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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 OCTOBER 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0my4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b06j5ycc)
John le Carre: The Biography

Episode 5

The life of John le Carre by Adam Sisman, is abridged for radio in five episodes by Katrin Williams:

From The Constant Gardener in the 1990s to the present day, and the author is still very much at work - "I find it very difficult to read my own stuff, but I look at it with satisfaction."

Reader: Stephen Boxer

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0myb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0myd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0myj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0myl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06j6cyd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Karen Smith.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b06j6cyl)
'Why I'm emigrating to Australia'. Fi Glover reads Your News. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b06j0mys)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b06j0myv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b06j5qd3)
Series 31

Artists' Ways - North Somerset

Clare Balding walks with Carolyn Savidge in the final programme of this series which has been themed Artists' Ways. In the first programme she walked with an artist who created outdoor artworks to help her to come to terms with never having had children. In this final programme, Carolyn explains how walking and art have helped her deal with the loss of her husband.

Carolyn's walk leaves from her front door in the village of Bleadon in North Somerset, and takes her out onto the hills and levels of north Somerset. On the way she describes the written, photographic and sound based project she has created since losing her husband to cancer. It's a moving walk, but also very uplifting as Carolyn describes how embracing the landscape has helped her begin to move forward with her life.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b06k95cn)
Farming Today This Week: Forestry

Charlotte Smith meets Sarah Walters and Stephen Briggs at 20-acre Alvecote Woods on the Warwickshire/Staffordshire border. They bought the overgrown and neglected woodland eight years ago. Now it's winning awards and was the first woodland to be awarded a Grown in Britain licence, which assures good practice and sustainability. The wood is also now home to a wide variety of wildlife, several ponds and a wildlife meadow.
We also hear about the forestry industry - worth a total of £4.1 billion pounds to the UK economy. And find out what advice scientists are giving about the increasing threat from tree diseases and pests.
The producer is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b06j0mz1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b06jv3qv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b06k95cq)
Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Ashley Walters

Sophie Ellis-Bextor first topped the charts with Groovejet (If This Ain't Love) and successes continued with hits including Murder On The Dancefloor and Take Me Home. Sophie joins Aasmah and Richard to talk about her career, taxidermy and reaching the final on Strictly Come Dancing.

Ashley Walters found fame as rapper Asher D in So Solid Crew. He's subsequently carved out a successful acting career, including an award winning performance in the film Bullet Boy, and starring roles in Top Boy and Inside Men. Ashley discusses his career, playing PC Ryan Draper in BBC drama Cuffs, and dealing with his phobia of birds.

We visit listener Jo Rhodes's Community Soup project in Settle, in North Yorkshire. In exchange for £4, hungry punters receive a bowl of soup, entitling them to vote on one of 4 pitches. Once all pitches are heard, votes are cast the winner takes all- to kick-start their project.

Mark Mason talks about travelling Britain collecting facts and trivia from every one of its 124 postcode areas.

Cricket Umpire Dickie Bird shares his Inheritance Tracks: Nat King Cole When I Fall in Love and Barbra Streisand The Way We Were.

Donal Skehan is a self-taught cook who has been in a Boyband, had a failed bid to represent Ireland in the Eurovision song contest and has been a presenter on Junior MasterChef. He reflects on his varied career and the art of presenting food.

Sophie Ellis-Bextor's latest album Wanderlust is out now.
Cuffs starring Ashley Walters starts on Wednesday 28th October at 8pm on BBC 1.
Mark Mason's Mail Obsession: A Journey Round Britain by Postcode is out now.
Dickie Bird - 80 Not Out, written with Keith Lodge, is out now.
Donal Skehan's latest book 'Fresh' is out now.


SAT 10:30 The Last Days of W.G. (b06k95ct)
Charlie Connelly unravels the celebrity and the mythology that surrounds W.G. Grace, to look for the man beneath the austere Victorian veneer.

It's been one hundred years since Grace died, but he still looms over the sport of cricket like no other player. He was arguably the most famous man of the late Victorian era, a true celebrity with an appeal that spanned the class system and reached across the British Empire.

Charlie Connelly comes across W.G. Grace in the last years of the great batsman's life, as his sporting career ends and his form begins to fade. Faced with great personal tragedies, and distressed by the slaughter of the First World War, Grace emerges as a complex and troubled man, a long way from the stoical buttoned up Victorian that is so often portrayed.

Featuring archive recordings with John Arlott and CLR James, and interviews with England cricketers Vic Marks, Rachael Heyhoe Flint and Nick Compton.

Producer: Harrry Graham
A Whistledown programme for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b06k95cw)
George Parker of The Financial Times looks back at a mixed week for the chancellor George Osborne. The sumptuous state visit of Chinese president Xi Jinping highlighted the economic benefits of trade with China, but at Westminster many Conservative MPs were unhappy about cuts to tax credits. With the House of Lords planning to derail the measure a constitutional crisis is in the offing. Plus how to manage an orderly spending review.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b06j0mz7)
History's Long Shadow

Reporters' stories. In this edition: Kevin Connolly goes for an evening stroll in Jerusalem observing that the triumphs and disasters of the past are as real as the tensions of the present if you know where to look. Nick Thorpe's with the migrants on the border between Croatia and Slovenia where everyone seems to have lost someone and the refugee crisis can seem like a football match. Jon Donnison tells us that life doesn't get much tougher than for a Filipino fishermen in typhoon season. Mark Stratton gets to know the extravagant role the dead play in the lives of people on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. And Mary Harper tells us they've got a camera now, but no costumes. And when they want guns, they have to borrow them from the police. This is the world of action film-making -- in Somaliland.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b06j0mzf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b06k95cy)
Cyber attack on TalkTalk, HMRC refund delays

More than four million customers of TalkTalk may have had their full data stolen, including bank details. It's not yet clear to what extent the data was encrypted. The programme looks at some of the problems listeners have had getting compensation for past breaches.

There are long delays by Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs in processing refunds for taxpayers; money that perhaps they should never have paid or are now reclaiming. Customers and tax practitioners have been reporting that tax refunds have been taking months rather than weeks. Anita Monteith from the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales joins the programme.

Machines that convert foreign notes and coins - even obsolete ones - into Sterling will begin to appear next week in London with plans for them to spread to the rest of the UK. Money Box staff have chucked their very old and odd foreign currency into the Fourex magic money machine. Listen to Bob Howard's report to find out what happens.

The Competition and Markets Authority published its provisional findings earlier this week about whether bank customers are getting a good deal and explored why more of us don't switch to get a better deal. The CMA stopped short of recommending that the major High Street banks should be broken up to encourage further competition. Has the regulator missed a once in a lifetime opportunity to reform the way our money is cared for by the banks? Damon Gibbons from the Centre for Responsible Credit speaks to the programme.

Presenter:Paul Lewis
Producer:Alex Lewis
Editor:Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b06j67y8)
Series 88

Episode 6

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp. Jeremy Hardy, Holly Walsh, Yasmine Akram and political sketch writer Michael Deacon are Miles' guests this week.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b06j0n02)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b06j0n06)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b06j6by6)
Nigel Evans MP, Nia Griffith MP, Cristina Odone, Lord Wigley

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from All Saints Church in Porthcawl, Wales, with a panel including the Conservative back bencher Nigel Evans MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Wales Nia Griffith MP, the journalist Cristina Odone, and the former leader of Plaid Cymru Lord Wigley.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b06k95d1)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b06k9bz9)
Unmade Movies

Orson Welles' Heart of Darkness

The broadcast premiere of Orson Welles' unproduced screenplay of Joseph Conrad's celebrated novel. Staring James McAvoy.

It's the 1890s and Mr Kurtz, one of the senior agents of an Ivory trading company, has disappeared.
Marlow, a skipper, is hired to take a steamship up the Congo River to find him. But the further he and the other company men travel up river, the greater the sense of impending danger, and the more disturbing the rumours that begin to circulate about Kurtz.

But truth is more terrifying than any of them imagined.

Heart of Darkness is part of Unmade Movies, a season of radio adaptations of unproduced screenplays by the major authors of the 20th century - including Harold Pinter, Arthur Miller, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and Ernest Lehman.

Orson Welles wrote this screenplay in 1939, with the intention of directing and starring as both Marlow and Kurtz. After founding the Mercury Theatre in 1937, his celebrated production of Julius Caesar and his radio adaption of The War of The Worlds established him as a major talent. RKO Pictures then signed a deal with him to produce his first feature film. Welles intended this to be Heart of Darkness but the script proved to be too audacious for them - and his second script, Citizen Kane, was greenlit instead.

A Screenplay by Orson Welles from the novel by Joseph Conrad
Adapted for Radio by Jamie Lloyd and Laurence Bowen
Music by Ben and Max Ringham
Sound Design by Wilfredo Acosta
Directed by Jamie Lloyd
Produced by Laurence Bowen
A Feelgood Fiction production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:55 The Listening Project (b06j67y6)
Bob and Ben - Glory Days

Fi Glover introduces two friends who meet regularly for a 'clonc' (West Welsh for chat) and enjoy exulting in the art of rugby - another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b06k9bzw)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Scouts, Homelessness, Female Breadwinners, Widowhood

We hear from the first female chair of the Scouts Association, Ann Limb, on her vision for her new role.

Should heterosexual couples have the same right to a civil partnership as lesbian and gay couples? Rebecca Steinfeld explains why she and her partner have filed a judicial review at the High Court and founded the Equal Civil Partnerships Campaign while Professor Robert Wintemute explains the legal challenge.

One woman describes how she became homeless, the problems she faced sleeping rough and the support she needed to get off the streets.

There are two million maternal breadwinners in Britain. Giselle Corey from the IPPR tells us why we have seen a rise in the number of women providing the main source of income for their family and Wendy Venables-Gordon tells us what it's like to bring home the bacon for her family.

Cokie van der Velde speaks about her work on the front line of the Ebola crisis and what it means to her to be named Barclay's Woman of the Year.

The author Helen Bailey on her book When Bad Things Happen in Good Bikinis. It includes responses to the blog she started - Planet Grief - as she coped with bereavement after her husband drowned while they were on holiday.

And Lizzie Ostrom talks about Perfume: A Century of Scents, taking us through some of the key scents of the last hundred years.


SAT 17:00 PM (b06k9c0g)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b06j5qdh)
Sponsorship

Whether it's high-profile sports events or blockbuster art exhibitions, companies like Adidas and Unilever spend millions of pounds on sponsorship - to get their brand associated with sporting or artistic excellence. The global sponsorship market is worth more than 30 billion pounds a year, but what happens when negative publicity - like Fifa's World Cup corruption scandal - starts to tarnish a brand? Evan Davis and guests discuss whether sponsors should walk away or use their influence to press for change.

Guests:

Peter Mather, Group Regional Vice President for Europe, BP;
Jan Gooding, Group Brand Director, Aviva;
Jaimie Fuller, Chairman, Skins.

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06j0n0b)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b06j0n0d)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0n0g)
Talktalk says the cyber attack on its website is less serious than initially feared.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b06k9c13)
Clive Anderson, Arthur Smith, Charlotte Church, Gregor Fisher, Robert Newman, Michaela Coel, Ezra Furman, Dom La Nena

Clive Anderson and Arthur Smith are joined by Charlotte Church, Gregor Fisher, Robert Newman and Michaela Coel for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Ezra Furman and Dom La Nena.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b06k9c1d)
Justin Trudeau

He's been a boxer, a bouncer and a bungee jumping coach. Now he's the Prime Minister of Canada. Justin Trudeau is going back to his childhood home, 24 Sussex Drive, the PM's residence in Ottawa. His father, Pierre Trudeau, was a previous resident. Justin Trudeau is young and charismatic. He might even be the world's first tattooed national leader. But who is he? What does he stand for? And can he live up to his famous name?

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producers: Charlotte Pritchard and David Rhodes.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b06j0n0j)
Magna Carta plays, Mississippi Grind, Mr Robot, Charles and Ray Eames, Beatlebone

Salisbury Playhouse has commissioned 4 new plays to mark the octocentenary of Magna Carta. How do contemporary playwrights deal with the ideas behind an 800 year old document?
Mississippi Grind is a film that follows 2 gamblers trying to beat the odds to turn their lives around as they head down the Mississippi river to the big game in New Orleans .
The latest cult TV series from the USA is Mr Robot - turning the world of computer coders and hackers into nailbiting narrative
The prolific and highly influential design team of Charles and Ray Eames are the subject of a new exhibition at The Barbican in London. You probably know their work without realising it (they designed the "Mastermind" chair and much more)
Beatlebone by Kevin Barry is the imagined story of John Lennon trying to reach spiritual peace by going to an island he has bought off the coast of Ireland.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b06k9d2b)
The Future of the BBC: A History

In advance of a special Media Show debate on the future of the BBC, Steve Hewlett explores the troubled past behind today's dilemmas - and traces them back to the Corporation's origins in the distant world of the 1920s.

He explores how the BBC was forged in the paternalist culture of interwar Britain. And how its first Director-General, the forbidding six-foot-six titan John Reith, carved it into the form it still has today: a public corporation. Reith's new British Broadcasting Corporation was not part of the government, but nor was it a commercial company. It occupied a public space somewhere in between.

Reith's model was all very well in an age of deference, when the BBC had the airwaves to itself. It even managed, after initial hostility, to come to terms with competition, in the shape of ITV.

But Steve explores how Reith's interwar Leviathan has fared since the 1970s, as it's been buffetted by hurricanes of change: the death of deference, the pressures of high inflation and political strife, and the tech-driven birth of a highly competitive global media market.

What does the BBC's past tell us about its capacity to survive and thrive in this brave new world, and how it might need to change?

With: Simon Heffer, David Hendy, Charlotte Higgins, Dominic Sandbrook, Jean Seaton

Producer: Phil Tinline.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b06j0wfc)
Reading Europe - Poland: Entanglement

Antigone in Warsaw

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best contemporary literature. In this hugely successful Polish crime thriller, a long suffering State Prosecutor finds himself trapped in a posst-Communist limbo land of half-truths and secrets. Will he prove himself to be a redoubtable seeker of the truth or will he compromise? A perplexing murder reveals tantalising glimpses of links to the old regime.

Part 2: Antigone in Warsaw
Szacki struggles with his burgeoning feelings for attractive journalist Monika Grzelka and the increasingly complex background of the murder victim. The final clues fall into place when he stages his own Family Constellation Therapy session with all the suspects.

The writer Zygmunt Miloszewski is a leading Polish writer. The Teodor Szacki series is a best seller in Poland. Antonia Lloyd Jones is an award winning translator of Polish fiction and chair of the Translators Association. Dramatised for radio by the writer, critic and journalist, Mark Lawson.

About Reading Europe:
Europe is central to our lives - we go on holiday to Europe, we do business in Europe, we watch in amazement as the various states try to grapple with migration in Europe. Over the next year or so we will be engaged in the debate as to whether or not we stay in Europe. But how much do we know this continent's countries and, in particular, how much do we know about what they're reading?

Over the course of two years, Reading Europe will travel from Calais to Istanbul. Through dramatisations, readings and essays, Reading Europe and Front Row will explore what Europe is writing, publishing and reading - and why.

Written by Zygmunt Miloszewski
Translated by Antonia Lloyd Jones
Dramatised for radio by Mark Lawson

Warsaw backgrounds: Zofia Morus
Polish language advisor: Richard Abel
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer/director: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b06j0n0l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b06j5bjl)
Turning a Blind Eye and the Law

If you're the kind of person who likes to smoke a joint and chat on your mobile while out for a relaxing Sunday afternoon drive it seems you're in luck. According to figures released this week it seems that the police are increasingly turning a blind eye to these offences and when it comes to enforcing the new law banning smoking in cars where there are children, the police have said it's not their job. If the purpose of the law is to protect public health and safety, and to set moral boundaries, can it ever be morally acceptable to ignore law breaking? Should the law be about defining what is right and wrong, good and bad in all circumstances? Or is it acceptable for a law to be a moral symbol of disapproval, with no real threat of enforcement? And if the police don't have a moral duty to enforce the law, what about us as citizens? From this week landlords will be breaking the law if they don't check their tenants have a right to live in the UK and teachers now have a legal duty to tackle extremism. In both cases it's no longer enough to define a good upright citizen as one who doesn't break the law; it's now about having a legal duty to enforce it too. The Moral Maze and the letter of the law.Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk, with Giles Fraser, Michael Portillo, Claire Fox and Melanie Phillips. Witnesses are John Cooper, Luke Gittos, Professor John Tasioulas and Peter Garsden.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b06j1kdm)
Programme 1, 2015

(1/12)
Kurt's widow, Keir's party and Kate's adventures with her fellow survivors could lead you to the Court of Navarre - at least, they could if you have the same kind of mind as the panellists on Round Britain Quiz, which returns for a brand new series with Tom Sutcliffe in the chair.

As always, six teams from around the UK will play one another to decide the eventual series title, with some familiar voices as well as newcomers among the panel this season. The first programme features the Scots, Val McDermid and Roddy Lumsden, against the Welsh team of Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards. The Scots are defending their title, but Wales are always strong contenders and will be going all-out to wrest it from them this year.

