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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 OCTOBER 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b06gxd1q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b06j78nc)
1606: William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear

Union

by James Shapiro

Episode Five : Union

King James' quest for the union of England and Scotland is not easily resolved.

Ten years ago James Shapiro won the Samuel Johnson Prize for his bestseller 1599: A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

1606: WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE AND THE YEAR OF LEAR is a compelling look at a no less extraordinary year in his life. The book traces Shakespeare's life and times from the autumn of 1605, when he took an old and anonymous Elizabethan play, THE CHRONICLE HISTORY OF KING LEIR, and transformed it into his most searing tragedy, KING LEAR.

1606 proved to be an especially grim year for England, witnessing the bloody aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot, divisions over the Union of England and Scotland, and an outbreak of plague. But it turned out to be an exceptional one for Shakespeare who, before the year was out, went on to complete two other great Jacobean tragedies that spoke directly to these fraught times: MACBETH and ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA.

Abridged by Anna Magnusson

Read by Ian McDiarmid

Produced by Gaynor Macfarlane.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06gxd1v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06gxd1x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06gxd1z)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b06gxd21)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06gxdb8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Shaunaka Rishi Das.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b06gxdbb)
'Why I gave my kidney to a stranger'

'I wanted to feel useful.' A listener explains why she donated her kidney altruistically.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b06gxd23)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b06gxd25)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b06gw3kk)
Series 31

Artists' Ways - Wiltshire

Clare Balding has been exploring Artists' Ways in this series of Ramblings. This week she walks with Matthew Hopwood whose project 'A Human Love Story' takes him walking through England as a pilgrim, seeking hospitality where it is offered, meeting people where they are; on the path, in the pub, around the corner, on the street, in prison, in church, on the towpath. The people he meets share their love stories, which Matthew records and publishes on his online audio archive.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b06hk4yd)
Farming Today This Week: Universal Expo - Feeding the Planet

Charlotte Smith discusses global food security with a panel of experts as the Universal Expo - or World's Fair - comes to a close in Milan. The event's themes were 'feeding the planet, energy for life'. On the panel are Patrick Holden, founding director of the Sustainable Food Trust; Andrew Burgess of the giant vegetable growers Produce World; and Mark Lynas, co-author of the Eco Modernists' Manifesto.
During the programme we hear reports from the Expo - including how an algae could replace meat protein, and why farmers in Holland are producing insects as human food.
The producer in Bristol is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b06gxd27)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b06hk68b)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b06hk68d)
Steve Coogan

Joining Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles is the actor, writer and comedian Steve Coogan. He has won seven comedy awards, six BAFTAs for his work including The Trip and Philomena, and had a box office number one with Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa. He discusses his childhood, comedy career and love of cars, including his mum's Morris Minor Traveller.
Deborah Alma, emergency poet, turns up in a 1970s ambulance - not with a suture but a sonnet.
In honour of Alan Partridge JP Devlin visits Cromer to meet some of the locals.
Ninette Finch - an 82 year old grandmother - describes how she became a successful 'extra' in retirement after a career in a bank, and the strange stunts she's been asked to perform.
Colin MacLachan on serving in the SAS before swapping his beret for a mortar board, taking a First in History, and meeting his wife in the line of duty.
And author Tony Parsons shares his Inheritance Tracks: In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning by Frank Sinatra and London Pride by Noel Coward.

Easily Distracted by Steve Coogan.
The Emergency Poetry - An Anti-Stress Poetry Anthology by Deborah Alma.
SAS: Who Dares Wins, starts on Channel 4 on Monday 19 October at 9pm.
The Slaughter Man by Tony Parsons is out now.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 Homer, Hagrid and the Incredible Hulk (b06hk68g)
Ben Hammersley meets creators and fans to investigate how extended fictional universes, from Harry Potter to Game of Thrones, took over global culture.

Ben visits Professor Dumbledore's office to talk to Stuart Craig, production designer on the Harry Potter films; goes to Los Angeles to meet Lauren Faust, creator of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic; and travels to San Diego Comic Con where he discusses different universes with Marc Zicree, writer on numerous film and TV series, including Star Trek.

Ben also speaks to authors Robin Hobb and Warren Ellis, and to Axel Alonso and Ryan Penagos from Marvel. And he hears from numerous fans, including Game of Thrones superfans Linda Antonsson and Elio Garcia about the joys of fandom.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b06hk6bq)
Steve Richards of the Independent examines the mood on the Labour backbenches after a difficult week for the party leadership. He hears from a controversial group of activists called Momentum. And he marks the passing of two big political figures.

The Editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b06gxd29)
The Night Train to Luxor

How the world really works. These despatches come from: Egypt, where a former military intelligence officer is now firmly in control of the presidency and awaits the election of the kind of parliament from which seldom is heard a discouraging word; China - its president is about to pay a state visit to Britain. At home, his press relations staff are working hard to ensure foreign journalists toe the party line; South Sudan - can a city vanish? Yes it can, according to our correspondent who's just been to Malakal, once the country's lively second city; Australia - it can be fifty degrees centigrade in the Simpson Desert, a landscape virtually untouched by human hand. So why would anyone choose to go there, accompanied by a camel? And Afghanistan - a story about the sound of music, and of hope, amid the din of Kabul.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b06gxd2c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b06hyt38)
Aviva data breach, Parking your investments, Financial advice gap

Thousands of Aviva customers who have made a claim for a traffic accident have been plagued with cold calls after their personal details were stolen. The Information Commissioner is looking into the data breach which comes just 18 months since tens of thousands of customer details were stolen by members of Aviva's staff. Ed Wallace, Director, MWR InfoSecurity, joins the programme.

As people search for better returns for their money, they may be tempted to consider less conventional investments. Money Box listener Veronica contacted the programme after spotting an advert for an investment in airport car parking spaces. Offering a guaranteed rental income of 8% for at least two years on an investment of £25,000. One company which is offering the investment is Park First. Money Box finds out what you would - and wouldn't - get for your money. John Slater, a director of Park First and Russ Mould, investment director at stockbrokers AJ Bell, speak to the programme.

Citizens Advice estimates that 23 million people would have taken financial advice at key times in their life but didn't. Welcome to the advice gap. A wide swathe of people need advice about savings and investments but can't afford it, don't know where to find it, or are suspicious of it. The regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority asks this week how the financial advice market could work better for consumers. We ask how can the gap be filled? Keith Richards, Chief Executive of the Personal Finance Society and Sue Lewis, Head of Financial Services Consumer Panel, debate the issues.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b06gx716)
Series 88

Episode 5

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp. Joining Miles this week in the name of news are Jeremy Hardy, Bob Mills, Anne McElvoy and Sara Pascoe.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b06gxd2g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b06gxd2j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b06gxc1q)
Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh MP, Ian Murray MP, Owen Paterson MP, David Watt

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Elphinstone Hall at Aberdeen University with a panel consisting of one of the SNP's new MPs at Westminster Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh, Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland Ian Murray, former cabinet minister Owen Paterson, and head of the Institute of Directors in Scotland David Watt.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b06hyt3m)
Grammar Schools and Replacing Trident

Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? Is it acceptable that a young person's entire educational trajectory could be determined by a single test? Should we replace Trident?
Presented by Julian Worricker
Producer Beverley Purcell.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b06hyt3p)
Unmade Movies

Unmade Movies: Arthur Miller’s The Hook

The world broadcast premiere of Arthur Miller’s unproduced screenplay tells the story of a 1950s Brooklyn longshoreman who is fired for standing up to his corrupt union boss, but decides to fight back by standing for union president.

1951. The Brooklyn Docks. Dawn. Hundreds of longshoreman queue in line to see if they’re going to be given a counter and picked for work in that day’s gang. It’s dangerous work, but with a hierarchy of corrupt union bosses all taking backhanders above them, they have no option but to accept.

The Hook is part of a season of radio adaptions of unproduced screenplays by the major authors of the 20th century - including Harold Pinter, Arthur Miller, Orson Welles and Ernest Lehman.
Arthur Miller developed the script for The Hook with Elia Kazan and it was on the trip to LA to pitch it to Harry Cohn at Columbia Studios that he met Marilyn Monroe for the first time. Cohn asked Miller to change the script and turn the corrupt union bosses into communists. Miller refused and the screenplay was shelved. He and Kazan then fell out over Kazan's testimony to McCarthy's House of Un-American Activities Committee. Kazan went on to make On The Waterfront and Miller wrote A View From The Bridge, essentially reworkings of The Hook.

This radio adaptation is directed by Adrian Noble. During his career Adrian has received over 20 Olivier Award nominations both as artistic director of the RSC and as a freelance theatre director.

Cast:
Narrator - David Suchet
Marty - Elliot Cowan
Louis - Nigel Lindsay
Rocky - Michael Feast
Farragut - Tim Pigott-Smith
Piggy - Nathan Wiley
Enzo - Jonathan Guy Lewis
Sleeper - Kerry Shale
Therese - Joanne Pearce
Old Dominic - Vincent Riotta
Mama - Lorelei King
Irene - Hollie Burgess
Pete - Leo Heller

Screenplay written by Arthur Miller
Adapted for radio by Laurence Bowen

Sound Design by Wilfredo Acosta

Directed by Adrian Noble
Produced by Laurence Bowen
A Feelgood Fiction production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:15 Woman's Hour (b06hyt3r)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Nadiya Hussain, Laurie Anderson, Getting children to sleep, Followership, Intimate Hygiene

The winner of the Great British Bake Off, Nadiya Hussain, on baking and why she wants to be seen as a role model for the stay at home mum.

Followership: Birgit Schyns of Durham University's Business School and Peninah Thomson the Chief Executive of the Mentoring Foundation on the qualities needed in good followers.

Laurie Anderson discusses her new film Heart of a Dog, which deals with the death, loss and language.

The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep is the first self-published book to top Amazon's bestseller list. We hear from its Swedish author Carl-Yohan Forssen Ehrlin who tells us why he thinks the book works and Vicki Dawson, the founder of the Children's Sleep Charity, on what she believes are the best tips to ensure our children get a good night's sleep.

A year ago David Cameron promised to modernise an outdated law that doesn't allow the mother of the bride or groom to be recorded on marriage certificates in England and Wales. The Green Party MP Caroline Lucas tells us why this change still hasn't happened and what she's doing about it.

Do women really need special 'intimate hygiene' products? Carrie Osman who has founded her own intimate skincare range and the feminist journalist Jade Moulds discuss.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed.


SAT 17:00 PM (b06hywnj)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b06gwfzx)
Going Public

Companies like Royal Mail, Saga and the AA have recently listed their shares on the stock market. It gives them access to plenty of money to help them grow, but also means they're subject to public scrutiny. Evan Davis and guests discuss why firms decide to float and how they must adapt to becoming a plc.

Guests:

Martin Clarke, CFO, the AA;
Dan Wagner, CEO, Powa Technologies;
Gillian Karran-Cumberlege, Co-Founder, Fidelio Partners.

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06gxd2m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b06gxd2p)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06gxd2r)
17/10/15 UN European migrant figures

Three times as many migrants cross the Mediterranean to Europe compared with 2014.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b06hywnl)
Clive Anderson, Nikki Bedi, Olivia Colman, Robbie Savage, Alexander Armstrong, Lucy Beaumont, Rae Morris, Nitin Sawhney

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Olivia Colman, Lucy Beaumont, Robbie Savage and Alexander Armstrong for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Rae Morris and Nitin Sawhney.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b06hywnn)
Mohammed Bin Nayef

Saudi Arabia's human rights record is firmly back in the spotlight. A teenage boy on death row for protesting. A British pensioner expecting to be lashed. Britain no longer willing to help train those running the Kingdom's jails.

Our subject this week - Saudi interior minister Prince Mohammad Bin Nayef - is right in the thick of it. Mark Coles profiles the man who is a crucial counter-terrorism partner for Britain and United States, and a hardliner who is next in line to the Saudi throne.

Producers: Chloe Hadjimatheou and Katie Inman.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b06hywnq)
Suffragette, City on Fire - Garth Risk Hallberg, Wolf in Snakeskin Shoes, Periodic Tales at Compton Verney

The film Suffragette looks at the campaign 100 years ago to gain women the right to vote. It was made with an all-star largely-female cast and crew. How broad is the appeal of this historical retelling?
City On Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg has been hyped by the publishers and lauded by many critics. It's a 944-page novel about New York City in the mid 1970s; does it justify the hoopla?
Wolf in Snakeskin Shoes is a modern reworking of Moliere's Tartuffe at London's Tricycle Theatre. Set in a black southern baptist church with a dissembling pastor, do the themes still resonate in the twenty-first century?
'Periodic Tales, The Art of the Elements" is an exhibition at Compton Verney in Warwickshire. It explores the way the elements of the periodic table have inspired and influenced artists over the centuries.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Rowan Pelling, Geoffrey Durham and Linda Grant. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b06hyxc6)
Attention Must Be Paid - Arthur Miller's Centenary

"Attention must be paid to such a person," says Linda of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's 'Death of a Salesman' . Miller himself spent his long life paying close attention to the society and times in lived in. He scrutinised the American Dream in 'Salesman', in 'The Crucible' revealed its hysteria and in 'All My Sons' its corruption.

One hundred years, to the day, after the birth of Arthur Miller his biographer, Christopher Bigsby, mines the BBC's and his own archives, tracing the life and work of this towering American figure.

When Miller turned 80 Bigsby, with the radio producer Julian May, spent a weekend at Miller's Connecticut home and, on the porch with the birds singing, recorded him recalling his life. Miller talks about his early days as the son of an illiterate Polish immigrant in Harlem, surviving the Depression and his initial struggles as a writer. He remembers his first sight of Marilyn Monroe and his hearing before the Un-American Activities Committee which informed 'The Crucible'.

As well as these monumental events this programme includes his insights into lesser known aspects of his life. How his earliest performed dramas were written for radio in the 1940s, for stars such as Orson Welles, recordings of which Bigsby found. There is, too, the story of how be became a music collector, and how he was a carpenter.

There are contributions from Dustin Hoffman, Warren Mitchell and Brian Dennehy, who all played Willy Loman, and Ying Ruocheng, who played the role in Beijing. Henry Goodman speaks about working on his late play, 'Broken Glass'. We hear from Harold Pinter, Nicholas Hytner and John Malkovich. And there is previously unbroadcast material from Miller's brother and sister, and his wife, the photographer, Inge Morath.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b06gtr70)
Reading Europe - Poland: Entanglement

The Reflection Room

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best contemporary literature. In this hugely successful Polish crime thriller, a long suffering State Prosecutor finds himself trapped in a post-Communist limbo land of half-truths and secrets. Will he prove himself to be a redoubtable seeker of the truth or will he compromise? A perplexing murder reveals tantalising glimpses of links to the old regime.

Part 1: The Reflection Room
When Henryk Telak is found dead with a meat skewer in his eye during a Family Constellation Therapy weekend, State Prosecutor Szacki and his police colleague Olga, Kuzniecow, have to work together to deduce who killed the man and why. An apparent total absence of motive is compounded when attractive young news reporter Monika Grezlka, shows a more than professional interest in Szacki.

The writer Zygmunt Miloszewski is a leading Polish writer. The Teodor Szacki series is a best seller in Poland. Antonia Lloyd Jones is an award winning translator of Polish fiction and chair of the Translators Association. Dramatised for radio by the writer, critic and journalist, Mark Lawson.

About Reading Europe:
Europe is central to our lives - we go on holiday to Europe, we do business in Europe, we watch in amazement as the various states try to grapple with migration in Europe. Over the next year or so we will be engaged in the debate as to whether or not we stay in Europe. But how much do we know this continent's countries and, in particular, how much do we know about what they're reading?

Over the course of two years, Reading Europe will travel from Calais to Istanbul. Through dramatisations, readings and essays, Reading Europe and Front Row will explore what Europe is writing, publishing and reading - and why.

Cast:
Teodor Szacki................Bryan Dick
Olga Kuzniecow.............Christine Bottomley
Cezary Rudzki................David Crellin
Monika Grzelka/
Hanna Kwiatowska........Rachel Austin
Barbara Jarczyk/
radio news reader.........Alexandra Mathie
Euzebius Kaim...............Dermot Daly
Henryk Telak/
Father Pazcek...............Glenn Cunningham

Written by Zygmunt Miloszewski
Translated by Antonia Lloyd Jones
Dramatised for radio by Mark Lawson

Warsaw backgrounds: Zofia Morus
Polish language advisor: Richard Abel
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer/director: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b06gxd2t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Open Art (b06hyyt1)
Master Rock

Master Rock is a repertoire for a mountain, conceived and written by Maria Fusco, and recorded live inside Cruachan Power Station, sited deep inside one of the highest peaks on the West coast of Scotland.

Master Rock is a story composed of three voices and the sound of the mountain, which will be played by French composer Olivier Pasquet.

