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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 FEBRUARY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0707w9t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b070hsck)
Benjamin Franklin in London

Episode 5

In the middle of the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin spent almost two decades in London - at exactly the same time as Mozart, Casanova and Handel. This is an enthralling biography - not only of the man, but of the city when it was a hub of Enlightenment activity.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London.

From his house in Craven Street, he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful - in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, and on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends - and, as an American colonial representative, he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. This brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin sought to prevent the America's break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event.

Episode 5:
It is 1775, and Franklin is no longer of any political use in London. He becomes Ambassador to France in the days before the Revolution.

Written by George Goodwin
Abridged by Barry Johnston
Read by Nickolas Grace

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707w9w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707w9y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707wb0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0707wb2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b070hxzb)
Reflection and prayer with writer and broadcaster, Anna Magnusson.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b070w213)
I write things I wouldn't tell anyone else

The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0707wb4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0707wb6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b070hktk)
Series 32

Walking with a Purpose: The Surrey Hills

Clare Balding joins Jenni Williams and her disabled three year old daughter, Eve, as they take their daily walk in the Surrey Hills. These walks are the highlight of their day as both enjoy being outside, admiring the views and watching the antics of their young and exuberant, golden retriever, Scout. Jenni talks candidly to Clare about how she and her husband, Steve have come to terms with Eve's condition and how they feel blessed to have such a happy and life affirming child.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0713f1d)
Farming Today This Week: Mental Health

One in four people in the UK are affected by serious mental ill-health, and it seems farmers are particularly at risk. The most recent available government statistics show that in 2014 forty-one farmers took their own lives - that's almost one a week. In this programme, David Gregory-Kumar visits a farm in Somerset run by a charity which aims provide opportunities and experience for vulnerable groups, including those with mental health problems. He also hears about a campaign to get mental health onto the curriculum at agricultural colleges, and finds out about attempts to raise awareness through tractor "selfies"!

Presented by David Gregory-Kumar and produced by Emma Campbell.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0707wb8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0713f1g)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0713m2l)
Laurence Fox

The actor Laurence Fox is best known for playing DI James Hathaway in the ITV crime drama Lewis. He's now on the London stage playing a giant of history Charles de Gaulle in 'The Patriotic Traitor'. He is part of Britain's most famous acting dynasty that includes his father James, uncle Edward and cousin Emilia. He is now carving out a career in music and has just released his debut album. He joins Saturday Live to talk about his new role, his passion for music, and his love for the countryside.

The zoologist Lucy Cooke grew up in the English countryside and was fascinated with nature from an early age. Her new TV series shows the length that people go to save orphaned animals. She joins Saturday Live to talk about her own passion for animals, in particular the weird and unloved ones.

Listener Lorna Currie Thomopoulos is a collector of paper dolls. She describes her collection as historical, beautiful and cherished fragile object d'arts.

Giles Abbott has just returned from a storytelling festival in India. He started storytelling after vision loss at the age of twenty-five. He talks about his love for traditional stories.

Levi Roots shares his Inheritance Tracks: Say a Little Prayer by Aretha Franklin and To Zion by Lauryn Hill.

Wendy Hilling shares her experience of living with her full time carer Teddy the golden retriever.

Laurence Fox stars in 'The Patriotic Traitor' at Park theatre London
'Nature's Miracle Orphans' presented by Lucy Cooke and Patrick Aryee is on BBC 1. Next episode Sunday 28th February.
'My Life in His Paws' by Wendy Hilling is published on 25 February.

Producer: Dianne McGregor
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b0713m2n)
Series 6

The French Connection

Continuing with his look at Oscar-winning films and what they tell us about the society that gave birth to them, Paul Gambaccini turns to the first R-rated movie to win the Best Picture Oscar and one of the earliest to show the newly complete World trade towers. An early example of the new wave in American Films, The French Connection went on to win 5 Oscars and set both its leading man (Gene Hackman) and its young director (William Friedkin) on what were to become glittering careers.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b072jwy1)
EU Special

Steve Richards and guests debate the implications of David Cameron's EU negotiation.
Producer: Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0707wbb)
A Man Dies Twice

Meeting the people populating the world of news. In this edition: thousands were massacred in the Bosnian town of Visegrad during the war there in 1992 - today, as Fergal Keane has been finding out, the authorities there want it to become a tourist destination. Visegrad is also on Nick Thorpe's mind only he's talking about the town by the River Danube in Hungary, where the so-called Visegrad 4, a grouping of regional nations, was born. Nick says that in today's Europe, their voice can no longer be ignored. As the US-election spotlight turns to South Carolina and Nevada, Robert Hodierne examines gun control and why the laws governing it won't be changing any time soon. Beth McLeod is in Malawi travelling on a boat built in Scotland when the country was a British protectorate which continues to provide a vital service to local communities. And he may have lived in Paris for two decades, but our man Hugh Schofield explains why it's only now, finally, that he seems to wield a bit of influence!


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b0707wbd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0713m2q)
The East-West Energy Divide

Why does a family in Wrexham pay more for their energy than a family in Nottinghamshire? It's not because they use more gas and electricity. It's because people in more rural areas, further away from the energy source, are charged more. The cost of sending energy down the lines and pipes is greater for more remote areas, pushing up household prices. But is that fair and why is there not a universal charge? Kevin Peachey reports.

Cash or pension? An NHS Trust is offering new recruits enhanced pay if they opt out of the NHS pension. Former pensions minister Steve Webb, who introduced auto-enrolment, tells Lesley Curwen why he thinks this is a worrying precedent.

Could property crowdfunding schemes help young people get on the housing ladder? The Social Market Foundation says they provide people with an opportunity to keep up with property market inflation while they save for a deposit. But MoneyWeek editor Merryn Somerset Webb tells Lesley Curwen people need to be aware of the risks.

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b070hxsn)
Series 89

Episode 7

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. This week's panel is Mark Steel, Danny Finkelstein, Holly Walsh and Vicki Pepperdine.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0707wbg)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 World at One (b0732184)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs.


SAT 13:45 Any Answers? (b0713m2y)
Your Say on the European Referendum Deal

In a special 45 minute edition of the programme you have your say on the European Referendum.
Presented by Julian Worricker
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Ian Rankin - Rebus (b0713m30)
A Question of Blood

Episode 2

Three pupils are gunned down by an ex-SAS soldier at a private school near Edinburgh. The police are at a loss to explain the motive - until DI Rebus begins to investigate an army helicopter crash on Jura.

Ron Donachie stars as Rebus in the conclusion of Ian Rankin's thriller.

DI Rebus ...................Ron Donachie
Siobhan Clarke......... Gayanne Potter
DI Hogan ................. Brian Ferguson
DCI Templer ............ Sarah Collier
Bell .......................... Brian Pettifer
Whiteread .......................... Veronica Leer
Brimson .......................... Kenny Blyth
James ...................... Alasdair Hankinson
Peacock .......................... Gavin Mitchell
Rachel .......................... Anita Vetesse
DCI Mullen .......................... Simon Tait
Steve Holly ....................... Ben Clifford
Miss Teri .......................... Nicola Roy

Other parts played by the cast.

Dramatised by Chris Dolan.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


SAT 15:30 The Beat Women (b06084ks)
The forgotten women of the Beat Generation supported, loved, endured, and were creatively overshadowed by their famous male counterparts. More than just muses, they were often authors in their own right. Laura Barton travels to New York to meet some of these women, writers such as Joyce Johnson, who already had a book deal when she met Jack Kerouac as a young woman, but has seen her long career overshadowed by her brief time as Keraouc's girlfriend. Hettie Jones risked everything to defy 1950's convention and her Jewish parents to marry the black poet LeRoi Jones, who later became Amiri Baraka.

Then there are writers such as Anne Waldman, from a later generation to Hettie and Joyce, who learnt from the Beat Generation and aims to keep the tradition alive today.

While in many cases the work of the women of the Beats was not be as innovative as their male counterparts, Laura argues that we should celebrate the writing of the women who fought to forge their own paths, for whom merely telling their story was a struggle.

Presenter: Laura Barton
Producer: Jessica Treen.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0713m32)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Julianne Moore, Author KM Peyton, Musician and designer Beth Ditto

The Oscar winning actor Julianne Moore talks about her role in the film Freeheld.

Lots of people have been asked to celebrate 'great mothers' on the social media 'motherhood challenge'. But is this just a smug fetishisation of motherhood, pushing it as an ideal of womanly perfection? And what about those women who can't or choose not to have children. We discuss with journalist Flic Everitt and Jody Day founder of Gateway Women a support network for women who are childless by circumstance.

The author of Flambards, KM Peyton, tells us about her latest novel Wild Lily and why she continues to be obsessed by horses.

In 1999, two teenagers armed with bombs and guns walked into their school and began shooting. Twelve children died at Colorado's Columbine High while another 24 were injured in what was then ' the worst school shooting in history'. Sue Klebold's son Dylan was one of the boys who carried out the attack. She describes her love for her son and attempts to find a reason for the tragedy.

Women often feel self-conscious about facial hair but it's very common. We discuss why is it something that we still don't talk openly about with Dr Sam Bunting a cosmetic dermatologist and Laura Cofield a PhD student at Sussex University who is writing about a cultural history of body hair removal in 20th century Britain.

How do adults with a learning disability make friends and relationships in a safe environment? We hear from Mandy and Jay who met through a charity called Stars in the Sky in Hampshire.

Beth Ditto the lead singer of the cult American band Gossip and outspoken LGBT activist talks about her new plus size fashion line.

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0713m34)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b070hns6)
Data Privacy

When you enter personal details onto any website or smartphone app, what happens to it? Where does it get stored, who owns it and who has access to it? These questions are becoming more relevant to ask as we put more details about every facet of our lives onto the internet. With a new piece of legislation passed in the EU dealing with this precise issue, businesses need to be up to speed with their knowledge on effective privacy management

Evan Davis and guests discuss why personal data is so valuable to business, and how the individual can also benefit from sharing this information.

Guests:

Mike Gordon, CEO, Callcredit Information Group

Liz Brandt, CEO, Ctrl Shift

Eduardo Ustaran, Data Privacy expert and Partner, Hogan Lovells.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0707wbl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0707wbn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707wbq)
In-out vote to be held on June 23rd, several cabinet ministers to campaign to leave EU.


SAT 18:30 Loose Ends (b0713m36)
Clive Anderson, Phil Gayle, David Leon, Ian Hislop, Jenny Sealey, Yorkston Thorne Khan

Clive Anderson and Phil Gayle are joined by David Leon, Ian Hislop and Jenny Sealey for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Yorkston Thorne Khan.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b0713m38)
Series 19

Popping Out

Popping Out
By Will Self

It's the immediate aftermath of the crucial EU summit in Brussels, where Britain has pitched for better terms over sovereignty, migration and the economy. All eyes are now on The Spokesman who will deliver Europe's response to our demands.

Read by Will Self.

Produced by Duncan Minshull.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0707wbs)
Uncle Vanya, Triple 9, The Night Manager, Mend the Living, Delacroix

a bunch of corrupt cops stage a bank heist in Triple 9; but can there honour among thieves in such a high-stakes job?
Chekhov's Uncle Vanya at London's Almeida Theatre has been adapted and directed by Robert Icke giving it a fresh contemporary feel.
John leCarre's 1993 novel The Night Manager has become a 6 part BBCTV series. Espionage, amoral weapons dealers, beautiful tragic women; all the best ingredients are there, what does it add up to?
Award-winning French novelist Maylis de Kerangal's latest work translated into English is Mend The Living - dissecting 24 hours of a human heart.
The first major London exhibition of work by - and influenced by - Eugene Delacroix has opened at The National Gallery.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Gillian Slovo, Jason Cowley and Kathryn Hughes. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0713m3h)
In the Bluff

There is, argues poet Paul Farley, something very particular about the bluff that sets it apart from other members of the deception family.

More theatrical than a straight-forward, two-dimentional lie, it can be called, it can be doubled, and often times remains mysterious - we never actually find out whether indeed a particular bluff was just that.

It permeates our everyday conversation, with nods of the head and affirmative grunts suggesting that yes indeed we have read Proust, and are of course conversant with Scandinavian philosophy; it proves a vital weapon on the sports field and the poker table; and in international relations and military strategy remains an invaluable resource.

Paul takes to the poker table himself, and speaks to experts from a variety of fields, including Jonathan Agnew and Bridget Kendal, to delve deeper into the psychology and application of the bluff.

Along the way he frequently has need to suggest a degree of knowledge in subjects that in fact remain largely a mystery to him.

Producer: Geoff Bird


SAT 21:00 Friday Drama (b040yvdq)
The Testament of This Day

A new radio play written and directed by Edward Bond, one of our greatest living playwrights, who turns 80 this year. In true Bond style, this confronting and disturbing drama connects with realities of our lives and societies. A young man embarks on two journeys, He is in control of only one. He soon discovers there is no going back, from either. An arresting drama about the world today.

As one of the most important and prolific post-war playwrights, Edward Bond has been at the forefront of radical, political and influential drama for over 50 years. He is one of the most produced playwrights in Europe. He was born in London in 1934. He had virtually no formal education and left school at 15. The Royal Court Theatre staged Saved in 1965. The play created a national scandal, which was instrumental in the abolition of censorship of the English stage, and established Bond as a major British playwright. He has written more than 50 plays, including Lear, The Sea, Bingo, The Woman, Restoration, The War Plays and 'The Paris Pentad' (Coffee, Crime of the Twenty-first Century, Born, People, Innocence). Many of these have attained the status of radical classics.

The Testament Of This Day is Edward Bond's third original radio drama, the previous two, also for Radio 4, Chair, and Existence having both become stage versions that have been translated and performed in many countries. Bond has found a passion and a new voice in the writing of original radio dramas, produced through his long term collaboration with radio drama producer Turan Ali.

Producer - Turan Ali
Writer and Director - Edward Bond

A Bona Broadcasting production for BBC Radio 4

Overflow and notes:

Edward Bond has also written poetry as well as texts for the cinema and opera, and a large body of theoretical work on drama. He also works as a director (often of his own work), including this radio drama, his radio directing debut.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0707wbv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b070fn1y)
Banning Boycotts

How far should you be allowed to express your moral and political beliefs through boycotts? There have been high profile boycott campaigns on everything from companies involved in the arms trade, fossil fuels, and tobacco products to economic and academic boycotts of Israel. Now the government is planning a law to make it illegal for local councils, public bodies and even some university student unions to carry out boycotts. Under the plan all publicly funded institutions will lose the freedom to refuse to buy goods and services as part of a political campaign. It's said that any public bodies that continue to pursue boycotts will face "severe penalties." The government believes cracking down on town-hall boycotts is justified because they undermine good community relations, poison and polarise debate and fuel anti-Semitism. Beyond the narrow principle of what tax payers money should be spent on, what is wrong with a group of citizens organising to express their moral, philosophical or political objection to a company or country through their economic, intellectual or cultural power? Such boycotts have in the past been very effective. If every pound we spend can on some level be seen as an expression of our individual moral codes, why should we not have a say on where money is spent on our behalf? Are boycotts misguided empty political gestures more designed to make us feel self-righteous? And even if they are is outlawing them justified? Banning the boycott - the Moral Maze. Chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox and Jill Kirby.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b070cxy8)
Heat 6, 2016

(6/17)
The sixth heat in the current season of the general knowledge quiz comes from Salford, with competitors from Shropshire, Merseyside and Lincolnshire making their bid for the title of Brain of Britain 2016.

Russell Davies asks the programme's traditionally testing questions. Could you remember who narrated the original series of The Clangers; who was runner-up in the Sports Personality of the Year award for 2015; or say what the time difference is between Perth and Sydney?

Today's winner will go through to the 2016 semi-finals later in the spring. For a bit of light relief the contestants will have to combine their knowledge to answer questions devised by a Brain of Britain listener, who'll win a prize if they can't do so successfully.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b070cgkk)
Love and the Rest

Roger McGough with poetry of love, hate and everything in between on this Valentine's edition of Poetry Please. Featured poets include Harold Pinter, Carol Ann Duffy and WB Yeats, and there are readings from Fiona Shaw, Alice Arnold, Paul Mundell and Burt Caesar. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 21 FEBRUARY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0713ntz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Stories (b0713pqt)
The Easter Lilies

Julia McKenzie reads Jane Gardam's classic story in which an elderly spinster dreams of adorning her suburban church with the wild lilies of her time in Malta, with unexpected results...
Reader: Julia McKenzie is a distinguished stage and screen actor, with two Olivier awards and Tony and BAFTA nominations. Her most recent TV roles include Miss Marple in the Agatha Christie TV series, and her film roles include Notes on a Scandal and Shirley Valentine.
Abridger: Justine Willett
Producer: Justine Willett
Born in 1928, Jane Gardam she did not publish her first book until she was in her 40s, but has become one of the most prolific novelists of her generation, with 25 books published over the past 30 years and a number of prestigious prizes to her name (she's twice winner of the Whitbread, and has been shortlisted for both the Booker and Orange prizes). Her novels include Old Filth, Last Friends, God on the Rocks and The Hollow Land. She's been called 'the laureate of the demise of the British Empire', for her poignant and witty portrayals of the end of the era of British imperial adventures.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713nv1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713nv3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713nv5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0713nv7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0713pqw)
Bells from St Martin's Church Desford in Leicester.


SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (b070fn20)
The Wilderness

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on the events leading up to Jesus' crucifixion. Throughout Lent six writers will reflect on these events through a variety of locations as they explore the theme of "Lent in the Landscape". This week Emma Loveridge, who used to run excursions to the Sinai Desert, takes us to her own private wilderness which she has created in Devon to reflect on Jesus' forty days and forty nights in the wilderness. Producer: Phil Pegum.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0713nv9)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0713rtc)
Repeat After Me

From declarations of love to the descent of words into music, the poet Ross Sutherland explores the consequences of repeating ourselves.

Featuring music from Steve Reich and David Lang.

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0713rtf)
Dairy: A More Ethical Alternative?

The Ahimsa Dairy Foundation is a not-for-profit company that was set up to provide entirely slaughter-free milk. Ruth Sanderson travels to North Leicestershire to meet co-directors Nicola Pazdzierska and Sanjay Tanna as they prepare to move their herd from Kent to a new site near Groby. It hasn't been a simple journey but as Ruth discovers the people behind Ahimsa are inspired by much more than profit. They are pioneering an approach to dairy that puts animal welfare at the heart of the business with a premium product that appeals to a select but growing market for religious or ethical reasons.

A new site will allow them to develop innovative mobile dairy technology and begin training oxen to be used on the land so that they too have a worth but Nicola and Sanjay must tackle many hurdles to get their new machinery approved. Soon after they had moved the cows the spectre of Bovine TB arose on the neighbouring farm and they must now wait to see if their animals are affected.

Ruth joins them to discover if their love of their animals and the help of their supporters can help them succeed against some big challenges.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0713nvc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0713nvf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0713rth)
Sikh women and the turban, The Church and the middle classes and Sin

As Ireland prepares to go to the ballot box we ask is there appetite for social change? What is the relationship between Church and State? Daniel Faas, head of the sociology department at Trinity College Dublin explains.

Ruth Hunt, Chief Executive of Stonewall, talks to Edward about the theme of Religion, Belief and Spirituality for LGBT History month and how Stonewall wants to change hearts and minds on this issue.
The Dark Side of the Soul looks at the concept of 'Sin' in the modern world. Although an old-fashioned word Stephen Cherry explains the 'Seven Deadly Sins' through contemporary examples from financial scandals to celebrity culture.

Where should the Church of England focus its efforts to stem falling membership? One proposal is to target the nation's large social housing estates. The Bishop of Burnley, Philip North, explains his idea and we hear from a vicar in Wythenshawe, Manchester, about the challenges he faces in filling the pews.

It was the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, who instructed Sikhs to wear the turban as a mark of their faith. Now it seems more and more women are wearing turbans. Nikki Bedi went to meet one woman in London to find out why?

Bob Walker visits Syrian refugees in Nottingham and they tell him their story of how they recently came to the UK and how they are coping in their new home.

Pope John Paul II's letters to show Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka raise questions about how difficult it is for a Catholic priest to have a non-sexual relationship with a woman. We look at the value of companionship with Father Phil Sumner and historian Elizabeth Abbott.

Producers
Amanda Hancox
Peter Everett.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b0713rtk)
Theatre for a Change

Noma Dumezweni makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Theatre for a Change
Registered Charity No 1104458
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Theatre for a Change'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Theatre for a Change'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0713nvj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0713nvl)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0713rtm)
Lent Pilgrimage 2: Taking and Leaving

How do we choose what to keep, what we require for inner vitality and balance, and what to leave behind on Lent Pilgrimage? Live from the shrine of St Augustine in Ramsgate, Kent. With the Rector, Fr Marcus Holden, and with a reflection by Robert Pugin Purcell, the great grandson of Augustus Pugin, the architect of the shrine which was Pugin's own church and which today holds the relics of St Augustine of Canterbury. With a special poem by Sr Mary Stephen. The Victoria Consort is directed by Thomas Neal. A link to online resources from Churches Together in Britain and Ireland is on the Sunday Worship web page. Producer: Rowan Morton Gledhill.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b070hxsv)
Vanilla Happiness

Adam Gopnik says the secret of happiness lies in unexpected pleasures, like finding yoghourt is vanilla when you expect it to be plain.

"Are the intrinsic qualities of something more powerful than the context in which we perceive it, or are what we call intrinsic properties really only the effect of expectations and surprise?"

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mhyzf)
Raven

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the raven. Ravens are one of the most widely distributed birds in the world and can survive Arctic winters and scorching deserts. In the UK, Ravens were once widespread, even in cities but persecution drove them back into the wilder parts of our islands. Now they're re-colonising the lowlands and are even turning up on the outskirts of London where, since Victorian times, the only ravens were the ones kept at the Tower.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0713nvs)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0713rtp)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0713rtr)
Dame Zaha Hadid

Kirsty Young's castaway is the architect, Dame Zaha Hadid.

The first woman to be awarded architecture's highest honour, the Pritzker Prize, she designed the Aquatic Centre for London 2012, Glasgow's Riverside Museum and has twice won the Stirling Prize - first for the MAXXI museum in Rome and secondly for her design for the Grace Academy school in Brixton, London. She recently became the first woman in her own right to receive the RIBA Gold Medal.

She was born in Baghdad in 1950 where her father was a prominent member of the opposition National Democratic Party. After attending school there, she travelled to Switzerland and England to boarding school before returning to London in 1972 to study at the Architectural Association.

In 1983 she won her first competition to design the Peak Leisure Club in Hong Kong. It gained her international recognition though it was never built: her first building was the Vitra Fire Station in Germany in 1993. In the late 1990s she built a contemporary arts centre in Cincinnati & a BMW car manufacturing plant in Leipzig. She won competitions to design a new opera house in Cardiff but it was never realised and her first permanent building in Britain was a Maggie's Cancer Care Centre in Scotland built in 2006. She has designed stations for the Nordpark Cable Railway in Innsbruck, Austria and in 2010 the Opera House in Guangzhou, China. In 2014 she became the first woman to win the Design Museum's Design of the Year Award for the Heydar Aliyev Cultural Centre, in Baku, Azerbaijan.

She was made a Dame in 2012 for services to architecture.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0713nvx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b06zqq9d)
Series 8

Calman, Cooke, Lowe

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Sarah Millican welcome:

* Comedian, Fearer of Raisins and Collector of Thimbles, Susan Calman
* An artist who's made an art out of copying art and claims that he has actually slept with the Mona Lisa, Adam Lowe
* A TV naturalist who admits that when she talks to animals, all they want to talk about is food, fighting and, well, mating, Lucy Cooke.

The Museum's guests discuss what Fifty Shades of Grey has in common with Capt. Kirk and Mr Spock making sweet exoplanetary love; how salt could be the building material of the future if only it didn't rain; and why living on a small island will either turn you into a pygmy or a giant.

Researchers: Anne Miller and Molly Oldfield of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and James Harkin.

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0713rtt)
The Sake Revelation

If your experience of sake has been limited to simply 'a hot cup of alcohol after a meal' like Sheila Dillon it's time to listen without prejudice. With thousands of breweries each producing dozens of varieties there is more range than most of us understand.

After a slump in sales in Japan young people are now returning to sake and in the UK interest is growing rapidly with top restaurants listing more choices, plans for specialist bars and more people in the drinks trade now qualifying in sake expertise.

But how do you know where to start? A lack of Japanese can make bottles hard to understand and when do you drink it hot or cold? What food can you pair them with? How do you avoid the really bad ones?

Sake samurai and sommelier Natsuki Kikuya explains how different varieties should be drunk and how the novice can gain confidence . She's joined by passionate sake convert, drinks writer Anna Greenhous and Techno DJ Richie Hawtin aka Plastikman fell so in love with sake he's now taking it to a new generation of young clubbers around the world.
Meanwhile the race is on between 2 breweries to produce the first sake in the UK. Will it be Scotland's Arran brewery or the Japanese Dojima brewery which is investing in a multi-million pound operation in Cambridgeshire?

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0713nw1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0713nw5)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 The Spoken Image (b068tsvg)
The photographer and former Picture Editor at The Guardian, Eamonn McCabe, curates a photo exhibition on the radio, featuring images that have moved and inspired him during his 50 years in the business. Together, the images represent the power photography has to connect us to our past and our humanity - our feats and failures, our memories, emotions, and our humour.

Pictures by acclaimed war photographer Don McCullin and portrait photographer David Bailey remind Eamonn of his youth in North London. He talks to the British photographer Michael Kenna about the tricks of light and the merits of black and white versus colour prints. He also offers some very personal reflections on his colleague at the Observer, Jane Bown.

We hear from Joel Meyerowitz whose images of the aftermath of the attack on the World Trade Center in September 2001 offer a visceral example of photo reportage, despite being taken after the event. Joel's moving account, courtesy of The National September 11 Memorial and Museum, raises questions about whether it is right to make something aesthetic from something tragic.

Other photographers featured include French greats Willy Ronis and Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Hungarian colour specialist Nickolas Muray, the Observer sports photographer Chris Smith - famous for his pictures of Muhammad Ali, and the cult British photographer Raymond Moore.

(Photo credit: "Boats, Dingle" (c) Michael Kenna/Supervision New York)

Producer: Olivia Landsberg
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b070hxsb)
Tutbury Castle

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Tutbury Castle in Staffordshire. Bunny Guinness, Matthew Wilson and Bob Flowerdew answer this week's questions, including how excessive rain can affect your soil and which seeds are best to grow outdoors.

Also, the panellists dispense advice on how to make an effective hot bed and Matthew Wilson takes to the busy streets of Shoreditch to investigate the long-forgotten work of Thomas Fairchild.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0713rtz)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with The Listening Project's first conversation using signing - one of a pair between hearing mothers and deaf children - and another about film versus digital legacy. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Riot Girls (b0713vvt)
The Life and Loves of a She Devil

Episode 1

by Fay Weldon, adapted by Joy Wilkinson. A darkly comic fairy tale about revenge, sex and power.

When Ruth discovers her husband is sleeping with a prettier, richer woman, she makes ingenious and diabolical plans to punish them both.

'The Life and Loves of a She Devil', written in 1983, is a gleefully bawdy satire on the war of the sexes, and a fable about the rewards and dangers of our capacity for transformation.

It is part of Riot Girls on Radio 4, a series of no-holds-barred women's writing that includes Erica Jong's 'Fear of Flying' and original plays following three generations of women by Lucy Catherine and Ella Hickson.

Adapted by Joy Wilkinson
Directed by Abigail le Fleming

The Writer
Fay Weldon CBE has written 34 novels, numerous TV dramas, several radio plays, 5 full length stage plays and five collections of short stories. She works as Professor teaching creative writing at Bath Spa University.

The Adapter
Joy Wilkinson was selected as a Screen International Star of Tomorrow 2015. She has several original feature projects and TV series in development, including the thriller KILLER CV, which was selected for the 2014 Brit List. Joy writes extensively for radio, on original dramas and adaptations. In theatre, her work has won prizes including the Verity Bargate Award.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0713vvw)
Meg Rosoff

Meg Rosoff, best known for her books for young people talks to Mariella about her debut novel for adults, Jonathan Unleashed. Booker winner John Banville introduces us to For Two Thousand Years, a classic Romanian novel now available in English for the first time.
Crime writer Ann Cleeves discusses the book she'd never lend - a rare volume of the flora and fauna of the tiny Hilbre Island, and there's new trends in book selling with the opening of Libreria - a new mobile phone free bookshop which hopes to win over hearts of the high tech community.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0713vvy)
Bubble and Squeak

Roger McGough with poetry of love, hate and everything in between on this Valentine's edition of Poetry Please. Featured poets include Harold Pinter, Carol Ann Duffy and WB Yeats, and there are readings from Fiona Shaw, Alice Arnold, Paul Mundell and Burt Caesar. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b070dq8f)
Sunni Shia Splits?

Are international conflicts creating tensions between Sunni and Shia Muslims in the UK?

Shabnam Mahmood reports from both Sunni and Shia communities and reveals how divisive messages from the Middle East are fuelling intolerance here.

Organisations which monitor hate crimes say sectarian violence, while low level, is increasing.

One Shia man tells the programme: "It is now becoming quite dangerous. It is an attack on me as a Shia that really scares me."

Mahmood reports from one of an increasing number of unity events being staged across the country to foster good relations. A Sunni imam tells her: "These are dangerous times and the religious leadership need to be seen to be doing things to bring communities together."

So can such work prevent tensions escalating in the face of the sectarian propaganda that's increasingly available online and on satellite television channels?

Producer: Sally Chesworth.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b0713m38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0713nw7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0713nw9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713nwc)
Boris Johnson has announced that he will argue for Britain's exit from the European Union


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0713wlr)
Antonia Quirke

Antonia Quirke selects the best in BBC radio in the last sevens days including wall-to-wall therapy sessions and recovery groups. Private letters written by a Pope to a cherished female friend, and a poet confessing to the delirious pleasures of bluffing. I encounter a childhood musical hero and we hear from the author outraged that his PM was so badly read he sent him a 101 books - to no apparent effect - And the Disney boss behind Frozen explains the secrets to its success.

Production team: Kevin Mousley, Kay Bishton and Elodie Chatelain.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0713wlt)
Jolene gives up coffee for Lent, but Kenton refuses to give anything up. Kenton's disparaging about Wayne's bread rolls and Wayne's plans to build the entire Mother's Day menu around them. Jolene confronts Kenton over his jealousy, and he reluctantly admits that Wayne seems to be a success... but he is only temporary, isn't he?
Kirsty tries to call Helen but Ursula picks up instead. Ursula promises to pass on a message, but when Helen asks if anybody rang, Ursula replies "only Tom". Helen decides she wants to head into town. Kirsty has offered to chauffeur her around if she wishes. However, Ursula steps in to take Helen for her scan on Wednesday and then to the shops - so she needn't bother Kirsty.
On a walking tour, Jill and Carol admire the gardens of Ambridge. They bump into Kirsty who tells them she was going to see Helen but Ursula advised her not to disturb her. The cows arrive on the fields of Brookfield - it's all change. Jill just hopes David and Ruth are doing the right thing.


SUN 19:15 Wordaholics (b01rlmpt)
Series 2

Episode 1

Gyles Brandreth hosts the comedy panel show challenging guests to display their knowledge of words and language.

On the panel: comedians Milton Jones and Alun Cochrane, Dictionary Corner's Susie Dent and Front Row critic Natalie Haynes.

Milton Jones will be coining his own new fear - the fear of becoming a monk: 'cloisterphobia'; Alun Cochrane's Yorkshire roots help him guess the meaning of the Polish word 'prozvonit'; Susie Dent explains the origin of the phrase 'gingering up' and Natalie Haynes tries to ban the word 'guesstimate'.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


SUN 19:45 Say Yes by Tobias Wolff (b0713x9k)
A couple are washing up after their evening meal. A casual conversation reveals a startling difference between them. How well do we know those who we love and live with?

Written by Tobias Wolff
Read by Henry Goodman

Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b070hxsj)
Junior doctors' strike, David Bowie's death

Feedback returns with the BBC Radio issues that matter most to you - from the coverage of Junior Doctors' debate and David Bowie's death, to a tough listen in The Archers and a documentary that invites you to see with your ears.

When David Bowie died, Radio 4's news programmes dedicated much of the day's coverage to the star. Many listeners felt the coverage was disproportionate. Jamie Angus, editor of the Today programme, speaks to presenter Roger Bolton to address complaints that the BBC let emotion override objectivity.

Jamie Angus also hears listeners' views on how his programme has been covering the Junior Doctors' contract debate. Listeners on both sides have concerns and question whether the BBC is picking the right people to represent the arguments and whether statements from the BMA and the government are being properly scrutinised.

Rob Titchener's relentless abuse of his wife Helen has been captivating many of the Ambridge faithful, but has also been forcing some to turn off their radios. Listeners debate whether the storyline is unmissable drama in the best tradition of the programme, or a subject that is just too painful to return to day in, day out.

And stop, stand still and listen. That's what listeners did when journalist Helena Merriman told them to during her documentary Batman and Ethan. The programme featured Ethan, a blind ten year old learning to explore the world through a technique called echolocation, which uses sound to create a picture of his environment. Roger Bolton speaks to Helena about recreating something that only blind people can understand, and asks if highlighting the unusual technique risks creating unrealistic expectations for many blind people.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b070hxsg)
Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Edmonde Charles-Roux, Norman Hudis, Antonin Scalia, Harper Lee

Matthew Bannister on

Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the United Nations Secretary General who had to deal with genocide in Rwanda and the war in the Balkans.

Edmonde Charles-Roux, the former resistance fighter who became editor of French Vogue magazine.

