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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b06nl5j7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b06qbvnm)
Every Time a Friend Succeeds Something Inside Me Dies: The Life of Gore Vidal

Episode 5

The authorised behind-the-scenes biography of one of America's great and most under-rated man of letters, the cosmopolitan and wickedly satirical Vidal, from a devoted yet candid old friend.

In Episode 5, Gore finds his largest audience yet, with his ground-breaking novel Myra Breckinridge. He leaves the US and establishes a life in Italy in his dream home on the Amalfi Coast.

Written by Jay Parini
Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06nl5j9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06nl5jc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06nl5jf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b06nl5jh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06ns4bq)
Prayer for the Day

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tony Macauley.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b06ns4bs)
'You're not the best judge of your own health'

'You're not the best judge of your own health'. iPM revisits the topic of elderly drivers, and former PM presenter Frances Coverdale reads Your News. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b06nl5jk)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b06nl5jm)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b06nrsrw)
The Macbeth Trail

Macbeth is one of Shakespeare's most enduring plays; a tragic tale of a Scottish king driven to his death as a consequence of the ruthless pursuit of power. However many are surprised to hear that there was a real king Macbeth of 11th century Alba who bears little resemblance to the character in the play. Mac Bethad mac Findláich or Macbeth as he's known in English, had a legitimate claim to the kingship and ruled relatively successfully from 1040 to 1057. It's possible to trace Macbeth's story through the landscapes he's associated with and where the significant events of this period of history occurred. Helen Mark journeys through Moray and south to Perthshire to visit places that are strongly connected to the life of Macbeth; landscapes in which it's also possible to discover the heritage of medieval Alba.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Sophie Anton.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b06p46bh)
Farming Today This Week: Tenant Farmers

Around a third of all agricultural land in England and Wales is farmed by tenant farmers. In this programme, Charlotte Smith finds out what the advantages and drawbacks are of not actually owning the land you farm. Over the last century, one of the main ways for would-be farmers who don't own land to get started has been as tenants on farms owned by the local council. For generations, it's been a stepping stone into the industry - but for many cash-strapped councils, farms have started to look like a tempting way of raising much-needed funds. Many have already been sold off in counties including Somerset, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire, and now Herefordshire is considering putting all of its 4,800 acres up for sale. Charlotte hears what that would mean for tenant farmers in the county. Meanwhile in Scotland, plans for land reform could have far-reaching effects for tenant farmers. Euan McIlwraith from BBC Scotland explains what the proposals could mean. And with the average length of farm tenancy now just three and a half years, what future is there for tenants looking to the long-term?

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b06nl5jp)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b06p46bk)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b06p46bm)
Anne Reid

Anne Reid joins Aasmah Mir and the Reverend Richard Coles. After becoming a household name as Coronation Street's Valerie Barlow, Anne's varied career has seen her seducing Daniel Craig in The Mother, and playing Celia in Last Tango in Halifax. Now Anne talks about fulfilling another ambition, by singing in her one women show.

JP Devlin meets listener Jayne Moore who set up Greensted Hedgehog Rescue in Norfolk.

Listener Andrew Morris talks about his science discussion group, which aims to show science is for everyone.

Ros Hubbard gives us a glimpse into the world of casting. Ros's first big success came with The Commitments and she has gone on to discover stars including Orlando Bloom.

Wildlife film-maker Gordon Buchanan has come face to face with many of the planet's biggest predators. He shares his Inheritance Tracks: DIVORCE sung by Tammy Wynette and Tusk by Fleetwood Mac.

Listener Ade Clewlow explains why he traced scientist Sandor Görög, who was hidden by his father in a monastery in Hungary to avoid being rounded up by the Nazis in 1944.

Anne Reid will be appearing in Kings of Broadway at the Palace Theatre in London on 29th November.

Producer Claire Bartleet
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 In Pod We Trust (b06p46bp)
Stories from the Heart

Miranda Sawyer continues her exploration into the world of podcasts by rounding up some of the best from around the globe.

This week's programme features personal storytelling concerning issues which some of us find it hard to talk about: love, sex, family and money. Matters of the heart.

Guests include Anna Sale, creator and host of New York-based podcast, "Death, Sex and Money", and Lea Thau, who documented her own love life in a series for Los Angeles-based Strangers podcast "Love Hurts".

Producer: Jim Frank
Researcher: Chris Pearson.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b06p46bt)
Design and Beauty

How far can we stretch the notion of a beautiful design? And, how fundamental is it to the world around us and our search for the answers to life's mysteries? We delight in beauty when we find it in the design of everyday objects. It's incorporated in the bodies we are born with and the ways we enhance them. And, on a cosmic scale, there is beauty in the rules which govern the universe. Bridget Kendall is joined by nobel prize winning physicist Frank Wilczek, furniture designer Khalid Shafar and body architect Lucy McRae to explore the frontiers of what beauty in design can mean.
(Photo: Basic perspective construction by Frank Wilczek).


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b06nl5jr)
The Smell of History

Analysis, observation, writing, storytelling. In this edition, the smells of a city's chequered history are resurrected in a shop in Serbia's capital, Belgrade. From inside Syria, the tactics a new force is employing to take the fight to the militants of IS. Aung San Suu Kyi's new government in Myanmar should soon be sworn in after its historic election victory -- but there are tough challenges ahead. All change in Poland too -- but why's the electorate there turned its back on an administration which provided new roads, airport terminals and jobs? And we're inside a beauty salon in Kabul turning down advice on a new coiffure and learning instead what sort of future Afghans think lies in store for their nation.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b06nl5jt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b06p46bw)
Energy company complaints ratings

The Energy Ombudsman's latest customer service complaints data was out this week. The worst performing companies according to their figures differ wildly from those listed on comparison websites. We investigate why this discrepancy.

Another week, another slew of your emails full of stories of Talk Talk fraudsters attempting to con you out of your savings. Find out what happens when we called the criminals back.

After three years in charge at the Investment Association, Daniel Godfrey was asked to leave shortly after he introduced a new Statement of Principles which most members of the trade body refused to sign up to. In his first broadcast interview since leaving, we ask him what went wrong.

And the tale of the bank who stopped a payment because of a suspected case of dolphin smuggling.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b06ns27q)
Series 47

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Freya Parker, Holly Walsh, Dr Phil Hammond, Grace Petrie and Jon Holmes for a comic romp through the week's news.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Gareth Gwynn, Sarah Morgan, Liam Beirne and Rose Biggin.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b06nl5jw)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b06nl5jy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:30 Any Answers? (b06p46jm)
A special Edition on the Paris Attack

In an extended Any Answers? Your reaction to the attacks in Paris.
Will it make you change your behaviour? What impact will it have on the national and international political landscape? And how much pressure is on the intelligence services as they try to protect people.

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b06p48lz)
Black Dog

Out of the blue, Clare's husband goes missing leaving her alone with their seven year old son and a huge black dog to look after.

Claire Rushbrook stars in award-winning playwright Katie Hims' funny and moving play about family, loss and love.

Clare ..... Claire Rushbrook
Ray ..... Ralph Ineson
Isaac (Age 7-10) ..... Alexander Aze
Isaac (Age 14) ..... Adam Thomas Wright
Isaac (Age 19) ..... Will Howard
Constable ..... Caolan McCarthy
Keisha ..... Nahel Tzegai
Jamal ..... Karl Queensborough
Gary ..... Stephen Critchlow
June ..... Rachel Davies
Brian ..... Peter Wight
Jo/Louise ..... Amelia Lowdell
Leia (Age 3) ..... Rosa Yevtushenko
Leia (Age 7) ..... Greta Dudgeon
Leia (Age 12) ..... Rebecca Ineson
Charlotte ..... Deeivya Meir
Morgue Assistant ..... Debra Baker
Therapist ..... Jessica Turner
Stranger ..... David Hounslow
Nurse ..... Evie Killip
Hermit ..... Chris Pavlo

Original music by Nina Perry
Cellist ..... Danny Keane

Director: Mary Peate

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2011.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b06p48m3)
Groping, Warriors, Nigel Slater

We refer to it a little jokingly as groping, but it's really a sexual assault. Laura Bates from the Everyday Sexism Project and Nicola Gatto a barrister who specialises in sexual assaults, discuss recent campaigns to put a stop to it.
A group of female MPs were earlier this week ejected from the New Zealand parliament when they tried to speak openly about their sexual abuse experiences and to demand an apology from the Prime Minister for accusing opposition MPs of 'backing the rapists' during a row about the detention of New Zealanders in Australia. We hear from two of those women, MPs Clare Curran and Marama Davidson.
The Maasai Warrior, Sonyanga Ole Ngais tells us why he and his friends are part of a team fighting against the practice of female genital mutilation through their passion for cricket. Their story is the subject of a new documentary film Warriors. Jenni speaks to Sonyanga and Dr Ann-Marie Wilson the Founder and Executive Director of the charity 28 Too Many which works to end FGM across Africa.
The designers of the new passport have focussed on UK figures and landmarks from the past 500 years. Out of the nine people chosen they included just two women. Public historian Helen Weinstein and artist Terri Bell-Halliwell discuss why women continue to remain invisible as public figures and why this matters.
When NASA recruited its first female astronaut candidates in January 1978, Sandy Magnus was a teenager who dreamed of going into space. 40 years on she's been on three missions on the International Space Station and is now the Executive Director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. She tells us why she's now working to encourage more women into Science and Engineering.
Writer Marina Warner on her new collection of short stories. And Nigel Slater cooks the perfect autumn cake and talks about his new seasonally inspired cookbook 'A Year of Good Eating'.


SAT 17:00 PM (b06p4b23)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06nl5k1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b06nl5k3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06nl5k5)
At least one British citizen among 129 people killed by gunmen and suicide bombers. President Hollande has vowed that France will be "merciless" in its response.


SAT 18:30 Loose Ends (b06p4b25)
Clive Anderson, Nikki Bedi, Murray Melvin, Monty Don, Gemma Jones, Benjamin Clementine

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Murray Melvin, Gemma Jones and Monty Don for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music Benjamin Clementine.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:02 Profile (b06p4b27)
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

He made his name foraging for unlikely things to eat, barbecuing squirrels, frying woodlice and sautéing baby rooks. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall established himself as a TV chef and conservationist through his River Cottage series, books and restaurants. His campaigns on the conditions of battery hens and wasteful fishing practices not only made headlines but led to changes in regulations and consumer behaviour.

Now he has set his sights on Britain's leading retailers, launching a self-declared 'war on waste' in the industry, while also encouraging shoppers to change their habits. Are there limits to what he can achieve as a television personality? Where will his campaigning lead to next?

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producers: Sonia Rothwell and Peter Snowdon.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b06nl5k7)
Steve Jobs, Branagh's The Winter's Tale, Vermeer, Verdi's Force of Destiny, The Great Swindle

Danny Boyle directs Michael Fassbender in the title role of Steve Jobs - a biopic of the technology genius.
Kenneth Branagh's Theatre Company launches with Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale.
An exhibition Masters of the Everyday: Dutch Artists in the Age of Vermeer at The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace allows the public a chance to see some Dutch masters from The Royal Collection.
ENO is staging Verdi's Force of Destiny; great music (the Jean de Florette tune!), a chorus of 49 singers, an orchestra of 69 musicians and a crazy plot, what does it all add up to?
The Great Swindle by Pierre Lemaitre was the 2013 winner of France's most prestigious book award, the Prix Goncourt. It looks at the aftermath of WW1 on a group of very different soldiers.

Main Image: Miranda Raison (Hermione) and Kenneth Branagh (Leontes) in Theatre Company's The Winter's Tale. Credit: Johan Persson.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b06p4cl2)
A Sympathetic Eye

Welcome to the 1960s and the earliest days of a new TV channel, BBC2, determined to explore the ordinary and extraordinary fringes of a rapidly changing society.

With its new documentary strand Man Alive, it set out to bring "human affairs, not current affairs" to our TV sets, with all the candour and emotion that statement promised.

In this programme, Simon Farquhar examines how TV, social hierarchies and norms were rapidly evolving in front of our eyes.

As the generation gap yawned, class divisions became blurred, traditional relations between men and women were challenged, and questions were asked about attitudes to sex and sexuality, Man Alive documented it all with a sympathetic eye and its trademark question: How do you feel?

Contributors include Sir David Attenborough, Dame Esther Rantzen, Twiggy, David McGillivray, Vivienne Barton and Dr Jill Singer.

Producer: Adam Bowen.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b06np7nx)
Dodie Smith - I Capture the Castle

Episode 2

Following Simon's marriage proposal, Rose is whisked off to a world of wealth in London and Cassandra finds herself in turmoil, pining for Simon and trying to cope with her father's increasingly bizarre behaviour in their ruined castle.

Conclusion of Dodie Smith's classic rags to riches love story dramatised by Jane Rogers.

Cassandra ...... Holliday Grainger
Rose ...... Scarlett Alice Johnson
Mortmain ...... Toby Jones
Topaz ...... Charlotte Emmerson
Thomas ...... Sam Hattersley
Stephen ...... Harry McEntire
Simon ...... John Macmillan
Neil ...... Henry Devas

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2015


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b06nl5k9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b06nrjjg)
Drugs in Sport and Human Enhancement

The report from the World Anti-Doping Agency couldn't have been clearer. Russian athletes were involved in state sponsored cheating and the IAAF was involved in bribery and corruption. Admittedly it's not exactly the stuff of Chariots of Fire, but what are the real moral boundaries that have been transgressed? If you think elite sport is all about individual talent and dedication you're sadly mistaken. Top athletes in all sports are supported by multi-million pound programmes that ensure they get the best of everything - including scientists who maximise their nutrition and medical treatment. If you come from a country that can't afford to pay for it, you're already handicapped. And if your son or daughter is showing some sporting promise you better get them in to a private school quickly. Half the UK gold medal winners in 2012 were educated privately and the pattern is repeated in almost every sport outside football. Sport is many things, but fair is not one of them, so why single out performance enhancing drugs in sport when we positively embrace them in other aspects of our lives? Has anyone turned down Viagra because it might give them an unfair advantage? As science progresses the possibility of human enhancement is becoming an everyday reality. Drugs to enhance memory and attention and to enable us to be smarter? Why not? If this all sounds like some kind of dystopian nightmare don't fret because there's a growing interest in the field of bio-medical moral enhancement to make us better people as well. Human enhancement - physical and moral on the Moral Maze, but beware, listening could give you an unfair advantage. Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips and Anne McElvoy. Witnesses are Ellis Cashmore, Martin Cross, Dr Rebecca Roache and Nigel Warburton.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b06nnnl9)
Programme 4, 2015

(4/12)
Northern Ireland take on Scotland in the contest of cryptic connections, with Tom Sutcliffe in the chair to ensure fair play. Val McDermid and Roddy Lumsden of Scotland are defending their Round Britain Quiz champions' title. The challengers from Northern Ireland are long-standing regulars Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney.

The programme's trademark questions will require both sides to delve into the most arcane depths of their knowledge, spanning words coined by famous authors, culinary recipes, British rock albums and curious historical mishaps. If that's whetted your appetite, jojn Tom and the teams for the fourth contest of the 2015 series, when Tom will also be revealing the answer to the teaser question left hanging at the end of the last programme.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 New Lyrical Ballads (b06npkhw)
Episode 2

Second of two programmes that will see Britain's current poets reading their own work inspired by Wordsworth and Coleridge's original Lyrical Ballads. That slim volume of poetry, published in Wine Street in Bristol, is renowned for its radical preface and considered to have marked the beginning of the English Romantic movement in literature. Featuring Fleur Adcock, Patience Agbabi, John Burnside, Gillian Clarke, Paul Farley, David Harsent, Kathleen Jamie, Liz Lochhead, Ian McMillan, Andrew Motion, Sean O'Brien, Alice Oswald, Ruth Padel, Don Paterson, Jean Sprackland and Michael Symmons Roberts. The programme was recorded at the Bristol Festival of Ideas which commissioned the work and gathered all the poets together to read their work to an expectant audience. The poets will be introduced by festival director, Andrew Kelly.



SUNDAY 15 NOVEMBER 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b06p4j9y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Comic Fringes (b038jkr9)
Series 9

The Understudy

Story series featuring new writing by leading comedians, recorded live in front of an audience at this year's Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Crammed into her tiny dressing room, an actress looks back on the highs and lows - mainly lows - of her life and career. A poignant and funny monologue written and performed by Jenny Éclair.

Completing the line-up, and coming up over the next two Sundays, will be witty tales by award-winning Irish comic Aisling Bea and Scottish master of droll Sanjeev Kohli.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jb0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06p4jb2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jb7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b06p4jbd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b06p4ln1)
Bells from the Parish Church of Holy Trinity, St Austell in Cornwall.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b06p4b27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:02 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b06p4jbg)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b06p4ln3)
Obsession

John McCarthy considers obsession - a single-minded focus on an activity or desire which can lead to great achievement, or to social and moral malfunction.

Charles Darwin recognised in himself that "passion for collecting which leads a man to be a systematic naturalist, a virtuoso, or a miser" and Nabakov explored the murky world of sexual obsession in his novel Lolita but, in his biography, drew on the moral consequences of his own boyhood obsession with butterfly collecting - the desire to pursue his hobby overriding friendship.

In this programme, there are readings from works by Ruth Padel, Helen Macdonald and AE Housman and the former ballerina Deborah Bull talks to John about whether the popular idea of the wilfully determined dancer is an accurate reflection of the world of classical ballet.

The readers are Alice May Feetham, Peter Marinker and Helen Macdonald. Deborah Bull is Assistant Principal (Culture and Engagement), Kings College London.

Producer: Natalie Steed
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b06p4ln5)
The Farm That Inspired The Archers

Sebastian Parsons has turned Rush Farm in Worcestershire into a community trust. He hopes the famous land which inspired Radio Four's 'The Archers' will now be preserved forever.