Created through brutal blasting procedures and pioneering technologies, Cruachan Power Station was opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 15 October 1965. Since winning a commission from Artangel and Radio 4, Fusco has immersed herself in the history of this extraordinary site, researching the power station's own archive, talking with the people involved in its creation 50 years ago and making field writings in the site.

Master Rock is a result of that work and tells the story of the mountain.

One of the voices in Master Rock is a Tunnel Tiger, one of the Irish explosive experts who emptied out the mountain so that the power station could be built one mile beneath the newly dammed Cruachan reservoir. Another is the ancient obdurate granite itself, the 450 million year old hard rock of Ben Cruachan. The third voice is Elizabeth Falconer, an unknown artist who made the huge mural inside the turbine hall of the power station.

This is the recording of a live performance, staged within the cavernous interior of the mountain.

Cast:
John Mulholland...........Lalor Roddy
Elizabeth Falconer.......Denise Riley
Granite........................Ceylan Hay

Music / Sound Design: Olivier Pasquet

Producer / Director: Maria Fusco
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b06gqh8f)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 51st series.

In almost forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of celebrity guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the famous panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 6

Oscar winning lyricist Don Black
Actress and writer Shobu Kapoor
TV Presenter Fern Britton
Novelist and Screenwriter Anthony Horowitz

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Producer ... Carl Cooper.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b06gtn4z)
Rural Miscellany

Roger McGough presents listeners' favourite poetry on a rural theme, including works by Robert Frost, John Clare, Christina Rossetti, and Wendell Berry, recorded for the programme in his native Kentucky. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 18 OCTOBER 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0m2v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Opening Lines (b037sdyz)
Series 15

Princess

The series which gives first-time and emerging short story writers their radio debut.

Philip Arditti reads Atar Hadari's straight-talking monologue. A young blade working as a hired hand in a kibbutz kitchen offers friendly advice on love but his motives are far from clear cut.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0m2y)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0m30)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0m32)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0m34)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b06j0tqq)
Bells from St Peter and St Paul, Shiplake in Oxfordshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b06hywnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b06j0m38)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b06j0tqs)
The Return

Inevitably, we all have to leave a place and, more likely than not, will experience a yearning to return - to a home, a sense of familiarity and safety.

The writer Kirsty Gunn explores her own relationship with the Scottish Highlands and the impulse to 'make homes in words'.

With reference to writings from Katherine Mansfield, Jayne Anne Philips and CS Lewis, and music by the Dixie Chicks, Dick Gaughan and Glen Campbell.

Produced by Rachel Hooper
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b06j0tqv)
Water Vole

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

In this programme recorded in 1999, Lionel Kelleway is joined by the late Rob Strachan on the outskirts of Oxford in search of water voles; the original 'ratty' in Kenneth Graham's 'Wind in the Willows'. When that book was written water voles were a much more common sight than today. But as Lionel is about to discover, looking in some of the most unlikely places near to modern human infrastructure can often bring about great rewards.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b06j0m3n)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b06j0m3z)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b06j0tqx)
Radiocarbon dating relics, Rural churches, Faith in the World Week

The Church of England has published a letter to the Prime Minister signed by 84 of its bishops calling for the Government to increase the number of Syrian refugees being resettled in the UK "to a minimum of 50,000" over the next five years. William Crawley speaks to the Anglcan Bishop of Durham, the Right Reverend Paul Butler and to the Melkite Greek Catholic Archbishop of Aleppo, Jean-Clément Jeanbart.

Rosie Dawson reports on a poll commissioned by BBC Local Radio for Radio 2's Faith In The World Week which suggests that people think British society is more religiously tolerant but less moral than it used to be. We also hear the experiences of families of minority faith traditions living in the UK.

In a frank assessment of the future of Church of England buildings, a panel led by the Bishop of Worcester, the Right Reverend John Inge, recommends the closure of rural churches where there is low attendance and a much more imaginative use of existing church buildings. He discusses the finding with William Crawley.

One of the measures the government of Sierra Leone took at the height of the Ebola crisis was temporarily to ban large gatherings. Kati Whitaker reports on the impact on religious practice in churches and mosques.

For the first time, theologians and scientists at Oxford University have joined forces to carry out a wide-ranging investigation into the authenticity of ancient religious relics. Professor Thomas Higham explains what he hopes the project will achieve.

Producers:
Dan Tierney
Carmel Lonergan

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b06j0tqz)
Peace Direct

Kamila Shamsie presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Peace Direct
Registered Charity No 1123241
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Peace Direct'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Peace Direct'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b06j0m45)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b06j0m49)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b06j0tr1)
By Adoption and Grace

Sunday Worship marks the beginning of National Adoption Week with a service of readings and music reflecting the joys and challenges of life for adoptive families. It's presented by Krish Kandiah, President of the London School of Theology and founder of Home for Good charity. He is also a foster and adoptive father. Krish hears stories from all corners of the Adoption triangle; Angela Frazer Wicks speaks of the circumstances which led to her losing her two sons to adoption, Rachel Gardiner and Alison Southall tell of their experience as adoptive mothers, and adoptees Sam and Ashley reflect on the effect of their early life experiences on their later development. Preacher: The Revd Tamsin Merchant reflects on the biblical metaphor of God as our adoptive Father. Producer: Rosie Dawson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b06gxysx)
Will Self: On Gardening

Will Self reflects on our relationship with gardens and gardening.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mj5kt)
New Zealand Bellbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the New Zealand bellbird. In 1770, during Captain James Cook's first voyage to New Zealand, an extraordinary dawn chorus caught the attention of his crew "like small bells exquisitely tuned": these were New Zealand bellbirds. New Zealand bellbirds are olive green birds with curved black bills and brush-like tongues which they use to probe flowers for nectar. Like other honeyeaters , they play an important role in pollinating flowers and also eat the fruits which result from those pollinations and so help to spread the seeds. The well camouflaged bellbird is more often heard before it is seen. They sing throughout the day, but at their best at dawn or dusk when pairs duet or several birds chorus together. Their song can vary remarkably, and it is possible hear different 'accents' in different parts of New Zealand, even across relatively short distances.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b06j0m4f)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b06j0wf1)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b06j0wf3)
Professor Sue Black

Kirsty Young's castaway is Professor Sue Black.

She is Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology at the University of Dundee, founder and past President of the British Association for Human Identification and heads the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification in Dundee.

Brought up on the west coast of Scotland and in Inverness, she fell in love with biology at secondary school and read Human Anatomy at the University of Aberdeen. After graduation she worked at London's St Thomas' Hospital as an anatomist and police began to call on her to help identify bones.

In 1999 she travelled to Kosovo, tasked with investigating the site of a mass shooting. She has worked in areas of conflict including Iraq and was part of the team helping to identify victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

She was awarded an OBE in 2001 for her services to forensic anthropology.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b06j0m4h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b06gqkv8)
Series 73

Episode 2

A Trip to Ikea and The Hippocratic Oath are amongst the subjects on the cards as Paul Merton, Julian Clary, Susan Calman and Josie Lawrence join Nicholas Parsons to see who can avoid hesitation, deviation and repetition. Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b06j0wf5)
A Milk Appreciation

When was the last time you drank a simple glass of milk? Perhaps you view it more as an ingredient for cooking or to splash in your tea rather than a product of beauty with its own strengths and qualities? When the retailers slashed milk prices to lure in customers, treating it as a loss leader may have made the consumer also view it as a commodity and devalue it too. Is it simply the 'white stuff'?

Dairy UK figures show an 18% decline in the average consumption of milk and milk products over the last 20 years. In the last year while volumes of milk sold on the market have increased slightly the value has declined. This Summer saw many dairy farmers protesting at supermarket depots, taking cows into stores and buying up all the supplies on the shelves in some branches.

Meanwhile sales of many milk alternatives are rising despite costing more. Sheila Dillon explores how these milks are made and can be used, what they give us compared to cow's milk and why they've become so popular.

Dutch 'milk addict and sommelier' Bas de Groot invites her for a tasting of milks, along with public health nutritionist Dr Helen Crawley and Professor Peter Atkins who's written about the history of milk. They discuss what could make us value the product more highly, what makes a variety distinctive and if it's possible to taste the 'terroir' of your pinta.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b06j0m4k)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b06j0wf7)
Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 The Jazz Ambassadors of the Cold War (b06j6lh3)
Julian Joseph tells the story of how some of the biggest jazz musicians toured the world in the name of democracy, only to turn the tables on the US government that had sent them.

During the Cold War, jazz was used as an instrument of global diplomacy. In an attempt to improve America's image abroad, a US State Department cultural programme sent out such jazz masters as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Dizzy Gillespie.

Jazz pianist, composer and broadcaster Julian Joseph recounts how, between 1954 and 1968, these 'jazz ambassadors' performed unlikely concerts in countries such as Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, the Congo, Yugoslavia and Russia.

But soon.,the contradictions began to occur to the musicians - they represented a liberal America, yet at home they still lived in a segregated society, with the Civil Rights Movement in full flow. The project exposed the often complicated and sometimes conflicted politics of the US government.

As the tours continued, the State Department's master plan had unanticipated consequences. The jazz luminaries did not always play ball and, in some cases, used their position to express their own politics.

Contributors include: Dizzy Gillespie's drummer, Charli Persip; jazz impresario George Wein; Penny Von Eschen, Professor of History at the University of Michigan; and Louis Armstrong biographer Ricky Riccardi.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06gx5qx)
Ayrshire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Ayrshire, Scotland.

Matthew Wilson, Anne Swithinbank, and Bunny Guinness are on this week's panel, answering questions from the audience.

Also, James Wong visits an exceptional urban garden in Vauxhall cultivated by Andy 'The Shanks Pony Gardener'. And to kick off our 'Exotic' season, Eric Robson makes the trip to Logan Botanic Garden near Port Logan.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b06j0wf9)
Sunday Omnibus - Challenges

Fi Glover introduces conversations from Lowestoft, Omagh and Glasgow, between family members who have had to face challenges but have overcome them with no regrets, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b06j0wfc)
Reading Europe - Poland: Entanglement

Antigone in Warsaw

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best contemporary literature. In this hugely successful Polish crime thriller, a long suffering State Prosecutor finds himself trapped in a posst-Communist limbo land of half-truths and secrets. Will he prove himself to be a redoubtable seeker of the truth or will he compromise? A perplexing murder reveals tantalising glimpses of links to the old regime.

Part 2: Antigone in Warsaw
Szacki struggles with his burgeoning feelings for attractive journalist Monika Grzelka and the increasingly complex background of the murder victim. The final clues fall into place when he stages his own Family Constellation Therapy session with all the suspects.

The writer Zygmunt Miloszewski is a leading Polish writer. The Teodor Szacki series is a best seller in Poland. Antonia Lloyd Jones is an award winning translator of Polish fiction and chair of the Translators Association. Dramatised for radio by the writer, critic and journalist, Mark Lawson.

About Reading Europe:
Europe is central to our lives - we go on holiday to Europe, we do business in Europe, we watch in amazement as the various states try to grapple with migration in Europe. Over the next year or so we will be engaged in the debate as to whether or not we stay in Europe. But how much do we know this continent's countries and, in particular, how much do we know about what they're reading?

Over the course of two years, Reading Europe will travel from Calais to Istanbul. Through dramatisations, readings and essays, Reading Europe and Front Row will explore what Europe is writing, publishing and reading - and why.

Written by Zygmunt Miloszewski
Translated by Antonia Lloyd Jones
Dramatised for radio by Mark Lawson

Warsaw backgrounds: Zofia Morus
Polish language advisor: Richard Abel
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore

Producer/director: Polly Thomas
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b06j0wff)
Jonathan Lee on High Dive

Novelist Jonathan Lee talks to Mariella Frostrup about his new book High Dive, a re-imagining of the events surrounding the bombing of the Grand Hotel in Brighton by the IRA during the Conservative Party Conference in 1984.

Also on the programme, novelist Sebastian Faulks reveals the influence of DH Lawrence on his own work, as he select Lady Chatterley's Lover as the Book He'd Never Lend, Mariella discusses prison book groups with Ann Walmsley and Sarah Turvey and Tatiana Salem Levy sends a literary postcard from Brazil.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b06j0wlw)
Pot Luck

Roger McGough presents half an hour of satirical poetry, read by Rory Bremner, with expert Katherine Rundell. Satire comes from poets as diverse as Horace, John Donne, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Hilaire Belloc and Adrian Mitchell. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b06grl93)
Colleges in Crisis

David Cameron has promised three million new apprenticeships by 2020. But Further Education colleges must deliver them against a background of year-on-year cuts - with the axe likely to fall again in this Autumn's spending review.

The National Audit Office has warned more than a quarter of further education colleges could be deemed financially inadequate by the end of the year. And this month MPs on the Public Accounts Committee will launch an inquiry into the financial sustainability of the sector.

But how far is the crisis also a result of poor planning and excessive borrowing by colleges themselves? A File on 4 investigation finds some institutions taking increasingly desperate measures to make ends meet.

And it asks whether the sector is being adequately policed: when a college faces financial collapse, what safety nets are in place?

Reporter: Fran Abrams Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b06hywnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06j0m4y)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b06j0m59)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0m5h)
18/10/15 Labour will reverse cuts to tax credits

Labour will reverse cuts to tax credits. Turkey asks Germany to speed up bid to join EU.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b06j0wty)
Hardeep Singh Kohli

Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses his BBC Radio highlights from the past week.

This week we pay homage to one of Hardeep's favourite writers, the great Arthur Miller as we celebrate the centenary of his birth.

There's magic, of the roundabout variety, a beautiful, tear-inducing story about a World War 2 veteran from BBC Radio Lincolnshire, some more Arthur Miller, mules, German shepherds, Kevin Bridges, did we mention Arthur Miller?.......also Frankie Boyle and a truly wonderful documentary about Bob Dylan...which isn't Arthur Miller.

Something for everyone and everyone for something. Or another.

Produced by Stephen Garner.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b06j0wv0)
In the knowledge of Calendar Girls, Brian thinks the Christmas Show might actually be worth seeing this year - and wonders who's in the cast (Sabrina Thwaite's involvement wouldn't harm ticket sales!) perhaps Jennifer should have a go, he says?

Susan thinks the dairy is spotless but Joe says there could be all sorts of diseases there. Joe gets rather upset with PC Burns at the lack of progress finding Ed's cows. David has called an emergency Farm Watch group meeting for tomorrow. Meanwhile, Dan has whipped Toby and his rugby mates into shape as they work to restore the village hall.

Brian's shocked when he goes to Berrow: there are fifteen cows being treated and Charlie has already lost twenty-six. Charlie insists he's on top of things - he just needs confirmation from the vet about what's causing this. Charlie's best guess is botulism. There's no sign of it letting up.

Susan's tempted to be in the Christmas show until she realises it's Calendar Girls. Neil's more concerned about Berrow and asks Jennifer what's really going on. Joe speculates on why Rob left: Jennifer says it was personal and also reveals that Helen is pregnant.
Jennifer demands to know from Brian what's happening. Brian doesn't think it's anything infections, but it's serious and there's no way Brian can sugar-coat it for the community.


SUN 19:15 Shedtown (b01pw3lq)
Series 2

'Til Press Do Us Part

Who hasn't thought about running away from it all at some time or other?

Throwing caution to the wind, wrenching oneself out of a long established orbit to head for the deep space of the unknown?

In series two of Shedtown, our wooden 'man-cave', icon of escape and isolation - the shed - continues to be a symbol of possibility and change.

Episode 2:
As William weds his blushing, boiler-suited, berk of a bride, old Johnny Edwards takes a turn for the worse.

Barry............................Tony Pitts
Jimmy..........................Stephen Mangan
Eleanor.........................Ronni Ancona
Johnny..........................Alan Leith
Colin.............................Johnny Vegas
Deborah........................Emma Fryer
William.........................Adrian Manfredi
Diane...........................Rosina Carbone
Dave............................Shaun Dooley
Father Michael.............James Quinn
Wes............................Warren Brown
Nell.............................Eleanor Samson

Narrator.......................Maxine Peake
Music..........................Paul Heaton and Jonny Lexus

Written and Directed by Tony Pitts
Produced by Sally Harrison
A Woolyback production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Funny Bones (b06j0xfj)
Cinema Trip

A new series of original stories in which Irish writers showcase their funny bones.

In this fantastically funny series, Yasmine Akram tells a tale of young woe and magical intervention. Tara Flynn takes us into the world of competitive baking and zombie hordes in 'Fete Worse than Death'. Finally, a trip to the cinema takes a surprising turn in a new story by comedian Maeve Higgins.