Norman Hudis, the screenwriter of many of the Carry On comedy films.

And Antonin Scalia, the conservative US Supreme Court Justice.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0713m2q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0713rtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b070d28w)
Inheritance

Why does inheritance arouse such powerful emotions? Family, death and money make for gripping stories - just ask Tolstoy, Austen or Dickens - but our attitudes also reflect the way we feel about society, the state, and even ourselves.

Discussions tend to dissolve into rows about levels of tax but in this programme Jo Fidgen explores the values and intuitions that underpin our strength of feeling.

Producer: Joe Kent.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0713nwf)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b0713x9m)
Hugh Muir of The Guardian analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b070hkyc)
John Lasseter

The Film Programme this week explores the work of American animator and film maker John Lasseter.

Presenter Francine Stock talks to John about his moving making techniques and films including Toy Story, Frozen and his latest release Zootropolis.

John also shares his experiences of working for both Pixar Animations and for Disney.

Presenter: Francine Stock
Producer: Anna Bailey
Editor: Jereome Weatherald.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0713rtc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 22 FEBRUARY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0713nxj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b070fft5)
Museums and nationalism, Imagining utopias

Museums and the 'nation': What can we learn about nationalism by looking at a country's cultural institutions? Laurie Taylor talks to Peggy Levitt, Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College, and author of a study which explores how museums today represent diversity and make sense of immigration and globalisation. She interviewed a range of museum directors, curators, and policymakers and heard the inside stories of the famous paintings and objects which define collections across the globe; from Europe to the United States, Asia, and the Middle East. They're joined by Julian Spalding, the art critic and writer.

Also, imagining utopias. Professor Craig Calhoun, director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, considers the role of impossible dreams in shaping our reality.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0713pqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713nxl)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713nxn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713nxq)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0713nxs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0726p96)
Reflection and prayer with writer and broadcaster, Anna Magnusson.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0713zdx)
TB testing on dairy farm, Changing legal landscape in farming, Biochar and ash dieback

Back in November Farming Today spend a week following a dairy farm near Stroud in Gloucestershire. We heard from Andrew and Hannah Cozens just how hard it is for them to make a living from their herd of 220 cows. The herd was tested for TB in December, which resulted in 5 "inconclusive results" - which meant they had to be re-tested. Emma Cambell goes along to watch the re-test, which opens up some very difficult decisions for the Cozens'.

Ash dieback has infected woodlands, parks and gardens right across the UK since it first arrived here in 2012. If it continues to spread we could lose up to 90% of our 146 million native ash trees. And the worst part is there's no cure. Or is there? We hear how an accidental discovery has led one tree health scientist to believe we may stand a chance of beating ash dieback. And it's all thanks to an ancient product Amazonian tribes used thousands of years ago to fertilise their soils. Anna Jones meets Dr Glynn Percival from Bartlett's Tree Health Research Laboratory based at Reading University.

The introduction of the National Living Wage for all working people aged 25 and above takes effect from 1st April, when the hourly rate will rise to £7.20. This is a change that is set to have a major impact on farms businesses which are heavily reliant on manual labour such as some vegetable or soft fruit producers.
And this isn't the only upcoming legal change facing the farming and food sectors. First, though: the introduction of the National Living Wage for all working people aged 25 and above takes effect from 1st April.. when the hourly rate will rise to £7.20. This is a change that is set to have a major impact on farms businesses which are heavily reliant on manual labour such as some vegetable or soft fruit producers. Joel Woolf is a solicitor, and head of agriculture at the law firm Foot Anstey. He explains the new legal measures that farmers need to deal with.

Presented by David Gregory-Kumar and produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0713nxv)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378srp)
House Sparrow

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the house sparrow. These birds are more commonly found living alongside us than any other British bird. Perhaps the most enterprising birds were the House Sparrows which bred below ground in a working mine at Frickley Colliery in Yorkshire.


MON 06:00 Today (b0713zdz)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0713zf1)
Future Economies

On Start the Week Andrew Marr looks ahead to a future dominated by automation, cyber security, the 'sharing economy' and advanced life sciences with the innovation expert Alec Ross, computer scientist Steve Furber and the journalist Paul Mason who predicts such changes heralding a post-capitalist world. But cutting-edge advances in robotics and computers will have a huge but uneven impact on working lives: while previous industrial revolutions affected blue collar workers, in the future traditionally middle class jobs will be under threat. The journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai focuses on the most marginalised sector of the white working class - the British far right.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0713zf3)
The Other Paris

Episode 1

Paris, City of Light, the city of fine dining and seductive couture and intellectual hauteur, was until fairly recently always accompanied by its shadow - the city of the poor, the outcast, the criminal, the eccentric, the wilfully nonconforming.

In The Other Paris, Luc Sante gives us a panoramic view of that alternative metropolis, which has all but vanished but whose traces are in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of France itself and, by extension, throughout the world.

He draws on testimony from a great range of witnesses - from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and flaneurs - whose research is matched only by the vividness of Sante's narration.

"Paris, a city so beautiful that people would rather be poor there than rich somewhere else." Guy Debord.
"This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest I've ever read about Paris. Ever. " Paul Auster.

Luc Sante was born in Verviers Belgium and emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. Since 1984, he has been a teacher and writer, and frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His publications include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, The Factory of Facts and Folk Photography. He currently teaches creative writing and the history of photography at Bard College in New York State.

Writer: Luc Sante
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0713zf5)
Fussy eating phone-in

Food writer Bee Wilson and psychologist Dr Lucy Cooke join Jane Garvey to answer your questions about how to cope with fussy eaters.

Following the huge response when we spoke to Bee about her book First Bite: How We Learn To Eat we return to the subject with a phone-in.

How can we help children get over fussy eating habits and enjoy wide and varied diet? Can problems with picky eating turn into serious issues that affect health in later life? How does it affect your social and family life?

If you'd like tips on changing food habits - whatever your age - or you want to share your experiences. Get in touch ...

The lines will open on Monday morning at 8am. Phone 03700 100 400
Or you can email now via the website bbc.co.uk/womanshour - and leave a contact phone number.


MON 10:45 Riot Girls (b0713zf7)
Fear of Flying

Episode 1

The radio premiere of Erica Jong's bold and bawdy novel about a young woman's quest for sexual liberation was a controversial best-seller in 1973.

Isadora Wing has been married to psycho-analyst Bennett for five years. But's she restless and yearns for the perfect, guiltless, zipless sexual encounter.

Dramatised by Annie Caulfield

Directed by Emma Harding.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b06yr6vh)
Darkie Day: Michael and the Mummers

Grace Dent presents untold stories of 21st century Britain. Young black film director Michael Jenkins is making a film about Padstow's Darkie Day. It's a long standing tradition where local residents black up their faces and process through the streets singing and dancing. The locals are defensive about their celebration which is part of their Cornish identity. Despite what outsiders think they say it has no racial overtones, but they did change the name to Mummers Day after complaints prompted MP Diane Abbott to call for the festival to be stopped. As a young Black British man Michael wants to experience it for himself and capture it on film. Will any of the town's residents accept his invitation to sit down and have an honest conversation with him about Darkie Day's origins and meaning? Is political correctness making it worse? This is a story where modern Britain meets medieval history in a clash of cultures.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


MON 11:30 Dot (b0714033)
Series 1

The Astonishing Adventures of Agent Whiff-Whaff

Comic adventures with Dot and the gals from personnel who are getting squiffy over Agent Bertie Whiff-Whaff.

Bertie wants Dot promoted, but can Dot handle life on the other side of the hallway?

Rollicking wartime comedy by Ed Harris - set in the personnel department of the Cabinet War Rooms.

Dot ..... Fenella Woolgar
Myrtle ..... Kate O'Flynn
Peg ..... Freya Parker
Millicent ..... Jane Slavin
Peabody ..... David Acton
Agent Bertie Whiff-Whaff ..... Adie Allen

Director: Jessica Mitic

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b0713nxx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 One to One (b05pn3sw)
Christina Lamb talks to Lady Khadija Idi Amin

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times and in this series of One to One she explores family legacies.

In the final of her three programmes, she explores what it's like to grow up the son or daughter of someone regarded as one of the most evil people on earth. And what happens if you are not aware of that legacy - how do you come to terms with it ?

Few people are seen as more of a byword for barbarity than Idi Amin, the Ugandan despot whose regime killed as many as 400,000 people when he was President from 1971 to 1979.

Christina Lamb talks to Lady Khadija Idi Amin dada, born in Saudi Arabia where her father was living in exile until he died. She tells Christina about her childhood and not being aware of her father's brutal legacy.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07142lg)
Food fraud, London Fashion Week, Subsidised flights

Consumer affairs programme.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0713nxz)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b07142lj)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b07142ll)
Deen Dayal: Courtier with a Camera

Professor Sunil Khilnani returns with Incarnations. In the first programme he profiles the pioneering photographer Lala Deen Dayal.

Born in 1844, Lala Deen Dayal would go on to become the court photographer for the fabulously wealthy sixth Nizam of Hyderabad, who dubbed him the "bold warrior of photography".

Earlier in his career, his images of the historic monuments and architecture of India had become a sensation, and a means by which Indian landmarks could be appreciated in the West. Over subsequent decades, Deen Dayal's carefully arranged portraits would open a window on a second aspect of a splendid, idealized India: the lifestyles of the late nineteenth-century elite. Though India had at this high point of the Raj become the world's leading stage for status display, which often involved the shooting of tigers, a person's status wasn't quite fixed unless the moment itself was shot - ideally by Deen Dayal himself.

"Deen Dayal captured a particular moment of elite indulgence and excess," says Sunil Khilnani. "Just before it was swept away."

Like many successful artists, before him and since, Deen Dayal became adept at selling his patrons the images of themselves they most wanted to see, and share. And his story might be simply a portrait of an artist as a public relations man, if his artistry wasn't so compelling and historically revealing.

Without him, we wouldn't understand so powerfully the moment when India became the world's exotic, wondrous playground for the wealthy, before the modern world got in the way.

Featuring interviews with artist Dayanita Singh and art historian Deborah Hutton.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith
Original music composed by Talvin Singh.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0713wlt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Riot Girls (b07142ln)
Susan

First of three new plays charting British feminism through three generations of women. We begin in 1975 with a frank exploration of the era's changing ideas about marriage, independence and female sexuality.

Birmingham, 1975. Susan makes the radical decision to leave her husband and take her two children, Emma and Tim, to live in a commune. When this first commune doesn't work - largely because commune life begins to mimic the gender power structures of the outside world - Susan feels compelled to move to an all-female commune. But this means leaving her 6 year old son. By Lucy Catherine.

Director ..... Emma Harding
Producer ..... Abigail le Fleming.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b07142lq)
Heat 7, 2016

(7/17)
Which artery takes deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs? Which actor was future Vice-President Al Gore's roommate at Harvard? And who wrote the novel on which the Hitchcock film Psycho was based?

Russell Davies puts these and a host of other questions to the latest contenders for the Brain of Britain 2016 title. The programme comes from the Radio Theatre in London, with the winner assured a place in the semi-finals of the contest later in the spring.

There'll also be the chance for a Brain of Britain listener to outwit the contestants with ingenious questions of his or her own devising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0713rtt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Gospel Truth (b06z2kyc)
Episode 2

Gospel's uplifting and rejoicing sound is world famous, a multi million-dollar music genre that in many ways has ended up the beating heart of American popular music. But can gospel be gospel if it entertains, makes money and praises the Lord at the same time? Financial educator Alvin Hall explores how this American religious music genre has been affected by both commercialisation and secularisation.

In this second part, Alvin explains how gospel became a global force in popular music. He reveals how Aretha Franklin's marriage of pop to gospel sold millions of records, introducing gospel to a world audience in the process. He looks at the rise of the gospel choir in the 1970s and 80s and discovers how it increasingly became a money-making industry. He also meets leading gospel stars Kirk Franklin and Donnie McClurkin to ask whether they think today's gospel stars have been affected by money and celebrity.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b07142ls)
Series 13

Climate Change

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by guests Dara O Briain, Professor Tony Ryan and Dr Gabrielle Walker to discuss the ever-hot topic of climate change. They take a forensic look at the evidence that the climate is indeed changing, how we know that we are responsible, and what can be done to stop it. The scientific willing may be there, but is the political will finally catching up?


MON 17:00 PM (b07142lv)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713ny1)
David Cameron appeals to MPs to back keeping Britain in the EU. Syria ceasefire agreed. Footballer Adam Johnson gives evidence.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b07142lx)
Series 74

Episode 1

New series. Paul Merton, Rufus Hound, Graham Norton and Pam Ayres join Nicholas Parsons for another episode of the classic panel show in which guests must try to speak on a given topic for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Topics tackled this week include Optimism, Humble Pie and The Isle of Man.

Just a Minute is the world's longest running panel show, still hosted after 49 years by the inimitable Nicholas Parsons. Appearing in this run of 6 episodes are regulars Paul Merton, Stephen Fry, Graham Norton, Pam Ayres, Josie Lawrence, Jenni Eclair, Gyles Brandreth and Tim Rice; while Rufus Hound, Esther Rantzen and Nish Kumar make their first appearances.

Rufus Hound is an actor and comedian, best known for his comic performances in One Man Two Guvnors and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

Esther Rantzen is of course well known to audiences as the host of long running magazine programme That's Life, as well as the founder of the charities ChildLine and The Silver Line.

Nish Kumar is a stand up and the host of NewsJack on Radio 4 extra.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b07143dv)
Rex is irritated when Toby is late for a meeting with Josh to discuss their pastured egg business. Rex points out how much of an asset Josh would be to them when Toby dismisses him as a "schoolboy". Rex then worries Toby will let him down on another job - moving Lilian's furniture out of the Dower House tomorrow. Meanwhile, Bert is far along in the process of building their egg-mobile. Toby's concerned at some of the fittings, but Bert's affronted when Toby suggests changes.
While raking straw, Ruth realises the sheer scale of the changes at Brookfield, and wonders if they are doing the right thing. David's excited though. Rather than help out David and Ruth, Josh goes to his meeting with the Fairbrothers. Ruth points out he also has revision to do.
Rex is impressed by Brookfield's new "multi-coloured" herd. Josh, Toby and Rex settle on a new breed of their own - Welsh hens - and a hardy type of packaging that.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b071fyq9)
Secret in Their Eyes, Katie Mitchell, AB Yehoshua, Stutterer

Briony Hanson reviews Secret in their Eyes, an adaptation of an Oscar-winning Argentine thriller starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Julia Roberts and Nicole Kidman.

Katie Mitchell discusses her National Theatre production of Sarah Kane's play Cleansed in which one character has his tongue cut out and his hands put in a shredder. But it is, Mitchell insists, really about love.

The short film Stutterer, about a man with a severe stammer, has been nominated for this weekend's Oscars. Ben Cleary, the writer, director and editor of the 12-minute film, discusses the challenges he faced as a first-time filmmaker.

AB Yehoshua is an outspoken author who's been called the Israeli Faulkner. His latest book, The Extra, steps into the head and heart of a woman in her 40s, a harpist, who has decided not to have children. What is the impact on her, her family - and perhaps even her country?

This edition of the programme was subject to an adjudication by the BBC Editorial Complaints Unit and has been edited since original broadcast. Further information is available here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/comp-reports/ecu/frontrow22022016 ."

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


MON 19:45 Riot Girls (b0713zf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Europe: Strangers on My Doorstep (b07143dx)
Hungary: At the Cutting Edge

As more European countries follow Hungary's lead and fence their borders against irregular migration, Maria Margaronis explores Hungarians' responses to the refugee and migration crisis. She visits the prison factory that makes most of the razor wire used on Europe's borders, and hears how the crisis is affecting Hungary's Muslim minority. She travels to the Serbian frontier with solidarity activists who support the border guards, and meets the Two-Tailed Dog Party, an opposition group with a biting analysis. What's behind Prime Minister Viktor Orban's hardline response to migration? And is Hungary the cutting edge of a new, illiberal Europe?

Producer Shabnam Grewal.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b071459c)
Multiculturalism: Newham v Leicester

How are councils in two of the UK's most multicultural places managing diversity? Back in the 1970s, the Labour party developed a model of working with ethnic minority and faith community groups to help new immigrants to Britain settle in. Presenter Sonia Sodha, a British Asian journalist, explores how this has worked in Leicester, a city often held up as a beacon of diversity. Has it led to more integration - or less? And does a radical new approach being trialled in Newham - the most diverse place in Britain - offer any lessons?

Sonia Sodha is chief leader writer of The Observer and a former Labour party aide.


MON 21:00 Unhappy Child, Unhealthy Adult (b070dksr)
We already know that unhappy experiences in childhood are more likely to lead to mental health issues in later life.

What's becoming clear, however, is that chronic stress and anxiety during this time can trigger dramatic changes in the body which contribute to our risk of developing diseases like diabetes, heart disease, cancer and stroke. Chronic stress in childhood is also associated with a shortened life span.