For Sebastian and his sisters who bought the farm back in 2005, safeguarding its future was of paramount importance. After purchasing 190 acres, a business park and a farmhouse the family have now sold 150 acres of the land to a community ownership trust known as Stockwood Community Benefit Society.

Ruth Sanderson meets the Parsons as the last slice of land is sold and asks if this is really the best way forward for this biodynamic and organic farm to be preserved for future generations.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b06p4jbj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b06p4jbl)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b06p4ln7)
Paris attacks, Theology of Islamic State, Chief Rabbi on migrants in Greece

Following the worst terror attack in Europe for over a decade we hear from John Laurenson as he talks to people on the streets of Paris and hears from the faith communities about how they are trying to make sense of the horror on across the city on Friday night.

As flowers are laid outside French Embassies across the world, Trevor Barnes hears from members of the French community in London attending a mass at the Catholic Notre Dame du France Church and Christians and Muslims holding a vigil in Trafalar Square.

In accepting responsiblity for the Paris atrocities, the so-called Islamic State claimed the attacks were a reprisal for French air-strikes in Syria. William Crawley discusses to what extent religious belief and theology are a driving force behind this group with Dr Katherine Brown, an expert in political Islam at King's College London, Dr Sara Silvestri who teaches International Politics at St Edmund's College, Cambridge and Haras Rafiq, Managing Director of the Quilliam Foundation.

Also in the programme: the inter-governmental summit on climate change is a fortnight away and campaigners from around the globe have begun their journeys to Paris. Trevor Barnes was in Trafalgar Square as around 40 "pilgrims" set off to the French capital - on foot.

Catholic Bishops in England and Wales have said their secondary schools should teach Judaism rather than Islam as part of its GCSE curriculum. A former Ofsted R.E adviser, Alan Brine, and Philip Robinson, adviser to the Catholic Education Service discuss.
Producers: Amanda Hancox
Zaffar Iqbal.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b06p4ln9)
Children in Need

Eloise Daly appeals on behalf of BBC Children in Need.
Donations: BBC Children in Need Appeal, PO Box 1000, London W12 7WJ, or you can give online at bbc.co.uk/pudsey, or call 0345 733 2233 (Calls to 03 numbers are charged at no more than UK geographic rates (as for 01 and 02 numbers) and will be included as part of any inclusive minutes. This applies to calls from any network including mobiles.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b06p4jbn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b06p4jbq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b06p4lnf)
In Solidarity with the People of Paris

In a change to our published programme - live from Emmanuel Church in South Manchester where a congregation has gathered from across the city to express solidarity with all those affected by the tragedy in Paris. The preacher is the Bishop of Manchester David Walker and the service is led by the bishop's interfaith advisor the Revd Steve Williams. The Daily Service Singers are directed by Christopher Stokes and the organist is Geoffrey Woollatt. Producer: Philip Billson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b06mv4js)
Roger Scruton: The Tyranny of Pop

Roger Scruton deplores the tyranny of banal and ubiquitous pop music. Young people, above all, need help to appreciate instead the great music of our civilisation.

"Unless we teach children to judge, to discriminate, to recognize the difference between music of lasting value and mere ephemera, we give up on the task of education."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlphq)
Southern Cassowary

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the roaring southern cassowary of Australia's Queensland. The territorial roaring calls of the world's second heaviest bird, the cassowary are odd enough, but it still won't prepare you for your first sighting of these extraordinary birds. Reaching a height of over 1.5 metres, they have thick legs armed with ferocious claws, blue – skinned faces and scarlet dangling neck- wattles. These are striking enough but it is the large horn, or casque, looking like a blunt shark's fin on the bird's head that really stands out. It's earned this giant its common name - cassowary comes from the Papuan for "horned head". Such a primitive looking creature seems out of place in the modern world and although the southern cassowary occurs widely in New Guinea, it's still hunted for food there. Cassowaries can kill dogs and injure people with their stout claws, but the bird usually comes off worst in confrontations.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b06p4npc)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b06p4npf)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b06p4nph)
Rt Hon Nicola Sturgeon

Kirsty Young's castaway is the Right Honourable Nicola Sturgeon, MSP.

Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP) and the fifth First Minister of Scotland in the devolved era, she is the first woman to hold either post. The eldest of two daughters, she was brought up in Irvine and attended the local Dreghorn Primary School. A studious child, she was encouraged in her interest in current affairs by a teacher and joined the SNP aged 16. At 21, she was the youngest candidate in the 1992 General Election, contesting the safe Labour seat of Glasgow Shettleston.

She learned a lot about electoral defeat in those first years, but after several unsuccessful attempts, she was elected to the Scottish Parliament as a list MSP for Glasgow in 1999. She served as the party's shadow minister for education, and later for health and for justice and was elected deputy leader of her party in 2004, standing on a joint ticket with Alex Salmond. When the SNP won the highest number of seats in the 2007 election, she was appointed deputy First Minister. She also took on responsibility for the SNP's independence referendum campaign.

In November 2014, following the No vote in the Scottish independence referendum and the subsequent resignation of Alex Salmond, Sturgeon was elected leader of the SNP and became First Minister of Scotland. She's been awarded the Scottish Politician of the Year award three times and in 2015 was judged to be the Most Influential Woman in the UK by BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour.

She is married to Peter Murrell, Chief Executive of the SNP.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b06p4jc0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b06nnnlk)
Series 73

Episode 6

Nicholas Parsons hosts the long running panel show where guests must try to speak without hesitation, deviation or repetition.

Sue Perkins, Tony Hawks and Gyles Brandreth are joined by newcomer to the game Andy Hamilton, who has a few problems with the rules.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b06p4r9r)
Scotch Egg! Scotch Egg!

Scotch eggs may conjure memories of Summer picnics, school dinners or even Alan Partridge but the humble bar snack has been elevated to a culinary canvas on which chefs can make their own mark and feature on the menus of some of the UK's top restaurants. Food writer Joe Warwick invites you to the madness and mayhem of the Scotch Egg Challenge at which chefs and retailers compete with traditional and unconventional recipes for the glory of the title of winner. But with Thai, Peruvian and vegetarian versions on offer how far can you go before it's no longer a scotch egg? What are the key essentials and when have you gone too far?

Joe digs into the history of this bundle of glory, hears from chefs as they prepare for the big night and finds out why a pub can get packed to the rafters by people clamouring to try a piece of scotch egg heaven.

Presented by Joe Warwick
Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock

iPlayer photo by Laurie Fletcher.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b06p4jc4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b06p52ct)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06ns0r0)
Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park.

Chris Beardshaw, Bunny Guinness and Christine Walkden are this week's panellists taking questions from an audience of local gardeners.

The questions range from how to create a sensory garden within an exposed playground, to how best to plant a massive bog garden, and how to keep sawflies away from your gooseberries.

Also, Chris Beardshaw visits the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park for a project called Wild Park 2020 whose aim is to eradicate invasive Rhododendrons and reintroduce the lovely red squirrel.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b06p56z1)
Sunday Omnibus - Children in Need

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who both have disabled children, about the impact on their lives from the moment of their birth. Their children have been helped by Acorns Children's Hospice in Walsall, which has received funding from Children In Need since 2011.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b06p56zj)
The Day of the Locust

Tod is a young scene designer in 1930s Hollywood trying to earn an honest buck and still maintain his artistic integrity. He falls in love with Faye, an aspiring actress and gets sucked into the toxic periphery of the dream factory.

Nathanael West's caustic satire on the flipside of the Hollywood dream.

Dramatised by Jim Poyser

TOD......Simon Lee Phillips
FAYE..... Laura Aikman
HOMER/MIGUEL .....Kerry Shale
ABE/HARRY...... John Guerassio
MRS LOOMIS/ MRS JOHNSON..... ..Teresa Gallagher
CLAUDE....... Louis Labovitch
EARL...... Todd Kramer

Director: Gary Brown

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2015.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b06p56zr)
Edna O'Brien on The Little Red Chairs

Irish novelist Edna O'Brien, now in her eighties, has just published The Little Red Chairs, an ambitious and disturbing novel which Philip Roth has decribed as 'her masterpiece'. It starts with the arrival of a war criminal in a small village on the west coast of Ireland, and moves to London and the Hague as it it considers the impact of his terrible crimes, and investigates the nature of evil. Edna O'Brien talks to Mariella about researching her novel, and why she believes fiction should tackle difficult and troubling themes.

Also on the programme - a sense of place: Frank Barrett who has undertaken a literary pilgrimage around Britain and poet Paul Farley, former writer in residence at Dove Cottage, discuss the appeal of writers' homes and visiting the real life settings of our great novels. And Garth Risk Hallberg and other New York novelists discuss why that city's recent past is such an attractive setting for them.


SUN 16:30 Forgotten History (b06p56zt)
Neil Kinnock is a long standing admirer of the poetry of fellow Welshman, Idris Davies. Born in 1905, Davies's two major poetic sequences draw on his experience of life as a miner and the economic hardships in the 1920s and 1930s. The socialist principles at the heart of Davies' writing chime with the South Wales valleys Kinnock knew half a century later. In the fifties Pete Seeger's setting of "The Bells of Rhymney" turned Davies into a folk hero, while TS. Eliot's description of his verse as "the best poetic document I know about a particular epoch in a particular place" has consigned Davies' voice to a small patch of Wales. To counter-balance these views, Neil Kinnock returns to Rhymney, Davies' birthplace and the source of much poetic inspiration, to meet those who knew the poet and his poetry, arguing that the breadth and depth of Davies' writing is the universal message of Everyman, Everywhere, in a wretched, angry world.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b06np61x)
An Inside Job

An inside job: the Britons smuggling illegal immigrants into the UK.
File on 4 hears from Britons jailed for hiding people in their cars. They reveal why - and how - they did it.
They were paid to smuggle people across the Channel by gangs based in London and the North West.
This unofficial migrant taxi service - run from camps in Calais and Dunkirk - is believed to be netting criminal networks millions of pounds a year.
But even that is dwarfed by the money to be made by British criminals bringing migrants over by the lorry load. Jane Deith reveals how the trade is spreading along the coast of Northern Europe, to Belgium and Holland. And she hears from Europol's Chief of Staff about the extent to which criminal networks based in Britain are involved in people smuggling. He tells the programme that more than 800 people have been identified as suspects.
Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Paul Grant.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b06p4b27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:02 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jcb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b06p4jcj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06p4jcq)
15/11/15 French police are searching for a man they believe took part in the attacks in Paris.

French police are searching for a man they believe took part in the attacks in Paris which have now claimed 132 lives.


SUN 18:30 Pick of the Week (b06p5701)
Gerry Northam

Gerry Northam chooses his BBC Radio highlights from the past week.

Conflict and its resolution are themes this week. We hear four farmers who've come together across the once genocidal divide in Rwanda to record music, and a seasoned negotiator tries to reconcile the Israeli Prime Minister with his sworn enemy - the leader of Hamas.

Gerry also explores the haunting power of The Last Post and its American counterpart Taps; and marvels at the flight of a goshawk and the athletic prowess of the human flea. And one of the biggest laughs of the week comes from Andy Hamilton on Just a Minute.

The pick of the BBC Radio iPlayer is Jeremy Thorpe: The Silent Conspiracy

Producer: Stephen Garner

Also recommended by listeners this week

Chris Hawkins A Brief History of Time in Ten Songs BBC 6 Music Thursday 11th November

The professor's summary of events ranging from The Big Bang, through civilisation, agriculture, etc., through to space travel and digital communication was outstanding.
Ian

Thanks for a thought provoking, atmospheric and innovative piece of radio.
Simon

A very clever piece of broadcasting.
Barry

Terrific early-morning radio - creatively curated.
liz

Chris Hawkins brief history of time programme is absolutely brilliant. Best thing I've heard in ages!
David

And .....

The Why Factor - 'Gardens' BBC Radio 4 Wednesday 10th November

Enjoyed the section about a Guantanamo Bay internee finding ways to garden, using broom handles to pound the earth, plastic spoons to scrape holes and planting pips and seeds saved from their food! The sheer determination and ingenuity shown in finding a way to create a small space to grow things was quite inspiring
Amanda

Very Moving words from Saddiq
Phil

The Why Factor on Gardens is a beautiful programme. The section on bacteria explained to me why I find myself smiling involuntarily as soon as I get down to the earth and start weeding. I've so often wondered about this. Please play that section or the one about the gardening at Guantanamo.
Claire.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b06p5705)
As Brian covers for sick Jeff, happily helping Adam with silage hauling, he and Adam discuss Phoebe, who has a driving theory test tomorrow. She's also swotting up as she aims for a place at Oxford. Brian warily mentions that Jennifer's planning something for his birthday. He and Adam also debate Home Farm's 'old system' - for Brian, the jury's still out on Adam's new way of farming.

Lynda updates Kirsty on Calendar Girls - Susan has been trouble with her Yorkshire accent. Kirsty's very taken with the role of Ruth, which Helen turned down. Lynda offers Kirsty an audition. Meanwhile, Lynda feels harassed by Kathy, who at Grey Gables has picked her up on putting too much energy into 'other commitments'.

Ruth shares David's enthusiasm for Pip's Welsh mules, although they're certainly different to what they're used to. A rather flat Ruth agrees that it's good to have Jill back at Brookfield. David reins in his enthusiasm, though, aware that Heather should be there now.

Ruth later confronts David over having brought in a company to do the artificial inseminations - her job! David explains that with Ruth away in Prudhoe he wasn't sure of her availability so made the decision without her. But it's a waste of money, says Ruth - once again David has made a wrong decision and she was left out of the loop.


SUN 19:20 Radio 4's Night of Comedy for Children In Need (b06nrxbj)
For one night only BBC Comedy takes over the Radio Theatre as Susan Calman hosts a top bill of stand up, sketches and music featuring comedy powerhouse Andrew Maxwell, News Quiz regular Sara Pascoe, 2015 Edinburgh Comedy Award nominee Nish Kumar, star of BBC Three's People Time Natasia Demetriou, Canadian Comedy award nominee Mae Martin, lyrical improviser Abandoman and BBC New Comedy Award finalist Tez Ilyas.

To donate five pounds text the word COMEDY to 70705. Text messages will cost £5 plus your standard network message charge and £5 will go to Children in Need. You must be 16 or over and please ask the bill payers permission. For full terms and conditions and more information, visit our website at bbc.co.uk/Pudsey.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b06ns27l)
Local Radio Special

High level scrutiny and the need for further savings shines a light on every corner of BBC. This week Roger Bolton is in Sheffield to find out what listeners think about their BBC local radio stations.

He speaks to Sheffield listeners and hears how holding local figures to account, local knowledge, companionship and reflecting the local community are key to keeping listeners engaged.

But across England, listening figures are in a slow decline. David Holdsworth, who is in charge of all 39 stations, explains why that is and how local radio is moving with the technical times.

Is there such a thing as a free lunch? We join 120 lonely older folk at a free fish and chip lunch organised by BBC Radio Sheffield. It was inspired by the late Winnie Blagden, a fan of the station. Having no family, Radio Sheffield asked their listeners if they could send Winnie a card. She received 16,000 - and a pile of chocolates and flowers.

And we hear from the BBC Radio Devon's sports department who regularly cover four or five games every Saturday afternoon - and transmit each one of them with individual commentary on an individual transmitter.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b06ns27j)
Helmut Schmidt, Pat Eddery, Julia Jones, Lord Noon and Nat Peck

Matthew Bannister on

Helmut Schmidt, the German Chancellor who helped to design the European Monetary System and agreed that US nuclear weapons could be sited in his country. His friend the former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger pays tribute.

Also the jockey Pat Eddery - Willie Carson remembers their rivalry on the course and their friendship off it.

The actress and TV scriptwriter Julia Jones, who wrote the sitcom Take Three Girls and the period drama The Duchess of Duke Street.

The businessman Lord Noon who made millions by selling authentic take away Indian curries to the British.

And the trombonist Nat Peck, last survivor of the Glenn Miller Band.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b06p46bw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b06p4ln9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b06nnnlt)
Will They Always Hate Us?

The Middle East conflict and other long-running international disputes have so far proved incapable of resolution by war or traditional diplomacy. So are the parties fated always to hate each other? Or might there be another approach that could be worth trying?

David Edmonds explores new ideas that psychologists are testing which could offer a way of tackling seemingly intractable disputes. These include understanding the real importance of sacred sites and how to negotiate about them, how to achieve empathy with opponents and the importance of how different sides understand historical events and how these then lastingly shape how different groups view each other.

The programme also hears from those with direct experience of conflict resolution and negotiation to understand how they react to what the latest research has to say. These include Senator George Mitchell, who was famously involved in talks over both Northern Ireland and the Middle East, and Jonathan Powell, Tony Blair's former chief of staff Jonathan Powell, author of "Talking with Terrorists".

Producer Simon Coates.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b06p4jcx)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b06p59dm)
Beth Rigby of The Times analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b06nrxb8)
Aaron Sorkin on Steve Jobs, How to make a movie on a smart phone

With Francine Stock

The West Wing creator Aaron Sorkin discusses his biopic about Apple founder Steve Jobs and why the relationship between the character and the real person is the difference between a building and a drawing of that building.

Director Sean Baker reveals how he made a feature film, Tangerine, with two smart phones, and why he'd still prefer people to watch it on a big screen.

Documentary-maker Saeed Taji Farouky talks about his experiences of being embedded with the Afghan National Army in one of the most dangerous regions in the world.

And a sound editor responds to bird-watchers' complaints about birdsong being used in the wrong movie locations.