Writer ..... Maeve Higgins
Reader ..... Eileen Walsh
Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b06gxxl9)
Debating the Past

When it comes to debate, how combative is too combative? When historian Niall Ferguson and novelist Jane Smiley appeared on Start the Week, a heated discussion took place about the nature of historical truth. But while a few listeners enjoyed the sparku exchange, it was too much for many. Two Feedback listeners hold their own debate, asking whether the exchange made for great radio or an argumentative mess. Roger Bolton is in the chair, but can he mediate?

Last week saw BBC Radio 4 celebrating National Poetry Day, with a marathon of live programming hosted by Andrew Marr, exploring British history and identity through poetry. 'We British: An Epic in Poetry', considered verse by the likes of Donne, Tennyson and Tempest, with contribution from a wide array of actors and experts. But how did the programming define British? And was the choice of verse radical enough for our listeners' tastes? Roger puts the listener reaction to the BBC Bristol Arts and Poetry editor, James Cook.

Last week, a Radio 4 play took on the difficult subject of Female Genital Mutilation. Many listeners were left shocked and moved. Written by Charlene James, the play told the story of two South London teenagers both affected by FGM. Listeners tell us why they felt they couldn't turn off.

And, what on earth is Grass Frost? Listeners have spotted the term popping up on the BBC's recent weather output, but the new terminology has left some listeners baffled. Roger speaks to BBC weather forecaster, Peter Gibbs, for answers on this meteorological phenomenon. And while he's there, where did 'pokey showers' come from?

Producer: Katherine Godfrey.
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b06gxxl7)
Geoffrey Howe, Sue Lloyd-Roberts, Joe Henson, Hugh Scully and Alexander Faris

Julian Worricker on:
The former Chancellor and Foreign Secretary, Geoffrey Howe, whose resignation speech in the Commons was generally regarded as the beginning of the end for Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister.
The journalist, Sue Lloyd-Roberts, whose reporting frequently took her to some of the most dangerous parts of the world.
The farmer and conservationist, Joe Henson, who founded the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.
Hugh Scully, who rose to fame as a television presenter through his work on 'Nationwide' and 'Antiques Roadshow'.
And the composer, Alexander Faris, best known for writing the theme tune to the 1970s ITV drama, Upstairs Downstairs.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b06hyt38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b06j0tqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b06gqr68)
Scotland's Radical Land Reform

In June the Scottish Government introduced radical proposals for land reform. Local communities would gain a new right to ask the government to force a landowner to sell their land if they are deemed a barrier to sustainable development. The plan caused uproar amongst landowners. David Cameron's father-in-law, Lord Astor, claimed the SNP was staging a Mugabe-style land grab. Yet campaigners in the growing cross-party movement for reform see this as just the start of a generational mission to break up the most unequal pattern of land ownership in the developed world. Is this an attack on the right of individuals to hold on to their property - or a much-needed step towards sustainable development?

Euan McIlwraith asks why so few people own so much of Scotland, whether it matters, and how you can legitimately diversify ownership in a 21st century liberal democracy.

Producer: Liza Grieg.

(Image: The Scottish Highlands. Credit: Shutterstock)


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b06j0m65)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b06j0xfv)
Dennis Sewell of The Spectator analyses how the newspapers are covering the big stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b06gwcp9)
Tom Hiddleston, The Program, The Lobster, Beasts of No Nation, Virtual Reality

With Francine Stock

We can see Tom Hiddleston in three movies over the next few months; he explains why his films are like London buses.

Actor Ben Foster mounts a defence of Lance Armstrong, the disgraced cyclist he plays in Stephen Frears' new drama The Program.

Yorgos Lanthimos discusses the reasons that his characters are transformed into animals if they don't find a a mate in his satire The Lobster.

Chris Milk reveals the future of virtual reality and why it will supersede the medium of cinema.

Cary Fukunaga discusses the use of child actors to play child soldiers in his harrowing war movie Beasts Of No Nation

Producer Catherine Bray remembers the time when she thought her hair might actually be space worms, after watching a horror movie at the tender age of ten.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b06j0tqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 19 OCTOBER 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0m8v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b06grz17)
Being Single - Modern Romance

Modern romance: love in the age of technology. Laurie Taylor talks to Eric Klinenberg, Professor of Sociology at New York University, & co- author of a new study exploring the dilemmas & pleasures of dating in the age of Tinder. He's joined by the writer & blogger, Zoe Margolis.

Also, Ai Ling Lay, lecturer in Marketing & Management at the University of Leicester, discusses her research on 'singles' in the marketplace.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b06j0tqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0m8x)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0m8z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0m93)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0m97)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06l4ztc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Shaunaka Rishi Das.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b06j0ymn)
Farm safety, Highland midges, Forestry

The safety record of British farming remains a concern. One farmer from Norfolk considers himself very lucky to be alive and is warning his colleagues about danger in the workplace. Tim Papworth was injured in a traumatic accident on his farm and now, five years later, he's finally met the Air Ambulance crew and the doctor who saved his life.
Midges are the tiny terrors of the Scottish Highlands. These blood-sucking insects are more than just an annoyance for campers and picnickers; the swarms on the hunt for warm-bloodied mammals every summer are costing rural tourism and agriculture millions of pounds. Dr James Logan has been investigating the secret life of the midge.
From fuel to furniture, forestry is big business. Woodland covers 12% of the UK and the forestry industry generates about £4 billion for the British economy every year. Stuart Goodall from the industry body Confor explains why trees and timber are easily overlooked.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Vernon Harwood.


MON 05:56 Weather (b06j0m9h)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hky3h)
Satin Bowerbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents Australia's satin bowerbird. Then male is a blackish looking bird with bright purple eyes, whose plumage diffracts the light to produce an indigo sheen with a metallic lustre. He builds a U-shaped bower of sticks on the forest floor into which he hopes to lure a female. But brown twigs on a brown woodland floor aren't very eye-catching, so he jazzes up the scene with an array of objects from berries and bottle-tops to clothes-pegs and even ballpoint pens. All have one thing in common: they are blue. The male dances around his bower to attract the greenish females: often holding something blue to impress her. As he poses, he calls enticingly to advertise his prowess. Once she's made her choice, she will leave to build her nest and rear her young alone.


MON 06:00 Today (b06j13r1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b06j13r3)
Power and Corruption with Stephen Frears and Mary Beard

On Start the Week the classicist Mary Beard tells Tom Sutcliffe that Ancient Rome matters: its debates about citizenship, security and the rights of the individual still influence our own debates on civil liberty. The Magna Carta is the starting point for the playwright Timberlake Wertenbaker's latest play which draws parallels between the King's abuse of power in 1215 and the global business elite today. The film director Stephen Frears tells the story of the meteoric rise and fall of one of the most celebrated and controversial sportsmen in recent history, Lance Armstrong, and of the journalist who was vilified when he tried to expose him. Lurid headlines take centre stage in the play Clarion, directed by Mehmet Ergen, which takes a satirical look at nationalism and the state of the British media.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b06j13r5)
John le Carre: The Biography

Episode 1

The life of John le Carre by Adam Sisman, is abridged for radio in 5 episodes by Katrin Williams:

'John le Carre' was born David Cornwell, and his early life was in thrall to a genial, vivid and rascally father called Ronnie, who was never short of surprises.

Reader: Stephen Boxer.

Producer: Duncan Minshull.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06j13r7)
Women Breadwinners, Best of the Best, Stacey Dooley

One in three mothers in working families are the main breadwinners according to a new report out today. Giselle Cory from the Institute of Public Policy Research on what's behind a ten percent rise in the figures since 1996.

On the 20th anniversary of the Women's Prize for Fiction, you can vote for your favourite read with the Best of the Best of the last ten years. Today hear Martha Kearney, chair of judges in 2006, discuss the winning novel, On Beauty, by Zadie Smith.

Stacey Dooley on the launch of BBC Three's Gender Season which looks at some of the worst places in the world to be female and investigates why the Philippines is fast becoming the world capital of the cyber-sex industry.

Six months ago, fathers became entitled to share statutory parental leave and pay during their child's first year. We hear fathers' reaction to this new opportunity and discuss its impact on employers with management consultant Mary Mercer.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Anne Peacock.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j13r9)
Early One Morning

Episode 6

Italy 1943. Chiara and Cecilia are living with their grandmother in a remote farmhouse, where they shelter passing deserters and Daniele, the small Jewish boy Chiara saved from the Nazis.

Thirty years later, in 1973, Chiara has lost touch with her troubled, junkie adoptive son, but she must now decide how to deal with the young Welsh teenager who keep phoning her and who claims to be Daniele's daughter.

Greta Scacchi, Juliet Aubrey and Sophie Melville star in Virginia Baily's powerful novel of love, loss and learning to be a mother.

Narrator.....Greta Scacchi
Chiara.....Juliet Aubrey
Maria.....Sophie Melville
Cecilia.....Alex Tregear
Daniele.....Adam Thomas Wright
Gennaro/ Adult Daniele.....Cesare Taurasi
Simone/ Nonna.....Jessica Turner
Antonio.....David Hounslow
Gabriele.....David Acton
Tommaso/ Nazi officer/ Brian.....Felix Auer
Edna.....Amelia Lowdell
Barry/ Goffredo.....Chris Pavlo
Gianni.....Sam Dale

Dramatised by Miranda Emmerson.

Director: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


MON 11:00 Journey of a Lifetime (b06j144b)
2015: Rhiannon Adam. Three Months on Pitcairn

Each year, the Royal Geographical Society organises, in association with BBC Radio 4, a contest to discover the most imaginative and exciting dream travel project. Rhiannon Adam was the winner in 2015 and her goal was to visit one of the world's smallest countries, Pitcairn Island.

Rhiannon grew up on sailing boat in the Atlantic reading romantic stories about The Mutiny of the Bounty and Pitcairn Island as final resting place for the renegade mutineers. She wondered about this far flung piece of the former British Empire and, as a wandering Brit, whether she might have something in common with the descendants of the mutineers.

The tiny, remote British territory of Pitcairn lies in the Pacific between Chile and and New Zealand. It is home to about fifty people and its remoteness has raised questions about its future as it needs to attract more settlers in order to survive. The romantic image of the island was challenged a decade ago when a number of men on the island were imprisoned for sexual abuse of young girls.

In this very personal account, photographer Rhiannon Adam explores the romance and reality of Pitcairn Island on her 'Journey of a Lifetime'.

Producer Neil McCarthy


MON 11:30 Dilemma (b01qwglw)
Series 2

Episode 2

Sue Perkins puts Josie Long, Owen Jones, Clare Grogan and Andrew Maxwell through the moral and ethical wringer.

The panellists finely balanced dilemmas include a catering faux pas, putting a value on human life and/or robots, keeping the back yard tidy and hearing the patter of tiny feet.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b06j0m9q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b064g54g)
19 October 1915 - Lilian Frost

On this day Russia and Italy declare war on Bulgaria, and Lilian Frost tries to make amends

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b06j144d)
Winter in a park home, Rural right-to-buy

Age UK says tens of thousands of elderly people living in holiday park homes and pre-fabs are struggling to keep warm in the winter. The charity says they are ineligible for much of the support provided to help people to insulate and heat their homes. They are pressing the government to set up an energy efficiency scheme to help park-home residents to reduce their heating bills.

The government wants to give housing association tenants the right to buy their homes. It's an extension of the right to buy available to council house tenants. But several organisations representing rural communities have told us they fear it could result in a serious shortage of affordable homes in the countryside. Michael Eavis, who founded and runs Glastonbury Festival gave land to a housing association so it could be used to provide affordable homes. He plans to do the same again but wants a cast iron guarantee that none of the homes will be sold under right-to-buy. We ask what protections could be put in place to protect the supply of affordable homes in rural areas.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b06j0m9y)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b06j147h)
News and analysis including Boris Johnson on a potential tax credit rebellion by Conservative MPs, refugees gathering in the Balkans and why some people in Stoke on Trent don't vote. Presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 Peter Snow Returns to the Future (b06j1kdh)
Chris Packham

There's no more famous extinct creature than the dodo. In the latest of Peter Snow's trips to the past and the future the nature broadcaster Chris Packham goes back to witness its extinction, then travels forward to 2017 to see the luckless bird resurrected thanks to some unlicensed DNA experiments in a Beijing laboratory.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b06j0wv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Open Art (b06hyyt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:15 on Saturday]


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b06j1kdm)
Programme 1, 2015

(1/12)
Kurt's widow, Keir's party and Kate's adventures with her fellow survivors could lead you to the Court of Navarre - at least, they could if you have the same kind of mind as the panellists on Round Britain Quiz, which returns for a brand new series with Tom Sutcliffe in the chair.

As always, six teams from around the UK will play one another to decide the eventual series title, with some familiar voices as well as newcomers among the panel this season. The first programme features the Scots, Val McDermid and Roddy Lumsden, against the Welsh team of Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards. The Scots are defending their title, but Wales are always strong contenders and will be going all-out to wrest it from them this year.

As always they'll need to draw on all of their general knowledge and ingenuity to unravel RBQ's trademark cryptic questions. The series will feature a generous smattering of questions devised by listeners and sent in since the programme was last on air.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b06j0wf5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Fiery Inspiration: Amiri Baraka and the Black Arts Movement (b06j1kdp)
Episode 1

The novelist and poet Bernardine Evaristo explores the complex and controversial man who played a key role in the development of the Black Arts Movement in the United States, and looks back at how the energy of that cultural phenomenon in 1960s America, inspired her as an emerging Black writer in 1980s Britain.

In Part I, Bernardine Evaristo returns to Rose Bruford College where she took her first steps towards building a career in the Arts, and she travels to New York to trace the steps that Amiri Baraka took towards establishing the Black Arts Movement.

Presenter - Bernardine Evaristo
Producer - Ekene Akalawu.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b06j1kdr)
Series 8

Vigilante

Aleks Krotoski delves into vigilantism on the web and looks at the moral and philosophical implications of fighting the good fight in a digital space. Can we consider the web to be a superhero?


MON 17:00 PM (b06j1kdt)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0mbb)
China's President declares UK in prime position to be main trading partner at start of state visit. Steel firm Caparo goes into administration. Jamie Oliver tells MPs 'tax sugar'.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b06j1kdy)
Series 73

Episode 3

The South Pacific, Conkers and Harvest Festivals are among the subjects on the cards as Andy Hamilton, Sue Perkins, Tony Hawks and Gyles Brandreth join Nicholas Parsons to play another round of the classic panel show. There's deviation, hesitation and repetition a-plenty.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b06j1kf0)
Alistair drops in on Brookfield to see how they are and tags along with David to move some heifers. They look good but David wonders whether the herd has a future. Alistair fills David in on Berrow's problems - looks like it's botulism (to be confirmed). They just hope it's not as bad as it could be.

Pip fetches the cows as Ruth deals with a call - she's dealing with Heather's probate. Ruth worries that an expensive winter could push the farm into a loss. This makes Pip wonder about whether the farm can survive with the three of them. Ruth assures Pip she did the right thing in coming home - and looks forward to hanging Pip's graduation photo on the wall.

Pip asks Toby if he's spoken to Adam about share farming yet. He needs to motivate the less ambitious Rex. Toby even advises Pip, sensing that she's being negative - she should do something about her dairy problem and find a way to make a local operation turn a profit.

Adam has spoken to Charlie and can tell he's in pieces. He and David can help by providing some silage, as Charlie needs to bring in outside feeds. Adam and David agree they need to help Charlie - and to get others involved.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b06j1kf2)
Young Chekhov, Robert Seethaler, Mississippi Grind review

Kirsty Lang talks to director Jonathan Kent and the rising star Olivia Vinall about Chichester Festival Theatre's Young Chekhov season. Instead of the familiar, and great, later plays - Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard - Jonathan Kent has assembled an ensemble of 23 actors to perform three of his earliest works, Ivanov, The Seagull and Platonov, in new versions by David Hare. Kent argues that Chekhov was a radical new voice, and Vinall, who is in all the plays, talks about tackling three different roles, all on the same day.
Mississippi Grind is a new gambling, road trip movie starring Ben Mendelsohn and Ryan Reynolds as two down-and-out, inveterate gamblers. The two men bring out the worst in each other but also find redemption in their friendship as they make their way round the casinos of the Southern States. Sophia McDougall reviews. Mississippi Grind opens on general release Friday 23 October cert 15.
The creator of E4 teen drama Skins, Bryan Elsley, debates the lack of diversity in UK television drama and how a new TV Writers Development scheme aims to address the imbalance.
Austrian novelist Robert Seethaler's sparse new book A Whole Life tells the story of Andreas Egger, who lives a quiet life in the mountains, touched by tragedy but at peace with his intimate knowledge of the landscape and his place in it. Robert discusses how our lives find meaning in the key moments, and how he conveys this in his writing.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Elaine Lester.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j13r9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Britain and China (b06jtztq)
Ahead of the State Visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping, the BBC's China Editor Carrie Gracie examines the past and future of the relationship between his country and Britain. Chancellor George Osborne has predicted a "Golden Decade" with huge benefits for both countries. The opportunities for business seem obvious. But what does history tell us about how China sees the relationship - and what are the risks to the UK in the future, both in terms of the economy and security?
Producer: Ingrid Hassler.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b06j1kf4)
Will George Be King?