Health-harming behaviours which contribute to disease risk, like smoking, drinking alcohol and drug use, are more common among those who have endured traumatic experiences in childhood.

But scientists are now revealing that these stressful childhood experiences have a direct impact on our physical health, through their impact on the developing brain and the immune system.

The question now is how to use this knowledge to improve the nation's health. Should health professionals routinely ask patients about traumatic events in their childhoods? And if so, who should broach the subject, where and when?

Geoff Watts visits a GP practice which is about to trial this novel idea, and looks at the growing body of evidence revealing how adverse childhood experiences contribute to poor health and shorter lives.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0713zf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b0713ny3)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07145xy)
Cameron: EU Exit a 'Leap in the Dark'

We ask three senior European politicians what they think about the British referendum and its effect on the future of the EU. Could football be an important factor in the final outcome? We talk to Howard Dean, a former Democratic presidential candidate, about this year's contest. And as Iranians prepare to vote we find out what people there think of the future prospects for the country.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07145y0)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 6

Rhashan Stone continues reading from the new novel by Meg Rosoff, her first for adults, Jonathan Unleashed. The story of a young man, Jonathan Trefoil who - aided by his canine companions Dante the collie and Sissy the spaniel - is struggling to navigate the responsibilities of adulthood and the demands of his new life in New York.

Jonathan's stress levels are going through the roof. Increasingly unhappy at work, he has hastily accepted his girlfriend Julie's commercially sensible proposal: to get married and have everything paid for by her employer, Bridal-360, in exchange for an eight page spread in the magazine and permission to live-stream the ceremony online to an audience of 100,000. What could possibly go wrong?

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b070dnqr)
Mouthpiece: Turning the Spoken Word into Songs

Michael Rosen & Laura Wright hear about Mouthpiece, a project in which composer Jennifer Bell has been given access to interview people from the Speaker to the barista about their working lives in the Houses of Parliament. She's then created songs from their words to show the human side of life there, and to reflect on the ways in which Parliament voices the country.
There is a tradition of using verbatim speech in music, and Michael compares Jennifer's work to the Radio Ballads of Ewan MacColl and Charles Parker, in particular Singing The Fishing.
Producer Beth O'Dea
More information about Jennifer Bell's work can be found on her website, www.jenniferbellcompany.com.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07145y2)
David Cameron explains to a noisy Commons why Britain is better off staying in the European Union. But plenty of Conservative backbenchers disagree. Susan Hulme has the best of a memorable day in the Commons.
Also on the programme:
* Anti- and pro-European peers in the Lords react to news of the coming In/Out EU Referendum.
* Is the Government creating 'Skype families' by preventing overseas parents of British children from moving to the UK?
* Peers speak out about bans placed on visiting speakers to British university campuses.



TUESDAY 23 FEBRUARY 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0713nz4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0713zf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713nz9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713nzc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713nzj)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0713nzl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072b0nh)
Reflection and prayer with writer and broadcaster, Anna Magnusson.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0714mbh)
Farming minister on Brexit, Rural housing, Future of farming

The Brexit referendum has led to a split in the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. While the Secretary of State Elizabeth Truss is supporting the campaign to stay in the EU, the Farming Minister George Eustice says he's in favour of leaving. He explains to Anna Hill why he's backing the "out" campaign.

An organisation which has campaigned for affordable rural housing in Cumbria for the last thirty years will close next month. Caz Graham finds out why. Meanwhile Anna Hill asks rural housing expert Professor Mark Shucksmith of Newcastle University what the situation is like elsewhere in the UK.

Today the National Farmers Union's annual conference gets underway in Birmingham, the theme of which is the Future of British Farming. All this week we're asking what that might look like. In this programme Anna asks Phil Bicknell, the Head of Food and Farming at the NFU, to get his crystal ball out.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkgqv)
Carrion Crow

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Carrion Crow. The crow is defined in Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language as "a large black bird that feeds upon the carcasses of beasts." Crows have always suggested an element of foreboding. They are arch-scavengers and black mobs of them crowd our rubbish tips but they're also birds we admire for their intelligence and adaptability.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0714mbk)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b0714mbm)
Dr Nick Lane on the origin of life on earth

Dr Nick Lane is attempting to answer one of the hardest questions in science. How did life on earth begin? You might think that question had been solved by Darwin in the 19th century. He wrote that he thought life might have started on earth "in a warm little pond", where all the necessary ingredients: water, sunlight and nutrients combined in this "primordial soup" to create the very first biomolecule of life. Others - like Fred Hoyle - thought that life came to earth from elsewhere in space. But Nick Lane has different ideas of how, and where, it happened. The place in question was deep under the sea in hydrothermal vents. Amongst other research he carries out at University College London, he's running an experiment to try to recreate this moment.
Nick Lane had an unusual route to this point in his scientific career. For some years he left his research career to become a medical journalist and write popular books. A rare opportunity took him back into the laboratory.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b0714mbp)
Mark Lawson talks to Adam Mars-Jones

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture. Journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject-matter, starting with the writer and critic Adam Mars-Jones. Long admired for his fiction and criticism, Adam has just published a work of non-fiction, Kid Gloves, which describes the experience of becoming end-of-life carer to his father, a retired judge, Sir William Mars-Jones. Mark and Adam reflect on the honesty and self knowledge needed when writing about your own life.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b071x0gp)
The Other Paris

Episode 2

Paris, City of Light, the city of fine dining and seductive couture and intellectual hauteur, was until fairly recently always accompanied by its shadow - the city of the poor, the outcast, the criminal, the eccentric, the wilfully nonconforming.

In The Other Paris, Luc Sante gives us a panoramic view of that alternative metropolis, which has all but vanished but whose traces are in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of France itself and, by extension, throughout the world.

He draws on testimony from a great range of witnesses - from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and flaneurs - whose research is matched only by the vividness of Sante's narration.

"Paris, a city so beautiful that people would rather be poor there than rich somewhere else." Guy Debord.
"This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest I've ever read about Paris. Ever. " Paul Auster.

Luc Sante was born in Verviers Belgium and emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. Since 1984, he has been a teacher and writer, and frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His publications include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, The Factory of Facts and Folk Photography. He currently teaches creative writing and the history of photography at Bard College in New York State.

Writer: Luc Sante
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0714mbr)
Wendy Cope, Making a Murderer, What is a feminist novel in the 21st century?

Wendy Cope is one of Britain's bestselling contemporary poets but she is also a prose writer and her most recent book is Life, Love and the Archers. She talks to Jane about performing, writing poetry, her latest book, and the role of the Poet Laureate.

A new report by the Anti-Trafficking Monitoring Group says women who are trafficked to the UK with their children are being systematically overlooked by the UK authorities.

Making A Murderer is the critically acclaimed Netflix TV documentary series that follows the trial of Steven Avery who wrongly served 18 years for rape but was then convicted of murder. Jane talks to the writers and directors of the show.

Jane talks to Lynn Nottage, 38th winner of the prestigious Susan Smith Blackburn prize for women playwrights.

This week Radio 4 features classic feminist novels, Fear of Flying and Life and Loves of A She-Devil. We ask what makes a feminist novel today.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 Riot Girls (b0714mbt)
Fear of Flying

Episode 2

New radio dramatisation of Erica Jong's uninhibited 1973 feminist classic about female sexuality.

Isadora Wing has overcome her fear of flying to travel to Vienna with husband Bennett to attend a psychoanalysts' conference. Here she meets a charming Englishman called Adrian Goodlove. Could this be the guiltless, zipless sexual encounter she has fantasized about?

Dramatised by Annie Caulfield

Directed by Emma Harding.


TUE 11:00 Cancer Moonshot (b0714mbw)
Episode 1

President Obama in his State of the Nation address in January 2016 announced a "Moonshot" effort to beat cancer. His vice-president Joe Biden is in charge of mission control, and for Biden, it's personal - his son Beau died from brain cancer last year at the age of 46. But there's a sense of déjà-vu about this new Moonshot - President Nixon declared war on cancer in 1971.
More than 40 years later, clearly the war is still not won - but what has it achieved?

GP Dr Graham Easton tells the story of philanthropist Mary Lasker whose campaigning influenced Nixon to start his War on Cancer. He hears how the Cancer Plan brought in mathematicians and physicists who had worked on the Manhattan Project and for NASA to find cures for cancer. Curing cancer turned out to be a much harder problem than landing men on the moon.

Graham Easton looks back at the treatments available in the 1970s and asks if the War on Cancer lead to improved therapies.
In the last forty years the outlook for some cancers, such as childhood leukaemia and testicular cancer, has improved markedly, but would these developments have happened without Nixon's campaign?


TUE 11:30 Musical Variations: The Life of Angela Morley (b0714nhm)
Stuart Barr uncovers the colourful career of British composer and transgender pioneer, Angela Morley.

In 1972, Wally Stott's transition to Angela Morley made front page news. Wally was famous. He was composer for the Goon Show and Hancock's Half Hour, and music director to stars like Frankie Vaughan and Shirley Bassey. "TV Music Man changes his sex" screamed the headlines. Where would Angela go from here? Stuart talks to Angela's friends and colleagues to discover how she made her mark in the music business, as a woman and a man. And he explores the special qualities of the music she wrote and arranged, from the famous 'Hancock' tuba theme to her work alongside John Williams on blockbusters like Star Wars and Superman.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0713nzn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 One to One (b04n31vy)
Nihal Talks Dogs

Broadcaster and DJ Nihal owns a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, a breed that is often perceived as a 'dangerous dog', though they are legal.

In the first of his two part series for One to One, Nihal meets Jordan who does have two dogs that are banned under the '1991 Dangerous Dogs Act'.

Jordan's mixed pit-bull types were taken away from him by the police as they were deemed to be 'dangerous'. He tells Nihal why he fought to keep them and how he now wants to change people's attitude towards all bull breeds.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b0714nhp)
Call You and Yours: Maternity Services

Call You & Yours today would like you to tell us your experience of maternity services in the UK. A review commissioned by NHS England today sets out what can be done to keep babies and mothers safe. The numbers of babies who die in England has fallen in recent years, but at more than 4 stillbirths per 1000 births, rates in England remain higher than in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland - and higher than in other European countries, including Germany, Sweden and Spain.

Email the programme to tell us what happened to you. The address is Youandyours@bbc.co.uk. Or call 03700 100 444 after 11am Tuesday 23rd February.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0713nzq)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0714nhr)
The chief inspector of schools in England tells us there's a growing North / South divide in secondary education. We also hear from a leading Liverpool politician.

David Cameron says the vote on the EU is a far bigger decision than the general election. We talk to the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Theresa Villiers, who is campaigning for the UK to leave, about the impact on the economy and on Northern Ireland.

Hugh Sykes reports on the whether India's BJP government is doing enough to combat religious intolerance.


TUE 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b0714nht)
Jamsetji Tata: Swadeshi Capitalist

Professor Sunil Khilnani explores the life and legacy of the industrialist Jamsetji Tata, one of a series of remarkable individuals who have made India what it is today. Tata played a vitally important role in establishing India's manufacturing base and went on to create the conditions for the country's future industrial development. Tata companies now constitute around five per cent of India's gross domestic product from hotels to power generation and IT. In the days of empire, the British dreamed of 'making the world England'; Tata helped to make the world more Indian.

Listeners can catch up with the series and see the list of remarkable Indians featured on the Radio 4 website.
Producer: Mark Savage
Readings: Sagar Arya.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07143dv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Riot Girls (b0717q6v)
Emma

Second of three new plays charting British feminism through three generations of women. By Lucy Catherine. Today's drama is the story of an ambitious young career woman, whose idealism is challenged when she encounters the seedier side of politics in the 1990s.

Emma is now in her twenties and, despite her unsettled childhood, has soared academically and is now a policy advisor to New Labour. She's on course to career success and, she believes, to changing the world. But when she catches the attention of senior party figure, Mac, she has to contend with regressive attitudes to women in the workplace.

Director.....Emma Harding
Producer.....Abigail le Fleming.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b0714nhw)
Tom Holland and guests discuss the stories that are Making History

Tom is joined by Professor Marjory Harper from the University of Aberdeen and Dr Elizabeth Shlala from Harvard.

With Syria in turmoil and its largest city battered, Tom Holland is joined by Philip Mansel and Professor Jerry Brotton to discover an age when this place was a cosmopolitan cornerstone of the Middle East.

Helen Castor treks west to find out how men and women tamed the wilderness of North America both on the ground and in popular culture. She talks to Dr Karen Jones from the University of Kent.

Social historian Juliet Gardiner shares her favourite year from history - 1936.

And Dr Catherine Fletcher from the University of Swansea discusses the new breed of "hashtag historians".

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b0714nhy)
The City That Fell into the Earth

How do you move a city? Lesley Riddoch travels to Arctic Sweden to find out. Kiruna is gradually sliding into Europe's biggest iron ore mine. The city has to be rebuilt two miles away. That requires an extraordinary blend of planning, architecture, technology and stoicism. If anyone can do it then it's the Swedes.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b0714nj0)
Talking or Texting?

We take it for granted that we can maintain our friendships and family relationships now in so many ways: phone, voicemail, email, text, instant message, Facebook, Skype.. but do we have any idea of the effects of these very different modes of communication? Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright look at research into their emotional impact.
Leslie Seltzer is Research Associate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and has tested the differing effects of a hug, a phone call and a text between mothers and daughters.
Dr Mirca Madianou is Reader in Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her research is into mothers from the Philippines who've come to work in the UK and then try to look after their children back home by Skype. What works best for families living on different sides of the world?
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07178g6)
David Greig and Natalie Haynes

Natalie Haynes and David Greig join Harriett Gilbert to discuss favourite books.

Writer and broadcaster Natalie Haynes reveals her love of the Classics through her choice of 'The Lost Books of the Odyssey' by Zachary Mason, which describes itself as 'forty-four variations on the story of Odysseus'. The eponymous hero, liar and storyteller has familiar and repeated encounters with the Cylops and the Sirens; he travels to Troy and back to Ithaca, but there's always a twist in the telling in this magical first book written by a computer scientist Mason.

David Greig is a playwright and the recently-appointed Artistic Director at the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh. He recommends 'A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again' by David Foster Wallace, a series of dazzling, clever and funny 'essays and arguments' about American life and culture.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


TUE 17:00 PM (b071g8lk)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713nzs)
Radio 4 1800 23.02.2016

Junior doctors in England have announced three further strikes after ministers said they would impose new contracts on them. The BMA says it will take government to court.


TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b05w000p)
Series 10

My Companion

In his continuing quest for somewhere to live, Ed finds himself living in an empty phoneshop, the occupation of which the council hopes will encourage the stakeholders to engage with their creativity. Far from enticing people in to attend 'slam poetry events' Ed has other things on his mind when he and his ex-wife Janet decide to attend the funeral of an old friend - together. Their children are not happy at this prospect, and neither is Elgar when he's left at a cattery called 'Southpaws'.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.

Produced by Dawn Ellis.

Ed Reardon's Week is a BBC Radio Comedy production.

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07178g9)
Josh swiftly sorts the problem with the egg-mobile that Toby spotted yesterday. Toby tries to gather information from Josh about Pip's relationship, and Josh reports that she's pining over Matthew. The Fairbrothers invite Josh to help them move Lilian out of the Dower House, but he must revise.
Ruth scolds Josh for neglecting his revision. Pip's texting Matthew every detail of life at Brookfield, while the new cows are skittish at the milking. After several attempts, Ruth, Pip and Josh finally have some success with them. But how long is it going to take to milk them all?
Jennifer drives an anxious Phoebe to college for an exam. Jennifer and Lilian discuss the Fairbrothers, and Lilian gets the impression they're helping her move because they're short of money. Jenny lends a hand as well. Later, Lilian tells the Fairbothers about her arrangements with Justin, her new tenant and boss. Toby points out that Justin was the owner of a farm that went bust, which Lilian refutes. Lilian reminisces about her life and loves as the Dower House is emptied around her. She will be seventy next year. She feels that is "awfully late" to be making a fresh start.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b071fv0f)
Churchill's Secret, Artist Jonathan Yeo, King Jack, Author Clare Morrall

Churchill's Secret is a feature-length ITV drama that examines a period of illness in Winston Churchill's life as prime minister in the 1950s. Political Biographer Sonia Purnell reviews it for us.

British artist Jonathan Yeo discusses his new portrait of Kevin Spacey as President Francis Underwood in the TV drama series House of Cards, as he unveils the painting at the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC

Set in small town America, new film King Jack, follows a fifteen year old boy, troubled by bullies, and forced to look after his young cousin over a seemingly endless summer weekend. Tim Robey reviews this coming-of-age tale.

Clare Morrall talks about her latest novel When the Floods Came. The book is a departure for the previously Man Booker shortlisted writer, as it's a set in a dystopian Britain ravaged by disease and flooding.

Cinematographer Douglas Slocombe has died age 103. Matthew Sweet tells us how he made films like Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Italian Job and Raiders Of The Lost Ark so special.