As always they'll need to draw on all of their general knowledge and ingenuity to unravel RBQ's trademark cryptic questions. The series will feature a generous smattering of questions devised by listeners and sent in since the programme was last on air.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b06j0wlw)
Pot Luck

Roger McGough presents half an hour of satirical poetry, read by Rory Bremner, with expert Katherine Rundell. Satire comes from poets as diverse as Horace, John Donne, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Hilaire Belloc and Adrian Mitchell. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 25 OCTOBER 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b06k9gzq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Feminine Mystiques (b037jn8q)
Mink

By Marina Warner
Read by Emma Fielding

Fifty years since the first publication of Betty Friedan's seminal feminist work The Feminine Mystique, Radio 4 has commissioned three leading writers to celebrate her influence in new short stories exploring the contemporary feminist landscape.

Emma Fielding reads the first story in this series, by award winning writer and mythographer Marina Warner. Just as some of Angela Carter's short stories from The Bloody Chamber were first published in high fashion magazine Vogue, and Carter's retelling of fable and myth turned on the original meaning of 'glamour' as a spell, Marina Warner explores feminine mystique through a housewife in the 1950s who weaves hope and freedom into her longing for a mink coat.

Marina Warner has written novels, short stories and non-fiction centering around women and the imagery and iconography they conjure for more than thirty years.

The other writers in the series are British-Sierra Leonean novelist Aminatta Forna, winner of the Commonwealth Writers Prize and judge of the Man Booker International Prize, with a surreal and wryly humourous contemporary story read by Doon MacKichan, and Sarah Hall, one of Granta's Best Young British Novelists 2013, who brings us a story set in a dystopian near future, read by Francesca Dymond.

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06k9gzs)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06k9gzv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06k9gzx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b06k9gzz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b06k9syn)
Bells from All Saints Church in Marsworth, Buckinghamshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b06k9c1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b06k9h01)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b06k9syt)
Enough Is Enough

John McCarthy is joined by tenor Ian Bostridge and ecological economist Professor Tim Jackson, to consider whether aspiration for "stuff" and status gets in the way of personal contentment.

They begin their exploration by considering where our desire for wealth and status comes from, and whether it was ever thus. But the discussion broadens to explore our discontent with other aspects of life, such as sufficiency of time, work, space, looks, faith and love.

They end with Bach's beautiful Cantata Ich habe genug. This translates: It is enough or I am content. The piece is about the very elderly man Simeon at last seeing the baby Jesus when he was brought to the temple. He says:

It is enough.
I have held the Saviour, the hope of all peoples,
In the warm embrace of my arms.
It is enough.

Ian and John discuss the way in which Bach captures this sense of contentment and peace of mind that so often eludes us as human beings.

Produced by Rosie Boulton
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b06k9sz1)
Lichens of Scotland

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

In this programme recorded in 2006, Lionel Kelleway is joined by lichenologists Brian and Sandy Coppins. They travel to possibly the oldest woodland in the British Isles, at Ballachuan south of Oban in search of rare and spectacular lichens literally festooning this hazel woodland; including the rare and gloriously named 'rubber gloved fungus'.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b06k9h03)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b06k9h05)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b06k9szd)
Scunthorpe's steel chaplain; Synod on the family; Henry V and God at Agincourt

When TATA Steel announced the loss of 900 jobs at their plant in Scunthorpe, one of the first people on site was industrial chaplain Peter Vickers. Bob Walker spent the day with him to hear how he is galvanising support for those affected.

Scandals in the NHS, Parliament and religious groups have undermined the public's trust in these institutions. On Monday, Lord Blair chairs a discussion with the Archbishop of Canterbury and Chief Rabbi about the challenges religious leaders face. Lord Blair tells William Crawley why he believes organisations have lost the confidence of the public and what they need to do.

The battle took place in 1415 near modern-day Agincourt in northern France. King Henry V was victorious. Juliet Barker author of Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England, tells us about the faith driven king

A recent report claims the majority of British Jews will be from the ultra-orthodox community by the end of the century. Rosie Dawson visits one of the largest communities in Manchester to explore the changes this could bring.

It's been 3 weeks of 'Cardinals clashing' and our reporter Helen Grady has been in Rome observing Church politics during the Synod on the Family. Father Alexander Lucie-Smith and commentator John Thavis debate the direction they think the Church will head after this Synod.

A 400 year old Bible that encourages adultery will go on sale next month. The typo caused a scandal when the mistake was discover in 1631 and led to the downfall of the printers. Professor Gordon Campbell looks at this and other unholy printing errors.

Producers:
David Cook
Rosie Dawson

Editor:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b06k9szg)
Railway Children

Frank Cottrell Boyce presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Railway Children
Registered Charity No 1058991
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Railway Children'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Railway Children'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b06k9h07)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b06k9h09)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b06k9szm)
Upon St Crispin's Day

Choral Matins from the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace commemorates the 600th anniversary of one of England's greatest victories - over the French at Agincourt. It was the musicians and clergy of the Chapel Royal who accompanied King Henry the Fifth to the battlefield. Later immortalised by Shakespeare, Olivier and Branagh, the English knights and longbowmen were King Henry V's 'Band of Brothers' who fought 'upon St Crispin's Day': 25th October, 1415. Though the English are believed to have been outnumbered by as many as 6 to 1, Henry won the day, the French king's daughter, and their son's right to be heir to the throne of France. The preacher is the Sub-Dean of Her Majesty's Chapels Royal, The Rev'd Canon Paul Wright, and the Boy Choristers and Gentlemen-in-Ordinary of the Chapel Royal are directed by Huw Williams. Producer: Katharine Longworth.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b06j6byb)
Roger Scruton: In Defence of Free Speech

Roger Scruton argues that the law on freedom of speech ought to protect those who express heretical views and not be used to close down debate.
"Free speech is not the cause of the tensions that are growing around us, but the only possible solution to them."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hky3h)
Satin Bowerbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents Australia's satin bowerbird. Then male is a blackish looking bird with bright purple eyes, whose plumage diffracts the light to produce an indigo sheen with a metallic lustre. He builds a U-shaped bower of sticks on the forest floor into which he hopes to lure a female. But brown twigs on a brown woodland floor aren't very eye-catching, so he jazzes up the scene with an array of objects from berries and bottle-tops to clothes-pegs and even ballpoint pens. All have one thing in common: they are blue. The male dances around his bower to attract the greenish females: often holding something blue to impress her. As he poses, he calls enticingly to advertise his prowess. Once she's made her choice, she will leave to build her nest and rear her young alone.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b06k9h0c)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b06kb0ft)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b06kb0fw)
Keith Richards

Keith Richards, member of the Rolling Stones, is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs.

Keith was born in Dartford and grew up as an only child. He and Mick Jagger went to the same primary school, but then lost touch until meeting again at Dartford train station in 1961 and discovering they shared a taste in blues music. Keith picked up his love of the guitar from his grandfather and honed his skills whilst at art college.

If one single, living person could be said to personify rock n' roll then it is surely him. He's been making music and causing havoc for over half a century and counting. His song writing, singing and guitar playing have helped to make The Rolling Stones a stratospherically successful group and his early and single minded dedication to the triumvirate pursuits of sex and drugs and rock and roll made him a counter-culture icon.

No surprise then that as a boy he would go to sleep at night with his arm around his first guitar.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b06k9h13)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b06j1kdy)
Series 73

Episode 3

The South Pacific, Conkers and Harvest Festivals are among the subjects on the cards as Andy Hamilton, Sue Perkins, Tony Hawks and Gyles Brandreth join Nicholas Parsons to play another round of the classic panel show. There's deviation, hesitation and repetition a-plenty.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b06kb0fy)
The Pear

For many of us, a disappointing experience with an unripe or tasteless pear has coloured our opinion of what was once thought of as a superior fruit: "gold to the apple's silver".

Sheila Dillon travels to Kent to meet Dr Joan Morgan, who is just publishing 'The Book of Pears - The Definitive History and Guide to over 500 Varieties', the product of years of research into and fascination with this fruit and all its manifestations.

Joan shows Sheila the pear orchard at the National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, one of the biggest fruit collections in the world, revealing the secrets of this unique collection - some 500 varieties of pear growing in one place.

Domestic production is falling, imports are rising, and just one variety of pear, the conference, dominates the UK market.

The once-prized varieties of cooking pear have been almost completely forgtten. Sheila invites cook and writer Nigel Slater to share his passion for what this fruit can do and how to look after it, and visits fruit farmer Clive Baxter who has invested in new technologies around storing and ripening. Dan Saladino tracks down the Gloucestershire-based distiller and cheesemaker Charles Martell, who has become enchanted by the intricacies and joys of the perry pear and the drinks it can make. As Sheila discovers, some people are working hard to restore a sense of enthusiasm around this ancient fruit, its flavours and its possibilities.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b06k9h17)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b06kb0g0)
Global news and analysis, presented by Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 A Man's a Man for a' That: Frederick Douglass in Scotland (b06kb0g2)
Opera singer Andrea Baker explores the impact of Frederick Douglass and the time he spent in Scotland, the country which she's made her home. As the great-granddaughter of slaves, she's always been inspired by Douglass, who escaped slavery to become an abolitionist and social reformer but, until now, was unaware of the impact he'd had on Scotland and vice versa.

In this feature, which features Parker Sawyers as the voice of Frederick Douglass, she discovers how Scotland got deep into the veins of Frederick Douglass. When he visited in 1846, he found an expression of freedom denied him in the United States: "in (no) class of society, have I found any curled lip of scorn ... on account of my complexion; not once". He famously stated: "I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong." Is it any wonder then, that he felt a connection with the country that produced the immortal poem 'A Man's a Man for A' That'? Indeed, addressing a white audience at a Burns Supper two years after his visit, Douglass said "if any think me out of my place on this occasion (pointing at the picture of Burns), I beg that the blame may be laid at the door of him who taught me that 'a man's a man for a' that."

It could be said that Douglass' influence on Scotland was equally dramatic. He spearheaded the 'Send Back the Money' campaign - what we'd now call a boycott movement aimed at cutting respectable ties with the American South. The idea was to shame the Free Church of Scotland into giving back Southern donations that came from the blood of slaves. Douglass lectured across Scotland - putting fire in the belly of the Scottish anti-slavery movement at a time when the cause was wilting elsewhere in Britain. Andrea Baker investigates if the money was ever sent back.

What was it about Scotland which so 'freed' Douglass? And did the anti-racist sentiment he espoused seed later Scottish campaigns against slavery and apartheid.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06j67y2)
South Yorkshire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from South Yorkshire.

Matt Biggs, Christine Walkden and Pippa Greenwood answer questions from the audience of local gardeners.

This week the panel offers advice to gardeners cultivating crops at 900ft, discuss planning a garden from scratch, and reveals the best methods for using nematodes.

Also, Matt Biggs presents a feature exploring the habits of the Clematis, the UK's most popular climber.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b06kb0g4)
Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces conversations from Aberystwyth, Birmingham and Grantham, celebrating rugby, community, and the mother-son relationship, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Penny Dreadfuls (b06kb0g6)
The Odyssey

Comedy trio Penny Dreadfuls take on Homer's tale of Odyseuss's epic journey home from the Trojan Wars and the incredible monsters and enchantress he encounters en route. Starring Peep Show's Robert Webb as Odysseus with Humphrey Ker, David Reed and Thom Tuck and guests Lolly Adefope and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.

Written by David Reed with additional material by Humphrey Ker
Producer.. Julia McKenzie
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b06kb0g8)
Adam Sisman on John Le Carre

Mariella Frostrup talks to Adam Sisman about his new biography of thriller writer John le Carre, creator of the bestselling Smiley novels and many more. This comprehensive life story has been written with le Carre's co-operation and access to his archive and reveals the author's troubled childhood, conman father and the way those beginnings influenced his novels.

Also on the programme, Mariella talks to Josh Spero who has tracked the previous owners of all his Classic textbooks; one editor recommends a great read from a rival publisher and Tahmima Anam and Aleksandar Hemon talk about the literature of migration as they publish moving stories in a collection which explores the notion of 'arrival'.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b06kb0gb)
Pot Luck

Roger McGough presents a pot luck of poetry from Byron and Keats to Charles Tomlinson. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b06j21ch)
Can Rotherham Recover?

Like other steel communities, Rotherham faces the loss of hundreds of jobs following the recent announcement of redundancies at the local plant. It's the latest blow to a town now synonymous with widespread child grooming. Last year the Jay Report estimated that 1400 young people had been sexually abused there. It said most of the victims were white and most of the perpetrators were Asian men. So what's been the impact on community relations and how far has the scandal affected the local economy? For File on 4, Manveen Rana returns to the town to talk to families, business owners and the authorities to find out whether Rotherham can recover.
Producer: Sally Chesworth.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b06k9c1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h19)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b06k9h1c)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06k9h1f)
Peers warned not to block cuts in tax credits

The government says a defeat on tax credits would be "constitutionally unprecedented". Austria and Slovenia warn that EU could fall apart unless it deals with the migrant crisis.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b06kb0gd)
John Waite

John Waite chooses his BBC Radio highlights from the past week.

The nation's favourite tree, the world's most famous extinct animal - and the detailed biography of a man who doesn't exist - they're all featured in this week's Pick of the Week. Plus there's "Just a minute" of humour from that long running radio staple; a bracing challenge to the brainbox from Round Britain quiz - and some lovely floaty music from BBC Radio 2's new "choristers of the year".

The Pick of the iPlayer is Kenneth Williams as Rambling Syd Rumpo from Round the Horne.

Producer: Stephen Garner.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b06kb0gg)
It's the Harvest Festival at St Stephens. Jennifer's grilled for information about Berrow - she insists it's just bad luck and that Lynda is being highly irresponsible to suggest there's an issue with the way they keep the cows.

Jill admits to Carol she feels Julia Pargetter doesn't approve of her being in her room at Lower Loxley. Jill worries that the housekeeping has slipped at Brookfield, so Carol encourages Jill to do something about it - perhaps take the family for lunch or send food parcels. Jennifer also suggests to Carol that she could audition for Lady Cravenshire in Calendar Girls.

Adam distracts Charlie from his worries with a drink. Charlie explains how the dog carcass got in after the flood - it's type C Botulism. Adam and Brian realise the dog and silage probably came from a Home Farm field - a flooded area. Jennifer thinks the dog could be Scruff.

Charlie's not exactly flavour of the month but decides to brave it at the Harvest Festival. Carol suggests to Charlie that he offer to audition for Lynda - he wants to smooth things over with her after their last conversation (or argument). Charlie wants to update Lynda on the situation at Berrow - Jennifer's not sure it's a good idea. She thinks Lynda must never find out that a dog was involved.


SUN 19:15 Shedtown (b01q03sb)
Series 2

End of the Beginning

In series two of Shedtown, our wooden 'man-cave', icon of escape and isolation - the shed - continues to be a symbol of possibility and change.

Episode 3: End of the Beginning

The creosoted community continues into surreal seaside chaos as it hits the headlines.

Father Michael spots a 'shopportunity' and Colin sees his failed dream, of running a successful visitor attraction, re-emerging.

Barry............................Tony Pitts
Jimmy..........................Stephen Mangan
Eleanor.......................Ronni Ancona
Colin..........................Johnny Vegas
Deborah.......................Emma Fryer
William.......................Adrian Manfredi
Diane.........................Rosina Carbone
Dave..........................Shaun Dooley
Father Michael............James Quinn
Wes..........................Warren Brown
Margaret....................Gwyneth Powell
Nell.............................Eleanor Samson
Narrator.....................Maxine Peake
Music.......................Paul Heaton & Jonny Lexus

Written and Directed by Tony Pitts
Produced by Sally Harrison
A Woolyback Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Nights of the Hunter (b06kb2lq)
At the End of an Unnamed Road

Stories that dwell in the shadows. A set of specially-commissioned tales about pursuers and the pursued.

Episode 1 (of 3):. At The End Of An Unnamed Road by M.J. Hyland
Marcus and Anna take a trip to the Lakes with a view to repairing their marriage. But Marcus's thoughts turn to something much darker.

M.J. Hyland is an ex-lawyer, a lecturer at the University of Manchester and the author of three novels - How the Light Gets In, Carry Me Down (shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize) and This Is How. She has twice been shortlisted for the National Short Story Award.

Writer: M.J. Hyland
Reader: Greg Wise

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b06jvcn2)
Arthur Miller - Your Reviews

Actor Martin Jarvis pays homage to Arthur Miller, England Cricketer Vic Marks gives his verdict on The Archers' game, and Radio 4 drama goes underground and avant-garde.

In recent weeks, BBC Radio has been host to a theatrical marathon celebrating the centenary of the birth of the great playwright Arthur Miller. With a wealth of plays, features and documentaries across Radio 3 and Radio 4, some critics called it overkill - but listeners couldn't get enough. Roger Bolton puts audience questions to Martin Jarvis, director of Radio 3's A View from the Bridge.

