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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 FEBRUARY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b06zj4hs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b06zvb6f)
City of Thorns

Episode 5

Ben Rawlence tells the stories of just a few of the forgotten thousands who make up the half a million stateless citizens of Dadaab - the world's largest refugee camp, in the desert of northern Kenya, close to the Somali border, where only thorn bushes grow.

Monday and Muna find their child, Christine, is being attacked by embittered Somali clan members. Guled threatens to make the long journey to Italy, and in Washington Ben Rawlence tries in vain to explain the nuances of Dadaab life to the National Security Council.

The author, a Swahili speaker, and former researcher for Human Rights Watch in the horn of Africa made several long visits to the camps over the course of four years. His account bears vivid witness to the lives of those who live in fear, poverty and limbo.

Read by David Seddon
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06zj4hv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06zj4hx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06zj4hz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b06zj4j1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06zvdt7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch: Tibetan Buddhist, writer, & editor.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b06zvdt9)
It was burgers, now I'm craving cucumbers

The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b06zj4j3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b06zj4j5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b06zv3wz)
Return to the Fens

In the final episode of this series Helen Mark visit Woodwalton Fen in Cambridgeshire with writer Simon Barnes to discover the lost landscape which inspired Charles Rothschild to draw up the Rothschild list. This list of wild places in need of preservation helped establish modern conservation ideas and in 1912 Rothschild established the Society for the Promotion of Nature Reserves for Britain and the Empire, the first society in Britain concerned with protecting wildlife habitats.
Today the bungalow on stilts which Rothschild built lies at the heart of the Great Fen. This 50 yearlong project aims to join another early nature reserve at Holme Fen to Woodwalton by creating a mosaic of wetland habitat. Helen finds out how this vision is already attracting wonderful wildlife and how the long term residents of the fens are now enjoying a growing appreciation of the landscape they love.
With a changing climate the fens offer natural solutions to flooding and nearby at Must Farm archaeologists have recently discovered how Bronze Age man embraced a watery landscape and thrived. In the future the Great Fen hopes it too can offer man viable alternatives to drainage which are beneficial for all the fen inhabitants.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0705z0r)
Farming Today This Week: Brexit and UK Farming - Shall we stay or shall we go?

Brexit and UK Farming: three farmers debate "Shall we stay or shall we go"? That's Sir Peter Kendall, former Chairman of the NFU, Ukip's Stuart Agnew and undecided farmer, Stephen Rash, who hears their arguments to find out whether he's in a better position as to how to use his vote in the referendum.

We also hear from the author of a report on the implications of Brexit for farmers, that's by agricultural economist Professor Alan Buckwell, and there are reports from Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland too.

The contributors discuss the role of farm subsidies from Brussels, access to markets in the event of a vote to leave the EU, and whether there really would be a "bonfire of the red tape".

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b06zj4j7)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0705z0t)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0705z0w)
Jamie Foreman

After playing tough guys in Layer Cake, Oliver Twist and Nil by Mouth, the part of thug Derek Branning in Eastenders seemed a natural choice for actor Jamie Foreman. But with comedy parts in Birds of a Feather and Pantomime under his belt he's now pushing his boundaries with an all singing all dancing role in Mrs Henderson Presents in the West End in London. Given his background as an East End gangster's son, his dramatic career seems even more surprising. He joins Richard and Aasmah on Saturday Live.

Social psychologist Viren Swami has a passion for passion, having studied attraction for ten years. He'll be discussing dating formation, revealing relationship myths and advising how best to meet your match.

They met at Birmingham University and despite not studying music they came together over their love of voice and formed an a Cappella group. The sons of Pitches went on to win Gareth Malone's naked choir competition, broadcast on BBC 2 at the end of last year, and now they are making a go at a professional career. 5 out of 6 of them join us on Saturday to talk about their passion for voice and to demonstrate it's versatility, and they'll be serenading us with an alternative love song.

Ruth Goodman is a social historian who is passionate about how people lived in the past, so much so that she spends much of her free time taking part in enactments. Her latest book is about her favourite era, and entitled How to be a Tudor.

We hear from listeners Paul and Helen who fell in love over the harp, and your Thank yous.

Comedian, writer and actor Chris Addison chooses his inheritance tracks. He inherited Mozart's Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments ('Gran Partita') and will pass on Waiting For The Great Leap Forwards by Billy Bragg (from 'Worker's Playtime')

Jamie Foreman stars in Mrs Henderson Presents at the Noel Coward Theatre in London
Viren Swami's book is Attraction Explained published by Routledge
How to be a Tudor is by Ruth Goodman published by Penguin
The Sons of Pitches tour starts in May 2016 - details via link to their website below
Chris Addison stars in The Royal Opera's new production of Emmanuel Chabrier's L'Étoile which runs 1-24 February 2016.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b070601q)
Series 6

The Last Emperor

Paul Gambaccini returns with the series that takes a long hard look behind the scenes of three classic films which have scooped the Best Picture Award. He reports on the artistic, political and personal decisions that lie behind the winners, laced with some pretty good gossip too.

In Episode 1 Paul hears from the director, producer, cinematographer and composer of the epic which opened up the recent history of China to the West and swept the Oscars in 1988.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b070601s)
Helen Lewis of The New Statesman looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Britain's approach to Syrian refugees, how Michael Gove is changing prison policy, the US presidential election race, and navigating legislation through the House of Lords.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b06zj4j9)
Trapped in a Nightmare

Human stories behind the headlines: Fergal Keane is on the frontline in Ukraine with a husband and wife who are determined to stay on in their home even as war consumes their town. Two boys talk to Quentin Sommerville about life, death and indoctrination in an ISIS-held town in Syria. Grace Livingstone is in the Venezuelan countryside finding that livelihoods are being hit hard by the financial crisis. On Mafia Island, off the coast of Tanzania, Hannah McNeish finds there are two principal topics of conversation - the performance of the new president and a fish called Jesus which, so the story goes, is as big as a car. And it is now official: the very best baguettes in the world are baked by Koreans. Steve Evans, in Seoul, talks of changing tastes in a young market with a global, fashionable appetite for the trappings of European culture and cuisine.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b06zj4jc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b070601v)
Should tax be such a taxing matter? Plus second-hand car insurance worries

On Money Box with Lesley Curwen: When you're buying a second-hand car, if the vehicle has been modified and you've not told your insurer, it could invalidate your cover in the event of an accident. The experience of Money Box listener Matt shows there is confusion over what constitutes a 'non standard' part and an 'upgrade'. He bought his car second hand and had no idea the vehicle's lights, bumper and grills had been modified by a previous owner. After an accident, he was shocked to find out that his insurer wouldn't pay out. After Money Box intervened, the insurer changed its mind.

Should tax be such a taxing matter? Angela Knight, the new boss of the Office of Tax Simplification, gives her first broadcast interview. She explains her priorities in tackling what experts say is Britain's over-complicated system of taxes and reliefs. Accountants point out that the tax code has actually expanded in the last five years - it now stretches to 19,000 pages. That's despite the best efforts of the OTS, which was launched in 2010.

A change which retailers hoped would reduce transaction charges on credit card purchases made to them by customers, looks like doing nothing of the kind. In December an EU regulation capped something called the interchange fees at 0.3 per cent. The expectation was that this would force the fees down. But because there's not just one but a series of costs involved in processing any card transaction, retailers have told Money Box, they still have to consider how much of their costs they need to pass on to customers who pay by this method. The programme hears from two businesses who take a different view on the issue.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b06zvdlg)
Series 89

Episode 6

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. This week's programme comes from Bristol and Miles is joined by Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Justin Moorhouse and Steve Lamacq.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b06zj4jf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b06zj4jh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b06zvdln)
Lord Blunkett, David Davis MP, Dr Kate Hudson, Quentin Letts

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Royal College for the Blind in Hereford with the Labour peer Lord Blunkett, the Conservative backbench MP David Davis, The General Secretary of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, Dr Kate Hudson, and the Daily Mail sketchwriter and author Quentin Letts, the panel discussed new GP Contracts, the effect of a possible Brexit on immigration to the UK, the renewal of the Trident nuclear deterrence and the issue of online surveillance and security.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b070601x)
Junior Doctors' Contract

Anita Anand takes your calls on the Junior Doctors' contract one of the issues raised in last night's Any Questions.
And your reaction on Twitter, email and text to the other Questions.

If we leave the European Union, will we see migrant camps on the white cliffs of Dover?
How have secret groups on Facebook escaped notice until now if we are over-surveilled?
Does the UK need a nuclear deterrent?

Presented by Anita Anand.
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Ian Rankin - Rebus (b070601z)
A Question of Blood

Episode 1

When a known criminal dies in a house fire the forensic evidence suggests he was murdered before the fire started.

Detective Inspector Rebus - the last person to see the victim alive - becomes the main suspect.

Meanwhile, a fatal shooting at a private school near Edinburgh unexpectedly leads Rebus to an army helicopter crash on Jura in a case involving diamonds and drug smuggling.

Ron Donachie stars as Rebus in Ian Rankin's thriller.

Dramatised in two parts by Chris Dolan.

DI Rebus ...................Ron Donachie
Siobhan Clarke......... Gayanne Potter
DI Hogan ................. Brian Ferguson
DCI Templer ............ Sarah Collier
Bell .......................... .Brian Pettifer
Miss Teri .................. Nicola Roy
Whiteread .............. Veronica Leer
Peacock ................... Gavin Mitchell
Kate .......................... Eilidh McCormick
Brimson .................. Kenny Blyth
James ...................... Alasdair Hankinson
Fogg.......................... Paul Young

Other parts played by the cast.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


SAT 15:30 Tropicalia: Revolution in Sound (b06zr3zl)
Tropicalia was a musical revolution in Brazil. Singer and journalist Monica Vasconcelos meets the key artists and contemporary champions of Tropicalia - from Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil to Marcos Valle and Talking Heads' David Byrne - and explores its enduring musical and political force.

Burning brightly for only few years in the late 1960s, and politically inspired by the uprisings in Paris in May 68, the Tropicalia movement electrified Brazilian music, combining the sophistication of bossa nova, samba and baiao with psychedelia, new Beatles-inspired electric sounds and orchestral experimentation. It was a deliberately subversive mix that provoked the country's military regime and led to the exile and imprisonment of some of Brazil's star musicians.

Tropicalia brought a new wave of liberation and energy into Brazilian music. Earlier in the decade, bossa nova had captured a mood of national optimism but, as the 1960s wore on, the political situation darkened. The military junta, in power since 1964, was drifting into open repression - the arts would be censored, musicians targeted, imprisoned and exiled. A new, more combative approach was called for.

Based around a core group of musicians - Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, the group Os Mutantes, singer Gal Costa and Tom Ze - Tropicalia was a mash up of styles which drew on the country's deep roots but pushed the sound elsewhere, radically. Harvesting influences from inside and outside Brazil, drawing especially on Western rock, classical orchestration and electronic effects, Tropicalia parodied, mixed and sampled global styles.

Produced by Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0707r9n)
Planning funerals, Camila Batmanghelidjh, Amy Cuddy

We hear from the columnist and broadcaster Emma Freud on the emotional rollercoaster of planning four funerals for family members and from Barbara Chalmers who has set up a website to help people record their funeral wishes.
Camila Batmanghelidjh, founder and former chief executive of the children's charity Kids Company gives her first broadcast interview since a committee of MPs published a report into the collapse of the charity earlier this month.
With the current Secretary General Ban Ki_Moon retiring in December this year the selection process for his successor has begun. We discuss the chances of that next Secretary General being a woman with the BBC's diplomatic Correspondent Bridget Kendall.
When Breath Becomes Air is a book about a man facing death following a cancer diagnosis, we hear from Lucy Kalanithi his wife on why her husband Paul decided to write the book and their decision to have a baby.
The American guru and Harvard Professor Amy Cuddy tells us how to overcome shyness and anxiety.
We hear from two breastfeeding mothers who took part in our phone in on the subject on Monday about their experiences.
And the Award winning spoken artist Hollie McNish shares her thoughts and feelings on becoming a mother.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0707r9q)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b06zv3xf)
Customer Service

All businesses rely on customers. So, why do some businesses bend over backwards to keep customers happy, and why do some of them appear not to care? What is the impact of poor customer service on a business and how much does it cost them to invest in improving their infrastructure? Evan Davis discusses dos and don'ts of customer service with an airline, an energy company and a retailer, all of which have tried to completely overhaul their image. Has it worked?

Guests: Kenny Jacobs, Chief Marketing Officer at Ryanair; Neil Clitheroe CEO retail and generation at Scottish Power and Gary Booker, Chief Marketing Officer at Dixons Carphone

Producer: Sally Abrahams
Researcher: Sofia Patel.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06zj4jk)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b06zj4jm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06zj4jp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0707r9s)
Clive Anderson, Nikki Bedi, Cuba Gooding Jr, Anita Rani, Joe Lycett, Bobby Baker, Beirut, Golden Rules

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Cuba Gooding Jr, Anita Rani, Joe Lycett and Bobby Baker for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Beirut and Golden Rules.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b0707r9v)
Series 19

Sweethearts

A fictional response to a story in the week's news. In the week that saw Google executives face a grilling from MPs over its 'sweetheart tax deal' - and a 'sugar daddy' app claimed to have signed up almost a quarter of a million UK students - actor and writer Katherine Jakeways tells the story of Libby, a student with a controversial fiscal arrangement of her own.

Directed by Emma Harding.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0707r9x)
Hieronymus Bosch, OJ Simpson, North Water, A Bigger Splash, Battlefield

The biggest Hieronymus Bosch exhibition ever has just opened in Holland. 500 years after his death, Noordbrabants Museum has gathered together the largest collection of his bizarre, extraordinary work
OJ Simpson's 1994 trial has been turned into a US TV drama. Does it have something new to show or say?
Ian McGuire's North Water has garnered positive reviews from the likes of Hilary Mantel and Martin Amis. It's a whodunnit set on board an 18th century whaling ship. "A version of Captain Ahab (if you squint a little) meets a version of Sherlock Holmes"
Ralph Fiennes stars in A Bigger Splash, a tale of louche life set around a swimming pool in a baking hot Italian villa. Also starring Tilda Swinton, Matthius Schoenaerts and Dakota Johnson
Battlefield at The Young Vic is Peter Brook's distillation of his magnum opus Mahabarata. A few short tales which deal with life an immense canvas in miniature

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Amanda Vickery, Natalie Haynes and Jim White. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0707r9z)
The Art of the Obit

Matthew Bannister, presenter of BBC Radio 4's obituary programme, Last Word, celebrates the culture, style, purpose and panache of a media institution: the obituary.

Matthew finds out about the delicate work of preparation, as he talks to leading obituary figures about how they choose which lives to cover. He examines some landmark obituaries, and reads from The Times full page obit on Hitler, an indicator of how the often delicate balance between honesty and sensitivity is achieved.

Matthew also reveals some of his own behind-the-scenes stories – like the time he made uncomfortably close contact with the corpse.

And a look at future developments, as some of the leaders in the obituary field reveal moves into the world of the pre-recorded farewell obituary video.

Musician Dave Swarbrick recalls how it felt to see his premature obit in print, and Matthew explores why working in the world of the obit is always surprising and unexpectedly life-affirming.

Producer: Neil George.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b06zqk2w)
Graham Greene: The Honorary Consul

Episode 2

In this concluding episode, Plarr's attempts to help Charley get him death threats from the police. Not only is the state closing in on Plarr, but his own past too.

In a conversation with Nicholas Shakespeare, Graham Greene once named ‘The Honorary Consul’ as his favourite among all his novels, “..because the characters change and that is very difficult to do.”

In this superbly tense and violent story of political kidnap and sexual betrayal set at the beginning of the Dirty War in early 1970s Argentina, Greene’s characters find themselves on a hellish journey. Isolated Dr Eduardo Plarr, son of a missing political prisoner, is lured into collaborating with a defrocked priest in a kidnap plot, only to find the lives of two people he doesn’t care for, suddenly in his hands. And Charles Fortnum, the drunken Honorary Consul in a one-horse town near the Paraguayan border, faces his own terrors, and the loss of the young prostitute he has fallen in love with.

Greene added: “For me the sinner and the saint can meet; there is no discontinuity, no rupture… The basic element I admire in Christianity is its sense of moral failure. That is its very foundation. For once you’re conscious of personal failure, then perhaps in future you become a little less fallible. In ‘The Honorary Consul’ I did suggest this idea, through the guerrilla priest, that God and the devil were actually one and the same person – God had a day-time and a night-time face, but that He evolved, as Christ tended to prove, towards His day-time face – absolute goodness – thanks to each positive act of men.”

