sausages or nothing. By turns pointless and harrowing, they are funny. Very funny. And they are funny now.

Comedian, Russophile and crumpled polymath Tim Key has been entranced by Kharms' beautiful, horrible, hilarious world for years. But is there more to Kharms than a series of curious happenings cooked up by an eccentric mind in a troublesome world? Key suspects there is. And he's prepared to delve.

As he delves, he encounters Noel Fielding, Alice Nakhimovsky, Matvei Yankelevich, Peter Scotto, Tony Anemone and Daniil Kharms.

Producer: Steven Rajam

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2016.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b072hlw1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b072n5xf)
Armenian Martyr’s Memorial, Der Zor

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

The Armenian martyr's memorial in Der Zor, Syria was a tribute to the Armenians who perished in the mass killings of 1915. It was consecrated in 1991 and then completely destroyed in 2014 by Islamic militants. A British-Armenian writer recalls her visits to Der Zor, and traces the harrowing journey of her ancestors through the Syrian desert.

This episode was first broadcast on 10 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Contributors: Nouritza Matossian, writer; Heghnar Watenpaugh, University of California Davis

With thanks to Elyse Semerdjian of Whitman College

Picture: Armenian Martyr's Memorial, Der Zor


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b072hlw3)
Energy market report, Disability in the workplace

The Competition and Markets Authority has been investigating how well the UK's energy market works for consumers and it publishes its interim proposals this morning. It gives a strong indication of what the CMA believes should change, before it publishes its final report in June.

More and more flights arriving and departing from UK airports are delayed, in fact last summer represented a five-year low for punctuality. The Civil Aviation Authority released figures this week which show that, overall, a quarter of flights between July and September last year were delayed, with the length of the average delay creeping up by a minute compared with the same period in 2014.

Crufts gets underway today and there's a touch of celebrity this year. A new stand is being added for dogs that are famous online. Bruno the miniature daschund, for example has 66,000 followers on the photo sharing website Instagram. Mika the husky has 58,000, whilst Ramsey the blue Staffordshire bull terrier has 128,000.
Now the Kennel Club says famous dogs on social media are having an impact in the real world. In the last year, registrations of Pembroke Welsh corgis have risen significantly, so the breed has been removed from the club's "at watch" list, reserved for breeds with fewer than 300 registrations. They're putting it down, in part, to Winny the Pembroke Welsh corgi, who has 18,000 Instagram followers.

Got a spare £10? Well, you could buy a pizza with it. Or you could buy a share of a flat and reap the rewards of investing in a buy-to-let property. Until now, buy-to-let has only been possible for people with a lot of spare cash and high borrowing power. If you have enough money, buying a second property to rent out sounds like a good investment. But you have to deal with all the hassle of demanding tenants and broken boilers. Some new online companies are trying to change all that using crowdfunding to open up the property investment market to everyone who has a bit of spare cash at the end of the month.

There are six million people of working age in the UK who have a disability and the government wants to get more of them into the workplace. They launched Disability Confident back in 2013 to help employers to get rid of barriers, increase understanding and ensure that disabled people have more opportunities to get work. But is it working?

Producer: Maire Devine
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b072hlw5)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b073hjsy)
The Prime Minister has had his say on the row about the Queen the tabloid and Brexit. He's also saying those who want to leave think the loss of British jobs is a price worth paying -- we debate if he's right.

We'll ask the energy industry if they back plans to cut bills.

Labour MP Dan Jarvis has been setting out his vision for the party - does it mean he wants to be the next leader ?

Five years since the start of the Syrian uprising, Lyse Douset has been back to where it all began to see what people there now want:.


THU 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b072n5xh)
Jinnah: The Chess Player

Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the King's India Institute in London, looks at the life and legacy of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan. Descriptions of his early life do not sound like someone who would go on to lead India's Muslims: he spoke English, dressed impeccably in Western clothes from Savile Row, smoked cigarettes and, according to some accounts, consumed alcohol and ate pork. Yet it was Jinnah who, along with others, publicly assented to the partition of India which, carried out in haste, would give roughly half of India's Muslims political autonomy, cause around a million deaths, displace some 14 million people and transform the geopolitics of the world.
Producer: Mark Savage
Music: Talvin Singh.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b072mz5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b072z7vp)
The Reserve Rope

The Reserve Rope - Episode 2

The Matterhorn was conquered on 14th July 1865 by Edward Whymper. But four men died on the descent. Damian Lewis stars as Whymper, forever tormented by the tragedy.

Jonathan Myerson's drama speculates on what went wrong and why. The climbing team were roped together on the way down but at least two were inexperienced and - for reasons never fully explained - attached together with rope that was unsuitable for holding the weight of a man.

A swift inquest was held and Whymper was exonerated. But some people never forgave him - especially the 8th Marquess of Queensbury, father to Douglas Hadow, one of the dead.