When it comes to reporting the news, getting to grips with statistics is vital for any correspondent. Listeners are fed reels of numbers, explaining everything from economic performance and mortality rates, to voting patterns and adultery. But how well do BBC correspondents understand these statistics, and do they risk being partial if they don't use them correctly? Roger speaks to Michael Blastland, one of the founders of Radio 4's chief number crunching programme More or Less.

Last week's Radio 4 drama Master Rock was recorded live inside a Scottish mountain - but some listeners wished it had been buried forever. With an experimental electronic soundscape, and a postmodern script, the drama told the story of the subterranean Cruachan Power station, and the people who built it. While some thought it was progressive, artistic, and a unique listen, for others it was an off-putting experience.

When the residents of Ambridge played the biggest cricketing fixture of the year, it was bound to be dramatic, and it didn't disappoint. But was the match plausible? Roger speaks to ex-England all-rounder Vic Marks to find out.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey.
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b06jvcn0)
General John Galvin, Joan Leslie, Michael Meacher, Howard Kendall, Jerry Parr and Coleridge Goode

Matthew Bannister on

General Jack Galvin who was NATO's Supreme Allied Commander in Europe as the Cold War ended. Generals Colin Powell and David Petraeus pay tribute.

Joan Leslie - the Hollywood star who made forty films in ten years.

Michael Meacher - the former Environment minister once described by Neil Kinnock as "Tony Benn's vicar on earth." The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn joins us.

Howard Kendall - Everton football club's most successful manager. Gary Lineker remembers playing under him.

Jerry Parr - the secret service agent who saved President Ronald Reagan's life when he was shot.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b06k95cy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b06k9szg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b06j1kf4)
Will George Be King?

Edward Stourton examines the long-term prospects for the British monarchy as an avowed republican becomes leader of the opposition. At least eighty per cent of the population affirm their belief in the institution, opinion polls suggest - a figure that has remained remarkably constant since the Queen, now the longest serving monarch, ascended to the throne. But how can we be sure that this support and the institutions that underpin the monarchy will remain by the time her great-grandson becomes King?

Within two or three generations the constitutional make-up of Britain could look very different. Could the monarchy withstand a series of upheavals such as the disestablishment of the Church of England, Scottish independence, a weakening of Britain's links with the Commonwealth and reform of the House of Lords (along with the remnants of the hereditary principle)? What if the institutional foundations on which the monarchy rests change irrevocably or disappear altogether? By the time Prince George is likely to become King, in the latter half of this century, social attitudes may have changed considerably. Is it safe to assume that the monarchy will survive? And what will attitudes towards this institution say about wider changes across British society?

Producer: Peter Snowdon.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b06k9h1h)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b06kb2lv)
Leading journalists analyse how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 TED Radio Hour (b06h1d11)
Series 2

Seven Deadly Sins

A journey through fascinating ideas based on talks by riveting speakers on the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) stage.

Guy Raz investigates the guilty pleasure of behaving badly and the challenge of confronting sin - and avoiding it.

With Christopher Ryan, Mick Cornett, Dave Meslin, Dr Gary Slutkin, Nick Hanauer, Parul Sehgal and Ken Jennings.

First broadcast in the USA on National Public Radio.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b06j6byb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 26 OCTOBER 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b06k9h2n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b06j57f3)
Human Rights in Northern Ireland, Social Mobility and Education

Northern Ireland & the unusual role of human rights discourse in the peace process. Laurie Taylor talks to Jennifer Curtis, honorary fellow in Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh, about her study into the way in which human rights became 'war by other means'.

Also, Vik Loveday, lecturer in Sociology at Goldsmiths College, discusses her research into attitudes to social mobility within higher education.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b06k9syn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h2q)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06k9h2s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h2v)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b06k9h2x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06kj4jn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Karen Smith.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b06kb7z1)
Big Data, National Parks, Pumpkins

George Freeman, the Conservative MP for Mid Norfolk, talks to Charlotte Smith about the first 'big data' centre of excellence for food and farming, which opens this week. He says it's going to revolutionise the future of British agriculture.
The North Yorkshire Dales and Lake District National Parks are expanding their area. Alison Morris lives and works in an area which will be encompassed and fears that it will push house prices up and local residents out. However, the Campaign for National Parks says that it will work with residents to ensure thriving communities.
As Halloween approaches, BBC Radio Leicester's Ben Jackson visits a farmer who is cashing in on the increasing seasonal craze for pumpkins.
Presenter Charlotte Smith. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


MON 05:56 Weather (b06k9h2z)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04sym21)
Black Chinned Hummingbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the North American black chinned hummingbird. What seems to be a large green beetle is flying erratically across a Los Angeles garden: suddenly, it hovers in mid-air to probe a flower bloom; this is a black-chinned hummingbird. Although often thought of as exclusively tropical, a few species of hummingbirds occur widely in North America and in the west; the Black-chinned hummingbird is the most widespread of all. Both sexes are glittering emerald above: the male's black throat is bordered with a flash of metallic purple, which catches the sun. Black-chinned "hummers" are minute, weighing in at just over 3 grams. But they are pugnacious featherweights seeing off rival males during intimidation flights with shrill squeals, whilst remarkably beating their wings around 80 times a second. They'll also readily come to artificial sugar-feeders put out by householders to attract these flying jewels to their gardens.


MON 06:00 Today (b06kbcy4)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b06kbcy6)
Social Class and Cultural Capital

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to the playwright Ben Power whose latest work interweaves three of DH Lawrence's dramas to evoke a lost world of manual labour and working class pride. The sociologist Mike Savage proposes a new way to think about class in Britain which not only looks at economic and social issues, but cultural preferences. Meanwhile the American writer Siri Hustvedt questions the cultural misogyny at play in the world of art, and Peter Davies celebrates the artists inspired by the northern industrial landscape.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b06kbcy8)
In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom

A North Korean Childhood

Human rights advocate Oona Chaplin reads the North Koeran defector, Yeonmi Park's remarkable account of her escape from one of the world's most repressive regimes, and her struggle for survival. Aged thirteen, she and her mother crossed the North Korean border into China where the pair fell into an underworld of human traffickers. Following their harrowing experiences, the two crossed the Gobi desert into Mongolia before they finally found freedom in South Korea. In today's episode, Yeonmi Park recalls what it was like to grow up in a dictatorship.

Twenty-two year old Yeonmi Park is now based in Seoul. She is travelling the world and speaking as a speaker and human rights activist.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06kbcyb)
Joan Collins, Cathy Tyson, Misogyny Monday

Award-winning screen star Joan Collins has sold more than 50 million copies of her books, translated into 30 languages. She joins Jane in the studio to talk about her sixth novel, The St Tropez Lonely Hearts Club, published early next month.

Actor Cathy Tyson discusses why she and playwright Michelle Inniss have set up their own theatre company, attempting to redress the lack of roles for mid-career black actors, particularly women.

'Don't feed the trolls' is advice regularly handed out when people find themselves subjected to abuse on social media. Gaming presenter Julia Hardy felt silenced by this approach and instead launched Misogyny Monday to call out trolls online and respond with witty one-liners.

Fleur Smithwick's novel 'How To Make A Friend' is about Alice and her imaginary friend, Sam. How common are such friends in childhood and should parents be concerned if their child suddenly develops one? Fleur and Dr Karen Majors of UCL's Institute of Education discuss.

Bettany Hughes, chair of judges for the Women's Prize for Fiction in 2011, champions the winning novel, The Tiger's Wife by Tea Obreht. You can vote now for your favourite novel from the last ten winners of the Women's Prize for Fiction. The vote closes on October 30.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Anne Peacock.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kbcyd)
How to Survive the Roman Empire, by Pliny and Me

Episode 1

First century Rome was a dangerous place. The Emperor had informers everywhere; no one was safe. One person who survived Domitian's purges was Pliny the Younger. Orphaned at an early age, Pliny was adopted and brought up by his famous uncle, the scientist Pliny the Elder, who died in the eruption of Vesuvius when his nephew was just 18.

In this first episode Pliny and his mother go shopping for a new slave. Pliny wants someone with secretarial skills to help him get his letters ready for publication. His mother has other needs in mind. They choose a man who was captured by the Romans when they invaded Wales and who has learned Latin and Greek from his previous master. Back at the villa the nervous new member of the household meets Doris, the Greek cook, an unsuccessful prophetess who was pipped to the post of Oracle at Delphi by another girl. If Pliny and his household are to survive the snake-pit of Imperial Rome, they must negotiate a political minefield, keep their eyes peeled for spies and most of all, not do anything to annoy the Emperor. Hattie Naylor's drama is based on real letters written by Pliny to his friends and colleagues nearly two thousand years ago.

Music composed by Pete Flood and performed by Pete Flood (percussion), Laura Cannell (recorder, crumhorn), Rhodri Davies (harp), and Paul Sartin (oboe, cor anglais)
Historical Consultant: Dr Peter Jones
Sound: Nigel Lewis
Production Coordinator: Eleri McAuliffe

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll.


MON 11:00 Duelling Scars (b06kbd0m)
On a July evening, a group of smartly dressed young men wearing caps and thin tri-coloured sashes are speeding through the south-western suburbs of Berlin. In the boot of the taxi is a set of scalpel-sharp swords. They're heading for a duel. Soon, two of those men will stand face-to-face with their opponents, swords drawn. And somebody may be scarred for life.

Writer Horatio Clare meets the German student fraternities who pursue a 200 year-old tradition of brotherhood, honour and swordsmanship - and for many of whom a duelling scar is still a badge of honour. He meets the members of Corps Marchia Berlin, one of many student Corps across Germany. What sets these all-male fraternities apart is the tradition of Mensur, academic fencing, a duel any aspiring member must undertake several times before they can be full members.

Horatio joins the Corps as two of its members prepare for a Mensur. In the training room at the Corps Marchia house he picks up a Schläger - the Corps duelling sword - and is taught the basic moves for defence and attack. But he discovers for himself that an even more challenging part of the Mensur is the steel goggles that the combatants wear to protect their eyes during a bout. The rest of the head is left exposed but the goggles are fastened so tightly that the swordsman can scarcely see. The duel is fought more by instinct than by sight.

The Corps pride themselves on a tradition of tolerance and neutrality, but many Germans confuse them with other outwardly similar groups who hold right-wing political views. As he trains with the Corps, Horatio asks his hosts about their relevance in the 21st century. They emphasise friendship and brotherhood, along with the courage and discipline which Mensur engenders, but there are other advantages: the lifelong bond between Corps members also gives plenty of networking opportunities after university.

At the Mensur, Horatio discovers that, if one of the duellists is hit, the real test is in how he takes that cut, the Schmiss. He must receive his scar without a flinch, without the slightest change of expression. The honour of the whole fraternity depends on it. This is what it takes to be accepted into their brotherhood. In the Corps, this is what it means to be a man.


MON 11:30 Dilemma (b01r5pxg)
Series 2

Episode 4

Sue Perkins puts Roisin Conaty, Samira Ahmed, David Reed and Robin Ince through the moral and ethical wringer.

The panellists finely-balanced dilemmas involve changing history; dipping into the archives; injust justice and a maths teacher's non-standard deviation.

There are no "right" answers - but there are some deeply damning ones.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2013.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b06k9h31)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b064jr1r)
26 October 1915 - Clemmie Crayford

Folkestone's most respected medium is troubled by a new and insistent spirit.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b06kbdm4)
Dementia, Railways, Movie merchandise

Dementia Tsar Alistair Burns discusses a new private-public partnership between the British government and big pharmaceutical companies which aims to find a cure for dementia within 10 years.

For nearly 200 years, Britain's railways have been an important part of national life. In the early years, they transformed our manufacturing industries, our diets and our leisure time and they also helped to create the first chain stores and mass advertising. Simon Bradley joins Winifred to talk about his new book, 'The Railways: Nation, Network and People'.

Film critic Anna Smith talks about movie merchandise on the day that the new James Bond film hits our cinemas.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Helen Lee.


MON 12:57 Weather (b06k9h33)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b06kbdm6)
With the government preparing for a showdown with peers over changes to tax credits we hear from Labour's leader in the Lords and the constitutional expert Vernon Bogdanor.


MON 13:45 All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception (b06kbdx5)
Episode 1

"All warfare is based on deception", wrote ancient Chinese philosopher and military strategist Sun Tzu. It may have been written five centuries before the birth of Christ, but his handbook The Art of War is as relevant now as it ever was. Historian and writer Ben Macintyre starts his 5-part focus on bluff and guile in battle with a look at the original strategists' bible.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b06kb0gg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b05s3pcg)
Mayday Mayday

A true, life-affirming story charting one man's journey from paralysis to recovery.

During the dying minutes of April 2004, as the Cornish town of Padstow celebrated the coming of summer, actor Tristan Sturrock broke his neck falling off a wall. Paralysed in hospital and about to become a father for the first time, he was told he may never walk again. This incredible true story charts his journey from the first of May to his first step, starring the real voices of all those who helped him to walk again. It is based on the stage play by Tristan Sturrock and Katy Carmichael, and adapted for radio by Becky Ripley.

Since its original transmission on 1st May 2015, Mayday Mayday has been awarded an international Third Coast Award.

Composer: Aaron May
Producer/Director: Becky Ripley.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b06kbdx8)
Programme 2, 2015

(2/12)
Why might an alien visiting earth find themselves faced with a Bellowing biographer, the Spartan victim of a swan, and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau?

The only place on Radio 4 where a question like this makes any kind of sense is Round Britain Quiz, and the teams will be unravelling it, with Tom Sutcliffe's help, in this week's second clash of the series. The Midlands team of Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock face the North of England pairing of Jim Coulson and Adele Geras.

As usual, the programme includes a number of ingenious question ideas suggested by Round Britain Quiz listeners.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b06kb0fy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Fiery Inspiration: Amiri Baraka and the Black Arts Movement (b06kbjdw)
Episode 2

The novelist and poet Bernardine Evaristo explores the complex and controversial man who played a key role in the development of the Black Arts Movement in the United States, and looks back at how the energy of that cultural phenomenon in 1960s America, inspired her as an emerging Black writer in 1980s Britain.

In Part 2, Bernardine Evaristo travels to Newark, the city where Amiri Baraka spent much of his life, she talks to the poets Sonia Sanchez and Nikki Giovanni - two luminaries of the Black Arts Movement, and she returns to the UK to ask whether it's time for a new Black Arts Movement in this country.

Presenter - Bernardine Evaristo

Contributor - Professor Komozi Woodward

Contributor - Sonia Sanchez

Contributor - Nikki Giovanni

Contributor - Charlie Hanson

Contributor - Paulette Randall

Contributor - Patricia St. Hilaire

Producer - Ekene Akalawu.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b06kbjdy)
Series 8

Doppelganger

The online world abounds with doppelgangers, cyber-twins, bots and mind-clones; in this Halloween episode of The Digital Human Aleks Krotoski explores the uncanny world of these digital doubles.

On the most simple level social networks and the now seemingly permanent cult of the selfie means that finding our visual double has never been easier. And its the appeal of this that was the inspiration for Niamh Gearney's website Twin Strangers where people register to hopefully track down their double. Niamh herself has found 3 doubles and she hopes to track down 7 having found that number in researching doppelganger myths.

For artist Daniel Bejar sharing his name with a famous musician has turned the online world into a battlefield for identity an idea he's exploring by changing his appearance to that of his more famous namesake and posting pictures to the web. While for Joanna McNeil she created her own cyber-twin; a bot to share answering her emails and messages. She hoped this would help her understand the ways in which emotion is conveyed online by delegating communication to an algorithm.

Its how the digital world makes doppelgangers of us all that fascinates Sara M Watson; technology critic and affiliate of the Berkman centre for internet and society at Harvard. We catch glimpses of these shadowy digital doppelgangers in ads that don't quite match who we think we are online or in recommendations make us feel uneasy. Its the attempts at personalisation of our digital experiences that she compares to the idea of the uncanny valley of robotics when something is so close to being human that it becomes repellent.

Producers: Peter McManus and Elizabeth Ann Duffy


MON 17:00 PM (b06kbjf0)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06k9h35)
The House of Lords is about to vote on measures designed to block the government's controversial cuts to tax credits. The WHO says processed meats such as bacon can cause cancer.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b06kbjf2)
Series 73

Episode 4

Agincourt, Kipling and Caravanning are among the topics on the cards as Josh Widdicombe, Jenny Eclair, Sheila Hancock and Paul Merton join host Nicholas Parsons as they try to avoid hesitation, deviation and repetition. Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

25th October 2015 is the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt. Nicholas remembers it well, of course.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b06kbk08)
Ed admits to Emma he thinks his days farming for himself are over. He'll have to give Oliver his notice, and then concentrate on his contracting work. Ed breaks it to Joe and Eddie. Eddie offers to help Ed out before he gives Oliver his notice - Eddie's due a big cheque for his work in Penny Hassett. But Ed says he has no choice.
Ed tells Emma he's proud of her, as she reminds him he's not the only breadwinner in the house. She persuades Ed to hold off talking to Oliver.