Edward Stourton examines the long-term prospects for the British monarchy as an avowed republican becomes leader of the opposition. At least eighty per cent of the population affirm their belief in the institution, opinion polls suggest - a figure that has remained remarkably constant since the Queen, now the longest serving monarch, ascended to the throne. But how can we be sure that this support and the institutions that underpin the monarchy will remain by the time her great-grandson becomes King?

Within two or three generations the constitutional make-up of Britain could look very different. Could the monarchy withstand a series of upheavals such as the disestablishment of the Church of England, Scottish independence, a weakening of Britain's links with the Commonwealth and reform of the House of Lords (along with the remnants of the hereditary principle)? What if the institutional foundations on which the monarchy rests change irrevocably or disappear altogether? By the time Prince George is likely to become King, in the latter half of this century, social attitudes may have changed considerably. Is it safe to assume that the monarchy will survive? And what will attitudes towards this institution say about wider changes across British society?

Producer: Peter Snowdon.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w9l70)
Hornbill

Exotic and bizarre, hornbills wowed European society when the first live specimens arrived in the nineteenth century. Their almost human like walk combined with their unbelievable bills and strange calls presented an image of nature most Europeans had never encountered. When their odd breeding behaviour became known - the males seal up the female in a hole in a tree cavity so that only her beak can protrude for weeks on end - they became great curiosities. The bill of the helmeted hornbill was particularly prized for carving the Victorian obsession - netsuke. Beautifully coloured, especially if reddened by the oil from a preen gland, the "ivory" became the most sought after material for Victorian display cabinets. Hornbill ivory is still so highly prized by the Chinese that the helmeted hornbill is on the verge of extinction; its bill fetches a higher price than elephant ivory. However in their Indonesian homeland they are seen as mythical creatures that guard the thin veil between life and death, ferrying souls between the earth and heaven. This sacred belief is now being used by modern conservationists to help protect them as they disappear at an alarming rate from the face of the earth. Because many of the Asian Hornbills nest in the largest trees, they are at greatest risk from loggers, legal or illegal, and therefore stand as flagship species for forest conservation in SE Asia.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b06j13r3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b06j0mbk)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b06j1kf6)
Caparo steel plant goes into administration.

Workers in London, Wales and the Midlands are among those affected.
President Xi Jinping arrives in the UK;
Has South Africa really become a 'rainbow nation'?
Richard Branson on the UN's drugs report;


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06j1kf8)
Reading Europe - Austria: A Whole Life

Episode 1

Short Desc
This gentle, remarkable novel tells the story of one man's life in the Austrian Alps.

Medium Desc
A labourer rescues a dying goatherd and carries him towards the village below the mountian. But something happens on the way which will stay with Egger for the rest of his life.

Long Desc
Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature. Robert Powell reads A Whole Life by the Austrian novelist Robert Seethaler.

This 'slim masterpiece' (Daily Mail) went straight onto the bestseller lists in Germany last summer and has been there ever since. Jim Crace called it both 'heart-rending and heart-warming', and over 200,000 people have read and celebrated this book across Europe.

When Andreas Egger reaches the village on the night that he tries to save Hannes, the goatherd, he goes into the inn and meets Marie - the only love of his life - for the first time. Romance and grief and a sometimes wry stoicism are the touchstones of Egger's solitary life as the 20th century unfolds around him. The modern world encroaches slowly on the valley, the forest is carved out for ski lifts, electricity arrives, and tourists too. But throughout it all, Egger remains steadfast in his modest struggle to survive and in his ever constant respect for the landscape around and above him.

Episode 1:
A snowbound rescue brings Andreas Egger down from the mountain. He carries a man on his back.

Read by Robert Powell
Written by Robert Seethaler
Abridged by Jennie Howarth
Translated by Charlotte Collins

Produced by Elizabeth Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b06grjn0)
The Alphabet

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright take us through the A-Z of the alphabet, with the help of Professor Nils Langer. How do we come to have the letters we do?
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06j1kfb)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 20 OCTOBER 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0mf7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b06j13r5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0mf9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0mfc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0mff)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0mfh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06l5pqd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Shaunaka Rishi Das.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b06j1n2g)
Ash Dieback, Cultured Beef, Studley Agricultural College Reunion, Abattoir Apprentices

The latest on Ash Dieback research. Some of our trees appear to be resilient.
Scientists are looking into the commercial viability of meat grown from animal cells in the lab.
Former students from the female-only Studley Agricultural College celebrate their 50th anniversary reunion in Warwickshire.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkygm)
Red-billed Quelea

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the World's most numerous bird; red billed quelea. Red-billed queleas are the most numerous birds in the world and as part of the weaverbird family sound and look like small neat sparrows. Their ability to adapt to local conditions and travel for food allows large populations of fast-breeding queleas to build up. The statistics are mind-boggling. Some flocks of red-billed quelea can comprise millions of birds which may take hours to fly past. There are probably between one and a half and ten billion birds in Africa. They breed in vast colonies; one colony in Nigeria covered one hundred and ten hectares and contained thirty one million nests.


TUE 06:00 Today (b06j1qtn)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b06j1qts)
Robert Plomin on the genetics of intelligence

Professor Robert Plomin talks to Jim Al-Khalili about what makes some people smarter than others and why he's fed up with the genetics of intelligence being ignored. Born and raised in Chicago, Robert sat countless intelligence tests at his inner city Catholic school. College was an attractive option mainly because it seemed to pay well. Now he's one of the most cited psychologists in the world. He specialized in behavioural genetics in the mid seventies when the focus in mainstream psychology was very much on our nurture rather than our nature, and genetics was virtually taboo. But he persisted, conducting several large adoption studies and later twin studies. In 1995 he launched the biggest longitudinal twin study in the UK, the TED study of ten thousand pairs of twins which continues to this day. In this study and in his other work, he's shown consistently that genetic influences on intelligence are highly significant, much more so than what school you go to, your teachers or home environment. If only the genetic differences between children were fully acknowledged, he believes education could be transformed and parents might stop giving themselves such a hard time.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b06j1qty)
Bel Mooney on Home

Bel Mooney explores whether home is an idea as much as a place. She goes to Birmingham to meet student Alan, who shares a rented house with two friends. While they return home to their parents at weekends, Alan stays in the student digs, the only home he currently has. He explains to Bel how family breakdown led to him to be homeless twice, first emotionally and then physically when his mother finally evicted him and his possessions from her house when he was eighteen.
Now twenty four, Alan describes how devastated he felt and how through the help of a local charity he got back onto his feet again.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b06j6fcy)
John le Carre: The Biography

Episode 2

The life of John le Carre by Adam Sisman, is abridged for radio in five episodes by Katrin Williams:

2. Under his real name of David Cornwell, he leaves Sherbourne, goes to Bern and meets Joe Kraemer, who proves a route of sorts into the spying game.

Reader: Stephen Boxer.

Producer: Duncan Minshull.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06j1qv5)
Women and Homelessness, Best of the Best, Women's Equality Party, Autism and Relationships

Sophie Walker, party leader of the Women's Equality Party, on the morning of their party conference talks to Jane about the birth and growth of the party.

Two speakers from a National Autistic Society conference talk about the challenges of negotiating a relationship together.

Muriel Gray, Chair of Judges in 2007, for the Women's Prize for Fiction champions "her" winner, Half of A Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. You can vote now for your favourite novel from the last ten winners of the Women's Prize for Fiction.

Life expectancy for a homeless woman in the UK is 43. Sleeping rough across England is on the increase and today St Mungo's, the homelessness charity is handing in a petition to Jeremy Hunt to pledge a commitment to better homeless healthcare. Why is women's route into homelessnes often more complex than men's?

Cokie Van Der Velde, winner of the Barclays' Women of the Year award, talks about her work on the front line of the Ebola crisis.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j1qv7)
Early One Morning

Episode 7

Italy 1943. A Nazi officer officer arrives at the remote farmhouse where Chiara is hiding her young Jewish charge, Daniele.

Thirty years later, in 1973, Chiara has lost touch with her troubled, junkie adoptive son, but she must now decide how to deal with the young Welsh teenager who keep phoning her and who claims to be Daniele's daughter.

Greta Scacchi, Juliet Aubrey and Sophie Melville star in Virginia Baily's powerful novel of love, loss and learning to be a mother.

Narrator.....Greta Scacchi
Chiara.....Juliet Aubrey
Maria.....Sophie Melville
Cecilia.....Alex Tregear
Daniele.....Adam Thomas Wright
Gennaro/ Adult Daniele.....Cesare Taurasi
Simone/ Nonna.....Jessica Turner
Antonio.....David Hounslow
Gabriele.....David Acton
Tommaso/ Nazi officer/ Brian.....Felix Auer
Edna.....Amelia Lowdell
Barry/ Goffredo.....Chris Pavlo
Gianni.....Sam Dale

Dramatised by Miranda Emmerson.

Director: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w9l34)
Oak

Oak is the symbol of noble endurance, loyalty, strength, constancy and longevity, and there are over 600 species. Heart of Oak is the official march of the Royal Navy – a rallying cry to brave sailors to guard our shores. Tennyson urges us to live our lives like the oak, to be "bright in spring, Living in gold." Its broad, pleasing shape, hard wood and prolific acorns, as well as the lovely shape of the leaves, establishes the oak as the nation's favourite tree.

As a timber its fine qualities also make it perfect for prestigious buildings, such as the debating chamber of the House of Commons. It is the symbol of Germany and the national tree of the US. In war it is used on medals of honour. The acorn has been eaten by many cultures and North American peoples revere the ancient oaks, their acorns made flour and the bark medicine. Oaks have inspired many moral tales. Huge, sturdy oaks grow slowly from small acorns and in The Man Who Planted Trees and old shepherd re-forests a barren valley by carefully and steadily planning a few acorns each day.

We have rested under oaks, climbed them, used their acorns, bark and wood. We have even made music from their tree rings. We see the oak as a symbol of virtue and goodness and in druidism the oak is central to beliefs that stretch back two millennia or more - no wonder we have a love affair with oaks.

Original Producer : Andrew Dawes
Archive Producer : Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio

Revised Repeat : First Broadcast BBC Radio 4; 20th October 2015


TUE 11:30 Tales from the Stave (b06j1qv9)
Series 12

Janacek - Glagolitic Mass

Leos Janacek wasn't an obvious candidate for a setting of the Mass, but the suggestion from Archbishop Precan and his own profound sense of Czech Nationalism was enough to inspire him. In 1926, during a damp holiday at the Czech spa town of Luhacovice, he began work on his famous Glagolitic Mass. There was also inspiration in the form of his muse, Kamila Stösslová. Hundreds of letters to Kamila tell of his infatuation with her. The truth is that both she, and her husband, were somewhat bewildered by the attention of this relatively elderly man. However, he insisted to her that the Mass might be heard as an imagined wedding celebration. If that was purely a figment of his imagination it matters little. The piece is a dazzling dramatisation of the mass ordinarium with spell-binding music.

In this programme Frances Fyfield is joined by Janacek specialists Nigel Simeone along with Jan Spacek from the Janacek museum and archive and members of the Philharmonic choir of Brno, Hana Skarkova and Tomas Suchomel. The score they examine is fragmentary. Leaves of A4 sized paper scribbled out by the composer in a way that few could make head nor tail of. It was left to his copyists to piece together this astonishing material.

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b06j0mfk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b064g55q)
20 October 1915 - Alice Macknade

On this day Germany announced an assault on Riga, and Alice Macknade reluctantly hosts a dinner party

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b06j1xz4)
Call You & Yours: Is love better second time around?

Call You & Yours is asking whether love is better second time around?

42% of marriages end in divorce, and dating amongst the over 50s is the fastest growing sector in the online dating world.

That may be because there is a high number of eligible people of that age out there now. Some will never have married, others will be divorced. Many would like to date again, and are on the look out for a new life partner.

You & Yours wants to know what it is like the second time around, when you are older and wiser, but may have other commitments to consider - children, or older parents.

Or maybe your parents or grandparents are the ones who have gone on to find romance. How are their relationships different to yours? What has it done to family life?

Email us your experiences at youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Please leave a phone number so that a researcher can ring you back.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b06j0mfm)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b06m9rpw)
Martha Kearney presents analysis of news and current affairs, including the latest on the UK steel industry and Richard Mabey's plant of the day.


TUE 13:45 Peter Snow Returns to the Future (b06j1xz6)
Hermione Eyre

The world of fashion takes some unusual turns, and none more extraordinary than this temporal trip to 1640 to witness the last Masque of the Court of Charles I, then forward to a 23rd century fashion show where the models are run off on a 3D printer and the whole thing ends in a riot. Peter Snow feels terribly underdressed but the writer Hermione Eyre keeps him on the straight and narrow.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b06j1kf0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b06j1xz8)
The Mermaid of Zennor

The Mermaid of Zennor is a re-imagining by Paul Dodgson of the Cornish folk tale. A supernatural story of mystery and obsession rooted in the contemporary world.

Jack and his wife Mary, from Cricklewood, are concerned that their son is falling into bad ways and, determined to turn his life around, they decide to move to Zennor.

Jack used to visit Zennor as a child and always dreamed of returning one day to fulfil his dream of becoming a fisherman. This seems the perfect opportunity - and a chance to get Matthew back on the right track.

Reluctantly, Matt agrees and gradually begins to rebuild his life with help of a local girl, Bel - until, one day, he hears some singing which can be heard by no one else.

Written by Paul Dodgson
Music composed by Paul Dodgson

Directed by Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b06j1xzb)
Series 8

The Clock

Josie Long navigates the changing texture of a day - with stories from the rush hour commute through the night until first light.

From an afternoon with Dr Clock the horologist through to a serendipitous voice reaching a woman in the darkness of the early hours, we hear stories of time and timing.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

The items featured in the programme are:

Glass Not Glitter
Produced by Abby Wendle
First made for the Third Coast International Audio Festival ShortDocs Competition
http://thirdcoastfestival.org/library/1123-glass-not-glitter

Dr Clock
Produced by Veronica Simmonds and John Spence
First featured on ABC Radio National's Soundproof
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/soundproof/dr-clock/6075288

Horace and Mabel
Feat. Horace Parlan
Produced by Rikke Houd

4am
Produced by Sara Parker.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b06j1xzd)
Coast: 50 Years of Change

A new report from the National Trust reveals how how our coast has changed over the last 50 years. Tom Heap asks if we've become better or worse at protecting the nation's prime asset.

He joins John Whittow who led a team of students to survey the coast in 1965 and compares his findings with a brand new study from Leicester University. Has the rapid urbanisation of the 1960s continued or has the tide been turned? What new threats are on the horizon?

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b06j1xzg)
Gorilla gorilla gorilla: Latin names for animals and plants

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to River Cottage natural forager and writer John Wright about the surprising and wonderful Latin names used to describe animals and plants, and how they came to be. What is an Aha ha?
John Wright is the author of The Naming of the Shrew: A Curious History of Latin Names.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b06j21bx)
Fraser Nelson and Adam Mars-Jones

Editor of The Spectator Fraser Nelson and critic Adam Mars-Jones talk about books they admire with Harriett Gilbert. Adam recommends I Knew The Bride, a moving collection of poems by Hugo Williams, and Fraser's choice is an historical novel of great relevance now: The Emigrants by Vilhelm Moberg. Harriett brings along Rum Punch by Elmore Leonard, which was adapted into the film Jackie Brown by Quentin Tarantino.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b06j21c1)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0mft)
20/10/15 Xi Jinping becomes the first Chinese president to address both houses of parliament

Xi Jinping becomes the first Chinese president to address both houses of parliament at Westminster
Tata steel company confirmed nearly 1,200 job losses at two UK plants


TUE 18:30 There Is No Escape (b06j21c5)
Episode 2

Andrew finds himself, like so many others across the country, having to spend a few hours over Saturday lunchtime with his girlfriend's parents.

But Andrew is determined not to go. He hatches a plan to get his workmate to call him in to an "emergency" at work. But all goes wrong when he gets a flat tyre and the only person who can come to his rescue is his girlfriend's father.

Sitcom about a man dissatisfied with his life, whose feeble attempts to run away invariably end with him traipsing home defeated.

Starring:

Andrew Lawrence
Diane Morgan

With Janice Connolly, Marek Larwood and Graham Fellows.

