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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 FEBRUARY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0713p6w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b071x1yy)
The Other Paris

Episode 5

Paris, City of Light, the city of fine dining and seductive couture and intellectual hauteur, was until fairly recently always accompanied by its shadow - the city of the poor, the outcast, the criminal, the eccentric, the wilfully nonconforming.

In The Other Paris, Luc Sante gives us a panoramic view of that alternative metropolis, which has all but vanished but whose traces are in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of France itself and, by extension, throughout the world.

He draws on testimony from a great range of witnesses - from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and flaneurs - whose research is matched only by the vividness of Sante's narration.

"Paris, a city so beautiful that people would rather be poor there than rich somewhere else." Guy Debord.
"This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest I've ever read about Paris. Ever. " Paul Auster.

Luc Sante was born in Verviers Belgium and emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. Since 1984, he has been a teacher and writer, and frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His publications include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, The Factory of Facts and Folk Photography. He currently teaches creative writing and the history of photography at Bard College in New York State.

Writer: Luc Sante
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713p6y)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713p70)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713p72)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0713p74)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0717nzj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones, Priest in charge of the City Parish of St John the Baptist, Cardiff.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b0717nzl)
Britain's greatest test pilot

The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0713p76)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0713p78)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b0717j1t)
Series 32

Loughrigg Fell - Simon Ingram

Clare Balding explores Loughrigg Fell, in Cumbria with the writer and journalist, Simon Ingram. With all the passion of a convert, he explains to Clare how he became bitten by the mountain climbing bug and why he wants to pass on his obsession to anyone who'll listen. In the space of a morning they are hit with torrential rain and howling winds but nothing deters them from their walk and Simon also explains how to stay safe while enjoying the mountains of Britain, no matter what the weather.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b071gycq)
Farming Today This Week: The Future of Farming

Charlotte Smith considers the future of farming with the Bower family at Lower Drayton Farm in Staffordshire, who've diversified more than most - from paintballing and motocross to hosting weddings, whilst still having time to grow and rear some food!

In the week of the NFU's national conference in Birmingham, the theme of which was the future of farming, farmer Ray Bower reflects on how and why they've diversified to the extent that they have, his partner Val running the entertainment side of things, including the fun farm and adventure playground. Ray's son Richard, Chairman of the NFU's Next Generation Policy Forum of young farmers, explains that he has his own ideas about how the farm remains the core business and how to develop it in the future.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0713p7b)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b071gw3z)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b071h07v)
Marian Keyes

Marian Keyes joins the Rev. Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir. A columnist, blogger and bestselling author of a dozen novels, she has sold more than 33 million copies worldwide. She shares her passion for "the twitters", collecting drawer knobs, browsing in chemists and "beachouse banjo" - chalk painting old furniture.
Gilding the recycled lily, mosaic maker Ed Chapman talks about his portraits which have turned sugar cubes into Alan Sugar, Welsh slate into Richard Burton and gravy stains into Andy Murray. Such inventive thrift will appeal to Jordon Cox, king of the couponeers, and the lad who flew to Sheffield via Berlin to save £8 on the train fare. His passion for couponing began after watching at TV programme. It was watching an inflight movie that inspired Adam Walker to give up his day job as a kettle and toaster salesman, to become the only Briton to have swum the Oceans Seven Challenge. He recalls inventing a new stroke after he torn his bicep, that led to a new career in coaching and teaching technique.
JP meets Saturday Live listener, Margaret Amey, to explore her collection of 700 teapots.
And the singer Tony Christie's shares his Inheritance Tracks: Come Back To Me, performed by Sammy Davis Jnr, featuring Buddy Rich Live at The Sands; and The Folks Who Live on the Hill, sung by Peggy Lee.

Making It Up As I Go Along, by Marian Keyes.
The David Beckham mosaic is on show at Phillips Auctioneers in Mayfair.
Man -V- Ocean by Adam Walker is out now.
Tony Christie's 'The Great Irish Songbook' is out now on Wrasse Records,

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b071h07x)
Series 6

Slumdog Millionaire

Somewhere between Bollywood and Hollywood, 'Slumdog Millionaire', the low budget independent production captured the heart of the world, and 8 Oscars in 2009 .

Paul Gambaccini tells the gripping story of the little film that got lucky, talking to some of those central to its creation, from Vikas Swarup, the Indian Diplomat who wrote the original novel, co-director Loveleen Tandem, who helped persuade the studios to let the child actors speak Hindi, and Resul Pookerty, whose magical soundscape of India won him an Oscar and changed his life for ever.

It was a film which took a city, a child of the slums, and a game show - and turned it into a star-crossed romance; a film which snuck past the infamous Foreign Language category and into the mainstream Best Picture category at the 81st Academy Awards - despite at least 20% Hindi.

Winning 8 Oscars, the film had no star actors, but a cast of millions - the city of Mumbai. The real star name was Danny Boyle, a director who, according to screen writer Simon Beaufoy, discovered in Mumbai a city 'like the inside of his head' - vibrant, frenetic, dazzling, and full of extremes.

This was also an independent film which nearly went straight to DVD, but rose again to take Oscar after Oscar, from under the noses of studio films.

Paul Smith of Celador Productions, describes how his company, who invented the game show, "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire", got lucky a second time - winning a Best Picture Oscar.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b071h081)
Tom Newton Dunn of The Sun looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The EU referendum campaign has begun and the political classes are electrified. The task of keeping the public electrified may prove more difficult. However for MPs tempted to trade insults to keep up momentum the Speaker had words of warning.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0713p7j)
Opting to go lower caste

The human stories behind the headlines. In this edition, we hear from India, where protests deprived ten million Delhi residents of their water. Members of the Jat caste want to force the government to reclassify them as lower-caste, so they can get quotas for government jobs and study places. Used Field Marshall for sale - the things you find on eBay in Egypt, when locals take the president at his word.
What happens when a Trump supporter meets a young Muslim refugee for brunch in Alabama? Our Moscow correspondent gets a distinctly chilly welcome in Siberia, and no, it's nothing to do with the weather. And arriving at the airport in Havana, it's an event in itself.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b0713p7q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0713p7s)
Pension reform or a grab on our pension cash?

On Money Box with Lesley Curwen: pension reform or a grab on our pension pots? The Chancellor, George Osborne,
is widely seen to be seeking ways to cut billions from the bill for pension tax relief, which according to one estimate, costs the country more than 20 billion pounds a year. But will he take radical action? We'll have to wait til Budget Day on March 16th to find out the answer. But pensions experts Alan Higham and Claer Barrett explain the options the Chancellor is currently considering and what effect they might have on our pension pots.

A few weeks ago Money Box looked at those annoying fees you get charged when you pay for something with your credit or debit card. But as listener Roger found out, extra surcharges can also be applied when you pay in cash, in person! He was asked to pay a 7.5% admin fee when he bought theatre tickets. So how clear are the rules on what we can be charged when we pay for tickets by cash? Peter Stonely of the Trading Standards Institute joins the programme.

Is there a ticking timebomb in the mortgage market? There's concern that people who have interest only mortgages who are now reaching the end of their loan don't have a way of paying off the capital. Refinancing their loan could be difficult - as it's now harder for older people to get mortgages that it used to be before the credit crunch of 2008. Ray Boulger from brokers John Charcol explains what's happening.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b0717m14)
Series 89

Episode 8

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. The line-up for this, the final show of the current series is Jeremy Hardy, Lucy Porter, Hugo Rifkind and Kerry Godliman.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0713p7v)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0713p7x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b0717n94)
Therese Coffey MP, Paul Nuttall MEP, Brendan O Neill, Lucy Powell MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Thistley Hough Academy in Penkhull Stoke on Trent with a panel including the Deputy Leader of the House of Commons Therese Coffey MP, the Deputy Leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall MEP, the Editor of Spiked on Line Brendan O Neill, and the Shadow Education Secretary Lucy Powell MP. Topics include the EU referendum, dress code for politicians, teacher recruitment and retainment, social mobility and Boris Johnson and Donald Trump as future political leaders.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0713p7z)
EU referendum, Teacher shortages

Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? which came from Stoke-on-Trent. Anita Anand takes your calls on the EU referendum and on teacher shortages.

Q; If we vote no to the EU, is this a leap into the unknown?

Q; Schools in areas such as Stoke-on-Trent have struggled for years to recruit and retain teachers. What would panel members do to restore a sense of joy, inspiration and value to the role?

Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b071h2x6)
Trial by Laughter by Ian Hislop & Nick Newman

William Hone is the forgotten hero of free speech in Britain.

He was a bookseller, publisher and satirist. In 1817, he stood trial for 'impious blasphemy and seditious libel'.

His crime was to be funny. Worse than that he was funny by parodying religious texts. And worst of all, he was funny about the despotic government and the libidinous monarchy.

Ian Hislop and Nick Newman's comedy drama based on the real trial transcripts.

Hone ...... Robert Wilfort
Prince Regent ...... Arthur Bostrom
Cruikshank ...... Conrad Nelson
Ellenborough ...... Jonathan Keeble
Shepherd ...... David Benson
Abbott ...... Malcolm Raeburn
Lady Hertford ...... Melissa Sinden
Sarah ...... Fiona Clarke
Reporter ...... Graeme Hawley
Clerk ...... Graeme Hawley

Original music by Conrad Nelson.

Director: Gary Brown

Ian Hislop is the editor of Private Eye and a team captain on 'Have I got News for You'. Nick Newman is a satirical cartoonist for The Sunday Times and Private Eye. They have known each other since their schooldays and have written many successful TV programmes together including 'My Dad's the Prime Minister' and 'The Wipers Times'.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


SAT 15:30 Musical Variations: The Life of Angela Morley (b0714nhm)
Stuart Barr uncovers the colourful career of British composer and transgender pioneer, Angela Morley.

In 1972, Wally Stott's transition to Angela Morley made front page news. Wally was famous. He was composer for the Goon Show and Hancock's Half Hour, and music director to stars like Frankie Vaughan and Shirley Bassey. "TV Music Man changes his sex" screamed the headlines. Where would Angela go from here? Stuart talks to Angela's friends and colleagues to discover how she made her mark in the music business, as a woman and a man. And he explores the special qualities of the music she wrote and arranged, from the famous 'Hancock' tuba theme to her work alongside John Williams on blockbusters like Star Wars and Superman.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0713p81)
A celebration of the classic children's picture book, Five Minutes Peace by Jill Murphy

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0713p83)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b0717j24)
Now We Are Ten

The Bottom Line first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2006. At the time, Tony Blair was Prime Minister, interest rates were 4.5%, petrol was 90 pence a litre and a first class stamp cost 32p (half today's price). In a special edition, to mark ten years since the programme came on air, Evan Davis and guests discuss some of the big changes that have happened in the past decade, including: the global recession, record high and record low oil prices, a technology boom and China's extraordinary economic growth. How have businesses adapted to the changing world?

Guests:

Nicola Horlick, CEO, Money & Co

Sir Ian Cheshire, Chairman, Debenhams

Nicola Shaw, CEO, HS1

Ken Olisa, Founder and Chairman, Restoration Partners

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0713p85)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0713p87)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713p89)
G20 warning about Brexit

The latest national andG20 leaders warn of shock to global economy of "Brexit"
Russia halts Syria air-strikes international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b071gy2g)
Clive Anderson, Stewart Lee, Pam St. Clement, Karl Bartos, Bob Marshall-Andrews, Buena Vista Social Club, GoGo Penguin

Clive Anderson and Scottee are joined by Stewart Lee, Pam St. Clement, Karl Bartos and Bob Marshall-Andrews for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Buena Vista Social Club and GoGo Penguin.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b071gwdv)
Series 19

27/02/2016

As the fixture lists start crowding in on Premier League football clubs, managers and even ex-managers have begun to feel the terrible weight of expectation. In this week's From Fact to Fiction, Mark Lawson imagines how one such manager might deal with the pressure by opening a direct line to 'the man above'.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0713p8c)
Grimsby, Javier Marias, Mark Wallinger, Sarah Kane, Murder and Broken Biscuits

Sacha Baron Cohen's new comedy Grimsby tells the story of two brothers separated in childhood reunited as adults; one is a spy, the other a lazy git
Thus Bad Begins is the latest novel from Javier Marias; one of Europe's finest writers
Artist Mark Wallinger's recent work has focussed on religion death and William Blake. He has a new exhibition opening in London
Sarah Kane's plays have always excited controversy: a restaging of Cleansed at London's Dorfman Theatre looks set to rouse familiar fury
BBC TV has new drama series starting: Murder and Broken Biscuits
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Louise Scodie, Amanda Craig and Kevin Jackson. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b071h083)
SKILL, STAMINA and LUCK

In 1982, a publishing phenomenon began with the first appearance of The Warlock of Firetop Mountain by Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone. It would be the first of a series that would sell some 17 million copies in 30 different languages. Which (JK Rowling notwithstanding) might sound unlikely for a set of children’s books involving wizards, goblins and elves.

What was it that set them apart? They were part of a much wider literary innovation known as interactive fiction. You don’t merely read them, page by page, cover to cover. You were asked to make decisions all the way along about what would happen next, where you would go, who you would even fight, which page to turn to. And you often had to keep a notebook and pair of dice close to hand while doing so. You might fail along the way and have to start again (or more likely you'd keep your finger in the previous page until you were satisfied you’d made the right choice). Essentially, they were puzzle books.

This sort of text based adventure would make its way very quickly into the digital realm as a very important early genre of computer game.

And we have built an interactive version of this programme, over at BBC Taster, if you would like to try your SKILL, STAMINA and LUCK.

Naomi Alderman charts the rise and rise of the interactive story, from its beginnings in obscure avant-guarde French literary groups through to the virtual worlds of modern video games, and the cult literary form today of Interactive Fiction.

Produced by Alex Mansfield


SAT 21:00 Riot Girls (b0713vvt)
The Life and Loves of a She Devil

Episode 1

by Fay Weldon, adapted by Joy Wilkinson. A darkly comic fairy tale about revenge, sex and power.

When Ruth discovers her husband is sleeping with a prettier, richer woman, she makes ingenious and diabolical plans to punish them both.

'The Life and Loves of a She Devil', written in 1983, is a gleefully bawdy satire on the war of the sexes, and a fable about the rewards and dangers of our capacity for transformation.

It is part of Riot Girls on Radio 4, a series of no-holds-barred women's writing that includes Erica Jong's 'Fear of Flying' and original plays following three generations of women by Lucy Catherine and Ella Hickson.

Adapted by Joy Wilkinson
Directed by Abigail le Fleming

The Writer
Fay Weldon CBE has written 34 novels, numerous TV dramas, several radio plays, 5 full length stage plays and five collections of short stories. She works as Professor teaching creative writing at Bath Spa University.

The Adapter
Joy Wilkinson was selected as a Screen International Star of Tomorrow 2015. She has several original feature projects and TV series in development, including the thriller KILLER CV, which was selected for the 2014 Brit List. Joy writes extensively for radio, on original dramas and adaptations. In theatre, her work has won prizes including the Verity Bargate Award.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0713p8f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b0717cpy)
Who Owns Culture?

It may not have the same impact as the Elgin Marbles, but a slightly battered bronze statue of a cockerel has re-ignited a row that has potentially profound implications for our museums and opens a Pandora's Box of moral dilemmas. The statue in question sits in the dining hall of Jesus College Cambridge, but it was originally from the Benin Empire, now part of modern-day Nigeria. It was one of hundreds of artworks taken in a punitive British naval expedition in 1897 that brought the empire to an end. In the same way that Greece has pursued the return of the Elgin marbles, Nigeria has repeatedly called for all the Benin bronzes - which it says are part of its cultural heritage - to be repatriated. The students at Jesus agree with them and are demanding the cockerel be returned. But to whom? There are dozens of high profile campaigns around the world to repatriate cultural artefacts, but the legal issue of rightful ownership is complex and made more so by the value of the objects in question. Does the fact that many of the finest treasures in our museums were acquired during the height of our imperial history mean we're duty bound to return them? If we accept the principle that art looted by the Nazi's should be returned, why not, for example, the Benin Bronzes? Artefacts like the Elgin Marbles are important because they are part of the story or humanity itself. Can any one country claim ownership over that? Would artefacts that have been returned to their original setting take on a new and more authentic cultural meaning that we in the West may not be able to understand, but which is nonetheless important to those who claim ownership? Should repatriation be part of a wider cultural enterprise to re-write our national and imperialistic historical narrative? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips and Michael Portillo. Witnesses are Dr Tiffany Jenkins, Prof Constantine Sandis, Mark Hudson and Andrew Dismore.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b07142lq)
Heat 7, 2016

(7/17)
Which artery takes deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs? Which actor was future Vice-President Al Gore's roommate at Harvard? And who wrote the novel on which the Hitchcock film Psycho was based?

Russell Davies puts these and a host of other questions to the latest contenders for the Brain of Britain 2016 title. The programme comes from the Radio Theatre in London, with the winner assured a place in the semi-finals of the contest later in the spring.

There'll also be the chance for a Brain of Britain listener to outwit the contestants with ingenious questions of his or her own devising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b0713vvy)
Bubble and Squeak

Roger McGough with poetry of love, hate and everything in between on this Valentine's edition of Poetry Please. Featured poets include Harold Pinter, Carol Ann Duffy and WB Yeats, and there are readings from Fiona Shaw, Alice Arnold, Paul Mundell and Burt Caesar. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 28 FEBRUARY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b071lcck)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Modern Welsh Voices (b03lntqf)
Brown Jug

Brown Jug by Linda Ruhemann. The first of five original stories by writers from Wales.