The Bull renovation is going strong, and Eddie looks forward to the builders being finished in Keepers Cottage by the weekend.

Adam asks David for his thoughts on the Fairbrothers, who are keen to go into share farming with Adam - David advises grilling them on their business plan. They discuss David's mixer wagon - Pip wants to buy a new one but it's a bit steep. As they cope in the meantime with self-feeding silage, Ruth's worried about them losing yields.

Eddie has a go at Charlie, who's grateful when Adam says that he'll speak at the public meeting on Wednesday - and Brian can chair it. Charlie calls Adam one of a kind.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b06kblgk)
Anne-Marie Duff, Under Milk Wood, The Affair, Fading light

As well as starring in the film Suffragette and the TV drama series From Darkness, Anne-Marie Duff is currently on stage at the National Theatre in Husbands & Sons, a combination of three plays DH Lawrence wrote about the Nottinghamshire mining community he grew up in, directed by Marianne Elliott. Samira meets Anne-Marie and Marianne in the theatre to discuss the challenge of staging them as a single play.

Kevin Allen's new film Under Milk Wood features Mrs Ogmore Prichard as a dominatrix and has Mr Pugh tearing the heart from his wife as they dance the Tango. Professor John Goodby asks if it's a good idea to update Dylan Thomas for a modern audience.

Dominic West and Ruth Wilson star in The Affair which examines the emotional and psychological aftermath of infidelity. Dreda Say Mitchell reviews the new series.

As the nights draw in and British Summer Time comes to an end - Front Row considers how filmmakers, writers, and composers have responded to the fading light of winter. With David Sexton, Literary Critic for the Evening Standard - Briony Hanson, Director of Film at the British Council - and Jeremy Summerly, Conductor and Director of Music at St Peter's College, Oxford.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kbcyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Welby: The Turbulent Priest (b06kblgr)
Mark D'Arcy examines the life and times of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. What drives him? And how far is he a political prelate?

Producer: Peter Mulligan.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b06kbm04)
Killing Cows

Carnivore and steak-lover Jo Fidgen attempts to work out whether killing cows for food can be morally justified

Many meat eaters believe animal suffering should be avoided. They buy higher welfare products or free range eggs and hope the animal they plan to eat has had a good life and a painless death. But if animal suffering matters, surely animal death does too?

Omnivorous Jo Fidgen explores the ethics of killing cows for food. She discusses cow psychology, fart spray and cannibalism with leading philosophers like Peter Singer and Jeff MacMahan. And she tests her own intuitions about meat eating as she looks a bullock in the eye before picking up some of his his minced and butchered body a few weeks later. And eating it.

While on this ethical journey Jo confronts big questions about where morals come from, what is bad about killing humans and how we decide what beings are worthy of our moral attention.

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w9l34)
Oak

Oak is the symbol of noble endurance, loyalty, strength, constancy and longevity, and there are over 600 species. Heart of Oak is the official march of the Royal Navy – a rallying cry to brave sailors to guard our shores. Tennyson urges us to live our lives like the oak, to be "bright in spring, Living in gold." Its broad, pleasing shape, hard wood and prolific acorns, as well as the lovely shape of the leaves, establishes the oak as the nation's favourite tree.

As a timber its fine qualities also make it perfect for prestigious buildings, such as the debating chamber of the House of Commons. It is the symbol of Germany and the national tree of the US. In war it is used on medals of honour. The acorn has been eaten by many cultures and North American peoples revere the ancient oaks, their acorns made flour and the bark medicine. Oaks have inspired many moral tales. Huge, sturdy oaks grow slowly from small acorns and in The Man Who Planted Trees and old shepherd re-forests a barren valley by carefully and steadily planning a few acorns each day.

We have rested under oaks, climbed them, used their acorns, bark and wood. We have even made music from their tree rings. We see the oak as a symbol of virtue and goodness and in druidism the oak is central to beliefs that stretch back two millennia or more - no wonder we have a love affair with oaks.

Original Producer : Andrew Dawes
Archive Producer : Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio

Revised Repeat : First Broadcast BBC Radio 4; 20th October 2015


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b06kbcy6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b06k9h37)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b06kbm06)
Lords defeat Government on tax credit changes

Malaysia's Rohingya Muslims;
Processed red meat cancer link;
Rotherham Muslim community stops co-operating with police.
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06kbm08)
Trigger Mortis

Episode 1

It's 1957 and James Bond, agent 007, has only just survived his showdown with Auric Goldfinger at Fort Knox. By his side is Pussy Galore, who was with him at the end.

Unknown to either of them, the USSR and the West are in a deadly struggle for technological superiority in the Space Race. And SMERSH is back.

The Soviet counter-intelligence agency plans to sabotage a Grand Prix race at the most dangerous track in Europe. But it's Bond who finds himself in the driving seat and events take an unexpected turn when he observes a suspicious meeting between SMERSH's driver and a sinister Korean millionaire, Sin Jai-Seong.

Soon Bond is pitched into an entirely different race with implications that could change the world. Thrown together with American agent Jeopardy Lane, Bond uncovers a plan that will bring the West to its knees in a heart-stopping climax.

Trigger Mortis is the first James Bond novel to feature previously unseen Ian Fleming material.

Read by Rupert Penry-Jones
Written by Anthony Horowitz, with original material by Ian Fleming
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer/Director: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b06j1xzg)
Gorilla gorilla gorilla: Latin names for animals and plants

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to River Cottage natural forager and writer John Wright about the surprising and wonderful Latin names used to describe animals and plants, and how they came to be. What is an Aha ha?
John Wright is the author of The Naming of the Shrew: A Curious History of Latin Names.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06kbm0b)
Peers vote to delay the Government's controversial cuts in working tax credits. Sean Curran covers a lively debate in the House of Lords.
Also on the programme.
* MPs condemn the imposition of VAT on sanitary products.
* A Minister is pressed over the loss of personal data of customers with the telecoms company Talk Talk.
* The Commons debates the arrests of protestors during the visit of the Chinese President to London last week.



TUESDAY 27 OCTOBER 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b06k9h45)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b06kbcy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h47)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06k9h49)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h4c)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b06k9h4h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06kj2jc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Karen Smith.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b06kj2jf)
Olive tree disease, Processed meat cancer risk, 60 years of auctioneering

A disease that attacks olive trees has taken hold in southern Italy. Xylella fastidiosa has infected more than a million trees that are now either dead or dying.
The World Health Organisation classes sausages and ham in the same category as cigarettes. Will it make a difference to consumers?
A Gloucestershire livestock auctioneer is celebrating six decades banging the gavel.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04symph)
Northern Jacana

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the northern jacana at home in Central American wetlands. A cross between a coot and a plover, northern Jacanas are found in swamps in Central America and Mexico. They're long legged birds with a black head and neck, and a chestnut body with yellow highlights. And, northern jacanas are polyandrous; the females have more than one partner. Males build platforms of floating vegetation and attract females by calling or posturing. If a female mates with a male, he may use his platform as a nest for her eggs. The female doesn't care for the eggs, but goes in search of up to three other mates. The result is that a single female may have several males raising different clutches of eggs for her and each clutch may contain the eggs of more than one male!


TUE 06:00 Today (b06kj2jk)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Media Show (b06kc96f)
Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate

The Media Show's Steve Hewlett hosts a landmark discussion about the BBC's future as the corporation approaches the review of its Royal Charter. The main players from government, regulators, broadcasters and other media will come together to assess how the BBC should be funded, what it should and should not do, and how it should be regulated. Steve and his guests will challenge the evidence, expose the brinkmanship and explore how specific changes could alter the DNA of the BBC. The no holds barred discussion will take place in front of a public audience which will put its own questions to the panel.

Producer: Paul Waters
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b06l162d)
In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom

An Impossible Choice

Human rights advocate Oona Chaplin reads the North Korean defector, Yeonmi Park's courageous account of her quest for freedom. Today, as her family struggles to find enough to survive a turning point is reached when Yeonmi's sister goes missing.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06kc96h)
Erica Jong, Joanna Trollope

'Fear of Flying' sold over 27 million copies worldwide. A decade since Erica Jong last published a novel, she discusses her new work, 'Fear of Dying'.

Erica Jong and Joanna Trollope compare their life experiences and talk about how much or little they think things have changed since they were young women in the early 1960s.

Vera Baird QC Police and Crime Commissioner for Northumbria and Nurse Richard Scott discuss the findings of the Court Observer's Panel which, since January, has watched adult rape trials in Newcastle.

Johanna Basford and why colouring for adults has become so popular.

Joanna Trollope was Chair of Judges in 2012 for the Women's Prize for Fiction. The winner that year was 'The Song of Achilles'. Is it in line for winner of the Best of the Best?

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kcb4g)
How to Survive the Roman Empire, by Pliny and Me

Episode 2

Venta, who used to be a free man called Cadwalader of Caerwent, has now been slave to Pliny the Younger for a month. He's been welcomed into the household, especially by Pliny's mother - though not by Doris the cook who resents him interrupting her divinations. With a picnic basket of stuffed dormice, Pliny and Venta go hunting for boar, though Pliny would much rather write a letter to his friend Tacitus than actually get his hands dirty - after all, he's got Venta to do that for him.

Hattie Naylor's drama is based on real letters written by Pliny to his family and friends nearly two thousand years ago.

Music composed by Pete Flood and performed by Pete Flood (percussion), Laura Cannell (recorder, crumhorn), Rhodri Davies (harp), and Paul Sartin (oboe, cor anglais)

Historical Consultant: Dr Peter Jones
Sound: Nigel Lewis
Production Coordinator: Eleri McAuliffe

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w9l9z)
Beetles

Beetles, in the group of insects known as Coleoptera or 'sheathed wing', make up roughly one quarter of all known living species on the planet, that's about 400,000 species. It's perhaps not surprising that beetles are at the heart of the many ways we take inspiration from nature.

"Ladybird, ladybird, fly away home,
Your house is all burned and your children are gone....."

This nursery rhyme is one of many across Europe that demonstrates our close relationship with ladybirds. Peter Marren, leading wildlife author, explains the story behind the rhyme and why the ladybird in folklore is seen as 'Our Lady's Bird'. The beetles collection at the Natural History Museum reveals the gold and silver beetles of the Cloud Forests of Costa Rica collected by Walter Rothschild in 1894. These beetles have evolved to evade predators with wing covers that reflect light and mimic drops of rain. Scarab beetles found in Ancient Egypt had a huge impact on both the ecology and culture of the region and we find out why they were revered as sacred.

In many cultures across the world, from Asia and India to the Americas, beetle wings have been gathered for centuries and crafted into textiles and jewellery. In the Amazon region, the Shaur tribe incorporated beetle wings into ceremonial dress to enhance their prowess as warriors.
With poetry by John Clare and a nursery rhyme written by A.A. Milne, we celebrate the beetle and the role it plays as both an exotic and mundane creature whose biology is so extraordinary that some scientists now wish to copy it. The new science of Biomimetics is evolving fast and beetles, with all their varied forms and irresistible structural colours, may yet prove as invaluable in our future as they have been in our past.


TUE 11:30 Tales from the Stave (b06kcb4j)
Series 12

Die Fledermaus

Frances Fyfield explores the handwritten manuscript of the famous Operetta Die Fledermaus by Johann Strauss II. It's held in the Wienbibliotek and the library host is Dr Thomas Aigner. Joining him is the conductor Gerrit Priessnitz, Stephanie Houtzel who sings Orlovsky at the Wiener Staatsoper and Anja-Nina Bahrmann who performs the role of Adele with the Vienna Volksoper.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b06k9h4l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b064jr35)
27 October 1915 - Alec Poole

Two year old Mathieu Dupont goes missing.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b06kcbvt)
Call You and Yours: What big changes have you made for the sake of your health?

Call You & Yours wants to know about any big changes you have made for the sake of your health.

The World Health Organisation has added processed meats, things like bacon and sausages, to the list of foods that can cause cancer. It says red meat is probably carcinogenic too.

We already know that smoking, alcohol, sugar, salt, being overweight, lack of exercise, sun bathing, loneliness, and even shift work are linked to ill health.

Has knowing what can make you ill led to a dramatic change in the way you live your life?

If so, why? Email us at youandyours@bbc.co.uk, and leave us a number so we can call you back.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b06k9h4n)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b06kj2jr)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Shaun Ley.


TUE 13:45 All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception (b06kw2bg)
Episode 2

In the Old Testament of the Bible, Joshua takes the city of Ai for the Israelites by pretending his army is running away. Believing they have routed their enemy, the city's defending fighters give chase to finish the job. Only then does a hidden Israelite attack-force rush into the city to set it ablaze. It is one of the earliest recorded instances of military deception. In episode 2 of his series, historian Ben Macintyre explores how this kind of feint has been a central tenet of military strategy ever since.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b06kbk08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b06kcbvw)
Blue Glory

By Hayley Squires.

For almost ten years Terence and his daughter Lillian have barely spoken to one another. But tonight, on his 60th birthday, father and daughter are reunited to watch their beloved football team vie for championship victory. Will they find reconciliation as satisfying as winning?

A tender drama about the fragile relationship between a father and a daughter, and the unifying power of the beautiful game.

Directed by Helen Perry

A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b06kcbvy)
Series 8

Copycat

Howling like a wolf, stolen identities and poetry composed from borrowed words. Josie Long presents stories of imitation and plagiarism.

Featuring:

Inspiration
Feat. Tom Robinson

Howling Cameraman
Feat. Rolf Steinmann
http://rolfsteinmann.de/
Produced by Rachel Simpson

Turd Ferguson
Feat. Alex Edelman
Produced by Sophie Black

No More Questions
Written and produced by Ross Sutherland

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in October 2015


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b06kcbw2)
Antipasto Agony

Bad news for lovers of tapenade and pesto. Olive trees are succumbing to a new disease. Tom Heap reports from Puglia on the ultimate foodie nightmare.

The heel of Italy is currently gripped by an outbreak of Xylella fastidiosa, a voracious tree disease that is systematically devastating olive groves in the main areas of production for olive oil.

95% of the world's olive trees are in the Mediterranean, and Italy is the world's second largest exporter of oil, behind Spain.

Rural communities risk being torn apart as the disease threatens the livelihoods of farming families that have grown olives in the region for centuries. The whole environment is set to change as trees die, leaving the landscape totally bare.

Tom meets the scientists about to wage war on the bacteria: Professor Giovanni Martelli and Dr Donato Boscia from the University of Bari. They are working to find a way of stopping the disease from spreading. If they are unsuccessful, olive production in the whole of the Mediterranean basin could be at risk.

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b06kcbw4)
Language Evolution: A Gene for Language?

How come humans learn to speak and use language in extraordinarily sophisticated ways, without any conscious effort, while other animals do not? Recent research suggests that the answer lies, in part, in our genes. And three generations of a British family held the key to discovering which gene.

Neuroscientist Dr Frederique Liegeois joins Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright to discuss the genetic basis of language.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b06kcbw6)
Philip Pullman and Caroline Criado-Perez

Author Philip Pullman & journalist Caroline Criado-Perez talk about books they love with Harriett Gilbert. Philip champions Sculptor's Daughter: A Childhood Memoir by Tove Jansson, the writer of the Moomin books. Caroline's choice is The Beggar Maid: Stories of Flo and Rose by Alice Munro and Harriett's is The Quiet American by Graham Greene.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b06kj2jy)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06k9h4q)
Government to press on with reforms to tax credits

The Chancellor says he'll press on with reforms to tax credits after the government's defeats in the House of Lords - but promises to reduce the impact on families.


TUE 18:30 There Is No Escape (b06kcbw8)
Episode 3

Andrew attempts to beat his workmate, Lennie, to a promotion.

But when all inevitably goes wrong, he then has to find a home for the dishwasher and tumble-dryer his girlfriend has already bought.

Sitcom about a man dissatisfied with his life, whose feeble attempts to run away invariably end with him traipsing home defeated.

Starring:

Andrew Lawrence
Diane Morgan

With Marek Larwood, Lizzie Roper and David Hounslow.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b06kch0h)
Jill admits she didn't sleep too well and Elizabeth feels stressed with work - and the
prospect of Lynda's visit to chat about Calendar Girls auditions at Lower Loxley. Joe's Ghost Walks have received a few complaints for being too scary, so Elizabeth sends Jill to spy on him tonight. Joe talks to Jill of a female ghost character who had something of Nigel Pargetter about her, also mentioning dancing and then teasing Jill about sleeping in Julia's old room.

Lynda asks Kirsty to consider the role of Celia in Calendar Girls. Helen seems too busy to audition, Lynda says, before revealing to Kirsty that Helen's pregnant. Kirsty feels the old Helen would have focused on her business and waited a bit longer before having a second child.

Lynda offends Susan by offering the role of Lady Cravenshire and saying she can easily pass for 65 with makeup. They also chat about Lynda's plans to make an actual calendar for the village hall fund.

Talk of ghosts makes Elizabeth think of Nigel - she admits to Jill that she sometimes feels his presence. Lynda delicately offers Elizabeth the role of Annie, the widow. Lynda tactfully explains that she thought of Elizabeth because of her courage, humour and determination to make something good come from a tragedy. She hopes Elizabeth might find the role cathartic - will she think about it?


