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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 JANUARY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b06vjc61)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b06vjstn)
The Vanishing Man

Episode 5

Laura Cumming charts the obsession of a 19th century Reading bookseller with a portrait of Charles I - painted when the Monarch was a young man on a visit to Madrid. The Spanish genius Velasquez painted very few pictures, so did John Snare discover a long-lost treasure? And if so, where is it now?

Episode 5:
In 1888 a Velasquez portrait of Prince Charles is reported as being lent to the Reading Art Museum by the widow of John Snare. Somehow the picture has returned to Britain.

This is a story about the intense emotions that great art can provoke - passions that sometimes verge on the irrational and which transcend considerations of value.

John Snare's conviction about the painting he bought evolved into a dispute with those who had more money, power and influence. In a sense, the missing Velasquez became a battleground for class war and the individual against the establishment.

But at the heart of the story lies a work of art, created with such skill and delicacy that it inspired the fiercest of feelings and continues to exert its mysterious pull to this day.

Read by Siobhan Redmond
Written by Laura Cumming
Abridged by Isobel Creed

Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06vjc63)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06vjc65)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06vjc67)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b06vjc69)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06vnd2r)
A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b06vnd2t)
I Heart Podcasting

Why some listeners love podcasting, and a step by step guide on how to get started.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b06vjc6c)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b06vjc6f)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b06vmxpk)
Yorkshire in the Dark

Yorkshire looks different in the dark. Helen Mark looks up into the heavens and deep underground for a new understanding of England's biggest county.

Off-road cycling in the Dales becomes a lot more thrilling when you strike out into the dark and, armed with an infra-red nghtscope you realise just how busy the forests of the North York Moors National Park are after sunset.

Helen will also be discovering how the Brontë sisters filled the long nights in the Haworth Parsonage and mining precious Blue John in the caverns of the Peak District.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b06w53b4)
Direct selling

Charlotte Smith looks at how farmers are using various ways to sell their produce directly to consumer. Charlotte heads to an industrial site in Somerset which is the home of a business started by James Mansfield and fifth-generation beef farmer James Flower, that began selling meat boxes sourced from James Flower's farm.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b06vjc6h)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b06w53b6)
Morning news and current affairs.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b06w53b8)
Katy Brand

Reverend Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir are joined by Katy Brand.

Comedian Katy Brand graced our screen in her Big Ass Show where we saw her parody pop culture. She danced like Beyonce for Sport Relief, has written her first novel Brenda Monk is Funny and her acting credits include Peep show and Nanny McPhee. Now she's a judge on the Costa book awards.

Almost four years ago Clare Owen found a gold wedding ring with an inscription and date. Her desire to reunite the ring with it's owner led her to set up her own lost and found company, Lostbox. She joins us to talk about how she's since reunited animals, soft toys and even people and to sing the praises of much maligned social media.

Levison Wood is an explorer who can currently be seen Walking the Himalayas in a Channel 4 documentary series. It's a distance of 1700 miles. He previously Walked the Nile. He joins Aasmah and Richard to share his experiences and explain why he is drawn to such expeditions.

Dr Eugenia Cheng is on a mission to make maths accessible. She does online maths tutorials, teaches maths to arts students and advises primary school teachers and she's even written a book about it in relation to baking: How to Bake Pi. She'll be talking about her passion for maths, music and infinity.

Wombles composer Mike Batt tells us his Inheritance Tracks.
Her chooses the 1st movement of Schubert's 9th Symphony (The Great C major) and
Little Red Rooster performed by Howling Wolf, written by Willy Dixon

JP takes a look in the diary of listener Barbara Bindley and we have your thankyous.

Levison Wood's book Walking the Himalayas is out now, and the fourth and fifth parts of the series air on Channel 4, 8pm Sundays and the whole series can be viewed on All 4.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b06w53bb)
Series 12

Stoke-on-Trent

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel programme from Stoke-on-Trent.

This week's audience questions are answered by the materials expert Zoe Laughlin, DIY cooking expert Tim Hayward, no-nonsense Manchester chef Rob Owen Brown, and the Catalan Cook Rachel McCormack.

Producer: Victoria Shepherd
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b06w53bd)
Isabel Hardman of the Spectator looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Two former health secretaries talk of their experience of disputing with the medical profession; a discussion on whether the Housing Bill presently going through parliament will solve the problem of shortage of homes; and how one side in the argument over membership of the EU is planning to reach consensus.
Plus the introduction of 'English Votes for English Laws' into the parliamentary system.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b06vjc6k)
Poles Apart

'Don't tell us how to run our country!' That was the word from Warsaw as the European Commission launched an investigation into some of the decisions taken by the new right-wing government in Poland; the authorities in India meet on Monday to evaluate the controversial traffic experiment in Delhi which was aimed at reducing pollution; the latest consumer spending figures in France offer little evidence that an economic recovery is underway -- but in Toulouse some people know where to get their food for free; lawyers for the Mexican drug lord known as 'el Chapo' have started to prepare a case against his extradition to the US -- some in Mexico would anyway prefer to see him face justice there and there's something to sing about in northern Norway - after six weeks their polar night season has come to an end, and the sun has finally made an appearance!


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b06vjc6m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b06w53bh)
How mobile phone firms can hold the key to bank security

On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

Mobile phones and banking security.

Before you do any major online banking transaction your bank may send you a text with a code to enter on the website. This 'two step authentication' acts as protection against criminals who have obtained our banking details. But cyber crooks are nothing if not inventive and they have found a weakness in the two step which they are exploiting. Hear the tapes of how they did it. And transferred two large payments from one Money Box listener's account.

Bowie Bonds.

Apart from music, videos, fashion, and branding, David Bowie, who died this week, was also one of the first to make money from his future record sales. The Bowie Bond earned him a capital sum of £33 million in exchange for the rights to his back catalogue earnings for just ten years. It's called 'securitisation' and we hear just how ground breaking it was.

Politics and regulation

The Financial Conduct Authority has admitted it is concerned about political pressure - while still firmly denying that any was exerted when it decided to downgrade its study into the culture of banks. A report into the effectiveness of the FCA Board says "Recent interventions by HM Treasury and other bodies have raised questions from directors regarding the Board's independence."

Is 35 the new 25?

Halifax reports that one in four of its new first time buyers are purchasing their home with a loan that will last half a lifetime. But is it sensible to take on a debt that could well last into retirement? Or at least beyond the horizon of good health. To some it is the only way to afford the ever rising cost of a home. We look at how much more a 35 year mortgage will cost, compared to one that lasts 25 years.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b06vn929)
Series 89

Episode 2

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. Hugo Rifkind and Sarah Kendall are among the panellists joining Miles to tackle the news of the last seven days.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b06vjc6p)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b06vjc6r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b06vnbcw)
Ken Livingstone, Alison McGovern MP, Dominic Raab MP, Ann Widdecombe

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Nexus Methodist Church in Bath with a panel including the Joint Chair of Labour's Defence Review Ken Livingstone, the chair of Progress Alison McGovern MP, Justice Minister Dominic Raab MP and the former Conservative minister Ann Widdecombe.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b06w53bk)
Trident, Freedom of speech

Your thoughts on a couple of the questions posed in last night's Any Questions?

Should this country renew its Trident nuclear weapons system?

Do you think that freedom of speech should include the right to say that marriage is between a man and a woman?

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b06w53bm)
Penelope Fitzgerald - Human Voices

Young Annie Asra finds bureaucracy, camaraderie, eccentricity and love in the BBC of 1940.

Based on Penelope Fitzgerald's Booker Prize-Winner's comic novel starring Helen George and Toby Jones.

Annie ...... Helen George
Sam ...... Toby Jones
Jeff ...... Geoffrey Streatfeild
Vi ...... Katie Redford
Mrs Milne ...... Susan Jameson
Eddie ...... Chris Pavlo
DG ...... Ewan Bailey
Producer ...... George Watkins
General Pinard ...... Sean Baker

Dramatised by Michael Butt

Director: David Hunter

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2016.


SAT 15:30 I Dressed Ziggy Stardust (b01r91qk)
For more than four decades, David Bowie entranced his followers. In this programme, Samira Ahmed looks at his particular appeal for British Asian women.

Across the generations, they were inspired by the skinny South Londoner, who challenged gender barriers and who played with alien identity and other-worldliness. Beneath the make up and exotic costumes, he was also the intelligent, politely spoken suburban young man who you could potentially introduce to your mother.

As Samira explores Bowie’s impact on British Asian teenagers, she talks to Shami Chakrabarti - the director of Liberty - about Bowie’s changing identities, sociologist Rupa Huq tackles his suburban psychoses, and Shyama Perera takes Samira on a journey to explain how her teenage obsession with Bowie even extended to sending costume designs to her hero, enabling her to claim that “I Dressed Ziggy Stardust”.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Alice Bloch
A Whistledown/ Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b06w56gs)
Tracey Ullman, Shami Chakrabarti

It's been three decades since we last saw Tracey Ullman on British screens but she's back this week with a new sketch show on BBC1. She tells Jane what we can expect and why Angela Merkel is one of her latest fascinations.

Shami Chakrabarti talks about her decision to step down as Director of the civil rights organisation Liberty.

Three people share their experiences of what it's like to be bisexual: Holly Matthies, Daniel Howell and Libby Baxter-Williams.

We hear from Bee Wilson about her new book, First Bite How We Learn to Eat and they discuss whether fussy eaters are born or created and why so many of us are obsessed with sugar.

The former cycle courier Emily Chappell tells us about her life on the road and how the stop gap job turned into a passion and way of life.

Can we and should we try and pass our music taste down to our kids? Music journalists Jude Rogers and Mark Sutherland discuss.

And we Cook the Perfect...Vegan Quesadilla with Aine Carlin.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed.


SAT 17:00 PM (b06w56gv)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b06vnd2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06vjc6t)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b06vjc6w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06vjc6y)
Iran and the United States have begun trading prisoners, as diplomats prepare to lift sanctions against Tehran.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b06w56gx)
Clive Anderson, Arthur Smith, Frank Skinner, Peter Richardson, Isy Suttie, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, The Milk, Reverieme

Clive Anderson and Arthur Smith are joined by Frank Skinner, Peter Richardson, Isy Suttie and Phoebe Waller-Bridge for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b06w56gz)
Series 19

Changes

By Graham White

In the wake of David Bowie's passing, and Tim Peake's spacewalk above the earth, two kids make some surprising discoveries about their parents less-than-defined identities.

Dad tells how he 'did a Bowie' one night as an adolescent in a small west country town - and describes the ridicule and hostility he faced.

Perhaps now is the moment when the children in turn have to consider the nature of their own identities, and changes.
A tale of two generations, and the meaning of Bowie.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b06w56h1)
The Revenant, Annie Leibovitz, Nicholas Searle, The Rack Pack, Give Me Your Love

Leonardo DiCaprio stars as American pioneers-man Hugh Glass, in Oscar-contender The Revenant. It's graphic, visceral, epic in scope and could sweep the boards at the awards
Photographer Annie Leibovitz has an exhibition of portraits under the title "Women", which will tour the globe. How does she tackle such an enormous subject?
The debut novel by former civil servant Nicholas Searle "the Good Liar" is gaining a lot of attention but do our critics think it's a good book?
BBC iPlayer's first online-only drama is a snooker comedy film 'The Rack Pack' - which tells the story of the rise of the sport in the early 80's from a parlour game to a world-conquering TV fixture.
Give Me Your Love is a play at The Battersea Arts Centre about the treatment of former combatants who have PTSD with MDMA (ecstasy). Is this a wise move?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Paul Morley, Natalie Haynes and Jacqueline Springer. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b06w56h3)
The Stranger in the Mirror

What is autism, and what causes it? Nobody knows, but there have been many theories, from the plausible to the offensive to the downright wacky. Autism remains a mysterious enigma and thus a receptacle of whatever we want to project onto it. Author and broadcaster Michael Blastland, whose son is autistic, delves into a rich archive and finds that looking at autism is like looking into a mirror. In it we see our own fears, beliefs, hopes and cultural prejudices.

Autism was formally identified in 1943, by child psychiatrist Leo Kanner. It existed long before that, of course, but autistic children were instead seen as "wild children", or mentally disabled, or bewitched. In some parts of the world they still are.

Michael Blastland takes us on a journey through the history of the theories about autism, which is in effect a history of social or scientific trends. With the post-war rise of psychoanalysis, for example, autism was blamed on mothers, so-called "refrigerator mothers". (Audio from the film Refrigerator Mothers is featured courtesy of Kartemquin Films, it was produced by David E. Simpson and J.J. Hanley.) When we worried about science messing with nature and our bodies (remember the BSE scandal?) we blamed vaccines. Then it was genes. And now, with economic need, autism and its more high-functioning form Asperger's Syndrome are almost fashionable. Silicon Valley has been called the largest sheltered workplace scheme in history.

Whenever there has been a twist in our attitude to autism, it has come out of a new scientific or social trend. The latest of which may be that as we are becoming a more diverse society, autism is just another kind of different.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b06vjlbb)
John Steinbeck - East of Eden

Episode 2

Adam has fallen under the spell of the enigmatic Cathy – a woman who has murdered her parents and now, on the run, has married Adam. He’s captivated by her. But on their wedding night it was Adam’s brother Cathy slept with.

The newly-weds are about to start a new life in California, but it’s not the one Adam imagines in this dark and febrile drama about familial love.

John Steinbeck's epic tale exploring the nature of good and evil, inspired by the story of Cain and Abel.

Starring Holliday Grainger, Robin Laing and David Yip.

Dramatised by Donna Franceschild.

Samuel….. Jimmy Chisholm
Cathy …..Holliday Grainger
Cal ….. Alasdair Hankinson
Faye…..Kathryn Howden
Aron ….. Samuel Keefe
Adam ….. Robin Laing
Abra ….. Gemma McElhinney
Dr Tilson…..Nick Underwood
Ethel…..Anita Vettesse
Lee….. David Yip

Director: Kirsty Williams

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2016.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b06vjc70)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Four Thought (b06vkktf)
Positively Medieval

Lucy Allen argues that the way in which medieval society is often presented - as indifferent to sexual violence against women - is wrong.

Lucy is an academic at Cambridge University, and she recounts a disagreement with a colleague about the realism of violence depicted in the TV show Game of Thrones. In fact, she says, medieval monarchs were passing laws against sexual violence in wartime, and some medieval literature reflects a nuanced understanding of trauma caused by rape.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton.


SAT 22:30 Three Pounds in My Pocket (b064z758)
Series 2

Episode 2

Kavita Puri looks at a turbulent period for South Asians living in Britain, from 1976 to 1981. There were confrontations and street battles across the country, in largely immigrant towns, between the National Front and anti-racist organisations. Many from the first generation shied away from conflict and ignored racist abuse, but the younger generation - many born here - fought back. "We are likely to die in this country," one interviewee says, "so if it means staying and fighting that's what we will have to do, and we won't give an inch." Kavita explores this generational difference, through candid and heartfelt memories.
Producer: Smita Patel

With help from Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter.

The programme contains archive from "Mind Your Language" written by Vince Powell for London Weekend Television.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b06vjv12)
Heat 1, 2016

(1/17)
Russell Davies hosts the quiz that's been testing the general knowledge of the general public for longer than any other. Now in its 63rd season, Brain of Britain returns with another 48 quiz enthusiasts from around the UK competing for the title Brain of Britain 2016.

The first heat of the new series draws together competitors from Cardiff, Shrewsbury, St Andrews and Haddenham in Buckinghamshire. At least one of them will be going forward to the semi-final stage in the spring. There are also semi-final places for the top-scoring runners-up, so those pipped in close contests can often get a second chance.

Russell will also be selecting a pair of questions submitted by a listener in a bid to 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Edinburgh at the Year's Midnight: A Winter Journey in Poetry through Scotland's Capital City (b06vjlbg)
A winter journey through Scotland's capital city by Stewart Conn. The poetry is introduced and read by Stewart with the acclaimed Scots actors Gordon Kennedy and Siobhan Redmond. Music is arranged and played by Aly Macrae.

Stewart Conn is one of Scotland's most highly-regarded poets. He lives in Edinburgh and was, from 2002 to 2005, the city's inaugural Makar - the Scots name for a poet or bard. His Bloodaxe collections include The Breakfast Room (2011 SMIT Scottish Poetry Book of the Year) and a new and selected volume, The Touch of Time.

"He stands among the indispensible poets of modern and contemporary Scotland" - Douglas Dunn

A fragment from Under The Ice by Stewart Conn, inspired by Raeburn's portrait which hangs in the National Gallery in Edinburgh:
"...Was Raeburn's skating parson
a man of God, poised
impeccably on the brink;
or his bland stare
no more than a decorous front?
If I could keep my cool
like that. Gazing straight ahead,
not at my feet. Giving
no sign of knowing
how deep the water, how thin the ice."

Produced by Gordon Kennedy
Directed by Marilyn Imrie.
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 17 JANUARY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b06w6rb5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Four Bare Legs in a Bed (b0222fgn)
An Interesting Condition

The second of three stories from Helen Simpson's collection, Four Bare Legs in a Bed, read by Rosie Cavaliero.
2/3 An Interesting Condition. Fear and loathing in an antenatal class.
Producer: Sarah Langan.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rb8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06w6rbg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rbl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b06w6rbn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b06w6t82)
Bells from St. Leonard's Church, Hythe in Kent.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b06vkktf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:15 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b06w6rbs)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b06w6t84)
Eruption

Samira Ahmed explores the power of eruptions - emotional, spiritual or geological.

We often think of eruptions of emotion, anger for example, as troubling and out of our control, but can they be useful or powerful ways of effecting change? Giles Fraser discusses with Samira the significance of Jesus over-turning the tables of the money changers in the temple.