Whilst shopping for souvenirs in a small holiday town a man's past is evoked and it brings a new perspective on the present.

Read by Robert Pugh
Directed by Helen Perry

A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071lccm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071lccw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071lccy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b071lcd2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b071lfk3)
Bells from the Church of St Eustachius, Tavistock in Devon.


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (b0717cq0)
The City

The Lent Talks are a series of essays on the different perspectives of the passion story. The location for this week's "Lent in the Landscape" talk is the iconic brick-built Victorian Gothic "All Saints Church" just behind Oxford Street in London. Maxwell reflects on Jesus' arrival in Jerusalem and his confrontation at the Temple. Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b071lcd4)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b071lfkd)
A Walk in the Woods

Our relationship to the forest is ancient and complex. Woodland offers protection but also harbours some of our deepest fears.

Danish radio producer Rikke Houd takes a walk in the forest, in the company of writers including Henry David Thoreau, Pablo Neruda, Dinah Hawken and the Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer, and discovers a place where we can both lose and find ourselves.

With music by Jussi Björling, the Polish composer and dendrophiliac Krzysztof Penderecki and the Swedish musician Victoria Bergsman, who performs as Taken By Trees.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b071lfkn)
Inspiring First Generation Farmers

John Terry always dreamed of being a farmer. After many years spent teaching he managed to create a school farm and with his savings he bought a small field. Today he farms 35 acres near Nuneaton in Warwickshire and his prize winning sheep are helping create herds across the world. Hoping to inspire others John has written children's books and the essential guide, 'How to Become a First Generation Farmer'. John tells Ruth Sanderson about his struggle to become a farmer and his hopes that his son will carry on his work. A sense of humour has been essential he says and has even inspired his latest endeavour - a joke book for farmers.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b071lcdj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b071lcdn)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b071lh7q)
Modesty goes mainstream, Christian perspectives on the EU debate, Cardinal Pell faces his critics.

As the EU Referendum campaigns get underway, Edward Stourton speaks to two Christians on opposite sides of the argument who are both taking to social media to garner support for their views. Adrian Hilton runs the influential Cranmer blog; Michael Sadgrove is the emeretus dean of Durham.

A cross-party group of peers has written to the Prime Minister urging him to put pressure on the UN Security council to declare the assaults on Christians in Syria and the Middle East a Genocide. John Pontifex from "Aid to the Church in Need" tells Edward why the term is appropriate and the positive effects that the designation could have.

The Church in Wales has parachuted an American religious leader in to the diocese of St Asaph to help its churches re-connect with their communities. Mark Yaconelli explains his approach to Edward. Paul Chambers, a sociologist of religion, explains why religion in Wales has declined more steeply than in the rest of the UK.

Cardinal George Pell will be giving evidence to the Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse from a video link in a Rome hotel room. A heart condition means he has been advised against travelling home to Australia to give evidence in person. Andrew West from ABC sets the scene for the hearing which begins on Sunday night/Monday.

Producers: Rosie Dawson
Carmel Lonergan
Series Producer: Amanda Hancox

photo by: Parker Fitzgerald for Uniqlo.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b071lh7s)
Brathay Trust

Jeff Prestridge presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Brathay Trust
Registered Charity No 1021586
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Brathay Trust'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Brathay Trust'

Photo credit: Phil Ide.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b071lcfl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b071lcfs)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b071lh7v)
Lent Pilgrimage 3: Becoming Present

Whether our journey takes us out onto the road or deep into reflection, how do we discern God's voice speaking to us?
The Rev. Dr. Stephen Wigley, Chair of the Wales Synod of the Methodist Church, reflects on how we can become more attentive to God's presence around us. The Rev. Richard Sharples leads the live service from Gresford Methodist Church, Wrexham which includes SS. Wesley's 'Lead Me, Lord', 'The Gift of Life' by John Rutter, and 'Take This Moment' by John Bell and Graham Maule, sung by The Sirenian Singers, directed by Jean Stanley-Jones. Accompanist: Christopher Enston.
Producer: Karen Walker.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b0717n96)
Moral Futures

Adam Gopnik thinks future generations will be as appalled by some practices that are accepted today as we are by aspects of the past.

"Even as we condemn our moral ancestors, we need to hold our ears to the wind, and listen for the faint sounds of our descendants telling their melancholy truths about us."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378srp)
House Sparrow

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the house sparrow. These birds are more commonly found living alongside us than any other British bird. Perhaps the most enterprising birds were the House Sparrows which bred below ground in a working mine at Frickley Colliery in Yorkshire.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b071lcg5)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b071lmwc)
Is Brookfield all set for change? Rob is always there for Helen.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b071lmwh)
Hugh Bonneville

Kirsty Young's castaway is Hugh Bonneville.

Known around the world for his portrayal of Lord Grantham in ITV's hugely popular Downton Abbey, he made British audiences laugh with his portrayal of the hapless Ian Fletcher in the BBC comedies Twenty Twelve and W1A and charmed audiences of all ages as Mr Brown in the animated film, Paddington Bear.

His immense range as an actor has ensured he's seldom been out of work since joining the National Theatre in 1987, but his thespian leanings started much earlier - writing, performing & even creating tickets for his very own dramatic productions - performed for his family at home. He was born in London to a surgeon and a former nurse and grew up with two older siblings. At junior school he refused to let a teacher put him off his passion for acting which he continued to pursue while doing a degree in Theology at Cambridge.

He chose an acting career over law, and following a brief time at drama school, his first professional role was "bashing a cymbal" in A Midsummer Night's Dream at London's Regent's Park theatre in 1986. He joined the National the following year and achieved his ambition of being a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1991. His television debut was as a conman in the ITV drama Chancer and his first appearance on the big screen was in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, directed by Kenneth Branagh. He appeared opposite George Clooney in the 2014 film The Monuments Men and was the voice of Father Christmas in the BBC's adaptation of the Julia Donaldson picture book Stick Man.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b071lcg8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07142lx)
Series 74

Episode 1

New series. Paul Merton, Rufus Hound, Graham Norton and Pam Ayres join Nicholas Parsons for another episode of the classic panel show in which guests must try to speak on a given topic for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Topics tackled this week include Optimism, Humble Pie and The Isle of Man.

Just a Minute is the world's longest running panel show, still hosted after 49 years by the inimitable Nicholas Parsons. Appearing in this run of 6 episodes are regulars Paul Merton, Stephen Fry, Graham Norton, Pam Ayres, Josie Lawrence, Jenni Eclair, Gyles Brandreth and Tim Rice; while Rufus Hound, Esther Rantzen and Nish Kumar make their first appearances.

Rufus Hound is an actor and comedian, best known for his comic performances in One Man Two Guvnors and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

Esther Rantzen is of course well known to audiences as the host of long running magazine programme That's Life, as well as the founder of the charities ChildLine and The Silver Line.

Nish Kumar is a stand up and the host of NewsJack on Radio 4 extra.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b071s6np)
Feeding India

Dan Saladino explores the fierce debate over how 1.2bn people will be fed in the future.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b071lcgg)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b071lcgj)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Simon Schama: The Obliterators (b071s6nr)
Simon Schama searches for a religious or political motive behind the destruction of archaeological sites.

Last year saw the unprecedented loss of treasured ancient sites in Syria and Iraq. While the conflict and the terrible human suffering it has caused remains the most important issue, there is worldwide concern that temples in Palmyra, the famous winged bulls and carvings of Nimrud, the fabulous contents of the museum at Mosul and antiquities from hundreds of other sites have been lost to the jackhammers and bulldozers of so-called Islamic State.

Simon Schama looks for an explanation for this violent spate of iconoclasm. Can it be explained by religion? Would a narrow reading of Islamic texts prompt such action? And, if not religious, what might be the political or criminal motive for destruction that pays no heed to history or beauty?

Simon also wonders if our own history of iconoclasm during the Reformation has anything to teach us.

Contributors include Dr Abdulkarim, director of antiquities for Syria; Jeremy Bowen, BBC Middle East editor; John Curtis, former keeper of Middle Eastern department at the British Museum; the historian of religion Karen Armstrong; and imam and Islamic scholar Osama Hasan.

Producer: Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0717lrx)
Royal Academy of Arts

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from the Royal Academy of Arts in London, coinciding with the Painting the Modern Garden exhibition.

Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and James Wong answer the gardeners' questions - including how to get the most out of your artichokes, how to puppy-proof gardens, and the recommended fruit bushes for a front garden.

We also follow James Wong as he takes in the Painting the Modern Garden exhibition at the Academy.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b071s6nt)
Sunday Omnibus: Dealing with Death and Suicide

Fi Glover introduces conversations about a mother's death and a much loved stepmother, a father's suicide, and sons who took their own lives, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Riot Girls (b071s6nz)
The Life and Loves of a She Devil

Episode 2

by Fay Weldon, adapted by Joy Wilkinson. A darkly comic fairy tale about revenge, sex and power.

Ruth's campaign to punish her husband and his mistress is well-advanced, and now she will still stop at nothing to get the life, and the body, she desires.

'The Life and Loves of a She Devil', written in 1983, is a gleefully bawdy satire on the war of the sexes, and a fable about the rewards and dangers of our capacity for transformation.

It is part of Riot Girls on Radio 4, a series of no-holds-barred women's writing that includes Erica Jong's 'Fear of Flying' and original plays following three generations of women by Lucy Catherine and Ella Hickson.

Adapted by Joy Wilkinson
Directed by Abigail le Fleming.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b071s6p5)
Graham Swift on Mothering Sunday

Mariella Frostrup talks to novelist Graham Swift, whose new book Mothering Sunday is set all on one day in March 1924. Traditionally domestic staff were sent home on Mother's Day but the heroine of this novel, a housemaid who is also an orphan, spends the afternoon with her secret lover. The events that unfold shape her life.
Also on the programme, a guide to the best books about envy and two authors discuss why they were inspired to write historical fiction about the whaling industry.
Adrian Searle of Freight Books gives his reading recommendation for March.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b071s6pd)
Fox Running

Roger McGough presents the late Ken Smith's reading of his long poem, Fox Running. The recording of this urgent, driving poem about a man adrift in the city was made on cassette tape and given to the programme by Ken's wife Judi Benson. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07178gc)
Dementia: What Do We Know?

It's estimated there are around 620,000 people in England with dementia. Prime minister David Cameron says fighting the disease is a personal priority and doctors in England have been encouraged to proactively identify people with early stage dementia.

The PM says that an early diagnosis allows families to prepare for the care of a relative, but others argue there's no treatment for such a diagnosis and no robust evidence to justify a process that might lead to harm. Deborah Cohen hears from doctors who are concerned the drive to raise diagnosis rates is leading to people being misdiagnosed.

The Government has also pledged millions of pounds to help make England "the best place in the world to undertake research into dementia and other neuro-degenerative diseases". Scientists leading the research say they are making progress to find tests which could identify people at risk from the disease and develop a cure. But other researchers say money is being wasted because current directions in drug development are following the same path as those of the past which have ended in failure.

Producer: Paul Grant.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b071gwdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b071lcgm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b071lcgp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071lcgr)
Allies of Iran's moderate president on course to claim victory in a parliamentary poll. Syria's truce holds despite violations. Cameron accused of downplaying life outside the EU


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b071s6pq)
John McCarthy

John McCarthy is picking this week's highlights from BBC radio including stories of top journalism that help put the world to rights and put the present and past in sharp and welcome focus.
Modern technology, it keeps us in touch - but are personal communications becoming virtual rather than real - can a text replace a hug?
Stress-inducing incidents and stress-busting activities.
Pele's football boots - where are they now?
And who was George Martin producing just before he took on the Beatles?

Pick of the Week production team : Kevin Mousley, Kay Bishton and Elodie Chatelain.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b071s6ps)
Tom finally catches Helen on her own. He wants to know if she and Henry are all right. Helen protests that he is reading too much into her tears at his birthday meal - she's fine.
Toby informs Carol that the village hall renovations are almost complete. He asks Carol's opinion about his pastured eggs, as well as Lilian who's passing on horseback. Lilian tells Toby she doesn't have time to stop, but they can talk if he comes back to the stables with her. While towelling down the horse, Toby gives Lilian his best sales pitch. It becomes clear that he has targeted her because of her business connections... namely, Justin.
Bert gives an emotional speech at St Stephen's, one year since the devastating flood, paying tribute to Freda. Carol helps Bert settle back in at the bungalow and says that Freda would approve of the décor... aside from the tartan footstool. Bert affirms that no matter how difficult he might find this time, this is where he belongs.


SUN 19:15 Wordaholics (b01rr48h)
Series 2

Episode 2

Gyles Brandreth hosts the comedy panel show challenging guests to display their knowledge of words and language.

Katy Brand and Alex Horne compete against Richard Herring and Natalie Haynes to find out who knows more about words.

Katy Brand reveals an unexpected love of Proverbs in the Old Testament and takes a guess at what 'cougar juice' meant at the turn of the 20th century; Richard Herring explains why his favourite West County word from his schooldays is 'wasp'; Natalie Haynes guesses the meaning of the German word 'zechpreller' which has no direct translation in English, and Alex Horne coins his very own onomatopoeia to describe a snowflake landing on a bubble.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


SUN 19:45 Leap (b071s6q8)
Leapers

Commissioned to mark Leap Day, Richard Beard's story follows Martin Pitter as he decides to go for a walk along Beachy Head on 29th February 2016, to contemplate the implications of this extra day.

Written by Richard Beard
Read by Stuart McLoughlin

Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b0717ls1)
EU coverage, Diversity

Roger Bolton with listener questions and comments on the EU referendum coverage, BBC diversity, stultifying sport and the continued furore over Rob and Helen in The Archers.

With the EU referendum date set and the battle between 'leave' and 'remain' set to dominate the headlines until June, the BBC's Chief Political Adviser Ric Bailey joins Feedback to address listeners' questions about how the referendum is being covered. Is the BBC biased on EU membership? Is the story being told too much as a battle in the Conservative party? And should pollsters be trusted now after failures at the general election?

Gaile Walters and Keon West first appeared on Feedback 18 months ago, when they were being trained as part of the BBC's Expert Voices scheme, which aimed to get experts from more diverse backgrounds into BBC programmes. They return to the programme this week to discuss how they've faired since the training, and whether the BBC is doing enough to improve the diversity of its radio output.

Commentators on radio sport often find themselves in the position of having to keep listeners entertained even when the game is not delivering any action. Feedback reporter Rob Crossan speaks to Test Match Special's Jonathan Agnew and 5 Live football commentator Ian Dennis to discover how they find ways to fill air time even if on field events are not up to scratch.

And finally, in last week's programme Roger asked listeners for their views on the ongoing Archers' story about Rob Titchener's abuse of his wife Helen. The response has been enormous, as listeners grapple with the question of whether the story is too important to miss, or too unsettling to air.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b071fnwb)
Alex Timpson, Lord Avebury, Douglas Slocombe, Umberto Eco, Pascal Bentoiu

Matthew Bannister on

Alex Timpson, who fostered ninety children over thirty years and helped shape the ethos of the family key cutting and shoe repair business.

Douglas Slocombe, the Oscar nominated cinematographer who shot films from Kind and Hearts and Coronets to Indiana Jones.

Umberto Eco the Italian academic and best selling author whose works include "The Name Of The Rose".

And the liberal peer Lord Avebury who, as Eric Lubbock, won a famous by election victory in Orpington and devoted his life to campaigning for human rights.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0713p7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b071lh7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b071459c)
Multiculturalism: Newham v Leicester

How are councils in two of the UK's most multicultural places managing diversity? Back in the 1970s, the Labour party developed a model of working with ethnic minority and faith community groups to help new immigrants to Britain settle in. Presenter Sonia Sodha, a British Asian journalist, explores how this has worked in Leicester, a city often held up as a beacon of diversity. Has it led to more integration - or less? And does a radical new approach being trialled in Newham - the most diverse place in Britain - offer any lessons?

Sonia Sodha is chief leader writer of The Observer and a former Labour party aide.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b071lcgw)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b071s6qn)
Miranda Green analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0717j1w)
The Oscars, A video shop in Greenland

With Antonia Quirke.

Clare Binns and Tim Robey assess the runners and riders in this year's Academy Awards

Antonia talks to Nikolene, an Inuit in Greenland, about why her local video shop is still popular, especially in Winter, and hears from Simon Brzeskwinski, whose decision to close his video shop, Video City, in Notting Hill led to very public displays of grief.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b071lfkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 29 FEBRUARY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b071lcjt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0717b5n)
Refusing adulthood, How young people feel about being poor

Refusing adulthood. Laurie Taylor talks to Susan Neiman, the American moral philosopher, who asks, if and why, some people refuse to grow up. She argues that being an adult allows the opportunity for agency and independence rather than signalling decline. Yet a modern tendency to idolise youth prevents us from seeing the rewards of maturity. They're joined by the writer, Michael Bywater, who wonders if we inhabit a culture of creeping infantilisation.