Image: Michael Fassbender portraying Steve Jobs. Image credit: Universal Pictures.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b06p4ln3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b06p4jf2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:30 The Island at the End of the World (b03mtkbm)
It may be the most isolated inhabited place on earth. Palmerston Island in the South Pacific is visited by a few yachts each year and the occasional container ship. Otherwise, the 62 inhabitants are untroubled by the outside world.
Thomas Martienssen makes the 8-day yacht journey to meet the native Palmerstonians, who are all descendants of an Englishman, William Marsters, who settled on the island in the 19th century with his three Polynesian "wives". He hears about the strong Christian faith of the islanders, listens to the ballad recounting the story of the community's founder and learns how they regularly salvage the wreckage of boats which have come to grief on the coral reefs. And he hears how fishing, the island's only source of commercial income, may now be threatened by over-exploitation of fish stocks. How long can the Palmerstonians continue to survive on their island at the end of the world?
Producer: Julie Ball.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b06p4ln1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jf4)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06p4jf6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jfb)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b06p4jfd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06qngf6)
Prayer for the Day

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tony Macauley.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b06p7b7g)
European aid for dairy farmers

Dairy farmers across the UK will get some extra money this week. Its their share of the EU emergency fund which was created in the wake of farmer protests across Europe earlier this year. The money aims to help them through the current crisis. £26 million will be shared by milk producers across the UK, which works out to an average of £2,000 each.
And we meet a father and son who gave up farming to concentrate on producing liqueurs from fruit!
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


MON 05:56 Weather (b06p4jfj)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04syywl)
Blue Manakin

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the advancing, leaping and queuing male blue manakin of Brazil. Male blue manakins are small, blue and black birds with scarlet caps. They live in the forests of south-east Brazil and neighbouring areas of Argentina and Paraguay. Whilst their plumage is eye-catching, their mating display is one of the strangest of any bird. A dominant male Blue Manakin enlists the support of one or more subordinate males. Calling loudly, all the males sidle along a branch towards the female, taking turns to leap into the air and then fly back down and take their place at the back of the queue. This sequence of advancing, leaping and queuing occurs at a frenetic pace, until, without warning, the dominant male calls time on this avian dance-off, with a piercing screech.


MON 06:00 Today (b06p7b7j)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 News (b06rwtjy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:03 Start the Week (b06p7b7l)
France Special

Andrew Marr was in Paris on Friday to record a special edition of Start the Week about France. Hours later the Paris attacks happened. This programme is not about these attacks or Islamic State or the French role in the war in Syria, but it is a conversation about the political, cultural and religious fault lines in France from the 19th century to today.
As BBC Radio 4 plans to broadcast a retelling of Emile Zola's 20 novel cycle, Les Rougon-Macquart, the journalist Anne-Elisabeth Moutet explores whether Zola is a 19th century gateway into understanding modern France. The novelist Agnès Desarthe has set her latest novel at the beginning of the 20th century and mixes the intimate with the great events of French history. The French Resistance is one of France's heroic myths and is central to the country's identity, but the historian Robert Gildea says the reality is far more complex. And contemporary France in all its complexity is represented in Karim Miské's thriller set among the radical Islamic preachers, Christian fundamentalists and corrupt police officers in one of the poorest suburbs of Paris.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b06p7b7n)
Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink

Don't Start Me Talking

'Had he not picked up a guitar, and put on the black glasses and porkpie hats, Elvis Costello might easily have been a poet, a Charles Simic or a Paul Muldoon,' New York Times

Elvis Costello, one of the greatest and most influential singer-songwriters, reads his witty, frank and very irreverent take of his 40 years at the top of the music business.

Born Declan Patrick MacManus in London in 1954, Elvis Costello was raised in London and Liverpool, the grandson of a trumpet player on the White Star Line and son of dance-band singer. Costello went into the family business and before he was twenty-four had his first record deal as part of the the first wave of the British punk and new wave movement. His album, 'My Aim Is True', was a huge hit, and with his band, The Attractions, he went on to record some of the most influential albums in the 1980s and 90s. Known for his lyricism, and with a reputation as something of an 'angry young man', he has gone on to become one of he elder statesmen of pop, collaborating with many music legends, including Burt Bacharach, Johnny Cash and Van Morrison. Costello has won multiple awards in his career, including a Grammy Award, and in 2003, Costello and the Attractions were inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

In this typically idiosyncratic memoir, he charts his often unlikely rise to international success, the experiences that inspired his best-known songs, as well as the absurdities and the darker sides of fame.

Today, Costello returns to the Hammersmith Palais, his father's old stomping ground, and looks back to those heady early days of British punk.

Written and read by Elvis Costello
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Richard Hamilton.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06p7b7q)
Mirror, Mirror - All About Appearance

The results of a Woman's Hour poll reveals how we see ourselves, what we like about our appearance and the difference between the sexes when it comes to spending time and money on how we look.

Phillippa Diedrichs from the Centre for Appearance Research and Sali Hughes, beauty writer for the Guardian, discuss the meaning behind the figures and why is appearance so important.

Reality TV star turned businesswoman Amy Childs and philosopher Mahlet Zimeta discuss how we use appearance to reflect how we want others to see us.

ComRes interviewed 1,006 British adults aged 18+ by telephone between 6th and 9th November 2015. Data were weighted to be
representative of all GB adults aged 18+. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06p7b7s)
How Does That Make You Feel?

Episode 1

On the campaign trail MP Richard Fallon's PA Genevieve set him up with a publicity 'girlfriend' to help him look less tragic. Though little more than a demure prop, the ruse seems to have worked. Unfortunately the girlfriend - who in reality looks like she's from a rock band circa 1976 - is now claiming they are engaged and making demands which Richard is finding it impossible to meet.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish', recently heard on Radio 4. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'. She wrote Enid (the life of Enid Blyton) for BBC4 and Shirley (the Shirley Bassey story) for BBC2.

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


MON 11:00 One Minute Silence (b06rw474)
One minute's silence for the victims of the Paris terror attack.


MON 11:03 The Invention of... (b06knmy9)
France

Le Petit Napoleon and the Franco-Prussian War

Two hours north east of Paris is a famous battlefield. The defeated French leader was called Napoleon, but the battle was not Waterloo. It was Sedan, and lining up against the French, the Prussians. The defeated French leader was Napoleon's nephew, le petit Napoleon, otherwise known as the emperor Napoleon III. This battle, in 1870, set up the dynamic that led to two world wars.

In the final Invention of France, Misha Glenny explores a crucial year for all western Europe. France was invaded, Paris bombarded, and Alsace occupied. January 18th 1871, a humiliating event - the proclamation of a new German empire, announced not in Germany but in the Palace of Versailles. Europe would never be the same.

With contributions from Thomas Kielinger, Jonathan Fenby, ambassador Sylvie Bermann, Andrew Hussey, Jeremy Black and Agnew Poirier. Plus contrubutions from Emile Zola's novel, Le Debacle.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


MON 11:30 Dilemma (b01rgj1n)
Series 2

Episode 6

Sue Perkins puts Miles Jupp, Isa Guha, Annie Nightingale and Sarah Kendall through the moral and ethical wringer.

Amongst the dilemmas facing the panel, Sue asks BBC Radio 1 DJ Annie whether she'd sell embarrassing recordings of media mogul, Rupert Murdoch.

There are no "right" answers - but there are some deeply damning ones.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2013.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b06p4jfs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Across the Board (b03mfn09)
Series 1

John Healy

Dominic Lawson conducts a series of interviews over a game of chess. In this episode he talks to the writer and former homeless alcoholic John Healy. How did chess help Healy give up the booze? And why does he believe that the world of chess is harsher than life on street.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b06p7b7v)
Insurance, Letters to Santa, The etiquette of complaining

Asda's customer service record has come under fire on Resolver - an online complaints website. Asda customers made five thousand complaints to them, in the last year - four times as many as the next most complained about supermarket - Morrisons.

If you're over 60 and looking for insurance it can be a minefield trying to find a provider. A listener has been in touch with us. He's 64 and has been trying to get short term income protection insurance to cover his mortgage in case he gets ill and can no longer work. He's contacted four different companies recommended by BIBA - the British Insurance Brokers' Association - but keeps being told he's too old to get cover.

On Monday the Royal Mail will reveal the definitive list of what children want this Christmas. The gift coming out on top this year is an old favourite - Lego. How do they know? Well, it's the job of the Royal Mail to sort through and deliver the thousands of letters children send to Father Christmas. We wanted to know what really happens to all the letters sent to Santa every year. We sent our reporter Geoff Bird along to the North Pole to find out.

And is there an etiquette to complaining

Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b06p4jfx)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b06p7b7x)
Latest on the French attacks with Mark Mardell in Paris and Shaun Ley in London. Plus a child is shot dead in Liverpool and Harriet Harman criticises Jeremy Corbyn on women policy.


MON 13:45 Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen (b06p7b7z)
Good Company

Lenny Henry investigates the sudden blossoming of black theatre groups in Britain in the late 1970s and 80s as new, second generation black Britons found their voices and created stages to express themselves. Most famous is Talawa, a theatre company founded by four renowned creative spirits, including Yvonne Brewster and Carmen Munroe, who applied for and were granted from the public purse £80,000 to stage The Black Jacobins, a play about Caribbean history, by the legendary writer CLR James.

Series consultant Michael Pearce
Producer Simon Elmes.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b06p5705)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Behind Closed Doors (b02qd1vc)
Behind Closed Doors: Series 1

One of the Lads

Did sexist bullying drive a high flying police woman out of her job? An employment tribunal has to decide if she was treated unfairly. Claire Rushbrook stars as barrister Rebecca Nyman and Susie Riddell as former Chief Inspector Suzy Andrews.

One Of The Lads is set at an employment tribunal. Suzy, ferociously bright and driven, rose rapidly through the ranks in the male-dominated Metropolitan Police. Over the years she didn't just cope with the situation - she thrived on it. But after a move to East Yorkshire Police her career went into a downward spiral. Suzy claims sexist bullying drove her out of the job she loved. Claire Rushbrook stars as London barrister Rebecca Nyman fighting Susie's case at the Employment Tribunal. Susie Riddell stars as former Chief Inspector Suzy Andrews.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS:
One of the Lads
By CLARA GLYNN

Other parts played by members of the cast.

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b06p7blp)
Programme 5, 2015

(5/12)
What would Fred Hoyle think of a writer of pulp Westerns, a penal reformer, a Restoration Archbishop of Canterbury, and British India?

Simon Singh and Marcus Berkmann of the South of England take on Adele Geras and Jim Coulson of the North of England, in this week's contest of cryptic connections. They'll have to unravel this and plenty of other puzzles, including several RBQ listeners' suggestions. Tom Sutcliffe is on hand to ensure fair play and to provide gentle hints wherever necessary, though he'll also be deducting points for every clue he has to give them.

The questions are available to view on the programme's webpage each week, from the beginning of the broadcast. Tom will also be giving the answer to the teaser question he left unanswered at the end of the previous edition - and setting another for this week.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b06p4r9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Blood, Sex and Money: The Life and Work of Emile Zola (b06p7cyt)
Double Oscar winning actress, and former politician, Glenda Jackson, presents an intriguing insight into the physical and cultural landscape of one of France's most prolific and influential writers- Emile Zola. She travels to Paris to get a real flavour of the great writers work and life, and how his experience and the life around him informed his great commentary of novels on the Second Empire. Zola's descendents describe how the reaction to J'Accuse and the Dreyfus Affair, where Zola accused the French Army of a cover up in an open letter to the press, still creates waves and bad feelings for the family. It's a journey of discovery for Jackson, right down to the fact that both Zola and she befriended a mouse.

Jackson plays the 100 year old matriarch and narrator of Radio 4's ground breaking 24 hour drama serialisation of all twenty novels in Zola's epic family Rougon-Macquart series, with the first season, Blood, beginning November 21st.

Blood, Sex and Money are the three major themes and title of the dramas, and Glenda explores how these themes infiltrated his work and life. She travels to his country home in Medan and meets his great grand-daughter. This was the home where, with his wife, he entertained his friends, such as Flaubert and Cezanne, where he set up a home for his lover and two children near by, and where he would cycle every afternoon to visit them.

Glenda also visits key areas in Paris where Zola lived in dire poverty, and where he gathered with his artist contemporaries - Manet, Monet, Cezanne at the height of the impressionistic and naturalistic movement. We also travel to Aix En Provence, in the South, where Zola and Cezanne grew up.
Research consultant - Kate Griffiths
Producer- Pauline Harris.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b06p7cyw)
Series 8

Imagine

Imagination is an essential component of what makes us human, it's complexity and artistry separating us from other animals as well as machines. Yet as digital technology progresses it's beginning to model this, once believed mystical, process.

Aleks Krotoski explores the implications of this latest stage of digital evolution. Could the digital world fill the gap for people who are unable to imagine? Does the production of imaginative arts such as poetry indicate a level of humanity in our machines? And if computers can indeed be programmed to imagine, what does this mean for the beauty and artistry of the human mind?

Producer: Elizabeth Ann Duffy.


MON 17:00 PM (b06p7cyy)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06p4jfz)
French officials identify the suspected mastermind behind the Paris attacks, which killed 129.
President Hollande announces plans to extend the state of emergency by 3 months.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b06p7cz0)
Series 73

Episode 7

Swimming, clementines, and festive spirits are amongst the subjects on the cards as Paul Merton, Sheila Hancock, Josh Widdicombe and Jenny Eclair try to avoid repetition, hesitation and deviation in the fiendishly simple panel game. Host Nicholas Parsons adjudicates. Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

Josh Widdicombe's new sitcom Josh premiers on BBC3 this week.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b06p7cz2)
Ruth agrees to lend Alan a calf for the Nativity service, as she and Usha discuss it. Ruth also learns than Carol is coming to Brookfield for Christmas lunch (another thing she was unaware of, she half-jokes). Ruth admits it's great to have Jill back at Brookfield, but she's aware that it should be Heather living with them now.

Rob finds a speeding ticket belonging to Helen and asks about it. She explains that she was driving too fast because she was in a hurry to get home after lunch with Ian. At least Henry wasn't in the car, says Rob, reminding Helen of the danger he was in on bonfire night - she wouldn't want to do that again, would she? Helen's grateful that he's not angry with her.

At the Bridge Farm shop, Rob's annoyed when Tony stands his ground over the selection of some tables for displaying fruit and veg. Rob feels they're too old fashioned but Tony puts Rob in his place, pointing out they're in danger of the shop looking sterile and clinical.

Helen's pleased to pass Rob a message from Greenbury Farm Services - they want him to attend an interview for the job she spotted. Helen's sure they'll snap him up.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b06p7cz4)
Toby Jones and Peter Bowker on Capital, Adil Ray on Saeed Jaffrey, Ticket re-selling, Hollywood's mature directors

Actor Toby Jones and screenwriter Peter Bowker on new BBC television drama Capital, based on John Lanchester's novel. The three part series is set in a gentrified south London street whose residents are targeted in a mysterious campaign.
If you've ever sat on re-dial or constantly refreshing a website, trying to get a ticket to a concert or event, you may want to contribute to the Government's consultation on the ticket touts harvesting tickets (some using computer software) in huge numbers to sell on at inflated prices. Consumer group Which? is lobbying for changes to the secondary ticket market to enable genuine fans to buy tickets at a fair price. Pete Moorey, head of campaigns at Which? and promoter Harvey Goldsmith discuss the effect ticket touts have on the market and discuss ways of combating the problem.
Saeed Jaffrey, veteran star of Bollywood and British cinema has died at the age of 86. Actor Adil Ray pays tribute to Jaffrey, and his influential roles in Gandhi, My Beautiful Laundrette as well as more recently Coronation Street.
The last couple of years have been particularly good for the 'mature' film director, with Ridley Scott, George Miller, Clint Eastwood and Martin Scorsese among those whose recent movies have been box-office gold. Adam Smith considers the winners and losers in the all-important numbers game.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Elaine Lester.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06p7b7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Changing Climate (b06p7d29)
The Science

Climate talks typically end in disenchantment and disarray, so will this year's summit in Paris be any different? In this three part series Roger Harrabin examines the science, politics and solutions of climate. In the first of this series he looks at the science behind climate change. Predicting the future climate is a pretty tricky business and over the last twenty five years or so its had a chequered history. Roger talks to the scientists about their models and asks if they are accurate enough or should they just be consigned to the dustbin. He takes tea with the leading US politician who simply won't be convinced of man-made climate change. He meets the "luke-warmers" who believe in climate change but don't think the planet will warm as much as predicted. He will also examine the current predictions and how confident we should be.
You can find links to transcripts of the interview done for this series on the Open University website creativeclimate.org.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b06nrqvh)
Norway and Russia: An Arctic Friendship Under Threat

In Norway, the sacking of a newspaper editor, allegedly after pressure from Russia, has caused a political storm over media freedom, and raised questions over what price the country should pay for good relations with its powerful eastern neighbour. Thomas Nilsen is a veteran environmental activist who edited a paper in the far north of Norway, in a region which has enjoyed a unique cross-border relationship with Russia. Now that's threatened by rising tension between Russia and NATO. And relations have been further strained by the flow of refugees, now coming through Russia into the far north of Norway. Tim Whewell reports on what it means for the Norwegian outpost of Kirkenes, where Norwegians and Russians work closely together in the oil and fishing business and where cooperation and friendship go back decades.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w9lgt)
Fleas

Throughout history, human fleas have been one of our closest companions; the irritating bedfellows of everyone from kings and queens to the poorest in society. Brett Westwood discovers how the flea has been a carrier of disease, causing suffering on an enormous scale. But, despite being a danger and a pest, their proximity has led to us to try to understand them and find humour in them.

The esteemed British naturalist Dame Miriam Rothschild was one of the world's leading experts on fleas and led an investigation into how they propel themselves to such speed and distance from their minuscule frame. As parasites, their ability to jump onto hosts to suck their blood led to fleas being charged with sexual energy in the 16th century. Poets wrote entertainingly intimate poems of their jealousy that the flea could jump onto areas of a beautiful woman that they themselves would be unable to reach.