Cast:
Edward Whymper...................Damian Lewis
Zipporah.................................Olivia Darnley
Douglas / Guide......................Jacob Fortune Lloyd
Queensbury / Pession /
Taugwalder / McCormick.........Joseph Kloska
Josiah / Club man 3 /
Favre / Seiler..........................Christian Rodska
Hudson / Meynet.....................Dominic Rye
Wills / Croz / Robertson /
Tyndall / Club man 2 /
Macdonald..............................Tom Gordon
Hadow....................................Sean Delaney
Carrel / Peter..........................Gabriel Lo Guidice

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b072n5xk)
Series 32

Trent, Dorset

Clare joins a lively primary school walking club as they ramble through the Dorset countryside. Pupils, teachers, local farmers and parents join the group which has been helping to draw the local community together for twelve years. Starting at a farm near the school, Trent Young's C of E near Sherborne, they walk on footpaths and over private farmland - made accessible by the farmers who help lead the walk - learning about the countryside as they go.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b072hs5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b072htqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b072n5xm)
Anomalisa, The Witch, Women in Love

With Antonia Quirke.

Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson discuss their stop-motion comedy Anomalisa, how they made a love scene with puppets and why it took 6 months.

Cinematographer Billy Williams recalls the tensions behind the scenes of the notorious naked wrestling bout between Oliver Reed and Alan Bates in Women In Love.

Director Robert Eggers reveals the difficulties of working with a goat on his supernatural horror The Witch, and why ravens are better actors.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b072hlw8)
Gain-of-function research, Mindfulness, Women in science, Snake locomotion

This week in the US, public discussions are taking place into controversial Gain of Function research. Who should decide the limits of studies where scientists make new, deadlier viruses in the laboratory? Dr Filippa Lentzos, biosecurity expert from King's College, London, lists a litany of accidental security breaches from the past. Should we stop this kind of dangerous research, or encourage it, in the interests of national security?

Mindfulness is a hot topic at the moment. As part of BBC School Report, students from Connaught School for Girls in Leytonstone have tested themselves to see whether meditation helps with their studies. Tracey Logan discusses the scientific research underpinning this trend with psychologist Claudia Hammond.

The Royal Society released a report this week entitled "Parent, Carer, Scientist." The idea is to encourage an environment in research institutions where scientists can have a life as well as a vocation. Professor Ottoline Leyser, Professor of Plant Development and Director of Cambridge University's Sainsbury Laboratory, discusses what needs to change to ensure more female scientists to stay in science.

How do snakes move across sand? BBC science reporter Jonathan Webb meets Perrin Schiebel, at the Georgia Institute of Technology. A physicist, she works with a giant sand pit and high-speed cameras, putting snakes through their paces to unpick how they can push their bodies off the sand without sinking into it.


THU 17:00 PM (b072hlwb)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b072hlwd)
Markets slide after the European Central Bank announces major stimulus measures


THU 18:30 Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On (b072n5xp)
Series 1

Art with Phill Jupitus

Susan Calman is the least relaxed person she knows. She has no down time, no hobbies (unless you count dressing up your cats in silly outfits) and her idea of relaxation is to play Grand Theft Auto, an hour into which she is in a murderous rage with sky high blood pressure. Her wife had to threaten to divorce her to make her go on holiday last year. Her first for four years. But she's been told by the same long-suffering wife, that unless she finds a way to switch off, and soon, she's going to be unbearable.

So Susan is going to look at her options and try to immerse herself in the pursuits that her friends find relaxing, to find her inner zen and outer tranquillity. Each week she will ditch the old Susan Calman and attempt to find the new Susan Calm, in a typically British leisure pursuit.

This time, she visits the Scottish National Portrait Gallery with Phill Jupitus.

Keep Calman Carry On is an audience stand up show in which Susan reports on how successful she's been - both at relaxing and at the pursuit itself - as well as playing in and discussing a handful of illustrative clips from her efforts. It's an attempt to find out how people find solace or sanctuary in these worlds and how Susan can negotiate her own place in them.

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b072n5xr)
David and Ed discuss the Brookfield Farm innovations. David explains that better quality yield should lead to greater profit, but Ed is sceptical. Ed says that quality produce was not enough to save his own farm. But now things are looking up, as Adam has provided him with a fair bit of work. They decide to go The Bull for lunch.
At The Bull, Wayne thinks they should put Tom's scotch eggs on their menu. Kenton is unenthusiastic, because it was Wayne's idea. David and Ed come in, and are complimentary about Wayne's food. Kenton doesn't want to hear it. Jolene forces him to pass on their compliments to the chef. David and Ed discuss Ed's foundation course, and hope that it will lead to better things for him, in a more specialised area.
Helen goes round to see Pat, and is offered lunch. She eats some, but not a lot. Pat offers to help out more, and encourages Helen to relax as her due date is only ten weeks away. Pat brings up the controversial issue of her decision to have a home birth. Helen insists it is what she and Rob want, in spite of her last, traumatic birth. Helen snaps and tells Pat to leave her alone, and that it is her decision: her baby, her body.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b072hlwg)
Martin Parr's exhibitions, Assemble at Tate Liverpool, Bradford Media Museum controversy, Morrissey as London's mayor

As the death is announced of production designer Sir Kenneth "Ken" Adam, director Nicholas Hytner remembers working with him on The Madness of King George III.