Producer: Jane Berthoud

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b06j21c9)
Rex tries to rouse Toby, having been up early working with the geese. Toby points out he has been networking with local farmers - he was at the meeting last night with David and the Grundy boys - he says Adam has invited them over to talk about share farming. They go over, but it seems Toby is ahead of himself as Adam wasn't exactly expecting them. Toby tries to persuade Adam to let them run cattle on his land. Adam will think about it, and would like to see their CVs.

As Adam goes round collecting silage form farmers, Helen's happy to help, but will check with Tom. Helen's a bit thrown when Adam offers his and Ian's congratulations to her.

Helen visits Fallon at her new home, Woodbine Cottage. Fallon also seems to know about her pregnancy (from Jolene, via Eddie). Helen mentions that Rob is in charge of the café area in the Bridge Farm shop, so Fallon can talk to him with any questions etc. Helen's a bit subdued as Fallon talks of her happiness with her business and life with Harrison.

Charlie is looking terrible, barely holding it together. Adam is there and Charlie appreciates a friend. Toby goes over to talk to Adam, unannounced, about this share farming idea. Adam says he'll think about it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b06j21cc)
Eames exhibition, Marlon Brando documentary, Janet Suzman

The husband-and-wife team of Charles and Ray Eames are widely regarded as America's most important designers, perhaps best remembered for their mid-century plywood and fiberglass furniture. Critic Corinne Julius joins Samira at a new exhibition at the Barbican in London where they explore their enduring appeal.

From A Streetcar named Desire and The Godfather, to Last Tango in Paris and Apocalypse Now, Marlon Brando is hailed by many as one of the great actors. Now 300 hours of audio tapes have revealed the painful childhood and dysfunctional adulthood that he drew on for his art. Listen to Me Marlon sets out to document his life and work in his own words. Producer John Battsek describes the process and the actor Kerry Shale offers his reaction.

Darryl Collis from See Saw Media explains how film studios are using fees from product placement to beef up their budgets.

Conductor Jane Glover discusses her new production of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro featuring students from The Royal Academy of Music, alongside stage actor and director Dame Janet Suzman who is turning her hand to directing opera for the first time.

Presenter : Samira Ahmed
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j1qv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b06j21ch)
Can Rotherham Recover?

Like other steel communities, Rotherham faces the loss of hundreds of jobs following the recent announcement of redundancies at the local plant. It's the latest blow to a town now synonymous with widespread child grooming. Last year the Jay Report estimated that 1400 young people had been sexually abused there. It said most of the victims were white and most of the perpetrators were Asian men. So what's been the impact on community relations and how far has the scandal affected the local economy? For File on 4, Manveen Rana returns to the town to talk to families, business owners and the authorities to find out whether Rotherham can recover.
Producer: Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b06j21ck)
RNIB ad campaign, Stephen Kennedy

Fazilet Hadi from the RNIB and Ian Macrae a broadcast journalist, discuss the controversy over the RNIB's latest ad campaign, aimed at raising awareness about the need for an ECLO (Eye Clinic Liaison Officer) to be available in all eye hospitals.
The ad features celebrities including Dame Shirley Bassey expressing their fears about losing their sight. Ian felt angry that his own disability was being portrayed as something to be so greatly feared. Fazilet countered that it was fair to say that many sighted people do fear losing their sight and the campaign sets out to raise awareness about the importance of providing the appropriate support for people who do experience sight loss.
Stephen Kennedy is a partially-sighted writer who has just had his first radio play 'John Lennon's Last Day' broadcast on BBC Radio 2.
Stephen talks about his visual impairment and how he physically writes.
He tells Peter that this is his third play about the Beatles and he has another one almost finished.


TUE 21:00 The Letters of Ada Lovelace (b06bglnh)
Thinking Machines

In part two of this dramatization of The Letters of Ada Lovelace, Georgina Ferry reveals the nature of the relationship between the young heiress, Ada Lovelace (Sally Hawkins) and the crusty mathematician, Charles Babbage (Anthony Head), inventor of steam-powered calculating machines.

Despite, (or perhaps because of), constant battles with her mental and physical health, Ada pursued her interest in Babbage's innovative engines, with zeal. She threw herself into the task of describing his Analytical Engine and writing the Notes of the engine for which she is now famous. In an extraordinary leap of imagination, she suggested that this steam-powered engine could be used for much more than just adding and subtracting - 'for music and art perhaps'. And grasped just how many problems - and not only mathematical ones - might one day be solved by rigorous, logical analysis.

All her life Ada struggled to escape her controlling mother, Lady Byron (Olivia Williams) and the legacy of her notorious and absent father, the romantic poet Lord Byron. Babbage gave her the attention and intellectual respect that neither of her parents offered. She defied convention and produced a work of astonishing prescience, predicting how steam-powered calculating machines might one day change the world. She was a flawed and fragile individual: a Victorian tech visionary.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b06j1qts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b06j0mg8)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b06j21cr)
President Xi Jinping addresses Parliament.

The Queen has been hosting a state banquet at Buckingham Palace tonight
Rare interview with resident of war-torn Aleppo in Syria;
Tory MP attacks tax credit changes in her maiden speech.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06jtp1f)
Reading Europe - Austria: A Whole Life

Episode 2

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature. Robert Powell reads A Whole Life by the Austrian novelist Robert Seethaler.

This 'slim masterpiece' (Daily Mail) went straight onto the bestseller lists in Germany last summer and has been there ever since. Jim Crace called it both 'heart-rending and heart-warming', and over 200,000 people have read and celebrated this book across Europe.

When Andreas Egger reaches the village on the night that he tries to save Hannes, the goatherd, he goes into the inn and meets Marie - the only love of his life - for the first time. Romance and grief and a sometimes wry stoicism are the touchstones of Egger's solitary life as the 20th century unfolds around him. The modern world encroaches slowly on the valley, the forest is carved out for ski lifts, electricity arrives, and tourists too. But throughout it all, Egger remains steadfast in his modest struggle to survive and in his ever constant respect for the landscape around and above him.

Episode 2: Egger is ready to settle down, he has built a house and knows love.

Read by Robert Powell
Written by Robert Seethaler
Abridged by Jennie Howarth
Translated by Charlotte Collins

Produced by Elizabeth Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 A Charles Paris Mystery (b01p71wn)
An Amateur Corpse

Episode 2

What starts as a simple voiceover job soon leads Charles to the discovery of a dead body.

Bill Nighy stars as actor-cum-sleuth, Charles Paris.

By Jeremy Front - based on Simon Brett's novel.

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Joan ..... Geraldine McEwan
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Hugo ..... Paul Ritter
Ellie ...... Amaka Okafor
Saskia ..... Christine Absalom
Geoff ...... Patrick Brennan
Clive ...... Sam Alexander

Director: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2012.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06j22fh)
Sean Curran reports as ministers come under fire over cuts to working tax credits. MPs hear from the Chinese President. And who's to blame for the latest job losses in the steel industry?

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 21 OCTOBER 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0mhr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b06j6fcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0mht)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0mhw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0mhy)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0mj0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06mb9jg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Shaunaka Rishi Das.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b06jtxbl)
Maize Debate, Knotweed, Biofuels

The Maize harvest is underway - there are more than 183,000 hectares of it - but is it damaging soils as well as providing sustainable energy?
The UK's most unwelcome invasive plant, Japanese Knotweed, might be about to meet its match, from jumping plant lice.
This week we're taking a closer look at woodland and forestry, focussing today on wood as fuel.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkyht)
House Crow

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the house crow, native of southern Asia. Leggier and longer-billed than the slightly larger European carrion crow and having a charcoal grey bib and collar and raucous call, these are common birds in towns and villages from Iran through India to Thailand. As scavengers they eat almost anything, which is how they've come to live alongside us. We provide water as well as food and have introduced the birds into areas of the Middle East and Africa. Although they don't fly long distances, the crows often hop aboard ships and arrive in foreign ports. Ship-assisted house crows have the potential to spread around the globe, a beautiful example of avian exploitation of human activity.


WED 06:00 Today (b06mbbhf)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b06j2fpd)
Dawn French, Wilfred Frost, Professor Joann Fletcher, Nikita Salmon

Libby Purves meets writer and comedian Dawn French; Egyptologist Professor Joann Fletcher; Wilfred Frost, son of Sir David Frost and wing walker Nikita Salmon.

Professor Joann Fletcher is based in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York where she teaches world mummification and funerary archaeology. Her book, The Story of Egypt, tells Egypt's ancient story by looking into the lives of its working people, as well as the pharaohs, to investigate this ancient society through its people's own words and personal belongings. The Story of Egypt is published by Hodder and Stoughton.

Wilfred Frost is the son of the late broadcaster Sir David Frost. A new biography, That Was The Life That Was, by Neil Hegarty recounts the story of how the son of a Methodist minister became the most successful TV host in the world. He was the only person to have met and interviewed every British prime minister since Harold Wilson as well as seven US presidents including the disgraced post-Watergate Richard Nixon. That Was The Life That Was, Frost - The Authorised Biography by Neil Hegarty is published by WH Allen.

Dawn French is a writer, comedian and actor who has appeared in shows including French and Saunders, The Comic Strip Presents ..., Murder Most Horrid, Vicar of Dibley, Jam and Jerusalem and Lark Rise to Candleford. Her new novel, According to Yes, is about an English nanny who shakes up a dysfunctional family in Manhattan. According To Yes is published by Michael Joseph. Dawn's show 30 Million Minutes is at the Vaudeville Theatre, London.

Nikita Salmon is a wing walker with the Breitling AeroSuperBatics team. She is also a primary schoolteacher. She joined the seven-strong squad after replying to an advert in her local paper and now travels the world performing hair-raising aerial acrobatics. Strapped to the wings of a restored 1940s Boeing Stearman biplane, she performs aerobatic moves including formation loops, rolls, and the mirror - when one aircraft flies upside down and the other aircraft joins underneath.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b06j6g4p)
John le Carre: The Biography

Episode 3

The life of John le Carre by Adam Sisman, is abridged for radio in five episodes by Katrin Williams:

Oxford, teaching at Eton, employment at MI5. And publication. During these eventful years the shadow of his father Ronnie continues to loom large.

Reader: Stephen Boxer

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06j2fpg)
Best of the best women's fiction, Autism and puberty, Civil partnership amendment, Living with grief

A private members bill in the House Of Commons will debate whether heterosexual couples should have the same right to a civil partnership as same sex couples. We speak to Rebecca Steinfeld - who along with her partner Charles filed a judicial review at the High Court and founded the Equal Civil Partnerships Campaign and from Professor Robert Wintemute, who explains the legal challenge.
Kirsty Lang, Chair of Judges in 2008, for the Women's Prize for Fiction champions "her" winner, The Road Home by Rose Tremain. You can vote now for your favourite novel from the last ten winners of the Women's Prize for Fiction.
Kate Reynolds has written a book 'Sexuality and Severe Autism' based on her experience as the mother of a child on the autistic spectrum who also has learning disabilities, and also as an agony aunt to other parents of children on the autistic spectrum.
Helen Bailey was widowed in her forties and has written about her experience of grief in 'When Bad Things Happen in Good Bikinis'.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b06j2fpj)
Early One Morning

Episode 8

Italy 1944. Chiara and her young Jewish charge, Daniele, are back in Rome, where food supplies are scarce.

Thirty years later, in 1973, Chiara has lost touch with her troubled, junkie adoptive son, but she must now decide how to deal with the young Welsh teenager who keep phoning her and who claims to be Daniele's daughter.

Greta Scacchi, Juliet Aubrey and Sophie Melville star in Virginia Baily's powerful novel of love, loss and learning to be a mother.

Narrator.....Greta Scacchi
Chiara.....Juliet Aubrey
Maria.....Sophie Melville
Cecilia.....Alex Tregear
Daniele.....Adam Thomas Wright
Gennaro/ Adult Daniele.....Cesare Taurasi
Simone/ Nonna.....Jessica Turner
Antonio.....David Hounslow
Gabriele.....David Acton
Tommaso/ Nazi officer/ Brian.....Felix Auer
Edna.....Amelia Lowdell
Barry/ Goffredo.....Chris Pavlo
Gianni.....Sam Dale

Dramatised by Miranda Emmerson.

Director: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b06j2fpl)
Hector and Delores - Inner City Life

Fi Glover with siblings who were born in Jamaica but have lived their life in Handsworth; it's changed over 50 years, but they continue to play an active part in the community. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Recycled Radio (b06j2fpn)
Series 4

The Countryside

Radio 4's alternative take on the sound archive in the company of Gerald Scarfe. This week, we take a twisting, scenic route through the great British countryside.
Producer: Chris Ledgard.


WED 11:30 A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics (b06j2gfy)
Series 1

The Rat-catchers of Yonville

By John Nicholson, Richard Katz and Javier Marzan

In 19th-century provincial France, a pair of vermin controllers seek their fortune. Arriving in the market town of Yonville, things start to go wrong when their rat-catching kit goes missing and then when they find themselves entangled in the marital woes of the town's doctor.

In this new series the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot of the book through their hapless buffoonery.

Cast:

Emma . . . . . Ingrid Oliver
John . . . . . John Nicholson
Javier . . . . . Javier Marzan
Charles . . . . . Richard Katz
Tuvache . . . . . Leo Wan
Hippolyte . . . . . Stephen Critchlow
Justin . . . . . Caolan McCarthy
Homais . . . . . Chris Pavlo
Madame Codoux . . . . . Jessica Turner
Felicite . . . . . Rebecca Hamilton

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko


WED 12:00 News Summary (b06j0mj3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b064g57r)
21 October 1915 - Isabel Graham

On this day the Allied fleet bombarded the Bulgarian coast, and Isabel and Dorothea have to put aside their differences

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b06j2gg0)
Cycling to work, Dishonest pension schemes, Lodgers

We report on an investment scheme described by a high court judge as "illegitimate". Hundreds of people were persuaded to transfer their pension funds on the promise of guaranteed high returns.

More people are taking in lodgers to supplement their income, but what are the pros and cons of sharing your home with strangers?

One year on from the launch of its loyalty card system, Match and More, Morrisons is dropping the "match" bit of the deal. Dropping that element of the scheme is significant because Morrisons was the only one of the big supermarkets to price-match the discounters Aldi and Lidl. So why ditch it now?

The biggest ever survey into attitudes to cycling in the UK. What would persuade you to get on your bike?

And a warning to beware of cold callers offering what sound like fantastic investment opportunities in parking spaces near airports.

Producer: Cecile Wright
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b06j0mj5)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b06mcy40)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Peter Snow Returns to the Future (b06j2gg2)
Robert Peston

Could we one day all be spending the Globo, the global currency? Robert Peston joins Peter Snow's time travelling car and visits the forge of King Alyattes in 600AD to see the minting of the world's first coin, then forward to the 2060 launch of the first universal currency. But what happens in the event of Globo Grexit?


WED 14:00 The Archers (b06j21c9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Tommies (b06j2gg4)
21 October 1915

by Nick Warburton

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, the new series of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago: from the Western Front, to Mesopotamia, via neutral Holland and occupied Belgium.

And through it all, we'll follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Indira Varma, Lee Ross and Jassa Ahluwalia star in this story, set at Brigade HQ 89th Punjabis, Pont du Hem, France, on October 21st, 1915. Mickey Bliss returns to the front line as a newly-trained officer, with the beginnings of war-winning technology in his hands. But it's a month since the battle of Loos began - and the Allies are still where they were before it started.

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b06mczxq)
Money Box Live: Your State Pension

What do you want to ask or need to know about your State Pension? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday with your questions or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

If you're looking forward to or approaching retirement age you'll need to check key facts about the number of qualifying years you've built up, the amount you'll receive and to consider whether you should fill any gaps or even defer taking it.

A new scheme called Class 3A allowing you to boost your state pension by up to £25 per week has just been launched. Who is it aimed at, what will it cost and how does it compare with other top up schemes?
Increasing your state pension income could affect other areas of your finances such as any means tested benefits you receive or the rate of income tax you pay, so you may want to ask about the pros and cons.

Or perhaps you reach state pension age after 6 April 2016 and have a question about your entitlement to The New State Pension?

Whichever system you retire under and whatever you need to know, joining presenter Lesley Curwen to answer your state pension questions will be:

Michelle Cracknell, Chief Executive, The Pensions Advisory Service.
Sally West, Strategy Adviser, Age UK.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, standard geographic call charges apply. Or e-mail questions to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.


WED 15:30 The Letters of Ada Lovelace (b06bglnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b06j57f3)
Human Rights in Northern Ireland, Social Mobility and Education

Northern Ireland & the unusual role of human rights discourse in the peace process. Laurie Taylor talks to Jennifer Curtis, honorary fellow in Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh, about her study into the way in which human rights became 'war by other means'.