Dr Eduardo Plarr ..... Geoffrey Streatfeild
Charley Fortnum ..... Matthew Marsh
León Rivas ..... Stefano Braschi
Aquino ..... Martin Marquez
Clara ..... Beatriz Romilly
Dr Humphries ..... Ewan Bailey
Colonel Perez ….. Chris Pavlo
Marta ….. Yolanda Vazquez
Crichton ….. George Watkins
José ….. Sean Baker
Father ….. Brian Protheroe

Dramatised by Nick Warburton.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b06zj4jr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b06ztttp)
Charities

Charity in the UK is big business. There are over 165,000 charities registered with the Charity Commission, and the total annual income of the sector is more than £100 billion. But what should they be allowed to spend their money on? The government has just announced that charities which receive state grants will not be allowed to spend any of that tax payers cash on political campaigning. The National Council for Voluntary Organisations has described the change as "draconian" and will amount to "gagging" them. There is a lot at stake. Charities get £13 billion pounds a year from national or local government. Figures from the National Audit Office show that that money makes up well over a half of the annual income of many well-known charities. Being a prophetic witness has always been a key aspect of what charities do. Campaigning and political activity is a vital part of that, but should it be funded by us the taxpayer, whether by direct grants or via the tax breaks that are part of charitable status. Or do we need to rethink our definition of what is and isn't a charity? If public schools can qualify for charitable status, why not campaigning groups like "Liberty"? With headlines about aggressive fund raising tactics of some organisations, the charity halo has become somewhat tarnished in recent times. But do we have an outdated "Lady Bountiful" view of what charities are for? If we want our charities to make a difference is it time to accept that they need to apply all the modern commercial tools you'd expect from such a large industry. Or, in their rush for influence and impact, have charities lost site of the personal relationships, responsibilities and trust that lie at the heart of altruism? What should charity be for? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Anne McElvoy, Giles Fraser and Matthew Taylor. Witnesses are Andy Benson, Debra Allcock-Tyler, Christopher Snowdon and Craig Bennett.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b06zqp80)
Heat 5, 2016

(5/17)
Russell Davies welcomes competitors from Kidderminster, Chester, Stirling and Rothbury in Northumberland to Media City in Salford for the latest contest in the 2016 series.

To stand a chance of making it through to the semi-final stage they'll have to know where Britain's first-ever safari park was, which 19th century war was ended by the Treaty of San Stefano, and the name of the party led by the Greek politician Alexis Tsipras.

There's also an opportunity for a Brain of Britain listener to 'Beat the Brains' with his or her question suggestions.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b06zqk30)
The Lakes and the Caribbean

Roger McGough with a miscellany including poetry from The Lakes and the Caribbean, as well as a trilogy for worriers. The poetry comes from Stevie Smith, Matt Harvey, Percy Shelley, Fleur Adcock and others. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0707v90)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Stories (b0707y3j)
The Pig Boy

Jessica Raine reads Jane Gardam's classic story in which a young wife is thrilled to be rejoining her husband in Hong Kong, still under the British. But all too soon she finds herself looking for authenticity and excitement...

Reader: Jessica Raine is best known for her role as Jenny in the TV drama Call the Midwife. Other recent TV credits include Jane Boleyn in Wolf Hall, and Tuppence Beresford in Partners in Crime.
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Julian Wilkinson
Writer: Born in 1928, Jane Gardam she did not publish her first book until she was in her 40s, but has become one of the most prolific novelists of her generation, with 25 books published over the past 30 years and a number of prestigious prizes to her name (she's twice winner of the Whitbread, and has been shortlisted for both the Booker and Orange prizes). Her novels include Old Filth, Last Friends, God on the Rocks and The Hollow Land. She's been called 'the laureate of the demise of the British Empire', for her poignant and witty portrayals of the end of the era of British imperial adventures.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707v9d)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707v9j)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707v9l)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0707v9n)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0707y3l)
Bells from the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Tonbridge in Kent.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b06kdztz)
National Pride

Alex Marshall, fresh from writing a book about national anthems, discusses nationalism and patriotism.

Alex tells stories of meeting self-described patriots and nationalists from Japan to Paraguay via France and Kazakhstan, and explores how our thinking about nationalism and patriotism is highly dependent on place and time.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0707v9q)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0707y3n)
A Wing and a Prayer

John McCarthy explores the sacred and profane place of birds in our daily lives.

He considers the many spiritual meanings birds have for humans. From doves as biblical heralds of the Holy Spirit to ravens in the Qur’an, birds are at the iconic heart of almost all world religions. But how did they get there? Is it their ability to fly which grips us? Or the apparent purity and beauty of (many) of their songs and calls?

Along the way, John explores the parallels between listening to Vaughan Williams’ Lark Ascending, hearing a dawn chorus in Kielder Forest and seeking a personal pathway to the divine. He also recalls a bird-inspired moment of hope during his time in captivity in Lebanon - a memory triggered by the music of the singer, Fairouz.

John meets keen birdwatcher and author, Stephen Moss who tells how his love of birds helped him through divorce and bereavement, and reveals the true meanings of birdsong, which prove to be both paradoxical and far more profane than sacred.

The programme includes poetry from John Clare, prose from Gerald Durrell, and music from Canteloube, Respighi and Chris Watson.

The readers are Madeleine Bowyer and Peter Marinker.

Producer: Matt Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0707y3q)
Reindeer Farming in Sweden

The indigenous people of northern Sweden are the Sami and their nomadic lifestyle has traditionally centred around the reindeer, both as a means of transport and for food and clothing. Today the Sami are no longer nomadic but many like Nils Nutti Sami want to continue to work with their reindeer. Nils has found a unique solution to the problem of meeting his family's need for money now that they live in a settled place whilst continuing to work with his beloved reindeer.

At the reindeer corral these semi-domesticated animals are used to take tourists on sleigh rides and to teach them about the Sami way of life. This means that the reindeer are of greater value and allows Nils to encourage young Sami and even non-Sami like Klara Enbom Burreau to continue with this traditional way of life in a sustainable way.

The Sami use every part of the reindeer for meat, blood sausages, fur and hide and as Helen Mark discovers, this relationship continues to sustain the Sami culture with its deep respect for nature.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0707v9s)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0707v9v)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0709v34)
Jehovah's Witness investigation, Mental health chaplains, The art of being still

The Sunday programme investigates allegations that the Jehovah's Witness ordered the destruction of documents that could be used during the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse. Was this in contravention of Section 21 of the Inquiries Act 2005 which is punishable by imprisonment?

Katy Watson reports from Mexico City as Pope Francis begins his historic trip there.

As the BBC launches a series of programmes about mental health, Trevor Barnes goes inside the oldest psychiatric hospital in Britain to meet the mental health chaplains who work there.

Rosie Dawson explores the Christian festival of Lent through the mindful reflection of art in six of Manchester's most iconic venues.

A new book by Rev Steve Chalke, founder of the youth and community charity Oasis, claims initiatives to 'prevent' young people from being exposed to negative and dangerous radicalisation can only go so far.

The Church of England say they have 'won the war' on payday loan companies. William asks Eric Leenders from the British Bankers Association who was on the Archbishop's task group what they achieved and how.

Producers:
David Cook
Carmel Lonergan

Editor:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b0709v36)
Tender Education and Arts

Olivia Colman presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Tender Education and Arts
Registered Charity No 1100214
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Tender Education and Arts'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Tender Education and Arts'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0707v9x)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0707v9z)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0709v38)
Lent Pilgrimage 1: The Open Road

A celebration of the art of conversation as we embark on a Lent pilgrimage.
With the Revd Ruth Harvey and Lynne Ling of Shoreline Conversations, who, with Churches Together in Britain and Ireland have crafted this year's Lent resources. On the Open Road the invitation is to undertake a particular kind of journey, a sacred journey which involves both inner and outer dimensions. Readings: Deuteronomy 26: 1-11, Luke 4: 1-19. Music: Ubi Caritas (Taize), Forty Days and Forty Nights (Aus Der Tiefe), Guide me, O thou Great Redeemer (Cwm Rhondda). With the Manchester Chamber Choir directed by Andrew Earis. From Emmanuel Church Didsbury; Producer: Philip Billson. See the Sunday Worship web page for a link to online resources from Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b06zvdlq)
Anti-Political Punditry

Adam Gopnik argues that the votes cast in America's primary in New Hampshire say far less about shifts in political opinion than the pundits and commentators claim.

"It takes less 'anger' and 'alienation' than a mild reshuffling of the ideological deck in a peculiarly shaped contest to produce results that look, on first glance, revolutionary."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dw7p8)
Superb Lyrebird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the superb lyrebird of eastern Australia. Superb lyrebirds are about the size of pheasants. During courtship, as the male struts and poses, he unleashes a remarkable range of sounds. Up to 80% of the lyrebird's display calls are usually of other wild birds. However, if kept in captivity, they can mimic a chainsaw, camera click, gunshot and a whole host of other man made sound. Research recently discovered that the lyrebird co-ordinates his dancing displays to particular sounds. But superb lyrebirds are promiscuous performers and it's quite likely that another male may have played the leading role while he dances and sings away.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0707vb5)
Sunday morning magazine programme presented by Paddy O'Connell. We hear how a blind boy can find his way around Edinburgh by clicking his tongue. Reviewing the papers: Gabriele Finaldi - Director of the National Gallery, former top doctor Sir Liam Donaldson and Newsnight presenter Kirsty Wark.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0709v47)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0709v49)
Ben Saunders

Kirsty Young's castaway is the polar adventurer Ben Saunders. In his own words he "specialises in dragging heavy things around cold places".

He's one of only three people to have skied solo to The North Pole and he holds the record for the longest solo Arctic journey ever on foot.

After traversing Russia and the frozen crust of the Arctic Ocean, his most recent adventure was to triumph where, a century before, Captain Scott and his men failed. Ben successfully retraced that ill-fated Terra Nova route by making the eighteen hundred mile journey through Antarctica-and-back, entirely on foot.

When he's not wrapped up somewhere cold, he is a motivational speaker.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0707vbk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b070cz5y)
Series 8

Lucas, Scott, Hartston

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Sarah Millican welcome:

* Comedian Matt Lucas
* Neuroscientist Sophie Scott
* Goggleboxer and former British chess champion, William Hartson

Researchers: Anne Miller and Molly Oldfield of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and James Harkin.

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0709v4f)
First Bite

In her new book, First Bite - How We Learn To Eat, Bee Wilson takes a deep and reflective look at how food choices and habits are shaped, and how they can be changed.

Sheila Dillon is joined by Bee Wilson and special guests to discuss the book's surprising findings, and how to make positive changes where positive change is needed.

Sheila and Bee are joined by Rosie Boycott, who advises the Mayor of London on food and is Chair of the London Food Board, as well as father and son Geoff and Anthony Whitington who star in the just-released film Fixing Dad, which documents Geoff's struggles with type 2 diabetes and his two sons' efforts to help him.

Dan Saladino tells the story of Professor Pekka Puska, who as a young public health doctor in the 1970s spearheaded the North Karelia Project in Finland, which in the context of a population with the highest rates of death from heart disease in the world, aimed to improve the way that a whole region ate.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0707vbr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0707vbw)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Batman and Ethan (b0709v4m)
Ethan was born blind. He's now a 10 year-old boy who collects sounds on his 51 dictaphones, composes music, and performs on stage in concerts. Until now he's been home-schooled, but last year he was offered a place at St Mary's Music School in Scotland - one of the best in the country. The problem is he struggles to get around.

This is where Batman comes in. His real name is Daniel Kish and like Ethan he's blind. He's a master of echolocation. He makes clicking noises - like a bat - to build a picture of the world around him. Neuroscientists have done experiments on him and found that he's managed to activate the visual part of his brain. He's taught people all over the world to "see through sound" and he's so good at it that he goes hiking, cycling and rock-climbing.

"Batman" (Daniel) comes to Scotland to spend 10 days with Ethan, to teach him echolocation and help him prepare for his new school. The documentary follows Ethan's progress as he learns from Daniel Kish. Listeners are introduced to the principles of echolocation, they follow Ethan practicing at home, on the train and at his new school. They're brought into Ethan's world, through music composed specially by Ethan, and they're with him on his birthday, on long walks in the Scottish hills, right through to his experience at school.

We follow Ethan up to his final day of term to find out how he's done, and see how he copes with his biggest challenge yet: playing an accordion solo with the orchestra at the school concert.

Produced and presented by Helena Merriman.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06zvbwn)
Seedy Sunday

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Seedy Sunday in Brighton- the UK's biggest and longest-running community seed swap event.

James Wong, Bob Flowerdew and Christine Walkden answer questions from the audience on topics such as increasing the snail population, growing show-stopping carrots, and 'to shred, or not to shred'. They also discuss their favourite seeds.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0709v4p)
Women and Community

Fi Glover introduces conversations between women in Derry, Barry and Grantham about community action, public office and life skills in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Gwyneth Hughes - Victory (b04d0l1g)
Admiral Lord Nelson, Sir William and Emma, Lady Hamilton have been living together in Italy.

But when they return home to England their triangular relationship comes under public scrutiny, ending only with Nelson's death at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805.

Starring Imogen Stubbs as Emma, Ronan Vibert as Nelson and Stuart Richman as Hamilton.

Produced at BBC Salford by Susan Roberts


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b070cgkh)
Elizabeth Strout - My Name Is Lucy Barton

Elizabeth Strout's new novel My Name is Lucy Barton is a moving meditation on motherhood, memory and overcoming a difficult past. The writer talks to Mariella Frostrup about her inspiration for the book, and her brief career as a stand-up comic.

Kevin Jackson joins Mariella to review a new graphic novel version of Proust's In Search of Lost Time and the new director of the Cheltenham Literature Festival talks about her ambitions for the event.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b070cgkk)
Love and the Rest

Roger McGough with poetry of love, hate and everything in between on this Valentine's edition of Poetry Please. Featured poets include Harold Pinter, Carol Ann Duffy and WB Yeats, and there are readings from Fiona Shaw, Alice Arnold, Paul Mundell and Burt Caesar. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b06zs22v)
After the Floods - A Tale of Two Cities

The Dutch city of Nijmegen has much in common with the English city of York. Similar in size, both are much visited by tourists because of their histories and architecture. But both also have rivers running through them and are susceptible to flooding. So how do their defences compare? And, as York and other communities continue to mop up the damage caused by the latest catastrophic flooding, did basic mistakes and a failure of planning make a bad situation very much worse?
Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Rob Cave.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b0707r9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0707vcl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0707vcs)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707vcz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b070cgkm)
John Waite

Love is in the air this Valentine's day edition when John Waite will make his selection of the best bits of BBC Radio this week. So we'll hear from the poetic trainspotters who just love old steam engines; the woman who fell in love with the man who saved her father's life - and why Chinese workers in Mao Tse Tung's cultural revolution fifty years ago - adored mangoes.

Production team Kevin Mousley, Kay Bishton and Elodie Chatelain.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b070cgkp)
Matthew and Pip are together on Valentine's Day, enjoying a walk up Lakey Hill before retiring indoors together.
Kenton's rather jealous to find Jolene and Wayne laughing together in the Bull kitchen. Jolene reassures Kenton and comes up with a plan for tonight: Kenton can deal with restaurant orders and help in the kitchen as Jolene looks after the movie goers - a chance for Kenton and Wayne to bond. Brief Encounter plays at the Bull. Pip becomes tearful thinking about the sad story - Matthew notices and points out that he won't be too far away and Cumbria is only temporary. Meanwhile, Ruth and David enjoy the film and the food, pleasantly surprised by Wayne. Ruth catches David becoming rather affected by the story as well - the idea of his wife having been 'a long way away' resonates and he and Ruth have a heart to heart.
Wayne thanks Kenton for taking him on and points out how happy Jolene seems with Kenton. When Wayne has knocked off, Kenton admits he hasn't been perfect and wishes he could do something to show Jolene how much she means to him. Jolene has an idea - they can keep Wayne on while they look for a new chef. Kenton agrees.


SUN 19:15 So Wrong It's Right (b01jxrtw)
Series 3

Episode 6

Presented by Charlie Brooker, So Wrong It's Right is a competitive game of wrongness where coming up with terrible ideas is the right thing to do.

Over a series of rounds, Charlie asks his guests to trawl through their lives for comic calmites and to pitch inappropriate ideas.

In this episode - the last in the current series - the guests joining him to try and out-wrong each other are comedians Susan Calman and Rob Beckett and Pointless star Richard Osman.

The panel's worst experience as a teenager is just one of the challenges in this edition. Will anyone better Richard Osman's confession that he performed a rap version of the Easter story in front his entire school?

The host of So Wrong It's Right, Charlie Brooker, also presents BBC2's How TV Ruined Your Life, Channel 4's You Have Been Watching and 10 O'Clock Live, and writes for The Guardian. He won Columnist of the Year at the 2009 British Press Awards and Best Newcomer at the British Comedy Awards 2009.

Produced by Aled Evans
A Zeppotron Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Shorts (b070cgkr)
Scottish Shorts

Still Life by Margaret Morton Kirk

Artist Jack lives quietly on a remote Scottish island until a chance meeting with a tourist changes everything.

Read by Melody Grove
Producer Eilidh McCreadie

Margaret Morton Kirk is a writer from Inverness. Her short stories have achieved success in a number of competitions and she is currently working on a crime novel set in her home town.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b06zvbwz)
Selfies, Sugar Daddies and Dodgy Surveys

Advertising dressed up as research has inspired us this week. Firstly recent reports that said that young women aged between 16 and 25 spend five and a half hours taking selfies on average. It doesn't take much thinking to realise that there's something really wrong with this number. We pick apart the survey that suggested women are spending all that time taking pictures of themselves.

The second piece of questionable research comes from reports that a quarter of a million UK students are getting money from 'sugar daddies' they met online. The story came from a sugar daddy website. They claim around 225,000 students have registered with them and have met (mostly) men for what they call "mutually beneficial arrangements". We explain our doubts over the figures.

There were reports recently that there will more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050. The report comes from The Ellen MacArthur Foundation. But, as we discover, there's something fishy about these figures.

Away from advertising, studies have shown that children born in the summer do not perform as well as children born earlier in the academic year. For this reason schools are being encouraged to be sympathetic to parents that want their summer-born children to start a year later. But what should parents do? Is this a good option? We speak to Claire Crawford, Assistant Professor of Economics at the University.

Gemma Tetlow from the Institute for Fiscal Studies explains how some areas of public spending having fallen to similar levels seen in 1948. She explains how spending has changed over time, and what might happen in the future.