Martin Parr, photographer and chronicler of British culture, gives John Wilson an early preview of the new show he has curated at the Barbican in London, Strange and Familiar: Britain as Revealed by International Photographers, as well another exhibition of his own photographs, Unseen City, in which he gives an unprecedented insight into the pomp and pageantry of the City of London.

In a controversial move, Bradford's National Media Museum is transferring its collection of 400,000 photographs and exhibits to London's Victoria and Albert Museum. Colin Ford, the museum's former director, joins John in the studio.

Assemble, a collective of architects and designers, won the Turner prize last year for their urban regeneration project in Liverpool. They talk to John Wilson about Art Gym - their latest Merseyside collaboration - which has just opened at Tate Liverpool.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b072n5x9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b072jlgv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b072n66d)
Horse Racing

Horse racing is the second most popular spectator sport in the UK but it is also a business. Presenter Evan Davis and guests discuss who makes the money: the horse owners, the jockeys, the race courses or the bookmakers?

Guests:

Simon Bazalgette, Chief Executive, The Jockey Club

Rachel Hood, Director, The Horsemen's Group

Ciaran O'Brien, Group Communications Director, William Hill bookmakers

Producer: Julie Ball.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b072hlw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b072n5x3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b072hlwj)
ECB move suggests Eurozone crisis is serious

The European Central Bank announces major steps to try to revive Europe's flagging economies. Also: the boss of racquet company Head on why he's standing by Maria Sharapova in the wake of doping allegations. And snooker champion turned techno DJ Steve Davis on being booked to play a festival.


THU 22:45 15 Minute Drama (b04m3ckm)
The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

Poems

By Rachel Joyce

Harold Fry has been walking forty days and Queenie waits. She writes and Sister Mary types. Did David steal the poems and will Queenie's secret be revealed?

Queenie ..... Sophie Thompson
Harold ..... Paul Venables
Sister Mary Inconnue ..... Roslyn Hill
David ..... Monty d'Inverno
Sister Catherine ..... Elaine Claxton
Sister Lucy ..... Hannah Genesius
Finty ..... Jane Slavin
Mr Henderson ..... Michael Bertenshaw

Directed by Tracey Neale


THU 23:00 Small Scenes (b072n66g)
Series 3

Episode 2

Award-winning sketch series starring Daniel Rigby, Mike Wozniak, Cariad Lloyd, Henry Paker and Jessica Ransom. Featuring more overblown, melodramatic scenes from modern life, such as a woman who uncovers the conspiracy behind cryptic crosswords, the real reason that dairy products have pictures of cows on them and a man who's addicted to giving lifts.

Written by Benjamin Partridge, Henry Paker and Mike Wozniak, with additional material from the cast.

Produced by Simon Mayhew-Archer.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b072n66j)
Sean Curran reports as the Government announces the date of the Queen's Speech. Labour says the move is a "profound mistake". And the new pubs adjudicator comes under fire.
Ministers set out what the Government is doing to improve the quality and quantity of apprenticeships in England, while the Government faces accusations in the Lords of being "outfoxed" by French energy giant, EDF, over new nuclear power stations.



FRIDAY 11 MARCH 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b072hly1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b072n5x5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b072hly3)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b072hly5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b072hly7)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b072hly9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b073m31p)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day Shirley Jenner, Lecturer at the University of Manchester.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b072n8ds)
Scottish Farmers Rally Parliamentarians

Scottish farmers and crofters demonstrate outside Holyrood to raise awareness among Members of the Scottish Parliament of the importance of the rural economy. It comes as EU subsidy payments are delayed, partly due to problems in the IT system used in Scotland. And Caz Graham reports on an art trail going on display in Cumbria - it's 60 fibreglass Herdwick Sheep, painted by artists and auctioned to raise money for a local charity.
Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Sally Challoner.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x474w)
Rook

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the rook. High in the treetops buffeted by March winds, rooks are gathering twigs to build their untidy nests. The bustle of a rookery is one of the classic sounds of the UK countryside, especially in farming areas, where rooks are in their element, probing the pastures and ploughed fields with long pickaxe bills.