Also, how children and young people feel about being poor. Rys Farthing, social policy researcher, explores how young people living in low-income neighbourhoods feel about their own lives, using data generated as part of a participatory policy project with five groups of young people, aged 11-21.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b071lfk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071lck0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071lck3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071lck6)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b071lck8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072p0wc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones, Priest in charge of the City Parish of St John the Baptist, Cardiff.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b071s7qk)
Lambing

Farming Today is spending the whole of this week on a sheep farm in Wales, talking about lambing. There are nearly sixteen million breeding ewes in the UK. Charlotte Smith meets just a few of them at the farm in the Brecon Beacons, and learns about life at lambing time.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b071lckc)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpd)
Great Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Great Tit. That metallic 'tea-cher, tea-cher' song of the great tit is instantly recognisable and you can hear it on mild days from mid-December onwards. It's the origin of the old country name, 'Saw-Sharpener'.


MON 06:00 Today (b071skp3)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b071skp5)
Nature or Nurture?

On Start the Week Mary-Ann Sieghart asks why some people succeed while others fail. She talks to the journalist Helen Pearson about the Life Project, a study of the health, wellbeing and life chances of thousands of British children, started in 1946. The television producer Joseph Bullman also charts a series of families back to the Victorian times to look at social mobility through the generations. The psychologist Oliver James wades into the nature/ nurture debate by arguing that we are the result of our environment and upbringing, but the scientist Marcus Munafò says there is increasing evidence of genetic links to who we are and what we do.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 The Real Henry James (b071skp7)
Europe v America

Henry James was not only a great novelist - he also wrote a great deal of entertaining non-fiction, producing reviews and essays on a wide variety of subjects. To mark the centenary of his death, these five anthologies reveal James through his letters, memoirs, essays and private notebooks.

Was James English or American? The British tend to regard him as American, the Americans as British. Although born in America, James's wealthy, eccentric father moved the family around constantly - to France, England, Switzerland, Boston - so the young James never felt settled in America. In fact, Henry James lived more of his life in his adopted country of England than in his native America. At the end of his life, he took British nationality in 1915 as a gesture of solidarity and as a protest against American neutrality in the First World War. But in some ways he always remained an outsider, and felt an outsider in both cultures.

James' writing gives us an insight into both societies. After he'd settled in London he composed a negative catalogue about his homeland - the tone hovers somewhere between real critique and self-mockery of the Englishman's snobbery about Americans.

The anthology has been selected by Professor Philip Horne of University College London, who is founding General Editor of a major scholarly edition of James's fiction and has re-transcribed the notebooks for an authoritative new edition.

Reader: Henry Goodman
With introductions by Olivia Williams

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071skp9)
The Zoella effect, Supporting ex-offenders, The female voice in Judaism and Islam, Short story writer Arlene Heyman

Young girls love a role model but what if it happens to be Zoella, the hugely popular beauty and fashion vlogger. We discuss the Zoella effect.
Key4Life works with young men leaving prison to help them to stop reoffending. We hear from a young man and his mother about the difference the charity has made to their lives, and Jane speak to the founder of Key4Life.
Religion has had a tricky relationship with the female voice, from attempting to control women's voices, to turning the female voice into a symbol of spirituality. We hear from a Muslim activist and a Jewish academic taking part in a festival in London called Sacred Voices.
Psychotherapist Arlene Heyman has just published her first collection of short stories, Scary Old Sex, in her seventies. Jane talks to her about old age, sex, her love of writing and why creating a story is entirely different from her work as a psychotherapist.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b071skpc)
Jane Eyre

Episode 1

Award winning writer Rachel Joyce dramatises this
beloved novel for the bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
A fantastic mix of injustice, romance, passion and danger wrapped
up in a glorious love story.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale

Award winning writer Rachel Joyce and Producer Tracey Neale are the team that brought The Professor, Villette and Shirley to the Radio 4 airwaves. And now
for the bicentenary celebrations it is time for the most beloved of Charlotte's novels - Jane Eyre.

Starring Amanda Hale (Ripper Street, The White Queen and Catastrophe) and Tom Burke (The Musketeers and War and Peace) the chemistry between the two as they play Jane and Rochester is both sparkling and spell binding.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b06yr76j)
Stacey Jackson: Chasing Dreams

Grace Dent follows pop star and mum Stacey Jackson as she launches a career in business.

Stacey Jackson is no ordinary working mum - she's a successful pop star with a very wealthy husband. But for Stacey, that's not enough. She's about to launch a career in business. Why does she keep chasing new dreams when she already has all the money anyone could wish for?

Producer: Sara Parker.


MON 11:30 Dot (b071skpf)
Series 1

The Extraordinary Example of the Ha'penny Exchange

A little East End snotling has infiltrated the Cabinet War Rooms. But Dot's got important propaganda work to do.

How will she dispose of the little gremlin, whilst simultaneously concocting a stirring, yet pithy slogan for the war effort? For King and country, she'll bally well try!

Comic adventures with Dot and the gals from personnel in the rollicking wartime comedy by Ed Harris.

Dot ..... Fenella Woolgar
Myrtle ..... Kate O'Flynn
Peg ..... Freya Parker
Millicent ..... Jane Slavin
Peabody ..... David Acton
Ha'penny ..... Alicia Ambrose-Bayly
Matron ..... Susan Jameson
Right Honourable Washtunrub ..... Sean Baker

Director: Jessica Mitic

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b071lckp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b071skph)
Winged Bull of Nineveh

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

With hundreds of thousands of lives lost, millions of people displaced and some of the world’s most significant heritage sites destroyed, the wars in Iraq and Syria have had an enormous cost. While the historical artefacts that have been bombed, defaced and plundered can never be restored, they are very well remembered. Through local histories, legends and personal stories, the Museum of Lost Objects recreates these lost treasures and explores their significance across generations and cultures, from creation to destruction.

The winged bull was a huge 2,700-year-old sculpture that stood guard at the gates of one of the most fabled cities in antiquity – Nineveh, modern-day Mosul, northern Iraq. Militants from the Islamic State group defaced the winged bull in February 2015, almost a year after seizing control of the city. We tell the story of the bull and the role of Nineveh in the origins of Iraqi archaeology.

This episode was first broadcast on 29 February, 2016

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Winged Bull of Nineveh, drawn by Eugène Flandin
Credit: The New York Public Library

Contributors: Mazin Safar, son of Iraqi archaeologist Fuad Safar; Mark Altaweel, Institute of Archaeology, UCL; and Iraqi archaeologist Lamia al-Gailani, SOAS

With thanks to Nigel Tallis and Sarah Collins of the British Museum, and Augusta McMahon of the University of Cambridge.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b071lcks)
Facebook cloning, Air passenger duty, Travelling during pregnancy

One of the biggest complaints from Facebook users is their difficulty in trying to report fake or bullying profiles to the company and You and Yours has received a number of e-mails from listeners who have had their Facebook profiles cloned. In the case of Sue Henning, criminals copied her Facebook profile and then used it to try and get money out of her friends. Sue tells us her story. Winifred is also joined by computer security expert Graham Cluley who is a computer security expert who gives advice on how to spot the fake Facebook accounts.

The easyFoodstore 25p trial comes to an end today but the store will continue to trade through March and April with a reduced range of items priced at 29p each. Opened with great fanfare at the beginning of February, within 48 hours Stellios's latest business venture was forced to close because it had run out of stock. When it reopened a couple of days later, customers were told that they could buy no more than ten of any one product. The easyFoodstore's slogan is "No expensive brands. Just food honestly priced." But has it found a successful business model? Carolyn Atkinson is inside the pilot store in North West London with Richard Shackleton, Director of Communications at EasyGroup.

Some large companies insist that their smaller suppliers sign up with a so-called Portal, or middle-man, who will handle payments. But according to the Federation of Small Businesses, many of their members are being forced to sign punitive contracts with Portal companies. Susie Maynard talks about how her business suffered at the hands of one of these middle-men. Tim Coleman from the Federation of Small Businesses also discusses the problem.

Many people are turning to Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), many of which are being offered by top universities. MOOCs are available in 'free' and a 'paid' versions. If you pay for one of these courses, you receive a certificate when you complete it. But is this certificate - costing anything from £30 to £200 - worth the money? E-learning expert Donald Clark takes a look.

From the 1st March, Air Passenger Duty on Economy air tickets for all children under 16 is being abolished. Last May, the Chancellor removed Air Passenger Duty for children under 12 but he caught the the airlines slightly on the hop as he'd given them less than six months to change their ticketing systems. This meant that parents had to apply for refunds as the tax was not automatically removed during the booking process. Having had over a year to get ready for the removal of Air Passenger Duty for 12 to 16 year olds, why have some airlines still not managed to change their ticketing software? This means that some parents do not know that they have to apply for a refund. Winifred talks to Hannah Maundrell, a personal finance expert from money.co.uk.

If you are pregnant and travelling on public transport, the charity of fellow passengers in offering up their seat can be a little bit hit-and-miss. Nina Warhurst, whose baby is due in April, has been on trains, trams, buses and tubes, to find out how well pregnant women are being looked after when they travel.


MON 12:57 Weather (b071lckw)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b071skpk)
The Cabinet Office has told us what to expect if Britain votes to leave the EU. It all comes down to the never-before-invoked Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

And the row over whether pro-Brexit ministers should be denied access to some government papers will be raised in the Commons - we'll speak to the former Chancellor and Chairman of Vote Leave Lord Lawson.

Two months ago a cyber attack left over 200,000 people in Ukraine without electricity. We hear concerns it could happen in other countries including Britain.


MON 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b071skpm)
Ramanujan: The Elbow of Genius

Sunil Khilnani tells the story of the mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan.

We are accustomed to mathematicians as enigmatic beings, but the case of Ramanujan, one of the most important mathematicians of the twentieth century, is particularly mysterious. His life seems to be have been spun from the stuff of fiction and film. It's told most often as a tale of a deeply religious, largely self-taught savant, rescued from an obscure south Indian town and brought to Cambridge by a don - where, just as his world changing potential was being unlocked, he died at the age of 32, leaving his greatest insights still secret.

This idealistic narrative - cut with various quantities of exoticism and the miraculous, depending on the teller - even involves some lost notebooks, dramatically rediscovered decades later, and a cryptic but ultimately revelatory deathbed letter.

In most re-tellings, the maths are merely a backdrop to the drama and tragedy. But Ramanujan's theoretical discoveries are recognized today as being at the forefront of the discipline: with implications for scientists at the cutting edge of cancer research as well as physicists trying to understand the deepest structures of the universe.

Featuring Professor Ken Ono.

Readings by Sagar Arya.

Producer: Martin Williams.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b071s6ps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b071sn29)
Series 7

Clennan Court

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

William Palmer has been betrayed by evil magician Morgan Hambleton. He promised to track him down but so far has done nothing, much to the anger of the King of the Greyfolk

Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Laura ..... Adie Allen
Coral ..... Cassie Layton
Delancey ..... David Schofield
Frances ..... Nicola Ferguson
Mrs. Greeves ..... Susan Jameson

Directed by Marc Beeby


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b071sn2c)
Heat 8, 2016

(8/17)
Russell Davies puts another four would-be Brains of Britain through the toughest general knowledge test of them all. Which is the hottest planet in the solar system? Who painted the notorious 80th birthday portrait of Sir Winston Churchill, which he hated and which his widow destroyed after his death? What type of well is named after a region of France near the modern border with Belgium?

The winner today is assured a place in the semi-finals which begin after Easter - but all of the competitors will be going for as many points as they can, as the top-scoring runners-up across the series also go through.

A listener will also be challenging the competitors with his or her own questions, in an attempt to Beat the Brains.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b071s6np)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Arts Exodus (b071sn2f)
What does an artistic presence mean to a community - is it the character and lifeblood of an area or the death knell for affordable housing? The artist and writer Deborah Coughlin examines the impact of gentrification, through her own experience and that of other artists in different cities and locations from London to Berlin, New York to Margate.

When she left art college in 2000, Deborah couldn't afford even the smallest bedsit in an area like Shoreditch, after artists like Tracey Emin had made the area desirable in the previous decade. She found a place further out of central London - in Clapton, with its reputation as 'murder mile'. Now Clapton is one of the most gentrified areas in East London and she has moved on.

So where can artists, particularly those at the beginning of their careers, afford to live and work? Deborah meets some in Margate, Kent, where there is a growing community of artists who are bringing the dying seaside town back to life. "There is space to grow in Margate, not just affordable studio space but space to think," says one.

In New York she finds the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council was funded 40 years ago to breathe life into the financial district and talks to the artist Sophie Matisse (great-granddaughter of Henri Matisse), who came to New York from Paris 25 years ago.

In Berlin, urban planner Dr Cordelia Polinna tells how the city uses rent and planning controls to keep accommodation affordable, but still fears the city will go "the same way as London".

Meanwhile, the Greater London Authority recognises the value of artists to the capital's economy and tourism - and is trying to work with developers to build in studio space.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b071sn2h)
Saudi Arabia

The UK's ties with Saudi Arabia have come under growing strain in recent months over how to balance human rights concerns with the government's desire to promote a crucial trade and investment relationship. The Arab state sits on more than a quarter of the world's known oil reserves, making it one of the richest countries in the Middle East and a vital strategic partner to many Western nations. It is also home to the birthplace of the Muslim Prophet Muhammad and the cradle of Islam. Its rulers espouse a strict version of Sunni Islam known as Wahhabism. The Wahhabi interpretation of Islamic law includes harsh punishments such as public beheadings and restrictions on women. How did Wahhabism gain so much influence in the country? What, in turn, has been its effect on the stability of the region and the wider world?

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b071lcl5)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071lcl7)
Teargas fired on the Greek-Macedonian border and at "the Jungle" camp in Calais. Nicola Sturgeon tells David Cameron not to fight a "miserable, fear-based" referendum campaign.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b071sn2k)
Series 74

Episode 2

Gyles Brandreth, Tim Rice & Esther Rantzen join Paul Merton and Nicholas Parsons as they try to speak without deviation, hesitation or repetition on such diverse subjects as Bubble & Squeak, Kiwis and A Leap Year in the classic panel game.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b071sn2m)
Pip and David are busy sheep shearing and Josh has mysteriously asked them to keep some wool back for him. Pip has no luck getting through to Matthew on the phone due to bad signal. David light-heartedly asks if she was planning on proposing, as it is the 29th February. She tells him not to joke about that!
Henry wets the bed. To make matters worse, he was sleeping in Rob and Helen's bed. He's distressed because he's being picked on at school. Rob and Helen exchange cross words before Ursula settles the matter. She's convinced that it's an act of attention-seeking because he'll soon have a little brother. Ursula says they must remain a united front, and Henry must go back to sleeping in his own bed. Later, Pat helps Rob out at the shop. Rob spins the home birth idea so that it sounds like it was purely Helen's. Pat relays what she has heard from Rob to Tom, but Tom's not as convinced by Rob's version of events.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b071lclc)
The Brontes, Malian kora player Ballake Sissoko and French cellist Vincent Segal, Truth reviewed

Samira Ahmed takes a tour of the Haworth Parsonage to consider the closed world of the Brontë siblings, and the how their imaginative childhood games fed into their writing. Novelists AS Byatt and Sophia McDougall, and actor Tom Burke who plays Mr Rochester in the new Radio 4 adaptation of Jane Eyre, discuss the enduring appeal of the Brontës' characters.

Michael Carlson reviews Truth, starring Robert Redford and Cate Blanchett, in which an investigative team at CBS News comes under fire for possible inaccuracies. The film is based on television news producer Mary Mapes' memoir Truth and Duty: The Press, the President and the Privilege of Power.

Malian kora player Ballaké Sissoko and French cellist Vincent Ségal recorded their album Musique de Nuit last year. Before they begin their tour of the UK, they discuss how they shunned the music studio, choosing instead to record on a Bamako rooftop.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Dixi Stewart.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b071skpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Europe: Strangers on My Doorstep (b071sx1d)
A Swedish Tale

Sweden received more asylum seekers per capita than any other country last year. But an open borders policy was slowly rowed back as accommodation started to run out and the authorities struggled to cope with the arrival of so many newcomers.

It's not just cities like Stockholm and Malmo that have seen an influx of newcomers. Ånge is a community of 9,000 people in the north of Sweden which is now home to 1,000 asylum seekers. An hour's drive away from the nearest big city, it's a place of picturesque natural beauty, but where in winter the sun sets as early as 2.30 in the afternoon and temperatures can plunge to as low as -30C.

In this programme, Keith Moore spends time in the community with locals and asylum seekers and tries to find out how one remote place copes with a big change change in such a short space of time.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b071sx1h)
Labour and the Bomb

Jeremy Corbyn's opposition to the renewal of Britain's nuclear deterrent has opened up divisions within the Labour Party that run very deep. The issue will come to a head when Parliament votes on whether to replace the Trident weapons system, following a recommendation from the Government. While Labour formally reviews its position, will Corbyn be able avoid a damaging split that beset the party in the 1980s?

It was a Labour government which decided to make Britain a nuclear power. "We've got to have this thing, whatever it costs. We've got to have a bloody Union Jack on top of it," declared Ernest Bevin, Foreign Secretary in the postwar Labour government. Ever since that decision in 1946, the question of whether to keep 'the bomb' has divided the party between those who believe it is the cornerstone of Britain's defence policy within NATO and others who have long campaigned to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Twice before in Opposition the party has opted for unilateral disarmament, only for the policy to be reversed after a period of acrimonious debate and electoral defeat.