And friend of the programme, Kevin McConway, explains some of the statistical words that non-statisticians do not understand.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b06zvbwv)
Marvin Minsky, Margaret Forster, Peter Powell, Sir Brian Tovey, Joe Alaskey

Matthew Bannister on

Professor Marvin Minsky - the computer scientist who carried out pioneering work on artificial intelligence.

Margaret Forster who wrote novels like Georgy Girl and acclaimed biographies including a life of Daphne Du Maurier.

Peter Powell who invented the stunt kite and turned it into a global business, before it all came crashing down.

Sir Brian Tovey who was director of the Government Communications Head Quarters - GCHQ - when the government tried to introduce a ban on trade union membership.

And Joe Alaskey, the voice artist behind Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b070601v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0709v36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b06zqq9l)
Brexit: The Irish Question

If the UK leaves the EU, what happens on the island of Ireland? Its people would be living on either side of an EU border. In this edition of Analysis, Edward Stourton explores an aspect of the Brexit debate that few elsewhere in the UK may have thought about, but which raises urgent questions. Would there be a new opportunities, with a new version of the old Anglo-Irish special relationship? Or could a divisive border and economic harm revive dangerous tensions?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Hugh Levinson.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0707vdt)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b070cgkw)
Sam Coates of The Times looks at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b06zv3x1)
Suffragette

With Francine Stock.

Film-maker Sarah Gavron talks about Suffragette and the marked reactions to the film since it was released in cinemas.

Director Mark Jenkin shows Francine how to develop film in instant coffee.

Debut director Stephen Fingleton discusses the unexpected challenges of making his low budget feature, The Survivalist, a post-apocalyptic drama set almost entirely in a small hut.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0707y3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 15 FEBRUARY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0707vg3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b06zttbs)
Weather forecasting, Young people and politics

Weather forecasting: Laurie Taylor explores a scientific art form rooted in unpredictability. He talks to Phaedra Daipha, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University, who spent years immersing herself in a regional office of the National Weather Service in America. How do forecasters decide if a storm is to be described as severe or hazardous; or a day is breezy or brisk? Do they master uncertainty any better than other expert decision makers such as stockbrokers and poker players? Charged with the onerous responsibility of protecting the life and property of US citizens, how do they navigate the uncertain and chaotic nature of the atmosphere?

Also, young people, populism and politics. How do young Europeans regard the political process and are they more attracted to populist ideologies than their older counterparts? Gary Pollock, Professor of Politics at Manchester Metropolitan University, has used survey evidence from 14 European countries, to explore the mixture of political positions held by young people, finding they don't map easily on to the typical 'left-right' spectrum.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0707y3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707vg5)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707vg7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707vg9)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0707vgc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b070v86y)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch: Tibetan Buddhist, writer, & editor.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b070cjsn)
Mental health, Emergency loans for Scottish farmers, Flood insurance in Somerset, Bluetongue warning

The NHS estimates that one in four adults will experience some form of mental health problem this year. All this week the programme will explore the mental health issues affecting farmers and their families, and what help is available in rural areas.

Scotland's rural affairs secretary has apologised for delays in administering farm subsidy payments, and now there is a £20 million loan on offer to Scottish farmers to help bridge the gap. The National Farmers Union Scotland says if the loan is to be effective, the money needs to be available quickly.

In April a new system for insuring properties in high risk areas will be launched, called FloodRE. But as our reporter Clinton Rogers has discovered, without a cap on insurance premiums, those affected by flooding could still be paying a high price.

Experts at the Animal and Plant Health Agency say there is a high likelihood of bluetongue disease arriving in England this year. Widespread outbreaks in France last year mean there is an 80 per cent chance that infected midges (which carry the virus) will arrive in the UK by the late summer.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Fiona Clampin.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0707vgf)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mhyzf)
Raven

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the raven. Ravens are one of the most widely distributed birds in the world and can survive Arctic winters and scorching deserts. In the UK, Ravens were once widespread, even in cities but persecution drove them back into the wilder parts of our islands. Now they're re-colonising the lowlands and are even turning up on the outskirts of London where, since Victorian times, the only ravens were the ones kept at the Tower.


MON 06:00 Today (b070cnxs)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b070cnxv)
Who Owns Culture?

On Start the Week Tom Sutcliffe discusses who owns culture. The writer Tiffany Jenkins tells the story of how western museums have come to acquire treasures from around the world, but dismisses the idea of righting the wrongs of the past by returning artefacts. The Zimbabwean writer Tendai Huchu believes the west shouldn't underestimate the impact of colonisation on cultural identity. Ellen McAdam, Director of Birmingham Museums Trust, discusses the pressures regional museums are under. While the art critic Waldemar Januszczak eschews traditional views of Renaissance art, arguing that far from a classical Italian form, its roots are in the 'barbarian' lands of Flanders and Germany.
Producer: Hannah Robins.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b070cnxx)
Benjamin Franklin in London

Episode 1

In the middle of the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin spent almost two decades in London - at exactly the same time as Mozart, Casanova and Handel. This is an enthralling biography - not only of the man, but of the city when it was a hub of Enlightenment activity.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London.

From his house in Craven Street, he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful - in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, and on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends - and, as an American colonial representative, he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. This brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin sought to prevent the America's break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event.

Episode 1:
In November 1724, aged 18, Franklin is sent to London for the first time to buy printing equipment for a Philadelphia newspaper.

Written by George Goodwin
Abridged by Barry Johnston
Read by Nickolas Grace

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b070cnxz)
Julianne Moore

The Oscar-winning actor Julianne Moore talks to Jane about her role in the new film, Freeheld. It is based on the true story of Laurel Hester, a police officer in Ocean County, New Jersey and her struggle to ensure that, following her diagnosis with terminal lung cancer in 2005, her civil partner is entitled to her pension benefits.

Last week Met Police Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe suggested that Police should no longer automatically believe women who claim to have suffered rape or sexual abuse, and it should be illegal to name suspects until charged. So what will it mean if police change their approach to allegations of rape and sexual abuse and no longer automatically believe the complainant? Jane is joined by Yvonne Traynor, CEO of Rape Crisis South London, Surrey & Sussex, Fiona Mallon, temporary commander & Metropolitan Police lead on rape, and Vera Baird, Police & Crime Commissioner for Northumbria.

Psychotherapist, Christine Webber discusses how we can best support our children through their first teenage heartbreak.

Tonight on BBC4 Botticelli's Venus: The Making of an Icon sees artist and entrepreneur Sam Roddick exploring the enduring appeal of the Renaissance masterpiece. Sam joins Jane to explain the making of a very modern icon of female sexuality.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b070crdl)
Halfway Here

Episode 6

by Lucy Catherine.

15 year old Nettie is still being kept alive artificially after her accident. Her mum is trying to find out what she was up to by looking at her laptop.

Director ..... Mary Peate.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b06yr6px)
Being Bowie

Laurence Bolwell has been dressing as David Bowie and singing his songs on stage for 18 years. One Monday morning, early in January, he hears the news that his idol has died. That Friday night, he is due on stage with his act in a theatre in Carmarthen. Grace Dent tells the story of Laurence's week, and finds out what it's like to be a tribute artist the day your hero dies.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


MON 11:30 Linda Smith: A Modern Radio Star (b070vbzw)
Andy Hamilton presents a tribute to his friend, the comedian and Radio 4 favourite Linda Smith who died ten years ago, at the age of 48.

Originally recorded a few months after Linda's death, Andy Hamilton speaks to her friends and colleagues including Jeremy Hardy, Mark Steele, Hattie Hayridge, Sandy Toksvig, Nicholas Parsons, Chris Neill, Simon Hoggart, Barry Cryer and her partner Warren Lakin.

He also treats us to some of her best radio bits including her own sit com Linda Smith's Brief History of Timewasting; as a panellist on The News Quiz, Just a Minute and I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue, plus her musings on Radio 4's Devout Sceptics which led to her being asked to be President of the Humanist Society.

Written and presented by Andy Hamilton
Researched and compiled by Michael Pointon
Produced by Claire Jones.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b0707vgm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b070cxxy)
Series 1

The Scarlet Mark

Drs Adam Rutherford and Hannah Fry are on hand to solve everyday mysteries sent in by listeners. For the last few weeks they've been collecting cases to investigate using the power of science - from why people shout on their mobile phones to what causes traffic jams.

In the first episode, called 'The Scarlet Mark', they get to the root of the following conundrum, posed by Sheena Cruickshank in Manchester:

'My eldest son is ginger but I am blonde and my husband brunette so we are constantly asked where the red came from. Further, people do say the "ginger gene" is dying out, but how good is that maths or is it just anecdotal?'

Our science sleuths set out to discover what makes gingers ginger with a tale of fancy mice, Tudor queens and ginger beards.

Featuring historian and author Kate Williams and Jonathan Rees from the University of Edinburgh, one of the team who discovered the ginger gene.

If you have any scientific cases for the team to investigate please email: curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b070cxy0)
Student accommodation, Mobile phone contracts, Cheap flights

Mobile phone companies need to take more responsibility for mistakes they make when people are ending contracts - that's according to Citizens Advice. We talk to a listener who cancelled her contract only to find the company were taking money from her account years later.

With numbers of students set to rise from already record rates, decent student accommodation has never been more difficult to find. Big developers are investing billions in the sector, building high end blocks with perks like gyms, wifi, security and in house cinema. These might be nice to live in, but are they affordable and how do they sit within communities? You and Yours investigates.

And we take a look at regional airports. Is it right to subsidise them when the aim is to improve cohesion and create jobs? It's a widespread practice across Europe, and makes for cheaper tickets from some airports. But with a new set of subsidised routes about to come on the market we ask how much benefit they are to the consumer - and the taxpayer.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0707vgw)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b070cxy2)
Two hospitals in Syria have been targeted in airstrikes, with reports of many civilians killed. With relations between Russia and Turkey deteriorating further, is this now a mini world war?

A plane which had to return to Heathrow after the co-pilot was dazzled by a laser is due to take off again about now. We'll ask the Metropolitan Police how they catch people who misuse the beams.

Remember the flagship coalition policy of Free School Meals for infants? Some smaller schools are complaining about losing part of their funding.

And how hundreds of amateurs around the country are joining the Royal Shakespeare Company to play Bottom and his friends.


MON 13:45 In Therapy (b070v9y4)
Series 1

Louise and Richard

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie meets Louise and Richard who are expecting their first child in a few days.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is. John is older - in his 60s and a retired railway trade unionist. His wife and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around. We also hear Susie's first meeting with Jo - a new patient and an out of work actress.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b070cgkp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b070cxy6)
In Pieces to Camera

Stephen Ridges is stuck in a cheap hotel trying to save his career. He's a writer on a TV show and he's about to be fired. And his wife has just phoned to tell him not to bother coming home unless he can turn it all around. He has 12 hours.

He's working on Jelly House (a scripted reality programme involving kids parties) and he hates it. But he needs the money. As he writes for his life he struggles to come to terms with exploiting real people's lives for entertainment. We listen in on meetings where talk of 'spiking' the jelly and planting unseen fathers are excitedly agreed in a world where crazed media people will do anything in an attempt to entertain.

Script Editor - Abigail Youngman
Writer - Sean Grundy
Producer - Alison Crawford.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b070cxy8)
Heat 6, 2016

(6/17)
The sixth heat in the current season of the general knowledge quiz comes from Salford, with competitors from Shropshire, Merseyside and Lincolnshire making their bid for the title of Brain of Britain 2016.

Russell Davies asks the programme's traditionally testing questions. Could you remember who narrated the original series of The Clangers; who was runner-up in the Sports Personality of the Year award for 2015; or say what the time difference is between Perth and Sydney?

Today's winner will go through to the 2016 semi-finals later in the spring. For a bit of light relief the contestants will have to combine their knowledge to answer questions devised by a Brain of Britain listener, who'll win a prize if they can't do so successfully.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0709v4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Gospel Truth (b06ycmd8)
Episode 1

Gospel's uplifting and rejoicing sound is world famous, a multi million-dollar music genre that in many ways has ended up the beating heart of American popular music. But can gospel be gospel if it entertains and makes money as well as praises the Lord? Financial educator Alvin Hall explores how this American religious music genre has been affected by commercialisation.

In this first episode Alvin examines gospel's journey from the church to the charts through the music of Thomas Dorsey, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Mahalia Jackson and Sam Cooke. Now considered some of gospel's greatest artists, these early singers all met with strong criticism from the church as they took their songs from the sacred world into the secular. Alvin also reveals how other gospel performers in the first half of the 20th century struggled fulfilling their religious obligations whilst battling with the temptations of life on the road.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b070cxyb)
Series 13

Maths of Love and Sex

Robin Ince and Brian Cox get romantic (although unfortunately not with each other) as they discuss the mathematics of love and the statistics of sex. They are joined on stage by comedian and former maths student Paul Foot, mathematician Hannah Fry and statistician Professor Sir David Speigelhalter, as they discover whether a knowledge of numbers can help you in the affairs of the heart? Can a maths algorithm help you find your perfect mate at a party and what do the statistics tell us about what happens after the party, if you do! They find out whether mathematicians are more successful at dating than comedians, and whether a rational, scientific approach to love and life long happiness is really the answer.


MON 17:00 PM (b070cz5w)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707vh4)
Cabinet To Decide Official Position On Referendum/ Airline Pilots Worry About Lasers 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b06zqq9d)
Series 8

Calman, Cooke, Lowe

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Sarah Millican welcome:

* Comedian, Fearer of Raisins and Collector of Thimbles, Susan Calman
* An artist who's made an art out of copying art and claims that he has actually slept with the Mona Lisa, Adam Lowe
* A TV naturalist who admits that when she talks to animals, all they want to talk about is food, fighting and, well, mating, Lucy Cooke.

The Museum's guests discuss what Fifty Shades of Grey has in common with Capt. Kirk and Mr Spock making sweet exoplanetary love; how salt could be the building material of the future if only it didn't rain; and why living on a small island will either turn you into a pygmy or a giant.

Researchers: Anne Miller and Molly Oldfield of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and James Harkin.

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b070d1p4)
Johnny got an impressive number of Valentine's cards and Tom compares him to ladies'-man John. Tom and Tony have a ploughing match coming up tomorrow, and former 'best ploughman in Borsetshire', Bert, agrees to judge. Tom compliments Johnny on his progress - he has an assessment next week. Johnny's left to work alone, with Bert watching and complimenting him on the tilth. Bert reminisces about Freda and Johnny wonders whether he'll ever have such a relationship.

Helen puts some of the flowers from her huge bouquet in the bedroom for Ursula - Helen was rather overwhelmed by all his gifts. Rob's put out when ungrateful Helen's not keen to wear the unflattering dress he bought her, for Ursula, so she agrees. Henry throws Helen rather by telling Ursula that "daddy says you're my new grandma."
Tom and Rob have a debate about suppliers for the shop. Tom responds to Rob's hint of hypocrisy, explaining that, yes, sometimes they will stock non-organic - but there's more to consider about quality. Rob plays the issue down, telling Tom to relax.

Ursula offers to help Helen with looking after Henry. She settles in and talks to Helen about Rob and his brother. Rob comes home and says he knew Helen and Ursula would get on like a house on fire - their laughter when he came in proved him right. Ursula jokes with Rob that he's always right.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b070d28r)
Yann Martel, Love, Delacroix, Mark Wallinger

Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger is perhaps best known for his Christ-like figure which became the first artwork to stand on the empty Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square in London. His latest work involved him driving repeatedly round an Essex roundabout. He talks about that and his other new works that make up his new solo exhibition.

Yann Martel won the Man Booker Prize in 2002 with Life of Pi which has now sold 13m copies worldwide making it the highest-selling winning book in the prize's history. He talks about his latest novel, The High Mountains of Portugal, another magic realist fable this time spanning the 20th Century.

Love is a new comedy created by Judd Apatow which follows a romance between two Los Angeles singletons. Natalie Haynes reviews.

Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art focuses on how the artist Eugène Delacroix transformed French painting in the 19th century. Richard Cork reviews the new exhibition at the National Gallery in London.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Angie Nehring.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b070crdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Europe: Strangers on My Doorstep (b070d28t)
Germany: At the Centre

In the European migration crisis, Germany stands at the centre. Angela Merkel encouraged hundreds of thousands to move there in recent months, calling for a 'welcome culture' to show itself among her fellow citizens. It was meant to show that the Germans - partly because of their dark twentieth century history - were uniquely prepared to respond to the refugee's plight.

And Germany's recent history does offer a fascinating lens through which to understand the current crisis. Chris Bowlby visits the Friedland transit camp, now housing Syrians but which has received successive waves of refugees since the 1940s, beginning with some of the millions of ethnic Germans driven west by the Red Army. We'll hear how Germany absorbed these multi millions, and then millions more 'guest workers' from Turkey and elsewhere. Has this changed the country, redefining what it is to be German? In Cologne, Chris explores how these unresolved tensions are resurfacing today, as the country debates how far it can continue to receive refugees in such numbers, and how they will integrate into today's Germany

Producer: Shabnam Grewal.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b070d28w)
Inheritance

Why does inheritance arouse such powerful emotions? Family, death and money make for gripping stories - just ask Tolstoy, Austen or Dickens - but our attitudes also reflect the way we feel about society, the state, and even ourselves.

Discussions tend to dissolve into rows about levels of tax but in this programme Jo Fidgen explores the values and intuitions that underpin our strength of feeling.

Producer: Joe Kent.