FRI 06:00 Today (b072zgn0)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b072ht0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b072n8dv)
Seamus Heaney's Aeneid Book VI

Episode 5

Seamus Heaney was working on a translation of book VI of Virgil's Aeneid in the last months of his life .

Ian McKellen reads the poet's posthumously published final work in which Aeneas travels into the underworld to meet the spirit of his father. It's a story that had captivated Seamus Heaney from his schooldays. But the work took on a special significance for him after the death of his own father, becoming a touchstone to which he would return as an adult. His noble and moving translation of Book VI bears the fruit of a lifetime's concentration upon it: he began translating passages in the 1980s, and was finalising the work right up to the summer of his death.

Given the themes of the posthumously released Book VI, there is added poignancy in this final gift to his readers - a work which marks the end of Heaney's poetic journey.

Then as her fit passed away and her raving went quiet,
Heroic Aeneas began: 'No ordeal, O Sibyl, no new
Test can dismay me, for I have foreseen
And foresuffered all. But one thing I pray for
Especially: since here the gate opens, they say,
To the King of the Underworld's realms, and here
In these shadowy marshes the Acheron floods
To the surface, vouchsafe me one look,
One face-to-face meeting with my dear father.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b072n8dx)
Uzo Aduba, Inga Beale

Two time EMMY winning actress Uzo Aduba, better known as Suzanne 'Crazy eyes' Warren, is one of the stars of Netflix series Orange is the New Black. She discusses her life and career so far, including her latest role in theatre production 'The Maids' at the Trafalgar Studios in London.

Inga Beale, Lloyd's of London's chief executive, came out as bisexual in 2008. The first woman to rise to the top of the LGBT business power list, she'll be speaking at this year's Women of the World Festival. She talks to Jenni Murray about the rebuilding trust in the insurance market, being a role model and why honesty in the work place about who you really are is part of being a good leader.

The Trials of Spring is a documentary and a series of short films that look at women involved in the Arab Spring of 2011. Four of the shorts will be shown at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival tonight. Oscar nominated film maker, Gini Reticker, joins Jenni to talk about why she made her films about women's struggle during and after the Arab Spring and what drives her as a human rights film maker.

Sue Elliott Nicholls investigates what happens when a treasured, funny family story gets 'misremembered'.

Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw, the academic who coined the term 'intersectionality' and co-founder of the African American Policy Forum, discusses her work with #blacklivesmatter and the unique challenges facing women and girls of colour when it comes to the struggle for gender equality and racial justice.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b072n8dz)
Jane Eyre

Episode 10

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Jane has to make a decision but what should
she do. As the pressure from St John grows, Jane
pleads for more time.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


FRI 11:00 Ghosts of the Tsunami (b072n8f1)
Five years after Japan's Tsunami, some survivors report seeing the ghosts of the dead.

Richard Lloyd Parry, Asia Editor of the Times, has lived in Japan for 20 years. After the 2011 Tsunami he began to hear strange stories from the survivors. One woman said she was possessed by 25 different spirits, including a chained dog which had starved within the Fukushima fallout zone. A young builder saw people, plastered in mud, walking endlessly past his house. A cab driver's fare disappeared from the back seat, as soon as the car arrived at the abandoned address.

Now, Richard revisits the region to talk to those who claim to have seen ghosts.

Their stories - sometimes frightening, sometimes beautiful - reveal deeply-held elements of Japanese faith and spirituality, such as the cult of the ancestors, and Richard quickly comes to understand the role the dead play in the lives of the living.

Almost 20,000 people died in the disaster and for many survivors it felt selfish to express their personal grief. We hear how, for those trying to help people struck by the tragedy, part of the challenge has been to prompt them to express how they feel. Perhaps this is what the ghosts are doing.

So, as well as those directly affected, Richard talks those who try to comfort them - such as publisher Masashi Hijikata, who has revived an old literary tradition of Kaidankai or weird tale parties, bringing people together to tell their ghost tales in a kind of group therapy. There's also Reverend Kaneta, a charismatic Zen priest who has performed exorcisms on the 'possessed' and travelled the coastline, encouraging people to talk about their trauma while drinking coffee and listening to the dissonant jazz of Thelonius Monk records.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Dilemma (b03xf0gm)
Series 3

Episode 6

Sue Perkins puts Bridget Christie, Michael Rosen, Laura Dockrill and Adil Ray through the moral and ethical wringer.

After a series of finely-balanced dilemmas are posed, Sue cross-examines them on their answers.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2014.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b072hlyc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b072n8f3)
Looted Sumerian Seal, Baghdad

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

This is the oldest and smallest object in the series: a tiny Sumerian cylinder seal depicting a harvest festival. It was carved in 2,600 BC and was part of the collection of ancient cylinder seals which disappeared when the Iraq Museum in Baghdad was looted during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. We tell the story of this seal and the pillaging of the country's most important museum.