In this programme, the veteran political reporter John Sergeant examines Labour's troubled relationship with the bomb. Former party leader Neil Kinnock and other senior figures reflect on how the party discarded unilateralism in the late 1980s and offer advice on what lessons can be learned. Can Jeremy Corbyn overcome opposition with the Parliamentary Labour Party to changing the official policy of multilateral disarmament? Does his recent suggestion of maintaining submarines without nuclear missiles satisfy those who want Britain to disarm come what may?

Producer: Peter Snowdon.


MON 21:00 Cancer Moonshot (b0714mbw)
Episode 1

President Obama in his State of the Nation address in January 2016 announced a "Moonshot" effort to beat cancer. His vice-president Joe Biden is in charge of mission control, and for Biden, it's personal - his son Beau died from brain cancer last year at the age of 46. But there's a sense of déjà-vu about this new Moonshot - President Nixon declared war on cancer in 1971.
More than 40 years later, clearly the war is still not won - but what has it achieved?

GP Dr Graham Easton tells the story of philanthropist Mary Lasker whose campaigning influenced Nixon to start his War on Cancer. He hears how the Cancer Plan brought in mathematicians and physicists who had worked on the Manhattan Project and for NASA to find cures for cancer. Curing cancer turned out to be a much harder problem than landing men on the moon.

Graham Easton looks back at the treatments available in the 1970s and asks if the War on Cancer lead to improved therapies.
In the last forty years the outlook for some cancers, such as childhood leukaemia and testicular cancer, has improved markedly, but would these developments have happened without Nixon's campaign?


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b071skp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b071lclm)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b071lclq)
Riot police clash with migrants in 'jungle' camp

Police in Calais clash with residents as demolition teams begin bulldozing parts of the migrant camp known as the 'jungle'. We speak to Aatish Taseer son of the murdered governor of Punjab in Pakistan, as his killer is executed. And how is the Brexit debate viewed by the biggest ex-pat community on the Continent, in the Costa del Sol?
Picture: migrants face riot police in Calais (AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUENPHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images).


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b071sx1k)
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Episode 1

Merricat Blackwood lives on the family estate with her sister Constance and her uncle Julian. Not long ago there were seven Blackwoods - until a fatal dose of arsenic found its way into the sugar bowl one terrible night. Acquitted of the murders, Constance has returned home, where Merricat protects her from the curiosity and hostility of the villagers.

"If you haven't read We Have Always Lived In The Castle you are missing out." Neil Gaiman.

"Her greatest book...at once whimsical and harrowing." Donna Tartt.

"A masterpiece of Gothic suspense." Joyce Carol Oates.

Shirley Jackson, who died 50 years ago, was perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery, and her novel, The Haunting Of Hill House, twice filmed and thought to be the last word in haunted-house tales. Her work has received increasing attention from literary critics in recent years. She has influenced such writers as Stephen King and Nigel Kneale.

Reader: Bryony Hannah
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b0714nj0)
Talking or Texting?

We take it for granted that we can maintain our friendships and family relationships now in so many ways: phone, voicemail, email, text, instant message, Facebook, Skype.. but do we have any idea of the effects of these very different modes of communication? Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright look at research into their emotional impact.
Leslie Seltzer is Research Associate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and has tested the differing effects of a hug, a phone call and a text between mothers and daughters.
Dr Mirca Madianou is Reader in Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her research is into mothers from the Philippines who've come to work in the UK and then try to look after their children back home by Skype. What works best for families living on different sides of the world?
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b071sx1m)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster on the row over access to official papers on the EU.



TUESDAY 01 MARCH 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b071lcqd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 The Real Henry James (b071skp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071lcqg)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071lcqj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071lcqn)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b071lcqq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072p0y3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones, Priest in charge of the City Parish of St John the Baptist, Cardiff.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b071syrt)
Lambing in Wales

Anna Hill meets farmer Richard Roderick on his sheep farm in the Brecons, where the whole programme is basing itself to reflect the busiest time of year - lambing. Two weeks in and Richard and the family have around a thousand lambs, including six sets of triplets born overnight. Some ewes will lamb on their own, but others need a little help, and Emma Campbell has been on a course to learn the skills. We also hear from a Dorset farmer who's lost many lambs to dog attacks - the advice is to keep your dog on a lead. The producer is Sally Challoner.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01s89gk)
Song Thrush

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Song Thrush. The male's song in the dawn chorus includes a repertoire of over a hundred different phrases making it one of the richest songs of any British Bird.


TUE 06:00 Today (b071t8qb)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b071t8qd)
George Davey-Smith on health inequalities

When George Davey-Smith started work as an epidemiologist, he hoped to prove that the cause of coronary disease in South Wales soon after the miner's strike was Thatcherism. The miners said they thought it was a combination of having a poor constitution and bad fortune. Thirty years later, George admits he would have done well to listen to them. Having spent decades studying the influence on our health of a huge number of variables, from lifestyle factors like car ownership to our genetic inheritance and most recently epi-genetic effects; George has concluded that whether or not individuals get sick is, to a significant extent, down to chance. But that's not to say that public health interventions are a waste of time.They can boost the overall health of a population, significantly.

George is director of the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b071t8qg)
Mark Lawson talks to Hannah Witton

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture, where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay out their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter.

Hannah Witton is a history graduate who has been a prolific vlogger, blogger and tweeter since her early twenties. She talks to Mark about making her life, her views and beliefs, ups and downs, all available for public consumption on the net.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 The Real Henry James (b072n0k7)
Dining Out in English Society

Henry James was not only a great novelist - he also wrote a great deal of entertaining non-fiction, producing reviews and essays on a wide variety of subjects. To mark the centenary of his death, these five anthologies reveal James through his letters, memoirs, essays and private notebooks.

Episode 2: Dining Out in English Society
Entertaining glimpses of English society through the sharp eyes of an American observer. James was an inveterate diner-out, and once managed 107 dinners in a season. He left sharp observations of the people he met at dinner, including the great writers of the day:

"The chattering and self-complacent Robert Browning, who I am sorry to say, does not make on me a purely agreeable impression. His transparent eagerness to hold the monopoly of the conversation and a sort of shrill interruptingness which distinguishes him have in them a kind of vulgarity."

For James, dining-out wasn't just a chance to meet celebrities - it gave him stories which became the plots in his novels. At one dinner, for instance, he heard the story of a family lawsuit which became The Spoils of Poynton. We hear the excited letter outlining the plot and characters for the novel which have struck him at the dinner table.

The anthology has been selected by Professor Philip Horne of University College London, who is founding General Editor of a major scholarly edition of James's fiction and has re-transcribed the notebooks for an authoritative new edition.

Reader: Henry Goodman
With introductions by Olivia Williams

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071t8qj)
Jess Glynne, Disabled teenagers growing up on TV, Women's pensions

Platinum-selling, Grammy-winning, Brit-nominated singer Jess Glynne talks about her rise to success and performs her new single Ain't Got Far To Go.

Jane talks to 15 year-old Zoe and 14 year-old Emily who have been filmed since they were babies by the TV series Born To Be Different. Zoe has Arthrogryposis, a condition that severely disables her legs and arms and has been friends with Emily who has Spina Bifida since they first met up aged four. Along with their mothers Rachael and Ann Marie, they join Jane to talk about growing up with disabilities.

Women's workplace pension savings are barely half those of men according to a report out today. A 'tough time in old age' lies ahead for some according to figures compiled for the TUC, and Age UK among other organisations. Alice Hood, Head of Strategy and Equality for the TUC, has the details.

Jade Lally, Britain's number one discus thrower, broke the English record twice in three days this weekend in Sydney, the longest discus throw by a British woman since 1983 to move to fourth in the 2016 world rankings. Jade talks to Jane from Australia to discuss qualifying for the Olympics in Rio this summer.

And, an archive interview with the writer Louise Rennison who has died aged 63.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Erin Riley.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b071tgbh)
Jane Eyre

Episode 2

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Episode Two
Life at Lowood School is cruel and harsh
and so Jane cherishes her friendship with Helen.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


TUE 11:00 Cancer Moonshot (b0725d18)
Episode 2

US Vice President Joe Biden is leading a Cancer Moonshot with $1 billion injection of cash. He is asking researchers to work more closely together and share their data to develop better ways of detecting cancer and to come up with new treatments. On this side of the Atlantic, Cancer Research UK has announced a series of Grand Challenges to find innovative therapies.

Even veterans of false dawns in the war against cancer believe that these campaigns have arrived at a good time. They say that we're on the cusp of a new era of a brighter outlook for cancer patients. This new era depends on earlier diagnosis, more accurate surgery and radiotherapy, and some new kinds of drugs.

Dr Graham Easton talks to doctors and scientists about how technology now allows them to read the genetic signature of each individual cancer, which can lead to personalised treatments. He finds out about how treatments that harness the body's immune system are leading to some remarkable recoveries for a handful of patients with some specific cancers, such as melanoma.

Graham also asks if prevention could be better than cure, and if the extra funding going into cancer research is enough to make a difference.


TUE 11:30 Black, White and Beethoven (b071tgbk)
Britain's music scene today is a rich, multi-cultural feast that draws on talent from all corners of society. Unless, that is, your passion is classical music. In Britain, and across Europe, performers, composers, teachers and institutions remain resolutely, predominantly white.

Why should this be, and is this a concern? Many believe steps to redress this imbalance are now long overdue, and that urgent action is required. But what should these actions be, and would they be successful?

Chi-chi Nwanoku and members of her Chineke! Orchestra, Europe's first professional Black and Minority Ethnic orchestra, talk about their lives in classical music: we also hear from other Black classical musicians about the circumstances of their work.
In Black White and Beethoven, Joseph Harker explores these issues - taking stock of where we are, and exploring some ideas that could help classical music to engage and reflect the full diversity of contemporary society.

Producer: Lyndon Jones for BBC Wales.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b071lcqs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b071tgbm)
Palmyra: Temple of Bel

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

In May 2015, the Syrian city of Palmyra was captured by the forces of the so-called Islamic State. Few of the group’s excesses have won as much attention as their ravaging of the city. They waged a campaign of violence against the local population, and they systematically destroyed many of the city’s great monuments, including the 2,000-year-old Temple of Bel. We trace the story of the Temple, pay homage to Palmyra’s ancient warrior Queen Zenobia – and hear from a modern-day Zenobia, daughter of Khaled al-Asaad, director of antiquities at Palmyra, who was beheaded by IS. She tells us when IS militants took over her home and her last words with her father. This programme was first broadcast on 1 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Contributors: Nasser Rabbat, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Salam al-Kuntar, University of Pennsylvania Museum; Zenobia al-Asaad, daughter of Khaled al-Asaad, her words read in English by Amira Ghazalla

Picture: Temple of Bel, Palmyra
Credit: Getty

With thanks to Faisal Irshaid of BBC Arabic, Alma Hassoun of BBC Monitoring, Rubina Raja of Aarhus University, Christopher Jones of Columbia University, and Christa Salamandra of City University of New York.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b071lcqv)
Call You and Yours: Enjoy Your Old Age

The experience of old age is changing. A new report has found that many people in their 60s and 70s are enjoying life. They holiday abroad once a year and exercise five times a week. But one in seven 70-somethings is also still harbouring romantic regrets over "the one that got away".

We want to hear what you enjoy about getting older - or whether there are any regrets? Email us now - our address is YouandYours@bbc.co.uk. Please leave a phone number so we can call you back.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b071lcr0)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b071tgbp)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b071tgbr)
Tagore: Unlocking Cages

Sunil Khilnani tells the story of the Bengali writer and thinker Rabindranath Tagore.

Born in 1861 To a prosperous Bengal family, Rabindranath Tagore went on to win India's first Nobel Prize, for literature, in 1913.

While India has often been framed in terms of competing groups - whether traditional institutions like caste, religion, and patriarchal families, or imperial subjecthood, or contemporary mass movements for nationalism - Tagore cut through these collectivities and tried to create a space for individual choice that stood apart from imposed groupings.

In a nationalist age when many of his contemporaries were preoccupied with independence, Rabindranath Tagore preferred to speak of freedom.

But he wasn't a radical individualist, his conception of freedom was related to expressivity, connection, and that deepest of human experience: love. Becoming who you are, he recognised, is not something you do on your own.

Featuring Professor Supriya Chaudhuri.

Readings by Sheenu Das.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith
Original music composed by Talvin Singh.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b071sn2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b071tgbt)
Series 7

Stickton General

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

Following the death of Laura Tyler, William Palmer has sworn to punish his former close friend Morgan Hambleton for his crimes. But first, he has to track him down.

Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Morgan ..... Justin Salinger
Camilla ..... Scarlett Brookes
Baxter ..... Nick Underwood
Randell ..... Carl Prekopp
Jackie ..... Nicola Ferguson
Brenda ..... Susan Jameson
Laura ..... Adie Allen

Directed by Marc Beeby


TUE 15:00 Making History (b071tgbw)
The latest historical and archaeological research.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b071tgby)
Acoustic Ecology

Peter Gibbs asks whether sound could become a vital tool in conservation, helping us understand far more about how wildlife interacts and how it is affected by changes in the environment . Technological advances in recording mean that we can now record huge amounts of data in remote locations. By using algorithms scientists hope to break down complex interactions between animals and their environment and be able to predict change or protect species. This is the emerging science of soundscape ecology. Scientists are hoping to apply big data solutions learnt from fields such as genetics to re-imagine conservation and asking all of us to listen and imagine what a world without natural sounds such as birdsong might be like.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b071tgc0)
Tip of the Tongue

It's an experience we've all had - desperately trying to recall a word. You might know the letter it begins with, the letter it ends with, but it just won't pop into your head. So how will Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright cope as we try and induce this most frustrating state: Tip of the Tongue?

They are put under the spotlight by psychologist Dr Meredith Shafto, and try to find ways round it with the help of somebody who can memorise a 1000-digit number in an hour - memory Grandmaster Ed Cooke.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b071tgc2)
Deborah Bull and Sam Leith

Deborah Bull, former Principal Dancer with the Royal Ballet, talks about her longstanding affection for Mr Pye by Mervyn Peake, an original and amusing tale set on Sark. Journalist and author Sam Leith, literary editor of The Spectator, advocates 77 Dream Songs by John Berryman, a collection of poetry he's passionate about. Presenter Harriett Gilbert's choice is News of a Kidnapping by Gabriel García Márquez, a non-fiction work detailing kidnappings in Colombia by the Medellín Cartel and Pablo Escobar.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b071lcrb)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071lcrd)
Seamus Daly is released from prison after the case against him collapses. Relatives of those who died in the Real IRA bomb attack in 1998 say they feel let down by police.


TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b05wyhnv)
Series 10

Joan of the Junction

Week four of Ed Reardon's 'No Fixed Abode' status finds him tramping along the canal trying to find someone to take him, and Elgar, in. When he fortunes upon the somewhat colourful Joan he hits the jackpot in more ways than one as not only does he gain a rather comfortable cabin bed, but as the pair chat about Joan's rather picaresque life over a can of cider, Ed discovers she has lived her life in the manner for a perfect Sunday night TV drama. Cue a call to his agent, Ping.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.
Produced by Dawn Ellis.
Ed Reardon's Week is a BBC Radio Comedy production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b071tgc4)
Brian's servicing a quad bike to escape from Kate. Justin gives Brian a heads-up: the B.L. Chair is leaving and they want Brian to take over. They also banter about having the Calendar Girls pictures up in their homes.
Ed and Adam discuss getting the covers back on the fruit tunnels. Adam worries they don't have enough workers to do all they have to do. Adam suggests Ed does three brief courses so that he's qualified in everything they need. However, Ed's concerned about going back to "classroom stuff", and funding it all. The Estate can loan him the money, though. Ed asks for a day or two to chew over the offer.
Johnny and Jazzer are working on a pig ark. Johnny has hired Rob for some work at a "petting zoo" event but he's not being paid - it's experience for his course. Tom observes that Rob is very good at getting people to do what he wants. Jazzer recommends that Johnny talks to Tony about his choice of modules. Johnny says he'll talk to Rob too. Tom's unsure, but Johnny believes Rob is full of good advice.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b071lcrr)
Peter Cook, Hitchcock/Truffaut, Tabletop Shakespeare, Tim Sayer

Professor Sir Peter Cook received a knighthood for services to architecture and was awarded the Royal Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architecture, yet he has never designed a building in Britain - until now. He shows us around the drawing studio he's created for the Arts University Bournemouth.

In 1962, Francois Truffaut persuaded fellow film director Alfred Hitchcock to sit with him for a week-long interview in which they discussed the secrets of cinema. Hannah McGill reviews a new documentary about this meeting, which resulted in Truffaut's seminal book "Hitchcock/Truffaut".

The Barbican is staging Shakespeare as we've never seen it before; each of his 36 plays have been condensed and are presented on a table top using a cast of everyday objects. Macbeth is a cheese grater, Pericles a light bulb and Hamlet's a bottle of ink. Tim Etchells from Forced Entertainment explains why.

The Hepworth Wakefield gallery has announced details of one of the UK's largest bequests. It's one of the most significant gifts received from a private collector. Tim Sayer was a passionate collector, a self-confessed 'art-oholic', and a retired BBC Radio 4 newswriter. So how did he acquire such an important collection?

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Angie Nehring.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b071tgbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b071tgc6)
Special Guardianships: Keeping Things in the Family?