Eye-witness accounts of volcanic eruptions and poems by Neil Rollinson and James Kirkup are read by Emily Taaffe and Peter Marinker, with music by Sibelius, Ennio Morricone, CPE Bach and Alan Hovhahness.

Producer: Natalie Steed
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b06w6t86)
A Life of Slime

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

In this programme recorded in 1999, Lionel Kelleway is joined by snail expert Mary Seddon in the Wye Valley. Lionel and Mary search through an ancient woodland on the trail of possibly the least-loved of creatures especially to gardeners. Along the way Lionel discovers many of this fascinating group are active in December and often easier to find as they search the woodland floor.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b06w6rbw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b06w6rby)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b06w6t88)
Seeking sanctuary in Germany, Anglican primates 2016, Monks cook 18th-century curry

For the next three years the US Episcopal Church will not be able to participate fully in the Anglican Communion. That's the decision of the Primates' Meeting held this week in Canterbury.

It's a consequence of the Episcopal Church's decision to recognise same sex marriage and homosexuality. The church has also had a number of privileges withdrawn. The Rt. Rev. Mariann Budde, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington DC gives Edward Stourton her reaction.

Reporter Trevor Barnes has been following the Primates' meeting. He reports on how the Archbishop of Canterbury's efforts to prevent a split of the global church were received and assesses reaction to the final communique.

It's a right that dates back to the Councils of Carthage, that of being able to seek sanctuary from the state in a church. Today, this practice is hardly ever recognised by governments but in Germany it's been revived as a last resort for refugees threatened with deportation. Joe Miller reports from Bavaria.

This Sunday, Pope Francis will hold a special Mass for migrants as he marks 'Migrants and Refugee Day.' Cardinal Vincent Nichols reflects on the current migrant situation across Europe.

Faith based charities receive the largest share of donations in Britain. There's concern that new proposals to regulate their fundraising will have a serious impact on their work. Jeremy Moodey, the CEO of the charity of Embrace ME and David Ainsworth from Civil Society Media debate.

We discover how a 18th century cookbook with one of the first recipes for chicken curry ended up in the library of Downside Abbey in Somerset.

Producers:
David Cook
Carmel Lonergan

Editor:
Amanda Hancox

Photo Credit : Evangelisch-Lutherischen Kirchengemeinde Immenstadt.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b06w6t8b)
The National Holocaust Centre and Museum

Broadcaster Natasha Kaplinsky presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of The National Holocaust Centre and Museum.
Registered Charity No 509022
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'The National Holocaust Centre and Museum'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'The National Holocaust Centre and Museum.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b06w6rc0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b06w6rc2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b06w6t8d)
God's Kingdom and Human Need

From New Kilpatrick Parish Church, Glasgow, with The Rev Roddy Hamilton.
Bearsden Choir directed by Andrew Nunn. Organist: Christopher Nickol.
Reading: Mark 2: 1-12
I heard the voice of Jesus say (Tune: Kingsfold)
We cannot measure how you heal (Tune: Ye Banks and Braes)
Take this moment, sign and space (J L Bell/G Maule)
Lord, we come to ask your healing (Ar Hyd Y Nos)
Spirit of God (Mallaig Sprinkling Song, Tune: Leaving of Lismore)
Angel voices ever singing (Tune: Angel Voices)
Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b06vnbcy)
Sing a New Song

Tom Shakespeare argues that we need a new national anthem, one that celebrates what's great about the whole country, reflects the diversity of the population and the values of modern society.
He suggests that existing anthem-like hymns such as Jerusalem, or the likes of Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory won't do. Jerusalem, for example, talks of walking on England's mountains green, excluding the Welsh, Scottish and Northern Irish.
A new anthem, written and composed for the purpose, would actually mean something and would make us proud of what's great about the United Kingdom. It would be in tune with our times.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sc8)
Kakapo

Michael Palin presents the New Zealand Kakapo, high on the ferny slopes of its island fortress off the coast of New Zealand. Kakapos are flightless and the heaviest parrots in the world. They're also called owl-parrots from their nocturnal habits and open owlish expressions. Like owls their plumage is richly mottled although no owl shares their beautiful moss-green tones.

Kakapos also have a curious mating strategy. The males gather at traditional "leks" or display areas to attract mates. At the top of a wooded ridge, the male digs one or more a bowl- like depressions in the ground which function as an amplifier. He then takes a deep breath, swells his throat-pouch like a balloon then releases the air with a soft booming call which can carry up to five kilometres.

This sound can now only be heard on a handful of offshore islands. The kakapo story is tragically familiar. Flightless and ground-nesting, it was helpless in the face of settlers who logged its forests and introduced cats and rats which slaughtered the birds. Between 1987 and 1992 the last surviving kakapos were relocated to predator-free islands. Now following intensive care and a national conservation strategy, there are about 130 kakapos in the wild.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b06w6rc5)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b06w6ty2)
On Plough Sunday, Ed is feeling nervous. And it is a time for farewells.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b06w6ty4)
Sir Anthony Seldon

Kirsty Young's castaway is the educationalist and writer, Sir Anthony Seldon.

Now Vice-Chancellor of Buckingham University, he was the Master of Wellington College. He has written, co-written and edited more than 30 books, including political biographies of Prime Ministers Churchill, Blair, Brown and Cameron.

He had to take his 'A' levels twice before going on to read PPE at Oxford and doing a PhD at the LSE, before embarking on his teaching career. His first headmaster job was at Brighton College and then he went onto be Master of Wellington College. During his tenure, the school became co-educational, set up partner schools in China, and introduced a more holistic approach to learning with happiness classes and stillness sessions added to the curriculum and in 2009 the state secondary Wellington Academy was founded in Wiltshire.

He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and of the Royal Society of Arts and in 2014 was knighted for services to education and modern political history.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b06w6rc7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b06vk8xv)
Series 8

Walsh, Dubner, Bramwell

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Sarah Millican welcome:

* Holly Walsh, comedian and would-be medieval scholar
* Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of Freakonomics, a best-selling book that turned our understanding of economics on its head
* Dr David Bramwell, author, comic, and adventurer whose book The No 9 Bus To Utopia recounts his year-long pilgrimage in search of a Better Life.

The Museum's Guest Committee speculate on what drove medieval monks to draw obscene doodles on sacred manuscripts; why a mind-reading microchip could see the end of civilisation as we know it; and an interesting theory about who all those streakers were at 1970s sports events.

Researchers: Anne Miller and Molly Oldfield of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and James Harkin.

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2016.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b06w6ty6)
Leeds: The Story of a City Through Its Food

When the Food Programme went to Leeds to cover its growing food and drink scene many areas of the city had recently been flooded. At the time community groups, including Muslims and Sikhs, were taking part in a food operation to feed those forced out of their homes - meeting the fundamental need for food while showing the strength of the community.

Dan Saladino explores the city - which has historic links to supermarket chains, wealth from the textiles industry and 'Leeds Dripping Riots'. The last 2 years have seen a thriving independent food and drink movement, with innovators starting projects which are changing the face of Leeds but also inspiring others around the world.

Adam Smith was working in Australia when he became aware and angered at the scale of edible food being wasted. After being told if he wanted to change the world he needed to change his home town he returned to Leeds, setting up a cafe which intercepted food being thrown away from shops, markets, projects and allotments to 'feed bellies not bins'. The pay as you feel model of the Real Junk Food Project has been replicated across Leeds and around the world with 126 cafes and more in the making. Yet Adam is far from content.

At Trinity Kitchen, a radical new model for a shopping mall food court which has drawn attention from others as far flung as Sweden and China. A 6 week rotation of new traders is no mean feat - with road closures and cranes hoisting food trucks into place.

Dan also meets Northern Monk in Grub and Grog - brewing quirky ales to match a changing, mainly vegan menu while Northern Bloc ice creams are keeping things close to home with flavours like Yorkshire Parkin and Black Treacle but with their eyes on expansion into the London market.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b06w6rc9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b06wbp94)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Can We Trust the Opinion Polls? (b06wbp96)
Episode 1

Last year's general election should have been an easy result to predict. There was a constant stream of opinion polls, many more than in previous campaigns. But they turned out to be highly misleading, suggesting a hung parliament. The actual result was a huge shock to the polling industry. So went wrong with the polls, and why? And how easy will it be to put it right?

In the first part of a series examining the role of opinion polling in British politics, David Cowling looks at the track record of polls in previous elections. He explores why their results matter and whether there were warning signs that should have indicated they were going wrong before last year's general election.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06vn91z)
RHS Harlow Carr

Eric Robson and the panel answer questions from the postbag at RHS Harlow Carr in Harrogate. Matthew Wilson, Bob Flowerdew and Christine Walkden offer the advice.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04bmtph)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces conversations between couples who together find the strength to make a fresh start, eliminate starvation in a small Tanzanian town, and deal with fatal illness, from Scotland, Birmingham, and Devon.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b06wbrk5)
John Steinbeck - East of Eden

Episode 3

Adam Trask has been raising his twin boys with the help of his cook, Lee.

His estranged wife -the enigmatic Cathy - has taken over a brothel after murdering its previous owner.

In order to protect the twins, Adam has always maintained that their mother is dead, but Cal, after listening in at a door, now knows the truth.

That knowledge is set to destroy the Trask world in this dark and febrile drama about familial love.

Conclusion of John Steinbeck's epic tale exploring the nature of good and evil, inspired by the story of Cain and Abel.

Starring Holliday Grainger, Robin Laing and David Yip.

Dramatised Donna Franceschild.

Judge..... Jimmy Chisholm
Cathy .....Holliday Grainger
Cal ..... Alasdair Hankinson
Aron ..... Samuel Keefe
Adam ..... Robin Laing
Abra ..... Gemma McElhinney
Joe ..... Gavin Mitchell
Will.....Nick Underwood
Ethel.....Anita Vettesse
Lee..... David Yip

Director: Kirsty Williams

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2016.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b06wbrk7)
Janice YK Lee

Mariella Frostrup talks to writer Janice Y K Lee whose first novel The Piano Teacher was an international bestseller. Her new book, The Expatriates, explores the lives of three American women living in Hong Kong, and the challenges of their privileged but isolated lifestyle.

Also on the programme Dr Sarah Dillon continues her series of Close Readings with an analysis of the comic genius of Cold Comfort Farm, and we help a listener overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of books available.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b06wbrk9)
Home

Roger McGough opens a new series of the poetry request programme with a selection of listeners' favourite poems about home, exile and belonging. The readers are Pippa Haywood and Richard Mitchley. Producer Christine Hall.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b06vkg22)
Bent Cops?

In the first of a new series, Allan Urry investigates claims by former officers from one of Britain's biggest police forces that they've been the victims of crimes committed by their own colleagues. He hears claims of dirty tricks by a secretive police unit within Greater Manchester Police which some officers say have led to criminal charges against them. Others say they've been unfairly targeted through the internal disciplinary process, with evidence distorted and statements changed.

Are they bad cops with an axe to grind or victims of corrupt practices and institutional cover up?

Producers: Sally Chesworth and Neil Morrow.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b06w56gz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rcc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b06w6rcf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06w6rch)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b06wbrkc)
Pauline Black

The musician and lead vocalist Pauline Black presents this week edition of Pick of the Week. This week she is uncovering secrets: the secret world of 'colour bars' and tribute acts in '60's working men's clubs, the secret burden of adult men who were sexually abused as children , the deployment of America's secret jazz weapon during the Cold War and hears the secret of David Bowie's success as a song writer from a musician who played on one of his greatest hits.

For her pick of programmes available on the I-Player Pauline returns to her roots with an excerpt from a BBC World Service programme on the history of Ska music.

Produced by Kevin Mousley

The Pick production team : Kay Bishton and Elodie Chatelain.

e-mail your favourite radio highlights of the week to potw@bbc.co.uk.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b06wbrkf)
Pip keenly gives Matthew a hand at work and they flirt with each other. Matt mentions a couple of Dorset farmers he knows and offers to set up a visit - perhaps Pip could join him to see their milking set up etc. Matthew worries about asking for time off though, but Pip talks to Ruth who lets them both go.
At the Bull, Jazzer complains to Jim about Pat's healthy cooking (and small portions). Jim has bigger frustrations - he can't get back home to Greenacres yet. The original company doing the work went bust and the new lot say it'll be ready by Easter - with any luck. Jim and Jazzer can't wait to be home again. Jazzer's thinking about whether to help with the village hall renovation. Kenton's avoiding the kitchen, as their current temporary agency chef doesn't seem to see eye to eye with Jolene. Kenton asks Jazzer and Jim to host Burns Night at the Bull on 25th January.
Brian's full of reassuring words for Charlie, who he feels mustn't let Berrow's problems hold him back. Brian hopes Charlie will come back one day when he has had time to enjoy some new success. Charlie talks positively about Adam - Brian says it's a shame Charlie won't be around to influence Adam. Yes, says Charlie, but some things just aren't meant to be.


SUN 19:15 So Wrong It's Right (b01hxmws)
Series 3

Episode 2

Presented by Charlie Brooker, 'So Wrong It's Right' is a competitive game of failure where coming up with the wrong answer is the right thing to do.

Over a series of rounds, Charlie asks three guests a number of questions to rummage through their pasts and test their creativity. So Wrong It's Right celebrates the pungent taste of disappointment by turning embarrassing mistakes into perverse triumphs.

In this episode, the guests joining him to try and out-wrong each other are comedians Lee Mack, Holly Walsh and panel show legend Barry Cryer.

The panel's worst experiences at school and the best ideas for the worst TV News gimmicks are put to the panel. Will anyone surpass Barry Cryer's suggestion of a revamped 'Newsnight' presented by tabloid darling and reality TV superstar Katie Price?

The host of So Wrong It's Right, Charlie Brooker, also presents BBC2's How TV Ruined Your Life, Channel 4's You Have Been Watching and 10 O'Clock Live, and writes for The Guardian. He won Columnist of the Year at the 2009 British Press Awards and Best Newcomer at the British Comedy Awards 2009.

Produced by Aled Evans
A Zeppotron Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 The Interrogative Mood (b06wbx0x)
Padgett Powell is an acclaimed writer of very stylised fiction and, in an extract from The Interrogative Mood, he weaves curious questions in a truly haunting manner.

In this amusing sonata of bizarre questions by the award-winning author, three voices ask the listener seemingly random thoughts to a soundtrack of American music.

In the introduction, the author himself explains the peculiar circumstances that led him to create the work.

The readers are Liza Ross, Garrick Hagon and Robert Ravelli.

Directed by Samuel Gunn
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b06vn925)
Weekend Stroke Deaths

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said this week that if you have a stroke at the weekends, you're 20% more likely to die. But is that true? We look at the evidence.

Are you more likely to win prizes with newer Premium Bonds? We ask Radio 4's Money Box presenter Paul Lewis if there is any truth in this.

A few weeks ago many newspapers were reporting that alcohol was the cause of 70% of Accident and Emergency attendances over the weekends. Did the newspapers misunderstand the research?

Why was the polling in the run up to the General Election last year so wrong? We speak to Professor John Curtice, lead author on a report using the 2015 British Social Attitudes Survey to see if they could come up with better data.

There is great excitement over rumours that one of the predictions Einstein made in his theory of General Relativity has finally been observed. We ask UCL physicist Dr Andrew Pontzen why this is big news.

Plus, is the air in Beijing is so bad that it's like smoking 40 cigarettes a day? We investigate.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b06vn923)
David Bowie, Alan Rickman, Olwyn Hughes and Ed Stewart

Matthew Bannister on

David Bowie, art expert, fashion icon and media manipulator.

Alan Rickman, the actor most famous for playing villains from the Sheriff of Nottingham to Professor Snape.

Olwyn Hughes, the sister of the poet Ted Hughes who fiercely guarded his literary legacy and that of his late wife Sylvia Plath.

And Ed "Stewpot" Stewart, the Radio 1 and 2 DJ who presented Junior Choice.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b06w53bh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b06w6t8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b06vmzv5)
California - Agriculture and Migration

Peter Day travels to California to discover how migrant workers have transformed farming and agriculture. He speaks to families from Japan and Mexico - who've made California their home and learns about the history of mass migration and its impact on the land.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b06w6rcl)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b06wbx1h)
Michael Deacon of The Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b06vmypd)
Alejandro Inarritu on The Revenant

With Francine Stock

The Oscar winning director of Birdman, Alejandro Inarritu discusses his western The Revenant, which tested his actors, including Leonardo Di Caprio, to their limits and was reportedly described as a living hell by members of the crew.

Director Lenny Abrahamson describes just how he made Room, a movie mainly set in a 11 x 11 foot cell.

Critic Catherine Bray assesses the runners and riders in this year's Oscars race.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b06w6t84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 18 JANUARY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b06w6rdp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b06vkj24)
Modern slavery, School lunch boxes

Modern Slavery: Laurie Taylor explores the tensions and dilemmas at the heart of contemporary struggles against enslavement; from forced labour to sex trafficking. He's joined by Julia O'Connell Davidson, the author of a new study which argues that the 'new abolitionist movement' fails to address the fundamental realities of injustice and exploitation in a globalised world. The writer and journalist, Rahila Gupta, offers another perspective.

Also, school lunchboxes: Vicki Harman, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Royal Holloway, University of London, considers the way in which middle class mothers view their children's packed lunches as a reflection of their parenting skills - sometimes struggling to satisfy their children's tastes and keeping on the right side of the school's strict guidelines. Is a home-made cupcake a transgression of rules or a worthy display of good mothering and home baking?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b06w6t82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rdr)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06w6rdt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rdw)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b06w6rdy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06wv701)
A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b06wcl1w)
Floating houses, Farm technology, Livestock market on TV

Over the past few weeks we've talked a lot about flooding, and many farming communities are still clearing up after the latest deluge. Flood defences in the Netherlands are being held up as an example of how communities could better deal with the threat of flooding in this country. The Dutch are building homes which will float on floodwater, rather than get inundated by it. Charlotte Smith find out how it works.