This episode was first broadcast on 11 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Contributors: Lamia al-Gailani, SOAS; Mazin Safar, son of Iraqi archaeologist Fuad Safar; John Curtis, Iran Heritage Foundation

With thanks to Augusta McMahon of Cambridge University, Mark Altaweel of the Institute of Archaeology UCL, and Sarah Collins of the British Museum

Picture: Sumerian harvest seal
Credit: Lamia al-Gailani


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b072hlyf)
Secret salesman manual, Tesco, Social media break-ups

You & Yours reveals an A-Z manual used by salesmen at a company that has been convicted of tricking customers into parting with thousands of pounds for work that could have been done at a fraction of the cost. It was used by Summit Roofguard Ltd, and details how salesmen can manipulate people into believing they have a great deal. The firm's two directors have been sentenced to two and a half years in prison for offences including unfair, misleading and aggressive commercial practices.

Tesco boss Dave Lewis speaks to reporter Samantha Fenwick about the supermarket's efforts to reduce food waste, as it rolls out a scheme in which left over food is given to charity.

Plus how social media has a way of prolonging a broken heart; the man who discovered through Google's social network that his ex-girlfriend was expecting a baby.

Presented by Peter White
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b072hlyh)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0745xtj)
The US President has said that David Cameron was "distracted" in the aftermath of the revolution in Libya. Andrew Mitchell, who was International Development Secretary at the time tells us the President's remarks were unfair, and the American ambassador in London explains why the special relationship is alive and well despite it all.
The Shadow Chancellor has launched what he calls a fiscal credibility law - but how different is it from what Ed Balls and Ed Miliband offered the voters? Not different enough according to the man in charge of Labour's 2015 election campaign.
And why are those between 18 and 35 depressed about their economic future?


FRI 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b072n8f5)
Manto: The Unsentimentalist

Sunil Khilnani explores the life and work of India's master of the short story, Saadat Hasan Manto.

Manto didn't fuss much over his sentences. He wrote in a rush, at hack speed, for money - and often legless drunk. His raw, visceral, personal response to his experiences - including the massacre at Amritsar, cosmopolitan Bombay and the horror of Partition - matched a historical moment that needed a raw, human response. In a divided country that Manto thought possessed 'too few leaders, and two many stuntmen', his sentences asserted, plainly, the human facts - not the moral or political motives that produced them.

As Professor Khilnani says, 'for all the velocity that his economy of language creates, the pressure of a story builds slowly. You're never quite prepared for the moment that blasts off the emotional roof. His sentences etch a groove in the mind not because he saturates his truths about atrocity in lurid color, but because he delivers them off-hand, even elliptically.'

Readings by Sagar Arya.

Producer: Martin Williams.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b072n5xr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b072n8f7)
Burn Baby Burn

Sean Grundy's satirical drama inspired by the Momart warehouse fire that destroyed works by Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, the Chapman Brothers and others of the Young British Artists movement.

"I think an ashtray is the most fantastically real thing."
Damien Hirst

On 24th May 2004, a fire in an East London warehouse destroys key works from the famous BritArt movement. Seminal works by Tracey Emin, Damien Hirst, Chris Offili and the Chapman Brothers go up in smoke. The collection is mainly owned by advertising guru Charles Saatchi. The art world is devastated. Many in the general public are highly amused.

Writer: Sean Grundy
Director: Dirk Maggs
Producer: David Morley

A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b072n8f9)
Northamptonshire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Northamptonshire. Chris Beardshaw, Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Wilson answer questions from an audience of local gardeners.

The panellists also share their topical tips for the coming weekend and Matthew Wilson goes on a quest to mend his grandfather's dung fork.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 First for Radio (b072n8fc)
Series 3

Delamere's Meadow

Two sisters have to find new grazing ground for their ponies and this marks the start of horsey intrigue with Mrs Luckie-Bryant..

Amelia Bullmore reads Nina Stibbe's short story.

Readings of acclaimed novelists' first stories for radio.

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2016.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b072n8fh)
George Martin, Nancy Reagan, Ray Tomlinson, Gillian Avery

Reeta Chakrabarti on

Sir George Martin, the legendary music producer who oversaw the Beatles' phenomenal success.
Nancy Reagan, the US First Lady, who went from actor to political wife, to campaigner against drug abuse.
Ray Tomlinson, one of the pioneers of the internet, and a founder of the email system.
And Gillian Avery, historian and award-winning author of children's literature.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b072n8fk)
US Elections, In Tune

Roger Bolton asks if the BBC has had too much coverage of the US Presidential election - and if it is anti Donald Trump.