Presenter : Samira Ahmed
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


TUE 19:45 Riot Girls (b0714mbt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07178gc)
Dementia: What Do We Know?

It's estimated there are around 620,000 people in England with dementia. Prime minister David Cameron says fighting the disease is a personal priority and doctors in England have been encouraged to proactively identify people with early stage dementia.

The PM says that an early diagnosis allows families to prepare for the care of a relative, but others argue there's no treatment for such a diagnosis and no robust evidence to justify a process that might lead to harm. Deborah Cohen hears from doctors who are concerned the drive to raise diagnosis rates is leading to people being misdiagnosed.

The Government has also pledged millions of pounds to help make England "the best place in the world to undertake research into dementia and other neuro-degenerative diseases". Scientists leading the research say they are making progress to find tests which could identify people at risk from the disease and develop a cure. But other researchers say money is being wasted because current directions in drug development are following the same path as those of the past which have ended in failure.

Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0713nzw)
The Thomas Pocklington Trust

A sheltered-accommodation block for blind people run by The Thomas Pocklington Trust is due to close. It's the third residential scheme that the charity has shut. We speak to the residents affected by the closure of Pocklington Court in Roehampton, south-west London, and ask the Deputy CEO of the charity, Keith Valentine, why they've made this decision and what will happen next.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b071fs79)
Charles Bonnet syndrome, Co-proxamol, Meningitis B vaccine, Smart tablets

Up to half a million people in the UK could have it, but it's a condition that hardly anybody has heard about: Charles Bonnet Syndrome.
It happens to people who are losing their sight through age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, diabetic eye problems or glaucoma. They see vivid and often frightening visual hallucinations and these images are soundless. Judith Potts' mother Esme was in her 90's when she eventually admitted to her daughter that she was seeing frightening images of goblins and Victorian children all around her. Judith had never heard of the condition and as she tells Dr Mark Porter, neither had any of the health professionals taking care of her mother. Shocked that there was so little awareness about something that is so common, she set up an awareness group, Esme's Umbrella. Dr Dominic Ffytche, Clinical Senior Lecturer at King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry and an expert in visual hallucinations, tells Mark that a key area of research is why some people have Charles Bonnet Syndrome and others don't.

Co-proxamol, or Distalgesic as it's better known, was a common drug for mild to moderate pain in the 1990's. But a decade ago, a review by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) decided that it wasn't a good painkiller and it had very worrying side effects. Its licence was withdrawn and doctors were urged to switch patients onto different medication (although it could still be prescribed on a "named patient" basis). Dr Andrew Green, Chair of the Clinical and Prescribing arm of the GP committee of the British Medical Association tells Mark he's disturbed that nearly ten years after the licence was withdrawn, thousands of patients are still being prescribed co-proxamol at a high cost to the NHS while Bedfordshire GP Dr John Lockley defends continued and careful prescribing for a tiny number of patients who can't get relief from other medication.

In a week in which hundreds of thousands of people have signed a petition calling for more children to receive the Meningitis B vaccine, Dr Margaret McCartney talks to Mark about the tricky decisions involved in planning immunisation programmes.

Traditional bedside paper charts, which record and monitor patients' vital signs, have been replaced in Oxford hospitals with smart PC tablets. Clinical staff enter patients' blood pressure, heart rate and temperature on the tablet and the new "smart" system provides an early warning traffic light system, alerting them if there's a deterioration in the patient's condition. This means clinicians can prioritise care and another major bonus is that the same information is available, at the touch of a button, to medical staff across Oxford's hospitals. The project is called SEND - System for Electronic Notification and Documentation - and it's a collaboration between the University of Oxford and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Mark goes to Oxford and with intensive care consultant and SEND Project Leader Dr Peter Watkinson, sees how the new paperless system is working.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b0714mbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0713nzy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b071fs7f)
Obama vows to close Guantanamo

President Obama says he has a plan for closing down the Guantanamo - we speak to William Lietzau, the Pentagon architect of the 'detention facility'. Also Charles Lister on the Syria truce, the story of the girl who wanted to be a boy and what do people in Grimsby make of the Sacha Baren Cohen film?
Picture: President Barack Obama speaks in the White House in Washington (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais).


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07178gg)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 7

The new novel by Meg Rosoff, read by Rhashan Stone. It's the story of a young man, Jonathan Trefoil who - aided by his canine companions Dante the collie and Sissy the spaniel - is struggling to navigate the responsibilities of adulthood and the demands of his new life in New York.

After his breakdown at work, Jonathan wakes up in hospital to discover that he's unable to form coherent sentences, generating random text instead. Neurologists are baffled by his case and there's little they can do except recommend strict bed rest. Julie is left responsible for the dogs and, during one of their walks, has a fateful meeting with a tall dark stranger.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b07142ls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b071gc06)
Sean Curran hears angry words from the foreign secretary at Russia's role in Syria. Why the police are cautious about giving apologies. And a Conservative calls for compassion over cuts.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 24 FEBRUARY 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0713p0s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b071x0gp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713p0v)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713p0x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713p0z)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0713p11)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072jslc)
Reflection and prayer with writer and broadcaster, Anna Magnusson.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b071ftsn)
NFU Conference

Farming Today reports from the annual conference of the National Farmers Union. Charlotte Smith talks to the Secretary of State of the Environment about her opinions on a possible British exit from the EU, and finds out what farmers think of her views.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx2qh)
Pied Wagtail

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Pied Wagtail. In winter, pied wagtails can often be seen roosting in towns and cities in large flocks. By day, pied wagtails are often obvious in fields feeding on insects but they're equally at home on our streets gleaning prey from pavements and road surfaces.


WED 06:00 Today (b071ftsq)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b07179c0)
Janet Ellis, Nina Myskow, Charles Foster, Sarah Kendall

Libby Purves meets veterinarian and barrister Charles Foster; presenter and writer Janet Ellis; journalist Nina Myskow and comedian Sarah Kendall.

Sarah Kendall is an award-winning comedian and writer. Born in Newcastle, New South Wales in Australia, she is a regular cast member of Clare in the Community on BBC Radio 4 and a frequent guest on the Now Show. A Day in October, her new show, takes audiences back to a pool party she attended in 1990 with disastrous consequences. Sarah Kendall: A Day in October is at the Soho Theatre, London.

Charles Foster is a writer, traveller, veterinarian and barrister. A keen naturalist, his new book explores what it's like to be a beast: a badger, an otter, a deer, a fox and a swift He lived life as a badger for six weeks, sleeping in a dirt hole and eating earth worms, he came face to face with shrimps as he lived like an otter and he spent hours curled up in a back garden in East London and rooting around bins like an urban fox. Being a Beast is published by Profile Books.

Janet Ellis is a television presenter, actor and writer who is best known for presenting the children's television programmes Blue Peter and Jigsaw. A former actor, she recently attended a creative writing course and her first novel, The Butcher's Hook, is a gothic thriller set in Georgian London. The Butcher's Hook is published by Two Roads.

Nina Myskow is a journalist and former editor of Jackie magazine which launched in 1964. She's editor-in-chief of Jackie the Musical which starts touring in March. Jackie the Musical revisits the heady days of the 1970s and 1980s, and tells the story of a 50-something divorcée who revisits her stash of well-thumbed Jackie magazines for the same reason she first read them nearly 40 years ago - advice on how best to navigate the opposite sex. Jackie the Musical previews at the Gardyne Theatre in Dundee before touring the UK.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b071x0v1)
The Other Paris

Episode 3

Paris, City of Light, the city of fine dining and seductive couture and intellectual hauteur, was until fairly recently always accompanied by its shadow - the city of the poor, the outcast, the criminal, the eccentric, the wilfully nonconforming.

In The Other Paris, Luc Sante gives us a panoramic view of that alternative metropolis, which has all but vanished but whose traces are in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of France itself and, by extension, throughout the world.

He draws on testimony from a great range of witnesses - from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and flaneurs - whose research is matched only by the vividness of Sante's narration.

"Paris, a city so beautiful that people would rather be poor there than rich somewhere else." Guy Debord.
"This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest I've ever read about Paris. Ever. " Paul Auster.

Luc Sante was born in Verviers Belgium and emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. Since 1984, he has been a teacher and writer, and frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His publications include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, The Factory of Facts and Folk Photography. He currently teaches creative writing and the history of photography at Bard College in New York State.

Writer: Luc Sante
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071ftss)
The life of a dancer in today's Moulin Rouge

Many years ago, author Bee Rowlatt used to be a showgirl - a professional dancer in nightclubs. She takes her friend and mentor Debbie Gills to the Moulin Rouge to find out what life as a showgirl is like today.

Between one and four percent of dads develop depression in the first year of their child's life and it's even higher if their partner's experience post natal depression. Raj shares his experience and Dr Alain Gregoire, a Perinatal Psychiatrist looks at the causes and why men are less likely to ask for help. Plus a look at what's on offer to support new fathers.

Abigail Hollick, has been visiting various cities around the country compiling a series for us called 'Women in One'. She approaches women in the street and asks them personal questions about their love life, childhood, regrets and dream. Today we hear from the first woman she met when she spent some time in Abergavenny

An estimated 41,300 three year olds are missing out on their free early education according to the latest survey from he Family and Childcare Trust. Jenni talks to their e Director of Programmes and External Affairs, Ellen Broome about what more needs to be done to ensure every child has a place.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


WED 10:41 Riot Girls (b07179c2)
Fear of Flying

Episode 3

New dramatisation of Erica Jong's seminal 1973 novel about female sexuality.

Poet Isadora Wing is in Vienna, where she keeps travelling between the beds of her husband Bennett and her new lover, the charming Englishman, Adrian Goodlove. But can Adrian offer the perfect, guiltless, zipless sexual encounter she's always fantasized about?

CAST

Isadora Wing.....Julianna Jennings
Bennett Wing.....Kevin Shen
Adrian Goodlove.....Max Bennett
Isadora's mother.....Adie Allen
Marty.....Nick Underwood
Judy.....Nicola Ferguson
Dr Reuben.....Sargon Yelda
Dr Happe.....Brian Protheroe

Dramatised by Annie Caulfield

Directed by Emma Harding.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07179c4)
Isobel and James - Memories of Mum

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between young siblings about their mother who died suddenly 5 years ago and the sometimes surprising things they love about their stepmother. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Verdun - The Sacred Wound (b07179qw)
Loss and Legacy

How do you mark the sacrifice of so many? How do you live with the dead? No other battle so defined the French experience of the Great War as Verdun, which raged from February to October 1916, and didn't truly end until the war did. In the decades that followed both the voices of the veterans and a nation's mournful sense of sacrifice played out across the landscape of Verdun, most notably in its alarming and astonishing ossuary.

This great white tower, resembling a crusaders sword or a giant, bone white, I.C.B.M. filled with the remains of German & French dead, stands amidst the garden of memory that is the national cemetery. Yet the graves are unquiet. This was where Marshall Petain, saviour of Verdun, should have been buried but can never be. Both Petain and DeGaulle were marked by Verdun and their fates would be intertwined in the inter-war years. In the 1930s German and French veterans would meet and pledge no more war but such pledges were hollow promises cynically exploited by veteran trench soldier Adolf Hitler who would soon sacrifice his own troops in a battle often likened to Verdun, Stalingrad.

The battle and its memory have shifted in meaning over the decades, moving from national to trans-national and proving the most symbolic of staging grounds for amity and understanding between two old foes as they remade Europe after 1945.
David Reynolds stands in the shadow of the great Ossuary of Douaumont and journeys through a landscape of loss.

Producer: Mark Burman.


WED 11:30 Reluctant Persuaders (b06d2lz5)
Series 1

The Best A Man Can Get

Things are getting desperate for the staff of Hardacre's, London's worst advertising agency. The work isn't coming in and accounts chief Amanda Brook finds herself reduced to pleading for the business of old friend/nemesis, India.

Back at the office, hopeless creative team Joe and Teddy devise a campaign for an anti-aging cream for men. Worse, they must grapple with the most difficult and least glamorous form of advertising of all - radio work.

They find themselves unexpectedly assisted by creative director Rupert Hardacre who descends from on high at Amanda's instruction to give the little people the benefit of his creative wisdom. The only trouble is, he seems to have forgotten most of it. Fortunately, he wrote it all down in a book entitled Hardacre on Advertising and he sets out to find a copy for Joe and Teddy.

Rupert Hardacre ..... Nigel Havers
Amanda Brook ..... Josie Lawrence
Joe ..... Matthew Baynton
Teddy ..... Rasmus Hardiker

Director: Alan Nixon
Producer: Gordon Kennedy

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015


WED 12:00 News Summary (b0713p13)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 One to One (b039px7s)
Carolyn Quinn speaks to Stephanie Slater

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives?

In this first interview, she speaks to Stephanie Slater, who survived a violent kidnapping in 1992. Michael Sams, later also convicted of murdering Julie Dart, held Stephanie for eight days. Following her release, she and her family were besieged by the media who camped in the field opposite her parents' house for 18 months. In this interview Carolyn finds out what impact the experience and subsequent media attention had on Stephanie as she attempted to come to terms with her ordeal, and rebuild her life.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b071fstt)
Cost of childcare, Seabass, Outlet shopping

New figures out today from the Family and Childcare Trust reveal that in ten local authorities in England there are only five childminders for every thousand children under five. Over the past five years, one in six child minders in England has left the profession and the cost of employing one has increased by a quarter. The government introduced childminder agencies in 2014, to try and encourage more people in to the profession, but to date the scheme hasn't taken off. It all means less choice for parents and contributes to the rising cost of childcare. We hear from parents, a newly registered childminder, and the Head of Research at the Family and Childcare Trust.

Stocks of wild Seabass are now so low that the Marine Conservation Society says we should stop buying and eating it. The European Commission has brought in emergency measures to curb commercial and recreational fishing of Seabass in the UK, but not everyone believes it'll solve the problem. Our reporter Shari Vahl travels to the coasts of Britain to investigate.

With Vodafone now the most complained about mobile operator in the UK, according the Ofcom, we look at the case of one customer who was charged £18,000 for one day of data roaming whilst in Moldova. Why is data roaming so expensive, and is there any more regulators and governments can do to bring down the cost?

PRODUCER: Alex Burton

PRESENTER: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0713p15)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b071ftsv)
Is David Cameron's EU deal legally binding? Not according to his own Justice Secretary, Michael Gove. We get the view of one former Judge at the European Court of Justice.

In his first interview since the Prime Minister announced a renegotiation deal we speak to Lord Hill, the UK's EU Commissioner.


WED 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b0717b5l)
Vivekananda: Bring All Together

Sunil Khilnani explores the life and work of Swami Vivekananda, a social and religious reformer who became India's first global guru, credited with introducing yoga to the west.

Vivekananda was a restless, baby-faced monk from Calcutta. And his image - arms defiantly folded, soft features hardened by a Napoleonic gaze - can be found all over that city today - on t-shirts, murals, posters and sculptures. It's a ubiquity that is testament to both his contemporary influence - and to the way his essential message has been transformed.

In his lifetime, Vivekananda was a reformer who insisted that Hinduism's moral force rested on its capacity to meet society's practical needs. In order to meet those needs Vivekananda established the Ramakrishna Mission, which had no precedent among Indian religious institutions, and continues all across the country as a dispenser of education, health and social welfare.

But despite his practical, critical, universalist thinking, Vivekananda has today become one of Hindu nationalism's leading spiritual lights.

Featuring Pratap Bhanu Mehta, president of the Delhi-based Centre for Policy Research.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b07178g9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Riot Girls (b0717pgp)
Katy

Third of three plays charting feminism through three generations of women. Set in 2015, Ella Hickson's play is the unflinching story of a young student's determination to make a stand on issues of consent and sexual violence. When traditional campaigning proves ineffective, she's tempted to compromise her own principles.

Directed by Emma Harding
Produced by Abigail le Fleming.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b071fstw)
Money Box Live: Self-Employment

Self-employment is at a record high, according to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics. 4.66m people work for themselves, making up 15% of the workforce.

Perhaps you're one of them.

Let us know what it's like to be self-employed. E mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Or ring 03 700 100 444 on Wednesday from 1pm.

Do you feel you get enough support, advice, protection from the State, financial institutions, the law?

A recent Government-commissioned report recommended extending state support to include starting or extending a family, increasing the flexibility and availability of mortgages, pensions and insurance, as well as introducing clarity over a legal definition of 'self-employed'. What do you think?

And what does the boom in self-employment say about our economy or how we value our workers? Is it sustainable? Get in touch.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b071fs79)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0717b5n)
Refusing adulthood, How young people feel about being poor

Refusing adulthood. Laurie Taylor talks to Susan Neiman, the American moral philosopher, who asks, if and why, some people refuse to grow up. She argues that being an adult allows the opportunity for agency and independence rather than signalling decline. Yet a modern tendency to idolise youth prevents us from seeing the rewards of maturity. They're joined by the writer, Michael Bywater, who wonders if we inhabit a culture of creeping infantilisation.