All this week, Farming Today will be looking at the use of new technology in agriculture. Charlotte talks to the head of engineering at Harper Adams University about the trends for the future.

And a new TV series starts tonight, based at the livestock market in Aberdeen. We get a sneak preview.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b06w6rf0)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0syn)
Poorwill (American Nightjar)

Michael Palin presents the common poorwill from an Arizona desert. In the dead of night, loud calls pierce the stillness on a moonlit track, a small shape suddenly sprouts wings and flutters into the darkness ... a Common Poorwill is hunting.

Poorwills are small nightjars that breed mainly in western North America, often in deserts and dry grassland. By day the poorwill sits in the open or among rocks relying on its mottled plumage for camouflage. By night, it emerges to hawk after insects snapping them up with its large frog-like mouth.
This technique works if it's warm enough for insects to be active, but in some places where poorwills live there are sudden cold snaps. Instead of migrating, the poorwill slows down its metabolism and goes into torpor for days or even weeks . This hibernation-like state is very rare among birds and allows the poorwill to get through lean periods and was first scientifically described in 1948, although the phenomenon had been recorded more than 140 years earlier by the great explorer Meriwether Lewis, during the Lewis and Clark Expedition to discover western side of America in 1804.


MON 06:00 Today (b06wclxj)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b06wclxl)
Alaa Al Aswany on Egypt

On Start the Week Tom Sutcliffe talks to the Egyptian writer Alaa Al Aswany about his latest novel which charts the country's social upheaval through the prism of Cairo's elite Automobile Club of Egypt. The foreign correspondent Wendell Steavenson looks back at the Egyptian revolution as the crowds gathered in Tahrir Square in 2011. The political economist Tarek Osman explores how Islamism has spread through the Middle East, and what its future prospects mean for the region, while Professor Hugh Kennedy charts the rise of the Caliphate and how the so-called Islamic State uses the iconography of early Islam as propaganda.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b06wclxn)
The Outrun

Washed Up and Back Home

Amy Liptrot's incisive memoir of overcoming alcoholism amid the luminous Orkney landscape.

Liptrot grew up on a sheep farm on Orkney. She was shaped by the wind-swept islands, but longed for the excitement of the city. A move to London led to a life that was hedonistic and fun but she was unable to control her drinking. Her alcoholism exposed her to some terrifying situations and left her lost and lonely. At thirty she finds herself washed up back home in Orkney, and discovers that this place she once longed to escape is curative, its wildness and lore playing an essential part in her recovery from addiction.

Today: Amy finds herself washed up and back home.

Written by Amy Liptrot
Read by Tracy Wiles
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Simon Richardson.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06wcph8)
Pensions Phone-In with Jane Garvey and Paul Lewis

Today Woman's Hour is doing a phone-in on pensions. Jane will be joined in the studio by Moneybox presenter Paul Lewis to answer your questions. Are you worried about your pension? With the introduction of the flat rate pension in April are you concerned about what you are entitled to? Is it fair? How do you find out? How do you cope with the transition to living on a pension? If you've found yourself waiting longer than expected for your pension, how are you managing? Or are you in your thirties and thinking about your pension?
You can call us on 03700 100444, e-mail us through the website or of course, tweet us.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wcphb)
The One about the Social Worker

Episode 1

Claire Skinner returns as the social worker with a past, in another rollercoaster story based on tough true cases by Martin Jameson.

Devon Sutcliffe's life has been less of a car crash, more of a motorway pile-up. Rejected, dumped, failed by everyone who could have cared for him, he has bounced from foster placement to residential unit to foster placement, and several times been labelled as 'unplaceable'. Finally out of care, almost anyone who has encountered him professionally expects him to be in prison within weeks.

Assigned to returning social worker Liz Beecham, she stakes her own rehabilitation on helping Devon survive alone. But when his chaotic mother Cheryl arrives in his new flat, Devon's need for her threatens to undo all Liz's work. A heart-stopping story is about to unfold about Devon's past... and his family's future.

1/5 How did the boy in boxers become the wanted man in an armed siege?

Claire Skinner is best known to TV viewers as harassed mum Sue in Outnumbered, but her wide-ranging career includes long associations with Mike Leigh, Alan Ayckbourn, and Sam Mendes. Her recent stage credits include Blurred Lines (NT Shed), Deathtrap (West End), Mrs Affleck (National Theatre) and The Father (Tricycle Theatre and West End).

Theo Barklem-Biggs has starred in Silk, the BAFTA-nominated Our World War, and the Donmar Warehouse's new production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses.

Martin Jameson is a prolific screenwriter, director and playwright whose recent work on Radio 4 includes Zola, Stone, Can You Tell Me The Name Of The Prime Minister?, and The Night They Tried To Kidnap The Prime Minister.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b06wcphd)
Strictly Come Langport

Grace Dent presents a new series documenting the untold stories of 21st century Britain.

Langport in Somerset has a secret. Not a dark secret, quite a happy one really - a dance competition to blow away the winter blues. Grace Dent and her producer zoom in on events and discover a classic tale of good vs evil - a sparky 70 year old widow called Mo doing the salsa; and opposing her a tango-ing video technician called Ferg. At stake, a small silver trophy and eternal local glory. So who will win Strictly Come Langport this year?

The producer is Miles Warde


MON 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b01p720p)
Series 4

Handsworth

Comedian Mark Steel returns with a new series, looking under the surface of some of the UK's more distinctive towns to shed some light on the people, history, rivalries, slang, traditions, and eccentricities that makes them unique.

Creating a bespoke stand-up set for each town, Mark performs the show in front of a local audience.

As well as examining the less visited areas of Britain, Mark uncovers stories and experiences that resonate with us all as we recognise the quirkiness of the British way of life and the rich tapestry of remarkable events and people who have shaped where we live.

During this 4th series of 'Mark Steel's In Town', Mark will visit Tobermory, Whitehaven, Handsworth, Ottery St Mary, Corby, and Chipping Norton.

This week, Mark takes a trip to Handsworth in Birmingham to explore reggae and riots, white supremacist gardening, and how takeaway food affects the time space continuum. From December 2012.

Additional material by Pete Sinclair.
Produced by Sam Bryant.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b06w6rf2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b06l3665)
18 January 1916 - Ralph Winwood

On this day, the battle of Sheik Sa'ad represented the first of several efforts to relieve the Siege of Kut, and Ralph Winwood has a mission of his own.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b06wcq19)
Modelling agencies, Tax credits, SIM card fraud

Consumer affairs programme.


MON 12:57 Weather (b06w6rf4)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b06wcq1c)
The Prime Minister, David Cameron, has said Muslim women who fail to improve their English language skills could be deported, in a drive to improve integration. The former Conservative minister, Sayeeda Warsi, welcomes more English classes but tells us some measures stigmatise communities. Tata Steel has confirmed that it is cutting just over a thousand jobs in the UK - We speak to both the Labour Party and the Welsh Secretary.

And should the police be forced to apologise to Field Marshal Lord Bramall after he was told he would face no action over allegations of historical child sex abuse? We hear about so-called 'scandal-hunting'.


MON 13:45 Three Score Years and Ten (b06wcq1f)
Looking Back

Bishop Richard Holloway, with the aid of great poets and writers, looks back on his life now that he has passed his allotted three score years and ten and wonders what his decreasing future holds and how best to cope with it.

He decides that, despite his apparent control of his own life and everything he has been taught about free will, we must start by acknowledging that, to a great extent, our lives were propelled by factors that were never under our control. We didn't choose our parents, and they didn't choose their parents, nor anything else in the history that formed us into the kind of person we were revealed to be.

Richard recalls his thoughts sitting at the bedside of many people as death approached and he watched them being eaten up with regret because they had not made more of their lives, and now it was too late. Wrong roads taken, right roads not taken, relationships broken and still unrepaired, and troubled children who blamed them for their own failures. Regret can be the saddest part of ageing and it can add an extra burden to what is already a difficult time.

There's no delete or rewind button in a human life, though we often wish there were. That's what we said. That's what we did. That's the kind of person we were.

But, he concludes, the remedy for irreversibility is the capacity to forgive and to be forgiven. And it has to include the hardest kind of forgiveness - self-forgiveness.

A Butterfly Wings production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b06wbrkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b036kbl2)
James Lees-Milne

The Unending Battle

by Christopher William Hill

It's 1944 and James Lees-Milne - and the National Trust - have returned to London. Comfortably accommodated in a flat in Cheyne Walk, Lees-Milne is attempting to secure a nearby property to house the musical collection of Boer War veteran, Major Benton Fletcher. Late one night, whilst trying to telephone a friend, Lees-Milne has a crossed line and makes the acquaintance of an anonymous woman. A friendship grows over the telephone wires, but at the woman's insistence they both keep their identities secret. When Lees-Milnes's childhood friend Tom Mitford returns unexpectedly from the continent, a sexual attraction is reawakened. Tom, however, has been a committed red-blooded male since Eton and is now determined to settle down after the war and raise a family - expecting James to help him sift through a list of potential wives. Tom is now a realist in love, but Lees-Milne is still an idealist. When disaster strikes, Lees-Milne must rely on the mysterious woman at the end of the telephone more than ever before.

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

The three plays star Tobias Menzies (Rome; Game of Thrones ) as James Lees-Milne and Victoria Hamilton (Lark Rise to Candleford; Victoria & Albert) as the novelist Nancy Mitford and chart four years during the war when Lees-Milne was at his most industrious in trying to secure properties for the National Trust. In this play, Joseph Mison (Salmon Fishing in the Yemen; Lost in Austen) stars as Tom Mitford.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b06wcsnb)
Heat 2, 2016

(2/17)
Russell Davies hosts the second heat in the 2016 series, with competitors from London and Leicester taking their first step towards the title Brain of Britain.

Would you know which city is the setting for Verdi's opera La Traviata? Or who the Republican nominee was, when Barack Obama won his second Presidential election in 2012? Russell has plenty more questions that will put today's four contenders to the test.

The winner will go forward to the series semi-finals after Easter, and there are semi-final places for the top-scoring runners-up of the series too, so there is a chance that more than one competitor today will qualify.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b06w6ty6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b06wcsnd)
Rebecca Front

Comedy actress Rebecca Front, star of Alan Partridge and The Thick of It, takes the audience at the Radio Theatre through her life in reading and comedy. Her readers are Nicola Stephenson and Ben Willbond. The pieces she loves are from How To Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran, The Code of the Woosters by P.G. Wodehouse, Rabbi Hugo Gryn and The Wind in the Willows. Rebecca also sings a song by the songwriter she most admires, Stephen Sondheim. It's Could I Leave You?, from the musical Follies, for which she's accompanied on piano by Benjamin Frost

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b06wcsng)
Series 13

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence

Brian Cox and Robin Ince return for a new series of their award winning science/comedy show. Tonight the infinite monkey's are joined on stage by comedian Jo Brand, neuroscientist Anil Seth, and robotics expert Alan Winfield to discuss Artificial Intelligence. How close are we to creating a truly intelligent machine, how do we define intelligence anyway, and what are the moral and ethical issues that the development of intelligent machines might bring?

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b06wcsnj)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06w6rf6)
18/01/16 Tata Steel cuts over a thousand jobs in the UK

Tata Steel is cutting just over a thousand jobs in the UK - 750 will go from its plant in Port Talbot. The First Minister of Wales described it as a 'devastating blow'.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b06wcsnl)
Series 8

Dodd, Fry, Jenner

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Sarah Millican welcome:

* Singer, photographic playboy and failed accountant Ken Dodd
* The University College London lecturer who took up mathematical modelling to get to grips with the dating scene, Dr Hannah Fry
* The man with the enviable task of overseeing the historical accuracy of over 1,200 songs and sketches that make up Horrible Histories, Greg Jenner

The Museum's peripatetic scholars reveal how the first ever alcoholic drinks were guzzled from a spitton; why the equation Wt+l =a +r.W,+IHW(H) and Hl+l = b + r2Ht + IWH(Wt), is the formula for a happy marriage; and why you can tell a joke in Liverpool that that won't get a laugh in London.

Researchers: Anne Miller and Molly Oldfield of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and James Harkin.

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2016.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b06wcsnn)
Fallon updates Jazzer on an eccentric client whose wedding she is covering with Emma next week. Fallon also feels inspired by an idea for her tearoom â€" serving quality brunch promotions, with food supplied by Tom. There's a little tension between Tom and Rob at the Bridge Farm shop over stock ordering. Rob picks Tom up on his apparent openness to including non-organic produce â€" if Rob had known, perhaps he and Helen would have taken on some Fairbrother geese before last Christmas. Tom talks about being responsive to customers and light on their feet. Rob diplomatically, perhaps sarcastically, thanks Tom for enlightening him about the change of strategy.

Brian fills David in on the latest from Berrow farm and its closing and selling off. Brian admires David's bravery as he starts to understand more about Brookfield's plan to move into grass based Spring calving.
Ruth and David discuss Bert, who seems eager to move back into his bungalow as it's nearly ready. It will be strange without Freda of course. Ruth tells David to stop worrying about Brookfield, reassuring him that the system they're adopting has worked well in other countries. David's keen to show Brian that he and Ruth are definitely doing the right thing at Brookfield.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b06wcttj)
The Assassin, Jack Thorne, Attacking the Devil, Peter May

The Assassin is the first film from Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao-Hsien for 8 years and his take on 'wuxia', a martial hero genre of Chinese fiction traditionally found in literature. The plot re-imagines a Tang Dynasty legend about a female assassin, and stars Shu Qi. Mark Eccleston reviews.

Crime writer Peter May returns to the Hebrides for his latest novel, Coffin Road, in which a man washed up on a beach with no memory of who he is, searches for clues to an identity which may prove him a murderer.

Attacking the Devil: Harold Evans and the Last Nazi War Crime is a new film documentary which charts Harold Evans's tenure as editor of The Sunday Times. The film's co-directors Jacqui and David Morris discuss the film and their focus in particular on the investigation by Evans's Insight team to expose the truth behind the thalidomide scandal of the late 50s and early 60s, that left thousands of babies born with severe physical deformities.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Ella-mai Robey.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wcphb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Deciding Fast and Slow (b06wcttl)
What is it really like to make decisions affecting millions of people, knowing that a mistake might be pounced upon instantly and your career left in tatters?

Government ministers face this challenge every day, and now under ever-rising pressures - not just 24 hour news, but also hugely influential social media and far stronger demand for more open and accountable decision-making.

Elinor Goodman finds out from senior politicians, civil service leaders and their advisors how government ministers make decisions in the face of growing pressure from this instant all-pervasive information culture. How is the quality of decision-making affected when the demands for faster and more transparent policy-making become impossible to resist?

As information circulates ever faster, can ministers actually keep up and make good decisions rather than succumb to the demands for swifter ones?

Where once there was just a news cycle to manage, now there is a need for instant replies to all manner of questions and challenges about the detail and purpose of policies themselves - and sometimes this happens before the policy has actually been finalised.

David Cameron leads a government that can only dream of the time and space afforded to his political hero Harold Macmillan, who was able to take weeks deliberating on subjects which today's PM must sometimes resolve in minutes. So, what are the pressures and processes that contribute to ministerial decision-making in the 21st century?

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b06vmr1w)
Molenbeek, Through the Looking Glass

After the terror attacks in Paris, the world's attention turned to an inner-city district of the Belgian capital, Brussels, where several of the attackers came from. Molenbeek has been notorious for many years as a breeding-ground for Islamist extremism - and the Belgian government vowed to "clean it up". But do the authorities really have any plan to prevent the radicalisation of young Belgians? Tim Whewell has been travelling back and forth to Brussels since the Paris attacks to talk to local people as they hold up a mirror to themselves and search for explanations - and attempt to have a dialogue with a sometimes dysfunctional state.

Lode Desmet producing.


MON 21:00 Is Ignorance Bliss? (b0639xsw)
In an age where we are saturated with information are we ever better off just 'not knowing'? Could 'not knowing' improve our memory, enhance our learning and even making us happier?

As someone who is occupationally immersed in information, author and journalist Sathnam Sanghera sets out to discover if ignorance really is bliss.

Leading us gently through a journey of the 'unknown', Sathnam meets scientists and psychologists who are investigating the realms of ignorance.

James Carse, Professor Emeritus at NYU has identified three types of ignorance - ordinary, wilful and higher, and says that this is a subject area he just can't resist talking about. Carse's research takes us back to a small group of medieval monks who dedicated their life to 'not knowing'.

Jumping back into the 21st Century Sathnam will join Lisa Son of Columbia University. She has conducted recent studies into the virtues of ignorance and how the process of ignorance can actually enhance our memory and learning.

Talking about education, Professor of Biology Stuart Firestein runs a course on ignorance - it's one of his most popular classes and basically involves a group of very smart people talking about what they don't know.

Alongside the 'science of ignorance' will be a healthy dose of personal reflection from those who have chosen ignorance as a way of life, including musician Johnny Borrell who boycotted the news as he believes you can find out more truth by walking down the street with a guitar.

Produced in Bristol by Nicola Humphries.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b06wclxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b06w6rf8)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b06wcttn)
Iran and US end 35-year-long feud

The sanctions that barred Iran from the global financial system for years, have been lifted. We ask which countries and which businesses will be best placed to take advantage of the opening up of the Iranian market.. and a spokesman for the US State department explains why America still isn't friends or Allies with Iran.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06wcttq)
The Automobile Club of Egypt

Episode 1

Once a respected landowner, Abd el-Aziz Gaafar has fallen into penury and has moved his family to Cairo. He is forced into menial work at the Automobile Club, a refuge of colonial luxury and privilege for its European members.