The comedic role of the flea continued into the era of the flea circus when they pulled miniature metal chariots several times their weight and their role as performers didn't end there - leading on into early cinema and even tourism. They may have been often overlooked but fleas have had a stark impact on our lives.

Revised and shortened repeat.

Archive Producer: Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio in Bristol


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b06p7b7l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:03 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b06p4jg4)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b06p7d03)
President Hollande says France is at war

The man suspected to be mastermind behind Paris attacks is believed to be a Belgian


MON 22:45 Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal (b06qnmhn)
Episode 6

With McCarthyism reaching fever pitch in 1950s America, Peter Sargeant - a dashing PR man - is hired by the Grand St Petersburg ballet to fend off rumours that their star choreographer is a communist. But New York's ballet world is shocked when, on the opening night, the lead ballerina plummets to her death from a wire, maintaining her classical pose in the 'fifth position' as she hits the floor.

Gore Vidal's earlier novel The City and the Pillar was published in 1948 when the author was 23 years old. Its central story of a homosexual relationship caused such a scandal that the New York Times book critic refused to review any book by Gore Vidal. Others followed his lead and the author found himself at a loss as to how to continue to earn a living through his pen until a publisher suggested that he turn his hand to writing under a different name. Death In the Fifth Position was published in 1952 - the first of a trio of entertainments featuring Peter Cutler Sargeant II as a publicist turned private eye.

Episode 6:
There's shocking news for the cast of the ballet just as everyone is anticipating the arrest of conductore Miles Sutton for the murder of his wife. Peter Sargeant's role as a publicist is rapidly becoming that of detective.

Written by Edgar Box (Gore Vidal)
Read by Jamie Parker

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


MON 23:00 Mending Young Minds (b06810pq)
Teenagers

In this moving and insightful two part series for BBC Radio 4, children and teenagers receiving treatment at the world renowned Tavistock Centre in London share their experience of living with mental health problems.

Over recent years the number of British children suffering from psychiatric illnesses has increased considerably and the age of presentation is falling. The Sunday Times has reported that the number of children admitted to hospital for self-harm, eating disorders and other psychological problems has doubled in four years. One in 10 five-to-16-year-olds has a mental health disorder, according to a 2014 Parliamentary task force report, and there has been a dramatic increase in demand for childhood and adolescent mental health services across the country.

In this programme, Dr. Juliet Singer goes inside the consulting room to speak to teenage patients, their parents and therapists about what's it's like to live with mental illness - including depression, suicidal thoughts, self-harm and anxiety - and how they are being treated.

The series explores why mental health problems among young people appear to be getting worse, with increased pressures from schools, parents, peer groups and social media.

Presenter: Juliet Singer
Producer: Melissa FitzGerald

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06p7d05)
TIP: MPs respond to the terrorist attacks in Paris. The resettlement of Syrian refugees is discussed at Home Office Questions. And Councillors express concerns over plans to give the right for tenants to buy Housing Authority accommodation. Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b06p4jhh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b06p7b7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jhp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06p4jhr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jht)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b06p4jhw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06qsr0w)
Prayer for the Day

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tony Macauley.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b06pb4tb)
Trade to China, Agri-tech hub, Fungi, English wine

A group of UK diary businesses have just returned from a trade mission to China.
A new agri-tech hub has been opened which brings together scientists, farmers, engineers and IT specialists, to come up the ideas for a less wasteful farming industry.
The National Trust's Tyntesfield estate has never had fertiliser applied to its lawns, so displays a colourful array of fungi.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0gsc)
Saddleback

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the formerly widespread saddleback of New Zealand. It's loud, piping and whistling calls once resounded throughout New Zealand's forests, but now the saddleback is heard only on smaller offshore islands. This is a bird in exile. About the size of a European blackbird, saddlebacks are predominantly black with a rust-coloured saddle-shaped patch on their backs. In Maori culture this mark came from the demi-God Maui who, after trying to catch the sun, asked the saddleback to fetch water. The bird refused, so hot-handed Maui grabbed it and left a scorch mark on the bird's back. As well as this chestnut saddle, the bird has two bright red wattles at the base of its beak which it can dilate when it displays. It also has an extensive vocabulary and one of its calls has earned it the Maori name –"Ti-e-ke".


TUE 06:00 Today (b06pb54g)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b06pb54j)
Paul Younger on energy for the future

Paul Younger, Rankine Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow, in conversation with Jim al-Khalili in front of an audience at the Free Thinking Festival at Sage Gateshead.

Paul Younger's future career was inspired by the hills around him near the River Tyne. From a background in geology he now carries out research into, as he says, "keeping the lights on and keeping homes and businesses warm whilst de-carbonising our energy systems."

He spent many years at the University of Newcastle, where he built up his expertise in the relationship between water and rocks. He has advised on how to clean up the highly polluted water left in mines after they are closed - from the North East to Bolivia.

His knowledge of the rocks beneath our feet has lead him to investigating how we might use more geothermal energy in the future. Paul Younger tells Jim al-Khalili about the experimental holes that have been drilled in County Durham and central Newcastle, and explains why these projects are now mothballed. And Professor Younger also talks about his research into other unconventional ways of generating energy - such as turning coal deep underground into gas.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b06pb54l)
David Schneider with Jenny Diski

David Schneider, despite being healthy, is terrified of dying. He wants to overcome his fears and find out whether a 'good death' is ever possible and how those facing up to it, cope. He visits the journalist and writer Jenny Diski who was told last summer that she had inoperable lung cancer and, at best, another three years to live. She now writes about the experience and her treatment, with her usual wit and candour, and her tweets have a devoted following. But as she says, 'I tell jokes but that doesn't mean that I'm not terrified at the prospect of my own non-existence.' They discuss this fear, what it is they are afraid of and whether faith might make a difference.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b06pb54n)
Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink

Accidents Will Happen

Elvis Costello, one of Britain's greatest and most influential singer-songwriters, reads his witty, frank and very irreverent take of his 40 years at the top of the music business.
Born Declan Patrick MacManus in London in 1954, Elvis Costello was raised in London and Liverpool, the grandson of a trumpet player on the White Star Line and son of dance-band singer. Before he was twenty-four, he had his first record deal as part of the the first wave of the British punk and new wave movement. His album, 'My Aim Is True', was a huge hit, and with his band, The Attractions, he went on to record some of the most influential albums in the 1980s and 90s. Known for his lyricism, and with an early reputation as something of an 'angry young man', he has gone on to become one of he elder statesmen of pop, collaborating with many music legends, including Burt Bacharach, Johnny Cash and Van Morrison. Costello has won multiple awards in his career, including a Grammy Award, and in 2003, Costello and the Attractions were inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

In this typically idiosyncratic memoir, he charts his often unlikely rise to international success, the experiences that inspired his best-known songs, as well as the absurdities and the darker sides of fame. Today: Costello looks back on how his early childhood in 1950s London fed into his music.
Written and read by Elvis Costello
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Richard Hamilton.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06pb5pr)
Carrie Brownstein, Explaining the Paris attacks for teens, Appearance

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey

Many teenagers first heard about the Paris attacks on Friday via social media - some even knew about the events before their parents. But with information streaming in from all directions what is the best way to talk toyoung people about the attacks and which news stories can they trust?

Joining us all through the programme is graphic artist 'Una'. She talks about the process of capturing the essence of people in cartoons and will be live sketching and tweeting, drawing members of the BBC production team and our guests.

In 1996, Carrie Brownstein's feminist punk band Sleater Kinney grew out of the Washington State Riot Grrrl scene which put women to the fore of music. Ten years on, she has a new memoir about her life in music, Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl, and the band have returned with a new album, No Cities to Love, which came out in January.

As she prepared for her wedding, Kjerstin Gruys found herself feeling bad about the way that she looked. To counter the negative feelings, she decided to stop looking in mirrors. She spent one whole year living without mirrors, not even checking her image on her wedding day. She talks to Jane about the experiment and its results.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pb5pt)
How Does That Make You Feel?

Episode 2

Having completed his rehabilitation course, following accusations of sexism and cruelty to his employees, Tony has returned to Martha's therapy sessions a new man - or so he thinks. He was alarmed to learn on his course that employers are not entitled to lock employees in a cupboard for misdemeanours and is still mystified as to why his casual often throw-away remarks on people's body shape, sexual attractiveness and general intelligence are not received in the spirit in which they were intended.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish', recently heard on Radio 4. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'. She wrote Enid (the life of Enid Blyton) for BBC4 and Shirley (the Shirley Bassey story) for BBC2.

Tony ..... Tim McInnerny
Martha ..... Frances Tomelty

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w9ljp)
Whales

Brett Westwood explores our complex relationship with the giants of the sea, whales. These vast creatures of the sea have undergone a remarkable transformation. Once feared as sea monsters they then became a valuable resource for oil, food, blubber and bone. In the 20th century, as their numbers dwindled, they suddenly became an image of fragility - a victim of humanity's ruthlessness. They moved from roaring sea monsters to creatures that sing and represent peace, a transformation created by the media.


Although there are many species of whale ranging in size and body shape, most people have one image in their minds, a kind of super-whale that amalgamates all that is good about nature. "Save the Whale" is a household slogan." This was demonstrated by the public reaction to the Thames Whale, a female Northern bottle-nosed whale that became stranded in London 10 years ago. People went into the water to try to save her, she was photographed, written about and sung about as people became entranced by her increasingly desperate plight. She was a wildlife media sensation. After her death popular newspapers even paid for the skeleton to be preserved in a glass case rather than broken up into drawers.


The media defines our view of the whale as either a wonder to be protected or a traditional resource to be exploited. Here in the UK the removal of the national treasure that is "Dippy the dinosaur" from the foyer of the Natural History Museum, to be replaced by a blue whale skeleton, shows how much this animal means to the public today.


TUE 11:30 Alice Is Still in Wonderland (b06pb5pw)
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has become an icon of British culture - the bizarre story and flamboyant illustrations have inspired all kinds of imagery, fashion, architecture, theatre, decoration and events. But its sinister undercurrents and dreamscape have also impressed artists and musicians.

On the 150th anniversary of the publication of Lewis Carroll's book, lead singer and song writer of alternative rock band Siouxsie and the Banshees, Siouxsie Sioux, explores its strange allure.

"From 8 onwards, I returned to those pictures of strange, impossible animals and freakish, devious adults as I followed the solitary, brave girl, from one weird encounter to the next. I was struck that Alice could grow or shrink at the bite of a cake or the sip of a drink - my body was changing by the day and I was desperate to be older and taller, like my sister, as I wobbled around in my mum's high heels. The Mad Hatter, the Dozy Dormouse, the Mock Turtle, the Duchess' baby pig and playing croquet with flamingos as mallets all made me laugh and I loved the floating head of the grinning Cheshire Cat who couldn't be beheaded.

But there was something else that drew me into Wonderland that I couldn't have named then, though I sensed its irreverence - something darker about adults and their rules and their craziness and endless unreasonableness. Alice was an ally and the book helped me dream myself out of the London suburbs." Siouxsie Sioux

Siouxsie Sioux travels to Oxford to retrace Lewis Carroll's inspiration and influence. With an Un-Oxford soundtrack.

A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b06p4jj1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Across the Board (b03mj945)
Series 1

Natan Sharansky

Dominic Lawson conducts a series of interviews over a game of chess. In this episode he plays the former Soviet dissident and Israeli politician Natan Sharansky.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b06pb6sf)
Call You and Yours: Confusing Small Print

Listeners tell their stories of getting caught out by the small print.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b06p4jj3)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b06pjsc0)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen (b06pb6sh)
Mainstream and Multicultural

Lenny Henry charts the breakthrough of a suite of powerful new black voices into serious theatre during the 1990s. Including Kwame Kwei-Armah, Winsome Pinnock, Paulette Randall, and Roy Williams.

Series Consultant Michael Pearce
Producer Simon Elmes.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b06p7cz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Behind Closed Doors (b02qncsf)
Behind Closed Doors: Series 1

Tilting the Odds

An equine vet's career is in jeopardy as he faces a disciplinary hearing for serious professional misconduct. Will his barrister Rebecca Nyman, played by Claire Rushbrook, be able to mount a credible defence? Gunnar Cauthery stars as the vet Falco Hermans.

Tilting The Odds is set at a Fitness to Practice hearing at the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. Falco Hermans is a vet in his thirties. Since qualifying he's built up a successful and lucrative practice as an equine vet in the racing town of Newmarket. He's got a big mortgage and three small children. He's facing a disciplinary hearing on several counts of misconduct. If he is struck off he faces financial ruin and disgrace in the racing community and in his home town.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS:
Tilting the Odds
By CLARA GLYNN

Other parts played by members of the cast.

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b06pb74b)
Series 8

Wild Water

From finding your way in a cold, dark sea swim to coping with the isolation at the bottom of the ocean, Josie Long hears stories of wild water.

The items featured in the programme are:

Mirage
Produced by Cicely Fell

Pool Party
Produced by Phil Smith

Diver
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

The Swim
Produced by Jodie Taylor with Jenny Horwell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2015.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b06pb74d)
In Conversation with David Attenborough

David Attenborough and a panel of influential thinkers on the natural world join Tom Heap to preview this month's Climate Summit in Paris. Can the world's leaders come to an agreement to save a warming planet?

The director of Titanic, Avatar and Terminator, James Cameron tells Tom that a vegan diet can slash our carbon emissions. Former Australian Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd recalls what went wrong at the last climate summit in Copenhagen and explains why he's so much more hopeful of real commitments on carbon emissions from the Paris meeting.

David MacKay, the government's chief scientific advisor on energy policy until 2014, tells Tom that Europe's renewable energy policy is unfit for purpose and David Attenborough raises the thorny issue of our rising population.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b06pb74g)
Should doping in sport be criminalised?

Lord Moynihan, an Olympic medallist and a former Minister of Sport, has called for doping in sport to be made a criminal offence. His call came in reaction to the allegations made in an independent report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Association that the London Olympics had been sabotaged by systemic doping by Russia. Lord Moynihan has long been known to favour tough measures against drug cheats - and similar criminal offences exist in Australia, Italy and France. But how workable would legislation be? And it would it act as a deterrent? We ask about the legal repercussions of the Paris attacks. And, the migrant crisis reaches Cyprus. But could those migrants now come to Britain?


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b06pb74j)
Niall Ferguson and Tracy Chevalier

Niall Ferguson and Tracy Chevalier talk books with Harriett Gilbert. Driver's Seat by Muriel Spark, South Sea Tales by Robert Louis Stevenson, and Irène Némirovsky's Suite Française are discussed. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (b06pb74l)
PM at 5pm - Paddy O'Connell with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06p4jj5)
Cameron pledges a "comprehensive strategy" to win support for military action.


TUE 18:30 Gloomsbury (b040014b)
Series 2

Desperate for a Thumbs-Up

At last, Ginny Fox has finished her rewrite of Borlando and rushes it off to her friend and confidante, Vera Sackcloth-Vest, for appraisal. Meanwhile, DH Lollipop has just completed a rewrite of Lady Hattersley's Plover and is nervously awaiting the critical verdict of Lionel Fox.

Never have two literary giants been so eager to have their geniuses confirmed, but self-doubt plagues their every waking hour.

Due to a series of unfortunate coincidences, involving Lionel's inability to remember addresses and Vera's obsession with creating a new Blue Garden at Sizzlinghust, which involves her sending off for hundreds of new plants by mail order and storing them in Gosling's shed, the manuscripts go missing.

What the writers interpret as a literary thumbs-down from their readers is nothing more than misdirected-mail. Friendships are strained to breaking point, while Ginny and Vera try to guess what the other is thinking and Mrs Gosling burns DH Lollipop's filthy manuscript when she accidentally comes across it and reads it from cover to cover.

Producer: Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b06pb82x)
Phoebe has passed her driving theory test, and is still busy reading science and current affairs papers and magazines in her quest to get into Oxford.

Neil's grateful for the offer of Jennifer's old kitchen units, for the village hall restoration. As Susan chivvies Neil along to their play rehearsal, Susan's miffed that Neil's letting Bridge Farm take his workers (Jazzer) away to help with the shop - and that manager Neil is doing the dirty work seeing to the pig arks.

Calendar Girls rehearsal has a late start due to Susan filling Lynda in on some good news: Neil heard from Jim that the village shop has been given Community Asset status. Susan hopes that'll put paid to Hazel Woolley's schemes - hopefully they'll reopen before Christmas. Susan's quite happy to steal an idea or two from her rivals at Bridge Farm. Susan gossips about Rob and Tony's supposed 'to-do' in the yard yesterday and how amazing Rob is. Meanwhile, Jennifer tells Elizabeth all about Adam and Ian's wedding coming up on December 14th.

Lynda has completed casting for all the female roles and nudity is naturally the hot topic: Lynda's pressured into appearing in her Calendar Girls calendar - it's everyone or no one!


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b06pb82z)
The Hunger Games, Costa Book Awards, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, The Man in the High Castle

Front Row reveals this year's Costa Book Awards shortlist. Critic Alex Clark comments on the authors chosen in the five categories; novel, first novel, poetry, biography and children's fiction.

The Hunger Games' film franchise reaches its conclusion with Mockingjay: Part 2, with Jennifer Lawrence reprising her role as the rebellious Katniss Everdeen for the last time. Sophia McDougall reviews the film which is released in UK cinemas this week.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is best-known as the leading National Basketball Association scorer, but he is also a best-selling author. His latest book, Mycroft Holmes, is a thriller about Sherlock Holmes' older brother. So how did an American come to write about this very English character?