The long process of selecting the next President of the United States is well underway, and some listeners are already bored stiff, while others are concerned that BBC reporters have lost their objectivity when it comes to unlikely Republican frontrunner Donald Trump. Roger Bolton puts listeners' concerns and questions to the BBC North America editor Jon Sopel.

It's the second year of the scheme to let female composers take over the Radio 3 airwaves on International Women's Day. After tremendous listener response last year, Feedback goes behind the scenes at a live broadcast of the afternoon programme, In Tune, from the Southbank Centre. Why has Radio 3 made such an effort to mark the day? What do these live extravaganzas aim to bring to the listener at home?

Phil Pegum, producer on the BBC's Lent Talks, and Cristina Odone who recently recorded her talk at the Tower of London, join Roger Bolton to discuss making Christian programming appeal to non-Christians and the challenges of recording on location.

Finally, foul ups on PM and Saturday Live have listeners asking whether technical standards at the BBC are slipping.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b072n8fm)
Jason and Kim - I Just Want to Be Like Everyone Else

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between an employer and a disabled employee, neither of whom expected they would be having this conversation. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b072hlyk)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b072hlym)
In his first major speech on the referendum, Boris Johnson said an independent Britain could forge a new free trade deal with the EU, based on the example of Canada, and urged those backing an exit to hold their nerve. Tony Blair has also intervened in the debate, urging campaigners in favour of remaining in the EU to show more passion.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b072n8fq)
Series 48

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Suzi Ruffell, Jon Holmes, Mitch Benn and Jessica Ransom to present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

This week the gang explore the binary nature of news reporting and discuss the implications of a future dominated by Artificial Intelligence with Dr Nick Hawes of Birmingham University.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b072n8fs)
Lynda wants Rob to be the guest of honour at the garden's opening, after his display of heroism during last year's floods. Rob reiterates that Helen probably isn't up to attending these special events.
Clarrie, Susan and Neil are helping out hanging the new curtains at the Village Hall. Eddie and Lynda, however, are distracted by the garden. Lynda takes her eye off the ball for a second and the curtains end up hanging at different lengths! Susan proposes that they have a picnic for the Queen's birthday, but Lynda frets that another event would steal her garden's thunder. Neil reckons the two events could complement each other.
Helen is in a confused daze. She tells Rob that she thinks the time has come for Ursula to go. Rob is worried that Ursula might hear Helen's disparaging comments. Helen complains that Ursula has been stifling, and Henry doesn't feel like her son anymore. Rob calls Helen ungrateful, and says that the problem is Helen's - not Ursula's - behaviour. Rob says that he "wanted a wife and mother for his child and look what he ended up with". Helen goes to strike Rob, he stops her, and strikes her. Later, Rob manages to pass the blame to Helen: she backed him into a corner. She apologises. Rob decides that it is time Helen got some psychiatric help.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b072hlyp)
The Ones Below, Sonita, Tate funding, Comedy Playhouse, War Horse music

The Ones Below is a dark and tense thriller, focussing on the relationship between two sets of first time expectant parents. After a tragic accident, a divide develops between them and a series of sinister clues lead to an unsettling discovery. Kate Muir, film critic for The Times, joins Kirsty Lang to discuss David Farr's big screen directorial debut.

Afghan rapper and activist Sonita shares her experience of almost being sold into a forced marriage and director Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami describes her award-winning documentary telling Sonita's story, screened at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival this evening and next week.

The BBC's Arts Editor and former Media Director at the Tate, Will Gompertz, considers the impact of BP's decision to end its sponsorship of the gallery after 26 years.

As the BBC announce a season celebrating sitcoms, Boyd Hilton takes a look at its latest comedy offering Stop/Start. The pilot episode airs tonight as part of the long running series Comedy Playhouse which gave birth to TV classics Steptoe & Son and Are You Being Served.

Joey will gallop around the West End stage for the last time when War Horse ends, after 7 years, tomorrow night. The extraordinary puppetry has attracted a lot of attention, but crucial to the play's success has been the music. This draws on folk song, which melds with classical orchestration. Director Tom Morris, and song-maker John Tams explain their approach, and Tim van Eyken, who was the original Songman in the National Theatre's production, plays and sings live in the Front Row studio.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b072n8dz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b072n8fv)
Peter Davis, Kate Hoey MP, Norman Lamb MP, Anna Soubry MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Spalding Grammar School in Lincolnshire, with a panel including the Lincolnshire businessman Peter Davis, Labour MP Kate Hoey, former Care Minister and Liberal Democrat MP Norman Lamb MP and the Small Business Minister Anna Soubry MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b072n8fx)
Human Hybrids

Adam Gopnik deplores the fashion for attacking so-called "cultural expropriation" as in the recent fuss over American students wearing sombreros at a Mexican theme party.