A vibrant and moving story of a family swept up by social unrest in post-War Cairo, written by Alaa Al Aswany, the internationally best-selling author of The Yacoubian Building and Chicago.

Read by Raad Rawi and Emerald O'Hanrahan

Translated by Russell Harris
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Produced by Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b06wctts)
Series 5

Bellowhead (the A-Side)

John Wilson continues with his new series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

Programme 9. 'Hedonism' by Bellowhead, released in 2010 and still the best selling independent folk album of all time.

The idea for Bellowhead came to John Spiers and Jon Boden when they were caught in a traffic jam on tour. The longer they were stuck in the car, the more names of friends they came up with of whom to invite - initially settling on a 'modest' line-up of 10 which then grew to an even sillier 11-piece after the recording of their first EP.

In June 2015, they announced that the band would be calling it a day on May 1st 2016, and exactly two weeks after the twelfth anniversary of their first ever gig in Oxford Town Hall they will finish their farewell tour with an intimate final show in the very same venue. The tickets for this gig sold out in two minutes.

Their most commercially successful album, Hedonism was recorded in Abbey Road Studios and released in October 2010. Produced by John Leckie, it served up a further mix of shanties, folk songs and dance tunes, arranged in an eclectic mix of musical styles and influences. The album includes rousing versions of 'Cold Blow The Wind', 'New York Girls' and the Jacques Brel song 'Amsterdam'

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard on Tuesday 19th January 2016 at 3.30pm.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06wcttv)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 19 JANUARY 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b06w6rgf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b06wclxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rgh)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06w6rgk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rgm)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b06w6rgp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06wv70y)
A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b06wcydm)
Marine conservation zones, Farming apps, Goat gene bank

The government has designated 23 new Marine Conservation Zones. But will they work? We hear from marine conservation expert Professor Callum Roberts and the fisheries minister, George Eustice.
Anna Hill finds out about a farming app which predicts what will happen in individual fields, based on information that's put in by the farmer combined with local weather predictions. The idea is that it can then give farmers an early assessment of how crops might get on.
The Rare Breeds Survival Trust has started raising funds to gather Golden Guernsey and Bagot goat embryos, to protect these native British breeds.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0t02)
Oilbird

Michael Palin presents the oilbird, from a Venezuelan cavern. Demonic screeching's and the rush of unseen wings mixed with a volley of strange clicks are the sound backdrop to oilbirds.

Oilbirds are known in Spanish as guacharos .."the wailing ones". These bizarre-looking brown birds with huge mouths, long broad wings and long tails were seen in 1799 by the explorer Alexander von Humboldt in 1817 who described their sounds as "ear-splitting". They're similar to nightjars, their closest relatives, but unlike them, oilbirds feed on fruit; ..... they're the world's only nocturnal flying fruit-eating bird.

In their dark breeding caves, they navigate using echolocation like bats. Young oilbirds grow fat on a diet of fruit brought in by their parents and can weigh half as much as again as the adults. These plump chicks were once harvested by local people and settlers for oil which was used in cooking and, ironically for a bird which spends its life in darkness, for lighting lamps.


TUE 06:00 Today (b06wcydp)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b06wcydr)
Donald Trump and the Politics of Celebrity

Jonathan Freedland focuses on the rise of Donald Trump through the prism of the past, by examining the careers of three high-profile 20th century Americans who became rich, famous and entered the political arena.
Jonathan's guests include Professor Anthony J. Badger, former Paul Mellon Professor of American History at Cambridge University; James P. Rubin, who was the Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs under President Bill Clinton;
Robert Singh, who is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck, University of London and a specialist in US government and politics and the politics of American foreign policy; Kate Andrews, Head of Communications and Research Fellow at the Adam Smith Institute; she is also a spokesperson for Republicans Overseas UK.

Producer Julia Johnson.


TUE 09:30 Under the Mushroom Cloud (b063zt9r)
A dramatic eye-witness account of the events in Hiroshima just over seventy years ago.

On 5th August 1945, Shuntaro Hida was a 28-year old doctor working at the Hiroshima Military Hospital - the epicentre of the atomic bomb dropped by the Enola Gay. After a dinner for visiting dignitaries, where a lot of sake had been consumed, he was woken by a man who had come to ask him to treat his sick grandchild. Strapped to the back of the man's bike, they cycled 6 km to the village of Heseka, where he spent the night treating the child.

This chance event saved his life.

Dr Hida's personal and professional story is such a remarkable and extraordinary one it makes compelling listening. As he was preparing to give the child a syringe, he happened to look up into the clear blue sky on the morning of 6th August and saw the American bomber flying over Heseka. Then he saw the blinding flash over Hiroshima and, a few seconds later, was thrown through the air by the force of the blast.

Clawing his way from under the rubble of the collapsed building, he saw the growing mushroom cloud.

Dr Hida's immediate instinct was to rush back to the hospital - but he describes encountering so many horrendously injured and burnt people fleeing the city, some crawling on their hands and knees with burnt flesh dropping off their bodies like molten wax, he couldn't get through.

So he jumped into the river and swam to the city centre, where he found complete and utter devastation. He made his way back to Heseka and did what he could - with only a few bandages and little else - to set up a treatment centre for the victims. Now aged 98, Dr Hida has dedicated the rest of his life to treating Hiroshima survivors.

Produced by Ruth Evans
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b06wcydt)
The Outrun

Back from the Brink

Amy Liptrot's incisive memoir of overcoming alcoholism amid the luminous Orkney landscape.

Liptrot grew up on a sheep farm on Orkney. She was shaped by the wind-swept islands, but longed for the excitement of the city. A move to London led to a life that was hedonistic and fun but she was unable to control her drinking. Her alcoholism exposed her to some terrifying situations and left her lost and lonely. At thirty she finds herself washed up back home in Orkney, and discovers that this place she once longed to escape is curative, its wildness and lore playing an essential part in her recovery from addiction.

Today: after hitting rock bottom in London Amy seeks treatment before the Orkney lambing season.

Written by Amy Liptrot
Read by Tracy Wiles
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Simon Richardson.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06wczlz)
Muslim women and learning English; Drew Gilpin Faust, the first woman president at Harvard

David Cameron has just announced that an extra £20 million should be available to teach English to Muslim women. Few people dispute the value of better access to English lessons, but David Cameron has angered many people by singling out the Muslim community and Muslim women in particular and suggesting that a lack of English might make you more susceptible to extremist viewpoints. We look at the situation of Muslim women without language skills in the UK today.

Drew Gilpin Faust was the first woman to become the President of Harvard University, the first president since 1672 without a degree from Harvard and the first to have been brought up in the South. She has always been a passionate campaigner for equality. She talks about developments in education and at Harvard in particular during the nine years she has been doing the job.

In 2011 the UK's still birth ranked at 33rd out of 35 high income countries. The latest research published in The Lancet now places the UK 21st, but things aren't improving here as quickly as in other European countries. We speak to Dr Alex Heazell, a report co-author and Senior Clinical Lecturer in Obstetrics at Manchester's Saint Mary's Hospital, and to Louise Silverton, Director for Midwifery at the Royal College of Midwives.

Baroness Joyce Gould was Director of Organisation for the Labour Party during politically tumultuous 1980s. In her memoir The Witchfinder General, Joyce describes her role in rooting out the Militant Tendency. She joins Jane to talk about her sixty-four years with the Labour Party.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wczm1)
The One about the Social Worker

Episode 2

Claire Skinner returns as the social worker with a past, in another rollercoaster story based on tough true cases by Martin Jameson.

Devon Sutcliffe's life has been less of a car crash, more of a motorway pile-up. Rejected, dumped, failed by everyone who could have cared for him, he has bounced from foster placement to residential unit to foster placement, and several times been labelled as 'unplaceable'. Finally out of care, almost anyone who has encountered him professionally expects him to be in prison within weeks.

Assigned to returning social worker Liz Beecham, she stakes her own rehabilitation on helping Devon survive alone. But when his chaotic mother Cheryl arrives in his new flat, Devon's need for her threatens to undo all Liz's work. A heart-stopping story is about to unfold about Devon's past... and his family's future.

2/5 Liz's decisions lead to an official complaint.

Claire Skinner is best known to TV viewers as harassed mum Sue in Outnumbered, but her wide-ranging career includes long associations with Mike Leigh, Alan Ayckbourn, and Sam Mendes. Her recent stage credits include Blurred Lines (NT Shed), Deathtrap (West End), Mrs Affleck (National Theatre) and The Father (Tricycle Theatre and West End).

Theo Barklem-Biggs has starred in Silk, the BAFTA-nominated Our World War, and the Donmar Warehouse's new production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses.

Martin Jameson is a prolific screenwriter, director and playwright whose recent work on Radio 4 includes Zola, Stone, Can You Tell Me The Name Of The Prime Minister?, and The Night They Tried To Kidnap The Prime Minister.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


TUE 11:00 Rethinking Anorexia Nervosa (b06wczm3)
Anorexia Nervosa is the most lethal of all psychiatric disorders. Early treatment can be effective but about a quarter of people develop a severe and enduring form of the disorder, which persists into adulthood and is notoriously difficult to treat.

The longer this pernicious disorder persists, the worse the prognosis for these patients. Desperate to find answers and offer hope, doctors and researchers are now pushing the boundaries of science in search of novel treatments. Sally Marlow talks to those at the cutting edge of research and to people who have been battling anorexia nervosa for decades. She discovers the role that thoughts and emotions play in the disorder, and how these are being examined by scientists who are increasingly turning to the brain to look for answers.

Scans are revealing areas and circuits in the brain which behave differently in people with anorexia nervosa. It's thought that the food rituals, obsessional thoughts and habits that characterise the disorder become entrenched over time, making it ever more difficult to break free from them. It appears that this might explain why for those who have had anorexia nervosa for many years, treatments such as talking therapies so often fail to help.

Armed with this knowledge, researchers are now using electrical stimulation to reset the brain areas and circuits that appear to be abnormal in patients with severe and enduring anorexia nervosa.

At Kings College London, researchers are trialling a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation, whereby electromagnetic currents are delivered to the brain of each study participant via a device held above the head. Meanwhile researchers at Toronto University are trialling a much more invasive technique, which involves implanting electrodes deep inside the brain.

It's hoped that these techniques may free patients from some of the mental torment that prevents them from benefitting from existing therapies. While researchers are cautiously optimistic about what they're discovering, trialling experimental techniques in such vulnerable and desperate patients, raises a myriad of ethical dilemmas for everyone involved.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 11:30 The Manchester Ballads (b06fkm2g)
The folk singer Eliza Carthy visits Chetham's Library in Manchester to find out about nineteenth century broadside ballads, and to see if she can find a new song to perform. She is joined by Andrew Biswell, Professor of English at Manchester Metropolitan University, who is an advocate of the cultural value of the ballads, which were printed on a single sheet and sold on the streets of Manchester. She meets Michael Powell, Librarian of Chetham's Library, which is one of the oldest public libraries in the English-speaking world, and he tells her more about the collections of ballads there. Many of the ballads reflect the Irish community in Manchester and she goes to the site of Little Ireland with Professor Brian Maidment to find out more about the conditions there. Eliza also has a go at printing a ballad herself, with help from Graham Moss at the Incline Press in Oldham. She talks to Jennifer Reid, the self-styled 'pre-eminent broadside balladress of the Manchester region', who has collaborated with the artist Jeremy Deller. Jennifer and Jeremy describe their work on his exhibition at the recent Venice Biennale which includes some of the ballads. Eliza asks her guests about their favourites then chooses one of her own to sing.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b06w6rgz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b06l36ch)
19 January 1916 - Alec Poole

On this day, negotiations between Montenegro and Austria were broken off, and it appears to parallel events in the Winwood household.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b06wd1jz)
Call You and Yours: What made you and your family feel less foreign and more British?

On Call You & Yours we are exploring how people and communities become better integrated in the UK. If your family came to Britain from overseas - what made a difference to you - what was it that made you stop feeling foreign and start feeling British?

The prime minister has promised new language lessons for migrant women in England who speak little or no English. The idea is to help people integrate better into the broader community and also to reduce extremism.

What does your experience tell you about the most important ways that people and communities become better integrated?

Email us now - youandyours@bbc.co.uk and don't forget to leave a phone number so we can call you back.

Join Winifred Robinson at 12.15pm.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b06w6rh5)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b06wd1k1)
The Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, rules out an immediate rise in interest rates because of the problems in the global economy. We analyse the risks we face..

Next week's planned strike by junior doctors in England has been suspended. The Chair of the British Medical Association tells us why.

The mystery of what happened to Rudyard Kipling's son during WWI has been solved.


TUE 13:45 Three Score Years and Ten (b06x95p2)
What Next?

Bishop Richard Holloway, with the aid of great poets and writers, looks back on his life now that he has passed his allotted three score years and ten and wonders what his decreasing future holds and how best to cope with it.

What happens after death is the great unknown. But Richard argues that death itself is our friend and we should reach out our hand to it because, whatever we believe or do not believe about what happens to us after death, most of us will need courage to face it at the end.

Courage is not being unafraid. It is to be very afraid, yet to overcome our fear and refuse to flinch. It is the best lesson life teaches us.

He suggests that, while Death is a necessity if we want to keep the earth habitable, this necessity is spiritual as well as physical. Apart from the boredom of living forever, without the prospect of death there would be little to spur human achievement, because there would always be time to get round to it later.

He concludes, "Maybe that's why Jesus told us to work while it was yet day, for the night was coming when no one could work. Death is the friend who prods us to do something with the one life while we have it and not waste it hanging around."

A Butterfly Wings production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b06wcsnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 British New Wave (b039cd9g)
Up the Junction

By Nell Dunn. Dramatised by Georgia Fitch.

In Nell Dunn's Sixties classic, a young writer from Chelsea decides to swap her privileged life for a grittier experience in industrial Battersea. We join Lily as she embarks on life in the working class community, forming strong friendships with sisters Sylvie and Rube and working in the local sweet factory. The girls scrape together enough to get by on, live in each other's pockets and shake off whatever drama life throws at them.

The bold energy of Nell Dunn's writing and characters is still like a breath of fresh air - fifty years on from the book's original publication.

Director/Producer ..... Lucy Collingwood

Up the Junction was Eastenders' star Lacey Turner's first radio drama.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b06w53bb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b06wd266)
Series 5

Bellowhead (the B-side)

John Wilson continues with his fifth series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

Programme 10 (B-side): Having discussed the making of 'Hedonism' (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 18th January and available online), Bellowhead respond to questions from the audience and performs exclusive live acoustic versions of some to the key tracks from the album.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b06wd268)
Slang

What is slang, where does it come from, and which subjects attract the most slang words? Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright thrash it out with lexicographer of slang and swearing Jonathon Green. Producer Beth O'Dea
Jonathon Green is the author of Slang: A Very Short Introduction.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b06wd26b)
Series 38

Nitin Sawhney on Jeff Buckley

Musician and performer Nitin Sawhney champions the life of Jeff Buckley who he regards as a genius singer, songwriter.
The expert is Steve Abbott who was a friend of Buckley's and released his debut record.

Presenter: Matthew Parris
Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


TUE 17:00 PM (b06wd7dr)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06w6rht)
19/1/16 Interest rate prediction

Mark Carney warns of further turbulence in the global economy.


TUE 18:30 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (b06wd7dt)
Series 2

The Employment Agency

When Milton launches a job agency, it turns out that getting people into work actually is rocket science. Which is why his best client suddenly goes ballistic.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is 'Help!'. Because each week, Milton, and his trusty assistant Anton (Tom Goodman-Hill) set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. Because when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

Written by Milton with James Cary and Dan Evans, the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton" returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

With Tom Goodman-Hill, Josie Lawrence and Ben Willbond.

Music by Guy Jackson.

Produced and directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4, first broadcast in January 2016.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b06wd7dw)
Lilian enjoys a look at some of Robert's backstage photos from the Calendar Girls performances. There's nothing too revealing, to Brian's disappointment as he asks for a look. The best, recurring picture, seems to be of Neil covering his eyes.

The date for the village hall reopening looks to have been set - they're aiming for Easter Monday. Lynda's keen to mark it with something special - perhaps a special guest? Lilian isn't quite ready to leave Home Farm and move back to the Dower House just yet, despite some subtle hints from Brian.

Eddie and Joe are erecting a new shed at Grange Farm, after the one burnt down during the wassail. Joe reveals that Tom wants to know Joe's mother's secret black pudding recipe.

Brian feels guilty for the treatment Charlie has had at Berrow Farm and in the village. Adam ruefully agrees - but that's life, eh?


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b06wd7dy)
Steve Carell in The Big Short, Brett Anderson and Suede, Fiona Barton

Steve Carell talks to Samira Ahmed about The Big Short, the Oscar-nominated film in which he plays a hedge fund manager trying to profit from the 2008 financial crisis.

Lead singer of Britpop legends Suede, Brett Anderson talks about their new album Night Thoughts, the second album since they reformed in 2013.

Journalist turned novelist Fiona Barton discusses her anticipated debut The Widow, about the wife of a suspected child kidnapper and murderer. She explains how years of watching the women married to men in the dock inspired her to write the story.

Oscars chief Cheryl Boone Isaacs is pledging to "alter the make-up" of the Academy to better reflect diversity in the film industry; we examine the options for change.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wczm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b06wd7f0)
Tennis: Game, Set and Fix?