Special guardianship orders are a way of giving legal status to those - usually grandparents, aunts and uncles, brothers and sisters - who come forward to care for children when their parents can't. SGOs were designed to let children grow up with family, instead of in care - once a relative is granted special guardianship, the council steps backs and the guardian can raise the child without social services interfering.
The use of special guardianship orders has been rising-last year more than 3,000 of them were made.
But special guardianship breaks down more often - and more quickly - than adoption.
And in some cases children have been neglected, abused, or murdered.
The family court service Cafcass and the Association of Directors of Children's Services have warned that weak assessments of the risks of family placements are a 'real risk' for children.
The government has re-written the law on how special guardians are assessed. But with court deadlines and growing pressure on social workers and budgets, will it make children safer? Jane Deith investigates.
Producer: Emma Forde.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b071lcrw)
The Minister for Disabled People

The Minister for Disabled People Justin Tomlinson answers listeners questions on PIPs, mobility benefit, attendance allowance for new applicants over 65-years old, Access to Work and the role of Disability Employer Advisors.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Anna Bailey.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b071lcrz)
Ovarian cancer, PBC, Treating severe head injury

The use of talc and its potential connection with ovarian cancer has hit the headlines after a court ruling in America. Given that nearly half the UK population uses talc to some degree GP Dr Margaret McCartney looks at the evidence and puts any link in perspective. PBC is an often missed condition that causes severe itching and fatigue with the resulting liver damage mistakenly associated with drinking too much. Laura Gilmore lived with the symptoms for many years - scratching herself raw and falling asleep during the day but still not waking refreshed - before getting a diagnosis. Professor James Neuberger explains the science behind PBC.

Plus treating severe head injury and why a commonly used intervention used in intensive care units across the country is being questioned. Professor Peter Andrews is the man behind a new trial looking at the evidence for hypothermia, or cooling people with head trauma to prevent damage. The trial was stopped because early evidence suggested harms from this commonly used practice. Dr Mark Porter discusses the implications for critical care medicine across the world with Peter Andrews and Professor John Myburgh who is at the University of New South Wales in Sydney.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b071t8qd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b071lcs2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b071lcs4)
Pensions review to question retirement age

Ros Altmann interview; James Naughtie on Super Tuesday; Old Gershwin track, new problem

(Photo shows a pensioner; credit BBC).


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b071tgc8)
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Episode 2

Merricat Blackwood lives on the family estate with her sister Constance and her uncle Julian. Not long ago there were seven Blackwoods - until a fatal dose of arsenic found its way into the sugar bowl one terrible night. Acquitted of the murders, Constance has returned home, where Merricat protects her from the curiosity and hostility of the villagers.

Episode Two:
The Blackwoods hold a tea party for Helen Clarke and her friend, Mrs Wright. But conversation takes a dark turn, much to Helen's dismay and Merricat's delight.

"If you haven't read We Have Always Lived In The Castle you are missing out." Neil Gaiman.

"Her greatest book...at once whimsical and harrowing." Donna Tartt.

"A masterpiece of Gothic suspense." Joyce Carol Oates.

Shirley Jackson, who died 50 years ago, was perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery, and her novel, The Haunting Of Hill House, twice filmed and thought to be the last word in haunted-house tales. Her work has received increasing attention from literary critics in recent years. She has influenced such writers as Stephen King and Nigel Kneale.

Reader: Bryony Hannah
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Andrew O'Neill: Pharmacist Baffler (b04v3950)
Episode 1

Comedian Andrew O'Neill is a transvestite or as he prefers to call himself, a "pharmacist baffler", or "correct toilet double-check instigator" or "patriarchal birthright rejecter". Andrew is also heterosexual, married and in a steam punk band. He confounds expectations and preconceptions.

In the first of two audience, stand-up shows using his own personal experience, he examines sexual and gender identity, what they are and how we get them.

From a transvestite's point of view, Andrew discusses gender identity and his own experiences growing up. His humorous take on these difficult and thought provoking issues delights the audience whilst occasionally shocking them.

Andrew is one of the most interesting and articulate voices on the circuit. He came out as a transvestite when he was 19, and now cross-dresses about half the time (the British Union Of Transvestites requires you to cross-dress at least 3 days out of the 7). He wears make-up and jewellery and has long hair. He's usually dressed in black, has lots of tattoos, plays in a steam punk band and has always been heterosexual. He's married and only ever fancies women. This makes him and Eddie Izzard the only out cross-dressing comics in the country.

This series brings his (almost) unique perspective to ideas about gender and sexual identity, He looks at where you get your ideas about what your gender is, and what it should look like, how your sexuality is defined and how other people's sexuality continues to fascinate us and not necessarily in a good way.

Written and performed by Andrew O' Neill with Stephen Carlin.

Producer; Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b071tgcb)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster where the Chancellor warns a vote to leave the EU would result in a "long, costly and messy divorce" and MPs raise Syrian ceasefire breaches.
A group of MPs investigate the laws on prostitution, moves to relax the Sunday trading laws come under fire and the dismantling of the Calais refugee camp is discussed by peers.



WEDNESDAY 02 MARCH 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b071lcvg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 The Real Henry James (b072n0k7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071lcvj)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071lcvl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071lcvn)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b071lcvq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072p10t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones, Priest in charge of the City Parish of St John the Baptist, Cardiff.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b071v06d)
Lambing Night Shift

Anna Hill spends the night in the lambing shed at what is the busiest time of the year for sheep farmers. All this week Farming Today is at Newton Farm in the Brecons in Wales with the Roderick family, whose ewes will produce 1800 lambs this Spring. We meet 18 year old Tudor Roderick who's helped to deliver 40 lambs overnight. We also analyse a damning Parliamentary report which criticizes the Common Agricultural Policy Delivery Programme for poor leadership. The programme - which is run by various organisations within Defra - assesses and pays out European subsidies for farmers across England. The Public Accounts Committee report highlights the impact of "dysfunctional and inappropriate behaviour" between senior officials, "potentially costing the taxpayer hundreds of millions of pounds in financial penalties" because of payment delays.
Produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k72zr)
Starling

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the starling. Throughout autumn parties of starlings have been crossing the North Sea to join our resident birds and as winter's grip tightens they create one of Nature's best spectacles. These huge gatherings, sometimes a million or more strong, are called murmurations and they offer the birds safety in numbers.


WED 06:00 Today (b071v1l5)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b071v1l7)
James Rebanks, Helen Scott, Carl Tanner, Caitriona Palmer

Libby Purves meets shepherd James Rebanks; Helen Scott from the Three Degrees; journalist Caitriona Palmer and American tenor Carl Tanner.

James Rebanks is a shepherd, known to his followers as the Herdwick Shepherd. The first son of a shepherd, who was the first son of a shepherd himself, he and his family have lived and worked in and around the Lake District for generations. In his book, The Shepherd's Life, he writes about a shepherd's year, giving an account of rural life and the connection with the land that has often been lost. The Shepherd's Life - a Tale of the Lake District is published by Penguin.

Caitriona Palmer is a journalist based in Washington DC. Adopted as a baby, she writes about establishing contact with her birth mother in her book, An Affair with my Mother. Caitriona was raised by loving adoptive parents and enjoyed a happy childhood. She discovered her birth mother, 'Sarah', in her twenties and they developed a close attachment. But Sarah set one condition on this relationship - she wished to keep it a secret. An Affair with my Mother is published by Penguin.

Carl Tanner is an American tenor. He plays Luigi in the Royal Opera House's production of Il Tabarro, a role he has previously sung in Buenos Aires and for New York City Opera. Before turning to opera Carl led an eventful life as a truck driver and bounty hunter. A keen and talented singer all his life, his career took off when he was discovered performing in a New York restaurant. Il Tabarro is at the Royal Opera House, London.

Singer Helen Scott is one third of The Three Degrees. The longest-running female vocal group in history, The Three Degrees were originally formed in 1963 in Philadelphia. Their hits include When Will I See You Again, Take Good Care of Yourself and A Woman in Love. Their first new studio album in 25 years, Strategy (Our Tribute to Philadelphia), is on SoulMusic Records and they are touring the UK.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 The Real Henry James (b072n0pg)
Modern Women

Henry James was not only a great novelist - he also wrote a great deal of entertaining non-fiction, producing reviews and essays on a wide variety of subjects. To mark the centenary of his death, these five anthologies reveal James through his letters, memoirs, essays and private notebooks.

Episode 3: Modern Women
Henry James was a lifelong bachelor, but many of his closest friendships were with women. And his novels are known for his sensitive and sympathetic treatment of women's experience - very often as his central characters.

His preoccupation with the situation of women, and with contemporary debates about women's role in society, emerges early in his career. In 1868, the 25-year-old James reviewed a book called Modern Women and What Is Said of Them - a British collection of anti-feminist articles. The book roused James to an angry attack on the marriage market which women found themselves in, and a defence of the position of women in a patriarchal society. We hear extracts from that impassioned review.

We hear too the moving letter which James wrote home to his mother after the death of his closest female friend, his cousin Minnie Temple. Minnie inspired Isabel Archer, his heroine in The Portrait of a Lady, and his heroine Millie Theale in The Wings of the Dove would resemble her even more closely.

The anthology has been selected by Professor Philip Horne of University College London, who is founding General Editor of a major scholarly edition of James's fiction and has re-transcribed the notebooks for an authoritative new edition.

Reader: Henry Goodman
With introductions by Olivia Williams

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071v1l9)
Emma Bridgewater, New female politicians in Iran, Are you turning into your mother?

Pottery designer Emma Bridgewater talks about creating modern day classic kitchenware. Described as "quintessentially British", her most recognisable designs range from simple polka dots to greyhounds chasing rabbits and they're all still made in Stoke-on-Trent. She'll tell us how it feels to be a designer turned industrialist.

Is turning into your mother inevitable and is it something to be welcomed or resisted? Alex Manson-Smith and Sarah Thompson blog about modern motherhood and counsellor Myira Khan works with clients on their relationships with their mothers.

Dirty Pakistani Lingerie is Aizzah Fatima's comic one woman show examining what it is to be a US Pakistani woman. Currently on tour around the UK, Aizzah and director Erica Gould join Jane tomorrow from Birmingham.

A record number of women have been elected to the Iranian parliament; their numbers will increase from 9 to 20 of 290 seats following Friday's elections.
We ask BBC Persian reporter Rana Rahimpour who these women are, where they stand politically and what challenges they face.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Laura Northedge.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b071v58f)
Jane Eyre

Episode 3

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Episode Three
When Jane returns to Thornfield Hall she discovers
the identity of the tall dark stranger.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b071v58p)
Ulrich and Anna – A European Family

Fi Glover with a conversation between a GP who moved here from Germany in the 1980s and his 18-year-old daughter; they reflect on whether they feel German, British or European. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


WED 11:00 An Eton Experience (b071v58t)
Pupils at the Newham based Forest Gate Community School have been inspired by the success of former pupils like Ishak Ayiris, who won a coverted scholarship place in the Eton sixth form. It's a success story his parents could hardly imagine: Dad was a care worker until he got ill and Mum had been a baker before leaving Ethiopia but had struggled to learn English because of a hearing problem. Currently, Eton spends £6.5m on means-tested bursaries, with 73 of the 1,300 pupils have their entire fees paid.

Headmaster Simon Henderson wants more bursaries for boys from disadvantaged backgrounds, so that anyone with the necessary talent can be financially supported at the £35,000-a-year school. Penny joins him and some of the pupils to find out what they hope to gain from the experience. The transition can be a difficult period and some struggle with the move from state schools in run down areas an institution which has educated 19 British prime ministers, including the present incumbent.

It is a difficult area for heads like Simon Elliott at Forest Gate: on the one he wants his pupils to am high, but on the other he is keen that standards across state schools are constantly improving. With his school having no sixth form there is a chance to offer a real alternative and each year he establishes a small group of very bright youngsters whose own parents are on limited incomes. By working with them to broaden their cultural and social experiences he believes he can better prepare them for the rigorous entrance exams and interview process in the indepedent sector. At the same time he is keen that they consider the state school alternatives and is interested in finding out what they eventually opt for.


WED 11:30 Reluctant Persuaders (b06flmfv)
Series 1

Vorsprung Durch Technik

Things are looking up for Hardacre's. They may still be London's worst ad agency, but business has begun to trickle in.

Moreover, thanks to a herculean effort by accounts chief Amanda Brook, the agency will be featured in an article in industry bible Campaign. It's a chance to answer their critics and take control of their image. A reporter is coming by today to interview the team, and Amanda needs them at their very best. Or - failing that - their least incompetent.

But the team has other things on their mind. Like Joe's divorce lawyer, who seems to have developed a sideline as a blacksmith. Or their campaign for Hardacre's mysterious gentlemen's club. Or why Teddy is covered in spiders.

Or what to do when the office lift breaks down, stranding Joe, Teddy, Amanda, and Hardacre between floors, with the woman from Campaign due any minute.

Edward Rowett's sitcom starring Nigel Havers as Rupert Hardacre, Mathew Baynton as Joe, Josie Lawrence as Amanda Brook and Rasmus Hardiker as Teddy.

Director: Alan Nixon
Producer: Gordon Kennedy

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b071lcvv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b071v594)
Tell Qarqur, Hama Province

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

As archaeological sites go, Tell Qarqur isn’t the most glamorous, but this mound in Syria is unique. It’s in the Orontes Valley in the west of the country and it contains 10,000 years of continuous human occupation. It is a goldmine of information for studying the movements of long history in a single place. In 2011, Tell Qarqur was occupied by the Assad military and since then, the whole area - the province of Hama and neighbouring regions - has been on the frontline of the war and many local residents forced to flee. Jesse Casana, the archaeologist who ran the excavation at Tell Qarqur, talks about monitoring the destruction of his site from space using satellite archaeology, and the Syrian villagers who worked with him now living as refugees.

This episode was first broadcast on 2 March, 2016

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Tell Qarqur
Credit: Jesse Casana


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b071lcvx)
New-build homes, Holiday money, Pets on Prozac

Damp walls, leaking sewage and badly fitting windows are just a few of the problems You & Yours has heard about from people who recently bought a newly built home. Surveys suggest that many buyers face problems with workmanship and finishing. We explore how the industry monitors its own standards and hear proposals for an ombudsman for newly built property.

One of the UK's biggest foreign exchange providers has reported an increase in sales of the euro in the last week or so. It is thought some holidaymakers are concerned that the value of sterling might fall during the EU referendum campaign and are choosing to buy their holiday currency months before they go away. But there is a warning that foreign exchanges are affected by a wide range of factors and the shifting value of sterling against holiday currencies is unpredictable.

An estimated 80 per cent of Britain's dogs suffer from behavioural conditions, such as anxiety or hyperactivity. That's according to a study, which also suggests behavioural problems can prevent owners from bonding properly with their pets. In some cases, vets are now using drugs similar to anti-depressants to improve behaviour. We examine the responsibility of owners in giving their pet the environment and stimulation they need and ask when the use of these drugs is appropriate.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b071lcvz)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b071v596)
EU announces unprecedented financial aid to countries to cope with the immigration crisis. Will the UK have to contribute and how could this effect the referendum campaign?

The Republican, Donald Trump, strengthens his position as favourite to become the party's candidate in the US Presidential election. We examine four of his key policies.

A tribute to Tony Warren, creator of Coronation Street, who has died at the age of 79.


WED 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b071v5rx)
Visvesvaraya: Extracting Moonbeams from Cucumbers

Sunil Khilnani explores the life and work of engineer, planner and politician Mokshagundam Visvesvaraya.

Visvesvaraya was a frail bureaucrat who walked hunched, as if the burden of state-building literally pressed down on his shoulders. But in the popular imagination he turned an engineering degree into a superhuman world-fashioning prowess. He changed the Indian nation with practical and enduring improvements for millions of people, including innovations in sanitation, statistics, flood control, drainage and irrigation.

Austere to the point of dourness, but audaciously hopeful, Visvesvaraya sought to frog-march India into modernity.

Featuring Bangalore-based social scientist Chandan Gowda.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b071tgc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b071v5rz)
Series 7

Shoulder Hill

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

William Palmer has promised to dispose of his former friend and erstwhile magician, Morgan Hambleton. But things have not gone as planned and trouble is coming.

Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Linda ..... Susan Jameson
Mrs. Welbelove ..... Joanna Monro
Ronnie ..... Sam Rix
Becker ..... Adeel Akhtar
Charity ..... Claire Price
Delancey ..... David Schofield
Queen of the Corn ..... Rose Hilton Hille
Mr. Shambles ..... Sean Baker

Directed by Marc Beeby


WED 15:00 Money Box (b071vjrh)
Money Box Live: Personalised Budgets

The NHS in England is to offer pregnant women their own "personal budgets", worth at least £3,000, so that they can pick and choose the care they receive. This follows a pattern set in other parts of the public sector, where people are assigned budgets to buy their own services. How well do these kind of schemes work?

Do you have a personalised care or health budget? How does it work for you? Maybe you are mum-to-be? Do you want more 'choice and control' over the kind of birth you can have? Let us know. E mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Or ring 03 700 100 444 on Wednesday from 1pm.

Then what about the use of Government voucher schemes to incentivise behaviour? Things like reward schemes to encourage you to give up smoking or small businesses to seek advice to boost cyber security? Have you any experience of these? In times when public sector funding is stretched are these a more cost effective way of delivering services?