Andrew Collins assesses the new TV adaptation of The Man In The High Castle, based on Philip K Dick's novel about America after an Axis victory in the Second World War, and which boasts Ridley Scott as executive producer.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Studio Producer: Angie Nehring.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pb5pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Dictatorship of Data (b06pb831)
The big data revolution is here, with masses more personal information available. And for authoritarian governments, this information is another weapon to use against their people. Gordon Corera discovers how agencies like the Stasi always longed for such technological power, and explores what might now be possible for politicians armed with masses of data about everyone, and the means to analyse it. How have Western companies been caught up in this world, and what can be done in response? Big data promises huge benefits in many areas - but can its darker side be resisted?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Richard Vadon.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b06pb833)
Libby Clegg, Job Interviews

The silver medallist, Libby Clegg, who's visually-impaired, talks to Peter White about her future plans now that funding from British Athletics has come to an end. And we talk about getting into the job market and doing interviews when you can't see.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b06pb835)
Astronauts, All in the Mind Awards, Crying and Lying

Claudia Hammond finds out why astronauts' experiences of seeing Earth from space can have profound effects on their feelings towards planet Earth. She talks to astronaut, Michael Lopez-Alegria, and trainee counselling psychologist, Annahita Nezami, about the Overview Effect and how the power of planet Earth may have therapeutic value for everyone back on terra firma. Clinical psychologist, Linda Blair, is one of the judges on the All in the Mind awards. She talks about how to have a conversation with someone who may be having problems with their mental health and what makes a good, empathetic listener. Thomas Dixon, Director of the Centre for the History of the Emotions at Queen Mary University, London, talks about the history of crying and why the stiff upper lip was just a blip in history. Also, Claudia talks to forensic psychologist, Bruno Verschuere, about his research into why we become worse at lying as we get older.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b06pb54j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b06p4jj7)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b06pb837)
Wembley fans sing French national anthem

Wembley football fans sing French national anthem.
Football match in Hanover called off for security fears.
Will the Paris attacks change attitudes to refugees?
Charlie Sheen's HIV admission.
How climate change is affecting Tonga.
With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal (b06qnmpb)
Episode 7

With McCarthyism reaching fever pitch in 1950s America, Peter Sargeant - a dashing PR man - is hired by the Grand St Petersburg ballet to fend off rumours that their star choreographer is a communist. But New York's ballet world is shocked when, on the opening night, the lead ballerina plummets to her death from a wire, maintaining her classical pose in the 'fifth position' as she hits the floor.

Gore Vidal's earlier novel The City and the Pillar was published in 1948 when the author was 23 years old. Its central story of a homosexual relationship caused such a scandal that the New York Times book critic refused to review any book by Gore Vidal. Others followed his lead and the author found himself at a loss as to how to continue to earn a living through his pen until a publisher suggested that he turn his hand to writing under a different name. Death In the Fifth Position was published in 1952 - the first of a trio of entertainments featuring Peter Cutler Sargeant II as a publicist turned private eye.

Episode 7:
With Miles Sutton's death confirmed as a gruesome accident, Detective Gleason declares the case closed. Peter is however a little curious as to why Mr Washburn had been writing letters seeking a replacement for Ella Sutton before she was murdered. Nonetheless they are all looking forward to the final performance in the first run of Eclipse.

Written by Edgar Box (Gore Vidal)
Read by Jamie Parker

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 23:00 Liam Williams: Ladhood (b06pb839)
Series 1

The First Time

Liam Williams - a two-time Edinburgh Festival Award nominated comedian - shares his teenage misadventures in the Yorkshire suburbs.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to its subject matter of teenage sex, this episode contains language and content that some listeners may find offensive.

With evocative monologues by "Adult Liam" being interjected with flashback scenes from his teenage years, this four-part series was recorded in Leeds and stars teens from Yorkshire.

Each episode delves into Liam's memories of his first fight, virginity loss, the best house party ever organised, and his marvellous outwitting of an entire teaching staff.

This is the New Labour, post-mining, aspirational heartland, meeting 50 Cent and Generation Y ennui, represented in a bourgeois radio format - by one of Britain's most exciting comedians.

Adult Liam ...... Liam Williams
Young Liam ...... Alfie Field
Bradley Dixon ...... Sam Shaw
Cranny ...... Matthew Hudson
Ralph Fletcher ...... George Richardson
Dale McIllroy ...... Oliver Gower
Tinhead ...... Lee Rockley
Rupert ...... Jacob Clarke

Producer: Arnab Chanda

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06pb83c)
Sean Curran reports as David Cameron urges support for bombing 'Islamic State' in Syria. MPs clash on the junior doctors' pay dispute. And should 16 and 17 year olds get the vote?

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b06p4jkg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b06pb54n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jkj)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06p4jkl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jkn)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b06p4jkq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06r169x)
Prayer for the Day

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tony Macauley.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b06pbwby)
New Research on Neonicotinoids and Bees, Cornish Cauliflowers, Farmers Health Check

New research on the effects of pesticides on honey bees.
Cornish cauliflower growers are desperate for colder weather to stop crops going to waste.
One estate in the north east of Scotland is distilling, bottling and labelling spirits made from farm produce.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0gzx)
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the greater racket-tailed drongo of South-East Asia. Across a clearing in a Malaysian forest flies a dark bird, seemingly chased by two equally dark butterflies. Those butterflies in hot pursuit aren't insects at all; they are the webbed tips of the greater racket-tailed drongo's excessively long wiry outer-tail feathers, which from a distance look like separate creatures as it flies. Glossy blue-black birds which live in wooded country and are great insect catchers, hawking after them in mid-air before returning to a perch. They're bold too and won't hesitate to harry and chase much larger birds than themselves, including, birds of prey. Like other drongos the greater racquet-tailed drongo has an extensive but not very musical repertoire which includes the sounds of other birds it meets, when it joins mixed feeding flocks, and can imitate the call of a hawk to alarm the hawk's victims and so steal food from them while they are distracted by the call: an ingenious tactic, which few other birds have learned.


WED 06:00 Today (b06pbty9)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b06pbtyc)
Michel Roux Jr, Thomas Heatherwick, Dr Sarah Beynon, Dorothy Saul-Pooley.

Libby Purves meets designer Thomas Heatherwick; chef Michel Roux Jr; entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and pilot Dorothy Saul-Pooley.

Dr Sarah Beynon is an entomologist who has just opened Grub Kitchen, a restaurant with insect dishes on the menu. Based at her bug farm in Pembrokeshire, Grub Kitchen features such delights as cricket falafels and mealworm hummus. Sarah's fascination with the natural world started in childhood - at five she was given her first 'bug box'. In the course of her research she has studied insects around the world including Zambia, Indonesia, Bolivia and Honduras. Grub Kitchen is at Lower Harglodd Farm, Pembrokeshire in Wales.

Chef Michel Roux Jr has spent many years working with organisations helping young people to find employment. In the series Kitchen Impossible he puts eight trainees with disabilities through an intensive four week introduction course to catering. The trainees are people who have been "written off" by employers because of their disabilities. Kitchen Impossible with Michel Roux Jr is broadcast on Channel 4.

Thomas Heatherwick is a designer whose studio was behind projects such as the UK Pavilion for the Shanghai World Expo in 2010, the Olympic Cauldron for the 2012 London Olympic Games and the design of the New Bus for London. The studio is currently working on the capital's Garden Bridge which will span the Thames between the South Bank and Temple. The bridge, which has aroused much controversy, will serve as a free public space, featuring trees, shrubs, climbing plants, hedges and flowers.

Dorothy Saul-Pooley is Master of the Honourable Company of Air Pilots - the first woman to head the organisation in its 85-year history. A lawyer turned pilot and flying instructor, she fell in love with flying at an early age but didn't take her first flying lesson until she reached her early thirties. In 2006 she qualified as a helicopter instructor and her logbook currently records over 9,500 flying hours at the controls of over 85 different types including fixed wing and rotary, piston, jet, glider and microlight aircraft.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b06pbtyf)
Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink

This World Is Killing You

Elvis Costello, one of the greatest and most influential singer-songwriters, reads his witty, frank and very irreverent take on his 40 years at the top of the music business.

Born Declan Patrick MacManus in London in 1954, Elvis Costello was raised in London and Liverpool, the grandson of a trumpet player on the White Star Line and son of dance-band singer. At twenty-four he had his first record deal as part of the the first wave of the British punk and new wave movement. His album, 'My Aim Is True', was a huge hit, and with his band, The Attractions, he went on to record some of the most influential albums in the 1980s and 90s. Known for his lyricism, and with a reputation as something of an 'angry young man', he has gone on to become one of he elder statesmen of pop, collaborating with many music legends, including Burt Bacharach, Johnny Cash and Van Morrison.
Today, Costello leaves Liverpool to make his fortune in London. But an early marriage, fatherhood and a dead-end job, seem to be at odds with the life of a would-be popstar

Written and read by Elvis Costello
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Richard Hamilton.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06pbtyh)
Saudi women - historic first vote in elections

As Saudi women prepare to vote and stand in local elections for the first time next month, Rothna Begum of Human Rights Watch explains what this historic moment means for women in the region.

Plus, women in jazz - why are they so much more likely to be a singers than musicians? Pianist and composer Zoe Rahman and big band leader Issie Barratt share their insider views.

And Mirror Mirror - we continue our special look at appearance.

Getting ready - in the first of a series talking to different women about how they get dressed to go out and why, we speak to 16 year old Londoner, Hannah.

And the science of visual attractiveness - why do we find someone beautiful, what's the biological and psychological explanation behind all this, and how have our perceptions of physical beauty changed over time? Carmen Lefevre of University College London and art historian Lucinda Hawkesley tell all.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b06pbtyk)
How Does That Make You Feel?

Episode 3

Caroline tells her therapist Martha how she has found a new niche - a 'cruelty aunt' role on a local newspaper where she tells the disadvantaged to "stop bleating and get on with it". This has met with mixed success. She has alienated so many of her colleagues that she is no longer able to return to work. And to top it all her husband has returned home and appears to in the midst - completely selfishly - of a mental breakdown. Why does everything but everything conspire to thwart her, when all she wants is to the most successful and best known celebrity in Britain?

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish', recently heard on Radio 4. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'. She wrote Enid (the life of Enid Blyton) for BBC4 and Shirley (the Shirley Bassey story) for BBC2.

Caroline ..... Rebecca Saire
Martha ..... Frances Tomelty

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b06pbtym)
Jesse and Ollie - Personal Pronouns

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who identify as non-binary, so prefer the pronoun they to he or she. Both attend the T-Group run by Space in Dorset; Space supports transgender young people aged 12-25. This conversation, produced with the support of All About Trans, is another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Joy of 9 to 5 (b06pbw9v)
Lucy Kellaway looks at the UK's long hours office culture and asks what happened to the 9 to 5?

In 1930 John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by 2030, we'd all be working a 15 hour week. And yet, almost half of us in the UK put in over a 40 hour week and most of those who work over 48 hours say they're unhappy.

In part one of a new series on modern work culture, Lucy Kellaway, management columnist for the Financial Times, discovers the origins of the eight hour working day.

She finds out what people are actually up to when they're in the office at all hours and argues much of the typical working day is taken up with time-wasting. For Lucy, our self image has become so intertwined with our job that we bolster it by putting the hours in - even if in doing so we're less happy and productive.

Speaking to business leaders, management researchers, and office workers, Lucy asks whether it's time to re-define our notion of 'hard work', and explores the idea that working less could actually be better for everyone.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Gemma Newby
Executive Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 The Lentil Sorters (b06pv0gx)
Researcher Bias

A sitcom set in the Office of Local and National Statistics which, depending on who you ask, is either where the real power of government resides, or the place where fun goes to die.

In this episode, Daniel and Audrey fight over the Welfare State with the aid of a can of strong lager, a fake police uniform and a beloved British character actor.

Meet the team:

Graham Quicks is Head of the People and Places Department of the LNS. There are three things in the world that Graham will always have faith in – statistics, the supremacy of filofaxes over computers and the idea that cardigans will never go out of style.

Audrey Carr is the Survey Researcher for the department. She believes passionately that statistics should be used as a tool to help the man on the street. Fortunately for her, she's never actually met "the man in the street". She's also passionate about Jane Austen, Les Miserables and pretending that she doesn't work in an office with Daniel.

Daniel Porter is the department's Data Analyst. He used to work in the City, until the City realised he was a colossal waste of space. Daniel divides his time between manipulating statistics to further his vision of capitalism, necking energy drinks and telling people his thighs are really, really strong. He's terrible.

Mrs. Wilkins has worked as tea lady, archivist and maintenance guru for fifteen years. She knows where the bodies are buried. We must stress that that is a figure of speech.

Graham Quicks ...... Vincent Franklin
Audrey Carr ...... Rebekah Staton
Daniel Porter ...... Kieran Hodgson
Mrs Wilkins ...... Julia Deakin

Special guests:
Jonty............................Tom Crowley
Stephanie....................Catriona Knox
Pete Postlefake............Paul Shearer
The Policeman..............Paul Putner
The Passer-By..............Tessa Coates

With Jo Unwin as The Narrator

Written by Jack Bernhardt

Producer: David Tyler

A Pozzitive production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2015.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b06p4jks)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Across the Board (b04mb80d)
Series 2

Magnus Carlsen

Across The Board: a series of interviews conducted by Dominic Lawson over a game of chess. Today, Dominic takes on the world's greatest chess player, Magnus Carlsen - and asks whether it wouldn't be better for Magnus to put his extraordinary intelligence to another use.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b06pbw9z)
Black Friday, Deprivation of liberty safeguards, Overbooked flights

You & Yours has learned that some families of people with dementia, who die in care homes, are waiting weeks or even months for a burial, because of the rules affecting Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. These "DOLS" are intended to make sure that people are looked after in a way that does not overly restrict their freedom. But the law requires that an inquest is carried out, even when the cause of death is clear, and that has led to some lengthy and upsetting delays.

Black Friday is a shopping tradition in the United States and in the last few years it has become big in Britain too. It's a day at the end of November when high street stores kick-start the Christmas shopping season with a special day of discounts. Last year, some shoppers grabbed real bargains. But others had to face huge crowds and the police were called to several supermarkets when things got out of hand. But what is in it for the retailers? This year Asda and Jigsaw have said that they are opting out altogether and the police have warned the big stores that they must be sure to have enough staff and security ready to cope with the increased number of shoppers.

We know that airlines routinely overbook flights, selling more seats than they actually have on the plane. They do it because usually not everyone turns up to fly at the time they booked, and airlines like to fill all their seats. But what if it is a really special journey and you want to be sure everything goes smoothly? We hear from a You & Yours listener whose "once in a lifetime" holiday with her elderly mother ended in disappointment when they were turned away at the airport.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b06p4jkv)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b06pbxjp)
Two people have been killed -- and seven arrested -- after a gunfight in a Paris suburb where the man suspected of planning last week's attacks was thought to be hiding. We have the latest from Saint Denis.

Here at Westminster David Cameron has indicated he'd be prepared to launch air strikes against the Islamic State group in Syria without UN backing. We discuss that with our panel of MPs.

Jeremy Corbyn has told Ken Livingstone to apologise after he suggested a shadow minister with a history of depression should seek "psychiatric" help. We ask the former Mayor of London if he will.


WED 13:45 Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen (b06pbwb1)
Last Taboos

Lenny Henry talks to black British film director Isaac Julien about his work as an out-gay film-maker who has from the beginning of his career confronted issues of discrimination, police brutality, and homophobia within the African Caribbean community. With his film Young Soul Rebels, which he made in 1991, but which was set in 1977 against the backdrop of the Queen's Silver Jubilee, Julien depicted head-on the violence and hatred of homosexuals within British black society. How, today, have attitudes changed?

Series Consultant Michael Pearce
Producer Simon Elmes.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b06pb82x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b03w16g8)
Jonesy

by award-winning writer Tom Wells. Jamie gets the run of the BBC Radio Drama sound department to tell his own story - the heroic journey of Withernsea lad Jamie 'Jonesy' Jones from chronic asthma sufferer to graduate in GCSE PE.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b06pbwb3)
Money Box Live: The Payment Revolution

According to the boss of Apple, the next generation of children born in Britain will not know what money is.

The way we pay for things has changed more in the past 15 years than in the previous 150. Mobile payments, contactless cards, virtual currencies are all driving a revolution in how we pay

Whilst cash still accounts for about 85% of global consumer transactions, new technology means that you can shop without taking your wallet out of your pocket, send cash using your mobile phone number and even pay for your bus with a sticker.

Whilst these new ways to pay may be modern and efficient, exactly how secure are electronic payment systems and what about people without a bank account or a mobile phone?

Join Lesley Curwen and guests. E-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now or call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday.

Panel:
Neil Aitken, Payments UK
Paul Horlock, Head of Payments, Nationwide.
Matt Hammerstein, Head of Customer and Client Experience, Barclays
Kebbie Sebastian, Managing Director, Penser Consulting

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b06pb835)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b06pbwb5)
Elite jobs, Hairdresser craft

How elite students get elite jobs. Lauren Rivera, Associate Professor of Management and Organisation at Northwestern University's Kellog School of Management, discusses her study into the hiring practices of top investment banks, consultancies and law firms. Do America's elite keep the top jobs for people just like themselves? Louise Ashley, Lecturer in Management Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London, adds a British perspective.