File on 4 reveals secret evidence of match fixing in tennis and investigates claims that sport's governing bodies have failed to act on repeated warnings about suspect players. The programme has seen confidential documents which reveal how some were linked to gambling syndicates in Russia and Italy which won hundreds of thousands of pounds betting on matches they played in. A number of those who have been repeatedly flagged on fixing lists passed to the game's Tennis Integrity Unit have continued to attract highly suspicious gambling activity. Reporter Simon Cox also has an exclusive interview with one of the most high profile players to be banned for match fixing who says the problem is widespread in the sport.
Reporter Simon Cox Producer Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b06w6rj6)
Symbols to Say You Are Partially Sighted

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b06wd7f4)
Hospital admissions and the 'weekend effect', Peyronie's disease

Dr Mark Porter unpicks the science behind the so called 'weekend effect'. Politicians have quoted research claiming that people are 20% more likely to die of a stroke at the weekend, while another much cited study finds 11,000 more deaths in people admitted at the weekend. But how valid are these figures and the research that generated them? Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the stroke data that has been criticised by experts as being out of date. While Mark Porter talks to Editor of the BMJ, Fiona Godlee, who published the 11,000 figure but is concerned about the political use of the findings. And discusses the study with lead author Nick Freemantle, plus Consultant Surgeon Sam Nashef who is sceptical about the results.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b06wcydr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b06w6rjf)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b06wd7f6)
Special report on people smuggling from Turkey into Europe

BBC correspondent threatened; "Staggering" Iraq death toll; Palin backs Trump
(Refugees board Turkish coastguard ship after failed attempt to reach Greece. Credit: REUTERS/Umit Bektas).


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06ymmx1)
The Automobile Club of Egypt

Episode 2

Once a respected landowner, Abd el-Aziz Gaafar has fallen into penury and has moved his family to Cairo. He is forced into menial work at the Automobile Club, a refuge of colonial luxury and privilege for its European members.

A vibrant and moving story of a family swept up by social unrest in post-War Cairo, written by Alaa Al Aswany, the internationally best-selling author of The Yacoubian Building and Chicago.

Episode 2:
Abd el-Aziz's wages from the Automobile Club are barely covering his costs. But that is the least of his problems.

Read by Raad Rawi and Amir El-Masry
Translated by Russell Harris
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Produced by Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b06wcsng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06wd8jh)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster. Labour tries to stop student grants being scrapped.



WEDNESDAY 20 JANUARY 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b06w6rn2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b06wcydt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rn4)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06w6rn6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rn8)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b06w6rnb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06wv714)
A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b06wf5l0)
Rural economy, Robotic chicken farming, Agricultural job on remote island

A new report will be launched at the House of Commons today, highlighting the contribution that rural businesses make to the UK's wider economy. It identifies four key areas which the Country Land and Business Association would like the government to focus on, in order to make sure that the 646,000 rural-based businesses in England and Wales are not overlooked in future legislation.

As LAMMA - the UK's largest farm machinery show - gets underway, Farming Today continues its week-long look at the uses of new technology in agriculture. Today we meet a chicken farmer based near Chesterfield, who relies on robotic technology to keep his birds healthy.

And how about a new job? We have news of a new farming opportunity - on the remotest inhabited island on earth.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0vb1)
Black Sicklebill

Michael Palin presents the black sicklebill of New Guinea. The black sicklebill is a breath-taking creature. It's a bird of paradise, and the male sicklebill's black feathers gleam with metallic blue, green and purple highlights. But his most striking features are a slender scythe-like bill, and an extremely long sabre-shaped tail whose central plumes can reach 50cm in length.

During courtship, he transforms his pectoral and wing feathers into a huge ruff which almost conceals his head and exposes an iridescent blue patch. Perching on a dead branch, he displays horizontally, looking less like a bird than a small black comet, all the while producing strange rattling cries.

It is thought that the Black sicklebill and its relative the Brown Sickle bill may have spooked the Japanese in the Second World War. Japanese forces had occupied the North coast of (Papua) New Guinea and during their push south to the capital, Port Moresby, had to cross the mountain territories of the sicklebills. It's said that on hearing the birds' courtship displays; they flung themselves to the ground, thinking that they were under fire from the Allies.


WED 06:00 Today (b06wf6n5)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b06wf6n7)
Gerald Seymour, Amy Liptrot, Tim FitzHigham, John Bright

Libby Purves meets novelist Gerald Seymour; adventurer and comedian Tim FitzHigham; writer Amy Liptrot and costume designer John Bright.

Tim FitzHigham is an adventurer, author and comedian. His new show, the Gambler, is on tour and in preparation he has undertaken some idiosyncratic challenges including cooking under ten feet of water. He has established himself as a man who is infamous for tackling endeavours that no one else would dare to. In previous shows he has paddled paper boats down the Thames; ridden hollowed out logs up the Amazon; run deserts in suits of armour and crossed the Channel in a bath tub. The Gambler is on tour.

Amy Liptrot's book, The Outrun tells her story of returning to Orkney after more than a decade away in London. Orkney becomes the central force in her recovery from alcohol addiction; she swims in the bracingly cold sea and tracks Orkney's wildlife including puffins nesting on sea stacks and the rare and secretive corncrake. The Outrun is published by Canongate.

Gerald Seymour is a novelist who made his mark with Harry's Game in 1975. Before embarking on his literary career he was a news reporter for 15 years, covering events in Vietnam, Borneo, Aden, Israel, Northern Ireland and at the Munich Olympics. His new novel, No Mortal Thing, is set in the murky world of the Calabrian crime organization known as the 'Ndrangheta. No Mortal Thing is published by Hodder and Stoughton.

John Bright is a costume designer for theatre, film and television. He won an Academy Award and BAFTA Award with Jenny Beavan for their work on A Room With A View in 1985. He started out working at Chichester Festival Theatre and later became a key member of the Merchant Ivory filmmaking team. His new website will feature his designs for film, theatre and television and his own personal collection of costumes including garments once belonging to Queen Mary and Margot Fonteyn.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b06wf6n9)
The Outrun

The Corncrake Wife

Amy Liptrot's incisive memoir of overcoming alcoholism amid the luminous Orkney landscape.

Liptrot grew up on a sheep farm on Orkney. She was shaped by the wind-swept islands, but longed for the excitement of the city. A move to London led to a life that was hedonistic and fun but she was unable to control her drinking. Her alcoholism exposed her to some terrifying situations and left her lost and lonely. At thirty she finds herself washed up back home in Orkney, and discovers that this place she once longed to escape is curative, its wildness and lore playing an essential part in her recovery from addiction.

Today: a job with the RSPB sees Amy scouring the islands nightly, listening for rare Corncrakes.

Written by Amy Liptrot
Read by Tracy Wiles
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Simon Richardson.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06wf6nc)
Sleeplessness and new mothers, Margaret Drabble on Janet Frame, Are high street prices sexist?

In November 2015 Woman's Hour spoke to Claire Throssell, mother to Jack and Paul, both killed in October 2014 by their father. Today Women's Aid, the domestic abuse charity, launches a major new campaign, 'Child First'. The campaign calls on the family courts and the Government to put the safety of children back at the heart of all decisions made by the family court judiciary. Their report 'Nineteen Child Homicides', details cases of children intentionally killed by a parent who was also known as a perpetrator of domestic abuse. Jane is joined by Polly Neate, Chief Executive of Woman's Aid and Anthony Douglas, CEO of CAFCASS, the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service.

The Women and Equalities Select Committee has announced that it will conduct an enquiry into the claims of sexist high street pricing that made the front page of the Times yesterday. We're joined by the committee chair Marie Miller MP and journalist Daisy Buchannan to ask why that pink razor costs more.

Sleeplessness after giving birth: How does this affect new mothers and what can be done to deal with a lack of sleep? Clinical psychologist Mia Scotland and Professor Jim Horne, Director of the Sleep Research Centre at Loughborough University, talk to Jane about how to combat sleeplessness and when to get help.

We celebrate the New Zealand author Janet Frame, who spent 8 years in mental hospitals in her twenties and escaped only when officials realised she was a prize winning writer. This month Frame's first novel "Owls Do Cry," is republished. The author Margaret Drabble has written its introduction and discusses the brilliant, reclusive author.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Helen Fitzhenry.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b06wf6nf)
The One about the Social Worker

Episode 3

Claire Skinner returns as the social worker with a past, in another rollercoaster story based on tough true cases by Martin Jameson.

Devon Sutcliffe's life has been less of a car crash, more of a motorway pile-up. Rejected, dumped, failed by everyone who could have cared for him, he has bounced from foster placement to residential unit to foster placement, and several times been labelled as 'unplaceable'. Finally out of care, almost anyone who has encountered him professionally expects him to be in prison within weeks.

Assigned to returning social worker Liz Beecham, she stakes her own rehabilitation on helping Devon survive alone. But when his chaotic mother Cheryl arrives in his new flat, Devon's need for her threatens to undo all Liz's work. A heart-stopping story is about to unfold about Devon's past... and his family's future.

3/5 Devon's mother has a surprise for him.

Claire Skinner is best known to TV viewers as harassed mum Sue in Outnumbered, but her wide-ranging career includes long associations with Mike Leigh, Alan Ayckbourn, and Sam Mendes. Her recent stage credits include Blurred Lines (NT Shed), Deathtrap (West End), Mrs Affleck (National Theatre) and The Father (Tricycle Theatre and West End).

Theo Barklem-Biggs has starred in Silk, the BAFTA-nominated Our World War, and the Donmar Warehouse's new production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses.

Martin Jameson is a prolific screenwriter, director and playwright whose recent work on Radio 4 includes Zola, Stone, Can You Tell Me The Name Of The Prime Minister?, and The Night They Tried To Kidnap The Prime Minister.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b06wf7ll)
Jim and Robin - Setting Sail

Fi Glover with friends who are united by their love of the sea and encourage unity through traditional seafaring: "If we don't all pull together in one direction we'll go nowhere" - another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Road Stories (b06wf7ln)
Nepal

"People talk about the power of the internet, the information super-highway; but sometimes a highway is all you need."

Miles Warde sets off on three eye-opening journeys, on foot, by bus and all other means to discover the importance of the highway to everyday life. In Nepal he travels north to south, from Tibet to India, across the mighty Himalaya. Here he meets people for whom a blacktopped highway is a source of astonishment. Fifty years ago there were only footpaths in these high mountains, but as the Chinese say, "To get rich quick first you build a road."

In Kenya a newly upgraded route from Nairobi through the badlands to Ethiopia promises to transform a region of tribal fighting and banditry. This is the road of 'terror and death', so Miles takes local reporter Michael Koloki along for the ride. Together they meet nomadic people who say Kenya starts at the road; and you'll hear perhaps the first ever recording of a border crossing intimate search.

And closer to home in Wiltshire, the Prime Minister's promise of a new tunnel past Stonehenge kicks up a hornet's nest of local and international uproar.

Miles Warde is the producer of The Invention of ... Germany, Brazil, Italy and France; and winner of the Royal Mail International travel writer award.


WED 11:30 Bad Salsa (b06wf7lq)
Series 2

Jumping the Shark

Marco's sister arrives and is not impressed by his new girlfriend - Camille. Jill is still trying to decide whether to have reconstruction while Tim lives the high-life on a photo shoot and Chippy thinks she can save her budding relationship with a lie.

Series two of the sitcom about three women who meet during cancer treatment and start going to salsa class together to maintain their friendship. As they adjust to life after cancer they realise that they've all changed.

The series is not about cancer, but about life after cancer, how you cope the changes in your outlook, your desires and your expectations. It's also about how other people cope with the change in you.

Written by Kay Stonham

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b06w6rnh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b06l375l)
20 January 1916 - Kitty Lumley

On this day, the first men from the Derby Scheme were mobilised for service, and Kitty has a moment of hope for her missing brother.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b06wg6y1)
You and Yours investigates storage firm Store First

A new twist in a long running investigation into investments in the UK storage company, Store First ltd. Listeners have told You & Yours they were persuaded by separate sales companies to take their money out of safe pension funds to buy Store First self-storage units. They were told terrific returns would be made by renting out the units to people who wanted to store their belongings, and also they could release their money from the investment easily. For many, none of this has happened.

During the programme, our reporter, Shari Vahl hears from a whistle blower who works at a Store First warehouse. He describes investors arriving at his place of work in tears asking what has happened to their investment. The Store First employee claims the promised returns are not being made because some warehouses are only as little as 8% occupied. He also claims some investor-owned storage units have obstructions inside them deeming them "unrentable", and says sums of money for insurance are being deducted from what investors were led to believe would be their takings. Investors who have spoken to You & Yours express shock and say Store First ltd have never told them any of this.

In a letter, Store First's chief executive, Toby Whittaker, says the occupancy rates claimed in the programme are completely inaccurate. He says obstructed units are usually owned by Store First itself, and any investors who 'choose' these units are guaranteed a rent, because Store First pays it. Mr Whittaker also denies misleading investors, and maintains they do get a good deal.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


WED 12:57 Weather (b06w6rnl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b06wg6y3)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Three Score Years and Ten (b06x966h)
Dancing Towards Death

Bishop Richard Holloway, with the aid of great poets and writers, looks back on his life now that he has passed his allotted three score years and ten and wonders what his decreasing future holds and how best to cope with it.

In this third episode, Richard is coming to terms with having exceeded his allotted Biblical span of three score years and ten while watching the world around him change out of all recognition and renewing itself in a way that he cannot.

He explains that he knew that the dissolution of his body had begun and he had started the dance to the grave when he noticed the skin on his arms developing the wavy alligator look of skin that was wearing out and coloured patches began appearing on his face like 'stains on old stone'.

In fact, he recalls, the process had started for him when he began to go bald in his twenties. He hated it and fought it in all the usual hopeless ways - buying pills advertised in a church magazine and combing what was left on top to the front of his head .

Caesar had been bald too and had actually started the comb-over fashion but, unlike Caesar, Richard's comb-over was never convincing and always looked sad to him. So one day he just shaved the whole thing off .

Now he suggests that losing his hair was a good preparation for ageing and for death - the final loss. "You could say that the skeleton is the ultimate baldy. That's how we're all going to end up so maybe I've been lucky to have had a bit of a rehearsal."

A Butterfly Wings production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b06wd7dw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Tumanbay (b06wg7rk)
Series 1

The Purge

In the eighth episode of this epic saga inspired by the Mamluk slave-dynasty, the Sultan (Raad Rawi) is increasingly insecure and fearful for his life, so begins a purge of the Palace. Slave trader Ibn (Nabil Elouahabi), is reunited with the daughter he thought he had lost. And her slave companion finally comes face to face with Gregor (Rufus Wright), the man who stole his kingdom.

Tumanbay, the beating heart of a vast empire, is threatened by a rebellion in a far-off province and a mysterious force devouring the city from within. Gregor, Master of the Palace Guard, is charged by Sultan Al-Ghuri with the task of rooting out this insurgence and crushing it.

Cast:
Gregor....................Rufus Wright
Al-Ghuri...................Raad Rawi
Cadali.....................Matthew Marsh
Wolf........................Alexander Siddig
Ibn..........................Nabil Elouahabi
Maya's Envoy..........Nadir Khan
Madu.......................Danny Ashok
Daniel.....................Gareth Kennerley
Heaven...................Olivia Popica
Slave.......................Akin Gazi
General Qulan.........Christopher Fulford
Manel.......................Aiysha Hart
Frog.........................Deeivya Meir
Sarah.......................Nina Yndis
Frog's Mother...........Sirine Saba
Shamsi.....................Laure Stockley
Pesha.......................Sky Yang
Boy...........................Darwin Brokenbro
Hodah.......................Nathalie Armin

Music - Sacha Puttnam
Sound Design - Steve Bond, Jon Ouin
Editors - Ania Przygoda, James Morgan
Producers - Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan, John Dryden

Written and Directed by John Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4


WED 15:00 Money Box (b06wg7rm)
Money Box Live: How could the shake-up in local government finances affect you?

Lesley Curwen and guests look at the financial challenges facing local councils and ask if your local services could be affected.

The way our local councils are funded is changing dramatically. In his 2015 autumn statement, Chancellor George Osborne announced that the money councils receive from Government to fund day-to-day services, will be phased out over the next four years. Councils will instead be allowed to increase council tax by 2% and those which pay for social care will be able to charge a further 2% on council tax to help pay for adult social care.

From 2020 councils will also keep the business rates collected from shops and businesses and many are also thinking of their own innovative ways of making money.

On Wednesday's programme, Lesley Curwen and guests ask what this transformation means for council budgets, discuss the difficult spending decisions being made and find out how local services could be affected.

On the panel:

Professor Tony Travers, London School of Economics.
Councillor John Clancy, Birmingham City Council.
Councillor Robert Gould, Dorset County Council.

Producers: Diane Richardson and Lesley McAlpine.
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b06wd7f4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b06wg7rp)
Con Men in New York, Iconography of punishment

Con men in New York: The little known world of the urban hustler. Laurie Taylor talks to Terry Williams, Professor of Sociology at the New School for Social Research in New York, about his study into the ways in which con artists play their game in back alleys, police precincts and Wall St boiler rooms. He spent years studying their psychological tricks as they scammed tourists with bogus tales, sold off knock offs in Canal St and crafted Ponzi schemes. They're joined by Dick Hobbs,
Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Essex.

The iconography of punishment. From Piranesi's prison fantasies to Warhol's Electric Chair, images of penal retribution have featured prominently in Western art. Eamonn Carrabine, Professor of Sociology at the University of Essex, asks what we can learn from artistic treatments of the ways in which we've dealt with criminals over time.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b06wg7rr)
The future of ITV, Impress announces members, Trust in the media

ITV has announced that two of its senior executives will be stepping down; Chairman Archie Norman will be leaving, as will Director of TV Peter Fincham. ITV Studios managing director, Kevin Lygo will replace him. Steve Hewlett discusses the thinking behind the changes with Mathew Horsman from consultancy Mediatique, and Steve Morrison, former CEO of Granada, shares his thoughts on whether this change of leadership means a change of direction for the UK's largest commercial broadcaster.