MON 21:00 Editing Life (b06zr3zj)
In the last couple of years, a new genetic technology has taken the world of medical and biological research by storm. It is known as CRISPR and it allows scientists to change the DNA code of any organism precisely, quickly and cheaply. The A's, G's, C's and T's of the genetic code have never been so easy to edit and rewrite. Professor Matthew Cobb, a biologist at the University of Manchester, has witnessed the profound impact of CRISPR on his field and for Radio 4, he explores the enormous potential and the challenges unleashed by this new power over the genetic code.

CRISPR-cas9's came out of apparently arcane science on how bacteria defend themselves from viruses . Now there is speculation about when the first CRISPR baby will born. This will be a child who will have started out as the first human embryo to have a genetic fault edited and corrected in such a way that its descendents will also never carry that gene and suffer the disease it causes.

CRISPR's appearance and rapid adoption by scientists around the world has made hitherto impractical genetic manipulations doable in any species. The most controversial form of genetic engineering - human germline line gene therapy (on single celled embryos, egg and sperm) now looks feasible because of CRISPR's ease and accuracy. The ethical debate about germline gene therapy has a much greater sense of urgency for scientists and non-scientists alike.

The applications and concerns about CRISPR's potential uses extend way beyond the human germline into the natural world. For the first time, the gene editing technology makes practical a genetic mechanism called gene drive. Organism engineered with gene drives could be used to spread lethal genes through wild populations of pest animals and plants - such as malaria-carrying mosquitoes, invasive cane toads in Australia or weeds. But many question whether this is a use of CRISPR we could control once it had been released into the environment.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
Sound engineer: Bob Nettles.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b070cnxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b0707vhj)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b070d28y)
Syria Airstrikes

50 people have been killed in airstrikes on civilians in Syria. Who is to blame? Should local councils be able to boycott foreign goods or services? And the mother of one of the Columbine killers breaks her silence - 18 years after the high school massacre.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b070d5sw)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 1

The first adult novel by Meg Rosoff, author of the bestselling Young Adult novel "How I Live Now".

Jonathan Trefoil has arrived in New York from college and is ready for his life to begin. He's found himself an apartment and he's temporarily in charge of his brother's dogs (Dante, a Border Collie, and Sissy, a Spaniel) while his brother is working in Dubai. His best friend Max gets him a job at Comrade, a marketing company run by one of their school friends. He has a smart girlfriend, Julie, who will join him once she's found work. Life seems good.

But it isn't really, he's lost; a dreamer floundering. His creativity is stifled by the mind-numbing work at Comrade: thinking up pithy ways to sell a budget office supplies company's wares, which they always reject in favour of tried and tested slogans "Pens: 3 for 2". He holds onto his sanity by writing a graphic novel "The New York Inferno" in which a Border Collie spirit guide accompanies a young poet through the nine circles of the New York underworld.

Things gradually come to a head when Julie secures a job in her company's New York office and the different, unhappy strands of Jonathan's life begin to slowly unravel.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b06zryhp)
Taking Turns in Conversation

Michael Rosen and linguist Dr Laura Wright discuss how well we judge taking it in turns when we're in conversation. Professor Stephen Levinson has new research on the science behind this, and joins them in the studio for a carefully-calibrated discussion.. He believes that the back-and-forth pattern we instinctively fall into may have evolved before language itself. Levinson's research has found that it takes about 200 milliseconds for us to reply to each other, but it takes about 600 milliseconds to prepare what we're going to say - so we're preparing as we listen. Levinson notes that this is a pattern found across all human languages, and some animal species, and that infants begin taking turns in interactions at about six months of age, before they can even speak. But what's going on when someone seems to get it wrong, to interrupt or talk over the other person?
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 America in Black and White (b070d5sy)
Criminal Justice

Protests against shootings of young black men by the police have pushed the issue of race to the top of the public agenda in the United States. Now BBC Washington correspondent Rajini Vaidyanathan, who has covered many of the recent protests, sets out to examine some of the deep, underlying structural issues which America still has with race.

In this first episode, Rajini investigates the criminal justice system. She examines the statistics and hears stories of those involved in the system. She speaks to liberal activists opposed to what they call the system of 'mass incarceration', and in Nebraska visits the conservative politician promoting laws to reduce the number of people behind bars. "Will that help black Americans?" she asks him. His reply? "I hope so."

Elsewhere she hears from protesters arguing that the system can never be reformed, and that the police need to be disarmed. She visits the retired police chief advising President Obama on the way forward, who acknowledges the problem but argues that "all black lives matter", including those killed by criminals, and that protesters must accept that the police are part of the solution. He has now been hired to help Chicago's troubled force improve its record.

Rajini also spends time with the police force teaching all its officers how to be 'ethical protectors'.

Producer: Giles Edwards.



TUESDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0707vm4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b070cnxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707vm6)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707vm8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707vmb)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0707vmd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b070vbg0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch: Tibetan Buddhist, writer, & editor.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b070dks1)
Organic food nutrition; Care farming; 4x4 damage

A new study published today in the British Journal of Nutrition investigates the nutritional differences between organic and conventionally-produced food. It concludes that there are differences, particularly when it comes to the percentage of beneficial Omega 3 fatty acids in milk. But does that mean it's necessarily more better for you? Caz Graham talks to two academics about what the research means.

Rangers on Dartmoor are warning that the moor is being damaged by 4x4 drivers "off-roading". They say that, after weeks of rain, the wet ground is vulnerable to erosion, and warn that several protected sites in the area have suffered severe damage.

As part of the BBC's "In the Mind" season, Nancy Nicolson explores "care farming" in the Highlands, and finds out how it helps vulnerable people - including those with mental health problems.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk3x)
Mistle Thrush: Part One

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the Mistle Thrush. Loud rattling calls, like someone scraping a comb across wood, tell you that Mistle Thrushes are about. From midsummer to early autumn, bands of Mistle Thrushes roam the countryside, where they feed on open pastures, among stubble or on moorland. These birds are very fond of the white sticky berries of mistletoe and spread the seeds into cracks of tree bark when they wipe their bills or defecate.


TUE 06:00 Today (b070dks3)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b070dks6)
Naomi Climer on engineering

Naomi Climer is one of the most senior British women engineers working in the communications industry, and after decades working on major projects she's left the world of business to become the first female president of Institution of Engineering and Technology (the IET). As part of her presidency, Naomi has launched a campaign called - Engineer a better World - to make us realise that engineering is an exciting and creative activity.. and, in particular, to attract and retain more women in the profession.

Naomi Climer's most recent role was running Sony's Media Cloud Services. She was based in California where, she says, engineers are treated like rock stars. She talks to Jim al-Khalili about how British engineers can gain higher status than they do today.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b070dksc)
Jan Ravens talks to Lyse Doucet

Actress and impressionist, Jan Ravens talks to one of her favourite subjects, the BBC's Chief International Correspondent, Lyse Doucet. They discuss how much her public image reflects her private self and how much consideration she gives to clothes and jewellery when appearing on television .
Producer Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b070dksg)
Benjamin Franklin in London

Episode 2

In the middle of the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin spent almost two decades in London - at exactly the same time as Mozart, Casanova and Handel. This is an enthralling biography - not only of the man, but of the city when it was a hub of Enlightenment activity.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London.

From his house in Craven Street, he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful - in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, and on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends - and, as an American colonial representative, he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. This brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin sought to prevent the America's break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event.

Episode 2:
After spending over 30 years in America, Franklin returns to London - not as a humble printer, but as a leading politician.

Written by George Goodwin
Abridged by Barry Johnston
Read by Nickolas Grace

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b070dksj)
Cartoonist Jacky Fleming; Mother of Columbine killer; Fall in number of childminders

Iconic cartoonist Jacky Fleming talks about female genius and her first book in 10 years The Trouble with Women.

Sue Klebold, the mother of one of the Columbine killers talks to Jane about living with the pain caused by her son. In 1999, two teenagers armed with bombs and guns walked into their school and began shooting. Twelve children and one teacher died at Colorado's Columbine High while another 24 were injured in what was then 'the worst school shooting in history'. Sue Klebold's son Dylan carried out the carefully planned attack along with Eric Harris before they shot themselves. Speaking in a rare interview, she describes her love for her son and attempts to find a reason for the tragedy.

The number of childminders in England has dropped by 10,000 in the past five years, putting pressure on childcare places and raising costs for working parents. Why are so many deciding to leave the work?

Flouting the dress code: being yourself or just plain rude? Hilary Alexander and Lucy Mangan discuss.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Jane Thurlow.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b070dksm)
Halfway Here

Episode 7

by Lucy Catherine.

Luke is still keeping watch by his sister's hospital bedside.

Director ..... Mary Peate.


TUE 11:00 Unhappy Child, Unhealthy Adult (b070dksr)
We already know that unhappy experiences in childhood are more likely to lead to mental health issues in later life.

What's becoming clear, however, is that chronic stress and anxiety during this time can trigger dramatic changes in the body which contribute to our risk of developing diseases like diabetes, heart disease, cancer and stroke. Chronic stress in childhood is also associated with a shortened life span.

Health-harming behaviours which contribute to disease risk, like smoking, drinking alcohol and drug use, are more common among those who have endured traumatic experiences in childhood.

But scientists are now revealing that these stressful childhood experiences have a direct impact on our physical health, through their impact on the developing brain and the immune system.

The question now is how to use this knowledge to improve the nation's health. Should health professionals routinely ask patients about traumatic events in their childhoods? And if so, who should broach the subject, where and when?

Geoff Watts visits a GP practice which is about to trial this novel idea, and looks at the growing body of evidence revealing how adverse childhood experiences contribute to poor health and shorter lives.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 11:30 The Beat Women (b06084ks)
The forgotten women of the Beat Generation supported, loved, endured, and were creatively overshadowed by their famous male counterparts. More than just muses, they were often authors in their own right. Laura Barton travels to New York to meet some of these women, writers such as Joyce Johnson, who already had a book deal when she met Jack Kerouac as a young woman, but has seen her long career overshadowed by her brief time as Keraouc's girlfriend. Hettie Jones risked everything to defy 1950's convention and her Jewish parents to marry the black poet LeRoi Jones, who later became Amiri Baraka.

Then there are writers such as Anne Waldman, from a later generation to Hettie and Joyce, who learnt from the Beat Generation and aims to keep the tradition alive today.

While in many cases the work of the women of the Beats was not be as innovative as their male counterparts, Laura argues that we should celebrate the writing of the women who fought to forge their own paths, for whom merely telling their story was a struggle.

Presenter: Laura Barton
Producer: Jessica Treen.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0707vmg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b070dkst)
Series 1

The Phantom Jam

Drs Rutherford and Fry set out to discover what makes traffic jam. Adam ventures on to the M25 in search of a tailback, and Hannah looks at projects around the world that have attempted to solve the scourge of the traffic jam.

Featuring Neal Harwood from the Transport Research Laboratory and BBC technology reporter, Jane Wakefield. And Masdar City man.

If you have any scientific cases for the team to investigate please email: curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b070dksw)
Call You & Yours: What Inspired You to Read?

This year marks the centenary of the birth of Roald Dahl - the first writer many children read for pleasure.

Studies suggest reading for pleasure is as important for a child's educational achievement as family income and background. So how can you persuade children that a good story is as fun as a good game?

On Call You & Yours we would like to find out how to inspire children to read. Tell us which books first got you excited about reading, and which ones you will be passing on to your children? Please email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

The programme also hears from well known children's authors, and the Children's Laureate, Chris Riddell, who tells us how he thinks children can be encouraged to read for fun.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0707vmj)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b070dkt0)
David Cameron is in Brussels to drum up support among MEPs for his EU reform demands, but the President of the European Parliament says there are still sticking points. Can David Cameron get a deal by the summit?

The French energy company EDF says four of the UK's nuclear power plants are to stay open beyond their scheduled closure date. Will that be enough to keep the lights on? We'll discuss.

Five months into his leadership, how is Jeremy Corbyn being seen by labour members in his north London heartland?

A possible breakthrough in cancer treatment, but how soon could patients benefit?

Also in the programme, how the poet William Blake has influenced bands from to Radiohead to U2.


TUE 13:45 In Therapy (b070v8b7)
Series 1

Harriet

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie meets Harriet, who is in her 40s. Since failed IVF, she has separated from her partner and is working in the office at a junior school.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is. Then there's John. He's older - in his 60s. A retired railway trade unionist, his wife and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around. We also hear Jo's first meeting with Susie. She is a new patient. An out of work actress. Then there's Louise and Richard - a couple expecting their first baby in a few days.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b070d1p4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b070dkt2)
Deliverers

A dark comedy about a disastrous school trip to France. A group of pupils are stranded outside Paris on their journey to the finals of the Young European Ethical Enterprise Awards. Newly qualified teacher Lee and more experienced colleagues Val and Lesley struggle to cope when one of their students goes missing and then try to minimise the fallout from the incident back home where headmistress Eve is determined to find out what really happened.

Directed by Liz Webb.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b070dkt5)
Helen Castor takes the chair for the programme which showcases new historical research and the people doing it.

Today, Tom Holland is on the Dorset/Wiltshire border where a farmer has dug up a Bronze Age body. Remarkably, as Dr Tom Booth from the University of Sheffield explains, this is far from unique. Indeed, just when the Pharaohs were building the pyramids to house them forever, Bronze Age Britons were busy mummifying their dead too.

With Bridge of Spies and now Deutschland '83, Helen Castor finds out why the Cold War has become such a hot topic with historians as well as TV viewers.

And Dan Snow takes us back to the year when the British Museum opened its doors for the first time, Wedgwood started production, Kew Gardens was founded and Britain swept almost everyone away on battlefields and seas across the globe. Is 1759 the most important date in history?

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b070dkt9)
Requiem for a King

Tom Heap tells the story of coal from Industrial Revolution to its apparent demise.

As the world begins to fall out of love with coal, is it too early to write its obituary?

Coal drove the Industrial Revolution in this country. It could be argued that it helped to put the 'Great' into Great Britain.

Now, at least in Britain, we're turning our back on the sooty black stuff. The last deep pit, Kellingley Colliery, closed in December 2015 and all of the coal-fired power stations in the UK are set to close in the next decade. Coal is on its knees.

But what about the rest of the world? China and the US have had an enormous appetite for coal and while both will continue to mine and burn the stuff for the coming decades, it is possible that we may have already reached 'peak coal' - the point at which coal demand will plateau, before declining.

Coal will continue to lift developing countries through the various economic growth. It is expected that areas of South Asia will continue to depend on coal to generate power but even in those places they are hoping to implement new, cleaner ways of burning coal. The fuel could be facing a 'long sunset'.

But is there a glimmer of hope?

Carbon Capture and Storage has often been hailed as a potential cure-all for Carbon Dioxide emissions from fossil fuels, so could it step in now to save coal before it is confined to the annals of history?

It may be too early to say. However in Canada there is one commercially operating plant. Many experts believe that we need CCS if we are going to seriously tackle our global CO2 emissions because, at least in the short term, coal will remain on his dusty throne for the coming decades.

Presenter: Tom Heap
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b070dnqr)
Mouthpiece: Turning the Spoken Word into Songs

Michael Rosen & Laura Wright hear about Mouthpiece, a project in which composer Jennifer Bell has been given access to interview people from the Speaker to the barista about their working lives in the Houses of Parliament. She's then created songs from their words to show the human side of life there, and to reflect on the ways in which Parliament voices the country.
There is a tradition of using verbatim speech in music, and Michael compares Jennifer's work to the Radio Ballads of Ewan MacColl and Charles Parker, in particular Singing The Fishing.
Producer Beth O'Dea
More information about Jennifer Bell's work can be found on her website, www.jenniferbellcompany.com.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b070dnqt)
Samantha Bond and Jason Cowley

Actress Samantha Bond and editor of The New Statesman Jason Cowley join Harriett Gilbert for some passionate conversation about favourite books.

Samantha Bond, star of 'Home Fires', 'Downton Abbey' and a one-time Miss Moneypenny, is also a voracious reader. Her choice is Donna Tartt's first novel, the best-selling 'A Secret History', a murder-mystery with a Vermont campus setting and an intriguing cast of characters.

Jason Cowley is credited with revitalising The New Statesman as its editor. He recommends 'The Secret Agent' by Joseph Conrad, a novel about a terrorist bomb-plot devised by a shady Soho shopkeeper who doubles as a spy for the Russians. The story was inspired by the death of a French anarchist who accidentally blew himself up while attempting to plant a bomb in Greenwich Park in 1894, and has, in its turn, inspired many adaptations since its publication in 1907.

Harriett's choice is 'The Dead Lake' by Hamid Ismailov, a haunting fairytale, with hints of Gunther Grass' 'The Tin Drum', about the impact of repeated atomic testing in Soviet-era Kazakhstan on the local people of the Steppes.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


TUE 17:00 PM (b070dnqw)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707vml)
David Cameron tries to drum up support for his EU plans. New cancer treatment welcomed.


TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b05vcsdq)
Series 10

One Man, Two Charlies

Ed Reardon leads us through the ups and down of his week, complete with his trusty companion, Elgar, and the curmudgeonly attitude to life that he's mastered over years of failure.

Ed finally finds himself homeless. However, all is not lost as an unexpected bonus of the recent financial apocalypse is that there are many premises in need of temporary caretakers. So it is that Ed finds himself residing in a furniture warehouse in Berkhamsted, complete with 'dream kitchen' fake fruit and a massage chair. He also somehow finds himself an author with a two book cookbook deal and a three figure advance.

With Stephanie Cole and Celia Imrie.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.

Produced by Dawn Ellis.