Also, how children and young people feel about being poor. Rys Farthing, social policy researcher, explores how young people living in low-income neighbourhoods feel about their own lives, using data generated as part of a participatory policy project with five groups of young people, aged 11-21.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b071fsh1)
Press Awards women nominees, Lord Best on BBC inquiry, Trinity Mirror's The New Day

The shortlist for the Press Awards 2015 has been unveiled and includes just 20 women, among a total of 114 journalists. The lack of women shortlisted has caused anger amongst some journalists - in response, an alternative awards ceremony 'Words By Women' has been set up, with Kay Burley of Sky News and Lisa Markwell, Editor of the Independent on Sunday on the judging panel. Joining Steve to discuss the representation and recognition of women in journalism are Marie Le Conte, journalist & co-founder of the awards, plus judge columnist Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, and Bob Satchwell, Executive Director of the Society of Editors & the Press Awards Chair of Judges.

Publisher Trinity Mirror is launching a new 'optimistic' and 'politically neutral' national newspaper next week. 'The New Day' will be an entirely new paper, not a sister-title or 'Daily Mirror-light' - making it the first standalone newspaper to be launched for around 30 years. Steve Hewlett talks to editor Alison Phillips about the editorial slant of the publication and how they hope to reverse the declines other papers are facing.

The House of Lords Communications Committee says the scale and scope of the BBC should not be cut back. The report, 'Reith not Revolution' - the title of which refers to Lord Reith, whose principles for broadcasting are at the heart of the corporation - follows an eight month inquiry. Steve Hewlett talks to cross party chair of the Committee Lord Best about the findings, the recommendations, and suggested changes the BBC could make.
Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b071g8x0)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713p17)
Rotherham gang jailed for abusing teenage girls.


WED 18:30 Chain Reaction (b0717cpt)
Series 11

Ed Byrne interviews Al Murray

Two heavyweights of stand-up are in conversation as Ed Byrne interviews Al Murray.

Ed tackles Al on a vast array of topics from Thackeray's attitude to the Irish to the thorny issue of offence in comedy via how best to talk to McFly.

Ed Byrne is an Irish stand-up comedian and actor who has been a favourite on the international comedy scene for 20 years. His celebrated observational routines made him a leading light of the UK stand-up circuit in the mid nineties and he went on to tour internationally, playing festivals and theatres across the world. In 1998 he was nominated for the prestigious Perrier Award at the Edinburgh Festival alongside eventual winner Tommy Tiernan, Peter Kay and Al Murray.

After an early foray into stand-up as a character called 'The Murderer', Al Murray created his famous Pub Landlord character in the mid nineties as part of a touring show with Harry Hill. The Pub Landlord went on to tour venues and festivals worldwide before making his own chat show and sitcom for Sky. Outside of the Pub Landlord, Al is well known as a presenter of history documentaries and stood against Nigel Farage in South Thanet during the 2015 UK General Election.

Chain Reaction is the long running hostless chat show where this week's interviewee becomes next week's interviewer.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0717cpw)
Eddie's building a shepherd's hut for Lynda. He insists to Clarrie that it isn't wonky, it's rustic. Ed's delighted that the Grundys are back at Grange Farm. However, he is worried that he is not allowed to take cattle on, due to his tenancy agreement. Adam encourages him to talk to Oliver about the terms of their tenancy. Johnny talks to Adam about his love of modern farming, which reminds Adam of a certain someone.
Ursula and Helen assess the midwife they met yesterday, whose advice seemed rather out-dated to Helen. Ursula suggests going back to basics at the birth. She and Rob think the baby should be born at home. Although Ursula defends the NHS, she reveals she does not like hospital births because her elder son nearly died. By contrast, she describes having Rob at home as "joyful". Henry's boisterous when he gets in from school, which takes Helen aback. It's down to the chocolate Ursula keeps giving him. Helen's confused because the midwives are saying one thing about the birth, and Ursula another. Rob says that Helen must do what she wants to do.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b071fsty)
Grimsby, Dominic Dromgoole, Poems that Make Grown Women Cry

Sacha Baron Cohen plays a football hooligan and Mark Strong his brother, a top spy, in the new action comedy film Grimsby. Quentin Cooper reviews.

Shakespeare's Globe's outgoing artistic director Dominic Dromgoole looks back over his tenure and discusses his final production, The Tempest.

After Poems That Make Grown Men Cry, Anthony Holden has now collected Poems That Make Grown Women Cry. In it, women from various walks of life select poems that move them to tears, and explain why. Holden discusses the similarities and differences between the two volumes, and is joined by Joan Bakewell and Elif Shafak who reveal their choices.

Mick Herron discusses his new novel Real Tigers, a thriller which takes place behind the scenes at Britain's Security Service.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 Riot Girls (b07179c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b0717cpy)
Who Owns Culture?

It may not have the same impact as the Elgin Marbles, but a slightly battered bronze statue of a cockerel has re-ignited a row that has potentially profound implications for our museums and opens a Pandora's Box of moral dilemmas. The statue in question sits in the dining hall of Jesus College Cambridge, but it was originally from the Benin Empire, now part of modern-day Nigeria. It was one of hundreds of artworks taken in a punitive British naval expedition in 1897 that brought the empire to an end. In the same way that Greece has pursued the return of the Elgin marbles, Nigeria has repeatedly called for all the Benin bronzes - which it says are part of its cultural heritage - to be repatriated. The students at Jesus agree with them and are demanding the cockerel be returned. But to whom? There are dozens of high profile campaigns around the world to repatriate cultural artefacts, but the legal issue of rightful ownership is complex and made more so by the value of the objects in question. Does the fact that many of the finest treasures in our museums were acquired during the height of our imperial history mean we're duty bound to return them? If we accept the principle that art looted by the Nazi's should be returned, why not, for example, the Benin Bronzes? Artefacts like the Elgin Marbles are important because they are part of the story or humanity itself. Can any one country claim ownership over that? Would artefacts that have been returned to their original setting take on a new and more authentic cultural meaning that we in the West may not be able to understand, but which is nonetheless important to those who claim ownership? Should repatriation be part of a wider cultural enterprise to re-write our national and imperialistic historical narrative? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips and Michael Portillo. Witnesses are Dr Tiffany Jenkins, Prof Constantine Sandis, Mark Hudson and Andrew Dismore.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b0717cq0)
The City

The Lent Talks are a series of essays on the different perspectives of the passion story. The location for this week's "Lent in the Landscape" talk is the iconic brick-built Victorian Gothic "All Saints Church" just behind Oxford Street in London. Maxwell reflects on Jesus' arrival in Jerusalem and his confrontation at the Temple. Producer: Amanda Hancox.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b0714nhy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b07179c0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b071fsh3)
Exclusive: 250,000 people 'at risk' of losing money in workplace pensions

World Tonight investigation into workplace pensions: One expert tells us that a quarter of a million people could lose their hard earned cash.
Bahrain's candidate for FIFA Presidency is mired in a human rights scandal ahead of Friday's vote
and why an increasing number of Asian families are using marriage detectives.

(Picture: Farmer Paul Rinder, worried about the workplace pension scheme. Credit - BBC).


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0717cq2)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 8

The new novel by Meg Rosoff, read by Rhashan Stone. It's the story of a young man, Jonathan Trefoil who - aided by his canine companions Dante the collie and Sissy the spaniel - is struggling to navigate the responsibilities of adulthood and the demands of his new life in New York.

Jonathan and Julie's wedding day arrives. With her employer Bridal-360 organising everything (including live-streaming the ceremony to an audience of 100,000 viewers) and Jonathan still unable to form coherent sentences, what could possibly go wrong?

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 23:00 The Literary Adventures of Mr Brown (b0717dlt)
Episode 1

Imagine if London's genteel literary scene had a bit more swag and a gangsta's lean. You've just imagined The Literary Adventures of Mr. Brown.

With the help of his naively affable intern, Charlie, the heroic, absurd and frankly bad-ass Kurtis Brown fights for his clients in London's entertainment industry.

When you need your fights fought and your books bought, who are you going to call? The best damn literary agent in the world, Kurtis Brown. He'll solve all your problems...for 15%.

Written and performed by Chris Gau and Mike Orton-Toliver.

Performer: Lola-Rose Maxwell

Producer: Zoe Rocha
Executive Producer: Ralf Little

A Little Rock production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2016.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b03yqcx7)
Series 1

Episode 6

A new series starring Paul Whitehouse and Esther Coles, with Rosie Cavaliero, Simon Day, Cecilia Noble and Marcia Warren.

The series follows Elizabeth, a Community Psychiatric Nurse in her forties, into the homes of her patients (or Service Users in today's jargon). It recounts their humorous, sad and often bewildering daily interactions with the nurse, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense their medication and offer comfort and support.

Compassionate and caring, Elizabeth is aware that she cannot cure her patients, only help them manage their various conditions. She visits the following characters throughout the series:

Lorrie and Maurice: Lorrie, in her fifties, is of Caribbean descent and has schizophrenia. Lorrie's life is made tolerable by her unshakeable faith in Jesus, and Maurice, who has a crush on her and wants to do all he can to help. So much so that he ends up getting on everyone's nerves.

Billy: Billy feels safer in jail than outside, a state of affairs the nurse is trying to rectify. She is hampered by the ubiquitous presence of Billy's mate, Tony.

Graham: in his forties, is morbidly obese due to an eating disorder. Matters aren't helped by his mum 'treating' him to sugary and fatty snacks at all times.

Ray: is bipolar and a rock and roll survivor from the Sixties. It is not clear how much of his 'fame' is simply a product of his imagination.

Phyllis: in her seventies, has Alzheimer's. She is sweet, charming and exasperating. Her son Gary does his best but if he has to hear 'I danced for the Queen Mum once' one more time he will explode.

Herbert is an old school gentleman in his late Seventies. Herbert corresponds with many great literary figures unconcerned that they are, for the most part, dead.

Nurse is written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings, who have collaborated many time in the past, including on The Fast Show, Down the Line and Happiness.

Written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings with additional material from Esther Coles
Producers: Paul Whitehouse and Tilusha Ghelani
A Down the Line production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b071gc7y)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster as Prime Minister's Question Time turns into a row about mothers. MPs and Peers complain that the financial deal between the UK and Scottish Parliaments is unfair to the rest of the UK. And officials tell a Commons Committee that corruption isn't rife in tennis. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



THURSDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0713p2h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b071x0v1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713p2k)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713p2m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713p2p)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0713p2r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072nlk2)
Reflection and prayer with writer and broadcaster, Anna Magnusson.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b071fxc4)
The Battle Against Slugs

This morning we're looking at the battle against slugs - the scourge of farmers and gardeners across Britain. It's estimated that the humble slug munches its way through a hundred million pounds of crops every year. There are two battle fronts in the fight against the slug. In Eastern England, Anglian Water is paying farmers to use a new kind of slug killer which causes less pollution in the company's drinking water reservoirs and in Shropshire, scientists are fitting slugs with micro trackers to plot their every move.

This week we're looking at the future of farming and we hear about a new eighty million pound research centre that's opening in 2018 in Norwich. It will concentrate on new innovations in crops and food.

We also report from the National Farmers' Union Conference in Birmingham where Pembrokeshire farmer Meurig Raymond was re-elected as president. He faces another testing time in office as farmers tell us about the challenges that lie ahead. As well as fears over the 'in or out' EU Referendum, farmers are also worried about the prices of milk and grain, the future for Britain's young farmers and the chances of survival for farmers whose businesses are under pressure.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sybil Ruscoe.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5bnl)
Mute Swan

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the Mute Swan. Mute Swans are deeply embedded in our culture. They are unique among British birds because the Crown retains the rights of ownership of all unmarked mute swans in open water. Since the 15th century, an annual census of mute swans has been held annually on the River Thames.


THU 06:00 Today (b071fxc6)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b0717j1r)
Mary Magdalene

Mary Magdalene is one of the best-known figures in the Bible and has been a frequent inspiration to artists and writers over the last 2000 years. According to the New Testament, she was at the foot of the cross when Jesus was crucified and was one of the first people to see Jesus after the resurrection. However, her identity has provoked a large amount of debate and in the Western Church she soon became conflated with two other figures mentioned in the Bible, a repentant sinner and Mary of Bethany. Texts discovered in the mid-20th century provoked controversy and raised further questions about the nature of her relations with Jesus.

With:

Joanne Anderson
Lecturer in Art History at the Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London

Eamon Duffy
Emeritus Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Magdalene College

Joan Taylor
Professor of Christian Origins and Second Temple Judaism at King's College London

Producer: Victoria Brignell.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b071x1vw)
The Other Paris

Episode 4

Paris, City of Light, the city of fine dining and seductive couture and intellectual hauteur, was until fairly recently always accompanied by its shadow - the city of the poor, the outcast, the criminal, the eccentric, the wilfully nonconforming.

In The Other Paris, Luc Sante gives us a panoramic view of that alternative metropolis, which has all but vanished but whose traces are in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of France itself and, by extension, throughout the world.

He draws on testimony from a great range of witnesses - from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and flaneurs - whose research is matched only by the vividness of Sante's narration.

"Paris, a city so beautiful that people would rather be poor there than rich somewhere else." Guy Debord.
"This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest I've ever read about Paris. Ever. " Paul Auster.

Luc Sante was born in Verviers Belgium and emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. Since 1984, he has been a teacher and writer, and frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His publications include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, The Factory of Facts and Folk Photography. He currently teaches creative writing and the history of photography at Bard College in New York State.

Writer: Luc Sante
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0717gdv)
Jill Murphy; The Hemsley Sisters

2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the classic children's picture book, Five Minutes Peace by Jill Murphy. The book introduces us to a family of elephants and Mrs Large longs for a moment of quiet to read the paper in the bath. It's sold over 5 million copies worldwide and been translated into 19 languages.

Annual figures released today are expected to show a rise in the numbers of those sleeping rough. New research from the homeless charity St Mungo's looks at access to mental health support for those sleeping in the streets. They say women who are living rough are more likely than men to need support for mental health problems, and the support services available are very poor. Petra Salva from St Mungo's and Diane Cosstick from Centrepoint UK look at what lies behind this new information.

The Hemsley sisters, Jasmine and Melissa, Cook the Perfect Huevos Rancheros. Hemsley + Hemsley create recipes free of gluten, grain and sugar. Their approach to food encourages people to eat healthily and live more energised lives.

Wetting the bed can be very distressing for children and parents but it's common for five, six and seven year olds not to be dry at night. A Woman's Hour listener, talks about her son. Dry during the day from two years old but now six still wets the bed at night. Brenda Cheer a specialist continence nurse from ERIC the children's bowel and bladder charity explains the causes of night time bed wetting & how parents can help?

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


THU 10:45 Riot Girls (b0717gdx)
Fear of Flying

Episode 4

The radio premiere of Erica Jong's exuberantly uninhibited novel about a young woman's pursuit of the perfect, guiltless, zipless sexual encounter.

It's decision time. Will Isadora go back to New York with her husband, Bennett, or will she take off around Europe with her new lover, charming Englishman, Adrian Goodlove?

Dramatised by Annie Caulfield

Directed by Emma Harding.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b0713p2t)
Turkey Points the Finger

The stories behind the headlines. In this edition, we hear from Turkey, which is unhappy at US support for Kurdish fighters in Syria, who combat so-called Islamic State there, as Turkey fears the Syrian Kurds might make common cause with the Turkish Kurds. The complexities of the war in Syria are becoming mingled with those of the Turkish-Kurdish conflict. Sri Lanka suffered almost 30 years of civil war, and many an autocratic regime, yet now the country seems set on a path of reconciliation. But will a former President and his supporters try and scupper it? In Ethiopia, our correspondent faints at the sight of eyelid surgery - performed on sufferers of an infection that risks turning them blind. The Galapagos islands are home to wondrous wildlife, but there are fears that this year's seal pups might not survive the effects of the El Nino phenomenon. And Detroit, once known for its motors and recent bankruptcy, is now reinventing itself as a place that makes bicycles, and attracts crowds of hipsters.


THU 11:30 The Art of Adultery (b0717gdz)
For centuries, popular culture has been enthralled by infidelity, moving from the ancient tales of Helen of Troy and Medea through to the popularity of modern day dramas like 'The Affair' and 'Doctor Foster'; along the way, few artists of note seem to have been able to avoid its dramatic appeal, whether Chaucer in Miller's Tale, Shakespeare in 'Othello' or Tolstoy in 'Anna Karenina' and 'War and Peace'. In 'The Art of Adultery', Natalie Haynes sets out to find out what the nature of that appeal might be, and also considers whether the way the basic story of unfaithful partners tells us anything about the times and places from where the particular stories are born. Along the way, she meets author Julian Barnes to talk about his own novel 'Talking it Over' as well as attitudes to infidelity in 19th century France; she visits Tate Britain to find out how attitudes on this side of the Channel were changing during the same period; filmaker Jane Gillooly talks about her documentary 'Suitcase of Love and Shame' featuring recordings made by a straying couple for each other in 1960s America, and hears from novelist Stella Duffy about how recent changes in attitudes have affected how gay and lesbian literature has tackled the subject.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b0713p2w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 One to One (b03b0wml)
Carolyn Quinn speaks to Gillian Duffy

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives?.