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b06kj2k6)
Anthony Hopkins and Ian McKellen, Jafar Panahi's Taxi, Guy Garvey

Anthony Hopkins and Ian McKellen discuss playing Sir and Norman in The Dresser, Richard Eyre's television adaptation of Ronald Harwood's 1980 play, which tells the story of the relationship between a stage actor and his devoted backstage dresser, and their struggles to get ready for Sir's next performance.

Iranian Director Jafar Panahi was previously placed under house-arrest for propaganda against the Iranian government and is currently serving a 20-year ban on directing any films. Despite the restriction, he has managed to bring out another film. Taxi sees Panahi himself as a taxi driver driving around Tehran and sharing in-car conversations with various members of the local community. Iranian-born journalist and broadcaster Kamin Mohammadi reviews.

As Guy Garvey prepares to release his first solo album Courting the Squall, the Elbow frontman discusses taking a break from his routine, his desire to increase his workload and try his hand at new ventures including acting and writing.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Ella-mai Robey.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kcb4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b06kch0m)
The Billion-Dollar Aid Question

As the crisis in Syria deepens and refugees flock westwards, the UK government insists it is helping with a £1.1bn aid package to neighbouring countries - but is it being spent wisely?

Simon Cox tracks money going from the UK to projects on the ground in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, trying to find out how much eventually gets to refugees. It's easy to see how funding an NGO to build new homes for Syrians is money well spent. But can the same be said for the hundreds of millions of pounds that go through the United Nations?

The programme hears from aid workers, UN officials, refugees and UN investigators about cuts to food rations against a backdrop of high salaries and overheads.

So is the UN up to the job of managing a modern-day refugee crisis?

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b06kch0r)
Central heating, Mike Lambert column

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b06kch0z)
Teenage Mental Health

As evidence accumulates that mental health problems are on the rise amongst adolescents, are services keeping up? Claudia Hammond is joined by a panel of experts to discuss teenage mental health.

Professor Shirley Reynolds, Dr Dickon Bevington, Kimberley Robinson and Sarah Hulyer discuss the pressures teenagers face and how the mental health of our adolescents is changing. They also offer thoughts on how services could be reshaped to cope with this changing demand and what parents can do to help their teenagers.


TUE 21:30 The Media Show (b06kc96f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b06k9h4v)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b06kch12)
Anger in Beijing over an American ship in the South China Sea.

Govt announces review of House of Lords powers
Law and Justice party secures majority victory in Poland
with Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06mcvsj)
Trigger Mortis

Episode 2

It's 1957 and James Bond, agent 007, has only just survived his showdown with Auric Goldfinger at Fort Knox. By his side is Pussy Galore, who was with him at the end.

Unknown to either of them, the USSR and the West are in a deadly struggle for technological superiority in the Space Race. And SMERSH is back.

The Soviet counter-intelligence agency plans to sabotage a Grand Prix race at the most dangerous track in Europe. But it's Bond who finds himself in the driving seat and events take an unexpected turn when he observes a suspicious meeting between SMERSH's driver and a sinister Korean millionaire, Sin Jai-Seong.

Soon Bond is pitched into an entirely different race with implications that could change the world. Thrown together with American agent Jeopardy Lane, Bond uncovers a plan that will bring the West to its knees in a heart-stopping climax.

Trigger Mortis is the first James Bond novel to feature previously unseen Ian Fleming material.

Read by Rupert Penry-Jones
Written by Anthony Horowitz, with original material by Ian Fleming
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer/Director: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 A Charles Paris Mystery (b01pc2kt)
An Amateur Corpse

Episode 3

Charles wants to prove that his old friend Hugo didn't kill his wife, but all the signs are pointing to Hugo's guilt.

Bill Nighy stars as actor-cum-sleuth, Charles Paris.

By Jeremy Front - based on Simon Brett's novel.

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Joan ..... Geraldine McEwan
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Hugo ..... Paul Ritter
Holly ..... Susie Ridell
Detective ..... Don Gilet
Paramedic ...... Joe Sims

Director: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2012.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06kch17)
TIP: Susan Hulme reports from Westminster. The Chancellor has reaffirmed his commitment to cutting tax credits, despite the House of Lords voting for a delay. Meanwhile MPs debate the Welfare Reform and Work Bill. And The director of the trade body, UK Steel, says the industry in Britain risks bleeding to death without urgent action.



WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b06k9h5p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b06l162d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h5r)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06k9h5t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h5w)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b06k9h5y)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06kj00f)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Karen Smith.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b06kj00h)
GM, Anthrax, Bees, Leaf peeping

MEPs go to the ballet box in Strasbourg to decide whether or not countries should have the right to decide to grow GM crops, or to opt out. Scotland's farming minister has said that they will opt out, but Nancy Nicolson talks to a potato grower in Perthshire, who thinks it could be detrimental to the future of the industry
Anthrax has been confirmed in a cow on a farm in Wiltshire by Public Health England. It's the first time it's been seen in livestock in the UK in 9 years. Microbiologist Professor Hugh Pennington says there is practically no risk to humans.
A report by the Independent Monitoring Board says that prisoners taking part in beekeeping courses at Altcourse prison in Liverpool, are more relaxed as a result. BBC Radio Merseyside's Marc Gaier talks to apiarist Andrew Hubbard.
Beatrice Fenton talks to Mark Ballard, a curator at Westonbirt arboretum in Gloucestershire, to find out why this Autumn has been particularly spectacular.
Presenter Caz Graham. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04symwf)
Marabou Stork

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the gaunt undertaker looking marabou stork in Africa. It is not very scientific to describe a bird as ugly, but the marabou stork would not win any prizes for beauty or elegance. This bulky stork, with a funereal air, has a fleshy inflatable sac under its throat which conspicuously wobbles as it probes African rubbish dumps for carrion. Seemingly more at home amongst the melee of vultures and jackals squabbling over a carcass, it is known in some areas as the undertaker bird. But, in the air the marabou stork is an elegant sight. It has one of the largest wingspans of any bird, up to 3 metres across. Soaring effortlessly on these broad wings the storks scan the sub-Saharan landscape for food. Marabou storks are doing well, thanks to our throwaway society and they've learned to connect people with rubbish – a salutary association one might say.

Producer : Andrew Dawes


WED 06:00 Today (b06kj00k)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b06kdrfd)
Peggy Seeger, Stanley McMurtry, Alex and Milton Mermikides, James Buchanan

Libby Purves meets folk singer Peggy Seeger; cartoonist Stanley McMurtry; composer Milton Mermikides and director Alex Mermikides and auctioneer James Buchanan.

Stanley McMurtry MBE, otherwise known as MAC, has been the Daily Mail's cartoonist for the past 46 years. He started out as an animator before becoming a cartoonist, producing daily images for the Daily Sketch and latterly the Mail. Mac views his role as making "dreary news of the daily paper brighter by putting in a laugh". In all of his cartoons, except when making a political statement or when it depicts a tragedy, Mac includes a small portrait of his wife within the picture. MAC's Year 2015 - Cartoons from the Daily Mail is published by Spellbinding Media.

Milton Mermikides was diagnosed with leukaemia 11 years ago and his sister Alex became his bone marrow donor. Together they have created Bloodlines, a combination of a dance performance and a medical lecture, which conveys what happens in the body - and in the mind - of someone undergoing last-chance treatment. Bloodlines is part of the 2015 Manchester Science Festival and is at the John Thaw Theatre at the University of Manchester.

Peggy Seeger is an American folk singer who, along with her late husband Ewan MacColl, led the folk revival movement of the 1950s and '60s. She is on tour with the album Joy of Living which features new interpretations of MacColl's songs by artists including Martin Carthy, Christy Moore, Steve Earle, Eliza Carthy and Jarvis Cocker. Joy of Living - A Tribute to Ewan MacColl is on Cooking Vinyl. The Ewan MacColl Tribute Tour starts with a concert at the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall.

James Buchanan founded Amati, an auction house for string instruments. He started out as a porter at Bonhams auction house and after completing his apprenticeship worked at Christie's and Bromptons before setting up his own house in 2012. He quickly realised he had an eye for distinguishing between the real and the fake and has handled instruments worth millions of pounds from the great Italian makers Stradivari and Guarneri del Gesù. The Amati Exhibition is at the Langham Hotel, London.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b06kvxw4)
In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom

China

Human rights advocate, Oona Chaplin, reads the North Korean defector Yeonmi Park's account of how she escaped one of the world's most repressive regimes and her quest for freedom. Today, after a daring escape into China events take a dark and disturbing turn.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06kdrfg)
Talking about miscarriage, Miranda Richardson, Leaving care

Around one in five pregnancies end in miscarriage but it's a subject that people often struggle to talk about openly. Lisa Francesca Nand and David Kirk break the silence in a documentary 'First Heartbeat' which they made about their personal journey trying for a family and the miscarriages they experienced along the way.

Miranda Richardson was Chair of Judges in 2013 for the Women's Prize for Fiction which was awarded to May We Be Forgiven by A M Homes. Is it in line for winner of the Best of the Best?

Young people in residential care homes in the UK are expected to live independently from the age of 18. In the first of two special features for National Care Leavers Week Jo Morris speaks to Natalie a young woman who is preparing to leave the children's home where she has lived since the age of 14. Martin Crewe, Children's Services Director for Barnardos describes the challenges facing young people like Natalie.

Presenter: Nikki Bedi
Producer: Caroline Donne.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b06kdrfj)
How to Survive the Roman Empire, by Pliny and Me

Episode 3

Venta has now been Pliny's servant and scribe for four months. They've been happy months, despite living under the unstable Emperor Domitian. But as time goes on, news of arrests and executions begins to circulate. Doris the cook sees portents of evil everywhere, especially in the entrails of small animals. The uneasiness only gets worse when Pliny receives a visit from his fellow lawyer, and arch-rival, Regulus. Then Pliny makes a trip to Comum to open a new library he has built for his old home town. When he drops in on his former mother in law, and is given preferential treatment from one of her slaves, Venta too begins to worry about his future.

Hattie Naylor's drama is based on real letters written by Pliny to his family and friends nearly two thousand years ago.

Music composed by Pete Flood and performed by Pete Flood (percussion), Laura Cannell (recorder, crumhorn), Rhodri Davies (harp), and Paul Sartin (oboe, cor anglais)

Historical Consultant: Dr Peter Jones
Sound: Nigel Lewis
Production Coordinator: Eleri McAuliffe

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b06kdsf8)
Paula and Gerry - More Than First-Date Nerves

Fi Glover introduces a couple whose relationship has survived her crippling social anxiety, remembering their first date and recognising how far she's come since then, by setting herself the challenge of mastering all 17 sporting disciplines included in the Commonwealth Games. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Recycled Radio (b06kdxsd)
Series 4

Outer Space

Gerald Scarfe is your starship captain on a bumpy ride through the Cosmos, joining broadcasters old and new in a search for intelligent life. Brian Cox and Melvyn Bragg compete to explain the sheer bigness of the Universe. Is it like a fried egg or a packet of Maltesers? Then there's the vital question of the first alien contact. Apparently Earth will be safer if we pretend we're out.

Wise words, sound advice and a distinct lack of Vogon poetry as we chop, loop, scratch, mix and mash a century of space broadcasting.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


WED 11:30 A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics (b06kdxsg)
Series 1

A Fistful of Sand

By John Nicholson, Richard Katz and Javier Marzan

Richard Wilson plays Robinson Crusoe in an irreverent re-boot of Daniel Defoe's classic.

After cheating their captain of the ship's treasure, a couple of sailors go into hiding on a deserted island. Their plans to lay low are rumbled when they're discovered by a long-forgotten castaway and his Spanish manservant.

In this new series the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot of the book through their hapless buffoonery.

Cast:

Crusoe . . . . . Richard Wilson
Friday . . . . . Javier Marzan
John . . . . . John Nicholson
Richard . . . . . Richard Katz
Captain . . . . . Sam Dale
First Mate . . . . . Leo Wan
Briggs . . . . . David Hounslow
Dodd . . . . . Caolan McCarthy

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko


WED 12:00 News Summary (b06k9h60)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b064jr42)
28 October 1915 - Roy Lavoie

Private Lavoie sees an opportunity to escape court martial.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b06kj3xz)
Spotting the scammers, Tackling TB, Literary tourism

We hear from TalkTalk customers who think they may have received scam calls, text or emails. But how do you spot the scammers, and what should you do to protect yourself from becoming their next victim.

Burns experts tell the BBC that safety standards are not good enough for children's Halloween costumes.

The customers who paid to become qualified first aiders, but came away with poor quality training, none of the equipment they paid for, and worthless qualifications and certificates.

How the NHS is tackling TB. The UK has got a higher incidence of TB in Western Europe but the problem is finding people who are affected with the disease. So the NHS is planning a mobile van which offers screening and treament to homeless people.

The custodians of Haworth Parsonage, home of the Brontes, can't agree on how to modernise the museum to attract more visitors. What's won and lost by widening your appeal?


WED 12:57 Weather (b06k9h62)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b06kj3y1)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception (b06kw34x)
Episode 3

You probably know the original apocryphal story; after 10 years laying siege to Troy, the Greeks pretend to sail away, leaving behind a giant wooden horse. When night falls, a small Greek force creeps from the horse and opens the city's gates to the invaders. But there have been 'Trojan Horse'-style plots throughout history, from an extremely committed Persian general who cut off his own ears and nose to take Babylon, to Agincourt-era Scots masquerading as English troops in Northern France. In episode 3 of his focus on ruse and bluff in battle, historian Ben Macintyre also looks at more modern examples of sneaking behind enemy lines.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b06kch0h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Tommies (b06kdyqg)
28 October 1915

by Michael Chaplin

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

Justin Salinger, Indira Varma and Anna Madeley star in today's story set in neutral Holland. Tasked to complete a sensitive diplomatic mission Robert de Tullio finds himself drawn deeper not only into the murky waters of 1WW Intelligence but also into a more personal and dangerous quest .

Robert ..... Justin Salinger
Commentator ..... Indira Varma
Martins ..... Sam Dale
Tamara ..... Anna Madeley
Meulken ..... Mark Edel-Hunt
Jonqueer ..... William Brand
Van Hasselt ..... Chris Pavlo
Guard ..... Neet Mohan
Barman ..... David Hounslow
Driver ..... David Acton
Celestine ..... Pippa Nixon

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: David Hunter.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b06kdyqj)
Money Box Live: How should we tackle the growing epidemic of cyber crime?

If you weren't worried about cyber crime before, the Talk Talk crisis may have changed your mind.

The company says all its four million plus customers may have been affected. Some are reporting that money has been taken from their bank accounts. Talk Talk can't say whether all their personal details were encrypted and therefore protected to some degree.

Have you been affected? How happy are you to trust companies with your data? What more needs to be done to ensure our information stays secure?

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday with your questions - standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Lesley McAlpine
Editor: Andrew Smith


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b06kch0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b06kdyw3)
Ambivalent atheism; Neoliberalism and old age

Ambivalent atheism: Laurie Taylor talks to Lois Lee, Research Associate with the Institute of Advanced Studies at University College, London, and author of a study of non religious people. In the UK today a variety of identity labels exist which articulate non belief -atheist, agnostic, humanist, secular, rationalist, free thinker and sceptic. Most of these terms are associated with organised and activist forms of non religion. But what of the ambivalent atheist, whose beliefs may be fuzzier, less clear cut? They're joined by the philosopher, Julian Baggini.

Also, old age and neoliberalism. John Macnicol, Visiting Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics, & one of Europe's leading academic analysts of old age and ageing, asks if the idea of retirement is being replaced by the belief that citizens should (or be forced to) work later in life. In a harsher economy is the notion of old age, as a protected stage of life, becoming increasingly anachronistic?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b06kdywc)
John Whittingdale, ITV News at 10 revamp with Tom Bradby

In this first full interview for The Media Show, the Culture Secretary John Whittingdale talks about the BBC's distinctiveness, value for money and the licence fee settlement. Also joining Steve Hewlett in the studio to give their reactions are former OFCOM partner Tim Suter, and Professor Lis Howell, Director of Broadcasting at City University in London.

ITV's News at Ten has been revamped with its former political editor Tom Bradby replacing Julia Etchingham and Mark Austin as the main anchor on the programme. The more informal style has been met with mixed reactions on social media - some argue that it adopts a US style anchor approach, while other viewers say they want the news, not personal comments. Tom Bradby joins Steve to explain the vision behind the revamp, how the dynamic will work between him and newly-appointed Robert Peston, and why he thinks the BBC news should vacate its ten o'clock slot.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b06kdyyr)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06k9h64)
FIFA deal to give World Cup to Russia
Teenager murdered at school in Aberdeen


WED 18:30 To Hull and Back (b06kdz3q)
Series 1

An Affair to Forget

Sophie is on a quest for love whilst her mother is trying to get accepted in to a posh Lady's Golf Club.