Also, hairdressing as craft. Dr Helen Holmes, Hallsworth Research Fellow at the University of Manchester, argues that the craft of such service work is obscured by the intangibility of the product, as well as the fact that it is a female dominated profession.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b06pbwb7)
Media coverage of events in Paris, Tory MP Jesse Norman on BBC Studio concerns

A series of co-ordinated attacks in Paris on Friday night have resulted in the deaths of at least 129 people. Media outlets quickly mobilized with blanket coverage across television, radio, newspapers and social media. How do the news media outlet co-ordinate and respond to such a breaking and dangerous situation? How do you decide what is a proportionate amount of coverage? And with so many unconfirmed reports, how can you be sure of the reliability of your story? Steve Hewlett discusses the pitfalls and challenges with a panel of guests; John McAndrew from Sky News', the BBC's Gavin Allen, Professor of TV journalism Stewart Purvis, Jeremy Griffin from The Times and Ryan Broderick from Buzzfeed UK.

The chair of the Commons culture, media and sport select committee has written to BBC director general Tony Hall about his concern over the corporation's plans to spin off its TV production arm into a separate commercial unit and create BBC Studios. Conservative MP Jesse Norman, who replaced John Whittingdale in May, says he has asked Lord Hall about the impact on commercial rivals and the production sector. He tells Steve Hewlett why its important for the public to be fully consulted over the creation of the new subsidiary.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b06pbwbk)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06p4jkx)
2 suspects killed in anti-terror operation in Paris. Livingstone apologises in psychiatric help row. All coal-fired power stations to close.


WED 18:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b06pbwzh)
Series 3

Broadband on the Run

Tom and his Dad fret about some potentially uncomfortable brushes with the law while Mum prepares for the arrival of a new lodger.

Series 3 of the sitcom where Tom Wrigglesworth phones home for his weekly check-in with his Mum, Dad and Gran - giving us a glimpse into his background and influences shaping his temperament, opinions and hang-ups.

Tom ...... Tom Wrigglesworth
Granny ...... Elizabeth Bennett
Dad ...... Paul Copley
Mum ...... Kate Anthony

With Chris Pavlo.

Written by Tom Wrigglesworth and James Kettle. With Miles Jupp.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in November 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b06pbwzk)
Toby and Rex are chuffed to have their licence, so they can press on with the geese. Toby tries to get Pip to go out with him - he also wants to go in with her and Adam with the share-farming business, offering to ease the burden by supplying fifty cattle of their own. But Rex is keen to stay focused on poultry.

Jill's settling back in at Brookfield and Ruth reminds her she doesn't have to tidy everything, as Jill rearranges the cupboards back to how she recognizes things. Ruth is still busy with paperwork and details for Heather's estate. She's disappointed to find out that Jez, the new AI man, has been and gone. Ruth finds herself feeling constantly not needed whilst trying to be useful. As Ruth focuses on her paperwork, Pip and David agree they're a bit worried about her. David tries to cheer Ruth up by telling her how good she has always been with the calves.

Ruth also finds out about Jill and Pip having champagne together as a mini celebration when David and Ruth were away. Jill reminds everyone they should have that celebration they had to put off - the nice meal. David looks forward to more success off the back of Pip's graduation, but Ruth seems to have mixed feelings as she and David look to the future ("whatever it may hold", says Ruth).


WED 19:15 Front Row (b06pbwzm)
Samuel Pepys, Jon Savage, Dana Fouras and Russell Maliphant

Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution, is the largest ever exhibition about the famous 17th-century diarist which takes a look at the time in which Pepys lived, from the execution of Charles I through the rule of Cromwell to the reinstatement of the monarchy with Charles II, all happening alongside plague, the Great Fire and war. John Wilson talks to the two curators, Robert Blyth and Kristian Martin.

Music historian Jon Savage discusses his new novel 1966: The Year The Decade Exploded. In it he argues that the events of 1966 - including the developments in the civil and women rights movements, the escalation of the Vietnam War, and the availability of LSD - resulted in an explosion of creativity which can be traced through the music charts from The Stones' 19th Nervous Breakdown to The Four Tops' Reach Out and I'll be There.

Dancer Dana Fouras on her return to the stage after almost 15 years, as her husband, the choreographer Russell Maliphant celebrates the 20th anniversary of his close artistic collaboration with lighting designer Michael Hulls.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pbtyk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b06pbwzp)
Islamic Terrorism

Perhaps one of the truly shocking things to come out of the events in Paris this week is that the security services were expecting a mass casualty terrorist attack and there are almost certain to be more of them in the future. Does the nature of modern terrorism mean we now have to change our way of life including what many regard as our fundamental liberal values? Does the threat mean that we all have to accept less freedom and more surveillance? Does the Muslim community have to accept that inevitably they will be subject to more scrutiny? President Hollande has said that France will destroy IS and there are those who see Islamic terrorism as an existential threat to our civilisation. But in our rush to arms and the moral barricades are we in danger of sacrificing the core values that our societies have been built on? The Moral Maze has been following the issue of Islamic terrorism, fundamentalism and how we should react to it since 1994. Paris has now been added to the list that already includes London, Madrid and many others over those years. This week we'll be inviting back witnesses who've appeared on our programme about this issue over the decades to take an historical perspective and to ask "where we go from here?" Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox, Michael Portillo and Anne McElvoy. Witnesses are Inayat Bunglawala, Simon Jenkins, Dr Taj Hargey and Edward Lucas.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b06pbwzr)
Democratising Education

Rachel Roberts argues that education needs a democratic revolution.

Rachel describes her own experiences in democratic schools - as a student, teacher, and now educational consultant. And she argues that even if every school won't make the transition to the full kind of radical democracy she enjoyed, every school - and every student - can benefit from the democratic ethos.

Producer: Katie Langton.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b06pb74d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b06pbtyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b06pbwzt)
St Denis Raid - Eight Arrested, Two Dead

"Mastermind" still missing; Has Paris "changed everything" ?; Ken Livingstone apology.


WED 22:45 Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal (b06qnn2q)
Episode 8

With McCarthyism reaching fever pitch in 1950s America, Peter Sargeant - a dashing PR man - is hired by the Grand St Petersburg ballet to fend off rumours that their star choreographer is a communist. But New York's ballet world is shocked when, on the opening night, the lead ballerina plummets to her death from a wire, maintaining her classical pose in the 'fifth position' as she hits the floor.

Gore Vidal's earlier novel The City and the Pillar was published in 1948 when the author was 23 years old. Its central story of a homosexual relationship caused such a scandal that the New York Times book critic refused to review any book by Gore Vidal. Others followed his lead and the author found himself at a loss as to how to continue to earn a living through his pen until a publisher suggested that he turn his hand to writing under a different name. Death In the Fifth Position was published in 1952 - the first of a trio of entertainments featuring Peter Cutler Sargeant II as a publicist turned private eye.

Episode 8:
A third death has abruptly re-opened the murder inquiry. Peter Sargeant feels impelled to take action to keep Jane clear of the accusing eye of Detective Gleason.

Written by Edgar Box (Gore Vidal)
Read by Jamie Parker

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:00 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (b06pbxjr)
Series 2

Lorna's Holiday

by Jenny Eclair

Lorna ..... Lesley Sharp

As Lorna recuperates in a five star hotel in Dubrovnik she acidly observes the two families staying in the villa next door, but what she sees threatens her own future as well as theirs.


Producer, Sally Avens


WED 23:15 Warhorses of Letters (b03s6jv7)
Series 3

Episode 3

Comedy by Robbie Hudson and Marie Phillips

Stephen Fry and Daniel Rigby star as Napoleon's horse Marengo and Wellington's horse Copenhagen in the moving epistolary tale of two horses deeply in love but sundered by history. With an introduction by Tamsin Greig.

This week artistic differences threaten to destroy our heroes' love for each-other as both attempt to find fame as writers. But is the literary horse public ready for Marengo's experimental, Proustian and incredibly long exploration of what it is to be a horse? Or is there more of a market for Copenhagen's rather racier "Fifty Shades of Hay"?

Produced by Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06pbxjt)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster, as the prime minister indicates his willingness to use military force against the group Islamic State in Syria.

And MPs express concern about the arrest of a former member of the Parachute Regiment in connection with the events of Bloody Sunday.



THURSDAY 19 NOVEMBER 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b06p4jm1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b06pbtyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jm3)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06p4jm5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jm7)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b06p4jm9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06r5dgq)
Prayer for the Day

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tony Macauley


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b06pd39x)
Judicial review on pollution, Farmers' views on EU, English wine

Environmental and angling groups are taking the government to court, amid claims it isn't doing enough to protect our rivers. Campaigners say Defra is failing in its duty to protect watercourses from agricultural pollution. A two-day judicial review gets underway today.

For British farmers who depend on subsidies from Brussels and export markets in Europe, the result of the forthcoming referendum on EU membership will be particularly important. Agricultural bodies around the country are already holding events to discuss the pros and cons. Vernon Harwood reports from an EU debate at the Three Counties Showground in Worcestershire.

And as part of Farming Today's week-long look at alcohol production in the British countryside, Sarah Swadling visits a Devon vineyard which has been making wine for more than twenty-five years.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0hgk)
Eastern Orphean Warbler

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the eastern orphean warbler in an olive grove near Athens. Until recently there used to be just a single species of Orphean Warbler; a summer visitor to southern Europe, North Africa and western Asia: a handsome bird much like a large blackcap with a white throat and greyish-brown back. But across the wide breeding range which stretches from Portugal to Pakistan some orphean warblers look and sound different. Those east of Italy tend to be subtly greyer above and paler beneath. And the songs of birds from Greece eastwards are longer and richer, often including the richness of nightingale like notes. These slight differences have persuaded many ornithologists that the Eastern Orphean warbler is a different species to the Western Orphean Warbler. Biologists call this "splitting "although exactly where these new species boundaries lie is a moot point.


THU 06:00 Today (b06pd3b3)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b06pd3b9)
Emma

"Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her." So begins Emma by Jane Austen, describing her leading character who, she said, was "a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like." Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss this, one of Austen's most popular novels and arguably her masterpiece, a brilliantly sparkling comedy of manners published in December 1815 by John Murray, the last to be published in Austen's lifetime. This followed Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Mansfield Park (1814), with her brother Henry handling publication of Northanger Abbey and Persuasion (1817).

With

Janet Todd
Professor Emerita of Literature, University of Aberdeen and Honorary Fellow of Newnham College, Cambridge

John Mullan
Professor of English at University College, London

And

Emma Clery
Professor of English at the University of Southampton.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b06pd3bc)
Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink

Pop Star Period

Elvis Costello, one of the greatest and most influential singer-songwriters, reads his witty, frank and very irreverent take on 40 years at the top of the music business.
Born Declan Patrick MacManus in London in 1954, Elvis Costello was raised in London and Liverpool, the grandson of a trumpet player and son of dance-band singer. At twenty-four he had his first record deal as part of the the first wave of the British punk and new wave. Costello's album, 'My Aim Is True', was a huge hit, and with his band, The Attractions, he went on to record some of the most influential albums in the 1980s and 90s. Known for his lyricism, and with a reputation as something of an 'angry young man', he has gone on to become one of he elder statesmen of pop, collaborating with many music legends, including Burt Bacharach, Johnny Cash and Van Morrison.
Today, a persona is created, a band is formed, and the idiosyncrasies of Top of the Pops are endured.
Written and read by Elvis Costello
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Richard Hamilton.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06r8t1z)
Business of beauty, Portugal politics, Men and appearance, Geling Yan

Why the British beauty industry is worth an estimated £9 billion - Vivienne Rudd, Director of Global Innovation and Insights at market analysts Mintel and Telegraph beauty editor Sonia Haria discuss the money made from products.

Portugal and women in politics - Alison Roberts, BBC correspondent in Lisbon talks about the success of Left Bloc party and its high profile women.

Chinese novelist Geling Yan on new book Little Aunt Crane.

Three young men discuss how their anxieties over appearance have affected their lives.

Innovation in the kitchen - Catherine Carr reports on why the Americans still use the cup measurement system to make their traditional brownies and pancakes, with food writer Bee Wilson.

Jane Garvey talks to three young men about how appearance has impacted on their lives.

Presenter: Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pd3bk)
How Does That Make You Feel?

Episode 4

Philip is back following a worrying 'reading glasses incident' where he was mistakenly taking his mother's blood pressure pills and she his tranquilising medication. With a new lease on life, although still living in his mother's house, Philip tells his therapist Martha about his recent visit to a writer's retreat in Yorkshire.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish', recently heard on Radio 4. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'. She wrote Enid (the life of Enid Blyton) for BBC4 and Shirley (the Shirley Bassey story) for BBC2.

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b06pd3bp)
The Drugs Mules of the Andes

Peru is the world's largest producer of cocaine. A staggering one-third of it travels on foot, on the backs of young men like Daniel. He is 18, full of bravado, and claims he does this work so he will be able to go to university and take care of his family. Daniel is one of thousands known as 'mochileros' - backpackers, in Spanish - who hike their illicit cargo from the tropical valley where most of Peru's coca is produced, up to Andean towns, out towards the border with Brazil, and to clandestine airstrips.

For Crossing Continents Linda Pressly meets the 'mochileros' who are mostly young men from isolated, peasant villages. They have grown up in coca-growing communities that suffered some of the worst atrocities of Peru's dirty war with Shining Path rebels in the 1990s. All of them do it for the money - payments of hundreds of dollars in a region where the incidence of poverty is more than twice the national average.

It is a perilous occupation. Armed gangs, a re-emerging Shining Path, the military and police all conspire to stop or control the trade. Daniel says that on every trip he makes, three or four young men will die. Highland prisons are bursting with mochileros who were caught, but in many ways they are the lucky ones - others die on the trails, their bodies devoured by wild animals.

The Drug Mules of the Andes tells the story of the 'mochileros', their families and the Peruvian authorities charged with interdiction.


THU 11:30 When Stockhausen Came to Huddersfield (b06pd3bt)
Ian McMillan finds out what happened when the controversial German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen's visit to the 1988 Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival nearly ended in disaster. This super star of the Avant Garde, who featured on the front cover of the Beatles Sergeant Pepper album, had been shocking audiences since the 1950's with his dazzling compositions. He was lured to the quiet West Riding mill town for its 10th anniversary festival, because the South Bank in London couldn't provide the rehearsal time and a suitable venue for his composition, Sternklang or 'Star Sound'. The Festival Director Richard Steinitz had promised him the cavernous council owned sports hall for the performance, which was turned into an indoor park for the occasion, complete with Christmas trees and artificial turf. While setting up for a concert in Huddersfield Town Hall part of the ceiling fell onto Stockhausen's mixing desk and narrowly missed injuring the great man himself. During his visit Stockhausen developed a taste for the local curry house, bought ear plugs to get to sleep in the railway hotel and invited local people to get ready for 'visitors from outer-space'. His reputation had gone before him, and he didn't disappoint those who were lucky enough to be there. The visit put the festival on the map, and has become part of local folklore. Ian is joined by the writer and broadcaster Robert Worby, the then Festival Director Richard Steinitz, Technical Manager Steve Taylor, musician Peter Britton who trained the student performers, and Jim Pywell who was a music student at the Polytechnic at the time.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b06p4jmc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Across the Board (b04md54h)
Series 2

Sigrid Rausing

Across The Board: a series of interviews conducted by Dominic Lawson over a game of chess. Today Dominic takes on one of Britain's leading philanthropists, Sigrid Rausing, who plays chess every day with her husband.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b06pmj9t)
VW emissions, Cinema trends, Tube map makeover, Affordable bridalwear

The owners of well over a million vehicles in the UK are caught up in the Volkswagen emissions scandal. We're looking at how the promised fix might affect them and their cars.

Cinema survived the age of the video cassette but streaming services like Netflix are posing a new threat. We report on how the industry hopes to keep us going to the movies.

And London's iconic tube map has had a makeover to keep walkers happy. We're putting it to the test.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b06p4jmf)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06pmj9w)
The French authorities have announced that the man they believe masterminded the attacks on Friday, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, was killed in yesterday's police operation in Paris. Junior doctors in England have voted overwhelmingly in favour of going on strike - we hear from the BMA and Con chair of Health Select Comm. A Libyan man has been arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to murder PC Yvonne Fletcher in London 31 years ago. And Spencer Livermore, Labour's last General Election Co-ordinator has accused Jeremy Corbyn of "failing to learn the lessons of why Labour lost in 2015" and has told us that unless he does, the Labour party "will lose in 2020".


THU 13:45 Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen (b06pd3c0)
African Accents

Lenny Henry investigates the sudden blossoming of new black British theatrical voices whose roots are not in the Caribbean but in Africa. From Nigeria via Peckham and Hastings comes the energetic talent of Bola Agbaje whose play Gone Too Far triumphed at London's Royal Court Theatre, winning an Olivier award in 2008 before being filmed for the big screen, with a slew of new work since. "Writing is easy" she tells Lenny Henry ...and, she says, it all came about only because she managed to squeeze a place on a Royal Court writers' scheme on the day applications closed.

Series Consultant Michael Pearce
Producer Simon Elmes.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b06pbwzk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b06pd8rv)
Not Now

By David Ireland.

It's 2:15. Kyle's just buried his father. He loved his Dad but it's his Uncle he's always looked up to. What happens during the next 45 minutes will change all that forever.

A darkly funny drama about sexual and social relations by one of Belfast's hottest young writers.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b06pd8rx)
Prehistoric Gower

Writer Iain Sinclair seeks the UK's oldest burial site in a cave along south Gower's windy clifftops. The 'Red Lady of Paviland' was interred in a cave 26,000 years ago, the bones decorated with red ochre. But, as he tells Helen Mark, "she" was in fact a he, buried with jewellery and alongside a mammoth's skull. This was at a time when the Bristol Channel was a tundra landscape.

Best known for his psychogeographic journeyings through unloved modern landscapes and wastelands, such as the M25 perimeter, Sinclair explains to Helen why he's drawn back to the ancient past in this part of south Wales, a place of childhood holidays, and the subject of his latest book, 'Black Apples of Gower'.