Ed Reardon's Week is a BBC Radio Comedy production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b070dq89)
Tom hopes that Helen will get more involved with the shop when she has recovered. Pat's certain that Ursula will be a great help to Rob and Helen, but Tom feels that Rob is organising things before talking to others (Pat could have helped at home). Pat sticks up for Rob and Tom's intrigued to meet Ursula, given that she's Rob's mother.
Roy and Kirsty discuss Valentine's Day - Roy suggests an 'anti Valentine's' card. Kirsty and Roy have each received an anonymous card, wondering who they can be from. Kirsty's still worried about Helen, and suspicious of Rob, who always 'appears' to be doing the right thing for Helen. But Roy doesn't seem to be worried.
Pat meets Ursula and Helen reassures Pat that she won't be side-lined. Kirsty tries to phone Helen but Ursula answers and agrees to pass on a message. Friendly Ursula knows how concerned Kirsty has been and suggests she comes round to see Helen - with Ursula there to help, Helen will be freer to see her friends. "You did say you were Rob's mother?" asks an astounded Kirsty.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b070dq8c)
Primal Scream's Bobby Gillespie, Steven Isserlis, Amalia Ulman

Primal Scream's Bobby Gillespie discusses the band's new album Chaosmosis and why they have returned to 'immediate' pop songwriting.

Cellist Steven Isserlis tells John Wilson about his new recording of the Elgar Cello Concerto, and his fear of performing the complete Bach Cello Suites from memory.

Amalia Ulman, the social media-based artist, discusses her work in Performing for the Camera, a new exhibition at Tate Modern in London, which examines the relationship between photography and performance, from the invention of photography in the 19th century to the selfie culture of today.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b070dksm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b070dq8f)
Sunni Shia Splits?

Are international conflicts creating tensions between Sunni and Shia Muslims in the UK?

Shabnam Mahmood reports from both Sunni and Shia communities and reveals how divisive messages from the Middle East are fuelling intolerance here.

Organisations which monitor hate crimes say sectarian violence, while low level, is increasing.

One Shia man tells the programme: "It is now becoming quite dangerous. It is an attack on me as a Shia that really scares me."

Mahmood reports from one of an increasing number of unity events being staged across the country to foster good relations. A Sunni imam tells her: "These are dangerous times and the religious leadership need to be seen to be doing things to bring communities together."

So can such work prevent tensions escalating in the face of the sectarian propaganda that's increasingly available online and on satellite television channels?

Producer: Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0707vmn)
Guide dogs in temples, Pips consultation

Amit Patel took his guide dog to the UK's largest Hindu temple for Diwali, but ran into problems. He explains why to Peter White. And the RNIB comes into the studio to talk about the consultation on Personal Independence Payments.

Producer: Siobhann Tighe.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b070dq8h)
E-cigarettes, Asherman's syndrome, Rugby

The UK's first licensed e-cig, owned by a tobacco company, is now classed as a medicine paving the way for it to be prescribed on the NHS to help people quit. Robert West, Professor of Psychology at University College London and one of the world's leading experts on smoking cessation, and GP Margaret McCartney debate the issues.

Asherman's Syndrome, a little known complication of surgery that is often missed but can cause infertility. Obstetrician Virginia Beckett explains how Asherman's Syndrome occurs and how it is treated.

Rugby is growing in popularity, particularly among children, with 1.2 million of them now playing at schools and clubs in England alone. But at what cost? Rugby is rough and injuries are more common than most parents think.

After her son and other young people were hurt repeatedly on the rugby field, Allyson Pollock, Professor of Public Health Research and Policy at Queen Mary, University of London, explored the incidence of injuries. From her research she is now recommending an end to the contact element of rugby in young people. Rugby Football Union's community medical director Dr Mike England responds.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b070dks6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0707vmq)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b070dr3k)
William caught up in EU referendum debate

Duke's controversial remarks; Syria allows aid to besieged areas; Poland holocaust row

(Photo shows Duke of Cambridge speaking at Foreign Office; credit - Getty Images).


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b070dr3m)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 2

Rhashan Stone reads the new novel by Meg Rosoff, author of the bestselling "How I Live Now".

Set in New York, the novel follows graphic designer Jonathan Trefoil as he navigates big city life as a fully-fledged adult. Aided by canine companions Dante the collie and Sissy the spaniel - who've been left in his charge by his brother James - Jonathan wishes there was a book he could read ("How To Be A Person") that would help him cope with his new responsibilities.

Increasingly worn down by his mind-numbing job in a marketing company, the one bright spot on Jonathan's horizon is the imminent arrival of his girlfriend Julie. But what will she make of the tiny apartment he's found? And how will she get on with the dogs?

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b070cxyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 America in Black and White (b07183xh)
Segregation

Rajini Vaidyanathan continues her examination of the debate about race in the United States. In this second episode she looks at segregation.

The famous 'Brown versus the Board of Education' legal case and the civil rights movement were supposed to have brought Americans together, but in Kansas City Rajini sees for herself the much more complicated legacy of desegregation. On the one hand, splintering solidarity in the black community; on the other, a city where white and black Americans still live quite separate lives.

Demographers suggest America is becoming less segregated, but in Atlanta, one of the big southern cities supposedly driving the desegregation, she finds the reality doesn't quite match the statistics. Catching up with a family featured throughout the series, she finds estate agents steering black families away from white neighbourhoods. She discusses that with Julian Castro, the US Housing Secretary, and hears about his new rules to get communities integrating.

In Connecticut she visits a community which has spent 20 years trying to integrate its schools, without requiring it of anyone.

Producer: Giles Edwards.



WEDNESDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0707vp0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b070dksg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707vp2)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707vp4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707vp6)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0707vp8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b070ss12)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch: Tibetan Buddhist, writer, & editor.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b070fdhq)
Flood update, Mental health awareness, Academic Archers conference

In December, floods left dairy farmer David Martin's milking parlour knee-deep in water. Two and half months on, Caz Graham goes to meet him, and finds out what his biggest concerns are now that the floodwaters have subsided.

Farming Today continues its week-long look at mental health. We hear from a campaigner who wants agricultural colleges to include education about mental health as part of their courses.

And the academic side of the Archers! We find out about a conference taking place in London today, at which a range of academic disciplines will turn their spotlight on the everyday story of country folk - from a paper on 'Lynda Snell as Archetypal Class Warrior' to one which investigates the similarities between Rob Titchner and Shakespeare's Othello.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk4j)
Great Spotted Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the Great Spotted woodpecker. In spring Great Spotted Woodpeckers drum loudly with their bills against tree bark to advertise their territories. Unlike many of our woodland birds, which are declining, Great Spotted Woodpeckers have increased rapidly over the last few decades - up to 250% since the 1970's.


WED 06:00 Today (b070fdhs)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 The Pope's Letters (b072jknz)
Saint John Paul was one of the most famous faces of the 20th Century - during the years of his globetrotting pontificate he was probably seen by more people than anyone in history. Now, the discovery of hundreds of letters charting a deep friendship with a Anna-Teresa Tymiencka, a married woman for 32 years, has revealed a new side of his life.

Edward Stourton presents extracts from the letters which convey John Paul's sense that she was a "gift" in his life and how important her companionship became to his role in the church.

This programme is only available within the UK.

Producer Phil Pegum
Editor Christine Morgan.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b070fdhx)
Benjamin Franklin in London

Episode 3

In the middle of the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin spent almost two decades in London - at exactly the same time as Mozart, Casanova and Handel. This is an enthralling biography - not only of the man, but of the city when it was a hub of Enlightenment activity.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London.

From his house in Craven Street, he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful - in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, and on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends - and, as an American colonial representative, he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. This brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin sought to prevent the America's break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event.

Episode 3:
Franklin's achievements in the field of physics, and specifically that of electricity, have won him an international reputation.

Written by George Goodwin
Abridged by Barry Johnston
Read by Nickolas Grace

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b070fdhz)
Sex Education in Schools

Branwen Jeffreys the BBC's Education Editor on why the government's rejected MPs' calls to make sex education in schools compulsory.

Kate Bornstein the American author, playwright, performance artist, and gender theorist. She identifies herself as gender non-conforming having been born male - but undergoing gender surgery in the 1980's. She's talks to Jane about her new series of performances where she explores the notion of "not-man, not-woman identity in a world that demands we be one or the other".

We hear from Ruth Ehrlich a young woman who decided to report a sexual assault on a London bus after seeing an advertising campaign urging women to come forward. Laura Bates Founder of the Every Day Sexism Project looks at what's being done around the country by police forces to catch those responsible.

KM Peyton, author of Flambards, had her first book published at the age of 15 and has had a book published every year since. She's now 86. She talks about her latest novel Wild Lily set during the 1920s and her life as a writer over the last 70 years.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Beverley Purcell.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b070fdj1)
Halfway Here

Episode 8

by Lucy Catherine.

Luke is desperate to communicate with his comatose twin sister somehow.

Director ..... Mary Peate.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b070fdj3)
Louise and Ivor - Negative Attitude

Fi Glover with a conversation between a retired photographer and his daughter, about the preservation of his archive of half a million negatives into the digital age. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Verdun - The Sacred Wound (b070fdj5)
The Battle

Verdun is the sacred wound of France. No other battle of the Great War would so define the trauma of loss, the bitterness of occupation and the Republic's desire to repulse the ancient enemy. It began in a rain of steel and ended with both sides exhausted but crucially France undefeated. It was the last battle the nation would fight alone and would, in the decades to come, help shape modern Europe. David Reynolds explores both the many meanings the battle generated in 1916 and the memory of loss that came to shape France & Germany in the post war years.

On February 21st 1916, this quiet part of the front, with its seemingly impregnable array of fortresses, was subjected to an almost unendurable bombardment. Industrial slaughter on an unprecedented scale. A million shells fall that day on an unprepared and increasingly panicked French army. Yet as the Germans advanced through torn up terrain there was still life and it was firing back.

What had been planned as an overwhelming breakthrough to crush French resolve & bring about a war of movement would escalate into 10 months of mutual artillery slaughter with soldiers scraping and burrowing into the earth to simply hold the line. It was a battle that made the name of Philippe Petain, ensured the majority of French forces marked by service there & ruined the reputations of its supreme commanders Erich von Falkenhayn, whose masterplan Verdun had been and Marshall Joffre, accused in Parliament of military failings & for presiding over terrible losses.

In the first of two programmes, historian David Reynolds travels to Verdun and its mournful battlefields to better understand what it meant for two nations to wage industrial warfare over a patch of land no bigger than the distance from Leeds to Bradford.

Producer: Mark Burman.


WED 11:30 Reluctant Persuaders (b06bnq1g)
Series 1

We Try Harder

Change is afoot at Hardacre's, London's worst advertising agency. New accounts chief Amanda Brook is well underway with her plans to turn the agency around, insisting they take any work they can get. Creative team Joe and Teddy thus find themselves reduced to working on posters for industrial adhesives, cast iron stoves, and jewellery for dogs.

Horrified at seeing his name associated with such a low calibre of clients, creative director and advertising legend Rupert Hardacre resolves to bring in a better class of account. He enlists Amanda's help to chase down McCutcheon's Whisky, a client he worked with many years earlier.

While Hardacre and Amanda head off, Joe and Teddy are left at the office determined to prove that they can design a poster, hire a plumber, and interview a client entirely unsupervised. Their jobs may just depend on it.

Rupert Hardacre - Nigel Havers
Amanda Brook - Josie Lawrence
Joe - Matthew Baynton
Teddy - Rasmus Hardiker

Director Alan Nixon
Producer Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b0707vpb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b070ffbh)
Series 1

The Aural Voyeur

Drs Rutherford and Fry tackle a vexing case sent in by Daniel Sarano from New Jersey, who asks why people shout on their mobile phones in public.

Our science sleuths find the answer by delving into the inner workings of telephony with a tale of engineering rivalry, Victorian etiquette and early otolaryngology.

Featuring acoustic technologist Nick Zakarov and historian Greg Jenner, author of 'A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Daily Life.'

If you have any scientific cases for the team to investigate please email: curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b070ffbk)
Charity call centres, Pay-day loans, Gardening

Last year was a bad one for charities - in today's programme we explore how charities might learn from the criticism and find new ways to protect their donors.

Telephone fundraising used to be very lucrative way of raising money for charities. But undercover investigations into call centres found that some were pressurising elderly and vulnerable people. We speak to a former employee of GoGen, a company that has now closed down, to find out what the call handlers were expected to do.

We examine why charities targeted one group of donors, so called "Dorothy Donors". These are older women, who like to donate to charity. Did charities take advantage of their good nature?

Also, we speak to the boss of pay day lender, The Money Shop on how he's trying to improve the reputation of his industry.

The growth in Garden Centres offering more than just plants - we speak to the retailers with coffee shops and dog groomers next to the roses.

And the listener who discovered her Facebook profile had been cloned, and a fake profile was sending messages to her friends.

Producer: Lydia Thomas
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0707vpl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b070ffbm)
David Cameron has been making final efforts to win support for his proposed reforms of the European Union. Among the visitors to Downing Street was Boris Johnson. How important is it for the Prime Minister to win the backing of the Mayor of London?

UN convoys in Syria are attempting to deliver desperately-needed aid to thousands of people trapped by the fighting. We hear from people besieged in Aleppo and an aid worker.

What price privacy? Apple says it will fight a court order to help the FBI access data on a phone, which belonged to a man who carried out a mass shooting.


WED 13:45 In Therapy (b070nvxf)
Series 1

Jo

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie has her first meeting with Jo, a new patient and an out of work actress.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is. John is older - in his 60s, and a retired railway trade unionist. His wide and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around. Then there's Louise and Richard - a couple expecting their first baby in a few days.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b070dq89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b03szts2)
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency

The Modern Husband Course

A new two-part dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's latest No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency book, 'The Minor Adjustment Beauty Salon'. Mma Remotswe and Mma Makutsi return to Radio 4 for a tenth series based on the popular novels set in Bostwana, dramatised by the author.

Episode 1 : The Modern Husband Course
Mr J.L.B. Matekoni embarks on a quest for self-improvement, with a little encouragement from Mma Ramotswe. Mma Makutsi settles into her new house while hiding a secret from her best friend.

Mma Ramotswe.................................CLAIRE BENEDICT
Mma Makutsi......................................NADINE MARSHALL
Mr J L B Matekoni...............................BEN ONWUKWE
Mma Sheba/Aunt Radiphuti................ADJOA ANDOH
Phuti Radiphuti ..................................JUDE AKUWUDIKE
Charlie / Liso......................................MAYNARD EZIASHI
Mma Soleti..........................................ELEANOR CROOKS
Mma Keitumetse.................................ANNA BENGO
Student...............................................STEVE TOUSSAINT
Mma Molapo................................... ....JANICE ACQUAH

Directed by Eilidh McCreadie


WED 15:00 Money Box (b070fft3)
Money Box Live: Is the Isa on its last legs?

Louise Cooper and guests debate: is the tax free ISA on its last legs?

Interest paid on Cash Isas from major High Street banks has been falling steadily. While some current or savings accounts actually have better returns on your money, than if you'd left your cash in a tax free ISA wrapper. Why are rates on Cash Isas from major banks so poor?

There's at least some good news for savers but ironically it won't help the ISA. When the Personal Savings Allowance comes into force in April, most of us will no longer be taxed on the interest we earn on our savings in banks or building society accounts. So we may choose not to put our savings in an ISA but chase better returns elsewhere.

Yet there are developments which could give the ailing ISA's profile a boost. Help to Buy Isas, launched by the Government last December to aid first time buyers, are very popular. More than a quarter of a million people have signed up for one since the launch. And for those people who want to take on a bit more risk for possibly better returns, there's the expected start of Peer to Peer ISAS, this April.

So what is the future for the ISA?

Join Louise Cooper and guests. E mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Or ring 03 700 100 444 on Wednesday from 1pm.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b070dq8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b070fft5)
Museums and nationalism, Imagining utopias

Museums and the 'nation': What can we learn about nationalism by looking at a country's cultural institutions? Laurie Taylor talks to Peggy Levitt, Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College, and author of a study which explores how museums today represent diversity and make sense of immigration and globalisation. She interviewed a range of museum directors, curators, and policymakers and heard the inside stories of the famous paintings and objects which define collections across the globe; from Europe to the United States, Asia, and the Middle East. They're joined by Julian Spalding, the art critic and writer.

Also, imagining utopias. Professor Craig Calhoun, director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, considers the role of impossible dreams in shaping our reality.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b070fft7)
Independent moves online, Editor-in-chief of Huffington Post UK, Genre-led divisions at the BBC

After thirty years, the Independent and the Independent on Sunday are to end their print editions next month - although they'll continue online. In addition, sister paper i has been sold to Johnston Press for £24 million. The Independent was selling more than 400,000 copies a day at its peak in the late 1980s, but its current paid circulation is around 56,000. Steve Hewlett talks to two key decision makers involved in the change; Amol Rajan, Editor of The Independent and Steve Auckland, Group CEO of ESI Media, which owns all three titles.

Today, we also hear from the Editor in Chief of the Huffington Post UK. The British incarnation of the online platform founded in the US in 2005 is now just one of legion 'digital native' content organisations, credited with playing a part in the demise of news in print. Today, Huffington Post UK will be guest edited by the Duchess of Cambridge. To discuss how this and other innovations might also raise the profile of the Huffington Post UK, Steve Hewlett is joined by Editor in Chief Stephen Hull.