Door-to-door sellers peddling thick bleach and an accident with a milk float all conspire to thwart their efforts.

Series 1 of the sitcom by BBC New Comedy Award winner, Lucy Beaumont.

Sophie still lives at home with her mum in Hull. They make a living doing car boot sales at the weekend. Except they don't really make a living because her mum can't bear to get rid of any of their junk. Plus, they don't have a car. As their house gets more cluttered, Sophie feels more trapped.

Starring Lucy Beaumont as Sophie and Maureen Lipman as Sheila.

Producer: Carl Cooper

A BBC Radio Comedy Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b06kdztv)
Concerned Oliver gives Ed a pep talk following the theft of Ed's cattle. Sadly, Ed didn't have the spare cash to insure the cows. Oliver offers an interest-free loan to tide Ed over but it's politely refused. Oliver reminds Ed he's a first class farmer and mustn't give up. Adam also has confidence in grateful Ed - tenancies are like gold dust, just look at the Fairbrothers.

Phoebe's taking her PPE test for Oxford seriously, and Jennifer's helping whilst also swotting for the Halloween pub quiz. Adam asks Brian about The Fairbrothers and their share farming proposition. Brian suggests reading their business plan very carefully. Adam also asks Brian to chair the public meeting about the Berrow Farm crisis on Wednesday. Adam suggests Alistair speaks as well.

Ruth and David talk about milk yields - the way they're doing things is like the old way, nice and simple. They need to discuss figures with Pip, who's busy helping the Fairbrothers. Ruth notes that Pip seems to be writing their business plan for them. Ruth doesn't want Adam taking the boys on under false pretences because of Pip. David encourages Ruth to have a night off and ring Usha to arrange a night out - if Ruth doesn't phone her, he will.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b06kj3y3)
Hussein Chalayan, Citizen Khan, Egypt after the Pharaohs

Samira Ahmed talks to fashion designer Hussein Chalayan about his ground-breaking dance show at Sadler's Wells. With Artistic Director Alistair Spalding.

As TV sitcom Citizen Khan returns to our screens, Samira is joined by writer and producer Anil Gupta, who also created Goodness Gracious Me.

Mafia expert John Dickie reviews Black Souls, an acclaimed Italian crime drama from director Francesco Munzi.

And Samira explores an exhibition at the British Museum about Egyptian religion after the Pharaohs, with curator Elisabeth O'Connell.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kdrfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b06kdztx)
Public Opinion

When Professor Averil Macdonald, the chairwoman of UK Onshore Oil and Gas, said that women are opposed to fracking because they don't understand it, the reaction was predictable. She was accused of being sexist, patronizing, misogynistic. But in all the brouhaha what was missed was the difficult moral question at the heart of her argument. Professor Macdonald was citing research that shows only 31.5% of women are in favour of shale gas exploration compared to 58% of men. She argued that while women do accept the rational benefits of shale gas, they prefer to give more weight to their emotional fears about its possible impact. Setting aside the issue of gender, fear has been a powerful motivator in many campaigns such as GM crops, nuclear power, the MMR vaccine and numerous others. Combine that with an understandable streak of nibby-ism and you get an implacable and emotionally charged opposition to progress or developments that could benefit the majority of people in this country. It took eight years to apporve Heathrow's terminal 5; a third runway is being fought even harder and HS2 is yet to get beyond the stage of computer generated graphics. Do we rely too heavily on public opinion? Should we trust politicians more to make the correct decisions on our behalf? Or are we abdicating our powers and responsibilities to a new breed of scientific philosopher-king? Rather than a toxic blend of ignorance and self-interest are these kinds of protest the sign of a healthy and thriving democracy where the voice of the minority is not only heard, but also counts and a reminder that there are values that go beyond the bottom line? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Matthew Taylor, Giles Fraser, Michael Portillo and Anne McElvoy. Witnesses are Ross Clark, David Babbs, Peter Tatchell and Patrick Diamond.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b06kdztz)
National Pride

Alex Marshall, fresh from writing a book about national anthems, discusses nationalism and patriotism.

Alex tells stories of meeting self-described patriots and nationalists from Japan to Paraguay via France and Kazakhstan, and explores how our thinking about nationalism and patriotism is highly dependent on place and time.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b06kcbw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b06kdrfd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b06kdzv1)
British man to be spared from flogging sentence in Saudi Arabia

British man will not be flogged in Saudi Arabia
Raqqa, Ramadi and raids - new US strategy on IS
Gay priest tells BBC Pope is being undermined
MI6 advertises for intelligence officers on Mumsnet
with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06mcwkx)
Trigger Mortis

Episode 3

It's 1957 and James Bond, agent 007, has only just survived his showdown with Auric Goldfinger at Fort Knox. By his side is Pussy Galore, who was with him at the end.

Unknown to either of them, the USSR and the West are in a deadly struggle for technological superiority in the Space Race. And SMERSH is back.

The Soviet counter-intelligence agency plans to sabotage a Grand Prix race at the most dangerous track in Europe. But it's Bond who finds himself in the driving seat and events take an unexpected turn when he observes a suspicious meeting between SMERSH's driver and a sinister Korean millionaire, Sin Jai-Seong.

Soon Bond is pitched into an entirely different race with implications that could change the world. Thrown together with American agent Jeopardy Lane, Bond uncovers a plan that will bring the West to its knees in a heart-stopping climax.

Trigger Mortis is the first James Bond novel to feature previously unseen Ian Fleming material.

Read by Rupert Penry-Jones
Written by Anthony Horowitz, with original material by Ian Fleming
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer/Director: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 The Pin (b06kgbgd)
Series 1

Episode 2

Join Alex and Ben in their weird twist on the double-act sketch show.

Strap in for a 15 minute delve in to a world of oddness performed in front of a live studio audience.

The Pin are an award-winning comedy duo, and legends of Edinburgh festival. They deconstruct the sketch form, in a show that exists somewhere between razor-sharp smartness and utterly joyous silliness.

After a sold-out run in Edinburgh, and a string of hilarious performances across BBC Radio 4 Extra, BBC 3, Channel 4, and Comedy Central, this is The Pin's debut solo show. Join them as they celebrate, make, collapse and rebuild their jokes, each other, and probably the radio too.

For fans of Adam and Joe, Vic and Bob, and Fist of Fun - a show of absurd offerings from two loveable idiots.

Producer: Sam Bryant.

First broadcast in Radio 4 in October 2015.


WED 23:15 Dreaming the City (b02ykyh1)
Strange Cargo

Four journeys into the dark recurring dreams of the city. In each episode, leading writers collaborate with documentary-makers Russell Finch and Joby Waldman to uncover the unsaid obsessions of city life.

Episode 4: Strange Cargo by Michael Smith

Writer Michael Smith returns to his hometown of Hartlepool for a glimpse into the historic port's collective imagination.

On a solitary walk back from the pub he peers into the shadows of the dark, deserted seafront.

These experimental radio features blend archive, fiction and documentary footage. What's real and what's fiction becomes unclear, just like the city. A city isn't just a location on the map, it's a place we imagine, dream about, invent even. A place to love, to endure or to resent. A place where you can find anything - but it always has a price. You don't need to live in one; it's part of the universal imagination. A place where everyone - and no one - belongs.

But the way we think of a city has common dark undertones, recurring dreams that come round again and again. These late night woozy dreamscapes each uncovers those unsaid obsessions, each taking a different theme - vermin, death, identity and -memory - and question why these ideas seem to keep coming back in the way we imagine urban living.

Producers: Russell Finch and Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

Location recording: Maxy Bianco.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06kgbgg)
Sean Curran reports on the fallout from the government defeat in the Lords on tax credits.



THURSDAY 29 OCTOBER 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b06k9h74)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b06kvxw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h76)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06k9h78)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h7b)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b06k9h7d)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06khvbm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Karen Smith.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b06khvbp)
GM, Pentland hills, Living wage

European MEPs have voted against a motion which would allow individual countries to opt out of using GM feed and food. They say that it's impossible to implement across Europe, which has free trade and open borders. Conservative MEP Julie Girling is pro-GM. She thinks clearer rules are needed around it, while Green party MEP Molly Scott Cato believes that European consumers don't want GM in any form and that the parliament should reject it altogether.

Sybil Ruscoe visits Evesham Vale Growers to see how the National Living Wage, which will be implemented in April, will affect workers, farmers and the cost of food. David Shepherd tells her it's going to have a big impact on their business.

Nancy Nicholson meets farmers who think that doubling the size of the Pentland Hills regional park would put a huge burden on other farmers in the area. Christine Grahame MSP proposed the extension and says that the move is in order to protect these areas and ensure that they are used properly by the public.

Presenter Sybil Ruscoe. Producer by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04syy3w)
Morepork

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the morepork or Ru-Ru, New Zealand's only surviving native owl. Strange double notes in the forests of New Zealand were once thought to be cries from the Underworld. But these calls are most likely to be that of a morepork calling. Its familiar call earned it the alternative Maori name of "ruru". Largely nocturnal, it has brown, streaky feathers and large bright yellow eyes which are well adapted for almost silent night hunting forays for large insects, spiders, small birds and mammals. In Maori mythology, moreporks, or "ruru" are spiritual birds, and can represent the ancestral spirit of a family, taking the form of a woman known as "Hine-Ruru" or "owl woman" who acts as a guardian, protecting and advising the family members.


THU 06:00 Today (b06khvbr)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b06kgggv)
The Empire of Mali

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Empire of Mali which flourished from 1200 to 1600 and was famous in the wider world for the wealth of rulers such as Mansa Musa. Mali was the largest empire in west Africa and for almost 400 years controlled the flow of gold from mines in the south up to the Mediterranean coast and across to the Middle East. These gold mines were the richest known deposits in the 14th Century and produced around half of the world's gold. When Mansa Musa journeyed to Cairo in 1324 as part of his Hajj, he distributed so much gold that its value depreciated by over 10%. Some of the mosques he built on his return survive, albeit rebuilt, such as the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Great Mosque of Djenne.

With

Amira Bennison
Reader in the History and Culture of the Maghrib at the University of Cambridge

Marie Rodet
Senior Lecturer in the History of Africa at SOAS

And

Kevin MacDonald
Professor of African Archaeology
Chair of the African Studies Programme at University College, London

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b06kvysb)
In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom

Into the Desert

Human rights advocate Oona Chaplin reads North Korean defector, Yeonmi Park's account of escape and survival. Today, following her escape from North Korea into China where she and her mother fell into the hands of human traffickers, a new but dangerous plan to find freedom takes shape.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06kggh1)
American folk artist and banjo player Abigail Washburn.

Abigail Washburn is an American folk artist and banjo player . She'll be playing live in the studio alongside her husband, Béla Fleck, ahead of their appearance at the London Jazz Festival in a couple of weeks time.
It's the 20th anniversary for the Women's Prize for Fiction. We've been hearing from each of the Chair of Judges from the last decade talking about their winning novel. Today it's the turn of Helen Fraser to talk about last year's winner, A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride. We continue our series following a young person as she leaves care. Today we catch up with Natalie to see how she's coping living on her own. And author Claire Harman unveils new facts about Charlotte Bronte discovered while researching her new book "Charlotte Bronte, a Life," as she joins Jenni alongside Jolien Janzingn who's behind the novel "Charlotte Brontë's Secret Love".

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kggh5)
How to Survive the Roman Empire, by Pliny and Me

Episode 4

Venta has been in the household of Pliny the Younger for five months, as secretary and scribe. Meanwhile, the Emperor Domitian's reign of terror continues. There's a rumour that he entertains people one day, then has them executed next morning on some trumped up charge. The atmosphere in the normally calm villa is uneasy. Pliny hears stories of slaves who are spying on masters. And then an invitation arrives - to dinner with the Emperor. They are instructed to wear black so Marcella arranges for their togas to be dyed. The night of the dinner arrives, and it proves just as alarming as they feared.

Hattie Naylor's drama is based on real letters written by Pliny to his family and friends nearly two thousand years ago.

Music composed by Pete Flood and performed by Pete Flood (percussion), Laura Cannell (recorder, crumhorn), Rhodri Davies (harp), and Paul Sartin (oboe, cor anglais)

Historical Consultant: Dr Peter Jones
Sound: Nigel Lewis
Production Coordinator: Eleri McAuliffe

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b06k9h7g)
The Comedian President

Guatemalans, united by anger against violence and a political system riddled with corruption, have chosen a comedian to be their next president. Jimmy Morales is riding on a wave of excitement - but his people want change. And they want it fast. There's another election this coming weekend -- it's in Turkey and the voting takes place amidst fears that the country could find itself sucked into the vortex of the seemingly endless war in neighbouring Syria. Russia's involvement in the conflict in Syria has its opponents outside the country but within Russia, few oppose President Putin's foreign policy. In this programme we meet a Russian war veteran who's defying public abuse and saying: those who launched this military operation don't know how dangerous it is, or how it will end. We travel to Patagonia in the south of Argentina to see how a Welsh community there is faring in the shadow of the snow-capped Andes. And the tastebuds are tingling in the American state of Oregon where a rather special kind of beer, only available at this time of year, is nearly ready!


THU 11:30 Ghost Stories from Theatreland (b06kgghc)
From Drury Lane to the old playhouses of Edinburgh, tales of long-dead stage-hands, actors and theatre managers who haunt the stage abound. These stories have usually only been whispered about backstage. Until now. Actor Jack Shepherd gets fellow actors and theatre staff to open up about their ghostly experiences in some of Britain's spookiest theatres.

He hears of the ghost of Joseph Grimaldi at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane, where actors believe the clown gives them a shove in the back when they've missed their cue or their mark on stage. There's the tale of the ghost of the 19th century actress Sarah Bernhardt, who is said to haunt the corridors of Brighton's Theatre Royal, and of the man in 18th century dress who appeared to a former artistic director of the old Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh:

"I realised I wasn't alone. I looked up and saw these buckled shoes and a man standing in the ash of the fireplace, wearing thick stockings and breeches. He was a very tangible, burly man in his late 40s, and he looked at me with the same curiosity that I looked at him, as if to say, 'What are you doing in my house?'"

Jack is our sceptical guide. Strange things happen in the theatre, and there is usually an explanation. Only what is it?

So widespread is the belief in haunted theatres in Britain that many have a 'ghost light' burning on stage all through the night. In Shakespeare's time it would have been a candle. Now it is a single bare lightbulb, intended to keep the ghosts at bay.

Contributors include Fiona Shaw, Gawn Grainger, Sir Richard Eyre and Max Stafford-Clark.

Produced by Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b06k9h7j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b064jrfg)
29 October 1915 - Nancy Parker

Folkestone is almost washed away by the rain.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b06khvbt)
Charity appeals, School water services, TalkTalk customers.

A government review is recommending a Fundraising Preference Service which would allow people to opt out of all charity appeals. Charities say it could cost them millions in lost donations but one of the UK's biggest charities - the Royal National Lifeboat Institute [RNLI] - is going to stop contacting people unless it has their express permission to do so. They explain why they have decided to act ahead of possible legislation.

Schools in the North West of England are paying almost three times more for water services than schools in other parts of the country. Figures from the Department for Education show that schools in the North West paid on average over ten thousand pounds each for water last year. In contrast, schools in the East of England paid just under three thousand pounds. Councillor Paulette Lappin from Sefton Council on Merseyside talks about this discrepancy.

How does a TalkTalk customer know if their data has been breached? One big clue is that they will be contacted by a lot of criminals trying to get them to reveal their bank details. You & Yours has been hearing from listeners in this situation.

Why do parking spaces appear to be getting smaller? Bob Walker investigates?


THU 12:57 Weather (b06k9h7l)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06khvbw)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception (b06kwl0d)
Episode 4

Knowledge is power. Nowhere is this more true than in the theatre of battle. In part 4 of his series, historian and writer Ben Macintyre looks at how espionage and misdirection –often through networks of spies and double-agents – relies on understanding your enemy's psychology. We'll also hear from a former member of the legendary SAS on how information control is vital to success in special forces' operations.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b06kdztv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b06kgvc4)
Julian Simpson - Fugue State

In the heart of the English countryside in a specialist residential hospital. A man, a government agent, is in a fugue state - a psychological shutdown - the result of something seemingly threatening that has taken place in a remote village.

Needing to act before the situation escalates and believing the patient can still hear, Doctor Fallon uses sound recordings to recreate events leading up to the point of shutdown, to prompt the patient's brain into remembering what has happened.

Julian Simpson's original drama was inspired by a series of talks and workshops at the Wellcome Trust, based around the latest thinking on how the human brain processes inputs - how it builds a model of the world, which we call reality, based on sensory information and our prediction of what we are expecting to see, hear or feel.

Scientific Advisor: Paul Fletcher

Director: Julian Simpson
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b06kgvc6)
Big Chill in Llanthony

Twenty years ago The Big Chill festival pioneered the concept of the boutique festival. Helen Mark meets founder Pete Lawrence as he returns to the magical Llanthony Valley where the first festival was staged. Together they explore the history of this unique landscape which has attracted artists and seekers of solitude since the 13th Century.