In this, her second interview, Carolyn hears from the woman who hit the headlines during the general election campaign of 2010 when Gordon Brown infamously called her a "bigoted woman". That remark, and the subsequent apology from the then Prime Minister, made Gillian Duffy a household name. Three years on, Carolyn Quinn talks to Gillian Duffy to find out how she dealt with persistent doorstepping newshounds, how she regards the experience now and whether her relationship with the Labour party survived the experience.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b071fxc8)
Care home fees, Fast cars, Scottish tea

A charity for older people, Independent Age, says many families are paying over the odds for their relative's care home, because local authorities are flouting new legislation. The rules, brought in last year under the Care Act, meant that families who were eligible for local authority funded care should not have to pay extra, when their relative's care needs change. The charity says nearly half of councils in England who answered a Freedom of Information request aren't complying with the changes. As a result, some families are being charged fees to pay for basic care, that should be funded by their local authority.

The father of a young woman who was killed by a car which had reached speeds of over 100 mph, tells us that the car industry advertises cars in a way that encourages them to be driven too fast. He's calling for a ban on car adverts that promote speed and power, and has told MPs that high performance cars designed for racing should not be allowed on public roads.

In Britain we spent more than £650m on tea last year, most of it produced in China and India. But if you fancy an alternative cuppa, how about tea grown in Scotland? Some of the newest commercial tea plantations are to be found in Scotland and there's now even a Scottish Tea Growers Association.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0713p2y)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b071fxcb)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b0717gf1)
Annie Besant: An Indian Tomtom

Sunil Khilnani explores the journey of Annie Besant, from late Victorian campaigner and social reformer in England to leader of India's Congress Party.

Possessed of a self-belief some thought inappropriate for a woman, Annie Besant's struggle against convention would make her an object of ridicule to many of her compatriots. So she escaped them: embarking on a life that would ultimately stretch across three continents and leave a mark on each of them

She became a polemicist for an array of ideas that challenged the complacencies of the Victorian age: atheism, the rights of workers and of women, birth control, free speech, Fabian socialism, Irish Home Rule. She became the first woman to study for a science degree at University College, London. She organized an infamous match girls strike. She advocated for more women in local government.

By the time she was forty, critics were calling her "Red Annie" and admirers were calling her one of the most remarkable women in nineteenth-century Britain.

By the time she had reached eighty, she had become one of the most remarkable women in twentieth-century India.

Producer: Martin Williams
Executive Producer: Martin Smith

Original music composed by Talvin Singh.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0717cpw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b06fpbxf)
Cuttin' It

Charlene James' multi award-winning drama set in South London.

Winner of 'Best Single Drama' in the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2016, winner of the Alfred Fagon Award for 'Best Play' and the George Devine Award for 'Most Promising Playwright' in 2015.

Two Somali teenagers, Muna and Iqra, go to the same school. They are from the same place but they are strangers; strangers who share a secret embedded in their culture.

Producer/Director ..... Jessica Brown.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b0717j1t)
Series 32

Loughrigg Fell - Simon Ingram

Clare Balding explores Loughrigg Fell, in Cumbria with the writer and journalist, Simon Ingram. With all the passion of a convert, he explains to Clare how he became bitten by the mountain climbing bug and why he wants to pass on his obsession to anyone who'll listen. In the space of a morning they are hit with torrential rain and howling winds but nothing deters them from their walk and Simon also explains how to stay safe while enjoying the mountains of Britain, no matter what the weather.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0713rtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0713vvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0717j1w)
The Oscars, A video shop in Greenland

With Antonia Quirke.

Clare Binns and Tim Robey assess the runners and riders in this year's Academy Awards

Antonia talks to Nikolene, an Inuit in Greenland, about why her local video shop is still popular, especially in Winter, and hears from Simon Brzeskwinski, whose decision to close his video shop, Video City, in Notting Hill led to very public displays of grief.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0713p30)
UK science and the EU, Sex of organs, Artificial colon, Gorillas call when eating

Britain faces a referendum on whether to leave Europe. Science, and scientists, often cross borders in collaborations, so what would the implications be for a British exit from the EU? The House of Lords Science and Technology Committee have an ongoing inquiry into how EU membership influences British science. Inside Science condenses the pertinent points.

The stem cells that make up our organs 'know' whether they are 'male' or 'female', and that this sexual identity could influence how they grow and behave. Dr Irene Miguel-Aliaga, at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre at Imperial College London, wanted to ask a very basic question: whether it is just the cells of the sex organs of a fully developed organism that 'know' their sexual identity, or whether this is true of cells in other organs too - and whether that matters. It was previously thought that non-reproductive organs are the same in both sexes, and function differently because of the differences in circulating hormones, but her new research suggests that cells know their sex.

At Birmingham University, chemical engineers have built a working prototype of an artificial human colon, the first of its kind. The colon does the last bit of moving your food out of your body, mixing it, squeezing the last few nutrients and excess water out of it. The team want to use it to measure drug delivery to the colon.

Talking with your mouth full is an unattractive trait, but for other, non-human, great apes it is a normal part of meal time. The noises recorded by a team at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology are from the silverback Western lowland Gorilla. Primatologist Eva Luef explains that this humming and singing during meal time is a way of signalling without wasting valuable eating time.


THU 17:00 PM (b071g8yh)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713p32)
Inquiry says BBC failings allowed abuse by Jimmy Savile and Stuart Hall to go undetected


THU 18:30 Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On (b073j5cg)
Series 1

Hillwalking with Muriel Gray

Susan Calman is the least relaxed person she knows. She has no down time, no hobbies (unless you count dressing up your cats in silly outfits) and her idea of relaxation is to play Grand Theft Auto, an hour into which she is in a murderous rage with sky high blood pressure. Her wife had to threaten to divorce her to make her go on holiday last year. Her first for four years. But she's been told by the same long-suffering wife, that unless she finds a way to switch off, and soon, she's going to be unbearable.

So Susan is looking at her options to try and immerse herself in the pursuits that her friends find relaxing, to find her inner zen and outer tranquillity. Can she ditch the old Susan Calman and attempt to find the new Susan Calm?

For the first attempt, Susan tries to learn how to unwind, by going hillwalking with Muriel Gray.

Keep Calman Carry On is an audience stand up show in which Susan reports on how successful she's been - both at relaxing and at the pursuit itself - as well as playing in and discussing a handful of illustrative clips from her efforts. It's an attempt to find out how people find solace or sanctuary in these worlds and how Susan can negotiate her own place in them.

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0717j20)
Tony helps Johnny out with some last-minute revision before his Level 2 farming exam. Later, Johnny returns having passed, so it's onwards and upwards to Level 3!
Tom minds the shop alone because Rob, Helen and Henry have had another disturbed night. Pat tells Tom that Helen and Kirsty have seemingly patched things up. Although, Helen didn't return Kirsty's call on Sunday. They wonder if Ursula forgot to pass on the message. Rob apologises, telling Tom that Henry has been boisterous with fragile, pregnant Helen. Rob also reports that Henry is feeling neglected because of the new baby.
Pat cooks a roast for the family to mark Tom's birthday. Helen says Ursula has been a huge help, but she does wish she would stop hyping Henry up on chocolate. Rob turns up with the scan photo, pointing out that Helen forgot to bring it. Pat is surprised that, after the pre-eclampsia, Helen has decided to give birth at home. Rob says they talked it through and this is their decision. During the meal, Helen starts sobbing and rushes out. Rob says he will follow her but Tom insists that he goes instead. They talk about John - it is eighteen years since he died. Tom tells Helen that if she ever needs to talk, he is here.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b071fxcd)
The Maids, Tim Parks, Shetland weaving

Kirsty Lang talks to actresses Uzo Aduba, Laura Carmichael and Zawe Ashton, who are starring in Jean Genet's play The Maids.

Tim Parks discusses his new novel Thomas and Mary - A Love Story, about a middle aged couple going through a difficult time in their relationship.

Lois Walpole is an artist who has gathered nets and ropes washed up onto the shores of Shetland and woven them into baskets and sculptures for her new exhibition at Shetland Museum in Lerwick.


THU 19:45 Riot Girls (b0717gdx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b0717j22)
Jimmy Savile and the BBC

How did Jimmy Savile get away with it when so many people appear to have known so much?

Media and Arts Correspondent David Sillito tracks down former presenters, producers and BBC executives who worked with Savile. On the day that the Dame Janet Smith Review is published, some speak publicly for the first time and reveal a shocking list of missed warning signs.

Producers: Steven Wright
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight

You can find details of organisations which offer advice and support with sexual abuse by visiting bbc.co.uk/actionline.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0717j24)
Now We Are Ten

The Bottom Line first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2006. At the time, Tony Blair was Prime Minister, interest rates were 4.5%, petrol was 90 pence a litre and a first class stamp cost 32p (half today's price). In a special edition, to mark ten years since the programme came on air, Evan Davis and guests discuss some of the big changes that have happened in the past decade, including: the global recession, record high and record low oil prices, a technology boom and China's extraordinary economic growth. How have businesses adapted to the changing world?

Guests:

Nicola Horlick, CEO, Money & Co

Sir Ian Cheshire, Chairman, Debenhams

Nicola Shaw, CEO, HS1

Ken Olisa, Founder and Chairman, Restoration Partners

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0713p30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b0717j1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b071fxcg)
Row over Europe's migrant crisis

Will the influx of refugees change how people vote in the UK referendum? Image: Migrants arriving in Greece. Picture credit: Getty.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0717j26)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 9

The new novel by Meg Rosoff, author of the bestselling "How I Live Now". It's the story of a young man, Jonathan Trefoil who - assisted by his canine companions Dante the collie and Sissy the spaniel - is struggling to navigate the responsibilities of adulthood and the demands of his new life in New York.

Cured of his speech problems after being jilted at the altar by Julie, Jonathan is ready to return to work at Comrade - despite the misgivings of his friend Max and work colleague Greeley.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 23:00 Talking to Strangers (b0717j28)
Episode 4

Comic monologues in which a range of characters find themselves engaging in that most un-British of activities: talking to a stranger.

Each piece is a character study: funny, frank, absurd, moving... Characters include a sex councillor who loves to draw, a spy who loves to share, a woman who likes to help too much ('I'm a serial helpist...'), a frustrated falconer, and a cheater who has to call her cheatee the morning after. And in this show, the listener themselves 'plays' the silent stranger in the piece...

Written and performed by Sally Phillips and Lily Bevan.

With guest stars including Emma Thompson, Olivia Coleman, Jessica Hynes, Steve Evets, Sinead Matthews and Joel Fry.

Producer: Sam Bryan

A BBC Comedy Production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0717j2b)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster as MPs reveal where they stand in the European referendum debate, while they welcome moves to claim EU funds to help areas hit by flooding.
The Government defends its decision to block councils from boycotting Israeli goods, action is urged over litter and the Commons Speaker warns MPs about their behaviour.



FRIDAY 26 FEBRUARY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0713p40)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b071x1vw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0713p42)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0713p44)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0713p46)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0713p48)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b072rsrs)
Reflection and prayer with writer and broadcaster, Anna Magnusson.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b071fqfn)
Farm Safety, Rural Broadband, Pasta made from Crickets!

Dozens of people die every year while working on farms in the UK, with thousands more injured. Farming remains one of the most dangerous occupations in the country, despite many initiatives to try and make a difference. Now a hands-on course is preparing the farmers of the future for possible accidents they might encounter.

The Rural Services Network gives its reaction to Ofcom's decision to force BT to open up its cable network to competition. Will it make a real difference to rural areas where broadband is slow or non-existent?

And would you eat pasta made not from flour but from ground-up crickets? We hear about a new product being marketed by a company based in Thailand.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyj8)
Tawny Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents young Tawny Owls. Most of us know the "hoot" and "too-wit" of Tawny Owls but might be puzzled if we heard wheezing in the woods, the sound of the young.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0717jsl)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0713rtr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b071x1yy)
The Other Paris

Episode 5

Paris, City of Light, the city of fine dining and seductive couture and intellectual hauteur, was until fairly recently always accompanied by its shadow - the city of the poor, the outcast, the criminal, the eccentric, the wilfully nonconforming.

In The Other Paris, Luc Sante gives us a panoramic view of that alternative metropolis, which has all but vanished but whose traces are in the bricks and stones of the contemporary city, in the culture of France itself and, by extension, throughout the world.

He draws on testimony from a great range of witnesses - from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and flaneurs - whose research is matched only by the vividness of Sante's narration.

"Paris, a city so beautiful that people would rather be poor there than rich somewhere else." Guy Debord.
"This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest I've ever read about Paris. Ever. " Paul Auster.

Luc Sante was born in Verviers Belgium and emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. Since 1984, he has been a teacher and writer, and frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. His publications include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, The Factory of Facts and Folk Photography. He currently teaches creative writing and the history of photography at Bard College in New York State.

Writer: Luc Sante
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Reader: Simon Russell Beale

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b071fnw4)
Lindsay Duncan; The Savile Review; Aoife Duffin

Lindsay Duncan joins Jenni to discuss her role as Clementine Churchill in a new TV drama.

Jimmy Savile Review. Following the publication of Dame Janet Smith's review into the BBC's culture and practices during the Jimmy Savile and Stuart Hall years we hear the response from a Savile survivor and from Nicole Westmarland Professor of Criminology at Durham University. Why is it so difficult to report abuse in large organisations like the BBC, what is the impact of a "macho culture" identified by Dame Janet Smith and what lessons can be learned?

Do you have just too much to do? Do you live in a blur of meetings, deadlines and appointments? In an extract from Late Night Woman's Hour to be broadcast tonight we hear about the drastic measures taken by two women to gain control of their lives.
And the actor Aoife Duffin currently performing in a Girl is A Half-formed Thing at the Young Vic.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Caroline Donne.


FRI 10:45 Riot Girls (b0717jsn)
Fear of Flying

Episode 5

Erica Jong's frank and funny 1973 novel about female sexuality.

Isadora Wing has left her husband, Bennett, and run off with her new lover, Adrian Goodlove, to tour the campsites of Europe. But will this new relationship provide the sexual liberation and fulfilment she's always fantasised about?

Dramatised by Annie Caulfield

Directed by Emma Harding.


FRI 11:00 Six Degrees of Connection (b0717kvf)
Is everyone in the world really connected by only six links? A famous experiment by social psychologist Stanley Milgram in the 1960s claimed that it took on average only six steps for a message to pass between two strangers in America. Since then the idea has become part of popular culture. But is it true? And if so, does it matter? Julia Hobsbawm investigates how social networks work, whether we should all pay more attention to our network connections, and whether governments can use social networks to promote - for instance - messages about health. Maybe, she discovers, it's not the six degrees of separation that matter, but the three degrees of influence.

Presenter: Julia Hobsbawm
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


FRI 11:30 Dilemma (b03ts4fp)
Series 3

Episode 2

Sue Perkins puts Tony Law, Isy Suttie, Gemma Cairney and Tim Harford through the moral and ethical wringer.

The panellists collectively attempt to resolve dilemmas based around footballing allegiance, supermarket deliveries, getting free 4G technology and a career in statistics.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0713p4j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 One to One (b03bdpl7)
Carolyn Quinn speaks to Claire Derry

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives

This week, Carolyn speaks to Claire Derry, the mother of Samuel Woodhead, the British teenager who went missing in the Australian outback in February 2013.

Samuel Woodhead was working on a cattle station in rural Queensland - just a few days into his gap year in Australia - when he decided to go for a run. He failed to return and was reported missing. A land and air search eventually found him three days later: three stone lighter, severely dehydrated and apparently 'hours from death'.

In this interview Claire Derry describes what it was like to cope with what had happened to her son, at the same time as dealing with intense media interest which - at one stage - turned against her son, accusing him of deliberately getting lost. And has she been able to return to "life as normal" after the experience?

Producer: Karen Gregor.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b071fnw6)
Holiday refunds, Needy marketing emails, Court closures

We investigate the case of the You and Yours listener who fractured her hip just after she booked her holiday and is housebound. We hear how she's not able to get the refund she is due because the travel agent is insisting that she visit the high street shop where she bought the holiday. What are your rights to a refund in this case and what would've happened if she'd bought the holiday online from the same company?

The government's announced that eighty six courts and tribunals across England and Wales are to close over the next two years with the aim of cutting costs and modernising the system. Campaigners say that many people, especially in rural areas, will face far longer and costlier journeys to their next nearest court.

More 25 to 34 year olds are living with their parents than any time in the past 20 years, according to official figures this week. What's driving them to it, how does it work out and what's the problem with enduring less-than-ideal circumstances for a few years until you can afford to buy? Didn't young people always do that?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0713p4l)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b071fnw8)
The Chancellor says if Britain votes to leave the European Union it would be a profound economic shock. But a former Treasury Minister isn't convinced.