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Lesley McAlpine
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b071lcrz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b071vjrk)
The debt collection industry, Spousal job loss

The debt collection industry: Laurie Taylor explores what happens when everyday forms of borrowing, such as credit cards, personal loans and store cards, spiral out of control. He talks to Joe Deville, Lecturer in Mobile Work at the University of Lancaster, and author of a study which offers a vivid account of consumer default and the evolution of agencies designed to collect people's debts. He's joined by Adrienne Roberts, Lecturer in International Politics at the University of Manchester, who has researched the growing reliance of households on borrowed money.

Also, how do couples react to spousal job loss? Karon Gush, Senior Research Officer at the University of Essex, considers the ways in which couples re-configure their lives and finances in response to one person losing paid employment.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b071lcw1)
Race and TV viewing, The BBC impact on the market, Should Ofcom replace the BBC Trust?

The Secretary of State John Whittingdale has been sharing his views of the BBC at the Oxford Media Conference. We hear what he had to say about BBC distinctiveness and the impact the corporation has on the market and on its commercial competitors. The BBC's head of strategy and digital James Purnell then gives his verdict on the Secretary of State's vision so far.

And Sir David Clementi has carried out a review of the governance and regulation of the BBC. Former chairman of the BBC Trust, Sir Michael Lyons discusses in details of his recommendations - in particular that the BBC Trust should be scrapped and a new unitary board created with oversight by the broadcasting regulator Ofcom. Plus reaction from Richard Tait - former BBC Governor and Trustee - and one time editor of Newsnight and editor in Chief at ITN and Professor Lis Howell - head of broadcasting at City University.

And, new research suggests that ethnicity is a significant factor in the television programming people watch and that the top twenty most viewed shows are very different for an ethnic minority audience compared to the country at large. We hear from one of the report's authors.


WED 17:00 PM (b071lcw3)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071lcw5)
Campaigners accused of not explaining 'Brexit' plans / Coronation Street creator dies


WED 18:30 Chain Reaction (b071vkwl)
Series 11

Al Murray interviews Ian Hislop

Pub Landlord creator, Al Murray passes the baton to the comedian and satirist Ian Hislop.

Chain Reaction is the long running hostless chat show where this week's interviewee becomes next week's interviewer.

After an early foray into stand-up as a character called 'The Murderer', Al Murray created his famous Pub Landlord character in the mid nineties as part of a touring show with Harry Hill. The Pub Landlord went on to tour venues and festivals worldwide before making his own chat show and sitcom for Sky. Outside of the Pub Landlord, Al is well known as a presenter of history documentaries and more recently as a candidate for parliament when he stood against Nigel Farage in South Thanet during the UK General Election of 2015.

Al's guest Ian Hislop is much more used to the cut and thrust of British politics both as a long-standing team captain on 'Have I Got News for You' and as the editor of satirical magazine Private Eye. As a dedicated fan and student of history, he has made several acclaimed documentaries on wide-ranging subjects including conscientious objectors and The Beeching Report.

Al grills Ian on his early days writing for such comedians as Harry Enfield, asks how we should define the role of the satirist and poses the intriguing question, 'what's it like being sued?'

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in March 2016.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b071vkwn)
Lynda has big ambitions for both her pageant and her garden. She has roped Jim in to join her assembled cast. Jim mentions that Dan's rugby career could be taking off as he helps Lynda choose a unifying theme for the garden: "resurgam".

Over coffee, Lilian and Jennifer discuss Lilian's new business arrangement. Lilian reckons Justin needs to change the perception that some of the village have of him. Jennifer meanwhile is updating the village website. They talk about Lilian's property sales - she doesn't expect to come out with pots of money. Lilian despairs that until she lost confidence after Matt, she kept a very close eye on the market. She has regained that confidence since working with Justin. Justin has sponsored the Borsetshire Businesswoman of the Year lunch, they just need to think of a candidate...

Rob makes an argument between Helen and Henry worse. Henry has been in trouble at school for pushing around the children who were teasing him. Rob tries to change their family Mothers' Day plans. Henry doesn't listen to Helen, but he does listen to Ursula, which Rob attributes to Helen's volatile moods. Rob tells Helen she isn't coping, and suggests she thanks Ursula for all her help.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b071lcw7)
Botticelli, Gillian Slovo, Tony Warren remembered, Dr Thorne

Gillian Slovo's latest novel, Ten Days, begins in London on a run down council estate where a young black man is accidentally killed whilst being restrained by police. In the days that follow, a peaceful demonstration turns into violent protest and the resulting riots begin to spread countrywide. Gillian Slovo discusses her book, and reveals how it was inspired by interviews she did with police, politicians, rioters and residents involved in the riots of 2011.

Botticelli Reimagined at the V&A explores the ways artists from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present day have responded to the Renaissance painter's work. Curator Ana Debenedetti has brought together the largest collection of his paintings in Britain since 1930 and exhibits them alongside works such as the Botticelli-themed dress that Lady Gaga wore for her Artpop tour, to a clip of Ursula Andress emerging like Venus from the waves in Dr No. She explains what makes Botticelli such an inspiration.

It was announced today that the creator of Coronation Street, Tony Warren, had died. In tribute to him we play an interview he did with Front Row when the new set was installed in 2013, and Helen Worth, who plays Gail McIntyre, remembers him.

Viv Groskop reviews Dr Thorne, Julian Fellowes' three part adaptation of Anthony Trollope's 1858 novel.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b071v58f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b071vjrm)
Historical Sex Abuse

The idea that we shouldn't speak ill of the dead has an ancient heritage dating as far back as 600BC. It's attributed to the Greek philosopher Chilon of Sparta, but judging by recent headlines around allegations of historic sex abuse it might not have much more of a shelf life. Police forces keen to redress claims that in the past they haven't treated victims fairly and to demonstrate they're not part of a an establishment cover up, are devoting huge resources to cases often dating back many decades and even when the alleged perpetrator is dead. Combine that with a press hungry for salacious gossip knowing that the dead can't sue for libel and it's open season on people who are not only unable to defend themselves, but who will never be brought to trial. The most famous example is the former Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath, but there are numerous others. Should the dead have the same rights as the living? Should they be presumed innocent until proven guilty? Is this just vindictive muck raking or do we owe the many victims of child abuse a duty to try to expose the truth, even after so many years have passed? If we aren't willing to expose what really happened 50 years ago, then what are the chances that we will ever face up to the truth of what happens today? There are those who argue that for too long the victim's voice has been ignored in our legal system and that these investigations help them get closure. But is that the same as justice? Should we hear these cases in court, or would they be better suited to some kind of truth and justice commission? In an increasingly victim-focused climate is our pursuit of historic crimes distorting the meaning of justice?
Chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Anne McElvoy and Mathew Taylor. Witnesses are Barbara Hewson, Peter Hitchens, Mark Watts and Malcolm Johnson.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b071vjrp)
The Dining Room

The Lent Talks are a series of essays on different perspectives of the passion story. This year the theme is "Lent in the Landscape". Michael Banner visits reflects the famous Dining Hall at Trinity College Cambridge to reflect on the Last Supper and betrayal. Producer: Phil Pegum.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b071tgby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b071v1l7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b071lcw9)
Sanctions on North Korea 'the toughest for 20 years'

Interview with UK's UN ambassador; Greeks get "humanitarian aid"; BMW Brexit email

(Photo shows seismic waves observed during a media briefing at Korea Meteorological Admin. in Seoul; credit Reuters).


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b071vjrr)
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Episode 3

Merricat Blackwood lives on the family estate with her sister Constance and her uncle Julian. Not long ago there were seven Blackwoods - until a fatal dose of arsenic found its way into the sugar bowl one terrible night. Acquitted of the murders, Constance has returned home, where Merricat protects her from the curiosity and hostility of the villagers.

Episode Three:
A stranger comes to the house. Merricat fears everything will change for the worse, unless she takes command of the situation.

"If you haven't read We Have Always Lived In The Castle you are missing out." Neil Gaiman.

"Her greatest book...at once whimsical and harrowing." Donna Tartt.

"A masterpiece of Gothic suspense." Joyce Carol Oates.

Shirley Jackson, who died 50 years ago, was perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery, and her novel, The Haunting Of Hill House, twice filmed and thought to be the last word in haunted-house tales. Her work has received increasing attention from literary critics in recent years. She has influenced such writers as Stephen King and Nigel Kneale.

Reader: Bryony Hannah
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 The Literary Adventures of Mr Brown (b071vjrt)
Episode 2

Imagine if London's genteel literary scene had a bit more swag and a gangsta's lean. You've just imagined The Literary Adventures of Mr. Brown.

With the help of his naively affable intern, Charlie, the heroic, absurd and frankly bad-ass Kurtis Brown fights for his clients in London's entertainment industry.

When you need your fights fought and your books bought, who are you going to call? The best damn literary agent in the world, Kurtis Brown. He'll solve all your problems... For 15%.

Written and performed by Chris Gau and Mike Orton-Toliver

Performer: Lola-Rose Maxwell

Producer: Zoe Rocha
Executive Producer: Ralf Little

A Little Rock production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 History Retweeted (b03vgnk3)
The Moon Landing

History Retweeted sends us back in time as we hear people from the past comment on a series of major world events, in 140 characters or fewer.

In this first episode, The Moon Landing: From Launch to Landing, we follow the crew of Apollo 11 as they cruise to the moon. We're given a snapshot of an internet-savvy 1960s - astronauts are trolled, Action Chaps are sold, and America wins gold in the space race.

A space-based David Bowie and a caterpillar's eating disorder are the trending topics of the day.

History Retweeted transports us to timelines gone by - feeding hashtags, trolls and trending topics into moments from history.

Featuring the voices of Tim Barnes and Simon Berry, Wayne Forester and Annabelle Llewellyn,
Peter Temple and Jelly Macintosh - with Lucy Beaumont as the voice of The Computer.

Written by Tim Barnes and Simon Berry

Produced by Sally Harrison
A Woolyback production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b071vgqf)
Rachel Byrne reports from Westminster on differing views among Conservatives on the EU.



THURSDAY 03 MARCH 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b071lczn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 The Real Henry James (b072n0pg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071lczq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071lczv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071lczx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b071lczz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072p147)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones, Priest in charge of the City Parish of St John the Baptist, Cardiff.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b071vl2g)
Sheep farming and the environment

Charlotte Smith is on a sheep farm in the Brecon Beacons with the Roderick family to look at the industry during the busiest time of the year - lambing. Farmer Richard Roderick shows us an old World War Two pill box which he's converted to a bat roost: the hedging he's planted alongside as a bat flight path also serves as shelter for his sheep. We meet the vet to hear what problems she encounters during lambing time. And food and marketing professor David Hughes from Imperial College London gives advice on how to market lamb to a younger generation. The producer was Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztqr)
Collared Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Collared Dove. Although these attractive sandy doves grace our bird-tables or greet us at dawn almost wherever we live in the UK, their story is one of the most extraordinary of any British bird.


THU 06:00 Today (b071vl2j)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b071vl2l)
The Dutch East India Company

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or VOC, known in English as the Dutch East India Company. The VOC dominated the spice trade between Asia and Europe for two hundred years, with the British East India Company a distant second. At its peak, the VOC had a virtual monopoly on nutmeg, mace, cloves and cinnamon, displacing the Portuguese and excluding the British, and were the only European traders allowed access to Japan.

With

Anne Goldgar
Reader in Early Modern European History at King's College London

Chris Nierstrasz
Lecturer in Global History at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, formerly at the University of Warwick

And

Helen Paul
Lecturer in Economics and Economic History at the University of Southampton

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 The Real Henry James (b072n0xp)
Encounters with Famous People

Henry James was not only a great novelist - he also wrote a great deal of entertaining non-fiction, producing reviews and essays on a wide variety of subjects. To mark the centenary of his death, these five anthologies reveal James through his letters, memoirs, essays and private notebooks.

Episode 4: Encounters with Famous People
Henry James ended his career in London in the early twentieth century as a figure of great dignity, known to his admirers as 'the Master'. But as a shy child, and a bashful young man, early in his career he had met some of the literary giants of the Victorian age. James's father Henry James Senior was a well-known and well-connected intellectual figure - though very eccentric - so all sorts of eminent people passed through the house. Towards the end of his life, James still remembers being overwhelmed by embarrassment and self-consciousness during an encounter with the most famous novelist of the day - the author of Vanity Fair.

"Still present to me is the voice proceeding from my father's library, in which some glimpse of me hovering, at an opening of the door, prompted him to the formidable words, 'Come here, little boy, and show me your extraordinary jacket!'"

We hear what happened next in that meeting with Thackeray - and of meetings with Dickens, Tennyson, and George Eliot.

The anthology has been selected by Professor Philip Horne of University College London, who is founding General Editor of a major scholarly edition of James's fiction and has re-transcribed the notebooks for an authoritative new edition.

Reader: Henry Goodman
With introductions by Olivia Williams

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071vl97)
Mother & Baby Bonds; Menstrual Leave

At this year's Cambridge Science Festival, Dr Vicky Leong will be leading an event on the bond between a mother and her baby, trying to prove that when mothers and their infants share a close relationship, a similar pattern develops in their brain waves. Dr Leong and Charlotte Philby, the founder and editor of Motherland, join Jenni to discuss this theory.

Twenty-five years ago volunteer Adele Patrick helped found the Glasgow Women's Library. Last month she was named Scotswoman of the Year, recognising her work with this thriving venture that's never lost sight of its grassroots origin.

A Bristol company are about to launch a workplace policy that includes a greater understanding of women's menstrual cycles. It's been widely covered in the press as the UK's first workplace "period policy" and includes allowing women to work flexibly and take time off around their menstrual cycle. We'll look at why its proved so controversial with the broadcaster and columnist Julia Hartley Brewer and the writer Tanya Gold.

Sue Elliott Nichols goes on the trail of the friend stealers.

Kathryn Hunter on gender-blind casting and what it feels like to play the iconic role of Cyrano de Bergerac.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b071vl99)
Jane Eyre

Episode 4

After Jane saves Mr Rochester's life she begins
to sense danger within Thornfield Hall. There's
something not quite right but what is it?

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b071ld01)
Trapped in a Dead-End

Having reached Greece after often perilous journeys, many migrants now find that their hoped-for route north is blocked. Danny Savage meets some of those who have to live in tents in Athens, and on the Greek-Macedonian border with little hope of reaching their final destinations. Many refugees have come from Syria, where neighbourhoods in some cities have been reduced to rubble. Warda al-Jawahiry visits Homs, parts of which have been completely bombed out. Yet there are those who still live there, and bear emotional scars that are as real as the physical destruction.

In the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, James Jeffrey goes for his early morning run, and finds he's not alone. For early dawn is the time when hyenas finish their night time scavenging in the city. Chris Bockman is in the Spanish enclave of Llivia - a small town completely surrounded by France, but with surprisingly few French speakers. And in Mongolia many young people are giving up the outdoor life of herding sheep on the steppe, and reading novels by candlelight in a yurt at night. Anthony Denselow meets some of them.


THU 11:30 Laverne in the Willows (b071vlmg)
Lauren Laverne has long been a firm fan of Kenneth Grahame's classic children's book 'The Wind in the Willows', in particular that most sparky of characters Mr. Toad, whose desire to have everything and anything new makes him such a vibrant fore-runner of the modern consumer. Lauren sets about telling the story of the book and its creator, Kenneth Grahame, who came up with the adventures of Mole, Ratty and friends as bedtime stories for his headstrong young son Alistair - thought by many to be the model for Mr. Toad himself. Along the way Lauren will visit the school that once was home to the Grahame family, and where he turned the stories into the book we're now so familiar with. She'll also hear from the author of the 'How to Train Your Dragon' series of books, Cressida Cowell, about her own love of 'Wind in the Willows', as well as Tom Moorhouse, an Oxford Universtity Ecologist who is writing a series of sequels to Grahame's classic tale.

Featuring the composition 'Nur Musik' by Mark Simpson.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b071ld03)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b071vlmj)
Minaret of the Umayyad Mosque, Aleppo

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

Since 2012, Aleppo - Syria's largest city - has been a key battleground in the conflict, and hundreds of its residents killed or displaced. Aleppo, thought to be the oldest city in the world, is now left in ruins. One of the great monuments of the city was the minaret of the Umayyad Mosque (also known as the Great Mosque) which was toppled in April 2013. It's still unclear who was responsible - Syrian government forces and rebels blame each other. We tell the story of the minaret, a world heritage site that was connected to that other great Aleppo landmark, the souk.

This episode was first broadcast on 3 March, 2016

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Minaret of the Umayyad Mosque
Credit: Getty

Contributors: Nasser Rabbat, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Zahed Tajeddin, artist and archaeologist; Heghnar Watenpaugh, University of California Davis; Jalal Halabi, photographer; Will Wintercross, Daily Telegraph

With thanks to Haider Adnan of BBC Arabic, Elyse Semerdjian of Whitman College, and Aya Mhanna.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b071ld05)
Weightloss surgery, Online banking break-in, Wine-tasting machines

More than half of all NHS weight loss surgery is now carried out on the middle aged, and the number of people getting gastric bands and bypasses aged over 64 is on the increase, according to the Health and Social Care Information Centre. Surgeons are now much more confident carrying out the operations, and there is growing confidence in the impact of bariatric surgery, despite it being incredibly invasive. In this programme we hear from listener Gill Gaine, who had a gastric bypass aged 67 last year. She talks about the impact it's had on her life - beyond the dramatic Before and After photos.