He's joined by archaeologist Ffion Reynolds, who's a specialist in prehistoric sites, and antiquarian bookseller Jeff Towns.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b06p4ln9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b06p56zr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b06pdcdy)
How I Pitched To Steven Spielberg, and Barbara Broccoli on Life Beyond Bond

With Francine Stock

James Bond producer Barbara Broccoli explains why she's just produced a film called Radiator, about a middle-aged man caring for his two elderly parents that was made for less than one percent of the budget of Spectre, and why not all films should be made for teenage boys.

Bridge Of Spies scribe Matt Charman reveals why he took off his clothes to pitch his Cold War spy thriller to Steven Spielberg on the phone.

A rare showing of a 13 hour French movie that was totally improvised, Out 1, is playing soon in a West End cinema. Francine is granted a private screening and reports back from her marathon viewing session - was it all worth it and more importantly, will she ever recover the feeling in her legs ?

And there's an opportunity for listeners to write their own coda to Brief Encounter - what Alec did next...


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b06pdcf0)
Antarctic ice sheet instability, Groundwater, Accents, Fluorescent coral

Antarctic ice-sheet instability
A new study models how the ice sheets in Antarctica will react if greenhouse gases rise at a medium to high rate. They predict the most likely outcome is a rise in global sea level of about 10cm by 2100. Previous research had put this figure at 30cm: this has not been ruled out by the new research, but it's been ruled much less likely.

Groundwater
The Earth's groundwater has been quantified - it's estimated to be 23 million cubic km. (which is equivalent to the Earth's entire land surface covered in a layer some 180m deep.) However, just 6% of the water is available for our use and to take part in the hydrogeological cycle. That small fraction is referred to as "modern" groundwater: it is extractable because it is near the surface, and can be used to supplement above-ground resources in rivers and lakes. But it's also the most sensitive to over use, climate change and to human contamination.

Fluorescent coral
Adam visits the National Oceanographic Centre in Southampton to see some fluorescent corals and asks how they can be utilised for medical imaging.

Accents
How are our accents changing? A three year study at University of Glasgow has found that Scottish accents haven't changed as much as English accents (which have become much more homogenised over the past 100 years). By listening to recordings from first World War Scottish prisoners of war, the Sounds of the City project has noticed that changes to Glaswegian accents have occurred over a much longer time frame than previously thought. But these changes have occurred locally - not in the same way or to the extent that it is thought English accents have evolved.

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b06ppk4w)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06p4jmh)
R4 1800 19 November 2015

French authorities say the man who they believe planned the attacks on Paris is dead. They say Abdelhamid Abaaoud was killed in yesterday's police operation in a northern suburb.


THU 18:30 Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section (b01rfy5w)
Series 2

With Doc Brown

Comedy show hosted by Alex Horne and his five piece band and specially written, original music.

This episode explores the theme of children including songs on George Formby, the alphabet and Rastafarians. Guest starring Doc Brown who raps with the band and talks to whales.

Guest starring comedian Doc Brown.

Alex's Horne Section are:

Trumpet/banjo .... Joe Auckland
Saxophone/clarinet ....Mark Brown
Double Bass/Bass .... Will Collier
Drums and Percussion .... Ben Reynolds
Piano/keyboard .... Ed Sheldrake

Producer: Julia McKenzie.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2013.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b06pdcf2)
Rob doesn't fancy attending Adam and Ian's wedding in December, telling Helen it would be rather hypocritical given Adam's roving eye and track record - he mentions Charlie Thomas "sniffing around" and how awful it would be for Ian if Ian ever found out. Although with that in mind, Rob can see why Ian would want to secure Adam in marriage.

Helen rushes to collect Henry, worried about being late and upsetting Rob, and has a minor car accident. Rob's concerned about Helen and the baby's safety. Thinking of the Helen's incident with Mike Tucker years ago, Pat persuades Helen to stop driving for the time being at least.

Meanwhile, the ad is in the Echo announcing the opening of the new Bridge Farm shop.
Peggy talks to Hazel on Clarrie's behalf. Hazel won't budge over evicting the Grundys, but says the village shop can open whenever Susan likes - she's rather indifferent to it.

Desperate for somewhere to live, Eddie and Clarrie look at flats - but Clarrie doesn't like any. The only one they can afford is tiny. They face up to the fact that Joe may have to go in to a home.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b06pdcf4)
Cate Blanchett, Enya, Bruntwood Prize winner

Oscar-winning actor Cate Blanchett discusses her role in Todd Haynes' new film Carol, based on a Patricia Highsmith novel about an affair between a 1950s American housewife and a shop assistant (Rooney Mara).

With 75m sales and four Grammy Awards to her name, Enya releases her new album Dark Sky Island. It's inspired by the poetry of Roma Ryan which takes islands as its theme, and specifically the Channel Island of Sark - designated the world's first dark sky island.

Katherine Soper won this year's Bruntwood Prize for playwriting, Britain's biggest competition of its kind, with her play Wish List. She discusses her play which centres on the loving relationship between a brother with OCD and a sister struggling to keep her zero-hour contract.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Rebecca Armstrong.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pd3bk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Paris: Could It Happen Here? (b06rywqs)
David Cameron says seven terrorist plots have been thwarted in the UK this year alone. Mass casualty attacks, like those seen in Paris, are on the agenda too according to the head of MI5.

What is going on in the communities from which this largely "homegrown" threat has emerged? In an attempt to understand, Edward Stourton gathers a group of Muslim journalists with grassroots knowledge.

Contributors:

Sabbiyyah Pervez

Mobeen Azhar

Fayaz Rizvi

Secunder Kermani

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b06pdcf6)
The Northern Powerhouse

Can the Northern Powerhouse solve Britain's North-South economic divide? For now, the Northern Powerhouse is a concept: an idea that towns and cities in the north can unite, forming their own economic hub to rival London and the south east. So how to turn it into a reality? Evan Davis and guests are with an audience at the Greater Manchester Chamber of Commerce to discuss what kind of businesses will settle in the north of England and what needs to be done to encourage them to make the move. They'll talk about the frustrations of poor transport links, the joys of green spaces and the reasons why businesses like to cluster.

Guests:
Wayne Hemingway, Designer and entrepreneur, Hemingway Design
Vanda Murray, an Independent Director, Manchester Airports Group
Sir Richard Leese, Leader, Manchester City Council and Chair, Transport for the North
Jo York, co-founder, Reframed TV

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b06pdcf0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b06pd3b9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b06pdcf8)
France confirms death of man thought to be organiser of Friday's massacre in Paris

The latest on the Paris terror attacks - and will junior doctors go on strike?


THU 22:45 Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal (b06qrmw8)
Episode 9

With McCarthyism reaching fever pitch in 1950s America, Peter Sargeant - a dashing PR man - is hired by the Grand St Petersburg ballet to fend off rumours that their star choreographer is a communist. But New York's ballet world is shocked when, on the opening night, the lead ballerina plummets to her death from a wire, maintaining her classical pose in the 'fifth position' as she hits the floor.

Gore Vidal's earlier novel The City and the Pillar was published in 1948 when the author was 23 years old. Its central story of a homosexual relationship caused such a scandal that the New York Times book critic refused to review any book by Gore Vidal. Others followed his lead and the author found himself at a loss as to how to continue to earn a living through his pen until a publisher suggested that he turn his hand to writing under a different name. Death In the Fifth Position was published in 1952 - the first of a trio of entertainments featuring Peter Cutler Sargeant II as a publicist turned private eye.

Episode 9:
The body count has reached three. Peter Sargeant is desperate to find out the truth and has begun to interview his list of suspects. But the clock is ticking as Detective Gleason seems about to make an arrest and, despite the lack of evidence, Peter’s girlfriend Jane Garden looks to be the likely candidate. Peter has already talked to Anna Eglanova who is convinced that Alyosha had a hand in Ella's death. Next he visits Jed Wilbur at home.

Written by Edgar Box (Gore Vidal)
Read by Jamie Parker

Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


THU 23:00 Jon Ronson On (b01rlrjz)
Series 7

11:11

Writer and documentary maker Jon Ronson returns for another five-part series of fascinating stories shedding light on the human condition.

In the first programme, he investigates confirmation bias - or why so many people look for evidence that confirms their pre-existing beliefs.

Jon believes he may be susceptible to confirmation bias himself. Over the last two years he has kept noticing that the time on his phone is 11.11. After looking on the internet, he found out there are many other people also doing this, including Uri Geller who first started noticing the number 11 over twenty years ago. Jon has also discovered that a particular community of people believe 11.11 is a sign for a new spirit guide who will come to earth, coincidentally known as Monjoronson. He speaks to the owner of the Monjoronson web domain, Ron Besser, and asks if it is possible that Jon himself is the spirit guide they're looking for.

Jon talks to other people who have been affected by confirmation bias, including an Oxford academic who believes her fate can be determined by looking at two lip balm pots.

The journalist David Aaronovitch says he believed the delusions he had while suffering intensive care psychosis after a routine operation were real.

Lotfi Raissi, the first person to be charged in connection with the September 11th attacks, tells Jon he believes his arrest was down to confirmation bias because he fitted a certain profile. A judge found there was no evidence to link Raissi to any form of terrorism.

Finally Jon speaks to the lawyer Clive Stafford Smith, who believes people who are prone to confirmation bias are more likely to be recruited to police forces.

Producer: Lucy Greenwell
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06pdcfb)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster as MPs back the deal to prevent the collapse of the power-sharing executive at Stormont and a minister defends the grants to the failed charity, Kids Company.
MPs press the Energy Secretary over plans to phase-out the UK's coal-fired power stations and mark International Men's Day with a debate on the high rate of male suicide.



FRIDAY 20 NOVEMBER 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b06p4jnk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b06pd3bc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jnp)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06p4jnr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06p4jnt)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b06p4jnw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06r9j65)
Prayer for the Day

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tony Macauley


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b06pdck2)
Antibiotics, Cider production, GM salmon, Sheep dip poisoning

Farmers who believe exposure to sheep dip has damaged their health have been meeting the Farming Minister George Eustice, to push for recognition of their problems. Until 1992, the use of sheep dip containing organophosphates was compulsory. It meant hundreds of sheep farmers were repeatedly exposed to the chemical, and many now believe that caused neurological damage and long-term health problems. Charlotte Smith hears from Paul Wright, who used to farm on the Lancashire/Yorkshire border. He's now retired, for health reasons.

Antibiotics have been in the headlines this week, with the frightening discovery of bacteria which have become resistant to the "drug of last resort". Should the farming industry be doing more to cut down its usage of antibiotics? Charlotte hears from the two organisations with views on the subject: the Alliance to Save our Antibiotics, a campaign group which aims to limit antibiotic use in UK farming, and RUMA - the Responsible Use of Medicines in Agriculture Alliance.

Genetically modified salmon has been approved by the American Food and Drug Administration. The Atlantic salmon has been modified with genes from other fish, so that it grows more quickly than other farmed salmon. Helen Briggs from the BBC's science team explains what the development means.

And as we conclude our week-long look at alcohol production on UK farms, Sally Challoner finds out how the cider harvest has been going.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sylr1)
Red-crowned Crane

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the red-crowned crane from Japan and Asia. Backlit by a Japanese winter sun, huge black and white birds dance for an audience. Their plumage mirrors the dazzling snow and dark tree-trunks. The only spots of colour are crimson - the caps of these Red-crowned Cranes. Red-crowned Cranes breed only in far-eastern Russia. Tall, majestic and very vocal, red-crowned cranes gather in groups to reinforce pair-bonds, by leaping into the air and fluttering their 2.5 metre wings, sometimes holding sticks or twigs in their long bills. During winter months, the cranes are fed with grain, and receive a stream of captivated visitors. In front of a wall of clicking camera shutters, the cranes perform their elaborate dance, to delight their captivated audience.


FRI 06:00 Today (b06pddgx)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b06p4nph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b06pddgz)
Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink

Diving for Pearls

Elvis Costello, one of the UK's greatest and most influential singer-songwriters, reads the final part of his witty, frank and very irreverent take on 40 years at the top of the music business.
Born Declan Patrick MacManus in London in 1954, Elvis Costello was raised in London and Liverpool, the grandson of a trumpet player and son of dance-band singer. At twenty-four he had his first record deal and was at the forefront of the the first wave of the British punk and new wave. Costello's album, 'My Aim Is True', was a huge hit, and with his band, The Attractions, he went on to record some of the most influential albums in the 1980s and 90s. He has since gone on to collaborate with some of the greats in music this century, including Burt Bacharach, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan and Van Morrison.
Today, infamy in the US, and protest songs at home.
Written and read by Elvis Costello
Producer: Justine Willett
Abridger: Richard Hamilton.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06pnp3s)
Kate Winslet - The Dressmaker

Kate Winslet on her new film The Dressmaker - what it's like having to perfect accents - and why she wants to shield her children from social media...

One in five Conservative MPs is female, an increase claimed in part by Women2Win, a campaign set up ten years ago to get more women at Westminster. The party still lies behind Labour and the SNP in percentages of women in parliament so are there plans to boost numbers without positive action such as all-women shortlists? a question for W2W co-chairwoman Baroness Anne Jenkin.

We continue our series on appearance. We've been talking to a number of men and women, boys and girls about their own beauty regimes and how they see themselves. Today it's the turn of women in their 80's and 90's

Plus inspired by an article written by Caitlin Moran about using cards to give compliments to strangers, we did a little experiment and tried it out on the streets of London, and talk to Caitlin about why she thinks it's a good idea.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Beverley Purcell.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pddh1)
How Does That Make You Feel?

Episode 5

Richard tells his therapist Martha about his recent date at a Korean/Swedish fusion restaurant. However this latest romantic failure and the news that his son Toby has sold one of his kidneys online might just be enough to push him over the edge...

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish', recently heard on Radio 4. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'. She wrote Enid (the life of Enid Blyton) for BBC4 and Shirley (the Shirley Bassey story) for BBC2.

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b06pddh3)
Series 21

Goodbye to Boleyn

The Boleyn Ground, Upton Park. Home to West Ham since 1904. No one would call the stadium, or indeed the streets that closely bind it in the borough of Newham, beautiful but it has echoed to one of football's oldest anthems 'I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles' since the 1920's. Now that song and the stones & grass that have been an arena for legends like Hurst, Moore & Peters will not just fade and die but be demolished. Very soon the club will move from E13 to E20 & the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, no longer owners but tenants in a very different space. Match days around Green Street and the other roads that bind the stadium to the area will be like every other day. But for these last few months the pavements still reverberate to the returning tribes of Essex, their family ties strong in a place that has greatly changed since Bobby Moore and his other '66 immortals made West Ham a global name.

Amidst the throng on match day, Alan Dein weaves his way through the streets to chronicle lives enfolded by the stadium. On the corner of the ground stands Our Lady of Compassion, in fact it was the church that originally sold the ground to the club. Now their Saturday services are shaped by the footfall of match day. Directly opposite the stadium live two nuns with a new found affinity for the Claret & Blue. Standing on a step ladder, shouting to the arriving crowds a scary looking skinhead offers wise insight into the passing of time and place. Inside Queen's Market, flogging his apples and pears, Bradley is waiting until the clock hits 2.30 before he pulls on his replica shirt and dives out into the thickening crowds making their way towards the big match.

Producer: Mark Burman.


FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Double Acts (b06pddh5)
Series 1

Hot Desk

For a few minutes, twice a day, at precisely seven in the morning and seven in the evening, a receptionist and a security guard meet to swap ownership of a desk.

Mathew Baynton and Jenny Bede star in the last of six two-handers written by Cabin Pressure's John Finnemore.

Written by John Finnemore

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b06p4jny)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Across the Board (b05sy63d)
Series 3

Piers Morgan

Across The Board is a series of interviews conducted over a game of chess. In this programme Dominic Lawson talks to the outspoken journalist and broadcaster Piers Morgan. The game turns out to be a brutal affair.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b06pddh7)
Wheelchair-accessible buses, Leasing a car, Organ donation

In a survey, nine out of ten wheelchair users said they had been refused space when they tried to get on a bus, and over half said they had experienced rudeness or intimidation from drivers. We speak to the charity, Leonard Cheshire Disability, who carried out the survey and First Bus about what needs to be done to make bus travel easier for disabled people.

Lease to buy, or straightforward leasing deals have made it easier than ever to drive a new car, and in September alone we spent more than two billion pounds on new cars through such deals. But are they as good value as they look?

One in ten people on the organ transplant list will die before a suitable organ is found for them. More than 7,000 people are currently on the waiting list. We hear from one patient desperately hoping for a new kidney.

An alternative tipple to go with the weekend curry - the Indian wine that could soon be spicing up our dinner tables.

The rise of digital radio - could we ever see the FM signal switched off?

How do landlord licensing schemes protect tenants from rogue landlords?

Producer: Cecile Wright
Presenter: Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b06p4jp0)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b06pddx3)
Jihadists have stormed a luxury hotel in Mali and are holding around 100 people hostage. We hear from eyewitnesses, and hear analysis about French military involvement in the region.

As European Union ministers meet to discuss what should happen to Europe's borders following the Paris attacks we hear from the Front National, who are calling for France to re-instate more stringent border checks. Our reporter Manveen Rana, who has been travelling from Jordan to Northern Europe with a refugee family tells us about the lax border controls they have encountered on the way, and we hear the latest episode in the family's journey.

After a torrid week for the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, one of his shadow cabinet allies - Jon Trickett - tells us about turbulence in the party and some intriguing details behind one of this week's rows.


FRI 13:45 Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen (b06pddx5)
Post-Black

In the last of his programmes tracing a century of black British theatre and screen, Lenny Henry explores the prospects for black British theatre and screen. He talks to black British film-director and creative artist Steve McQueen, who was the first ever black director to win an Academy Award for Best Picture - and who's also a proud winner of the Turner Prize for art. Lenny hears about Steve's new project for BBC television, a grand sweeping story of an African Caribbean family growing up across three decades from the late 1960s.