"Cultural mixing - the hybridization of hats, if you like - is the rule of civilisation not some new intrusion within our own. Healthy civilisations have always been mongrelized, cosmopolitan, hybrid, corrupted and expropriated and mixed.".


FRI 21:00 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b072n8fz)
Incarnations: India in 50 Lives - Omnibus

Amrita Sher-Gil, Subhas Chandra Bose, Gandhi, Jinnah, Manto

Sunil Khilnani presents an omnibus edition of Incarnations: India in 50 Lives.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b072hlyr)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b072hlyt)
Atrocities in South Sudan

Are conditions in South Sudan crisis now worse than Syria? Picture: Soldier in South Sudan, credit: AFP.


FRI 22:45 15 Minute Drama (b04m3cf2)
The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy

The Arrival

By Rachel Joyce

Queenie is waiting for Harold Fry to arrive but she is runnng out of time. As she writes we discover why she has hidden away from him for over twenty years.

Queenie ..... Sophie Thompson
Harold ..... Paul Venables
Sister Mary Inconnue ..... Roslyn Hill
Sister Catherine ..... Elaine Claxton
Sister Lucy ..... Hannah Genesius
Finty ..... Jane Slavin
Mr Henderson ..... Michael Bertenshaw
David ..... Monty d'Inverno

Directed by Tracey Neale


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b072jlgx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b072n8g1)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster, where peers debate gambling and Mps discuss deporting foreign criminals.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b072n8g3)
Jason and Kim - A New Town, a New Life

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between an employer and a disabled employee which makes clear the prejudice she's been subjected to but also the power of new beginnings. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b072j325)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b072j325)

15 Minute Drama 22:45 MON (b04lpsbx)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b072jdqk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b072jdqk)

15 Minute Drama 22:45 TUE (b04m0q75)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b072mq8n)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b072mq8n)

15 Minute Drama 22:45 WED (b04m0rzf)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b072n5x9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b072n5x9)

15 Minute Drama 22:45 THU (b04m3ckm)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b072n8dz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b072n8dz)

15 Minute Drama 22:45 FRI (b04m3cf2)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 WED (b070htsr)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b072jlgx)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b072jlgx)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b071x88c)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b072n8fx)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b071sx1h)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0736vv8)

Andrew O'Neill: Pharmacist Baffler 23:00 TUE (b04vf439)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b071ld75)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b071x889)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b072n8fv)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0729t65)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b072hlw8)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b072hlw8)

Back to the Ice 13:30 SUN (b072htqp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b072hs5l)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b072hs5l)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b072j3g0)

Black, White and Beethoven 15:30 SAT (b071tgbk)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b072j0mn)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b072j0mn)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b072jdqh)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b072jdqh)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b072mlsc)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b072mlsc)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b072n5x5)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b072n5x5)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b072n8dv)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b072htqw)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b072htqw)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b071sn2c)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b072j34f)

Brexit: What Happens to Scotland? 20:00 MON (b072w537)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b072hlhk)

Cancer Moonshot 21:00 MON (b0725d18)

Chain Reaction 18:30 WED (b072my2p)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b072jlgs)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b072jlgs)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b072ht0p)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b072ht0p)

Dilemma 11:30 FRI (b03xf0gm)

Dot 11:30 MON (b072j327)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b072htqt)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b072jlgn)

Drama 14:15 WED (b072my2h)

Drama 14:15 THU (b072z7vp)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b072n8f7)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b05xglm4)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0729rqj)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b072hwfw)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b072jdq9)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b072mls7)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b072n5x1)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b072n8ds)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b071x87y)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b072n8fk)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b071tgc6)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b072n9s7)

First for Radio 15:45 FRI (b072n8fc)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b071ld6v)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b072hlvz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b072hllc)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b072hlnt)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b072hlsf)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b072hlwg)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b072hlyp)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b071x87m)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b072n8f9)

Ghosts of the Tsunami 11:00 FRI (b072n8f1)

History Retweeted 23:15 WED (b03w18g1)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b072n5x3)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b072n5x3)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b072hlnw)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 MON (b072j32f)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 TUE (b072jfcz)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 WED (b072mvvr)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 THU (b072n5xh)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 FRI (b072n8f5)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 21:00 FRI (b072n8fz)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b072hlny)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b072hlny)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b071sn2k)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b072j3g2)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b071x87t)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b072n8fh)

Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island 10:30 SAT (b0729rqq)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b072jlgv)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b072jlgv)

Leap 19:45 SUN (b072hvn2)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (b071vjrp)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b072mz5t)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0729t61)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b072jlgq)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b071ld6b)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b072hlgv)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b072hlkn)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b072hln3)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b072hlrj)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b072hlvn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b072hly1)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b072mls9)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b072mls9)