Also, Vik Loveday, lecturer in Sociology at Goldsmiths College, discusses her research into attitudes to social mobility within higher education.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b06j57f5)
Alan Rusbridger, Leveson laws, PinkNews, ITV buys UTV

Fleet Street's confidence has "worn thin", says the former editor of the Guardian, Alan Rusbridger. In a wide ranging speech at the Society of Editors' annual conference, he also took a swipe at the rest of the UK media by criticising their lack of interest in the Snowden revelations and the subsequent debate about the issue of surveillance. Steve Hewlett talks to him about his legacy and asks where next for the Guardian?

The culture secretary John Whittingdale says he is not convinced the time is right to introduce laws forcing publishers to pay both sides' legal costs in libel and privacy cases, even if they win. Most of the industry has argued that the measures undermine press freedom. However, the prospect of Mr Whittingdale abandoning this key element of the Leveson regime drew criticism from campaign group Hacked Off. Steve speaks to Helen Anthony, author of recent report "Leveson's Illiberal Legacy" and Evan Harris of Hacked Off.

The portrayal of LGBT issues in the media still needs improving, according to the Chief Executive of the online site PinkNews which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this month. Steve hears from Ben Cohen, Chief Executive, about how media outlets are covering LGBT issues today, and whether there is still a need for specialist sites like his now.

ITV has bought the Northern Ireland broadcaster UTV for a reported £100 million. UTV's television division, which operates in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland accounted for 36 per cent of its revenue last year, according to Thomson Reuters data. The deal will put 13 of 15 channel 3 licences in the hands of ITV. Media analyst Alex DeGroote explains how media, money and politics have converged to influence the sale.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b06j57f7)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0mj7)
Britain signs nuclear deal with China

Britain signs a multi billion pound nuclear power station deal with China.


WED 18:30 To Hull and Back (b06j57f9)
Series 1

Crying in the Chapel

Songs of Praise are paying a visit to Hull. Sophie sees this as an opportunity to start a successful singing career.

But neglected plumbing and a painting of Elvis at The Last Supper make an impossible task even more difficult...

Series 1 of the sitcom by BBC New Comedy Award winner, Lucy Beaumont.

Sophie still lives at home with her mum in Hull. They make a living doing car boot sales at the weekend. Except they don't really make a living because her mum can't bear to get rid of any of their junk. Plus, they don't have a car. As their house gets more cluttered, Sophie feels more trapped.

Starring Lucy Beaumont as Sophie and Maureen Lipman as Sheila.

Producer: Carl Cooper

A BBC Radio Comedy Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b06j57fc)
Lynda gets busy trying to recruit actors for Calendar Girls, asking Helen and working on Susan - the star of last year's show. Susan fears being exposed though, not keen to get undressed on stage. Lynda sneakily prints off audition posters at work and when Susan
phones Lynda to turn down a role, Lynda pretends in front of suspicious Roy that she's dealing with a customer.

Rob shows no remorse for Charlie and the situation at Berrow Farm. Lynda laps up Rob's negative view of Charlie, but Helen's sympathetic. Rob tells Lynda about his step parental agreement application - Helen's rather taken aback that Rob's so open about it.

Rob's aggressive on the phone to a builder and uses Helen's vulnerable state to make a point. Helen's uncomfortable and says she wants to be treated normally - she isn't happy that everyone knows their secret, but as ever Rob wins her round and she drops the subject.
Henry's delighted when Rob tells him he can adopt him. Henry says he has the best daddy in the world - and asks if he can go hunting now! Rob says that's up to Helen, who agrees.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b06j57ff)
Mark-Anthony Turnage, Clocks exhibition, Colum McCann, Martin Simpson

Mark-Anthony Turnage discusses composing his first piano concerto which gets its UK premiere on Thursday at the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester. He reveals how difficult he found it to write, and where he drew his inspiration from.

As the Clockmaker's Museum - which holds the world's oldest clock and watch collection - is rehoused at the Science Museum, Kirsty takes a look round with the keeper of the collection, Sir George White.

Colum McCann speaks to Kirsty Lang about his new collection of short stories, Thirteen Ways of Looking. When he was composing them Colum was physically assaulted so badly that he was hospitalized. He describes how that attack affected his writing.

The guitarist and singer-songwriter Martin Simpson grew up in Scunthorpe where the steelworks there made a profound impression on him, and everywhere he has travelled he has been conscious of that industry. His song 'Home Again' expresses this, and his premonition that, one day lights of the furnace that illuminated his childhood would dim - and now they are about to. We hear his song while he reflects on its genesis.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j2fpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b06j5bjl)
Turning a Blind Eye and the Law

If you're the kind of person who likes to smoke a joint and chat on your mobile while out for a relaxing Sunday afternoon drive it seems you're in luck. According to figures released this week it seems that the police are increasingly turning a blind eye to these offences and when it comes to enforcing the new law banning smoking in cars where there are children, the police have said it's not their job. If the purpose of the law is to protect public health and safety, and to set moral boundaries, can it ever be morally acceptable to ignore law breaking? Should the law be about defining what is right and wrong, good and bad in all circumstances? Or is it acceptable for a law to be a moral symbol of disapproval, with no real threat of enforcement? And if the police don't have a moral duty to enforce the law, what about us as citizens? From this week landlords will be breaking the law if they don't check their tenants have a right to live in the UK and teachers now have a legal duty to tackle extremism. In both cases it's no longer enough to define a good upright citizen as one who doesn't break the law; it's now about having a legal duty to enforce it too. The Moral Maze and the letter of the law.Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk, with Giles Fraser, Michael Portillo, Claire Fox and Melanie Phillips. Witnesses are John Cooper, Luke Gittos, Professor John Tasioulas and Peter Garsden.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b06j5bjn)
On Being Ignored

John Osborne tells a story of waiting for a bill in a cafe, and explores how a proliferation of new ways of communicating can mean we end up feeling ignored.

Producer: Katie Langton.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b06j1xzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b06j2fpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b06j5bjq)
Mark Carney intervenes in the EU membership debate.

Bank of England Governor says Britain's membership has increased "openness and dynamism" of UK economy.
Netanyahu Holocaust remarks condemned
Starbucks tax deals ruled "illegal"
and Birmingham misses out on Chinese President's visit.
with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06jtp3l)
Reading Europe - Austria: A Whole Life

Episode 3

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature. Robert Powell reads A Whole Life by the Austrian novelist Robert Seethaler.

This 'slim masterpiece' (Daily Mail) went straight onto the bestseller lists in Germany last summer and has been there ever since. Jim Crace called it both 'heart-rending and heart-warming', and over 200,000 people have read and celebrated this book across Europe.

When Andreas Egger reaches the village on the night that he tries to save Hannes, the goatherd, he goes into the inn and meets Marie - the only love of his life - for the first time. Romance and grief and a sometimes wry stoicism are the touchstones of Egger's solitary life as the 20th century unfolds around him. The modern world encroaches slowly on the valley, the forest is carved out for ski lifts, electricity arrives, and tourists too. But throughout it all, Egger remains steadfast in his modest struggle to survive and in his ever constant respect for the landscape around and above him.

Episode 3:
War arrives in Europe and Egger leaves the valley for the Russian front.

Read by Robert Powell
Written by Robert Seethaler
Abridged by Jennie Howarth
Translated by Charlotte Collins

Produced by Elizabeth Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 The Pin (b06j5bjs)
Series 1

Episode 1

Join Alex and Ben in their weird twist on the double-act sketch show.

Strap in for a 15 minute delve in to a world of oddness performed in front of a live studio audience.

The Pin are an award-winning comedy duo, and legends of Edinburgh festival. They deconstruct the sketch form, in a show that exists somewhere between razor-sharp smartness and utterly joyous silliness.

After a sold-out run in Edinburgh, and a string of hilarious performances across BBC Radio 4 Extra, BBC 3, Channel 4, and Comedy Central, this is The Pin's debut solo show for Radio 4. Join them as they celebrate, make, collapse and rebuild their jokes, each other, and probably the radio too.

Producer: Sam Bryant.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


WED 23:15 Dreaming the City (b02x93ry)
Raising the Bones

Four journeys into the dark, recurring dreams of the city. In each episode, leading writers collaborate with documentary-makers Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta to uncover the unsaid obsessions of city life.

Episode 3: Raising the Bones by Naomi Alderman

A heart-broken girl returns to the Roman ruins of Silchester, where she once spent the perfect day with a lost love. But on her return, she discovers it has been transformed into a bustling city - the city that could have been but never was.

These experimental radio features blend archive, fiction and documentary footage. What's real and what's fiction becomes unclear, just like in the city.

A city isn't just a location on the map, it's a place we imagine, dream about, invent. A place to love, to endure or to resent. A place where you can find anything - but it always has a price.

You don't need to live in a city - it's part of the universal imagination. But the way we think of it has common dark undertones, recurring dreams that come round again and again. These late night woozy dreamscapes uncover those unsaid obsessions, each taking a different theme, and question why these ideas seem to keep coming back in the way we imagine urban living.

With thanks to English Heritage.

Producers: Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06j5jsj)
Susan Hulme reports as David Cameron defends proposed cuts to tax credits and warns the Lords not to challenge them.
MPs quiz Labour's Tom Watson and senior police officers about abuse allegations against Lord Brittan.
Teachers have called for more clarity about the role and powers of regional schools commissioners.
And a Labour peer suggests Transport for London should have clamped the Queen's carriage while it was carrying Chinese President Xi JinPing over a £2 million pound debt for unpaid congestion charge.



THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0mkt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b06j6g4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0ml0)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0ml2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0ml7)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0mlb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06j6nml)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Shaunaka Rishi Das.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b06j5k6m)
Defra's future, Road safety, Farmer comedian

Environment Secretary Liz Truss has told a committee of MPs that Defra will need to be 'smaller and more strategic' as big budget cuts loom. She denied that there were plans to merge or abolish any Defra agencies, but said the different agencies could save money but working more closely together.
We also meet a farmer who's diversified to become a stand-up comedian.
Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkylk)
King Eider

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Arctic specialist the king eider duck. Relatives of the larger common eider found around the British coast, king eiders breed around the Arctic and sub-Arctic coasts of the northern hemisphere. As true marine ducks they can dive to depths of 25 metres on occasion, to feed on molluscs and marine crustaceans. The drake King Eider has colourful markings; having a black and white body with a reddish bill, surmounted by an orange-yellow shield. His cheeks are pale mint-green and his crown and nape are lavender-grey. He uses his bill pattern and head colours in a highly ritualised display to woo his mate, fluffing up his chest and issuing an amorous coo-ing call.


THU 06:00 Today (b06j6nmx)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b06j5ncn)
Simone de Beauvoir

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Simone de Beauvoir. "One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman," she wrote in her best known and most influential work, The Second Sex, her exploration of what it means to be a woman in a world defined by men. Published in 1949, it was an immediate success with the thousands of women who bought it. Many male critics felt men came out of it rather badly. Beauvoir was born in 1908 to a high bourgeois family and it was perhaps her good fortune that her father lost his money when she was a girl. With no dowry, she pursued her education in Paris to get work and in a key exam to allow her to teach philosophy, came second only to Jean Paul Sartre. He was retaking. They became lovers and, for the rest of their lives together, intellectual sparring partners. Sartre concentrated on existentialist philosophy; Beauvoir explored that, and existentialist ethics, plus the novel and, increasingly in the decades up to her death in 1986, the situation of women in the world.

With
Christina Howells
Professor of French and Fellow of Wadham College at the University of Oxford

Margaret Atack
Professor of French at the University of Leeds

And

Ursula Tidd
Professor of Modern French Literature and Thought at the University of Manchester

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b06j5ncw)
John le Carre: The Biography

Episode 4

The life of John le Carre by Adam Sisman, is abridged for radio in five episodes by Katrin Williams:

From The Spy Who Came In From The Cold to Tinker, Tailor.., le Carre is one of the biggest names in the writing world. Then there's the time he encountered Dennis Healey at a party, with genial accusations in the air.

Reader: Stephen Boxer.

Producer: Duncan Minshull.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06j6nn3)
Ann Limb, the new chair of the Scout Association

It's 24 years since girls were first allowed to join the Scouts and now for the first time in its 108 year history a woman is the new Chair of the Scouts Association. Ann Limb, former civil servant and teacher, Quaker and daughter of a butcher from Moss Side joins Emma Barnett to discuss her vision for her new role.

The Scottish Secretary has said there's no "convincing constitutional reason" why decisions on the law governing abortion should not be handed to MSPs through the Scotland Bill, which is currently working its way through Westminster. The BBC's Scottish Political Correspondent Lucy Adams looks at what it might mean.

We hear from listener and single mum Tania who wanted us to cover the impact growing up without a dad can have on girls. Rebecca and Anna , two young women who grew up without fathers share their thoughts.

Plus on the 20th anniversary of the Women's Prize for Fiction, you can vote for your favourite read with the Best of the Best of the last ten years. Today Fi Glover, chair of the Judges in 2009, talks about Home, by Marilynne Robinson.

And Lizzie Ostrom on why she gave up a job in PR to follow her lifelong obsession - perfume. Her book Perfume: A History of Scents is out today.

Presented by Emma Barnett
Producer Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j5nd2)
Early One Morning

Episode 9

1944. As American soldiers parade through Rome, Chiara receives some devastating news.

1973. Chiara confides in her oldest friend about her dilemma over Daniele's teenage daughter, Maria, who doesn't yet know anything about her father's past.

Greta Scacchi, Juliet Aubrey and Sophie Melville star in Virginia Baily's powerful novel of love, loss and learning to be a mother.

Narrator.....Greta Scacchi
Chiara.....Juliet Aubrey
Maria.....Sophie Melville
Cecilia.....Alex Tregear
Daniele.....Adam Thomas Wright
Gennaro/ Adult Daniele.....Cesare Taurasi
Simone/ Nonna.....Jessica Turner
Antonio.....David Hounslow
Gabriele.....David Acton
Tommaso/ Nazi officer/ Brian.....Felix Auer
Edna.....Amelia Lowdell
Barry/ Goffredo.....Chris Pavlo
Gianni.....Sam Dale

Dramatised by Miranda Emmerson.

Director: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b06j0mlh)
A Murder at Number 48

Reporter despatches from far and wide. In this edition: Alastair Leithead on the wave of violence in the African state of Burundi connected to the president's third term in office. David Shukman's in the Philippines where thousands of people have been driven from their homes by a typhoon in which it rained, and then went on raining for days on end. Lucy Ash is in Beziers in southern France, a city accused of being a laboratory for the far right. Trudeaumania's back in Canada - Rajini Vaidyanathan talks of how he was swept to power on a tide of votes, many from the country's young, but the question is, can he now deliver? And it's a capital city determined to become the Dubai of Africa - James Jeffrey is in Djibouti where some locals wonder what might be lost in their republic's drive for modernity.


THU 11:30 Rave: The Beat Goes On (b06j5qcx)
In the early 90s, a group of young people thought they'd found an entire new way of living, powered by music, dancing, love, and drugs. Just as the world seemed to be getting more materialistic, they went in the other direction, living without money, usually without homes, with life as one long noisy illegal party. But can you keep that up? What about when the state tries to crush you? What about when children come along? When the drugs scene turns bad, and when you just get older and more tired? This is the story of a small group of friends that came together in 1990, who called themselves Spiral Tribe. On the rave scene, they are legendary. Now 25 years on, many of them are still together, still partying across Europe, but now with money and a keen sense of the value of their historic brand. Are they still living the dream, or has the dream changed? Jolyon Jenkins reports.

Interviews and research by Milly Chowles.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b06j0mln)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b064g582)
22 October 1915 - Adam Wilson

On this day a British subject was found guilty of spying for Germany and sentenced to a lifetime of penal servitude, and Florrie and Albert take a trip to the pictures

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b06j6t8f)
Buy-to-let, Plastic plants, Will disputes

Buy to let mortgages are booming - research from the Council of Mortgage Lenders show there was a leap of almost 40% in the number given out last year. It seems would-be landlords aren't put off by the fact that from 2017 landlords won't be able claim as much tax relief on their mortgage payments. And existing landlords warn they are already putting up rents in anticipation.

New figures from the Ministry of Justice show a sharp rise in the number of contested wills being taken to court. Lawyers think it may be down to complex relationships with divorces and remarriages, but there is the suggestion that the rising value of property plays a role. What are last wishes worth if a court can overturn them?

And one of Royal Mail's most valuable resources is its database of postcodes and the names that go with them. They're highly sought after by marketing companies trying to sell us things. But should Royal Mail be allowed to sell this information? And how can you stop them sending it out?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Olive Clancy.


THU 12:57 Weather (b06j0mlx)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06j6t8h)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 Peter Snow Returns to the Future (b06j5qcz)
Genevieve Bell

Peter Snow's guest is the futurist Genevieve Bell who takes him on a journey to meet the monks who compiled the medieval Domesday Book in 1086 then forward to the day after tomorrow and a world shaped by Big Data. But what connects the historical database of the past with the decision shaping data of the future?