Impress, the alternative press regulator to IPSO, will today sign up to the Press Recognition Panel - which was set up following parliament's creation of the royal charter on press regulation. Since its inception in 2013, Impress has failed to gain any members - at present, three major publishers of national titles - the Guardian, Independent and Financial Times - have not signed up to regulation by either Ipso or Impress. Walter Merricks, the chair of Impress, joins Steve Hewlett to announce the six publishers the regulator now has on board.

A global survey by PR firm Edelman has found a "huge increase" in levels of trust that British people feel towards traditional media. Its 'Trust Barometer', a survey of over 33,000 people globally, and over 1000 people in the UK, found that university educated individuals with higher incomes felt a big rise in trust of the media - up 14% this year to 52%, compared with those on lower incomes whose "trust score" in the media was 40%. Ed Williams, Edelman UK CEO discusses the findings, and Natalie Fenton, Professor of media and communications at Goldsmiths College & Director at campaign group Hacked Off, considers how consumption habits are changing the way we perceive media brands.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b06wg7rt)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06w6rnq)
Concerns about oil send share prices plummeting


WED 18:30 It's Jocelyn (b06wg7rw)
Series 1

Episode 4

Meet a monosyllabic shop assistant, a pair of terrible African Drummers and a two terrible bedroom DJ's called 'Uncooth Youth FM'.

Jocelyn Jee Esien vents her frustration at the world around her through sketches and stand-up.

With Curtis Walker, Ninia Benjamin and Kevin J.

Producer: John Pocock

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2016.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b06wg7t9)
David's arm's still aching but he's up to some light work with Ruth. Pip and Matthew are enjoying their farm visit to the Welbys'. The tenancy agreement is being drawn up for Rex and Toby to continue farming at Hollowtree. Meanwhile, Josh has picked a BSc in Agriculture with Farm Business Management to apply for - he feels he needs a back-up plan if Ruth and David's dairy idea goes pear shaped.
Ian and Adam lunch at Grey Gables as Ian wants to try out the new menu as a customer. Ian also fishes for information about when Charlie's leaving Ambridge. Adam's making no predictions, and also feels uncertain about what Justin Elliot's planning regarding the Estate contract. He wants to see an agreement in writing. Ian comments on watching TV box sets with Adam, asking him to save 'The Affair' to watch with him.
Josh, Rex, David and Ruth debate the pros and cons of the new spring calving system they're planning to adopt at Brookfield. David hopes Josh will come round to it. David knows that there's so much riding on it - they really have to make it work.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b06wg7zz)
Elton John, Antonia Fraser on George Weidenfeld, Nicholas Searle

Elton John tells John Wilson about returning to his rock roots and the joy of the school run.

Front Row launches an appeal to track down lost public art works.

Lady Antonia Fraser pays tribute to her mentor, Lord Weidenfeld, who's died at the age of 96.

Nicholas Searle discusses his debut novel, The Good Liar, a story of a conman in his 80s who hopes to pull off one last job when he meets a woman through a dating website.

Comic book writer Kieron Gillen gives his take on Sky One's new superhero drama Lucky Man, based on an idea by Stan Lee and starring James Nesbitt.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wf6nf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Leader Conference (b06wg801)
Series 5

20/01/2016

Andrew Rawnsley chairs the live debate programme which takes the form of a newspaper leader conference that decides the editorials which will appear the next day. He is joined by five prominent journalists who write leading articles for major newspapers across the United Kingdom. Three subjects in the news will be chosen and the panel will then determine - after lively discussion - what should be said about them. Two of the subjects debated will reflect current events and will encourage strong - and witty - exchanges. The third topic will be in a lighter vein. Following the discussion of each subject, Andrew will invite one of his guests - different in each case - to draw up on air, without notice, the leader for that subject and to set out what it will say. All the leading articles will be published on the Radio 4 website the following day.

Producer: Simon Coates.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b06wg803)
Reaching Out

Charlie Howard argues that public services should find their users, not wait to be found.

Charlie started the charity MAC-UK to provide specialist mental health services to gang members and other at-risk young people. As she began to work with them, she found more and more people who would never have accessed traditional services, but were in desperate need of them.

She makes the case that this is also a better, more efficient way to help service users, and argues that other public service providers - from teachers to job advisers - should consider how they can adopt the same approach.

Producer: Katie Langton.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b06wg805)
Series 2

The meteorite and the hidden hoax

In 1864 a strange type of rock fell from the sky above Orgueil in rural France. Shocked and frightened locals collected pieces of the peculiar, peaty blob from the surrounding fields, and passed them on to museums and scientists.

At that time, a debate had been raging over the origin of life; Could life possibly form from mere chemicals? Or did it need some strange unidentified vital substance?

Into this debate fell the Orgueil meteorite, and because it seemed remarkably similar to loamy soil, some wondered whether it may hint at the existence of extra-terrestrial life.

The great Pasteur allegedly investigated, but disappointingly found no such thing. Nevertheless, the mere possibility prompted later ideas that the origin of life on earth indeed lay elsewhere in the universe, ideas that were greeted with varying degrees of skepticism over ensuing decades.

As Phil Ball narrates, given how much was at stake, and how bitterly scientists argued on either side, the most remarkable thing about the story is the extraordinary secret the meteorite kept to itself until exactly 100 years later.

Producer: Alex Mansfield


WED 21:30 Midweek (b06wf6n7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b06wg807)
Special report on Turkish government battle with PKK

The battle raging in South Eastern Turkey, in which about 200 civilians have been killed, over the past six months. The battle is between the Turkish government and Kurdish separatists from the PKK -- and there are daily casualties. A special report from Andrew Hosken.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06ymn5b)
The Automobile Club of Egypt

Episode 3

Once a respected landowner, Abd el-Aziz Gaafar has fallen into penury and has moved his family to Cairo. He is forced into menial work at the Automobile Club, a refuge of colonial luxury and privilege for its European members.

A vibrant and moving story of a family swept up by social unrest in post-War Cairo, written by Alaa Al Aswany, the internationally best-selling author of The Yacoubian Building and Chicago.

Episode 3:
Abd el Aziz gets a new job. With tragic repercussions.

Read by Raad Rawi and Emerald O'Hanrahan
Translated by Russell Harris
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Produced by Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Don't Start (b06wg843)
Series 3

Driving

What do long term partners really argue about? The third series of Frank Skinner's sharp comedy. Starring Frank Skinner and Katherine Parkinson.

In this episode, Kim and Neil's return home from a funeral involves a missed left turn, a backseat stenographer and the planet Zobula.

The first and second series of Don't Start met with instant critical and audience acclaim:

"That he can deliver such a heavy premise for a series with such a lightness of touch is testament to his skills as a writer and, given that the protagonists are both bookworms, he's also permitted to use a flourish of fine words that would be lost in his stand-up routines." Jane Anderson, Radio Times

"Frank Skinner gives full rein to his sharp but splenetic comedy. He and his co-star Katherine Parkinson play a bickering couple exchanging acerbic ripostes in a cruelly precise dissection of a relationship." Daily Mail

"...a lesson in relationship ping-pong..." Miranda Sawyer, The Observer

Don't Start is a scripted comedy with a deceptively simple premise - an argument. Each week, our couple fall out over another apparently trivial flashpoint. Each week, the stakes mount as Neil and Kim battle with words. But these are no ordinary arguments. The two outdo each other with increasingly absurd images, unexpected literary references and razor sharp analysis of their beloved's weaknesses. Underneath the cutting wit, however, there is an unmistakable tenderness.

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b03vgnk5)
Series 1

Episode 1

A brand new series starring Paul Whitehouse and Esther Coles, with Rosie Cavaliero, Simon Day, Cecilia Noble and Marcia Warren.

The series follows Elizabeth, a Community Psychiatric Nurse in her forties, into the homes of her patients (or Service Users in today's jargon). It recounts their humorous, sad and often bewildering daily interactions with the nurse, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense their medication and offer comfort and support.

Compassionate and caring, Elizabeth is aware that she cannot cure her patients, only help them manage their various conditions. She visits the following characters throughout the series:

Lorrie and Maurice: Lorrie, in her fifties, is of Caribbean descent and has schizophrenia. Lorrie's life is made tolerable by her unshakeable faith in Jesus, and Maurice, who has a crush on her and wants to do all he can to help. So much so that he ends up getting on everyone's nerves.

Billy: Billy feels safer in jail than outside, a state of affairs the nurse is trying to rectify. She is hampered by the ubiquitous presence of Billy's mate, Tony.

Graham: in his forties, is morbidly obese due to an eating disorder. Matters aren't helped by his mum 'treating' him to sugary and fatty snacks at all times.

Ray: is bipolar and a rock and roll survivor from the Sixties. It is not clear how much of his 'fame' is simply a product of his imagination.

Phyllis: in her seventies, has Alzheimer's. She is sweet, charming and exasperating. Her son Gary does his best but if he has to hear 'I danced for the Queen Mum once' one more time he will explode.

Herbert is an old school gentleman in his late Seventies. Herbert corresponds with many great literary figures unconcerned that they are, for the most part, dead.

Nurse is written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings, who have collaborated many time in the past, including on The Fast Show, Down the Line and Happiness.

Written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings with additional material from Esther Coles
Producers: Paul Whitehouse and Tilusha Ghelani
A Down the Line production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06wg86g)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster as David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn clash over the axing of student grants and MPs attack the painting red of the front doors of asylum seekers.
Ministers face calls for a fresh investigation into the death of 13-month-old Poppi Worthington and MPs hear that the Chief Inspector of Prisons, Nick Hardwick, threatened to suspend prison inspections in England and Wales over a dispute with the Ministry of Justice.
And the Government comes under cross-party pressure to change the legislation that will ban psychoactive substances, or so-called legal highs.



THURSDAY 21 JANUARY 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b06w6rpp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b06wf6n9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rpr)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06w6rpx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rq3)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b06w6rq7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06wv73q)
A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b06wg8p3)
Scottish land reform, Farm technology, GB food unit, Stoats

New amendments to the Land Reform Bill are being discussed in the Scottish Parliament. Charlotte Smith finds out why the plans for reform could be made more radical.

The "Great British Food Unit" is launched today. This government initiative aims to increase manufactured food exports to a value of six billion pounds by 2020. We hear from the Secretary of State for the Environment, Elizabeth Truss.

All this week we're looking at the uses new technology is being put to on farms. Emma Campbell meets one farmer who thinks that the focus on robots, satellites and drones may be distracting farmers from getting the basics - like soil health - right.

And we hear about moves to eradicate stoats from the island of Orkney.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0t44)
Kea

Michael Palin presents the kea from a windswept mountain in New Zealand. A a snow-capped mountain in New Zealand's South Island are not a place where you'd expect to find a parrot, least of all a carnivorous one (and with a penchant for rubber). But this is the home of the kea.

Keas are curious birds in every sense of the word. Drab greenish brown, they're the world's only Alpine parrot. When they can find them, keas eat fruits and berries, but also, especially in winter they descend from the higher slopes and scavenge on animal carcasses at rubbish dumps, cracking bones with their sharp beaks to reach the marrow. They will even attack live sheep, stripping the fat from their backs and damaging vital organs. Although this habit is rare and is now understood to be largely restricted to injured sheep, it led to widespread persecution of the birds and a bounty was paid on the head of each bird killed which led to widespread declines so that keas became endangered.

Today Keas are legally protected. In their mountain homes, the parrots survive to entertain and exasperate tourists as they clamber over cars, strip rubber seals from windscreens and remove wiper-blades ... curious birds indeed.


THU 06:00 Today (b06wg9dt)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b06wg9dw)
Thomas Paine's Common Sense

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Thomas Paine and his pamphlet "Common Sense" which was published in Philadelphia in January 1776 and promoted the argument for American independence from Britain. Addressed to The Inhabitants of America, it sold one hundred and fifty thousand copies in the first few months and is said, proportionately, to be the best-selling book in American history. Paine had arrived from England barely a year before. He vigorously attacked monarchy generally and George the Third in particular. He argued the colonies should abandon all hope of resolving their dispute with Britain and declare independence immediately. Many Americans were scandalised. More were inspired and, for Paine's vision of America's independent future, he has been called a Founding Father of the United States.

With

Kathleen Burk
Professor Emerita of Modern and Contemporary History at University College London

Nicholas Guyatt
University Lecturer in American History at the University of Cambridge

And

Peter Thompson
Associate Professor of American History at the University of Oxford and Fellow of St Cross College

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b06wg9dy)
The Outrun

Rose Cottage

Amy Liptrot's incisive memoir of overcoming alcoholism amid the luminous Orkney landscape.

Liptrot grew up on a sheep farm on Orkney. She was shaped by the wind-swept islands, but longed for the excitement of the city. A move to London led to a life that was hedonistic and fun but she was unable to control her drinking. Her alcoholism exposed her to some terrifying situations and left her lost and lonely. At thirty she finds herself washed up back home in Orkney, and discovers that this place she once longed to escape is curative, its wildness and lore playing an essential part in her recovery from addiction.

Today: Amy has moved to tiny Papa Westray, one of the smallest inhabited Orkney islands.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06wg9f0)
Prostitution zones, Friends and illness, Zero waste, Puppy farms

A street prostitution zone has been made a permanent fixture in Leeds. How does a managed area of prostitution operate? Julie Bindel, writer and feminist activist and Dr Belinda Brooks-Gordon, reader in Psychology and Social Policy at Birkbeck, University of London give the arguments for and against?

Over 15 million people in the UK are living with chronic illness, or dealing with long-lasting bouts of sickness and treatment such as chemotherapy. What effect does this have on close friendships and relationships? Melissa Viney talked to Francesca Hand, Catherine Hale and Jules about the impact of living with health problems.

After you've Mari Kondo'd your home and cleared away all your clutter, what next? James Wallman says we should forget about 'stuff' and start having experiences, and Bea Johnson has lived waste-free with her family since 2008.

The RSPCA estimate that the illegal puppy farming industry is worth in excess of £100 million. Gangs pretend to be legitimate breeders and hide the fact they are turning over hundreds of dogs as quickly as possible with no regard for the animals' welfare. Janetta Harvey is a campaigner against the practice.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wg9gf)
The One about the Social Worker

Episode 4

Claire Skinner returns as the social worker with a past, in another rollercoaster story based on tough true cases by Martin Jameson.

Devon Sutcliffe's life has been less of a car crash, more of a motorway pile-up. Rejected, dumped, failed by everyone who could have cared for him, he has bounced from foster placement to residential unit to foster placement, and several times been labeled as 'unplaceable'. Finally out of care, almost anyone who has encountered him professionally expects him to be in prison within weeks.

Assigned to returning social worker Liz Beecham, she stakes her own rehabilitation on helping Devon survive alone. But when his chaotic mother Cheryl arrives in his new flat, Devon's need for her threatens to undo all Liz's work. A heart-stopping story is about to unfold about Devon's past... and his family's future.

4/5 Devon's hopes for the future meet the reality of his past.

Claire Skinner is best known to TV viewers as harrassed mum Sue in Outnumbered, but her wide-ranging career includes long associations with Mike Leigh, Alan Ayckbourn, and Sam Mendes. Her recent stage credits include Blurred Lines (NT Shed), Deathtrap (West End), Mrs Affleck (National Theatre) and The Father (Tricycle Theatre and West End).

Theo Barklem-Biggs has starred in Silk, the BAFTA-nominated Our World War, and the Donmar Warehouse's new production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses.

Martin Jameson is a prolific screenwriter, director and playwright whose recent work on Radio 4 includes Zola, Stone, Can You Tell Me The Name Of The Prime Minister?, and The Night They Tried To Kidnap The Prime Minister.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b06wg9gr)
Lessons for Migrants

Today our correspondents ... are in the classroom as migrants, newly arrived in Finland, are taught about Finnish values, culture and the place of women in western society; consider how much the self-styled Islamic State has been damaged by recent successes by Iraqi government forces supported by foreign air power; go to Norway, a country outside the EU but inside the single market. Is that an example the UK might follow after the referendum has been held on whether it should stay in or leave the EU? Our man in Cuba takes a stroll through Havana's poorly lit streets amid concerns that an upsurge in tourism will lead to a rise in crime; and a trip to the hopfields of southern Germany where one brewer is finding that beer and art can be an intoxicating mix.


THU 11:30 Raising the Dead (b06wg9gt)
For the past few decades music teacher and pianist Francesco Lotoro has been collecting music written in concentration camps from the Second World War.

Francesco's life is entirely given over to recovering the creations of composers and performers, many of them Jewish, who died in the camps. A massive amount of music was written in camps. Classical music by established composers, but also songs, symphonies, sonatas, operas, lullabies, jazz riffs often scribbled on old sacks, toilet paper or scratched into mess tins.

Francesco has discovered works by important composers as Hans Krasa, the Czech creator of the masterpiece 'Brundibar', as well as Viktor Ullmann and Gideon Klein - all killed by the Nazis in 1944, but writing music until the very end.

Composer Adam Gorb is head of composition at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester. Working closely with the BBC Philharmonic, Adam travels to Italy to meet Francesco and together they pick through his 8000 piece archive, much of which has never been heard before.

In this special documentary, which broadcasts in the days running up to Holocaust Memorial Day, Adam Gorb returns to Britain with a piece of unfinished music written by Viktor Ullman before his death. This piece will be performed by the Philharmonic for the first time.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b06w6rqh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b06l37nw)
21 January 1916 - Marion Wardle

On this day, the Prime Minister stated that more women workers would be needed to supply enough munitions to the war, and former factory workers Marion and Edie feel even more liberated.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b06whswj)
Cinema box office sales, Downsizing your home, Restaurant leftovers

The voucher website Groupon has stopped promoting a dental clinic, after customers complained they'd received nothing for their money or had been abandoned part way through treatment. The clinic offered teeth straightening treatments costing between £800 and £1000 but has become very difficult to contact. It's left some patients in pain with braces they can't afford to have removed.