Fraud reporter Shari Vahl investigates how criminals have been able to break into Natwest customer bank accounts using only a mobile phone number and other publicly available information. She demonstrates how simple the process is by accessing a colleague's account and transferring money out of it and into her own. Natwest says as a result it has tightened its security systems.

Plus how you could taste a slither of a hundred pound bottle of wine for the change in your pocket. Winifred Robinson samples the delights of a wine tasting machine.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


THU 12:57 Weather (b071ld07)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b071vlml)
The President of the European Commission has told economic migrants not to come to Europe. Mark Mardell asks if this will halt the flow of people trying to enter Europe.

Eurosceptics have dismissed claims by a French minister that migrants could be allowed to travel to Britain unchecked if the UK votes to leave the European Union. The former Director General of the UK Border Force, Tony Smith, explains if this is feasible.

Lord Turner, who conducted a wide review of pensions a decade ago, tells us we shouldn't be too set in our ways about the retirement age.


THU 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b071vlmn)
Periyar: Sniper of Sacred Cows

Sunil Khilnani tells the story of EV Ramaswamy Naicker, known to his followers as Thanthai Periyar: the Great Man - a self-conscious dig at his nemesis Gandhi, the Great Soul.

Periyar is best known in India as an anti-Brahmin activist, a rationalist and a take-no-prisoners orator. He campaigned actively and energetically for decades against religion, against the caste system and for the equality of women.

Where Gandhi and his followers wore white, Periyar instructed his supporters to dress in black. Where Gandhi massaged the religious beliefs of his audiences, Periyar called his listeners fools, insulted their beliefs and caste practices, and threatened to thwack their gods and idols with his slippers. And where Gandhi wanted to build a national Indian movement, Periyar revelled in the Dravidian south.

'I've got no personal problem with God," Periyar once said. "I've never even met him, not once". Occupying conventional political office never interested Periyar, but he left a massive imprint on modern south Indian politics.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b071vkwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b071vlmq)
Series 7

Caudley Fair

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

William Palmer must do what he can to prevent the marriage of Mr Delancey’s daughter to the King of the Greyfolk. But the king has laid his plans...

Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Delancey ..... David Schofield
Mr Hibbens ..... Joe Kloska
Moira ..... Carolyn Pickles
India ..... Scarlett Brookes
Frank ..... Nick Underwood
Boris ..... Ewan Bailey
Zach ..... Sean Baker
Leila ..... Nicola Ferguson

Directed by Marc Beeby


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b071vlms)
Series 32

Samaritans

Clare Balding walks from the famous dragon at Bures on the Essex/Suffolk border to Assington in Suffolk. Joining her is a group of volunteers from the Colchester branch of the Samaritans charity. It's a supportive walking-group which helps volunteers to bond and decompress, something that's necessary in an emotionally challenging although rewarding role.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b071lh7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b071s6p5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b071vlmv)
The Coen brothers on synchronised swimming and communism

The Coen Brothers talk to Antonia Quirke about Hail Caesar, a parody of Hollywood in the early 50s and explain why they believe there were Reds under the beds in the film industry at the time.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b071ld09)
UK's longest-running cohort study, The Brain prize, Hairy genetics

This week is birthday time for the 3000-strong group of 70 year olds who might qualify for the title of longest-serving science guinea pigs. Participants in The National Survey for Health and Development cohort study have been closely monitored since their birth in 1946. Joining Adam Rutherford to discuss how this and other similar studies have influenced our lives, and what data we should collect on today's babies, are the Head of the National Survey for Health and Development at MRC's Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at University College London, Professor Diana Kuh, and Professor Debbie Lawlor, programme lead at the Medical Research Council's epidemiology unit at Bristol University.

A team of British team has picked up £1 million from The Brain Prize, which is issued by a Danish Charity annually. Tim Bliss, Graham Collingridge and Richard Morris have won for their work on how memories are formed. BBC science reporter Jonathan Webb is a former neuroscientist and brings us up-to-date with the latest thinking on how we remember.

Finally, grey hair and mono-brows have been all over the news this week with some follicular genetics. A team from UCL assessed the hair types of several thousand Latin Americans and cross-referenced this with their genomes to see what bits of DNA are associated with those characteristics. They found a set of gene variants - or alleles - some known to us, some new, that appear to be part of the reason we have straight hair or curly, bushy brows or mono-brows. Dr Kaustubh Adhikari from UCL is the lead author on the study.

Producer: Jen Whyntie.


THU 17:00 PM (b071ld0c)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071ld0f)
President Hollande has warned of "consequences" if Britain votes to leave the EU


THU 18:30 Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On (b071whf9)
Series 1

Holiday with John Finnemore

Susan Calman is the least relaxed person she knows. She has no down time, no hobbies (unless you count dressing up your cats in silly outfits) and her idea of relaxation is to play Grand Theft Auto, an hour into which she is in a murderous rage with sky high blood pressure. Her wife had to threaten to divorce her to make her go on holiday last year. Her first for four years. But she's been told by the same long-suffering wife, that unless she finds a way to switch off, and soon, she's going to be unbearable.

So Susan is going to look at her options and try to immerse herself in the pursuits that her friends find relaxing, to find her inner zen and outer tranquillity. Each week she will ditch the old Susan Calman and attempt to find the new Susan Calm, in a typically British leisure pursuit.

This time John Finnemore takes her on a spontaneous holiday.

Keep Calman Carry On is an audience stand up show in which Susan reports on how successful she's been - both at relaxing and at the pursuit itself - as well as playing in and discussing a handful of illustrative clips from her efforts. It's an attempt to find out how people find solace or sanctuary in these worlds and how Susan can negotiate her own place in them.

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b071whfc)
There's a breech birth at Brookfield, but David's hoping for fewer complications overall with the new herd. Toby shares good news - Justin is going to invest in the pastured egg business. When he leaves, Pip and David discuss Toby, who seems to have calmed down a lot around Pip, as Matthew and Pip seem stable together.
Johnny is heading to Leeds to see his mum on Mother's Day, and a girl from college is going to help him pick out a present. "Just a friend" he insists. Johnny discusses his course choices with Tom. He then reveals that Rob is pushing him towards a desk job. Tom reminds Johnny that it isn't up to Rob, or anyone else, to decide what Johnny should do at college. After Tom's chat, Johnny realises that being stuck in an office is not what he wants.
Fallon's cinnamon hot cross buns are a success for the tea room. Kirsty asks Fallon whether she has heard from Helen but she hasn't. Later, Harrison and Fallon go late night shopping, and describe how Wayne and Fallon's relationship is recovering - even though Harrison once arrested him! Kirsty also asks Tom if he has spoken to Helen, but they decide she must be busy.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b071ld0h)
Richard Gere in Time Out of Mind, Tanita Tikaram, Look Back in Anger

Richard Gere's latest film Time Out Of Mind sees him playing a homeless man who struggles to survive on the streets of New York City, Dreda Say Mitchell reviews the film which is a personal project for Gere, aimed at drawing attention to the plight of the homeless.

John Osborne first offered Look Back in Anger to Derby Theatre, but it was rejected. They're making amends with a 60th anniversary production, and a new play, Jinny, written in response to it from a female perspective. Samira Ahmed talks to the director Sarah Brigham and Benedict Nightingale, who as a young critic, saw the original production.

Tanita Tikaram rose to fame in the 1980s with the album Ancient Heart. It sold 4m copies and produced four chart singles including Twist in My Sobriety. The singer discusses her new album Closer to the People which is influenced by Anita O'Day, Philip Glass and Thelonious Monk.

Was Hilma af Klint (1862-1944) Europe's first abstract artist, before even Kandinsky and Mondrian? A new exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in London shows how this Swedish artist was reacting to the big debates of the late 19th and early 20th century. Charlotte Mullins reviews.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b071vl99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b071whg8)
Dublin's Gangs

Extra armed police have been put on the streets of Dublin after two murders within just four days of each other. It's being blamed on a flare up of gang wars more akin to Sicily. The first involved gunmen carrying Ak47s disguised as police who burst into a respectable hotel packed with people. The next was assumed to be a swift reprisal: a man was shot several times in his own home. Melanie Abbott travels to Dublin to find out the background to this bitter gang feud and talk to the community caught in the middle.

Producer: Anna Meisel.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b071whgb)
Tax Avoidance

Global firms like Amazon, Google and Starbucks have been criticised for using clever accounting tricks to reduce their tax bills in the UK. But how much tax should they be paying? Evan Davis and guests discuss the whys and wherefores of the international tax regime, including the role of tax havens. Along the way, they'll digest the "Dutch sandwich" and the "double Irish" tax avoidance devices used by some multinationals. And given the widespread perception that many firms don't pay their fair share of tax, they'll assess efforts by the world's major economies to rewrite the rules on corporate tax.

Guests:

Heather Self, Tax Partner, Pinsent Mason

Rolf Rothuizen, Partner, RPS Legal, Amsterdam

Anthony Travers, Chairman, Cayman Islands Stock Exchange

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b071ld09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b071vl2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b071ld0k)
EU migration crisis - has Europe run out of ideas?

EU migration crisis - has Europe run out of ideas? How safe is internet dating? And when is it OK to swear in public?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b071x4nw)
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Episode 4

Merricat Blackwood lives on the family estate with her sister Constance and her uncle Julian. Not long ago there were seven Blackwoods - until a fatal dose of arsenic found its way into the sugar bowl one terrible night. Acquitted of the murders, Constance has returned home, where Merricat protects her from the curiosity and hostility of the villagers.

Episode Four:
Merricat tries to extinguish Cousin Charles, with dire consequences.

"If you haven't read We Have Always Lived In The Castle you are missing out." Neil Gaiman.
"Her greatest book...at once whimsical and harrowing." Donna Tartt.

"A masterpiece of Gothic suspense." Joyce Carol Oates.

Shirley Jackson, who died 50 years ago, was perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery, and her novel, The Haunting Of Hill House, twice filmed and thought to be the last word in haunted-house tales. Her work has received increasing attention from literary critics in recent years. She has influenced such writers as Stephen King and Nigel Kneale.

Reader: Bryony Hannah
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Small Scenes (b071x4ny)
Series 3

Episode 1

Award-winning sketch series starring Daniel Rigby, Mike Wozniak, Cariad Lloyd, Henry Paker and Jessica Ransom. Featuring more overblown, melodramatic scenes from modern life, such as a woman who uncovers the conspiracy behind cryptic crosswords, a saxophonist who is tortured by his inability to play the solo from Baker Street and what happens if you buy Chris de Burgh's old house.

Written by Benjamin Partridge, Henry Paker and Mike Wozniak, with additional material from the cast.

Produced by Simon Mayhew-Archer.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b071x4p0)
Keith Macdougall reports from Westminster as there are calls for tougher action to tackle online bullying, MPs debate the problem of violent gangs and peers want a recycling boost.



FRIDAY 04 MARCH 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b071ld2f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 The Real Henry James (b072n0xp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b071ld2k)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b071ld2m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b071ld2q)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b071ld2s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072p1gs)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones, Priest in charge of the City Parish of St John the Baptist, Cardiff.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b073jgcn)
Lambing: a look ahead

All week Farming Today has been based on a sheep farm in the Brecon Beacons in Wales, taking a look at look at life on the farm at lambing time. In this programme, Charlotte Smith meets two French students who are getting work experience at the farm. She also asks farmers Richard and Helen Roderick how they see the future of the farm as they look ahead. And Richard shows her the rare sight of a ewe which has just given birth to five lambs - all of them in good shape - the happy, healthy, mighty quins!

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv5m)
Coot

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the Coot. The explosive high-pitched call of the coot is probably a sound most of us associate with our local park lakes. Coot are dumpy, charcoal-coloured birds related to moorhens, though unlike their cousins, they tend to spend more time on open water, often in large flocks in winter.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0728l2h)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b071lmwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Real Henry James (b072n0zp)
Childhood and Family

Henry James was not only a great novelist - he also wrote a great deal of entertaining non-fiction, producing reviews and essays on a wide variety of subjects. To mark the centenary of his death, these five anthologies reveal James through his letters, memoirs, essays and private notebooks.

Episode 5: Childhood and Family
It may seem paradoxical to end a series on Henry James by going back to his childhood - but that's what James himself did in old age. As he approached 70, James began to look back over his life and career - by then he was the only one of five siblings to survive - and found that his early memories and associations multiplied with an almost uncontrollable vividness.

We hear memories of how he roamed free as a young boy on the streets of New York, and of his father, an eccentric religious philosopher who detested 'prigs'.

We hear too a moving and intimate account of a visit James paid towards the end of his life to the family grave-plot near Harvard - where his parents, his sister Alice, and Wilky, one of his brothers, were buried. James wrote about this only in his private notebooks, which speaks revealingly about the importance of family for him. The programme ends with a passage about the quest for religious faith, and with James's great motto in life, "e kind, be kind, be kind..."
The anthology has been selected by Professor Philip Horne of University College London, who is founding General Editor of a major scholarly edition of James's fiction and has re-transcribed the notebooks for an authoritative new edition.

Reader: Henry Goodman
With introductions by Olivia Williams

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071x876)
Iconic film legend Louise Brooks, Global childcare burdens, Kung Fu Panda 3

Louise Brooks was never one of the best-known or highly-paid actresses in Hollywood but transcended silent movies (and even cinema itself) to become an iconic figure, due to her unique look, and her refusal to conform in a male-dominated industry. Ahead of a rare screening of her 1928 film Beggars of Life we discuss her legacy with early film experts Pamela Hutchinson and Melody Bridges.

Childcare isn't just a problem for women in the UK. Today two international organisations publish research which describes how women and girls take on the burden of informal childcare and housework around the world, including the UK - often taking on the double burden of managing home and work. Sally Copley, Oxfam's Head of UK Policy and Campaigns and Claire Melamed, Director of Poverty and Inequality at the Overseas Development Institute, discuss.

Kung Fu Panda 3 has taken more than $300 million worldwide since its first screening in January - and that doesn't include Europe. Its director Jennifer Yuh Nelson is one of the highest grossing women directors in Hollywood - she'll discuss the appeal of Kung Fu Master panda Po and what it's like to be a woman leading the field in animation.

In the first year of the Northern Power Women Awards - a collaborative campaign to improve gender diversity in the North of England - founder Simone Roche describes her plan to increase opportunities for women in business and we speak to one of the award winners.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Anne Peacock.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b071x878)
Jane Eyre

Episode 5

Rachel Joyce's 10 part dramatisation for the
bicentenary celebrations of Charlotte Bronte's birth.
Episode Five
After a ghastly cry in the middle of the night wakes all
in Thornfield Hall, Rochester asks for Jane's help.
As they climb the stairs he asks if she is afraid of blood.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.


FRI 11:00 Glad to Be Grey (b071x87c)
Professor Mary Beard is a distinguished Cambridge Classical scholar with a string of highly-regarded books on Ancient Rome to her name, so it's slightly irksome to her that she is almost better known for her long grey hair.

In this highly-authored Radio Four documentary, Mary Beard investigates a growing reluctance to embrace grey hair.

Starting in the Mayfair salon of "hair colourist to the stars", Jo Hansford, she's informed that her hair is "dreadful" and given a personal consultation by Jo herself about how and why she should colour it.

In favour of choice and the fun of colouring hair, (she has always hankered after pink streaks), Mary is particularly disturbed by the pressures in society for women to conceal their age.

It's not just about women, though. Mary has recently come to recognise that far more men now colour their hair, but why won't any of them talk to her about it? Eventually, fellow Cambridge Classicist, Professor Simon Goldhill, agrees to "come out" on air. In defending his use of colour and challenging Mary's own choice, he gives her a philosophical run for her money.

Ultimately, Mary has to admit the paradox of making a radio programme about grey hair, so she turns to a surprise, high-profile television presenter to learn more about the pressures on women in the public sphere to colour their hair.

Concluding that ageism may be the new "glass ceiling", Mary insists upon the right to be both an "enfant terrible" and also an "eminence grise".

The all-grey production team consists of production coordinator Anne Smith and producer Beaty Rubens.


FRI 11:30 Dilemma (b03vf07z)
Series 3

Episode 3

Sue Perkins puts Tom Wrigglesworth, Lucy Beaumont, Anne McElvoy and Joel Morris through the moral and ethical wringer.

The panellists attempt to resolve dilemmas based around dictators and ugly children; using a phone booth to solve a super problem and helping out an audience member.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b071ld2y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Museum of Lost Objects (b071x87f)
The Lion of al-Lat

The Museum of Lost Objects traces the histories of 10 antiquities or cultural sites that have been destroyed or looted in Iraq and Syria.

The Lion of al-Lat was a protective spirit, the consort of a Mesopotamian goddess. This 2,000 year old statue was one of the first things the so-called Islamic State destroyed when they took Palmyra in 2015. The Polish archaeologist Michal Gawlikowski recalls discovering the lion during an excavation in the 1970s, and we explore the wider symbolism of lions and power and how this was appropriated by modern rulers including Bashar al-Assad’s own ancestors.

This episode was first broadcast on 4 March, 2016.