THU 14:00 The Archers (b06j57fc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b06j5qd1)
Ten Funerals and a Wedding

By Nick Underwood.

Phoebe works part-time in a whisky shop where her skirt matches the tartan carpet. The rest of the time she's a humanist celebrant who specializes in death.

She's not remotely qualified for weddings and she's certainly not a fan of them. And then her best friend asks her to conduct hers...

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b06j5qd3)
Series 31

Artists' Ways - North Somerset

Clare Balding walks with Carolyn Savidge in the final programme of this series which has been themed Artists' Ways. In the first programme she walked with an artist who created outdoor artworks to help her to come to terms with never having had children. In this final programme, Carolyn explains how walking and art have helped her deal with the loss of her husband.

Carolyn's walk leaves from her front door in the village of Bleadon in North Somerset, and takes her out onto the hills and levels of north Somerset. On the way she describes the written, photographic and sound based project she has created since losing her husband to cancer. It's a moving walk, but also very uplifting as Carolyn describes how embracing the landscape has helped her begin to move forward with her life.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b06j0tqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b06j0wff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b06j5qd5)
Mad Max, Jaws, Cartel Land, Casting James Bond

With Francine Stock.

Director George Miller reveals the influence of Buster Keaton on his post-apocalyptic epic Mad Max:Fury Road.

The maker of Cartel Land, an eye-opening documentary about the Mexican drug wars, Matthew Heineman, tells Francine what it was like to visit a secret meth lab and to be caught in the middle of a shoot-out.

Composer Neil Brand dissects the opening of Jaws, and explains why a few notes can instil fear in us all.

Debbie McWilliams is one of the women who gives James Bond his licence to kill. She's been the casting director for all the 007 movies since For Your Eyes Only and let us in on a few secrets, for your ears only.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b06j5qd7)
Animal experiments, Bees and diesel, Sense Ocean, Readability of IPCC report

Animal experiments
Scientists are changing the way they measure animals used in research. The most recent Home Office report not only shows the numbers of animals used, it also grades how much each animal suffered. Dr Sara Wells from MRC talks to Adam about this new measure, and also the fact that the overall number of animals used in 2014 has declined for the first time in years.

Bees and diesel
The polluting power of diesel has been getting a lot of press recently. Now, new research has shown that the volatile nitrogen oxides in diesel exhaust (NOx) are preventing bees from finding their food flowers. The diesel chemically alters some of the most common floral scent compounds, rendering them unrecognisable to bees and other insect pollinators. The effect adds to the suite of environmental factors impacting bee survival.

Sense Ocean
Adam visits the National oceanography Centre in Southampton where they are working on Sense Ocean - A big Europe-wide project which is monitoring what is in the world's oceans. Professor Matt Mowlem, is Head of the Ocean Technology and engineering group, and he is in charge of making sensors, which measure the chemical and biological nature of sea water from small platforms and vehicles.

Readability of IPCC Report
A paper in Nature Climate change last week scored the IPCC Summary for Policy Makers report, very low for 'readability', Adam discusses the trade-off between writing science that is right, and writing science that is understandable.

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b06j6t8m)
News interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0mm4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 The Brig Society (b06j5qd9)
Series 3

GCSE

Please turn your radio over and start listening as Marcus Brigstocke has just thirty minutes to retake his GCSEs. During the show he will be sitting a genuine GCSE exam set by the Producer in an attempt to get the bottom of Grade Inflation and also the class.

The invigilators are Margaret Cabourn-Smith ("Miranda"), William Andrews ("Sorry I've Got No Head") and Justin Edwards ("The Thick Of It") with a secret appearance by The Now Show's Jon Holmes.

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt and Dan Tetsell.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b06j5qdc)
Joe's trying on his scary makeup for the Lower Loxley ghost walks, and frightens Keira all dressed up in a coat of Susan's which he's using as a cloak. Emma shows Eddie her first go at a website for him and the turkey business. Joe doesn't buy Eddie's story about an ancestor farming in the 1700s. Meanwhile, Will's still patrolling the area for poachers.

Emma goes to see David and Ruth and quits her cleaning job at Brookfield. She explains that as things are taking off with Fallon's vintage business, she just won't have enough time. Emma's full of enthusiasm, feeling reminded of what she's good at.

Pip has been talking to Helen and feels that the Bridge Farm shop could be a real destination. Pip wants to do more to marketing Brookfield's beef and lamb.

It's Pip's graduation day but there's a problem with a busted mixer wagon. The event goes ahead just fine though. David jokingly remembers Ruth's graduation - when they lost their hats during the photo. Ruth gives Pip her gift and card from Heather. The gift is a silver fountain pen, engraved with 'With love and pride, Granny'. Tearful Ruth hugs Pip - they're all proud of her.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b06j6t8r)
Daniel Craig, Art Power 100, Stephen Kovacevich

John Wilson talks to Bond star Daniel Craig about his new film, Spectre.

Pianist Stephen Kovacevich on his close musical partnership with Jacqueline du Pre and coping with stagefright.

Is BBC1's new police drama, Cuffs, a worthy successor to The Bill? Julia Raeside reviews.

And Art Review editor JJ Charlesworth on who holds the most power in today's art world.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j5nd2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b06j5qdf)
Salad v Surgery: Treating Type 2 Diabetes

In June of this year, presenter of Radio 4's Woman's Hour, Jenni Murray, underwent an operation which removed 75 per cent of her stomach. A few months later, she has lost over 4 stones in weight and her symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes have gone into remission.

Once a purely cosmetic procedure, bariatric surgery procedures like this have been described as the greatest advance in the history of treatment of Type 2 diabetes - so why aren't more patients being treated in this way?

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE), which provides guidance and advice to the NHS, has said obese patients with diabetes should be rapidly assessed for surgery - but that's yet to happen.

The treatment has been met with fierce criticism, especially from the tabloid press, which declared it undeserved: fat people should just stop eating instead of using up valuable resources to pay for vanity operations.

Furthermore, Britain's leading diabetes charity, Diabetes UK, has also warned of the 'serious risks' posed by the procedure - even though the NHS has itself stated it is not more risky than a routine gall bladder operation.

The irony here is that increasing the number of bariatric procedures could actually save the NHS millions of pounds, as patients are weaned off costly diabetes drugs - the NHS currently spends around £12bn a year treating the disease.

With round 700 people diagnosed with diabetes in Britain every day, are we letting misguided morality get in the way of an opportunity to save money - and lives?

CONTRIBUTORS INCLUDE:

Jenni Murray, presenter Radio 4's Woman's Hour

Simon O'Neill - Director of Health Intelligence, Diabetes UK

Prof Roy Taylor, Professor of Medicine and Metabolism, Newcastle University

Prof Francesco Rubino, Professor of Metabolic Surgery, King's College Hospital

Prof Mark Baker, Director of the Centre for Clinical Practice, NICE

Mr Andrew Mitchell, Consultant General Surgeon, Darlington Memorial Hospital

Presenter: Adrian Goldberg
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith

Note: A version of this programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June, 2014.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b06j5qdh)
Sponsorship

Whether it's high-profile sports events or blockbuster art exhibitions, companies like Adidas and Unilever spend millions of pounds on sponsorship - to get their brand associated with sporting or artistic excellence. The global sponsorship market is worth more than 30 billion pounds a year, but what happens when negative publicity - like Fifa's World Cup corruption scandal - starts to tarnish a brand? Evan Davis and guests discuss whether sponsors should walk away or use their influence to press for change.

Guests:

Peter Mather, Group Regional Vice President for Europe, BP;
Jan Gooding, Group Brand Director, Aviva;
Jaimie Fuller, Chairman, Skins.

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b06j5qd7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b06j5ncn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b06j6t8t)
Clinton anger over Republican questions on Benghazi attack

Former Sec of State says opposition trying to exploit attack which killed US Ambassador


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06jtp9b)
Reading Europe - Austria: A Whole Life

Episode 4

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature. Robert Powell reads A Whole Life by the Austrian novelist Robert Seethaler.

This 'slim masterpiece' (Daily Mail) went straight onto the bestseller lists in Germany last summer and has been there ever since. Jim Crace called it both 'heart-rending and heart-warming', and over 200,000 people have read and celebrated this book across Europe.

When Andreas Egger reaches the village on the night that he tries to save Hannes, the goatherd, he goes into the inn and meets Marie - the only love of his life - for the first time. Romance and grief and a sometimes wry stoicism are the touchstones of Egger's solitary life as the 20th century unfolds around him. The modern world encroaches slowly on the valley, the forest is carved out for ski lifts, electricity arrives, and tourists too. But throughout it all, Egger remains steadfast in his modest struggle to survive and in his ever constant respect for the landscape around and above him.

Episode 4:
Television comes to the valley and stirs emotions Egger has buried deep.

Read by Robert Powell
Written by Robert Seethaler
Translated by Charlotte Collins
Abridged by Jennie Howarth

Produced by Elizabeth Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Rob Newman (b06j5qr3)
Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution

Episode 2

Rob Newman returns with a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of Survival of the Fittest and The Selfish Gene with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob is our guide on a journey through a unique audio A-Z of nature that takes in everything from altruistic amoebae and dancing squid to Richard Dawkins wrestling naked with a postal worker.

Piecing these fragments together allows Rob to correct some major distortions of Darwinism, as well as rejig the theory of natural selection in the light of what we now know about epigenetics, mirror neurons and the Flintstones.

Written by Rob Newman
Starring Claire Price, with Jenni Murray as the voice of the Encyclopaedia.

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06j5qr5)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster, as MPs debate proposals to give English and Welsh MPs extra powers when legislation only affects their constituents.

And peers criticise the government over the cuts to tax credits amid a row about the role of the House of Lords.



FRIDAY 23 OCTOBER 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b06j0mpw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b06j5ncw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06j0mpy)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06j0mq0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06j0mq4)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b06j0mq6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06jvbcn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Shaunaka Rishi Das.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b06jvbcq)
Biomass, Royal meeting, Fly-tipping, Forestry

One of the USA's most powerful environmental groups, the Natural Resources Defence Council says that the Drax power station is damaging forests in the southern states of America because of its demand for wood pellets. Paul Murphy from BBC North has been following the situation, he says Drax categorically deny harming forests in any way.
The Prince of Wales will host a Farming Crisis Summit today. The Prince is said to be 'extremely concerned about the state of British farming and the vulnerability of smaller farms in particular.' Allan Wilkinson is the head of Agriculture for HSBC and will be at the meeting. He told Charlotte Smith that its crucial that a way forward for small farms is found.
Fly tipping has increased according to the latest figures from Defra. Derek Holliday from the Country Land and Business Association thinks that the government need to do more to help land owners who have rubbish dumped on their land.
Sally Challenor goes in to the forest to meet some young people who are finding a career with timber

Presenter Charlotte Smith. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxq8)
Montezuma Oropendola

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Panamanian Montezuma oropendola. In a clearing in the humid rainforest in Panama a tall tree appears to be draped in hanging baskets. These are the nests of a New World blackbird, Montezuma oropendola. The male produces an ecstatic bubbling liquid call as he displays to females, reaching a crescendo whilst bowing downwards from his perch, spreading his wings and raising his tail. They weave long tubular basket-like nests from plant fibres, which they suspend in clusters from tall trees. Colonies can contain up to one hundred and seventy nests, but more usually number about thirty.


FRI 06:00 Today (b06jvcms)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b06j0wf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b06j5ycc)
John le Carre: The Biography

Episode 5

The life of John le Carre by Adam Sisman, is abridged for radio in five episodes by Katrin Williams:

From The Constant Gardener in the 1990s to the present day, and the author is still very much at work - "I find it very difficult to read my own stuff, but I look at it with satisfaction."

Reader: Stephen Boxer

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06jvcmv)
Nawal El Saadawi; HRT - how to decide whether to take it or not

Egyptian, feminist and writer, Nawal El Saadawi on continuing to speak out against female oppression and still being politically active at 83;

Making a decision to take HRT or not can be a confused process. Consultant gynaecologist, and past chair of the British Menopause Society, Mr Tim Hillard discusses the research and specialist in women's health, GP, Dr Sarah Gray illustrates how she helps women to make a choice.

Women's Prize for Fiction, Best of the Best: Daisy Goodwin, Chair of Judges in 2009 discusses that year's winner 'The Lacuna' by Barbara Kingsolver;

Bethan Lewis, BBC Wales political reporter, reports from Plaid Cymru Annual Conference on what they are offering women voters ahead of next year's assembly elections ;

Julia Medforth has launched a campaign to save the damson. We hear why.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j5ycg)
Early One Morning

Episode 10

Rome 1973. With Simone's encouragment, Chiara determines to tell Maria the truth aboout Daniele and confront her own past.

Greta Scacchi, Juliet Aubrey and Sophie Melville star in Virginia Baily's powerful novel of love, loss and learning to be a mother.

Narrator.....Greta Scacchi
Chiara.....Juliet Aubrey
Maria.....Sophie Melville
Cecilia.....Alex Tregear
Daniele.....Adam Thomas Wright
Gennaro/ Adult Daniele.....Cesare Taurasi
Simone/ Nonna.....Jessica Turner
Antonio.....David Hounslow
Gabriele.....David Acton
Tommaso/ Nazi officer/ Brian.....Felix Auer
Edna.....Amelia Lowdell
Barry/ Goffredo.....Chris Pavlo
Gianni.....Sam Dale

Dramatised by Miranda Emmerson.

Director: Emma Harding

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


FRI 11:00 Cold War Confidential (b06j6665)
The disappearance of diplomats Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean in May 1951 rocked the British establishment and lead ultimately to the unmasking of the notorious Cambridge spies - a network of brilliant graduates who had penetrated the heart of British power to spy for the Soviet Union.

As the Government finally opens its archives on Burgess and Maclean, held secret for nearly 65 years, Martha Kearney examines the papers to discover how Foreign Office Mandarins reacted to the horrifying discovery of spies within their midst.

Heavily criticised at the time for saying too little in public and engaging in a cover-up, we can now learn what was being said behind closed doors. Donald Maclean had been under suspicion for leaking documents from Washington during the war and was due to be confronted about it when he disappeared. We can now follow events as the net closed in around him- and see how attention soon turned to Kim Philby, Maclean's fellow spy, still at his post in the Washington Embassy.

The archives include files from the Foreign Office, Cabinet Office and Security Service but, in this programme, Martha focuses mostly on the Foreign Office as an institution and what the papers reveal about its atmosphere at the time - the Old Boy network mode of recruitment and management, and the soul searching that went on in the wake of the spy scandal.

Producer: Deborah Dudgeon
Series Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Double Acts (b06j6667)
Series 1

Wysinnwyg

It's Kerry's first day in the Sales Support Department of Willard & Son Bath Suppliers - where she meets Adele for the very first time.

Alison Steadman and Isy Suttie star in the second of six two-handers written by Cabin Pressure's John Finnemore.

Adele............Alison Steadman
Kerry.............Isy Suttie

Written by John Finnemore
Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b06j0mqd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b064g592)
23 October 1915 - Albert Wilson

On this day German cruiser Prinz Aldalbert was sunk by an Allied submarine losing most of its crew, and Albert Wilson has to make an impossible decision.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b06jvcmy)
Force feeding, Online banking mistakes, National Mole Day

A freedom of information request reveals a steep rise in patients in England with eating disorders being fed against their will.

Scottish Power is bottom of the pile when it comes to customer service.

What do European consumers think about VW now?

The rise and rise of national awareness days - a celebration of the weird and the worthy.

The digit slip that can cost you a fortune if you use online banking.

Producer: Kevin Mousley
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b06j0mql)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b06j6669)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:45 Peter Snow Returns to the Future (b06j666c)
Jonathan Glancey

What will remain of the greatest architecture in the world when human beings are no longer here? The architectural writer Jonathan Glancey takes Peter Snow on a tour of ancient Rome and a trip to the City of London in a far future when humankind has gone.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b06j5qdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b06j67y0)
The Liberty Cap

Pete has been suffering from depression for many years but no therapy or medicine has had any lasting benefit. Now he is considering taking part in a clinical trial that is testing a new treatment that uses Psilocybin, the psychoactive chemical found in magic mushrooms.

The Liberty Cap is written by Hattie Naylor (award winning playwright whose many plays include Ivan and the Dogs and The Diary of Samuel Pepys) and made in consultation with Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, a psycho-pharmacologist at Imperial College London, who is conducting research into psychedelic drugs and their potential therapeutic uses.

Scientific research into psychedelic drugs has been effectively shut down for decades but is now becoming more widespread. The action of this drama is inspired by clinical trials that are currently taking place and the ethical questions they raise, although all characters portrayed are entirely fictional.

The Liberty Cap was developed through the Wellcome Trust Experimental Stories scheme.