Last year was a bumper one for UK cinemas, with rising ticket sales. Winifred Robinson speaks to an industry insider about what the big cinema chains are doing to entice people away from their big televisions and back in to the cinema.

New figures suggest around half of people aged 55+ would like to downsize their home, but many don't because they can't find a suitable property to move into. We ask what's preventing developers from building the kind of houses suitable for the "last time buyer".

Producer: Alex Burton
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b06w6rqk)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06whswl)
The Home Secretary says the findings of the inquiry into the death of Alexander Litvinenko are "deeply disturbing". The report says Russia's president "probably approved" the poisoning of Mr Litvinenko - the Kremlin says it's biased and opaque. We speak to Mr Litvinenko's widow.

We have a report into how an NHS trust that failed to investigate hundreds of deaths knew about health and safety failings four years ago..

And the BBC is under pressure again over Jimmy Saville. A leaked draft of the report it commissioned into his sex crimes criticises the Corporation's "deferential culture" and managers who thought themselves "above the law".


THU 13:45 Three Score Years and Ten (b06x96pw)
Letting Go

Bishop Richard Holloway, with the aid of great poets and writers, looks back on his life now that he has passed his allotted three score years and ten and wonders what his decreasing future holds and how best to cope with it.

He recalls being young, celebrating the constant shift and change of history and embracing every fad and fashion that appeared. So it has been a surprise to realise, almost without noticing, that he has joined the ranks not only of the old but of the old fashioned - the crazy shift of change embraced so eagerly in youth is the very energy that is now carrying him into the past along with steam trains and shopping-free Sundays.

He says, "Hardly surprising that some of us oldies become bitter and angry and feel like strangers in our own homes. Some think it's a modern disease, bred of the accelerating rate of change in our world today. In fact, the bitter old person is a constant in history."

Go back as far as you can and the old grumble about the young. In the century before the birth of Christ, the Roman poet Horace recorded an old man. "Tiresome, complaining, a praiser of the times that were when he was a boy, a castigator and censor of the young generation," he wrote.

It seems to be ageing itself that corrodes the spirit, not change as such, which is why growing old can be spiritually dangerous - anger against the young for being young, rage against the world for becoming an unfamiliar place, fury at change and its sister decay.

Richard's solution is "bite the bullet, hand over the reins and sit in the sun to enjoy what's left.".


THU 14:00 The Archers (b06wg7t9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b036w39n)
Bang Up

Bang Up by Sarah Hehir

Winner of the first BBC Writer's Prize.

Emma teaches creative writing in a detention centre . Her life is imploding. Her estranged father contacts her with news of the birth of a baby . Throwing herself into work with the young offenders, new student Lee surprises her with the sensitivity of his writing .

Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b06whswq)
Somerset Peat: Past, Present and Future

Helen Mark uncovers why peat makes the Somerset Levels a special place to visit, not just for the wildlife. Since earliest times humans have exploited this natural resource. Its wetlands once supported Lake Villagers whose secrets lay buried deep beneath the feet of the modern archaeologist keen to uncover what these wetlands preserves for millennia.

A mere 50 years ago the extraction of peat was a major industry employing hundreds of people. It was cut for fuel, for horticulture, even animal feed. That industry has all but faded into history and Helen visits one of the last remaining extraction companies. Once this landscape was scarred by man, littered by trackways and industry, yet today what remains of this scarred is being managed to return it to another use. Helen discovers the memories of those who walked this peatland landscape are enjoyed by a new visitor, the nature watcher.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b06w6t8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b06wbrk7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b06whsws)
Adam McKay on The Big Short

With Francine Stock

Anchorman writer/director Adam McKay discusses The Big Short, his Oscar nominated tragi-comedy about the financial crisis that hit the global markets in the mid 2000s.

Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao-Hsien reveals why he cut out the plot from his martial arts epic, The Assassin, recently voted by British critics as the best film of last year.

Ben Hopkins talks about his political satire Lost In Karastan in which an unemployed film-maker is hired by a dictator to make an epic extolling the virtues of his country.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b06whswv)
Ancient Britons' DNA, Concorde's 40th Anniversary, Giant dinosaur, New planet?

Our ability to extract DNA from old bones is improving, giving us a much clearer picture of who our ancestors were, and what they did. Two new papers out this week in Nature Communications are filling in some gaps in our knowledge of the history of Britain. One of the pieces of research - led by Professor Dan Bradley from Trinity College Dublin - examines DNA from individuals who died in northeast England at the beginning of the first millennium of the current era. The other paper analyses the genomes of East Anglian people who lived at a similar and slightly later time, and the lead author is Dr Stephan Schiffels. He worked at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge at the time of this research, and is now based at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Professor Mark Thomas from University College London is a co-author on Dan Bradley's paper and joins Adam Rutherford to discuss this research in the context of its rapidly changing field.

Concorde flew its first commercial flight on the 21st January 1976. To mark its 40th birthday, Concorde engineer Christopher Mitchell and Concorde pilot David Rowland talk about the extraordinary aeroplane's scientific and engineering legacy.

What looked like an innocent rocky outcrop in the Argentinian desert turned out to be something completely different: An eight foot long femur, belonging to the world's largest dinosaur. Ben Garrod is one of the team who has put together this as yet unnamed behemoth. He talks us through the extraordinary discovery and journey to investigate a new species - and it's only just beginning. The work has been documented as part of the TV programme 'Attenborough & the Giant Dinosaur', due to air at 6.30pm this Sunday 24th Jan on BBC One.

Finally, today's headlines indicate that we might have been missing something fairly substantial in our very own solar system: A new ninth planet. However, as BBC Science Correspondent Jonathan Amos tells us, this isn't yet confirmed. With Dr Ellen Stofan, NASA Chief Scientist.

Producer: Jen Whyntie.


THU 17:00 PM (b06whswx)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06w6rqt)
Public inquiry into former spy's killing concludes senior Russian officials were involved


THU 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b06whsx1)
Series 5

Episode 3

John Finnemore - writer and star of Cabin Pressure and John Finnemore's Double Acts, regular guest on The Now Show and The Unbelievable Truth - returns for a fifth series of his multi-award-winning sketch show, joined as ever by a cast of Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

This week we look back at a career in accounting, hear of an over-rated experience and, we're sorry to say, Patsy Straightwoman returns with an interview sketch.

"One of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" - The Guardian
"The best sketch show in years, on television or radio" - The Radio Times
"The inventive sketch show ... continues to deliver the goods" - The Daily Mail
"Superior comedy" - The Observer

Written by and starring ... John Finnemore

Original music composed by ... Susannah Pearse
Original music performed by ... Susannah Pearse & Sally Stares

Producer: Ed Morrish

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2016.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b06whsx3)
Pat is rather taken by surprise, and Kirsty's talking weddings (!).


THU 19:15 Front Row (b06whsx5)
Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray, Utopias in fiction, Villagers

Oscar Wilde's grandson Merlin Holland discusses his new adaptation of Wilde's novella The Picture of Dorian Gray for the West End stage.

As this year marks the 500th anniversary of the publication of Thomas More's Utopia, Jerry Brotton, Professor of Renaissance Studies, and Sarah Crossan, author of two YA dystopian novels (Breathe and Resist) discuss the impact of More's work on utopian and dystopian fiction.

Conor O'Brien, better known for Villagers - his Irish Indie folk band from Dublin - talks about performing old songs in a new way for their latest album Where Have You Been All My Life?

Shortly before his death last month, Motorhead's hard-living frontman Lemmy did an unlikely advert for milk. Ben Wardle considers the appeal for advertisers of the wild men of rock, from John Lydon to Alice Cooper.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wg9gf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b06whsx7)
Litvinenko: The Miniature Nuclear Attack

It was a death in Britain like no other seen in living memory.

The gaunt and agonised face of the former Russian security service officer, Alexander Litvinenko, stared out of television screens and newspaper front pages in November 2006 as his painful end approached in London's University College Hospital. His poisoning by a radioactive isotope was a bizarre death. It baffled the experts and transfixed a horrified nation.

As the public inquiry into this mysterious death got under way in 2014, reporter Peter Marshall investigated the evidence suggesting that the Russian state might have been behind the fatal poisoning. Eighteen months later, as the inquiry publishes its findings, The Report returns to the story.

This is an updated version of a programme first broadcast on 7 August 2014.

Reporter: Peter Marshall
Producer: Simon Coates.


THU 20:30 In Business (b06wj1bt)
Norway's European Vision

Norway isn't a member of the European Union, but does business with the EU. Is it a model for other countries? Jonty Bloom speaks to people working in a range of businesses - including Norway's vital fishing industry - and asks about the advantages and disadvantages of the arrangement.

Produced by Ruth Alexander.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b06whswv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b06wg9dw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b06wj1bw)
Litvinenko murder 'probably' ordered by Putin

The Russian government has reacted with fury to claims that President Putin approved the murder of a dissident in London.

Concerns about an eight-year-old home-schooled boy who died from scurvy had been raised with officials a year earlier.

And how Australia is embracing Syrian refugees


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06ymn8g)
The Automobile Club of Egypt

Episode 4

Once a respected landowner, Abd el-Aziz Gaafar has fallen into penury and has moved his family to Cairo. He is forced into menial work at the Automobile Club, a refuge of colonial luxury and privilege for its European members.

A vibrant and moving story of a family swept up by social unrest in post-War Cairo, written by Alaa Al Aswany, the internationally best-selling author of The Yacoubian Building and Chicago.

Episode 4:
Abd el-Aziz's death triggers strong emotions at the Automobile Club.

Read by Raad Rawi, Amir El-Masry and Emerald O'Hanrahan
Translated by Russell Harris
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Produced by Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b01c7rqd)
Series 4

Episode 3

Comedian-activist Mark Thomas and his studio audience consider proposals for a People's Manifesto.

The Agenda:
1) Cancel out everyone's debt.
2) Sue Goldman Sachs for their part in the Greek economic collapse.
and
3) Increase the indicated speed on car speedometers.

Plus throughout the show there are "any other business" policy suggestions from the studio audience.

Produced by Colin Anderson.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06wj1c0)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster on the Government's response to the inquiry into the murder of Alexander Litvinenko and a debate on childhood obesity.



FRIDAY 22 JANUARY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b06w6rv0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b06wg9dy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rv2)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06w6rv6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06w6rv8)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b06w6rvd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06wv9c6)
A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b06wj5w9)
Paying Farmers to Flood?

Environment Secretary Liz Truss confirms the government is looking into plans to pay farmers to allow their fields to flood, to prevent problems further downstream. The money would come out of a European fund - managed by Defra - that aims to improve biodiversity, the environment and encourage rural development. Some farmers we spoke to believe new money should instead be made available.
We've also been looking at some of the new technology that farmers are using. Today, a horticultural company in Suffolk that uses robots to plant seeds and move seedlings; and we hear from the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones on how farmers can use 'big data'.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sxg)
Red-Eyed Vireo

Michael Palin presents the red-eyed vireo from North America. About the size of British great tits the red-eyed vireo is a common summer visitors to much of North America where they breed in woodlands. The adult vireos are mainly olive green with white bellies and grey heads and their red eyes are highlighted by a white eyestripe. Seeing the birds as they hunt insects among the leaves is much harder than hearing them, because red-vireos are tireless songsters. They used to be known locally as "preacher birds " and territorial males hold the record for the largest repertoire produced by a songbird in a single day.

Each vireo can have a repertoire of between a dozen and over a hundred different song-types. And while these marathon "question- and- answer" sessions are the soundtrack to many North American woods, they aren't universally appreciated. The nature writer Bradford Torrey wrote in 1889 that "whoever dubbed this vireo the preacher could have had no very exalted opinion of the clergy"

Producer Andrew Dawes.


FRI 06:00 Today (b06wj5wc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b06w6ty4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b06wj5wf)
The Outrun

Personal Geology

Amy Liptrot's incisive memoir of overcoming alcoholism amid the luminous Orkney landscape.

Liptrot grew up on a sheep farm on Orkney. She was shaped by the wind-swept islands, but longed for the excitement of the city. A move to London led to a life that was hedonistic and fun but she was unable to control her drinking. Her alcoholism exposed her to some terrifying situations and left her lost and lonely. At thirty she finds herself washed up back home in Orkney, and discovers that this place she once longed to escape is curative, its wildness and lore playing an essential part in her recovery from addiction.

Today: examining the fault lines bisecting her life, Amy questions why she became an alcoholic.

Written by Amy Liptrot
Read by Tracy Wiles
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Simon Richardson.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06wv9y2)
Is digital and social media a benefit or a distraction at work?

Has our addiction to digital media gone too far? What impact is it having on our work? Author Stefana Broadbent says it's become vital to to a healthy work/life balance, while Martin Talks, founder of Digital Detoxing, believes we need to stop relying on it. Where do you stand?

After Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon smartly rebuffed comments on her wardrobe from a TV news reporter, we look at how women in power make the way they dress work for them. Helen Lewis Deputy Editor of the New Statesman, and Shahidha Bari, a lecturer in Romanticism at Queen Mary University of London, and a woman with a keen eye for fashion, discuss. A report on cousin marriages which is common within the British Pakistani community. The marriages are legal - but carry a greater risk of passing on congenital anomalies. Those risks have been well documented in places like Luton and Bradford and are now being highlighted in Peterborough.

And as we approach LGBT history month, we unveil the hidden history of lesbian bars with author Maureen Duffy, Gina Ware of the Gateways Club and LGBT historian Rebecca Jennings.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wj5wh)
The One about the Social Worker

Episode 5

Claire Skinner returns as the social worker with a past, in another rollercoaster story based on tough true cases by Martin Jameson.

Devon Sutcliffe's life has been less of a car crash, more of a motorway pile-up. Rejected, dumped, failed by everyone who could have cared for him, he has bounced from foster placement to residential unit to foster placement, and several times been labeled as 'unplaceable'. Finally out of care, almost anyone who has encountered him professionally expects him to be in prison within weeks.

Assigned to returning social worker Liz Beecham, she stakes her own rehabilitation on helping Devon survive alone. But when his chaotic mother Cheryl arrives in his new flat, Devon's need for her threatens to undo all Liz's work. A heart-stopping story is about to unfold about Devon's past... and his family's future.

5/5 Liz walks into a siege.

Claire Skinner is best known to TV viewers as harrassed mum Sue in Outnumbered, but her wide-ranging career includes long associations with Mike Leigh, Alan Ayckbourn, and Sam Mendes. Her recent stage credits include Blurred Lines (NT Shed), Deathtrap (West End), Mrs Affleck (National Theatre) and The Father (Tricycle Theatre and West End).

Theo Barklem-Biggs has starred in Silk, the BAFTA-nominated Our World War, and the Donmar Warehouse's new production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses.

Martin Jameson is a prolific screenwriter, director and playwright whose recent work on Radio 4 includes Zola, Stone, Can You Tell Me The Name Of The Prime Minister?, and The Night They Tried To Kidnap The Prime Minister.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


FRI 11:00 Every Case Tells a Story (b05xd5k2)
The Case Against Slavery

Clive Anderson looks at a variety of famous and infamous court cases and retells the story that the case brought into the public eye.

In this programme he explores the Somersett Case from 1772.

James Somersett was an escaped slave in London. His master Charles Stuart tracked him down and tried to transport him back to the Caribbean to be sold. The court case that ensued, in which defenders of James Somersett argued in front of the most powerful judge in the country, Lord Justice Mansfield, that a human being cannot be forced out of the country against their will would go on to pave the way for the abolition of the slave trade a generation later.

Featuring Amma Asante, Professor Norman Poser, Professor James Walvin and Steven M. Wise.


FRI 11:30 The Cold Swedish Winter (b06wj5wm)
Series 2

Episode 4

The second series of this sitcom from Danny Robins (co-creator Lenny Henry comedy Rudy's Rare Records), set and recorded in Sweden and starring Edinburgh Comedy Award-winner Adam Riches, Danny Robins and a cast of Sweden's most popular TV comedy actors.

Geoff has moved to Yxsjö in northern Sweden, to start a new life with his girlfriend Linda in the (frequently frosty) bosom of her family.

This year, new dad Geoff has plenty of fresh experiences to contend with, including three varieties of pickled cabbage, sinister Christmas elves and an unpleasant visit from Sweden's answer to the BNP. It's all worth it though for Linda (Sissela Benn, star of the Swedish version of The Office) and baby John.

While Geoff and Linda now have their own place, he still has to deal with her disapproving Dad, Sten (comedian Thomas Orredsson from Crimes of Passion), her alarmingly flirtatious mother Gunilla (comedian Anna- Lena Bergelin) and her apparently suicidal, arsonist brother, Anders (award-winning stand up Fredrik Andersson).

Geoff is determined to be more Swedish than the Swedes as he takes to his new country with renewed enthusiasm, and he has help, in the form of fellow expat, cynical Ian (Danny Robins), an unending source of (slightly misleading) information, and Soran (Farshad Kohlgi of The Killing), a Danish Kurd with Swedophobia.

Episode 4: It's Summer and Geoff, Linda and baby Jon are off on holiday - bliss. Geoff has seriously romantic plans too, as they head further north for bright summer nights, skinny dipping and wild strawberries. But their idyll is soon under threat from mosquitoes, fish and the rest of the family.

Writer: Danny Robins
Director: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b06w6rvn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b06l37r3)
22 January 1916 - Isabel Graham

On this day, the Dublin police raided several houses, seizing arms and a printing press, and Isabel is unhappy witness to a raid on the Belgian restaurant.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes

SECRET SHAKESPEARE
A Shakespeare quote is hidden in each Home Front episode that is set in 1916. These were first broadcast in 2016, the 400th anniversary year of the playwright's death. Can you spot them all?