The imposing ruins of Llanthony Priory have been painted by Turner and it is here where Pete first decided to hold an event characterised by music in keeping with the surroundings. Just down the road is the Maes-Y-Beran camping ground where the event took place, 500 music lovers congregated on Wyndham Morgan's farm in 1995 and Ariane Morgan has fond memories of that time. Helen takes Pete to remember that day along with some of the musicians and festival goers who were there.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b06k9szg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b06kb0g8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b06kgvc8)
Brief Encounter

To mark the 70th anniversary of Brief Encounter, Francine Stock asks why it still makes grown men and women weep despite the restrained passions, clipped accents and various parodies. She enlists the help of fans Moira Buffini, Matthew Sweet, Thomas Dixon, Neil Brand and Antonia Quirke.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b06kgvcb)
Oxygen on comet 67P; Bees and antimicrobial drugs; Reproducibility of science experiments; Reintroduction of beavers

Oxygen on comet 67P
Molecular oxygen (O2) detected on comet Churymov-Gerasimenko 67P, has scientists baffled. Current models of the formation of our Solar System do not predict conditions that would allow for O2.

Bees and antimicrobial drugs
The antibacterial properties of honey have been exploited for thousands of years, but now scientists at the University of Cardiff are using honeybees to collect and identify plant-derived drugs which could be used to treat antibiotic resistant hospital pathogens. By screening honey for these plant compounds and identifying the plant through the pollen grains in the honey, researchers can narrow down the active ingredients and even exploit this to get bees to make medicinal honey.

Reproducibility of science experiments
A lot of science experiments, when redone, produce different result. Professor Dorothy Bishop chaired a report, out this week, on reproducibility in science. She explains why reproducibility is important, why failures are due to many factors beyond fraud, and how measures, such as pre-registration and collaboration on large expensive experiments, can help make science more robust and repeatable.

Reintroduction of beavers
In National Mammal Week and the Mammal Society UK is giving a whole day of its national conference at Exeter University over to the reintroduction of European beavers. In February last year a group of beavers were spotted apparently having been living and breeding on the River Otter in Devon for quite some time. By March this year an attempt by DEFRA to remove them had been challenged by local campaigners and now a 5 year watch period has been set up over which time the effects of the beavers on the ecosystem will be monitored. But how might the renegade rodents have been influencing the ecosystem? And with another project currently underway to reintroduce the Pine Marten, a large relative of the weasel, to Wales is there a new public focus on mammal reintroductions in the UK?

Producer: Fiona Roberts


THU 17:00 PM (b06khvby)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06k9h7n)
After almost forty years, China has ended its policy restricting couples to just one child


THU 18:30 Barry Cryer at 80 (b06kgvcd)
Barry Cryer is one of the most significant figures in British comedy. He wrote for Danny La Rue, David Frost and Morecambe & Wise, and has been a fixture on television and radio since the 1960s. He is of course best-known, and best beloved, to the Radio 4 audience for his work on I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue, the "antidote to panel games" which has been running since 1972.

To mark Barry's 80th birthday his son, Bob Cryer, organised a gala performance at the Palace Theatre in London's West End, in aid of one of Barry's favourite charities. Radio 4 is delighted to present a selection of highlights from the evening, which sees friends, family, contemporaries and other acts he loves assemble to pay tribute to the man the comedy world knows simply as "Uncle Baz".

Producer ... Ed Morrish
A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b06kgvcg)
Lynda's holding her Calendar Girls auditions today and Carol is looking at the part of Jessie. Susan turned down Lady Cravenshire, a part which Carol suggests Jill should go for. Carol's also helping Kenton with the Bull's Halloween quiz questions. She and Jill wonder what he'll get Jolene for their 2nd (cotton) anniversary. Jill and Carol discuss Joe's ghost walks - and his story about a chorus girl. Jill admits she wants to be back at Brookfield.

Ruth opens up to Usha - she feels guilty for not being able to forgive David over some big decisions, despite all his good intentions. Ruth admits she'd like Jill to come back to Brookfield - Usha suggests asking her.

Elizabeth knows that Jill's restless at Lower Loxley and perhaps wants to move back to Brookfield. She talks to Usha about Ruth and grief, with mention of not moving on. Elizabeth recalls her failed relationships with Ifty and later Roy. She relates in a way to the character Annie in Calendar Girls. With Elizabeth on-board to play Annie, Lynda gets thinking about someone comic to play Chris opposite her.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b06kgvcj)
David Mitchell, Francesca Caccini, Theaster Gates

The author of Cloud Atlas, David Mitchell, talks about his new horror-inspired novel Slade House. Inhabiting the same universe as his last book The Bone Clocks, this new 'slim' novel covers a period starting in 1979 and ending this weekend, and began its life as a series of tweets.

The dramatic ruins of a Bristol church is the venue for Theaster Gates's Sanctum. For 24 days there will be performances around the clock - from poetry to a drum and pipe band, choirs to readings - creating 576 hours of continuous sound.

In 1625 the celebrated Baroque composer Francesca Caccini became the first woman to write an opera, La Liberazione di Ruggiero. As Brighton Early Music Festival puts on rare performances of the work, music director Deborah Roberts explains why she is important.

The musician, Sting is auctioning off part of his art collection. Andrew Male from Mojo magazine, takes a look at what a pop musician's taste in paintings can reveal.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Angie Nehring.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kggh5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b06kgvcl)
Peter Oborne's Chilcot Report

The inquiry into the UK's involvement in the Iraq war started 6 years ago - and there's still no sign of a report. Political columnist Peter Oborne can't understand why: "Come on Sir John! It's not that difficult. I reckon I could get something together in 3 weeks." To prove his point, Peter Oborne attempts to put together a definitive 30 minute audio report into Britain's involvement in the Iraq war... within budget and on time.

Using evidence provided to the Iraq Inquiry and that already publicly available Oborne delivers his verdict on the key questions relating to the British Government's decision to go to war with Iraq. The programme hears from those in key positions in the lead up to the conflict, including:

Dr Hans Blix, Chairman of the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC), 2000 - 2003
Sir Christopher Meyer, British Ambassador to the United States, 1997 - 2003
Sir Stephen Wall - European Adviser to Prime Minister Tony Blair and head of the Cabinet Office's European Secretariat, 2000 - 2004
Carne Ross - First Secretary, United Kingdom Mission to New York, 1998 - 2002

Producer: Hannah Barnes
Researcher: Phoebe Keane.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b06kgvcn)
Financial Engineering

What does a financial engineer do? A mechanical engineer may design a machine, one that does a task or overcomes an obstacle, but what problems does modern finance solve? Can the clever manipulation of debt, equity or derivatives, really make human beings better off? Some think finance is a bit of a racket, designed to extract money from the enterprise of others; others think modern finance is a miracle that can create value from nothing. Evan Davis and guests try to get to the bottom of this argument on this week's The Bottom Line.

Guests:

John Kay - Economist and writer
Jessica James - Head of the FX Quantative Solutions Group, Commerzbank
Jon Moulton - Founder, Better Capital.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b06kgvcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b06kgggv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b06kgvcq)
The state of Jordan's refugee camps

Jordan's refugee camps - conditions so bad, some are returning to Syria;
China ends its one-child policy;
Special report from Southern Turkey;
Is the glass ceiling breaking in British boardrooms?
America has a new House speaker.
With Simon Jack.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06mcxcl)
Trigger Mortis

Episode 4

It's 1957 and James Bond, agent 007, has only just survived his showdown with Auric Goldfinger at Fort Knox. By his side is Pussy Galore, who was with him at the end.

Unknown to either of them, the USSR and the West are in a deadly struggle for technological superiority in the Space Race. And SMERSH is back.

The Soviet counter-intelligence agency plans to sabotage a Grand Prix race at the most dangerous track in Europe. But it's Bond who finds himself in the driving seat and events take an unexpected turn when he observes a suspicious meeting between SMERSH's driver and a sinister Korean millionaire, Sin Jai-Seong.

Soon Bond is pitched into an entirely different race with implications that could change the world. Thrown together with American agent Jeopardy Lane, Bond uncovers a plan that will bring the West to its knees in a heart-stopping climax.

Trigger Mortis is the first James Bond novel to feature previously unseen Ian Fleming material.

Read by Rupert Penry-Jones
Written by Anthony Horowitz, with original material by Ian Fleming
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer/Director: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Rob Newman (b06kgvcs)
Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution

Episode 3

One of Britain's finest comedians, Rob Newman presents a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of Survival of the Fittest and The Selfish Gene with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob is our guide on a journey through a unique audio A-Z of nature that takes in everything from altruistic amoebae and dancing squid to Richard Dawkins wrestling naked with a postal worker.

Piecing these fragments together allows Rob to correct some major distortions of Darwinism, as well as rejig the theory of natural selection in the light of what we now know about epigenetics, mirror neurons and the Flintstones.

Written by Rob Newman
Starring Claire Price, with Jenni Murray as the voice of the Encyclopaedia.

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast on 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06kgvcv)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 30 OCTOBER 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b06k9h8n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b06kvysb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h8q)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06k9h8s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06k9h8v)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b06k9h8x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06khsv5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Dr Karen Smith.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b06kgx2s)
Bramley apples, Sheep farming, Brewing

There are fears that there will be a shortage of Bramley apples in the UK this year. The warning has come from Adrian Barlow, Director of English Apples and Pears, the body which represents apple growers. He says it's because growers are favouring varieties like Gala, which are more popular with consumers.

Meanwhile, organic Bramley apple grower Adrian Blackshaw says he can't get rid of his apples, and that there is no demand in the market for them. He is set to lose 30 tonnes of unpicked fruit.

Caz Graham finds out what it takes to be a sheep farmer of the future, as she visits an event to inspire and enthuse young farmers in Cumbria.

Many producers in the UK are currently struggling with the political fall-out of the Ukraine crisis. The Russian ban on the import of meat, dairy and vegetables has shut off an important market for our producers. Clare Worden visits St Peter's Brewery in Norfolk to find out how the Russian import ban has affected their trade.

Presented by David Gregory-Kumar and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkysz)
Vampire Finch

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the blood sucking vampire finch. On Wolf Island in the remote Galapagos archipelago, a small dark finch sidles up to a booby with a taste for blood. Sharp-beaked ground finch is found on several islands in the Galapagos and is one of the family known as Darwin's finches. Several species of ground-finches have devolved bill sizes which vary depending on their diet and the competition for food. Usually seeds, fruits, nectar and grubs. But one sharp-beaked ground-finch has gorier ambitions. On the isolated islands of Wolf and Darwin where seeds are scarcer in times of drought this bird has taken to drinking the blood of other seabirds, especially boobies. It pecks at the bases of their feathers and greedily laps up the flowing blood. For this reason it's often known as the, the vampire finch.


FRI 06:00 Today (b06khsv7)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b06kb0fw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b06l1c8t)
In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom

A Place of Safety

Human rights advocate Oona Chaplin reads North Korean defector, Yeonmi Park's account of escape and survival. Today, Yeonmi and her mother struggle to come to terms with their past, and their harrowing experiences in China. Meanwhile, the search for Yeonmi's sister gathers pace.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06kh27l)
Priscilla Presley; Is there a gay dialect? Secondary breast cancer

Priscilla Presley on her long career in show business and keeping Elvis' memory alive.

Catherine Priestley, Clinical Nurse Specialist for the charity Breast Cancer Care, on the diagnosis and treatment of secondary breast cancer.

Is there a gay dialect? Benjamin Cohen, Editor of Pink News and Dr Lucy Jones, Assistant Professor of Sociolinguistics at the University of Nottingham, discuss.

Shami Chakrabarti was Chair of Judges in 2015 for the Women's Prize for Fiction. The winner that year was 'How to be Both' by Ali Smith. Shami talks about why she describes the book as 'not only good book, but a great book'. You can vote now for your 'Best of the Best' over the last ten year's of winners.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kh27q)
How to Survive the Roman Empire, by Pliny and Me

Episode 5

Pliny is put out when one of his guests fails to show up for dinner, though his mother is delighted by another guest, Martial the poet, much to Venta's disapproval. Venta has a visitation in the night from Pliny's dead uncle, Pliny the Elder - or was it just a dream? Then a visit from the obnoxious Regulus gives rise to a secret that Venta is compelled to keep from his Master. Pliny, meanwhile, in fear of his life at the hands of the Emperor, is thinking about his legacy.

Hattie Naylor's drama is based on real letters written by Pliny to his family and friends nearly two thousand years ago.

Music composed by Pete Flood and performed by Pete Flood (percussion), Laura Cannell (recorder, crumhorn), Rhodri Davies (harp), and Paul Sartin (oboe, cor anglais)

Historical Consultant: Dr Peter Jones
Sound: Nigel Lewis
Production Coordinator: Eleri McAuliffe

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll.


FRI 11:00 The Spider (b06kh27s)
Hidden amongst the long grass a spider is busy spinning. But this is no ordinary spider and it's no ordinary web that she's spinning. Alison Steadman plays Sandra the sun-loving spider and her 'alter ego', Patsy, in a funny tale written by Lynne Truss about an eight legged femme fatale. Sandra is a Nursery web spider, and as for the spinning; well she just can't help herself "Oh, Sandra, how many more times, my love? You are not a loom!" she cries. In fact, as she explains, she doesn't even have to make webs. Other spiders have to make webs to catch their dinner, but not the Nursery Web spider; she simply hunts down her prey, jumping out and surprising them, "its much more energy efficient and leaves more time for sitting in the sun admiring your own legs". Nevertheless she is very good at spinning which is just as well, because her web makes a perfect 'tent' or nursery in which to look after her young. Spinning also takes her mind off things, like her recent unfortunate encounters with male suitors who dupe her with their gifts, fake accents and cheating ways. The result is "pregnant with no dinner" and a family of over 100 spiderlings; quite a handful for a spider who never really wanted to be a mother. And so, Sandra sits by her nursery web, sharing her troubles with us and her 'alter ego', Patsy when she's not being interrupted by the "Spider Relationship Councillor". With wildlife sound recordings by Chris Watson and expert advice from Tim Cockerill, arachnophobes beware as on the eve of Halloween, a Nursery web spider takes to the airwaves, to reveal what life is really like in amongst the long grass!


FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Double Acts (b06kh27w)
Series 1

Red-Handed

Joel comes home early from work one day to find an unexpected visitor in the shape of Henry.

John Bird and Lawry Lewin star in the third of six two-handers written by Cabin Pressure's John Finnemore.

Written by John Finnemore

Producer: David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b06k9h8z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b064jrpj)
30 October 1915 - Kitty Lumley

The Dardanelles Committee of the British Cabinet decide to wind down the Gallipoli campaign, and in the last episode of Season 5 Kitty Lumley feels like pulling out of Folkestone.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b06khsv9)
Renewable subsidy cuts, FC United, Food waste

We report on a Private Member's Bill calling on parking charges to be dropped for carers, on the grounds that they're already saving the NHS millions of pounds. Across the EU 22 million tonnes of food is thrown away by households each year. We test drive two apps which are supposed to help you cut down on the waste.

And we report on the NHS transformation project which is supposed to tackle the number of people who stay in care longer than they should rather than finding homes in the community.

Also, FC United was created out of the supporters of Manchester United who grew disillusioned with the corporate nature of the modern game. They've just got into the first round proper of the FA Cup - but the nature of the TV deal is forcing them to play the game on a Monday. Are they right that Monday night football is a construction designed for TV - or should they stick to the rules of the competition they signed up to?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b06k9h91)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b06kh27y)
Shaker Aamer returns to Britain after 13 years; Lord Adonis on new Infrastructure Commission; Syrian peace talks.


FRI 13:45 All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception (b06khsvc)
Episode 5

For as long as there have been predators and prey, there has been camouflage. That said, the term was only coined, in a military sense, during World War One. The development of the rifle and then the sniper made it an ever more crucial aspect of battle. In this final episode of his series, historian Ben Macintyre also explores the role of military deception in modern-day warfare.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b06kgvcg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b03b2w1w)
Jeff Young - The Exuberant

By Jeff Young

Jack 'Space' Hopper is an Exuberant - meaning he hunts for meteorites. So if your house has been hit by a rock from outer space, he'll turn up on your doorstep with money in his pocket, a magnet on a stick and a mad desire to touch your fridge.

Jack's on the hunt for a space rock that's come down somewhere slightly to the east of Aberystwyth. His arch nemesis, and object of unrequited desire, is the flame-haired, musk-scented Aurora. But who will find the rock first?

A comedy about the mad desire to catch a falling star. Written by radio, TV and theatre writer Jeff Young and starring Adeel Akhtar (Utopia, Four Lions), Victoria Elliott (Hebburn), Eiry Thomas (Stella) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey).

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06kh281)
Liverpool

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Liverpool.

Matthew Wilson, Christine Walkden, and Pippa Greenwood are the panellists answering questions from the audience.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 New Writing from the Arab World (b06kh283)
Farida's Eyes

A series bringing attention to contemporary short fiction from the Arab World. In the first of three stories - Farida's Eyes by Sudanese author Leila Aboulela - a bright and eager student is struggling in class, but helping her is not a priority for her father.