BBC 3 has this week become an online-only platform. It follows reports that BBC 3 might merge with Radio 1 to form a new 'BBC Youth' brand, and that the BBC Director General Tony Hall may soon announce plans for a corporation-wide restructuring into genre-led divisions, such as BBC Inform & BBC Entertain, rather than channels. Steve is joined by Lorraine Heggessey, former Controller of BBC 1 and Tim Suter, media consultant & founding partner in Ofcom, to discuss the pros and cons of reshaping BBC content in this way.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b070fft9)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707vq3)
German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, says David Cameron's EU demands are justified.


WED 18:30 Tim FitzHigham: The Gambler (b05r3z49)
Series 2

Episode 4

Adventuring comedian Tim FitzHigham and his old nemesis Alex Horne recreate a 19th century bet; can Tim ride a horse from London to Dover and back before Alex makes 1 million dots on a piece of paper?"


WED 19:00 The Archers (b070fftd)
Pip invites a delighted Rex to her birthday drinks tonight at The Bull. She thanks Rex for his advice about Matthew, and reveals she was on the point of giving up until she spoke to Rex. Pip asks about a Valentine's card she received - the writing looks like Toby's. Rex says quickly that it wasn't from him. Pip insists she is not the kind of girl that men pine over. Toby insists to a miffed Rex that he was just trying to play cupid for Rex, who tells Toby to drop it. Back to business, Rex and Toby discuss the specifications of the egg-mobile with Bert. He accepts their challenge to build it.
The Grundys go ahead with introducing cattle to the land at Grange Farm without Oliver's consent. Bert questions their actions but Joe isn't concerned.

Ruth and Pip are working hard. David, meanwhile, checks through the paperwork for the sale of the herd tomorrow. Pip's planning a relatively quiet night, mindful of all the changes at Brookfield. Pip and Ruth share a heartfelt moment, and together they milk the 'original' cows one final time. They're looking forward to the future, and Pip says part of what has kept her positive is having Matthew beside her. "That's love for you," says Ruth, and Pip realises that she really does love Matthew.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b070fn1w)
Freeheld review, Anna Hope, Jack Garratt, Unexpected Eisenstein

Stella Duffy reviews Julianne Moore and Ellen Page in Freeheld, based on the true story of lesbian police detective's struggle to have her pension transferred to her domestic partner after she is diagnosed with cancer.

Novelist Anna Hope discusses her new book, The Ballroom, a love story set in an asylum in Yorkshire in 1911 and set against a backdrop of changing attitudes towards poverty and mental illness.

Singer and multi-instrumentalist Jack Garratt on his début album, Phase.

Film historian Ian Christie shows Samira around his new exhibition of previously unseen drawings by pioneering Soviet film maker Sergei Eisenstein.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Jack Soper.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b070fdj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b070fn1y)
Banning Boycotts

How far should you be allowed to express your moral and political beliefs through boycotts? There have been high profile boycott campaigns on everything from companies involved in the arms trade, fossil fuels, and tobacco products to economic and academic boycotts of Israel. Now the government is planning a law to make it illegal for local councils, public bodies and even some university student unions to carry out boycotts. Under the plan all publicly funded institutions will lose the freedom to refuse to buy goods and services as part of a political campaign. It's said that any public bodies that continue to pursue boycotts will face "severe penalties." The government believes cracking down on town-hall boycotts is justified because they undermine good community relations, poison and polarise debate and fuel anti-Semitism. Beyond the narrow principle of what tax payers money should be spent on, what is wrong with a group of citizens organising to express their moral, philosophical or political objection to a company or country through their economic, intellectual or cultural power? Such boycotts have in the past been very effective. If every pound we spend can on some level be seen as an expression of our individual moral codes, why should we not have a say on where money is spent on our behalf? Are boycotts misguided empty political gestures more designed to make us feel self-righteous? And even if they are is outlawing them justified? Banning the boycott - the Moral Maze. Chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox and Jill Kirby.


WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b070fn20)
The Wilderness

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on the events leading up to Jesus' crucifixion. Throughout Lent six writers will reflect on these events through a variety of locations as they explore the theme of "Lent in the Landscape". This week Emma Loveridge, who used to run excursions to the Sinai Desert, takes us to her own private wilderness which she has created in Devon to reflect on Jesus' forty days and forty nights in the wilderness. Producer: Phil Pegum.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b070dkt9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b070fdhv)
Rob Askins, Dr Dean Burnett, Mark Lockyer, Ellie Crossley

Due to scheduling changes this episode will be broadcast on Radio 4 at 21:30. The full length programme is available online from February 17 2016.

Libby Purves meets playwright Rob Askins; actor Mark Lockyer, neuroscientist and stand-up comedian Dean Burnett and cattle warden Ellie Crossley.

Rob Askins is a writer and playwright. His play, Hand To God, is a semi-autobiographical story about his teenage years growing up in a small Texas town and attending a church puppet school. Hand To God, is directed by Moritz von Stuelpnagel and is at the Vaudeville Theatre, London.

In 1995 Mark Lockyer was forced to abandon an acting career after suffering a breakdown. In his one-man show, Living with the Lights On, he tells of his experience living with an undiagnosed bi-polar disorder and his journey through the medical and criminal justice systems to his eventual recovery. Living with the Lights On is touring the UK, starting in Exeter and finishing at London's Young Vic.

Dr Dean Burnett is a doctor of neuroscience and a stand-up comedian. He teaches psychiatry at Cardiff University and is the author of the science blog, Brain Flapping. His book The Idiot Brain - a Neuroscientist Explains What Your Head is Really Up To, examines how and why the brain sabotages our behaviour. The Idiot Brain - a Neuroscientist Explains What Your Head is Really Up To, is published by Guardian Faber.

Ellie Crossley is warden of the Chillingham Wild Cattle, a rare breed of animals based in Northumberland where they have grazed for over 800 years. The herd numbers around 100 beasts, and have remained genetically isolated for hundreds of years. She is the first female to hold the post of warden.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b070fn22)
Ankara car bomb kills 28 people

Turkey's former Europe minister says it's an attack on Turkey's unity. Ahead of a key EU summit which opens tomorrow, we have the latest on the attempt to get a deal to persuade Britain to stay in the EU; and should Apple help the FBI to unlock the phone of the San Bernardino killer?


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b070fn24)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 3

The new novel by bestselling author Meg Rosoff, read by Rhashan Stone.

Jonathan Trefoil has arrived in New York fresh from college and ready for his life to begin. He's found himself an apartment and he's temporarily in charge of his brother's dogs (Dante, a Border Collie, and Sissy, a Spaniel) while his brother is working in Dubai. His best friend Max has landed him a job at Comrade, a marketing company run by one of their school friends. He has a smart girlfriend, Julie, who has just joined him. Life is good... isn't it?

Greeley, Comrade's new Office Manager, brings a brighter, healthier vibe to Jonathan's working life - even encouraging him to bring the dogs into work. But just as Jonathan begins to feel that he's getting on top of his new life, Julie floors him with a commercially sensible proposition.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 23:00 The Future of Radio (b070fn4c)
Series 2

Friends Electric

These programmes reveal the secret work of the Institute of Radiophonic Evolution in South Mimms - drawing on conference calls, voice notes and life-logs, to tell a compelling and strange story of the technological lengths to which the researchers will go to push forward the boundaries of the emerging digital technologies.

Each week a jiffy bag of sound files arrives at BBC Radio 4. We listen to the contents to discover what backroom boffins Luke Mourne and Professor Trish Baldock (ably assisted by Shelley – on work experience) have been up to.

In this episode, jealousy of a fellow inventor drives Luke to take Artificial Intelligence to the next level.

Luke..................William Beck
Trish..................Emma Kilbey
Shelley...............Lizzy Watts
Felix....................David Brett
Leary..................Eddie Eyre
Pontius...............Chris Stanton
with Chris Stanton and Jessica Carroll

Written by Jerome Vincent & Stephen Dinsdale

Producer David Blount

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b03y15jr)
Series 1

Episode 5

A brand new series starring Paul Whitehouse and Esther Coles, with Rosie Cavaliero, Simon Day, Cecilia Noble and Marcia Warren.

The series follows Elizabeth, a Community Psychiatric Nurse in her forties, into the homes of her patients (or Service Users in today's jargon). It recounts their humorous, sad and often bewildering daily interactions with the nurse, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense their medication and offer comfort and support.

Compassionate and caring, Elizabeth is aware that she cannot cure her patients, only help them manage their various conditions. She visits the following characters throughout the series:

Lorrie and Maurice: Lorrie, in her fifties, is of Caribbean descent and has schizophrenia. Lorrie's life is made tolerable by her unshakeable faith in Jesus, and Maurice, who has a crush on her and wants to do all he can to help. So much so that he ends up getting on everyone's nerves.

Billy: Billy feels safer in jail than outside, a state of affairs the nurse is trying to rectify. She is hampered by the ubiquitous presence of Billy's mate, Tony.

Graham: in his forties, is morbidly obese due to an eating disorder. Matters aren't helped by his mum 'treating' him to sugary and fatty snacks at all times.

Ray: is bipolar and a rock and roll survivor from the Sixties. It is not clear how much of his 'fame' is simply a product of his imagination.

Phyllis: in her seventies, has Alzheimer's. She is sweet, charming and exasperating. Her son Gary does his best but if he has to hear 'I danced for the Queen Mum once' one more time he will explode.

Herbert is an old school gentleman in his late Seventies. Herbert corresponds with many great literary figures unconcerned that they are, for the most part, dead.

Nurse is written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings, who have collaborated many time in the past, including on The Fast Show, Down the Line and Happiness.

Written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings with additional material from Esther Coles
Producers: Paul Whitehouse and Tilusha Ghelani
A Down the Line production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 America in Black and White (b0718434)
The Future of Black America

Rajini Vaidyanathan concludes her series looking at race in America by examining how black Americans are represented, and asking what it means to be black in America today.

Travelling widely across the country she hears from families in Atlanta, activists in Missouri and academics in New York City. She speaks to the artist Kehinde Wiley about his subversive attempts to literally paint power differently and to the poet Tracy K. Smith about the vital role stories can play in encouraging empathy, and she hears from the civil rights icon John Lewis why he is using comic books to tell his story.

Rajini discusses what is taught in schools, what is shown on TV, and how the reality of being black in America means new black migrants to the United States are increasingly retaining their immigrant identity to avoid being considered 'African American'. She discusses the next generation of leadership, who can authentically lead the Black Lives Matter movement, and attends a remarkable convention in Baltimore encouraging Americans to have 'courageous conversations about race.'

Producer: Giles Edwards.



THURSDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0707vsy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b070fdhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707vt0)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707vt4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707vtd)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0707vtj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b070v8qf)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch: Tibetan Buddhist, writer, & editor.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b070h6wp)
HS2 update, Coastal erosion in Sussex, 'Tractor Selfie' campaign

The latest on how the contested HS2 rail link route is affecting farms and villages in the West Midlands. BBC Correspondent Peter Plisner reports, speaking to a farmer near Stafford whose farm house and barns are facing demolition.

Winter storms along the Sussex coast are leading to increased erosion of the dramatic chalk cliffs at Cuckmere Haven near Eastbourne. They're falling into the sea at a rate of 30-40 cms every year, which has led to the gradual demolition of a row of cottages which are being undermined by the sea. Chrissie Reidie reports.

And the campaign to raise awareness of mental health issues in farming which is attracting support from hundreds of farmers in the UK and around the world. The 'Tractor Selfie' campaign was set up last summer in memory of a farmer who took his own life. Alex Paske explains why she's set up this social media campaign in which farmers post up selfies of themselves with tractors in the background.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Mark Smalley.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378tjf)
Oystercatcher

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachen presents the oystercatcher. These black and white waders used to be called sea-pies because of their pied plumage, which contrasts sharply with their pink legs and long red bill. Oystercatchers don't often eat oysters. Instead they use their powerful bill to break into mussels on rocks or probe for cockles in the mud of estuaries.


THU 06:00 Today (b070h6ws)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b070h6ww)
Robert Hooke

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life and work of Robert Hooke (1635-1703) who worked for Robert Boyle and was curator of experiments at the Royal Society. The engraving of a flea, above, is taken from his Micrographia which caused a sensation when published in 1665. Sometimes remembered for his disputes with Newton, he studied the planets with telescopes and snowflakes with microscopes. He was an early proposer of a theory of evolution, discovered light diffraction with a wave theory to explain it and felt he was rarely given due credit for his discoveries.

With

David Wootton
Anniversary Professor of History at the University of York

Patricia Fara
President Elect of the British Society for the History of Science

And

Rob Iliffe
Professor of History of Science at Oxford University

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b070h6wz)
Benjamin Franklin in London

Episode 4

In the middle of the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin spent almost two decades in London - at exactly the same time as Mozart, Casanova and Handel. This is an enthralling biography - not only of the man, but of the city when it was a hub of Enlightenment activity.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London.

From his house in Craven Street, he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful - in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, and on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends - and, as an American colonial representative, he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. This brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin sought to prevent the America's break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event.

Episode 4:
Franklin's opponents in the Pennsylvania Assembly are preparing poisonous attacks to greet him on his return to America.

Written by George Goodwin
Abridged by Barry Johnston
Read by Nickolas Grace

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b070hbsn)
Beth Ditto, Syrian hospital bombings, Fetishising motherhood, Sharon D Clarke, The Button Box

Earlier this week some 50 people were killed when four hospitals in Northern Syria were hit by missiles. Dr Rola Hallam, Medical Director of the NGO Hand in Hand for Syria explains why hospitals are being targeted and how aid agencies and NGO's are helping women and children caught in the conflict.

Beth Ditto, lead singer of the cult American band Gossip, outspoken feminist and LGBT activist speaks to Jenni on the day she launches her own plus-size fashion line.

Is the Motherhood Challenge on social media a celebration of motherhood or an unrealistic image of womanly perfection? To discuss, Jenni is joined by the journalist Flic Everitt, and by Jody Day, the founder of Gateway Women, a global support network for women who are childless by circumstance, and the author of Living The Life Unexpected: 12 Weeks To Your Plan B For A Meaningful And Fulfilling Future Without Children.

Actor and singer Sharon D Clarke recently opened at the National Theatre playing Ma Rainey, an African American singer often referred to as the Mother of the Blues. Sharon joins Jenni to talk about Ma, the importance of strong, female, black characters, training as a social worker and she sings Ma Rainey's Black Bottom.

Lynn Knight keeps a button collection that has been passed down through three generations of women in her family. She joins Jenni to talk about "The Button Box," her book which uses buttons to tell the story of women's lives from pre-First World War domesticity, to the delights of beading and glamour in the thirties, to short skirts and sexual liberation in the sixties.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Caroline Donne.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b070hbsq)
Halfway Here

Episode 9

by Lucy Catherine.

Nettie is still being kept on life support as her pregnancy continues.

Director ..... Mary Peate.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b0707vtn)
The Showdown Summit

Colouring in the space between the headlines. In this edition: behind the scenes at the EU as a meeting nears which could determine Britain's future in Europe; why many in the cities of Venezuela, mired in economic crisis, have a fond word for their former hardline socialist president Hugo Chavez; mass migrations's one of the biggest stories of our time but in Portugal they're concerned not about new arrivals, but about the number of people leaving; a visit to a jail in the US state of Oregon leaves our correspondent considering what it must be like to be locked up there and what it must be like to work there and clog dancing's not a subject tackled frequently on this programme but in Brittany, we find, it can be a good excuse for a bit of a knees-up!


THU 11:30 JD Salinger, Made in England (b070hbss)
JD Salinger is feted as the writer of one of greatest ever American novels. The Catcher in Rye established him as the most celebrated chronicler of urban New York and, in Holden Caulfield, he created the enduring embodiment of disaffected American youth.

Less well known is that Salinger spent three months in Tiverton, Devon, while preparing to be part of the D Day landings in 1944, and that during this short time he wrote a revealing autobiographical short-story and worked on the development of Holden Caulfield's character. Mark Hodkinson - a Salinger devotee who edited his best-selling biography - travels to Tiverton to retrace Salinger's steps and discover how Devon influenced Salinger's work.

The central character in the short-story, For Esme – with Love and Squalor, is, as Salinger was, a fledgling writer who becomes a US sergeant stationed in Devon. With the help of a local reading group, Mark visits the most likely church featured in the story and learns from people who remember the GIs being in town.

Mark is also accompanied by Dr Sarah Graham of the University of Leicester. They discuss how the story and Salinger's time in Devon informed his work, and life.

The programme also hears an exclusive interview with a 96 year old New Yorker who served with Salinger in Tiverton and remained friends with the reclusive writer for the rest of his life. "Salinger liked Devon," says the veteran soldier, "Any free time he had was taken up by writing on his portable typewriter."


THU 12:00 News Summary (b0707vtx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b070hbsv)
Series 1

The Squeamish Swoon

Science sleuths Hannah Fry and Adam Rutherford investigate the following question sent in by Philip Le Riche:

'Why do some people faint at the sight of blood, or a hypodermic needle, or even if they bash their funny bone? Does it serve any useful evolutionary purpose, or is just some kind of cerebral error condition?'

Adam is strapped onto a hospital tilt table in an attempt to make him blackout and Hannah receives an aromatic surprise.

Featuring consultant cardiologists Dr Nicholas Gall and Dr Adam Fitzpatrick and cardiac physiologist Shelley Dougherty.

If you have any scientific cases for the team to investigate please email: curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b070hbsx)
Payment errors, Energy prices, Train performance, Fat pets

The new promise to rescue money sent in error to the wrong bank accounts.

We're told that switching is the way to reduce your energy bills - but how can you get a good deal when you live somewhere served by just one supplier?