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b06wv9c8)
Flood Flu, Contactless Cards and Gift Aid

After the kind of floods we saw at Christmas, the waters recede, and often the media interest goes with it. The cost to businesses is calculated and the political arguments are thrashed out, but one aspect of the recovery gets less coverage. It's the health implications of having your home, or your place of work flooded. Our reporter Kevin Core has been in Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd.

Contactless card transactions now account for one in 10 card payments, according to the UK Cards Association. It's so popular with some retailers that they are charging customers for NOT going contactless.

We are used to vending machines that give you coffee, chocolate and mineral water. Now, in the French city of Grenoble, there are dispensing machines that give you short stories. Eight of them have been installed in places in the city where people often have to wait in queues. Each one distributing short stories for free.

Your nominations for our category in the Food and Farming Awards have been flooding in. We're looking at the best local food retailers. You've been telling us about the local shops you use that are holding their own against the big supermarkets.

And are you confused by what Gift Aid is. Has it stopped you donating to the Charity of your choice? Find out more

Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Chas Watkin.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b06w6rvs)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b06wv9cb)
News and current affairs presented by Mark Mardell.
Leaders of the EU are warning that the migration crisis is threatening the very idea of the European Union itself --- and the German finance minister tells the BBC that it won't be able to solve the many problems facing it, if the UK leaves.
There's more economic data out today - Government borrowing is down, -- so was spending in the run up to Christmas --- we'll find out what that tells about the state of the economy.
Lad culture - some may see it as a bit of a laugh - but the Government is telling universities they have to do more to deal with it.
And who is the new Chief of Defence Staff - we hear from someone who knows him well.


FRI 13:45 Three Score Years and Ten (b06x97fy)
Perish Resisting

Bishop Richard Holloway, with the aid of great poets and writers, looks back on his life now that he has passed his allotted three score years and ten and wonders what his decreasing future holds and how best to cope with it.

He reflects on the way time steals everything from us - "our youth, those we love and last of all it comes for us". What disconcerts him most is how the "unstaying feet of time" seem to be speeding up as they pursue him towards his end and he wonders if Time is trying to cheat him of what is left by fast-forwarding it like this.

The positive side to this apparent increasing acceleration of his life is that it has made Richard determined to cherish what remains. Not to moan about the cold days and long dark nights of a Scottish winter, but to savour them. Not to grieve over the fact that there may not be many springs and summers left, but to heed the words of Dylan Thomas and learn to catch and sing the sun in flight before, for him, it sinks forever.

He admits, "Time has been generous to me so I can bear its impatience now to see me gone, but it doesn't stop me wondering and obsessing about time itself and the way it devours all its children."

Now he is determined not to worry about what comes next but to live his life in such a way that his death will be an unjust fate.

A Butterfly Wings production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b06whsx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b06wj67f)
Because...

A psychological thriller by the BAFTA-winning writer Trevor Preston who died in April. Ruth was a successful investigative journalist until a terrible accident in France. Her physical recovery now takes second place to her desperate need to remember what really happened that night. Only recovering that memory can allay the fears that fill her every thought.

Ruth ..... Raquel Cassidy
Dr. Quinn ..... Caroline Catz
Elsa ..... Jasmine Hyde
Bernard ..... Stephane Cornicard
Jean ..... Chris Pavlo
Farid ..... Maximilien Seweryn
Rushmer ..... Ewan Bailey
Professor ..... Sean Baker

Directed by Toby Swift

Trevor Preston trained at the Royal College of Art before embarking on a career in television. He wrote for many of the best dramas of the 1970s and 80s, including Ace of Wands, Callan, The Sweeney, Minder, Out and Fox, for which Trevor received a BAFTA in 1981. His film work includes Billy the Kid and the Green Baize Vampire and the Mike Hodges directed I'll Sleep When I'm Dead starring Clive Owen. Trevor wrote several radio dramas, the first of which, Flaw in the Motor, Dust in the Blood, was shortlisted for the Imison Award and a Mental Health in the Media Award in 2009.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06wj67h)
Stowe Gardens

Eric Robson and the panel are in Stowe Gardens.

Bunny Guinness, Pippa Greenwood and Bob Flowerdew answer this week's questions from the audience, which include pruning Mulberry trees, ornamental beds and water features, and what to do with felled branches.

They also offer advice on how to keep home grown vegetables "supermarket crisp".

This week's feature sees Eric Robson take a turn through one of Lancelot 'Capability' Brown's most celebrated gardens.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Shorts (b06wj6y1)
The Time Being

The Sandwich

Season 8 of the showcase for previously un-broadcast writers

With no one to talk to and in a job that he hates, Pan Wong can’t wait for lunchtime.

Thom Tuck reads Ben Pedroche's short story.

Ben Pedroche writes fiction, and also blogs about his two passions - London and hip-hop music. He has published books related to London history, and lives south of the river with his wife and daughter.

Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2016.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b06wv9cd)
Glenn Frey, Lord Weidenfeld, Jeanne Cordova, Haskell Wexler, Gilbert Kaplan.

Matthew Bannister on

Glenn Frey - singer, guitarist and songwriter with The Eagles - who sold millions of albums in the 1970s.

Lord Weidenfeld, the influential publisher, party giver and networker - and, in later life, rescuer of Christians from Syria and Iraq.

The writer and activist Jeanne Cordova - a former nun who campaigned for lesbian rights.

Haskell Wexler, the cinematographer who won an Oscar for the film "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf?".

And Gilbert Kaplan, the multi millionaire businessman who conducted Mahler's "Resurrection" Symphony more than a hundred times.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b06wv9cg)
Billionaires v the World

Oxfam says that 62 people now own as much wealth as half of the world's population. But is this really telling us anything meaningful? And how is it that this study shows that some of the world's poorest people live in the United States?

What do you do with bored children on a bus? Rob Eastaway, author of 'Maths on the go,' gets three pupils to play a game on the Number 12 in south London.

Prime Minister David Cameron said this week that 22% of British Muslim women speak little or no English. He says that equates to 190,000. We look at the figures.

Plus, was the Hatton Garden Heist the biggest robbery ever? Is water more expensive than oil? And a new prime number is discovered.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b06wj7bs)
Edward and James – The Sausage Machine

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who have both come out of university with degrees, but at some cost; another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


FRI 17:00 PM (b06wv9cj)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06w6rw1)
The German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has warned her fellow EU partners against acting alone to deal with the migrant crisis.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b06wj7bv)
Series 89

Episode 3

Series 89 of the satirical quiz. Miles Jupp is back in the chair, trying to keep order as an esteemed panel of guests take on the big (and not so big) news events of the week. Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Andrew Maxwell and Samira Ahmed are this week's guests.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b06wj7bx)
Lilian enjoys being back in the saddle, and Rex and Toby need to choose their moment.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b06wv9cl)
Michael Keaton, Herons, Helen Ellis, John Bratby exhibition

Michael Keaton discusses Spotlight, the Oscar-nominated film about a team of investigative journalists at the Boston Globe who in 2002 uncovered widespread child abuse in the Catholic Church.

The playwright Simon Stephens is well known for his gritty, hard-hitting dramas, as his play Herons demonstrates. It's a disturbing portrait of adolescent violence experienced by 14-year-old Billy, who is tormented by local bullies. First performed in 2001, it now returns to the stage in a new production by Sean Holmes, Artistic Director at London's Lyric, Hammersmith. Henry Hitchings reviews.

US Blogger and novelist Helen Ellis counts Margaret Atwood amongst her fans. Kirsty talks to her about her humorous collection of stories, American Housewife.

The painter John Bratby became famous for his paintings of dustbins and the interiors of lavatories in the '50s and '60s. Dismissed by some as a 'Kitchen Sink' artist, but celebrated by many, he was such a prolific artist that he is believed to have painted over 3,000 works. The majority of those are owned by the public and many have been brought together in an exhibition at the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings. Curator Liz Gilmore and David Bratby discuss his work.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06wj5wh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b06wj7bz)
Andrew RT Davies AM, Carwyn Jones AM, Mark Reckless, Kirsty Williams AM, Leanne Wood AM

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Pater Hall, Pembroke Dock with the Leader of the Conservatives in Wales Andrew R T Davies AM, the First Minister of Wales Carwyn Jones AM, the Director of Policy Development for UKIP Mark Reckless, the Leader of the Liberal Democrats in Wales Kirsty Williams AM, and the leader of Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood AM.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b06wj7c1)
Face to Face

Tom Shakespeare is concerned by the growth in cosmetic procedures and the pressure more and more women and girls, in particular, feel to conform to a face and body type.

"My anxiety is about the society that first generates body dissatisfaction and then provides surgery as the solution to that cultural problem".

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b06l37tj)
18-22 January 1916

In the week of the first concerted attempt to break the Siege of Kut, Folkestone's characters are all looking for release.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Shaun McKenna
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b06w6rw9)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b06wv9cn)
Brazil battles Zika virus

A mosquito-borne virus causes nearly 4,000 babies to be born with abnormally small heads; street protests in Tunisia; and should rents be controlled
Photo Credit: AP.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06ymphx)
The Automobile Club of Egypt

Episode 5

Once a respected landowner, Abd el-Aziz Gaafar has fallen into penury and has moved his family to Cairo. He is forced into menial work at the Automobile Club, a refuge of colonial luxury and privilege for its European members.

A vibrant and moving story of a family swept up by social unrest in post-War Cairo, written by Alaa Al Aswany, the internationally best-selling author of The Yacoubian Building and Chicago.

Episode 5:
Kamel takes over his father's job in the storeroom where he makes a powerful contact.

Read by Raad Rawi and Amir El-Masry
Translated by Russell Harris
Abridged by Jeremy Osborne

Produced by Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b06wd26b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06wj87s)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b06wj87w)
Alan and Victoria - Fishing for Family History

Fi Glover introduces a conversation from Jersey about a onetime family fishing business and the powerful pull of the sea for island dwellers - another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b06wcphb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b06wcphb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b06wczm1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b06wczm1)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b06wf6nf)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b06wf6nf)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b06wg9gf)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b06wg9gf)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b06wj5wh)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b06wj5wh)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b06vnbcy)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b06wj7c1)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b06w53bk)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b06vnbcw)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b06wj7bz)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b06w56h3)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b06whswv)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b06whswv)

Bad Salsa 11:30 WED (b06wf7lq)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b06w6t82)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b06w6t82)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b06wcttq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b06ymmx1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b06ymn5b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b06ymn8g)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b06ymphx)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b06vjstn)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b06wclxn)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b06wclxn)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b06wcydt)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b06wcydt)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b06wf6n9)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b06wf6n9)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b06wg9dy)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b06wg9dy)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b06wj5wf)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b06vjv12)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b06wcsnb)

British New Wave 14:15 TUE (b039cd9g)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b06w6rc5)

Can We Trust the Opinion Polls? 13:30 SUN (b06wbp96)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b06vmr1w)

Deciding Fast and Slow 20:00 MON (b06wcttl)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b06w6ty4)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b06w6ty4)

Don't Start 23:00 WED (b06wg843)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b06w53bm)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b06vjlbb)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b06wbrk5)

Drama 14:15 MON (b036kbl2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b036w39n)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b06wj67f)

Edinburgh at the Year's Midnight: A Winter Journey in Poetry through Scotland's Capital City 23:30 SAT (b06vjlbg)

Every Case Tells a Story 11:00 FRI (b05xd5k2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b06w53b4)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b06wcl1w)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b06wcydm)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b06wf5l0)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b06wg8p3)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b06wj5w9)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b06vkg22)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b06wd7f0)

Four Bare Legs in a Bed 00:30 SUN (b0222fgn)

Four Thought 22:15 SAT (b06vkktf)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b06vkktf)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b06wg803)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b06w56gz)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b06w56gz)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b06vjc6k)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b06wg9gr)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b06wcttj)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b06wd7dy)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b06wg7zz)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b06whsx5)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b06wv9cl)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b06vn91z)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b06wj67h)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b06wd26b)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b06wd26b)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b06l37tj)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b06l3665)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b06l36ch)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b06l375l)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b06l37nw)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b06l37r3)

I Dressed Ziggy Stardust 15:30 SAT (b01r91qk)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b06vmzv5)

In Business 20:30 THU (b06wj1bt)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b06wg9dw)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b06wg9dw)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b06w6rj6)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b06wd7f4)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b06wd7f4)

Is Ignorance Bliss? 21:00 MON (b0639xsw)

It's Jocelyn 18:30 WED (b06wg7rw)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 THU (b06whsx1)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b06vn923)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b06wv9cd)

Leader Conference 20:00 WED (b06wg801)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b06w6t86)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b06w56gx)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 MON (b01p720p)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 23:00 THU (b01c7rqd)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b06wctts)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b06wd266)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b06vjc61)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b06w6rb5)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b06w6rdp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b06w6rgf)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b06w6rn2)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b06w6rpp)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b06w6rv0)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b06wf6n7)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b06wf6n7)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b06w53bh)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b06w53bh)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b06wg7rm)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b06vn925)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b06wv9cg)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b06vjc69)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b06w6rbn)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b06w6rdy)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b06w6rgp)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b06w6rnb)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b06w6rq7)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b06w6rvd)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b06w6rbs)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b06vjc6m)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b06w6rc7)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b06w6rf2)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b06w6rgz)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b06w6rnh)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b06w6rqh)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b06w6rvn)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b06vjc6c)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b06w6rby)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b06w6rc2)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b06vjc70)

News 13:00 SAT (b06vjc6r)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b03vgnk5)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b06wbrk7)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b06wbrk7)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b06vmxpk)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b06whswq)

PM 17:00 SAT (b06w56gv)

PM 17:00 MON (b06wcsnj)

PM 17:00 TUE (b06wd7dr)

PM 17:00 WED (b06wg7rt)

PM 17:00 THU (b06whswx)

PM 17:00 FRI (b06wv9cj)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b06wbrkc)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b06wbrk9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b06vnd2r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b06wv701)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b06wv70y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b06wv714)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b06wv73q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b06wv9c6)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b06w6t8b)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b06w6t8b)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b06w6t8b)

Raising the Dead 11:30 THU (b06wg9gt)

Rethinking Anorexia Nervosa 11:00 TUE (b06wczm3)

Road Stories 11:00 WED (b06wf7ln)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b06w53b8)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b06w56h1)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b06wg805)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b06vjc65)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b06w6rbg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b06w6rdt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b06w6rgk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b06w6rn6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b06w6rpx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b06w6rv6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b06vjc63)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b06vjc67)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b06vjc6t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b06w6rb8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b06w6rbl)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b06w6rcc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b06w6rdr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b06w6rdw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b06w6rgh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b06w6rgm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b06w6rn4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b06w6rn8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b06w6rpr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b06w6rq3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b06w6rv2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b06w6rv8)

Shorts 15:45 FRI (b06wj6y1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b06vjc6y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b06w6rch)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b06w6rf6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b06w6rht)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b06w6rnq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b06w6rqt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b06w6rw1)

So Wrong It's Right 19:15 SUN (b01hxmws)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b06w6t84)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b06w6t84)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b06wclxl)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b06wclxl)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b06w6t8d)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b06w6t88)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 18:30 TUE (b06wd7dt)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b06w6ty2)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b06wbrkf)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b06wbrkf)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b06wcsnn)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b06wcsnn)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b06wd7dw)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b06wd7dw)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b06wg7t9)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b06wg7t9)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b06whsx3)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b06whsx3)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b06wj7bx)

The Cold Swedish Winter 11:30 FRI (b06wj5wm)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b06vmypd)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b06whsws)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b06w6ty6)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b06w6ty6)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b06wcsng)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b06wcsng)

The Interrogative Mood 19:45 SUN (b06wbx0x)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b06w53bb)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b06w53bb)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04bmtph)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b06wf7ll)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b06wj7bs)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b06wj87w)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b06wcydr)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b06wcydr)

The Manchester Ballads 11:30 TUE (b06fkm2g)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b06wg7rr)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b06vk8xv)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b06wcsnl)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b06vn929)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b06wj7bv)

The Report 20:00 THU (b06whsx7)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b06wcphd)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b06w53bd)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b06wbp94)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b06wcttn)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b06wd7f6)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b06wg807)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b06wj1bw)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b06wv9cn)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b06vkj24)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b06wg7rp)

Three Pounds in My Pocket 22:30 SAT (b064z758)

Three Score Years and Ten 13:45 MON (b06wcq1f)

Three Score Years and Ten 13:45 TUE (b06x95p2)

Three Score Years and Ten 13:45 WED (b06x966h)

Three Score Years and Ten 13:45 THU (b06x96pw)

Three Score Years and Ten 13:45 FRI (b06x97fy)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b06wcttv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b06wd8jh)

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Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b06wj1c0)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b06wj87s)

Today 07:00 SAT (b06w53b6)

Today 06:00 MON (b06wclxj)

Today 06:00 TUE (b06wcydp)

Today 06:00 WED (b06wf6n5)

Today 06:00 THU (b06wg9dt)

Today 06:00 FRI (b06wj5wc)

Tumanbay 14:15 WED (b06wg7rk)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0sc8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0syn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04t0t02)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04t0vb1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04t0t44)

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Under the Mushroom Cloud 09:30 TUE (b063zt9r)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b06vjc6f)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b06w6rcl)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b06wbx1h)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b06wcsnd)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b06w56gs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b06wcph8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b06wczlz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b06wf6nc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b06wg9f0)

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Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b06wd268)

World at One 13:00 MON (b06wcq1c)

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World at One 13:00 WED (b06wg6y3)

World at One 13:00 THU (b06whswl)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b06wv9cb)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b06wcq19)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b06wd1jz)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b06wg6y1)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b06whswj)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b06wv9c8)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b06vnd2t)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b06vnd2t)