Leila Aboulela won the first Caine Prize for African Writing. She is the author of four novels, a collection of short stories and several radio plays. Her novels include The Translator, a New York Times 100 Notable Books of the Year. Minaret and Lyrics Alley were both long listed for the Orange Prize. Leila's book of short stories, Coloured Lights, was short-listed for the MacMillan Silver PEN award. Her work has been translated into 14 languages. She grew up in Khartoum and now lives in Aberdeen. Farida's Eyes was originally commissioned by Banipal, the Arab literary magazine.

Reader: Amrita Acharia
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b06kh66d)
Professor Lisa Jardine, Philip French, Ronnie Massarella, Maureen O'Hara

Matthew Bannister on

Professor Lisa Jardine, the historian whose intellectual curiosity stretched across the arts and sciences. She was chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and a regular broadcaster on Radio 4.

Philip French, for thirty-five years the Chief Film Critic of the Observer.

Ronnie Massarella who built up a successful family ice cream business and managed the British showjumping team for 32 years.

And Maureen O'Hara, the red haired Irish film star known as the Queen of Technicolor. She appeared opposite John Wayne in five of his films including the Quiet Man.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b06kh66k)
With violence escalating in recent weeks between Israelis and Palestinians, the conflict is once again high on the news agenda. Coverage of the story is always scrutinised strongly and this week we'll hear from listeners who allege biased reporting about both sides. But can such a long-running and complex conflict be fairly covered in a forty second news bulletin? Roger Bolton speaks to Kevin Connolly, the BBC's Middle East Correspondent.

When The Daily Mail's cartoonist Stanley "Mac" McMurtry appeared on Midweek, he discussed the nature of modern satire with Libby Purvis. But during a discussion about political correctness, he used an outdated term to describe ethnic minorities that some consider offensive. Should Libby Purves have stepped in and corrected him on air?

When Erica Jong was invited on to Woman's Hour, many listeners expected a steamy listen. And the author did not disappoint. Presenter Jane Garvey's attempt's to reel it in were in vain, so was it a little too much for a morning during half term? Listeners didn't seem to think so. Roger speaks to Jane Garvey about a truly memorable interview and how you know when you've stepped over the line.

And last week Radio Solent broadcast an item about love in later life, and a lonely 95 year old local man, Bill Palmer, was one of those to call in. Within an hour of the call, Bill was in the studio, speaking directly to Solent's listeners. His story of elderly isolation touched many - it spread online and quickly went global. Roger speaks to Chris Harris, the executive producer on the day, and Chris Osborn, one of those who called in.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b06kh66n)
Paula and Gerry - I Thought My Anxiety Was Who I Was

Fi Glover introduces a couple talking about whether overcoming the crippling social anxiety that constrained her life - by tackling all 17 sports included in the Commonwealth Games - means she is no longer the woman her husband married. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b06khsvf)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06k9h93)
Shaker Aamer, the last British resident held at Guantanamo, has arrived back in the UK.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b06kh66q)
Series 88

Episode 7

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp. Susan Calman, Francis Wheen, Zoe Lyons and Elis James join Miles to take a look at the headlines of the moment.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b06kh66v)
Rob fusses over Helen and gives her some money to go and buy maternity clothes. He wants to take Henry to the Bridge Farm shop as he checks on progress and persuades Helen not to come, as Henry wants more Daddy time. Helen also wants to come with Rob to run some things by the shop's site manager, but Rob tells her to focus on shopping. Rob's also going to show Pat and Tony the baby scan on his own, teasingly pointing out to 'selfish' Helen that she got to show them Henry's.

Lynda treats Susan to lunch to discuss Calendar Girls, and cleverly reels Susan in - she knows Susan doesn't want to be in the show, so who on earth can fill the boots of such a challenging role as Chris, opposite Elizabeth's Annie? She needs someone sensitive, with comic ability and emotional depth. Susan selflessly agrees to take it on. She's even happy to strip off - well, she says, if it's good enough for Elizabeth Pargetter...

Helen and Kirsty meet up for the first time in a while. Helen gets upset as she talks about her pregnancy. Kirsty tells Helen she can tell her if anything's wrong, but Helen says she's fine. But it sounds like a question when Helen says everything's going to be alright.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b06kh66z)
Saoirse Ronan, The Hairy Ape, Ghost Stories and Acoustic Hendrix

Kirsty Lang talks to Saoirse Ronan, Oscar nominated at the age of 13 for Atonement, who plays an Irish immigrant in her new film Brooklyn, based on Colm Toibin's novel.

As Halloween approaches, unsurprisingly book publishers take advantage and countless book about ghosts have been appearing on our shelves. We take a look at three quite different examples and ask why our fascination with ghosts continues.

Susannah Clapp reviews The Old Vic's new production of The Hairy Ape, Eugene O'Neill's classic expressionist masterpiece. Yank, played by Bertie Carvel, is a labourer who revels in his status as the strongest stoker on a transatlantic ocean liner.

This week the opening of the house where Jimi Hendrix lived as a museum was announced. Kirsty hears from Benji Kirkpatrick, who will be playing at the opening, why he has made an album of the rock singer and electric guitar wizard's songs that are performed entirely acoustically and with no trace of a guitar.

Producer: Julian May.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06kh27q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b06kh673)
Suzanne Evans, Lord Heseltine, Tristram Hunt MP, Zoe Williams

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Townsend Hall in Shipston on Stour in the Cotswolds with a panel including UKIP Deputy Chairman Suzanne Evans, former Deputy Prime Minister Lord Heseltine, Labour MP Tristram Hunt and the columnist Zoe Williams.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00qx5rh)
Lisa Jardine: The Power of Memory

The late historian Lisa Jardine presented many editions of A Point of View. As a tribute, this is another chance to hear her reflections on the importance for history of the recording of personal memories and her regrets that her mother could no longer recall her own fascinating life.
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b064jrpl)
26-30 October 1915

Last omnibus edition of Season 5 of Home Front, an epic drama series set in Great War Britain.

CAST
Guard ..... David Acton
Esme ..... Katie Angelou
Norman ..... Sean Baker
Edie ..... Kathryn Beaumont
Roy ..... Tim Beckmann
Stella ..... Ava Bell
Ray ..... Scarlett Bell
Isabel ..... Keely Beresford
Gabriel ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Mack ..... Owen Clarke
Dolly ..... Elaine Claxton
Alice ..... Claire Louise Cordwell
Beau ..... Stephen Critchlow
Sylvia ..... Joanna David
Cooper ..... Mark Edel-Hunt
Marion ..... Laura Elphinstone
Hilary ..... Craige Els
Roland ..... Jack Holden
Man 1 ..... David Hounslow
Adam ..... Billy Kennedy
Kitty ..... Ami Metcalf
PC Eldridge ..... Dan Hagley
Brad ..... Neet Mohan
Clemmie ..... Joanna Monro
Albert ..... Harry Myers
Woman ..... Rhiannon Neads
Johnnie ..... Paul Ready
Marieke ..... Olivia Ross
Florrie ..... Claire Rushbrook
Dorothea ..... Rachel Shelley
Alec ..... Tom Stuart
Sally ..... Sarah Thom
Maggie ..... Hollie Thoupos
Ivy ..... Lizzy Watts
Nancy ..... Jane Whittenshaw

Written by Richard Monks
Story-led by Sarah Daniels
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b06k9h95)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b06khsvh)
Could the conflict in Syria change the results of Turkey's elections on Sunday?

A special report from Razia Iqbal in Istanbul.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06mcxt5)
Trigger Mortis

Episode 5

It's 1957 and James Bond, agent 007, has only just survived his showdown with Auric Goldfinger at Fort Knox. By his side is Pussy Galore, who was with him at the end.

Unknown to either of them, the USSR and the West are in a deadly struggle for technological superiority in the Space Race. And SMERSH is back.

The Soviet counter-intelligence agency plans to sabotage a Grand Prix race at the most dangerous track in Europe. But it's Bond who finds himself in the driving seat and events take an unexpected turn when he observes a suspicious meeting between SMERSH's driver and a sinister Korean millionaire, Sin Jai-Seong.

Soon Bond is pitched into an entirely different race with implications that could change the world. Thrown together with American agent Jeopardy Lane, Bond uncovers a plan that will bring the West to its knees in a heart-stopping climax.

Trigger Mortis is the first James Bond novel to feature previously unseen Ian Fleming material.

Read by Rupert Penry-Jones
Written by Anthony Horowitz, with original material by Ian Fleming
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Producer/Director: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b06kcbw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06khsvk)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b06kh67b)
Mark and Duncan - Finding a Rare Friendship

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between two friends, one of whom is disabled, yet whose relationship is equal in terms of the support they give each other. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b06kbcyd)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b06kbcyd)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b06kcb4g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b06kcb4g)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b06kdrfj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b06kdrfj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b06kggh5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b06kggh5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b06kh27q)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b06kh27q)

A Charles Paris Mystery 23:00 TUE (b01pc2kt)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b06kcbw6)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b06kcbw6)

A Man's a Man for a' That: Frederick Douglass in Scotland 13:30 SUN (b06kb0g2)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b06j6byb)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b06j6byb)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00qx5rh)

A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics 11:30 WED (b06kdxsg)

All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception 13:45 MON (b06kbdx5)

All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception 13:45 TUE (b06kw2bg)

All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception 13:45 WED (b06kw34x)

All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception 13:45 THU (b06kwl0d)

All Fair in War: A History of Military Deception 13:45 FRI (b06khsvc)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b06kch0z)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b06kch0z)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b06j1kf4)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b06kbm04)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b06k95d1)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b06j6by6)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b06kh673)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b06k9d2b)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b06kgvcb)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b06kgvcb)

Barry Cryer at 80 18:30 THU (b06kgvcd)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b06k9syn)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b06k9syn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b06kbm08)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b06mcvsj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b06mcwkx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b06mcxcl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b06mcxt5)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b06j5ycc)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b06kbcy8)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b06kbcy8)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b06l162d)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b06l162d)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b06kvxw4)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b06kvxw4)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b06kvysb)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b06kvysb)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b06l1c8t)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b06k9h0c)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b06kcbw2)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b06kcbw2)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b06kb0fw)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b06kb0fw)

Dilemma 11:30 MON (b01r5pxg)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b06k9bz9)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b06j0wfc)

Drama 14:15 MON (b05s3pcg)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b06kcbvw)

Drama 14:15 THU (b06kgvc4)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b03b2w1w)

Dreaming the City 23:15 WED (b02ykyh1)

Duelling Scars 11:00 MON (b06kbd0m)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b06k95cn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b06kb7z1)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b06kj2jf)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b06kj00h)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b06khvbp)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b06kgx2s)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b06jvcn2)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b06kh66k)

Feminine Mystiques 00:30 SUN (b037jn8q)

Fiery Inspiration: Amiri Baraka and the Black Arts Movement 16:00 MON (b06kbjdw)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b06j21ch)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b06kch0m)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b06kdztz)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b06j0mz7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b06k9h7g)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b06kblgk)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b06kj2k6)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b06kj3y3)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b06kgvcj)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b06kh66z)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b06j67y2)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b06kh281)

Ghost Stories from Theatreland 11:30 THU (b06kgghc)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b064jrpl)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b064jr1r)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b064jr35)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b064jr42)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b064jrfg)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b064jrpj)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b06kgggv)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b06kgggv)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b06kch0r)

John Finnemore's Double Acts 11:30 FRI (b06kh27w)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b06j1kdy)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b06kbjf2)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b06jvcn0)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b06kh66d)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b06k9sz1)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b06k9c13)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b06j0my4)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b06k9gzq)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b06k9h2n)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b06k9h45)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b06k9h5p)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b06k9h74)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b06k9h8n)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b06kdrfd)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b06kdrfd)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b06k95cy)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b06k95cy)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b06kdyqj)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b06j5bjl)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b06kdztx)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w9l34)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w9l9z)

New Writing from the Arab World 15:45 FRI (b06kh283)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b06j0myl)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b06k9gzz)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b06k9h2x)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b06k9h4h)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b06k9h5y)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b06k9h7d)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b06k9h8x)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b06k9h01)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b06j0mzf)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b06k9h13)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b06k9h31)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b06k9h4l)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b06k9h60)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b06k9h7j)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b06k9h8z)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b06j0mys)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b06k9h05)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b06k9h09)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b06j0n0l)

News 13:00 SAT (b06j0n06)

Nights of the Hunter 19:45 SUN (b06kb2lq)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b06kb0g8)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b06kb0g8)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b06kgvc6)

PM 17:00 SAT (b06k9c0g)

PM 17:00 MON (b06kbjf0)

PM 17:00 TUE (b06kj2jy)

PM 17:00 WED (b06kdyyr)

PM 17:00 THU (b06khvby)

PM 17:00 FRI (b06khsvf)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b06kb0gd)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b06j0wlw)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b06kb0gb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b06j6cyd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b06kj4jn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b06kj2jc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b06kj00f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b06khvbm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b06khsv5)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b06k9c1d)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b06k9c1d)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b06k9c1d)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b06k9szg)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b06k9szg)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b06k9szg)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b06j5qd3)

Recycled Radio 11:00 WED (b06kdxsd)

Rob Newman 23:00 THU (b06kgvcs)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b06j1kdm)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b06kbdx8)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b06k95cq)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b06j0n0j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b06j0myd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b06k9gzv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b06k9h2s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b06k9h49)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b06k9h5t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b06k9h78)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b06k9h8s)

Shedtown 19:15 SUN (b01q03sb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b06j0myb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b06j0myj)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b06j0n0b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b06k9gzs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b06k9gzx)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b06k9h19)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b06k9h2q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b06k9h2v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b06k9h47)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b06k9h4c)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b06k9h5r)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b06k9h5w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b06k9h76)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b06k9h7b)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b06k9h8q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b06k9h8v)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b06kcbvy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b06j0n0g)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b06k9h1f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b06k9h35)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b06k9h4q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b06k9h64)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b06k9h7n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b06k9h93)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b06k9syt)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b06kbcy6)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b06kbcy6)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b06k9szm)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b06k9szd)

TED Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b06h1d11)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 TUE (b06kcb4j)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b06kb0ft)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b06kb0gg)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b06kb0gg)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b06kbk08)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b06kbk08)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b06kch0h)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b06kch0h)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b06kdztv)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b06kdztv)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b06kgvcg)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b06kgvcg)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b06kh66v)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b06j5qdh)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b06kgvcn)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b06kbjdy)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b06kgvc8)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b06kb0fy)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b06kb0fy)

The Last Days of W.G. 10:30 SAT (b06k95ct)

The Listening Project 15:55 SAT (b06j67y6)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b06kb0g4)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b06kdsf8)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b06kh66n)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b06kh67b)

The Media Show 09:00 TUE (b06kc96f)

The Media Show 21:30 TUE (b06kc96f)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b06kdywc)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b06j67y8)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b06kh66q)

The Penny Dreadfuls 15:00 SUN (b06kb0g6)

The Pin 23:00 WED (b06kgbgd)

The Report 20:00 THU (b06kgvcl)

The Spider 11:00 FRI (b06kh27s)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b06k95cw)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b06kb0g0)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b06kbm06)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b06kch12)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b06kdzv1)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b06kgvcq)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b06khsvh)

There Is No Escape 18:30 TUE (b06kcbw8)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b06j57f3)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b06kdyw3)

To Hull and Back 18:30 WED (b06kdz3q)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b06kbm0b)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b06kch17)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b06kgbgg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b06kgvcv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b06khsvk)

Today 07:00 SAT (b06jv3qv)

Today 06:00 MON (b06kbcy4)

Today 06:00 TUE (b06kj2jk)

Today 06:00 WED (b06kj00k)

Today 06:00 THU (b06khvbr)

Today 06:00 FRI (b06khsv7)

Tommies 14:15 WED (b06kdyqg)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04hky3h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04sym21)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04symph)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04symwf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04syy3w)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04hkysz)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b06j0myv)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b06j0mz1)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b06j0n02)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b06j0n0d)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b06k9h03)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b06k9h07)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b06k9h17)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b06k9h1c)

Weather 05:56 MON (b06k9h2z)

Weather 12:57 MON (b06k9h33)

Weather 21:58 MON (b06k9h37)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b06k9h4n)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b06k9h4v)

Weather 12:57 WED (b06k9h62)

Weather 12:57 THU (b06k9h7l)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b06k9h91)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b06k9h95)

Welby: The Turbulent Priest 20:00 MON (b06kblgr)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b06k9h1h)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b06kb2lv)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b06k9bzw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b06kbcyb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b06kc96h)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b06kdrfg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b06kggh1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b06kh27l)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b06j1xzg)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b06kcbw4)

World at One 13:00 MON (b06kbdm6)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b06kj2jr)

World at One 13:00 WED (b06kj3y1)

World at One 13:00 THU (b06khvbw)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b06kh27y)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b06kbdm4)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b06kcbvt)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b06kj3xz)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b06khvbt)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b06khsv9)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b06j6cyl)