And the fat pets that go on a diet - do they lose weight? Do they keep it off? We revisit some we met over a year ago, including a dog so large it couldn't get up the stairs.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0707vv3)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b070hbt0)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 In Therapy (b070cxy4)
Series 1

Helen

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie meets Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet John - in his 60s, and a retired railway trade unionist. His wife and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around. We also meet Louise and Richard - a couple expecting their first baby in a few days, and Jo, who is meeting Susie for the first time - she is an out of work actress.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b070fftd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b03szx7n)
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency

The Minor Adjustment Beauty Salon

A new two-part dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's latest No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency book, 'The Minor Adjustment Beauty Salon'. Mma Remotswe and Mma Makutsi return to Radio 4 for a tenth series based on the popular novels set in Bostwana, dramatised by the author.

Episode 2: The Minor Adjustment Beauty Salon
Mma Ramotswe searches for answers as the campaign against Mma Soleti steps up a gear. Meanwhile the Agency welcomes a new arrival, and an old wrong is finally righted.

Mma Ramotswe.......................................CLAIRE BENEDICT
Mma Makutsi............................................NADINE MARSHALL
Mma Potokwani.......................................JANICE ACQUAH
Mma Soleti...............................................ELEANOR CROOKS
Charlie.....................................................MAYNARD EZIASHI
Daisy Manchwe........................................NOMA DUMEZWENI
Official.....................................................STEVE TOUSSAINT
House Mother..........................................ALIBE PARSONS

Directed by Eilidh McCreadie


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b070hktk)
Series 32

Walking with a Purpose: The Surrey Hills

Clare Balding joins Jenni Williams and her disabled three year old daughter, Eve, as they take their daily walk in the Surrey Hills. These walks are the highlight of their day as both enjoy being outside, admiring the views and watching the antics of their young and exuberant, golden retriever, Scout. Jenni talks candidly to Clare about how she and her husband, Steve have come to terms with Eve's condition and how they feel blessed to have such a happy and life affirming child.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0709v36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b070cgkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b070hkyc)
John Lasseter

The Film Programme this week explores the work of American animator and film maker John Lasseter.

Presenter Francine Stock talks to John about his moving making techniques and films including Toy Story, Frozen and his latest release Zootropolis.

John also shares his experiences of working for both Pixar Animations and for Disney.

Presenter: Francine Stock
Producer: Anna Bailey
Editor: Jereome Weatherald.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0707vvw)
Gravitational Waves, UK Spaceport, Big Brains and Extinction Risk, Conservation in Papua New Guinea

Gravitational waves were announced last week, in what may be the science discovery of the decade. The Ligo detector, the most sensitive instrument on the surface of the planet, detected the ripples given off by the collision of two black holes. Adam Rutherford puts a selection of listener questions to UCL cosmologist Dr Andrew Pontzen.

In March 2015, Campbeltown, Glasgow Prestwick, Stornoway, Newquay, Llanbedr and Leuchars were shortlisted by the government as possible sites for a "cosmodrome" or spaceport. With the UK space industry worth an estimated £40 billion by 2030, various stakeholders met for the UK spaceport conference at the Royal Aeronautical Society in London to discuss the progress of the project. What would the impact be for scientists, industry and the public?

Big brains have traditionally been considered an advantage. Animals with larger brains are better at using tools, working as a social group and assessing how to react to predators. But when Dr Eric Abelson cross referenced relative brain size against the mammals on the endangered list, he found something surprising. Many animals with the bigger brains are threatened within extinction. He talks to Adam about why that may be.

Tim Cockerill, ecologist and adventurer, returns from Papua New Guinea to discuss how one group of indigenous people have decided to work with scientists in order to conserve and study their local environment.


THU 17:00 PM (b070hkyf)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707vvy)
Judges rule the law on joint enterprise has been misinterpreted for more than 30 years.


THU 18:30 Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On (b0717j1y)
Series 1

Cricket with Andy Zaltzman

Susan Calman is the least relaxed person she knows. She has no down time, no hobbies (unless you count dressing up your cats in silly outfits) and her idea of relaxation is to play Grand Theft Auto, an hour into which she is in a murderous rage with sky high blood pressure. Her wife had to threaten to divorce her to make her go on holiday last year. Her first for four years. But she's been told by the same long-suffering wife, that unless she finds a way to switch off, and soon, she's going to be unbearable.

So Susan is looking at her options to try and immerse herself in the pursuits that her friends find relaxing, to find her inner zen and outer tranquillity. Can she ditch the old Susan Calman and attempt to find the new Susan Calm?

This time, in a typically British leisure pursuit; Susan goes to a cricket match with Andy Zaltzman.

Keep Calman Carry On is an audience stand up show in which Susan reports on how successful she's been - both at relaxing and at the pursuit itself - as well as playing in and discussing a handful of illustrative clips from her efforts. It's an attempt to find out how people find solace or sanctuary in these worlds and how Susan can negotiate her own place in them.

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b070hn0w)
At Brookfield they say goodbye to the herd. Pip worries that they might be distressed, but Ruth assures her they'll be looked after. Pip gets talking to Bert as he starts to gather materials for his egg-mobile.
Brian goes to the Borchester market to support David and Ruth as the cows are sold. Brian's astounded that Justin's trusting Lilian with an expense account as part of her new job - what on earth will Justin's wife Miranda make of it? Brian comments that Justin's using Lilian to get in with the Borchester crowd. He and Jenny also laugh about the idea of Lilian going teetotal. More seriously, Brian's not looking forward to Kate "descending" on Home Farm again.

David manages to fetch some good prices for the livestock. David and Ruth have a heart-to-heart in the now-emptied cow sheds. They may be missing their cows, but David says he is just glad they haven't lost one other.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b070hn0y)
David McCallum, Marjorie Owens as Norma, Ashvin Kumar

As he publishes his first novel at the age of 82, David McCallum looks back at his career, from starring in cult TV series The Man From Uncle and Sapphire and Steel to his current role in crime drama NCIS.

Samira Ahmed talks to the American soprano Marjorie Owens, as she makes her English National Opera debut in Norma by Bellini, one of the most challenging roles in opera.

Oscar nominated Indian director Ashvin Kumar on why he is casting his new film about the conflict in Kashmir in the UK.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b070hbsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b070hns3)
7-Day NHS

This drive for changing the way the NHS operates has been frequently used by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt as the reason why a change to junior doctor and consultant contracts is needed. But what does it actually mean? John Ware explores what a seven-day NHS would look like, what evidence there is that it's needed, and, crucially, whether we can afford it.

Reporter: John Ware
Producer: Hannah Barnes
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b070hns6)
Data Privacy

When you enter personal details onto any website or smartphone app, what happens to it? Where does it get stored, who owns it and who has access to it? These questions are becoming more relevant to ask as we put more details about every facet of our lives onto the internet. With a new piece of legislation passed in the EU dealing with this precise issue, businesses need to be up to speed with their knowledge on effective privacy management

Evan Davis and guests discuss why personal data is so valuable to business, and how the individual can also benefit from sharing this information.

Guests:

Mike Gordon, CEO, Callcredit Information Group

Liz Brandt, CEO, Ctrl Shift

Eduardo Ustaran, Data Privacy expert and Partner, Hogan Lovells.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0707vvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b070h6ww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b070hns9)
Brexit overshadows migration talks at EU summit

Will the Brexit issue overshadow talks on the migration crisis in the EU council? Also the Pope's thinly veiled rebuke to Donald Trump, Bosnia's application to join the EU, and the prize-winning 'Refugee Coat', which can be turned into a sleeping bag and tent.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b070hnsc)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 4

Bestselling author Meg Rosoff's new novel, set in New York, read by Rhashan Stone.

Jonathan Trefoil has arrived in New York ready for his life to begin. He's found an apartment and is temporarily in charge of his brother's dogs (Dante, a Border Collie, and Sissy, a Spaniel) while his brother is working in Dubai. His best friend Max has got him a job at Comrade, a marketing company run by one of their school friends. He has a smart girlfriend, Julie, who has just joined him in the city. Life is good... isn't it?

Julie's unexpected proposition, and his hasty acceptance, leaves Jonathan reeling. A visit to his parents doesn't quite go as planned and, back at work, as things unravel further, leading office manager Greeley to step in with some wise advice.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 23:00 Talking to Strangers (b070hrqj)
Episode 3

Comic monologues in which a range of characters find themselves engaging in that most un-British of activities: talking to a stranger.

Each piece is a character study: funny, frank, absurd, moving... Characters include a sex councillor who loves to draw, a spy who loves to share, a woman who likes to help too much ('I'm a serial helpist...'), a frustrated falconer, and a cheater who has to call her cheatee the morning after. And in this show, the listener themselves 'plays' the silent stranger in the piece...

Written and performed by Sally Phillips and Lily Bevan.

With guest stars including Emma Thompson, Olivia Colman, Jessica Hynes, Steve Evets, Sinead Matthews and Joel Fry.

A BBC Comedy Production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2016.


THU 23:30 Minimal Impact (b05xdcb7)
Tailfins and Burgers

The story of the musical aesthetic and the ubiquitous technique of minimalism.

It's now fifty years since the west coast American composer Terry Riley wrote In C, a work that consisted of 53 short musical phrases repeated at will. For New Yorker Steve Reich, this offered a new kind of musical expression for a post-war society of 'tailfins, Chuck Berry and millions of burgers sold'. With origins as much in the art world and the pop music industry as in the experimental musical philosophy of John Cage, 'minimalism' slowly but incontrovertibly assumed a dominant position in the musical landscape.

In this American-inflected first episode, composers from three generations - Steve Reich himself, Julia Wolfe of Bang on a Can and Bryce Dessner, a composer and guitarist with The National - consider the impact of the minimalist aesthetic and the techniques it employed in the USA and abroad, revealing a 'victory for the art school over the music conservatoire'.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0707vyh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b070h6wz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0707vzg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0707vzj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0707vzl)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0707vzn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b070v9y2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Alison Murdoch: Tibetan Buddhist, writer, & editor.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b070hscf)
15 years since foot-and-mouth, Dementia among farmers, Food provenance passport scheme

Caz Graham marks the fifteenth anniversary of the outbreak of Foot and Mouth by visiting Cumbria's mass livestock burial ground that's now a flourishing nature reserve. Nearly half of the farms infected were in the Lake District, and disposing of the piles of dead livestock became a real problem. Some were burnt but there were concerns that the vast plumes of smoke from infected animals may be a health hazard. Eventually a mass burial site was established on a former RAF airfield near Carlisle. Half a million animals were buried at Watchtree but now 15 years on, Caz finds out that it's now a nature reserve.

What happens to farms when the head of the family, often the head of the business, suffers from the effects of dementia? Reverend Canon Barbara Clutton, who's the 'Rural Life Officer' for the Coventry diocese, and a Trustee of the Farm Community Network explains that the impact of dementia can first become apparent with problems handling the farm paperwork.

With just under a million horses and many leisure riders in the UK blacksmiths are very much in demand. Owen Mort used to be a welder in a shipyard but he's retrained as a blacksmith. BBC Northern Ireland's Agriculture and Environment Correspondent, Conor Macauley, meets him.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k6slx)
Robin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the robin. Christmas cards became popular around 1860 and robins often featured, carrying letters in their beaks or lifting door-knockers and were often referred to as the 'little postmen'. Until 1861, postmen wore red coats and were nick-named redbreasts or Robins, so the association between a familiar winter bird and the person who brought Christmas greetings was irresistible.


FRI 06:00 Today (b070hsch)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0709v49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b070hsck)
Benjamin Franklin in London

Episode 5

In the middle of the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin spent almost two decades in London - at exactly the same time as Mozart, Casanova and Handel. This is an enthralling biography - not only of the man, but of the city when it was a hub of Enlightenment activity.

For the great majority of his long life, Benjamin Franklin was a loyal British royalist. In 1757, having made his fortune in Philadelphia and established his fame as a renowned experimental scientist, he crossed the Atlantic to live as a gentleman in the heaving metropolis of London.

From his house in Craven Street, he mixed with both the brilliant and the powerful - in London coffee house clubs, at the Royal Society, and on his summer travels around the British Isles and continental Europe. He counted David Hume, Matthew Boulton, Joseph Priestley, Edmund Burke and Erasmus Darwin among his friends - and, as an American colonial representative, he had access to successive Prime Ministers and even the King.

The early 1760s saw Britain's elevation to global superpower status with victory in the Seven Years War and the succession of the young, active George III. This brought a sharp new edge to political competition in London and redefined the relationship between Britain and its colonies. They would profoundly affect Franklin himself, eventually placing him in opposition with his ambitious son William.

Though Franklin sought to prevent the America's break with Great Britain, his own actions would finally help cause that very event.

Episode 5:
It is 1775, and Franklin is no longer of any political use in London. He becomes Ambassador to France in the days before the Revolution.

Written by George Goodwin
Abridged by Barry Johnston
Read by Nickolas Grace

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b070hscm)
Legal aid, Christine Delphy, Dating with a learning disability, Erica Jong, Facial hair

The Court of Appeal has found that Government changes to the rules which allow victims of domestic abuse to obtain legal aid are legally flawed. Jenni speaks to Emma Scott, Director of Rights of Women.

Christine Delphy is a world leader in feminist thinking. She founded a journal with Simone de Beauvoir and co-founded the Mouvement de Libération des Femmes. Increasingly, she has argued that French attitudes towards the hijab and Muslim women are reprehensible. She talks to Andrea Catherwood about her career.

How do adults with a learning disability make friends and relationships in a safe environment? Woman's Hour hears from Marianne Radcliffe of the charity Fitzroy about their campaign Love4Life, Mandy and Jay a couple who met through Stars in the Sky, a dating and friendship service for adults with learning difficulties and Nicole Hamerton, one of its founders.

Radio 4's season Riot Girls, about women's writing from the second wave of feminism to the present day includes a dramatisation of Erica Jong's novel Fear of Flying, published in 1973. Jenni spoke to Jong in 1990 and asked her what she said to the critics who suggested she wrote pornography.

Women often feel self-conscious about facial hair but it's very common. Why is it something that we still don't talk openly about? Jenni talks to Laura Cofield, Phd student from Sussex University and Dr Sam Bunting, cosmetic dermatologist.

Presenter: Jenni Murray.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b070hscp)
Halfway Here

Episode 10

by Lucy Catherine.

Luke's dark night of the soul is over.

Director ..... Mary Peate.


FRI 11:00 Choose Life (b070hscr)
In February 1996, Trainspotting exploded onto the big screen. Twenty years on, the real-life recovering addicts who inspired the filmmakers and actors reveal their own stories.

"All the characters are so recognisable that you don't know whether to laugh or cry. You are asked to do both." Review of Trainspotting, The Guardian, February 1996.

Scotland has a massive drug problem. The number of substance-related deaths has more than doubled since 1996 - the year Irvine Welsh's novel about a group of heroin addicts became one of the UK's most successful films, directed by Danny Boyle and starring Ewan McGregor and Robert Carlyle.

Trainspotting won a string of awards for its uncompromising portrayal of drug abuse. Much of the action and emotion on screen was informed by a small group of real-life recovering addicts, who advised the filmmakers and actors.

Calton Athletic Recovery Group is credited at the end of the film for special technical advice, and thanked "for their inspiration and courage".

Now, members of the Glasgow-based charity reveal their own stories.

Davie, Willie, Peter, Colin and others from Calton Athletic Recovery Group talk candidly and intimately about their own experiences of drug addiction and recovery. They discuss the impact on loved ones, the need for honesty, and their own decisions to "Choose Life", in the famous opening words of the film.

They also talk about their involvement in the making of Trainspotting, including their cameo roles, and they consider how true to life it was - and still is.

Produced by Steve Urquhart
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Dilemma (b03szh9f)
Series 3

Episode 1

Sue Perkins puts Kerry Godliman, John-Luke Roberts, Julia Hartley-Brewer and Clarke Carlisle through the moral and ethical wringer.

The panellists collectively attempt to resolve dilemmas based around dinosaur bones, injured guinea pigs, and unethical banks.

They also assert their moral correctness over giving directions and selling state secrets.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0707vzq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b070hv9m)
Series 1

The Stellar Dustbin

An unusual case today for science sleuths Hannah Fry and Adam Rutherford sent by Elisabeth Hill:

'Can we shoot garbage into the sun?'

The duo embark on an astronomical thought experiment to see how much it would cost to throw Hannah's daily rubbish into our stellar dustbin. From space elevators to solar sails, they explore the various options that could be used to send litter to the Sun.

Featuring space scientist Lucie Green and astrophysicist Andrew Pontzen.

If you have any everyday mysteries for the team to investigate using the power of science, please email: curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b070hv9p)
The puppy trade, Efforts to improve how charities are run

Peter White talks to the former Cabinet Secretary Gus O'Donnell about his aim to make charities better run and more successful. More problems for npower customers with their bills. And the Animal Welfare Minister responds to calls for reforms to the breeding and sale of puppies.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0707vzv)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b070hv9r)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 In Therapy (b070v8bn)
Series 1

John

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie meets John, a retired railway trade unionist in his 60s. His wife and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is. We also hear Susie's first meeting with Jo - a new patient and an out of work actress. Then there is Louise and Richard who are expecting their first child in a few days.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b070hn0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Martyn Hesford - Tittle Tattle (b0415hb8)
Tittle Tattle by Martyn Hesford

It is 1964 and the 'Carry On' films are at the height of their popularity. Kenneth Williams is taking his mother Louie out for afternoon tea to celebrate her 60th birthday. He makes sure it is in a 'select' tea room - Derry and Toms. But who does he bump into? None other than fellow 'Carry On' actor Charles Hawtrey and his mother Alice. Charles is meeting a director about an upcoming film, but he is being very secretive as to who this mystery person is.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

Martyn Hesford is a hugely experienced scriptwriter and is best known for FANTABULOSA! (BBC 4) starring Michael Sheen which chronicles the life of Kenneth Williams. Martyn was nominated for a BAFTA for Best Single Drama for this film.