Also taking part in this assessment of the future shape of their art are director and playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah, theatre director Michael Buffong and writer Roy Williams.

Series consultant Michael Pearce
Producer Simon Elmes.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b06pdcf2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b06pdjgg)
Puellae - Or the Truth About Chips and Other Things

In Nalini Chetty's comic drama two friends meet in a wine bar during the Edinburgh Festival before going to see a show on the Fringe. Sixteen years after leaving St Myrtles School for Girls, Neve and Tess gossip about their school-days, diets, old boyfriends and political ideals, lost or discarded. As one bottle of wine leads to another - and with the Fringe show forgotten - the veneer of contentment at their well-balanced lives gradually disintegrates.

Producer/director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06pdjgm)
Westonbirt Arboretum

Peter Gibbs hosts a tree special from Westonbirt Arboretum.

Chris Beardshaw, Anne Swithinbank and Bob Flowerdew answer the questions.

This week the panellists delve into the postbag to catch up on some queries about trees from GQT listeners in the UK and abroad.

Also, Chris Beardshaw meets with staff at Westonbirt to discuss the 2050 Glade project which trials plants from different provenances to see how they perform in a changing climate.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 e=mc2 (b06pdjgt)
Ian Sansom - The Twin Paradox

It's the day of the first manned mission to Mars.

As Commander Carl Ehrlich's twin brother Kevin awaits the final countdown in a local bar it seems the mission just might offer him the perfect means of gaining some long-awaited one-upmanship on his internationally-renowned, hugely successful, ever-so-slightly older brother!

Taking inspiration from Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, Ian Sansom discovers it's all relative in his story of sibling rivalry and space travel.

Read by Trevor White

Writer ..... Ian Sansom

Producer: Heather Larmour

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2015.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b06pdjh0)
Roy Dommett, Warren Mitchell, Allen Toussaint, Cynthia Payne and Jonah Lomu

Matthew Bannister on

Roy Dommett, one of the UK's leading rocket scientists who was also a well known morris dancer.

Warren Mitchell, the actor best known for playing Alf Garnett in the TV sit com "Till Death Us Do Part"

Allen Toussaint, the New Orleans producer and musician who worked with many of the great names in rock.

Cynthia Payne, who ran a brothel at her home in Streatham where men exchanged luncheon vouchers for sex.

And Jonah Lomu, the rugby player who won 63 caps for the All Blacks and scored 37 international tries.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b06pdjh3)
Paris Attacks Coverage

On Friday 13th November, Paris became the site of Western Europe's deadliest terrorist attack in over ten years. From the immediate aftermath of the attacks through to the end of the weekend and into this week, the story received heavy coverage across all BBC Radio networks, with BBC Radio 5 Live dedicating a whole day to rolling news about Paris on Saturday. It was a major story, but was BBC Radio's response proportionate? We hear your reaction.

As the fight over Britain's membership of the EU intensifies, the upcoming referendum has become ripe territory for BBC Radio 4's satirists. When last Friday's The Now Show took a comedic look at the subject, some listeners were deeply unhappy with what they perceived as a 'staying in' bias. Should the BBC be scrutinising its output for bias already? And is it possible to have truly balanced comedy? Roger Bolton speaks to the BBC's Chief Adviser on Politics, Ric Bailey.

This time last year, BBC Radio 5 Live's schedule was overhauled. Three of its biggest presenters, Shelagh Fogerty, Richard Bacon and Victoria Derbyshire, left and, as a consequence or not, so did 10% of the listenership. How has 5 Live fared since? Roger speaks to the network's controller Jonathan Wall to discuss ratings, sports rights and the booming sister station 5 Live Sports Extra.

Last week, a brand new DAB station called BBC Music Jazz burst into existence, offering listeners music by all the greats from Gershwin to Gillespie. BBC Music Jazz was a pop up station - a temporary digital channel created in collaboration with Jazz FM. And listeners loved it. We look back at the brief and smoking life of BBC Music's first Jazz pop up.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey.
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b06pdjh7)
Graham and Heather - Being Yourself

Fi Glover introduces a revealing conversation between a father and daughter about the impact his childhood experiences have had on his life. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b06pdjh9)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06p4jp2)
Commandos storm hotel where Islamist gunmen have been holding more than 130 hostages. EU to increase security checks at the external borders of the Schengen area.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b06pdjhc)
Series 47

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Freya Parker, John Robins, Emily Taylor, Mitch Benn and Mae Martin for a comedy take on the week's news.

Written by the cast with additional material from Gareth Gwynn, Andy Wolton, Sarah Campbell and Kiri Pritchard-McClean.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b06pdjhf)
Kenton feels positive, looking forward to the Bull's grand reopening, which will coincide with the Christmas lights switch-on on December 4th. He relishes in the Ambridge 'Blitz Spirit', talking about things reopening and village activities including the upcoming touch-rugby tournament. Harrison talks of Fallon and Emma being busy with their catering business - with a big wedding coming up. Kenton notices that Charlie seems miserable, though. Charlie's trying to escape his worries, as he learns about the Grundy's having to move out of Grey Gables and problems for local dairy farmers.

Evasive Charlie admits to Adam that he's under pressure from Justin - like the Grundys, he could be out on his ear soon.

Ruth's busy sending an important email as David, Pip and Jill chivvy her along to join them for Pip's celebration dinner at La Femme Du Monde. Over dinner, Ruth tells David how proud she is of Pip - and raises a toast of her own. Ruth's so grateful at how they've managed without her during difficult times. But Ruth can't stop all the thoughts buzzing round her head, including her late Mum and the farm. She needs to get away and clear her head. Ruth has decided to go to New Zealand on a farm research trip - the one Pip mentioned a little while ago.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b06pdjm8)
Emile Zola Special: JR, Michel Houellebecq

Kirsty Lang is in Paris seeking out the 21st Century French artists, writers and performers who are keeping the spirit of Zola alive in their work today.

Author Edouard Louis grew up in shocking poverty not unlike the conditions Zola observed in the 19th Century. His childhood is the subject of his first literary work Getting Rid of Eddy Bellegueule.

Zola's ability to shock is not unlike that of Michel Houellebecq - probably the most internationally famous novelist to come out of France in recent times and certainly the most controversial.

Abd al Malik is an award winning rapper and spoken word artist. He sees his work as a protest against racism and islamophobia in France.

JR - often described as the French Banksy - exhibits freely in the streets by gluing or pasting giant, blown up photographs onto buildings or entire streets in the council estates that surround Paris.

Florence Aubenas is best known for her immersive journalism. As the recession hit France, she posed as an unskilled worker and for 6 months cleaned toilets on a cross channel ferry.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Sarah Shebbeare.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06pddh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b06pdlg5)
Charles Clarke, Lindsey German, Lord Lawson, Sir Martin Sorrell

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Charles Darwin School, Biggin Hill, Kent with a panel including the former Home Secretary Charles Clarke, the convenor of the Stop the War coalition, Lindsey German, former Chancellor of the Exchequer Lord Lawson and the businessman Sir Martin Sorrell.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b06pdlgb)
Sarah Dunant: Crisis in Catholicism

Sarah Dunant sees a new crisis in the Catholic church as a result of unchanged policy over divorce, homosexuality, celibacy and the role of women.

"Men may truly believe in God but for most of them chastity is too big an ask and if enforced leads, at worst, to abuse and at best to a clergy and hierarchy ignorant of, and often unsympathetic to, the problems of being human. From there it's but a skip and a jump to the role of women and their exclusion from the heart of the church."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen (b06pdlgr)
Omnibus: Part 2

The 1980s were a time of political upheaval and deep changes to the way the state engaged with British society, but for black theatre, perhaps paradoxically, it was a time of a great explosion of talent and opportunity. As Brixton and Toxteth burned, a host of new and brilliant young theatre groups burst into life, some benefiting from the final largesse of the dying Greater London Council, wound up by act of Parliament in 1986. Thus Talawa was born with an £80,000 GLC grant to stage its first, landmark production which required a cast of 23 - but there were many others too.

On television, Channel 4 brought new specialist magazine programming for black viewers, quickly emulated by the BBC, and series like Empire Road found ready and growing popularity, while the films of Isaac Julien addressed issues of race and sexuality for both niche and mainstream audiences. By the 1990s and early 2000s, new black writing talent like Roy Williams and Winsome Pinnock were reflecting sharp social divisions, and the problems faced by black youth in Britain's inner cities. This, too, was the world that young British-Nigerian writer Bola Agbaje grew up in, and powerfully wrote about in her groundbreaking new plays.

Consultant: Dr Michael Pearce
Producer: Simon Elmes.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b06p4jp4)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b06pdlgz)
A special programme about immigration and social cohesion with a panel and audience.

A special programme about immigration and cohesion with a panel and audience at the Refugee Studies Centre at Oxford University.
Will increased immigration lead to less integration and more tension in our communities?
Is it inevitable that these terrorist attacks make us worry more about the people in our neighbourhood, and thus harm social cohesion?


FRI 22:45 Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal (b06qrn50)
Episode 10

With McCarthyism reaching fever pitch in 1950s America, Peter Sargeant - a dashing PR man - is hired by the Grand St Petersburg ballet to fend off rumours that their star choreographer is a communist. But New York's ballet world is shocked when, on the opening night, the lead ballerina plummets to her death from a wire, maintaining her classical pose in the 'fifth position' as she hits the floor.

Gore Vidal's earlier novel The City and the Pillar was published in 1948 when the author was 23 years old. Its central story of a homosexual relationship caused such a scandal that the New York Times book critic refused to review any book by Gore Vidal. Others followed his lead and the author found himself at a loss as to how to continue to earn a living through his pen until a publisher suggested that he turn his hand to writing under a different name. Death In the Fifth Position was published in 1952 - the first of a trio of entertainments featuring Peter Cutler Sargeant II as a publicist turned private eye.

Episode 10:
It would appear that Mr Washburn has decided to let Jane Garden take the fall. He is willing to see her arrested and have her reputation ruined even when she is found innocent, in order for the ballet company to continue its tour. Peter continues to piece together his theory of what happened, but time is running out. He needs to spend some time with Louis to find out what he knows. It's an evening that involves alcohol and a bathhouse.

The music used in the series is (as mentioned in the story) Bartok's Concerto For Orchestra.

Written by Edgar Box (Gore Vidal)
Read by Jamie Parker

Abridged by Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 23:00 BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2015 (b06pdlh1)
Marcus Brigstocke looks back at twenty years of the BBC New Comedy Awards, including highlights from the 2015 final, which took place earlier in the day at London's Comedy Store and was broadcast live on BBC Radio 2.

He also talks to figures that put the awards into context - how long will it be before these bright young talents are part of the comedy firmament? Marcus himself knows that it's a long path to success - he won the awards back in 1996, but Giles Wemmbley-Hogg didn't arrive on Radio 4 until 2002...

Contributors include comedy industry insiders who gave seen new comedians come and go; comedians who have had success despite failing to reach any awards final; a comedian who did well in the competition but gave up nonetheless.

Producer: Ed Morrish
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06pdlh3)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b06pdlh5)
Kevin and Derek - The Fine Art of Competition

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between artists who are friends but who cannot entirely escape the competitive nature of the art world. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b06p7b7s)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b06p7b7s)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b06pb5pt)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b06pb5pt)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b06pbtyk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b06pbtyk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b06pd3bk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b06pd3bk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b06pddh1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b06pddh1)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b06pb74j)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b06mv4js)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b06pdlgb)

Across the Board 12:04 MON (b03mfn09)

Across the Board 12:04 TUE (b03mj945)

Across the Board 12:04 WED (b04mb80d)

Across the Board 12:04 THU (b04md54h)

Across the Board 12:04 FRI (b05sy63d)

Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section 18:30 THU (b01rfy5w)

Alice Is Still in Wonderland 11:30 TUE (b06pb5pw)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b06pb835)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b06pb835)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b06nnnlt)

Any Answers? 13:30 SAT (b06p46jm)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b06pdlg5)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b06p4cl2)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b06pdcf0)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b06pdcf0)

BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2015 23:00 FRI (b06pdlh1)

Behind Closed Doors 14:15 MON (b02qd1vc)

Behind Closed Doors 14:15 TUE (b02qncsf)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b06p4ln1)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b06p4ln1)

Blood, Sex and Money: The Life and Work of Emile Zola 16:00 MON (b06p7cyt)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b06qbvnm)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b06p7b7n)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b06p7b7n)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b06pb54n)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b06pb54n)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b06pbtyf)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b06pbtyf)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b06pd3bc)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b06pd3bc)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b06pddgz)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b06p4npc)

Changing Climate 20:00 MON (b06p7d29)

Comic Fringes 00:30 SUN (b038jkr9)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b06pb74d)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b06pb74d)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b06nrqvh)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b06pd3bp)

Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal 22:45 MON (b06qnmhn)

Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal 22:45 TUE (b06qnmpb)

Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal 22:45 WED (b06qnn2q)

Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal 22:45 THU (b06qrmw8)

Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal 22:45 FRI (b06qrn50)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b06p4nph)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b06p4nph)

Dilemma 11:30 MON (b01rgj1n)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b06p48lz)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b06np7nx)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b06p56zj)

Drama 14:15 WED (b03w16g8)

Drama 14:15 THU (b06pd8rv)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b06pdjgg)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b06p46bh)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b06p7b7g)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b06pb4tb)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b06pbwby)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b06pd39x)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b06pdck2)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b06ns27l)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b06pdjh3)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b06np61x)

Forgotten History 16:30 SUN (b06p56zt)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b06pbwzr)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b06nl5jr)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b06p7cz4)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b06pb82z)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b06pbwzm)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b06pdcf4)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b06pdjm8)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b06ns0r0)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b06pdjgm)

Gloomsbury 18:30 TUE (b040014b)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b06pd3b9)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b06pd3b9)

In Pod We Trust 10:30 SAT (b06p46bp)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b06pb833)

John Finnemore's Double Acts 11:30 FRI (b06pddh5)

Jon Ronson On 23:00 THU (b01rlrjz)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b06nnnlk)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b06p7cz0)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b06ns27j)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b06pdjh0)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b06pb74g)

Liam Williams: Ladhood 23:00 TUE (b06pb839)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:00 WED (b06pbxjr)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b06pddh3)

Loose Ends 18:30 SAT (b06p4b25)

Mending Young Minds 23:00 MON (b06810pq)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b06nl5j7)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b06p4j9y)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b06p4jf2)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b06p4jhh)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b06p4jkg)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b06p4jm1)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b06p4jnk)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b06pbtyc)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b06pbtyc)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b06p46bw)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b06p46bw)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b06pbwb3)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b06nrjjg)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b06pbwzp)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w9lgt)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w9ljp)

New Lyrical Ballads 23:30 SAT (b06npkhw)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b06nl5jh)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b06p4jbd)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b06p4jfd)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b06p4jhw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b06p4jkq)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b06p4jm9)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b06p4jnw)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b06p4jbg)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b06nl5jt)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b06p4jc0)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b06p4jfs)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b06p4jj1)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b06p4jks)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b06p4jmc)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b06p4jny)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b06nl5jk)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b06p4jbl)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b06p4jbq)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b06nl5k9)

News 13:00 SAT (b06nl5jy)

News 09:00 MON (b06rwtjy)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b06p4ln5)

One Minute Silence 11:00 MON (b06rw474)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b06pb54l)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b06p56zr)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b06p56zr)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b06nrsrw)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b06pd8rx)

PM 17:00 SAT (b06p4b23)

PM 17:00 MON (b06p7cyy)

PM 17:00 TUE (b06pb74l)

PM 17:00 WED (b06pbwbk)

PM 17:00 THU (b06ppk4w)

PM 17:00 FRI (b06pdjh9)

Paris: Could It Happen Here? 20:00 THU (b06rywqs)

Pick of the Week 18:30 SUN (b06p5701)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b06ns4bq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b06qngf6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b06qsr0w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b06r169x)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b06r5dgq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b06r9j65)

Profile 19:02 SAT (b06p4b27)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b06p4b27)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b06p4b27)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b06p4ln9)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b06p4ln9)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b06p4ln9)

Radio 4's Night of Comedy for Children In Need 19:20 SUN (b06nrxbj)

Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen 13:45 MON (b06p7b7z)

Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen 13:45 TUE (b06pb6sh)

Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen 13:45 WED (b06pbwb1)

Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen 13:45 THU (b06pd3c0)

Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen 13:45 FRI (b06pddx5)

Raising the Bar: 100 Years of Black British Theatre and Screen 21:00 FRI (b06pdlgr)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b06nnnl9)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b06p7blp)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b06p46bm)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b06nl5k7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b06nl5jc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b06p4jb2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b06p4jf6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b06p4jhr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b06p4jkl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b06p4jm5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b06p4jnr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b06nl5j9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b06nl5jf)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b06nl5k1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b06p4jb0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b06p4jb7)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b06p4jcb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b06p4jf4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b06p4jfb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b06p4jhp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b06p4jht)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b06p4jkj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b06p4jkn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b06p4jm3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b06p4jm7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b06p4jnp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b06p4jnt)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b06pb74b)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b06nl5k5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b06p4jcq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b06p4jfz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b06p4jj5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b06p4jkx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b06p4jmh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b06p4jp2)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b06p4ln3)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b06p4ln3)

Start the Week 09:03 MON (b06p7b7l)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b06p7b7l)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b06p4lnf)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b06p4ln7)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b06p4npf)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b06p5705)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b06p5705)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b06p7cz2)

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The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b06pdcf6)

The Dictatorship of Data 20:00 TUE (b06pb831)

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The Invention of... 11:03 MON (b06knmy9)

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Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 18:30 WED (b06pbwzh)

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When Stockhausen Came to Huddersfield 11:30 THU (b06pd3bt)

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