Presenter: Kanishk Tharoor
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Lion of al-Lat
Credit: Michal Gawlikowski

Contributors: Michal Gawlikowski, Warsaw University; Zahed Tajeddin, artist and archaeologist; Augusta McMahon, University of Cambridge; Lamia al-Gailani, SOAS

With thanks to Sarah Collins of the British Museum


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b071ld30)
Pork testing, Railway revivals, Second-hand vinyl values

How many of Dr Beeching's cuts have been reversed over the years? We look at the stations and lines that have reopened for rail passengers.
The clamp down on high street butchers with checks on where their pork is sourced.
And the surge in popularity of second-hand vinyl- how much might your old LPs be worth?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b071ld32)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b073lr0m)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell. Facebook's new tax bill, a bomb in East Belfast and Lord Tebbit on EU referendum tactics.


FRI 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b071x87h)
Iqbal: Death for Falcons

Sunil Khilnani tells the story of the poet and philosopher Sir Muhammad Iqbal.

One of India's most patriotic, eloquent writers, Iqbal is also celebrated as Pakistan's national poet. In his spare time, he wrote one of the first Urdu textbooks on economics; earned a doctorate in philosophy, which he studied for in Lahore, Cambridge and Germany; and became a barrister in London.

It was during his time in the west that Iqbal formulated his Islamic critique of Western society that would eventually become famous in Europe, India and the larger Muslim world.

To Iqbal, the West's problem was one of love and desire. Like the devil, the West seemed consumed with an insatiable appetite. But the devil's failing, like the failing of Milton's Satan, was that he 'declined to give absolute obedience to the Almighty Ruler of the Universe.'

In the same way, the West, by turning away from God and the human brotherhood preached by Christ, had become a terrible inversion of the ideal society. Its desires, severed from the highest things, had become purely material.

Iqbal's vision inevitably brought him to loggerheads with those, including the British government and the Congress movement, whose aspirations for India did not extend to an ideal Islamic polity.

Partly as a result, although he died almost a decade before its creation, Iqbal's work has often been read as a forceful argument for Pakistan.

Featuring Professor Javed Majeed.

Readings by Sagar Arya.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b071whfc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b071x87k)
Series 7

Bayldon Abbey

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz

Mr Delancey is desperate to prevent the marriage of his daughter India, to the King of the Greyfolk. But both William Palmer and India are trapped within the enchantment of Caudley Fair.

Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Delancey ..... David Schofield
Mr Hibbens ..... Joe Kloska
Juliana ..... Clare Corbett
Zach ..... Sean Baker
Moira ..... Carolyn Pickles
Frank ..... Nick Underwood
India ..... Scarlett Brookes
Boris ..... Ewan Bailey
Leila ..... Nicola Ferguson
Girl ..... Rose Hilton-Hille

Directed by Marc Beeby


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b071x87m)
Hadlow College, Kent

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Hadlow College in Kent.

Matt Biggs, Anne Swithinbank and Pippa Greenwood answer the questions from the audience on trees suitable for small gardens, making peace with pests, and plants fit for a queen. They also take time to reminisce on their own days as horticultural students.

And Eric takes a look around Down House, home of keen botanist Charles Darwin and where he penned On the Origin of Species.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Imagining Chekhov (b071x87p)
The Death of Anton Chekhov by Alison MacLeod

A set of three stories, commissioned specially for Radio 4. Alison MacLeod explores the life and work of one of the finest short story writers of them all - Anton Pavlovich Chekhov.

This story could be called The Death Of Anton Chekhov By Anton Chekhov. Now very ill, Chekhov travels with Olga to a spa town in Germany in the hope of better treatment.

Reader: Peter Firth

Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in March 2016.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b071x87t)
Tony Warren, Louise Rennison, Lord Chorley, George Kennedy, John Chilton

Reeta Chakrabarti on
Tony Warren, who created the long-running TV soap Coronation Street, embedding a working-class north of England cast of characters in the national consciousness.
Louise Rennison, comedian and author of young adult fiction, whose frank and funny books won her a loyal following amongst teenage girls.
Lord Chorley, a parliamentarian and conservationist, whose many public roles included former chairman of the National Trust.
George Kennedy, the versatile American character actor, who won an Oscar for his role in the film Cool Hand Luke.
And John Chilton, the trumper


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b071x87y)
Fear of Flying, Evan Davis

Roger Bolton discusses audience comments about The Bottom Line with Evan Davis, finds out about Radio 4's new comedy commissions, and hears listener reactions to an explicit drama.

It's been ten years since Evan Davis started presenting The Bottom Line, Radio 4's business chat show which aimed to bring senior and expert voices from the City to a broader audience. Evan reflects on the programme with Roger Bolton and addresses listener concerns that the focus of the programme is too narrowly aimed at the City's highest echelons, that business reporting has been trying to gloss over the city's failures in the financial crash, and about the number of women appearing on the programme.

Last week, some listeners were shocked to turn on their radios at 10:45am and hear four letter words and explicit content in Fear of Flying, Radio 4 dramatisation of Erica Jong's novel about sexual liberation. Was Radio 4 right to air the drama directly after Woman's Hour? Should radio have a watershed, like TV?

Sioned Wiliam is Radio 4's new commissioning editor for comedy and has just released her first full set of commissions. She joins Feedback for the first time since her appointment to discuss the future of comedy on the network. What kind of new voices will she bring to the network? Will she try and put her own stamp on old favourites? And do shrinking budgets mean Radio 4 comedy is under threat?

And the Government has recently released a number of reports, ahead of the White Paper expected to outline their plans to reform the BBC. Colin Browne from The Voice of the Listener and Viewer joins Feedback to explain what the reports reveal and what the implications might be for BBC radio.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b071x883)
Nikola and Maris - Leaving Latvia

Fi Glover with a conversation between a father and daughter about the impact his departure from their home in Latvia to work in Guernsey when she was just 7 had on their family. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b071ld34)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b071ld36)
Facebook set to pay millions more pounds in UK tax after overhauling its tax structure


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b071x885)
Series 48

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Mae Martin, Marcus Brigstocke and Gemma Arrowsmith to present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

This week the gang take a look at the impending EU Referendum and discuss the fallout from Super Tuesday with Channel 4 News' Chief Writer Felicity Spector.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b071x887)
Ursula brings Henry round to Bridge Farm under mysterious circumstances. It transpires that Henry's foot was scolded by an over-hot bath, which was drawn by Helen. Henry started shouting that he "hated his mummy", and Rob did his best to calm the situation down. Tony points out how out of character this is for Helen, which Ursula attributes to hormones. Ursula's concerned by Helen's forgetfulness, and informs Pat about the problems with Henry at school. Ursula thinks the solution is for her, Pat and Tony to keep a watchful eye on Henry while Helen's pregnant.
As Ed clips ferrets' claws in the bedroom, Emma badgers him about accepting Adam's offer to study for a Certificate of Competence. Emma assures him that he is as smart as anyone she knows, when he wants to be!
When Ursula goes, Tony expresses concern that Helen might be suffering from anorexia again. Tony thinks he and Pat should only attempt to talk to Helen if she is susceptible to it - she needs to make the first move, or it might drive her away. Tony remembers how Henry's birth brought him closer to Helen, and hopes for the same to happen with this new baby. He believes Helen has a lot of people she can turn to... including Ursula.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b071ld38)
Hail, Caesar!, Don Quixote, Thirteen, English Touring Opera

George Clooney stars in the Coen brothers' latest film Hail, Caesar!, a comedic homage to Hollywood's Golden Age in the early 1950s. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh joins Kirsty Lang to review the film which also features Josh Brolin, Tilda Swinton, Scarlett Johansson and Ralph Fiennes. It's in cinemas from today, certificate 12A.

David Threlfall has left the bad-lands of Manchester in Shameless for those of La Mancha, playing the errant knight in James Fenton's adaptation of Don Quixote for the Royal Shakespeare Company. David tells Kirsty why the nutty knight is an important figure for us today, and James Fenton reveals how, in telling his story, Cervantes invented the novel, and the modern novel, all at once. Don Quixote is on at the Swan Theatre in Stratford until 21st May.

In the opening scene of BBC3's first online drama, Thirteen, Ivy Moxam escapes from the cellar, her prison for the last thirteen years. After a desperate 999 call from a phone box, she is picked up by the police and taken to be interviewed. This 5-part drama, also shown on BBC2, focuses on what happens next, how Ivy struggles to find her identity and re-establish relationships with her family and friends. Creator and writer, Marnie Dickens, joins Kirsty in the studio.

And English Touring Opera's Artistic Director James Conway on taking 3 large scale operas to 21 towns around the country, including Gluck's Iphigenie and the first UK staging of Donizetti's Pia de Tolomei. English Touring Opera's Season starts tomorrow at the Hackney Empire and finishes in Carlisle in June.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b071x878)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b071x889)
Juliet Davenport, Clive Lewis MP, Mark Littlewood, Jacob Rees Mogg MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate Thornbury in Gloucestershire with a panel including the CEO of Good Energy Juliet Davenport, Labour Energy Minister Clive Lewis MP,the Director General of the Institute of Economic Affairs Mark Littlewood, and the Conservative MP Jacob Rees Mogg MP. Questions include EU referendum, migration from EU V Non EU countries, legalisation of prostitution, renewable energy and government subsidies and should the tackle be banned from the game of rugby at secondary schools?


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b071x88c)
The Love of Honours

Adam Gopnik reflects on our age old love of honours and prizes in every walk of life.

"We want honours not to prevent others from having them but to hold them ourselves. People kill each other for power; but they merely ridicule each other for prizes."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b071x88f)
Incarnations: India in 50 Lives - Omnibus

Ramanujan, Tagore, Visvesvaraya, Periyar, Iqbal

Sunil Khilnani presents an omnibus edition of Incarnations: India in 50 Lives.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b071ld3b)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b071ld3d)
Will Iran's Death Penalty Laws Change?

Will drug traffickers escape execution; will Brazil's former president Lula be charged; and why R2D2 is so loveable
Picture Credit: Demonstration against the death penalty in Iran. Afp.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b071x88j)
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Episode 5

Merricat Blackwood lives on the family estate with her sister Constance and her uncle Julian. Not long ago there were seven Blackwoods - until a fatal dose of arsenic found its way into the sugar bowl one terrible night. Acquitted of the murders, Constance has returned home, where Merricat protects her from the curiosity and hostility of the villagers.

Episode Five:
The fire at the Blackwoods' house draws the villagers, a vengeful mob.

"If you haven't read We Have Always Lived In The Castle you are missing out." Neil Gaiman.

"Her greatest book...at once whimsical and harrowing." Donna Tartt.

"A masterpiece of Gothic suspense." Joyce Carol Oates.

Shirley Jackson, who died 50 years ago, was perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery, and her novel, The Haunting Of Hill House, twice filmed and thought to be the last word in haunted-house tales. Her work has received increasing attention from literary critics in recent years. She has influenced such writers as Stephen King and Nigel Kneale.

Reader: Bryony Hannah
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b071tgc2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b073m1hg)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b071x88l)
Jean and Khursheed – Our Lives as Migrants

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who both immigrated to the UK, one from the US and one fleeing Idi Amin’s Uganda, comparing their experiences. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b071skpc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b071skpc)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b071tgbh)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b071tgbh)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b071v58f)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b071v58f)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b071vl99)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b071vl99)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b071x878)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b071x878)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b071tgc2)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b071tgc2)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b0717n96)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b071x88c)

An Eton Experience 11:00 WED (b071v58t)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b071459c)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b071sx1h)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 10:30 SAT (b071h07x)

Andrew O'Neill: Pharmacist Baffler 23:00 TUE (b04v3950)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0713p7z)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b0717n94)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b071x889)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b071h083)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b071ld09)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b071ld09)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b071lfk3)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b071lfk3)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b071sn2h)

Black, White and Beethoven 11:30 TUE (b071tgbk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b071sx1k)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b071tgc8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b071vjrr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b071x4nw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b071x88j)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b071x1yy)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b07142lq)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b071sn2c)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b071lcg5)

Cancer Moonshot 21:00 MON (b0714mbw)

Cancer Moonshot 11:00 TUE (b0725d18)

Chain Reaction 18:30 WED (b071vkwl)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b071tgby)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b071tgby)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b071lmwh)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b071lmwh)

Dilemma 11:30 FRI (b03vf07z)

Dot 11:30 MON (b071skpf)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b071h2x6)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b05wyhnv)

Europe: Strangers on My Doorstep 20:00 MON (b071sx1d)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b071gycq)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b071s7qk)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b071syrt)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b071v06d)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b071vl2g)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b073jgcn)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b0717ls1)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b071x87y)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07178gc)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b071tgc6)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b071gwdv)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b071gwdv)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0713p7j)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b071ld01)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b071lclc)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b071lcrr)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b071lcw7)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b071ld0h)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b071ld38)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0717lrx)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b071x87m)

Glad to Be Grey 11:00 FRI (b071x87c)

History Retweeted 23:15 WED (b03vgnk3)

Imagining Chekhov 15:45 FRI (b071x87p)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b071vl2l)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b071vl2l)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b071lcrw)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 MON (b071skpm)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 TUE (b071tgbr)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 WED (b071v5rx)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 THU (b071vlmn)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 FRI (b071x87h)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 21:00 FRI (b071x88f)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b071lcrz)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b071lcrz)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b07142lx)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b071sn2k)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b071fnwb)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b071x87t)

Laverne in the Willows 11:30 THU (b071vlmg)

Leap 19:45 SUN (b071s6q8)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (b0717cq0)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b071vjrp)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b071gy2g)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b071tgbw)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0713p6w)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b071lcck)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b071lcjt)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b071lcqd)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b071lcvg)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b071lczn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b071ld2f)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b071v1l7)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b071v1l7)

Modern Welsh Voices 00:30 SUN (b03lntqf)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0713p7s)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0713p7s)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b071vjrh)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b0717cpy)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b071vjrm)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 MON (b071skph)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 TUE (b071tgbm)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 WED (b071v594)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 THU (b071vlmj)

Museum of Lost Objects 12:04 FRI (b071x87f)

Musical Variations: The Life of Angela Morley 15:30 SAT (b0714nhm)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0713p74)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b071lcd2)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b071lck8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b071lcqq)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b071lcvq)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b071lczz)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b071ld2s)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b071lcd4)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b0713p7q)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b071lcg8)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b071lckp)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b071lcqs)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b071lcvv)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b071ld03)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b071ld2y)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0713p76)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b071lcdn)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b071lcfs)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0713p8f)

News 13:00 SAT (b0713p7x)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b071lfkn)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b071t8qg)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b071s6p5)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b071s6p5)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0713p83)

PM 17:00 MON (b071lcl5)

PM 17:00 TUE (b071lcrb)

PM 17:00 WED (b071lcw3)

PM 17:00 THU (b071ld0c)

PM 17:00 FRI (b071ld34)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b071s6pq)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 MON (b071sn29)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 TUE (b071tgbt)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 WED (b071v5rz)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 THU (b071vlmq)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 FRI (b071x87k)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b0713vvy)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b071s6pd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0717nzj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b072p0wc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b072p0y3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b072p10t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b072p147)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b072p1gs)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b071lh7s)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b071lh7s)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b071lh7s)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b0717j1t)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b071vlms)

Reluctant Persuaders 11:30 WED (b06flmfv)

Riot Girls 21:00 SAT (b0713vvt)

Riot Girls 15:00 SUN (b071s6nz)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b071h07v)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0713p8c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0713p70)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b071lccw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b071lck3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b071lcqj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b071lcvl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b071lczv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b071ld2m)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0713p6y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0713p72)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0713p85)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b071lccm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b071lccy)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b071lcgm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b071lck0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b071lck6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b071lcqg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b071lcqn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b071lcvj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b071lcvn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b071lczq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b071lczx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b071ld2k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b071ld2q)

Simon Schama: The Obliterators 13:30 SUN (b071s6nr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0713p89)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b071lcgr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b071lcl7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b071lcrd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b071lcw5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b071ld0f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b071ld36)

Small Scenes 23:00 THU (b071x4ny)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b071lfkd)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b071lfkd)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b071skp5)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b071skp5)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b071lh7v)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b071lh7q)

Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On 18:30 THU (b071whf9)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b071lmwc)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b071s6ps)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b071s6ps)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b071sn2m)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b071sn2m)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b071tgc4)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b071tgc4)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b071vkwn)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b071vkwn)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b071whfc)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b071whfc)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b071x887)

The Arts Exodus 16:00 MON (b071sn2f)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b0717j24)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b071whgb)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0717j1w)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b071vlmv)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b071s6np)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b071s6np)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b071t8qd)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b071t8qd)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b071s6nt)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b071v58p)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b071x883)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b071x88l)

The Literary Adventures of Mr Brown 23:00 WED (b071vjrt)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b071lcw1)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b0717m14)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b071x885)

The Real Henry James 09:45 MON (b071skp7)

The Real Henry James 00:30 TUE (b071skp7)

The Real Henry James 09:45 TUE (b072n0k7)

The Real Henry James 00:30 WED (b072n0k7)

The Real Henry James 09:45 WED (b072n0pg)

The Real Henry James 00:30 THU (b072n0pg)

The Real Henry James 09:45 THU (b072n0xp)

The Real Henry James 00:30 FRI (b072n0xp)

The Real Henry James 09:45 FRI (b072n0zp)

The Report 20:00 THU (b071whg8)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b06yr76j)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b071h081)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b071lcgj)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b071lclq)

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The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b071ld0k)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0717b5n)

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Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b071sx1m)

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Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b071x4p0)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b071lcgw)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b071s6qn)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0713p81)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b071skp9)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b0714nj0)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b071lcks)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b0717nzl)