After starting his career as an actor, Martyn turned to screenwriting and penned a number of highly acclaimed BBC award winning single dramas such as A SMALL MOURNING, winner of Radio Times Drama Award, BRAZEN HUSSIES starring Julie Walters and A LITTLE BIT OF LIPPY starring Kenneth Cranham. As well as working on original pieces, Martyn has adapted several classic novels for TV. NICHOLAS NICKLEBY (ITV1), DR JEKYLL AND MR HYDE (Clerkenwell Films/Working Title/Universal Pictures) and THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP (ITV1).


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b070hxsb)
Tutbury Castle

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Tutbury Castle in Staffordshire. Bunny Guinness, Matthew Wilson and Bob Flowerdew answer this week's questions, including how excessive rain can affect your soil and which seeds are best to grow outdoors.

Also, the panellists dispense advice on how to make an effective hot bed and Matthew Wilson takes to the busy streets of Shoreditch to investigate the long-forgotten work of Thomas Fairchild.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Imagining Chekhov (b070hxsd)
Woman With A Little Pug by Alison MacLeod

A set of three stories, commissioned specially for Radio 4. Alison MacLeod explores the life and work of one of the finest short story writers of them all - Anton Pavlovich Chekhov.

In this playful reworking of Chekhov’s classic tale ‘The Lady With A Little Dog’, a philanderer encounters a woman in a Brighton hotel. But they can’t help thinking they’ve met each other somewhere before.

Alison MacLeod lives in Brighton. She was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award in 2011 and her stories Solo, A Capella and In Praise Of Radical Fish have featured in previous Radio 4 series. Her works include The Changeling and The Wave Theory of Angels. Her novel, Unexploded, was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize and was broadcast as Book At Bedtime. Alison is Professor of Contemporary Fiction at the University of Chichester.

Reader: Peter Firth
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2016.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b070hxsg)
Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Edmonde Charles-Roux, Norman Hudis, Antonin Scalia, Harper Lee

Matthew Bannister on

Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the United Nations Secretary General who had to deal with genocide in Rwanda and the war in the Balkans.

Edmonde Charles-Roux, the former resistance fighter who became editor of French Vogue magazine.

Norman Hudis, the screenwriter of many of the Carry On comedy films.

And Antonin Scalia, the conservative US Supreme Court Justice.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b070hxsj)
Junior doctors' strike, David Bowie's death

Feedback returns with the BBC Radio issues that matter most to you - from the coverage of Junior Doctors' debate and David Bowie's death, to a tough listen in The Archers and a documentary that invites you to see with your ears.

When David Bowie died, Radio 4's news programmes dedicated much of the day's coverage to the star. Many listeners felt the coverage was disproportionate. Jamie Angus, editor of the Today programme, speaks to presenter Roger Bolton to address complaints that the BBC let emotion override objectivity.

Jamie Angus also hears listeners' views on how his programme has been covering the Junior Doctors' contract debate. Listeners on both sides have concerns and question whether the BBC is picking the right people to represent the arguments and whether statements from the BMA and the government are being properly scrutinised.

Rob Titchener's relentless abuse of his wife Helen has been captivating many of the Ambridge faithful, but has also been forcing some to turn off their radios. Listeners debate whether the storyline is unmissable drama in the best tradition of the programme, or a subject that is just too painful to return to day in, day out.

And stop, stand still and listen. That's what listeners did when journalist Helena Merriman told them to during her documentary Batman and Ethan. The programme featured Ethan, a blind ten year old learning to explore the world through a technique called echolocation, which uses sound to create a picture of his environment. Roger Bolton speaks to Helena about recreating something that only blind people can understand, and asks if highlighting the unusual technique risks creating unrealistic expectations for many blind people.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b070hxsl)
Ann and Daniel - Breaking the Sound Barrier

In a first for The Listening Project, Fi Glover introduces a conversation that uses signing. A mother and her son reflect on their experiences of the deaf and hearing worlds. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b070nx1d)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0707w0r)
EU leaders remain locked in talks amid signs Mr Cameron is struggling to win concessions


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b070hxsn)
Series 89

Episode 7

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. This week's panel is Mark Steel, Danny Finkelstein, Holly Walsh and Vicki Pepperdine.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b070hxsq)
Lilian shows Justin into his new rental accommodation, the Dower House. Lilian tells him he's free to make changes (within reason). They discuss business, in particular the sponsors for the Borsetshire Businesswoman of the Year. Justin flatters Lilian by saying that she must surely have been nominated in the past. They decide to go to the lunch together.
Jennifer laughs with Lilian about her being let loose with Justin's credit card. Jennifer's pleased that things are looking up for Lilian again. Also, Jennifer reports that Ian and Adam fell out on Valentine's Day because someone sent Adam an anonymous card.
Lynda corners Kirsty about her various projects, and tries to enlist her in the pageant play she is arranging: "England's Pleasant Land" by E.M. Forster. Lynda looks forward to the play, an examination of the countryside which she feels is prescient today. Kirsty goes to see Helen, and encourages her to get involved in the pageant - and village life - again. This leads them to talking about the "activism" of Kirsty's youth and Ursula says she can still see that "spark" in Kirsty. As Helen and Kirsty talk, it feels just like old times. Kirsty attributes Helen's good mood to Ursula's arrival... whilst Ursula is across the village, on the phone to Rob, telling him to put a stop to their friendship - the sooner the better.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b070nqx1)
Harper Lee remembered, The Night Manager, Simon Armitage, Zelda

Novelist Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman, is remembered by Elaine Showalter and Christopher Bigsby.

John le Carré's novel The Night Manager has been adapted for television by Danish director Susanne Bier and writer David Farr. A spy thriller set in the shadowy world of the arms trade they describe how they changed the sex of the main character, and brought a Scandinavian flavour to this very British writer.

Poet Simon Armitage and director Paul Hunter discuss collaborating on I Am Thomas, a piece of music theatre about the last person in Britain to be executed for blasphemy.

Nintendo's Zelda franchise, one of the most successful video game series of all time, celebrates its 30th anniversary this Sunday. Naomi Alderman tells us what she admires most about the game.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b070hscp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b070hxss)
Damien Green MP, Dan Hannan MEP, John Mills, Emily Thornberry MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Wolfson College, Cambridge University with Conservative MP Damien Green, Conservative MEP Dan Hannan, the businessman and Deputy Chair of Vote Leave John Mills, and Shadow Defence Secretary Emily Thornberry MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b070hxsv)
Vanilla Happiness

Adam Gopnik says the secret of happiness lies in unexpected pleasures, like finding yoghourt is vanilla when you expect it to be plain.

"Are the intrinsic qualities of something more powerful than the context in which we perceive it, or are what we call intrinsic properties really only the effect of expectations and surprise?"

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b05v6d35)
The Choke

The journalist, author and Olympian Matthew Syed blew it big time at the Sydney 2000. A GB medal prospect in table tennis he was thrashed by an opponent he had beaten many times before- he choked. He's been keen to understand ever since why sometimes the brain robs an individual of the ability to do routine tasks - in his case to hit a ping pong ball on the table.

You don't have to be a world class sportsman to choke think of that job interview you fluffed or that wildly attractive person at a party that left you unable to do what you do everyday- speak coherently.

In The Choke Matthew will explore the neurological and psychological trajectory of a choke illustrated with some dramatic examples where the pressure told at the worst possible time- musicians, politicians, businessmen, actors and sportsmen all feature in this examination of when we fail to do what comes naturally to us.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0707w14)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b070nqx7)
UK reaches EU deal in Brussels

Cabinet to meet Saturday; Gove expected to join "No" campaign; Harper Lee dies.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b070hxsx)
Jonathan Unleashed

Episode 5

Rhashan Stone reads the new novel by bestselling author Meg Rosoff.

Moving to New York fresh from college, Jonathan Trefoil's new life as an adult with grown-up responsibilities is not going quite as planned. Although he knows it's a terrible idea, he has hastily accepted his girlfriend Julie's marriage proposal: she works for a wedding magazine and they've offered to pay for everything in return for live-streaming the ceremony and running a four-page spread in the next issue. Soon, the stress of his personal life spills over into his work and the only thing keeping him sane is the companionship of his brother's dogs, Dante and Sissy.

Written by Meg Rosoff.

Read by Rhashan Stone.

Abridged by David Jackson Young.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b070dnqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Minimal Impact (b05xxhw6)
Jesus' Blood and Fluffy Clouds

The story of the musical aesthetic and the ubiquitous technique of minimalism.

Fifty years since the emergence of a challenging new 'art school' attitude to musical composition emerged in the United States - in the work of Terry Riley, Steve Reich and others - various techniques associated with 'minimalism' have been absorbed into every aspect of modern musical life, from the pop industry and dance scene, to film scores and religious music, as well as contemporary concert music.

In this second episode, British composers trace how the minimalist aesthetic has informed music as diverse as John Tavener's Song for Athene and The Orb's Little Fluffy Clouds. Contributors include Gavin Bryars, composer of the iconic Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet, film and dance composer Jocelyn Pook, Indian percussion player and composer Talvin Singh, Alex Paterson of The Orb and the most minimal of English composers Laurence Crane.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b070hxwl)
Jane and Hannah - Deaf or Hearing

Fi Glover with a conversation in which a hearing mother and her pregnant deaf daughter wonder whether the new baby will be deaf or hearing, and reflect on their own experiences. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b070crdl)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b070crdl)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b070dksm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b070dksm)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b070fdj1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b070fdj1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b070hbsq)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b070hbsq)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b070hscp)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b070hscp)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b070dnqt)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b070dnqt)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b06zvdlq)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b070hxsv)

America in Black and White 23:30 MON (b070d5sy)

America in Black and White 23:30 TUE (b07183xh)

America in Black and White 23:30 WED (b0718434)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b06zqq9l)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b070d28w)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 10:30 SAT (b070601q)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b070601x)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b06zvdln)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b070hxss)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0707r9z)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b05v6d35)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0707vvw)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0707vvw)

Batman and Ethan 13:30 SUN (b0709v4m)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0707y3l)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0707y3l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b070d5sw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b070dr3m)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b070fn24)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b070hnsc)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b070hxsx)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b06zvb6f)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b070cnxx)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b070cnxx)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b070dksg)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b070dksg)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b070fdhx)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b070fdhx)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b070h6wz)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b070h6wz)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b070hsck)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b06zqp80)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b070cxy8)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0707vb5)

Choose Life 11:00 FRI (b070hscr)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b070dkt9)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b070dkt9)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0709v49)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0709v49)

Dilemma 11:30 FRI (b03szh9f)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b06zqk2w)

Drama 14:15 MON (b070cxy6)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b070dkt2)

Drama 14:15 WED (b03szts2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b03szx7n)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b05vcsdq)

Editing Life 21:00 MON (b06zr3zj)

Europe: Strangers on My Doorstep 20:00 MON (b070d28t)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0705z0r)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b070cjsn)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b070dks1)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b070fdhq)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b070h6wp)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b070hscf)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b070hxsj)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b06zs22v)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b070dq8f)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b06kdztz)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b0707r9v)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b0707r9v)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b06zj4j9)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b0707vtn)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b070d28r)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b070dq8c)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b070fn1w)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b070hn0y)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b070nqx1)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b06zvbwn)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b070hxsb)

Gwyneth Hughes - Victory 15:00 SUN (b04d0l1g)

Ian Rankin - Rebus 14:30 SAT (b070601z)

Imagining Chekhov 15:45 FRI (b070hxsd)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b070h6ww)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b070h6ww)

In Therapy 13:45 MON (b070v9y4)

In Therapy 13:45 TUE (b070v8b7)

In Therapy 13:45 WED (b070nvxf)

In Therapy 13:45 THU (b070cxy4)

In Therapy 13:45 FRI (b070v8bn)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0707vmn)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b070dq8h)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b070dq8h)

JD Salinger, Made in England 11:30 THU (b070hbss)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b06zvbwv)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b070hxsg)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b070fn20)

Linda Smith: A Modern Radio Star 11:30 MON (b070vbzw)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0707r9s)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b070dkt5)

Martyn Hesford - Tittle Tattle 14:15 FRI (b0415hb8)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b06zj4hs)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0707v90)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0707vg3)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0707vm4)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0707vp0)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0707vsy)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0707vyh)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b070fdhv)

Minimal Impact 23:30 THU (b05xdcb7)

Minimal Impact 23:27 FRI (b05xxhw6)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b070601v)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b070601v)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b070fft3)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b06ztttp)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b070fn1y)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b06zvbwz)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b06zj4j1)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0707v9n)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0707vgc)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0707vmd)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0707vp8)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0707vtj)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0707vzn)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0707v9q)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b06zj4jc)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0707vbk)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0707vgm)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0707vmg)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0707vpb)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0707vtx)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0707vzq)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b06zj4j3)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0707v9v)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0707v9z)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b06zj4jr)

News 13:00 SAT (b06zj4jh)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b03y15jr)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0707y3q)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b070dksc)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b070cgkh)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b070cgkh)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b06zv3wz)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0707r9q)

PM 17:00 MON (b070cz5w)

PM 17:00 TUE (b070dnqw)

PM 17:00 WED (b070fft9)

PM 17:00 THU (b070hkyf)

PM 17:00 FRI (b070nx1d)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b070cgkm)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b06zqk30)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b070cgkk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b06zvdt7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b070v86y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b070vbg0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b070ss12)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b070v8qf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b070v9y2)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b0709v36)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0709v36)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0709v36)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b070hktk)

Reluctant Persuaders 11:30 WED (b06bnq1g)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0705z0w)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0707r9x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b06zj4hx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0707v9j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0707vg7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0707vm8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0707vp4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0707vt4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0707vzj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b06zj4hv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b06zj4hz)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b06zj4jk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0707v9d)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0707v9l)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0707vcl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0707vg5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0707vg9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0707vm6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0707vmb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0707vp2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0707vp6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0707vt0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0707vtd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0707vzg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0707vzl)

Shorts 19:45 SUN (b070cgkr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b06zj4jp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0707vcz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0707vh4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0707vml)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0707vq3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0707vvy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0707w0r)

So Wrong It's Right 19:15 SUN (b01jxrtw)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0707y3n)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0707y3n)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b070cnxv)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b070cnxv)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0709v38)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0709v34)

Susan Calman - Keep Calman Carry On 18:30 THU (b0717j1y)

Talking to Strangers 23:00 THU (b070hrqj)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0709v47)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b070cgkp)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b070cgkp)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b070d1p4)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b070d1p4)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b070dq89)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b070dq89)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b070fftd)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b070fftd)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b070hn0w)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b070hn0w)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b070hxsq)

The Beat Women 11:30 TUE (b06084ks)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b06zv3xf)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b070hns6)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 MON (b070cxxy)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 TUE (b070dkst)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 WED (b070ffbh)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 THU (b070hbsv)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 FRI (b070hv9m)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b06zv3x1)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b070hkyc)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0709v4f)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0709v4f)

The Future of Radio 23:00 WED (b070fn4c)

The Gospel Truth 16:00 MON (b06ycmd8)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b070cxyb)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b070cxyb)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b070dks6)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b070dks6)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0709v4p)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b070fdj3)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b070hxsl)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b070hxwl)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b070fft7)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b070cz5y)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b06zqq9d)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b06zvdlg)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b070hxsn)

The Pope's Letters 09:00 WED (b072jknz)

The Report 20:00 THU (b070hns3)

The Stories 00:30 SUN (b0707y3j)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b06yr6px)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b070601s)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0707vbw)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b070d28y)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b070dr3k)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b070fn22)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b070hns9)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b070nqx7)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b06zttbs)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b070fft5)

Tim FitzHigham: The Gambler 18:30 WED (b05r3z49)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0705z0t)

Today 06:00 MON (b070cnxs)

Today 06:00 TUE (b070dks3)

Today 06:00 WED (b070fdhs)

Today 06:00 THU (b070h6ws)

Today 06:00 FRI (b070hsch)

Tropicalia: Revolution in Sound 15:30 SAT (b06zr3zl)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04dw7p8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03mhyzf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b038qk3x)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b038qk4j)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b0378tjf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03k6slx)

Unhappy Child, Unhealthy Adult 11:00 TUE (b070dksr)

Verdun - The Sacred Wound 11:00 WED (b070fdj5)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b06zj4j5)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b06zj4j7)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b06zj4jf)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b06zj4jm)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0707v9s)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0707v9x)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0707vbr)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0707vcs)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0707vgf)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0707vgw)

Weather 21:58 MON (b0707vhj)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b0707vmj)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b0707vmq)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0707vpl)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0707vv3)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0707vzv)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b0707w14)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0707vdt)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b070cgkw)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0707r9n)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b070cnxz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b070dksj)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b070fdhz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b070hbsn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b070hscm)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b06zryhp)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b070dnqr)

World at One 13:00 MON (b070cxy2)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b070dkt0)

World at One 13:00 WED (b070ffbm)

World at One 13:00 THU (b070hbt0)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b070hv9r)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b070cxy0)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b070dksw)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b070ffbk)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b070hbsx)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b070hv9p)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b06zvdt9)