Written by Hattie Naylor

Programme consultant: Dr Robin Carhart-Harris
Music consultant: Mark Jackson
Sound design by Alisdair McGregor

Produced and directed by Boz Temple-Morris
A Holy Mountain production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06j67y2)
South Yorkshire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from South Yorkshire.

Matt Biggs, Christine Walkden and Pippa Greenwood answer questions from the audience of local gardeners.

This week the panel offers advice to gardeners cultivating crops at 900ft, discuss planning a garden from scratch, and reveals the best methods for using nematodes.

Also, Matt Biggs presents a feature exploring the habits of the Clematis, the UK's most popular climber.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Enduring Land - Extracts from Sunset Song (b06j67y4)
Episode 3

One of the most important Scottish novels of the 20th century, Sunset Song follows the coming of age of its heroine Chris Guthrie in rural Aberdeenshire. Set at the beginning of the last century, the novel is a beautifully wrought depiction of a rural community coming to terms with a rapidly changing modern world and the devastating impact of the Great War.

In this final extract, Chris receives devastating news from Chae, a neighbour, home on leave from the Front, who had spoken to her husband, Ewan, just before his death. Though awful to hear, it allows her to grieve properly, and sheds light upon Ewan's terrible behaviour before he left for France.

Terence Davies's eagerly anticipated film of Lewis Grassic Gibbon's classic novel had its UK premiere at the London Film Festival last week and will go on general release at the beginning of December.

Reader: Hannah Donaldson

Writer: Lewis Grassic Gibbon

Abridger / Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b06jvcn0)
General John Galvin, Joan Leslie, Michael Meacher, Howard Kendall, Jerry Parr and Coleridge Goode

Matthew Bannister on

General Jack Galvin who was NATO's Supreme Allied Commander in Europe as the Cold War ended. Generals Colin Powell and David Petraeus pay tribute.

Joan Leslie - the Hollywood star who made forty films in ten years.

Michael Meacher - the former Environment minister once described by Neil Kinnock as "Tony Benn's vicar on earth." The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn joins us.

Howard Kendall - Everton football club's most successful manager. Gary Lineker remembers playing under him.

Jerry Parr - the secret service agent who saved President Ronald Reagan's life when he was shot.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b06jvcn2)
Arthur Miller - Your Reviews

Actor Martin Jarvis pays homage to Arthur Miller, England Cricketer Vic Marks gives his verdict on The Archers' game, and Radio 4 drama goes underground and avant-garde.

In recent weeks, BBC Radio has been host to a theatrical marathon celebrating the centenary of the birth of the great playwright Arthur Miller. With a wealth of plays, features and documentaries across Radio 3 and Radio 4, some critics called it overkill - but listeners couldn't get enough. Roger Bolton puts audience questions to Martin Jarvis, director of Radio 3's A View from the Bridge.

When it comes to reporting the news, getting to grips with statistics is vital for any correspondent. Listeners are fed reels of numbers, explaining everything from economic performance and mortality rates, to voting patterns and adultery. But how well do BBC correspondents understand these statistics, and do they risk being partial if they don't use them correctly? Roger speaks to Michael Blastland, one of the founders of Radio 4's chief number crunching programme More or Less.

Last week's Radio 4 drama Master Rock was recorded live inside a Scottish mountain - but some listeners wished it had been buried forever. With an experimental electronic soundscape, and a postmodern script, the drama told the story of the subterranean Cruachan Power station, and the people who built it. While some thought it was progressive, artistic, and a unique listen, for others it was an off-putting experience.

When the residents of Ambridge played the biggest cricketing fixture of the year, it was bound to be dramatic, and it didn't disappoint. But was the match plausible? Roger speaks to ex-England all-rounder Vic Marks to find out.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey.
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b06j67y6)
Bob and Ben - Glory Days

Fi Glover introduces two friends who meet regularly for a 'clonc' (West Welsh for chat) and enjoy exulting in the art of rugby - another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b06jvdyc)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06j0mr1)
Talk Talk says it's received a ransom demand after a major cyber attack.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b06j67y8)
Series 88

Episode 6

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp. Jeremy Hardy, Holly Walsh, Yasmine Akram and political sketch writer Michael Deacon are Miles' guests this week.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b06j6by4)
Fallon and Harrison get everything ready for their housewarming at tonight at Woodbine cottage.

Emma's happy for Helen as she finds out about her pregnancy - Emma fondly remembers their chats on the playground bench. Helen mentions the Bridge Farm shop and café - they've got another firm coming in to finish off the plastering etc. Helen talks about Rob being in charge, reasoning that it's better for her to not be under pressure. Fallon reminds Helen that it's still her business. Fallon later talks to Emma, sensing something isn't quite right. But Emma says Helen's fine.

In the wake of the cow crisis at Berrow Farm, Lynda is ambushing people to sign her petition against the dairy. Lynda argues with Charlie, who Adam stands up for. Harrison later tells Adam what Rob's been saying about Berrow - that without him there would have been health problems even sooner.

Charlie tells Adam that one of the grass silage clamps has tested positive for botulism. Adam says it's great that now Charlie can start feeding the others. But Charlie has more to tell - one of the staff was clearing out the contaminated stuff and noticed something hanging from the loader - which turned out to be the remains of a dog.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b06kj8ww)
Tracey Thorn, Jekyll and Hyde, Howard Brenton on Magna Carta

Tracey Thorn, singer-songwriter and one half of Everything But the Girl, discusses her work as a solo artist, which forms the basis of a new two-disc compilation.

ITV's new adaptation of the Jekyll and Hyde story begins this Sunday. Greg Tate, lecturer in Victorian literature, talks us through how TV and film have made use of the character over the years.

As part of the commemoration of the Magna Carta's 800th anniversary, Salisbury Playhouse has commissioned four internationally-known dramatists to write new plays inspired by the document, said to be the origin of the liberties and the rule of law we enjoy today. Playwrights Howard Brenton and Sally Woodcock discuss their separate dramas.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06j5ycg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b06j6by6)
Nigel Evans MP, Nia Griffith MP, Cristina Odone, Lord Wigley

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from All Saints Church in Porthcawl, Wales, with a panel including the Conservative back bencher Nigel Evans MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Wales Nia Griffith MP, the journalist Cristina Odone, and the former leader of Plaid Cymru Lord Wigley.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b06j6byb)
Roger Scruton: In Defence of Free Speech

Roger Scruton argues that the law on freedom of speech ought to protect those who express heretical views and not be used to close down debate.
"Free speech is not the cause of the tensions that are growing around us, but the only possible solution to them."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b064g5b3)
19-23 October 1915

Omnibus edition of Home Front, the epic drama series set in Great War Britain, over a week when crises lead to drastic actions.

Written by Richard Monks
Story-led by Sarah Daniels
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b06j0mrf)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b06jtq2b)
Strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Americas is bearing down on Mexico.

Hurricane, bearing down on Mexico's Pacific coast, threatening a "potentially catastrophic" landfall.
The World Tonight examines the impact of climate change on extreme weather events.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06jtpn5)
Reading Europe - Austria: A Whole Life

Episode 5

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature. Robert Powell reads A Whole Life by the Austrian novelist Robert Seethaler.

This 'slim masterpiece' (Daily Mail) went straight onto the bestseller lists in Germany last summer and has been there ever since. Jim Crace called it both 'heart-rending and heart-warming', and over 200,000 people have read and celebrated this book across Europe.

When Andreas Egger reaches the village on the night that he tries to save Hannes, the goatherd, he goes into the inn and meets Marie - the only love of his life - for the first time. Romance and grief and a sometimes wry stoicism are the touchstones of Egger's solitary life as the 20th century unfolds around him. The modern world encroaches slowly on the valley, the forest is carved out for ski lifts, electricity arrives, and tourists too. But throughout it all, Egger remains steadfast in his modest struggle to survive and in his ever constant respect for the landscape around and above him.

Episode 5:
An echo from his past shocks Egger and he seeks shelter on the high slopes.

Read by Robert Powell
Written by Robert Seethaler
Translated by Charlotte Collins
Abridged by Jennie Howarth

Produced by Elizabeth Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b06j21bx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b06kj8wy)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b06j6byl)
Jack and Angela - I Always Want to Be There for You

Fi Glover with a mother and son who reflect on how difficult it was for him to leave for university when his grandmother was ill, but also how there comes a time to let go. Recorded in the mobile Booth at the Woodland Trust in Grantham, this is another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b06j13r9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b06j13r9)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b06j1qv7)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b06j1qv7)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b06j2fpj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b06j2fpj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b06j5nd2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b06j5nd2)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b06j5ycg)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b06j5ycg)

A Charles Paris Mystery 23:00 TUE (b01p71wn)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b06j21bx)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b06j21bx)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b06gxysx)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b06j6byb)

A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics 11:30 WED (b06j2gfy)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b06gqr68)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b06j1kf4)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b06hyt3m)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b06gxc1q)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b06j6by6)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b06hyxc6)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b06j5qd7)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b06j5qd7)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b06j0tqq)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b06j0tqq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b06j1kf8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b06jtp1f)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b06jtp3l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b06jtp9b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b06jtpn5)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b06j78nc)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b06j13r5)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b06j13r5)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b06j6fcy)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b06j6fcy)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b06j6g4p)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b06j6g4p)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b06j5ncw)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b06j5ncw)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b06j5ycc)

Britain and China 20:00 MON (b06jtztq)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b06j0m4f)

Cold War Confidential 11:00 FRI (b06j6665)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b06j1xzd)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b06j1xzd)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b06j0wf3)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b06j0wf3)

Dilemma 11:30 MON (b01qwglw)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b06hyt3p)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b06gtr70)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b06j0wfc)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b06j1xz8)

Drama 14:15 THU (b06j5qd1)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b06j67y0)

Dreaming the City 23:15 WED (b02x93ry)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b06hk4yd)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b06j0ymn)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b06j1n2g)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b06jtxbl)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b06j5k6m)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b06jvbcq)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b06gxxl9)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b06jvcn2)

Fiery Inspiration: Amiri Baraka and the Black Arts Movement 16:00 MON (b06j1kdp)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b06grl93)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b06j21ch)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b06j5bjn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b06gxd29)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b06j0mlh)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b06j1kf2)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b06j21cc)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b06j57ff)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b06j6t8r)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b06kj8ww)

Funny Bones 19:45 SUN (b06j0xfj)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b06gx5qx)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b06j67y2)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b064g5b3)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b064g54g)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b064g55q)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b064g57r)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b064g582)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b064g592)

Homer, Hagrid and the Incredible Hulk 10:30 SAT (b06hk68g)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b06j5ncn)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b06j5ncn)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b06j21ck)

John Finnemore's Double Acts 11:30 FRI (b06j6667)

Journey of a Lifetime 11:00 MON (b06j144b)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b06gqkv8)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b06j1kdy)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b06gxxl7)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b06jvcn0)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b06j0tqv)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b06hywnl)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b06gxd1q)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b06j0m2v)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b06j0m8v)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b06j0mf7)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b06j0mhr)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b06j0mkt)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b06j0mpw)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b06j2fpd)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b06j2fpd)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b06hyt38)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b06hyt38)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b06mczxq)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b06j5bjl)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w9l70)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w9l34)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b06gxd21)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b06j0m34)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b06j0m97)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b06j0mfh)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b06j0mj0)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b06j0mlb)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b06j0mq6)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b06j0m38)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b06gxd2c)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b06j0m4h)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b06j0m9q)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b06j0mfk)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b06j0mj3)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b06j0mln)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b06j0mqd)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b06gxd23)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b06j0m3z)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b06j0m49)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b06gxd2t)

News 13:00 SAT (b06gxd2j)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b06j1qty)

Open Art 22:15 SAT (b06hyyt1)

Open Art 14:15 MON (b06hyyt1)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b06j0wff)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b06j0wff)

Opening Lines 00:30 SUN (b037sdyz)

PM 17:00 SAT (b06hywnj)

PM 17:00 MON (b06j1kdt)

PM 17:00 TUE (b06j21c1)

PM 17:00 WED (b06j57f7)

PM 17:00 THU (b06j6t8m)

PM 17:00 FRI (b06jvdyc)

Peter Snow Returns to the Future 13:45 MON (b06j1kdh)

Peter Snow Returns to the Future 13:45 TUE (b06j1xz6)

Peter Snow Returns to the Future 13:45 WED (b06j2gg2)

Peter Snow Returns to the Future 13:45 THU (b06j5qcz)

Peter Snow Returns to the Future 13:45 FRI (b06j666c)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b06j0wty)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b06gtn4z)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b06j0wlw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b06gxdb8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b06l4ztc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b06l5pqd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b06mb9jg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b06j6nml)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b06jvbcn)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b06hywnn)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b06hywnn)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b06hywnn)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b06gqh8f)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b06j0tqz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b06j0tqz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b06j0tqz)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b06gw3kk)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b06j5qd3)

Rave: The Beat Goes On 11:30 THU (b06j5qcx)

Recycled Radio 11:00 WED (b06j2fpn)

Rob Newman 23:00 THU (b06j5qr3)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b06j1kdm)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b06hk68d)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b06hywnq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b06gxd1x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b06j0m30)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b06j0m8z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b06j0mfc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b06j0mhw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b06j0ml2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b06j0mq0)

Shedtown 19:15 SUN (b01pw3lq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b06gxd1v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b06gxd1z)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b06gxd2m)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b06j0m2y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b06j0m32)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b06j0m4y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b06j0m8x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b06j0m93)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b06j0mf9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b06j0mff)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b06j0mht)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b06j0mhy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b06j0ml0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b06j0ml7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b06j0mpy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b06j0mq4)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b06j1xzb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b06gxd2r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b06j0m5h)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b06j0mbb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b06j0mft)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b06j0mj7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b06j0mm4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b06j0mr1)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b06j0tqs)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b06j0tqs)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b06j13r3)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b06j13r3)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b06j0tr1)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b06j0tqx)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 TUE (b06j1qv9)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b06j0wf1)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b06j0wv0)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b06j0wv0)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b06j1kf0)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b06j1kf0)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b06j21c9)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b06j21c9)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b06j57fc)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b06j57fc)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b06j5qdc)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b06j5qdc)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b06j6by4)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b06gwfzx)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b06j5qdh)

The Brig Society 18:30 THU (b06j5qd9)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b06j1kdr)

The Enduring Land - Extracts from Sunset Song 15:45 FRI (b06j67y4)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b06gwcp9)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b06j5qd5)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b06j0wf5)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b06j0wf5)

The Jazz Ambassadors of the Cold War 13:30 SUN (b06j6lh3)

The Letters of Ada Lovelace 21:00 TUE (b06bglnh)

The Letters of Ada Lovelace 15:30 WED (b06bglnh)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b06j1qts)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b06j1qts)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b06j0wf9)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b06j2fpl)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b06j67y6)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b06j6byl)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b06j57f5)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b06gx716)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b06j67y8)

The Pin 23:00 WED (b06j5bjs)

The Report 20:00 THU (b06j5qdf)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b06hk6bq)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b06j0wf7)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b06j1kf6)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b06j21cr)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b06j5bjq)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b06j6t8t)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b06jtq2b)

There Is No Escape 18:30 TUE (b06j21c5)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b06grz17)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b06j57f3)

To Hull and Back 18:30 WED (b06j57f9)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b06j1kfb)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b06j22fh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b06j5jsj)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b06j5qr5)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b06kj8wy)

Today 07:00 SAT (b06hk68b)

Today 06:00 MON (b06j13r1)

Today 06:00 TUE (b06j1qtn)

Today 06:00 WED (b06mbbhf)

Today 06:00 THU (b06j6nmx)

Today 06:00 FRI (b06jvcms)

Tommies 14:15 WED (b06j2gg4)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04mj5kt)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04hky3h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04hkygm)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04hkyht)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04hkylk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04hkxq8)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b06gxd25)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b06gxd27)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b06gxd2g)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b06gxd2p)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b06j0m3n)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b06j0m45)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b06j0m4k)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b06j0m59)

Weather 05:56 MON (b06j0m9h)

Weather 12:57 MON (b06j0m9y)

Weather 21:58 MON (b06j0mbk)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b06j0mfm)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b06j0mg8)

Weather 12:57 WED (b06j0mj5)

Weather 12:57 THU (b06j0mlx)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b06j0mql)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b06j0mrf)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b06j0m65)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b06j0xfv)

Woman's Hour 16:15 SAT (b06hyt3r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b06j13r7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b06j1qv5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b06j2fpg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b06j6nn3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b06jvcmv)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b06grjn0)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b06j1xzg)

World at One 13:00 MON (b06j147h)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b06m9rpw)

World at One 13:00 WED (b06mcy40)

World at One 13:00 THU (b06j6t8h)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b06j6669)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b06j144d)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b06j1xz4)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b06j2gg0)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b06j6t8f)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b06jvcmy)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b06gxdbb)