In Rotherham, the gang convicted of grooming and sexually abusing children are sentenced. We speak to a lawyer of some of the victims and South Yorkshire police.

Iran goes to the polls We hear the hopes of one man campaigning for reform.


FRI 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b0717kvm)
Chidambaram Pillai: Swadeshi Steam

Sunil Khilnani explores the thwarted revolutionary ambitions of Chidambaram Pillai.

Chidambaram Pillai was a feisty baby-faced lawyer from Tuticorin in southern India. His is one of the many, largely forgotten stories of failure that litter the path to independence. But it's also a fascinating story, of an up-country lawyer without economic resource, social status or political power taking on the might of Empire. And he chose an unlikely way to resist the British: steam ships.

Featuring historian David Washbrook.

Producer: Martin Williams.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0717j20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b06kgvc4)
Julian Simpson - Fugue State

In the heart of the English countryside in a specialist residential hospital. A man, a government agent, is in a fugue state - a psychological shutdown - the result of something seemingly threatening that has taken place in a remote village.

Needing to act before the situation escalates and believing the patient can still hear, Doctor Fallon uses sound recordings to recreate events leading up to the point of shutdown, to prompt the patient's brain into remembering what has happened.

Julian Simpson's original drama was inspired by a series of talks and workshops at the Wellcome Trust, based around the latest thinking on how the human brain processes inputs - how it builds a model of the world, which we call reality, based on sensory information and our prediction of what we are expecting to see, hear or feel.

Scientific Advisor: Paul Fletcher

Director: Julian Simpson
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0717lrx)
Royal Academy of Arts

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from the Royal Academy of Arts in London, coinciding with the Painting the Modern Garden exhibition.

Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and James Wong answer the gardeners' questions - including how to get the most out of your artichokes, how to puppy-proof gardens, and the recommended fruit bushes for a front garden.

We also follow James Wong as he takes in the Painting the Modern Garden exhibition at the Academy.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Imagining Chekhov (b0717lrz)
Chekhov's Telescope by Alison MacLeod

A set of three stories, commissioned specially for Radio 4. Alison MacLeod explores the life and work of one of the finest short story writers of them all - Anton Pavlovich Chekhov.

In this tale, Chekhov and his lover - the actress Olga Knipper - take a holiday in Yalta, unaware that a news reporter is stalking their every move.

A note on the letters between Chekhov and Olga:
These are fictional composites of the writer’s own words and Chekhov’s actual letters from the volume Dear Writer, Dear Actress: The Love Letters of Anton Chekhov and Olga Knipper, translated by Jean Benedetti.

Reader: Peter Firth
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b071fnwb)
Alex Timpson, Lord Avebury, Douglas Slocombe, Umberto Eco, Pascal Bentoiu

Matthew Bannister on

Alex Timpson, who fostered ninety children over thirty years and helped shape the ethos of the family key cutting and shoe repair business.

Douglas Slocombe, the Oscar nominated cinematographer who shot films from Kind and Hearts and Coronets to Indiana Jones.

Umberto Eco the Italian academic and best selling author whose works include "The Name Of The Rose".

And the liberal peer Lord Avebury who, as Eric Lubbock, won a famous by election victory in Orpington and devoted his life to campaigning for human rights.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b0717ls1)
EU coverage, Diversity

Roger Bolton with listener questions and comments on the EU referendum coverage, BBC diversity, stultifying sport and the continued furore over Rob and Helen in The Archers.

With the EU referendum date set and the battle between 'leave' and 'remain' set to dominate the headlines until June, the BBC's Chief Political Adviser Ric Bailey joins Feedback to address listeners' questions about how the referendum is being covered. Is the BBC biased on EU membership? Is the story being told too much as a battle in the Conservative party? And should pollsters be trusted now after failures at the general election?

Gaile Walters and Keon West first appeared on Feedback 18 months ago, when they were being trained as part of the BBC's Expert Voices scheme, which aimed to get experts from more diverse backgrounds into BBC programmes. They return to the programme this week to discuss how they've faired since the training, and whether the BBC is doing enough to improve the diversity of its radio output.

Commentators on radio sport often find themselves in the position of having to keep listeners entertained even when the game is not delivering any action. Feedback reporter Rob Crossan speaks to Test Match Special's Jonathan Agnew and 5 Live football commentator Ian Dennis to discover how they find ways to fill air time even if on field events are not up to scratch.

And finally, in last week's programme Roger asked listeners for their views on the ongoing Archers' story about Rob Titchener's abuse of his wife Helen. The response has been enormous, as listeners grapple with the question of whether the story is too important to miss, or too unsettling to air.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b0717ls3)
Katherine and Finlay - Making Dad Proud

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between an 11 year old and his mum about life without his dad, who took his own life, and how rugby has forged a link between them. Organised through Child Bereavement UK, this is another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b071fnwd)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0713p4n)
Three brothers - who abused girls as young as eleven in Rotherham over a fifteen year period - have been given long prison sentences.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b0717m14)
Series 89

Episode 8

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. The line-up for this, the final show of the current series is Jeremy Hardy, Lucy Porter, Hugo Rifkind and Kerry Godliman.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0717m19)
The final batch of David and Ruth's herd are arriving. Lynda admires the new livestock and informs them about the commemorative service to mark the flood. Lynda is also planning a pageant to mark both Easter and the re-opening of the Village Hall. David won't be taking part as they'll be up to their necks in calves, so Lynda must look elsewhere for her 'cast'. David's nervous about calving with the new cows, but is pleased that it's a whole new chapter in the history of Brookfield.
Helen suggests to Rob they hire someone else at the shop. Her parents keep helping out but they're supposed to be retired. Rob talks of tightening their belts, and thinks it's mad that Johnny has been promised a full-time job at Bridge Farm when he finishes studying. Helen even suggests Rob could get a job elsewhere, but he insists he must be close to her, to help her. Kirsty declines to take part in Lynda's pageant, and heads off to meet Helen. Helen can't remember getting Kirsty's message from Ursula. Kirsty's suspicious of Helen's behaviour, and wonders if Ursula did actually pass the message on. Kirsty finally asks if Rob is mistreating Helen. Helen tries to eject her from the house. Rob walks in and gives Kirsty her marching orders.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b071fnwh)
Woodstock, Birger Larsen on Murder, Hacks in the spotlight, Trouble at the opera

When most people think of Woodstock their mind immediately turns to the 1969 festival - but Woodstock is 60 miles away from the site of the festival. Small Town Talk by Barney Hoskyns provides an insight into the lives of the stars who lived there including Bob Dylan, Jimmy Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Van Morrison.

The Killing director Birger Larsen discusses his latest film, The Third Voice. This is the first episode of Murder, a three-part BBC Two drama, in which the characters speak exclusively to the camera.

Spotlight is rare among recent films, in that it treats reporters as other than corrupt and venal. Adam Smith considers cinema's changing portrayal of newspaper journalists, from bold crusaders for truth to greedy slime-balls, and everything in between.

And, on the day the chorus voted to go on strike...what exactly is going on at the English National Opera.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Julian May.


FRI 19:45 Riot Girls (b0717jsn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0717n94)
Therese Coffey MP, Paul Nuttall MEP, Brendan O Neill, Lucy Powell MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Thistley Hough Academy in Penkhull Stoke on Trent with a panel including the Deputy Leader of the House of Commons Therese Coffey MP, the Deputy Leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall MEP, the Editor of Spiked on Line Brendan O Neill, and the Shadow Education Secretary Lucy Powell MP. Topics include the EU referendum, dress code for politicians, teacher recruitment and retainment, social mobility and Boris Johnson and Donald Trump as future political leaders.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0717n96)
Moral Futures

Adam Gopnik thinks future generations will be as appalled by some practices that are accepted today as we are by aspects of the past.

"Even as we condemn our moral ancestors, we need to hold our ears to the wind, and listen for the faint sounds of our descendants telling their melancholy truths about us."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b0717n98)
Incarnations: India in 50 Lives - Omnibus

Deen Dayal, Jamsetji Tata, Swami Vivekananda, Annie Besant, Chidambaram Pillai

Sunil Khilnani presents an omnibus edition of Incarnations: India in 50 Lives.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0713p4q)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b071fnwp)
Osborne: more austerity 'may be needed'

The Chancellor, George Osborne, says worsening economic conditions further spending cuts may be needed. We speak to the Institute for Fiscal Studies director, Paul Johnson. Also on the programme the Fifa election, Iran's 'blogfather' Hossein Derakhshan, and why doesn't Spain have a government 10 weeks after the election?


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0717n9x)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 10

Final instalment of the ten part abridgement of the new novel by Meg Rosoff, read by Rhashan Stone.

Unemployed, single and starting to despair, Jonathan has asked his former colleague Greeley to help him find a new direction for his life. Accompanied by Dante the collie and Sissy the spaniel, the four leave New York behind for a weekend spent deep in the forest. While there, Jonathan receives a series of texts that suggest all is not lost with Dr Clare.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 23:00 Woman's Hour (b0717nwy)
Late Night Woman's Hour - A Brief History of Me Time

Do you have just too much to do? Do you live in a blur of meetings, to do lists, deadlines and appointments? Then make time to listen to Lauren Laverne and guests Katharine Whitehorn, Madeleine Bunting, Mags MacKean and Amanda Owen as they discuss the brief history of "me time". Who invented leisure time? Who gets it? Who wants it? How much? What do women do with theirs and what should they be doing with it?

Katharine Whitehorn has been a working journalist since the 1950s. She writes a regular column in The Observer.

Amanda Owen has written several books about her life as a working farmer with eight children. Her most recent book is A Year in the Life of the Yorkshire Shepherdess.

Mags MacKean gave up a high powered job ion journalism to climb full time. Her book about how these experiences changed her is called The Upside Down Mountain.

Author Madeleine Bunting's most recent book was 'The Plot - A biography of an English Nature'. She is currently working on a book on mindfulness.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Luke Mulhall.


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0717nx0)
TIP: Moves are underway to give up to six million expatriates the vote. The Big Issue founder Lord Bird gives an unusual maiden speech in the House of Lords. And the view of the UK's EU deal from the European Parliament. Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b0717nx2)
Ann and Jane - Our Sons

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between two mothers whose sons took their own lives and who have drawn strength from their shared experience. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b07178g6)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b070hxsv)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0717n96)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b070d28w)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b071459c)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 10:30 SAT (b0713m2n)

Any Answers? 13:45 SAT (b0713m2y)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0717n94)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0713m3h)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0713p30)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0713p30)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0713pqw)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0713pqw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07145y0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07178gg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0717cq2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b0717j26)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0717n9x)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b070hsck)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0713zf3)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0713zf3)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b071x0gp)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b071x0gp)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b071x0v1)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b071x0v1)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b071x1vw)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b071x1vw)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b071x1yy)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b070cxy8)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b07142lq)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0713nvs)

Cancer Moonshot 11:00 TUE (b0714mbw)

Chain Reaction 18:30 WED (b0717cpt)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b0714nhy)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b0714nhy)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0713rtr)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0713rtr)

Dilemma 11:30 FRI (b03ts4fp)

Dot 11:30 MON (b0714033)

Drama 14:15 THU (b06fpbxf)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b06kgvc4)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b05w000p)

Europe: Strangers on My Doorstep 20:00 MON (b07143dx)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0713f1d)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0713zdx)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0714mbh)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b071ftsn)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b071fxc4)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b071fqfn)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b070hxsj)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b0717ls1)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b070dq8f)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b07178gc)

Friday Drama 21:00 SAT (b040yvdq)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b0713m38)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b0713m38)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0707wbb)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b0713p2t)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b071fyq9)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b071fv0f)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b071fsty)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b071fxcd)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b071fnwh)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b070hxsb)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0717lrx)

Ian Rankin - Rebus 14:30 SAT (b0713m30)

Imagining Chekhov 15:45 FRI (b0717lrz)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b0717j1r)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b0717j1r)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0713nzw)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 MON (b07142ll)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 TUE (b0714nht)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 WED (b0717b5l)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 THU (b0717gf1)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 FRI (b0717kvm)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 21:00 FRI (b0717n98)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b071fs79)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b071fs79)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b07142lx)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b070hxsg)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b071fnwb)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (b070fn20)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b0717cq0)

Loose Ends 18:30 SAT (b0713m36)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b0714nhw)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0707w9t)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0713ntz)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0713nxj)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0713nz4)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0713p0s)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0713p2h)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0713p40)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b07179c0)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b07179c0)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0713m2q)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0713m2q)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b071fstw)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b070fn1y)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b0717cpy)

Musical Variations: The Life of Angela Morley 11:30 TUE (b0714nhm)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0707wb2)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0713nv7)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0713nxs)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0713nzl)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0713p11)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0713p2r)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0713p48)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0713nv9)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b0707wbd)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0713nvx)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0713nxx)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0713nzn)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0713p13)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0713p2w)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0713p4j)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0707wb4)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0713nvf)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0713nvl)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0707wbv)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b03yqcx7)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0713rtf)

One to One 12:04 MON (b05pn3sw)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b0714mbp)

One to One 12:04 TUE (b04n31vy)

One to One 12:04 WED (b039px7s)

One to One 12:04 THU (b03b0wml)

One to One 12:04 FRI (b03bdpl7)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0713vvw)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0713vvw)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0713m34)

PM 17:00 MON (b07142lv)

PM 17:00 TUE (b071g8lk)

PM 17:00 WED (b071g8x0)

PM 17:00 THU (b071g8yh)

PM 17:00 FRI (b071fnwd)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0713wlr)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b070cgkk)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0713vvy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b070hxzb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0726p96)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b072b0nh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b072jslc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b072nlk2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b072rsrs)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b0713rtk)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0713rtk)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0713rtk)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b070hktk)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b0717j1t)

Reluctant Persuaders 11:30 WED (b06d2lz5)

Riot Girls 15:00 SUN (b0713vvt)

Riot Girls 10:45 MON (b0713zf7)

Riot Girls 14:15 MON (b07142ln)

Riot Girls 19:45 MON (b0713zf7)

Riot Girls 10:45 TUE (b0714mbt)

Riot Girls 14:15 TUE (b0717q6v)

Riot Girls 19:45 TUE (b0714mbt)

Riot Girls 10:41 WED (b07179c2)

Riot Girls 14:15 WED (b0717pgp)

Riot Girls 19:45 WED (b07179c2)

Riot Girls 10:45 THU (b0717gdx)

Riot Girls 19:45 THU (b0717gdx)

Riot Girls 10:45 FRI (b0717jsn)

Riot Girls 19:45 FRI (b0717jsn)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0713m2l)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0707wbs)

Say Yes by Tobias Wolff 19:45 SUN (b0713x9k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0707w9y)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0713nv3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0713nxn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0713nzc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0713p0x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0713p2m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0713p44)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0707w9w)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0707wb0)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0707wbl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0713nv1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0713nv5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0713nw7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0713nxl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0713nxq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0713nz9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0713nzj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0713p0v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0713p0z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0713p2k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0713p2p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0713p42)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0713p46)

Six Degrees of Connection 11:00 FRI (b0717kvf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0707wbq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0713nwc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0713ny1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0713nzs)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0713p17)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0713p32)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0713p4n)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0713rtc)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0713rtc)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0713zf1)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0713zf1)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0713rtm)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0713rth)

Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On 18:30 THU (b073j5cg)

Talking to Strangers 23:00 THU (b0717j28)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0713rtp)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0713wlt)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0713wlt)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07143dv)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07143dv)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07178g9)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07178g9)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0717cpw)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0717cpw)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0717j20)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0717j20)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0717m19)

The Art of Adultery 11:30 THU (b0717gdz)

The Beat Women 15:30 SAT (b06084ks)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b070hns6)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0717j24)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b070hkyc)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0717j1w)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0713rtt)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0713rtt)

The Gospel Truth 16:00 MON (b06z2kyc)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b07142ls)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b07142ls)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b0714mbm)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b0714mbm)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0713rtz)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b07179c4)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b0717ls3)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b0717nx2)

The Literary Adventures of Mr Brown 23:00 WED (b0717dlt)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b071fsh1)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b06zqq9d)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b070hxsn)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b0717m14)

The Report 20:00 THU (b0717j22)

The Spoken Image 13:30 SUN (b068tsvg)

The Stories 00:30 SUN (b0713pqt)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b06yr6vh)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b072jwy1)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0713nw5)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07145xy)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b071fs7f)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b071fsh3)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b071fxcg)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b071fnwp)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b070fft5)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0717b5n)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b07145y2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b071gc06)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b071gc7y)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b0717j2b)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b0717nx0)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0713f1g)

Today 06:00 MON (b0713zdz)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0714mbk)

Today 06:00 WED (b071ftsq)

Today 06:00 THU (b071fxc6)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0717jsl)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03mhyzf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b0378srp)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03bkgqv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03dx2qh)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03k5bnl)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b01sbyj8)

Unhappy Child, Unhealthy Adult 21:00 MON (b070dksr)

Verdun - The Sacred Wound 11:00 WED (b07179qw)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b0707wb6)

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