Modern Welsh Voices 00:30 SUN (b03m3nv0)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b071ld6z)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b071ld6z)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b072my2k)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b071vjrm)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b072mz5r)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 MON (b072j329)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 TUE (b072jfct)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 WED (b072mq8v)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 THU (b072n5xf)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 FRI (b072n8f3)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b071ld6l)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b072hlh3)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b072hlkx)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b072hlnc)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b072hlrs)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b072hlvx)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b072hly9)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b072hlh5)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b071ld6x)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b072hlhs)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b072hll1)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b072hlnh)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b072hlry)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b072hlw1)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b072hlyc)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b071ld6n)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b072hlh9)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b072hlhf)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b071ld7w)

News 13:00 SAT (b071ld73)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b072hs5q)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b072jdqf)

Out of the Ordinary 11:00 WED (b072mq8s)

PM 17:00 SAT (b071ld79)

PM 17:00 MON (b072hll7)

PM 17:00 TUE (b072hlnp)

PM 17:00 WED (b072hls9)

PM 17:00 THU (b072hlwb)

PM 17:00 FRI (b072hlyk)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b072hvmy)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b071s6pd)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b072htxz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b071x8d4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b073mhmm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b073m7nq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b073m7g9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0747d8t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b073m31p)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0729t63)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0729t63)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b072hs5v)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b072hs5v)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b072hs5v)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b071vlms)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b072n5xk)

Riot Girls 21:00 SAT (b071s6nz)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b04c9gsl)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0729rqn)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b071ld7t)

Saving Science from the Scientists 11:00 TUE (b072jdqm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b071ld6g)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b072hlgz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b072hlks)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b072hln7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b072hlrn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b072hlvs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b072hly5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b071ld6d)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b071ld6j)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b071ld7k)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b072hlgx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b072hlh1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b072hlhz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b072hlkq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b072hlkv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b072hln5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b072hln9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b072hlrl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b072hlrq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b072hlvq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b072hlvv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b072hly3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b072hly7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b071ld7p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b072hlj3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b072hll9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b072hlnr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b072hlsc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b072hlwd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b072hlym)

Small Scenes 23:00 THU (b072n66g)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b072hs5n)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b072hs5n)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b072j0ml)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b072j0ml)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b072hs5x)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b072hs5s)

Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On 18:30 THU (b072n5xp)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b072ht0m)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b072hvn0)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b072hvn0)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b072j3g4)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b072j3g4)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b072jmpp)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b072jmpp)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b072mz5p)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b072mz5p)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b072n5xr)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b072n5xr)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b072n8fs)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b071whgb)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b072n66d)

The Croft & Pearce Show 23:00 WED (b072mz5w)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b071vlmv)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b072n5xm)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b072ht0r)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b072ht0r)

The Greatest Ever Faker 16:00 MON (b072j3fy)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b072jdqc)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b072jdqc)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b072htqr)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b072mq8q)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b072n8fm)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b072n8g3)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b072hls7)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b071x885)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b072n8fq)

The Real Henry James 00:30 SAT (b072n0zp)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b06yr7ft)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0729rqs)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b072hlhx)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b072hllh)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b072hlp2)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b072hlsh)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b072hlwj)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b072hlyt)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b071vjrk)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b072my2m)

Tim Key Delves Into Daniil Kharms And That’s All 11:30 THU (b072n5xc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b072j4cd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b072n9s9)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b072mz5y)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b072n66j)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b072n8g1)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0729rql)

Today 06:00 MON (b072j0mj)

Today 06:00 TUE (b073m7ns)

Today 06:00 WED (b073m7gc)

Today 06:00 THU (b072w4bf)

Today 06:00 FRI (b072zgn0)

Tony McHale - Dead in the Water 14:15 MON (b03nt8n9)

Turntable Tales 11:30 TUE (b072jfcr)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03mztpd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03wphhd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b01sby29)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03wpzmk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03ws7gc)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03x474w)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b071ld6q)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b071ld6s)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b071ld71)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b071ld7m)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b072hlh7)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b072hlhc)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b072hlhv)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b072hlj1)

Weather 05:56 MON (b072hlkz)

Weather 12:57 MON (b072hll5)

Weather 21:58 MON (b072hllf)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b072hlnm)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b072hlp0)

Weather 12:57 WED (b072hls3)

Weather 12:57 THU (b072hlw5)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b072hlyh)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b072hlyr)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b072hlj7)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b072hvn4)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b071ld77)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b072j0mq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b072hlnf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b072mm0c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b072n5x7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b072n8dx)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b071tgc0)

Wordaholics 19:15 SUN (b01rvptv)

World at One 13:00 MON (b072j32c)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b072jfcw)

World at One 13:00 WED (b072w6jh)

World at One 13:00 THU (b073hjsy)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0745xtj)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b072hll3)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b072hlnk)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b072hls1)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b072hlw3)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b072hlyf)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b071x8d6)