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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 OCTOBER 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b06d266f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Reading Europe (b06f23n4)
Elif Shafak

Five European writers visit a favourite bookshop to explore how issues preoccupying their societies are being reflected by contemporary novelists.

Today, Elif Shafak visits a bookstore in Istanbul to understand whether modern Turkey can be experienced through its shelves.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06d266h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06d266k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06d266m)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b06d266p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06d9tgq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Bishop John Arnold.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b06d9tgs)
A listener shares his insight into the Syrian crisis. Harriet Cass reads Your News.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b06d266s)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b06d266w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b06d9blf)
Series 31

Artists' Ways - Falkirk

Clare Balding walks along the Forth and Clyde canal to the spectacular Kelpies - 30 metre high statues of horses' heads, modelled on Clydesdales. Walking with her is a group led by Jan Bee Brown - the Reader in Residence at Falkirk Libraries.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b06f4vk2)
Honey harvest, Bees and pollination

Charlotte Smith finds out why this year's honey harvest is 40% down for many producers. She joins amateur and professional beekeepers at the Swindon Apiary in Wiltshire.

With varroa mite to contend with, and field trials underway to assess the possible impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on the UK's declining bee population, Charlotte speaks to two amateur beekeepers, Mike Benson and Ian Cowdy, and professional bee farmer, Terry Cooke.

They acknowledge that whilst more than three quarters of crops cultivated in Europe are dependent on pollinators, bees face many threats, in spite of their significant contribution to agriculture. They also discuss - and sometime agree to disagree - on the pros and cons of the rise in the number of urban beekeepers, an aspect of the public's widespread concern over declining bee numbers, and what's described as 'colony collapse'.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b06d266y)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b06f4vk4)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b06f4vq9)
Gaby Roslin

Inspired by Blue Peter at the age of three Gaby Roslin's career has taken her from The Big Breakfast to Chicago and the National Lottery Draw. She joins Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir to talk about her life and career on stage and TV.
George Dowell dreamed of playing professional football before a car crash left him paralysed from the chest down. The former defender used to play for Worthing FC but he now has a different dream - guiding the club into the football league.
JP Devlin meets Allan Charles Wilmot, who describes moving from Jamaica to the UK and his life as a WWII Serviceman and post-war entertainer.
Martin Withers DFC, The Vulcan to the Sky Trust's Chief Pilot, was the captain of the Vulcan that flew the historic, record-breaking, bombing run to the Falkland Islands in 1982. He talks about flying her for her final display on Sunday. Marty Jopson shares his passion for the science of everyday life - from why teapots dribble, what's the difference between a biscuit and a cake and why leaves go brown.
And the singer Belinda Carlisle shares her Inheritance Tracks. She chooses True Love sung by Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly and Drugs Don't Work by The Verve.

Vulcan's final display is on Sunday 4 October at Gaydon - Heritage Motor Centre (Warwickshire) and Old Warden (Bedfordshire).

The Science of Everyday Life by Marty Jopson, is out now.

Now You Know, The Memoirs of Allan Charles Wilmot, is available from Liberation Publishers.

Belinda Carlisle is touring the UK from 3 - 10 October.
BELINDA CARLISLE: CD SINGLES 1986 - 2014 is out now.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b06f4vqc)
Series 11

Hampton Court

Jay Rayner and the panel are at the Royal Palace at Hampton Court.

This week's line-up of culinary experts includes the food historian Dr Annie Gray, the experimental DIY cooking expert Tim Hayward, singer and foodie Andi Oliver, and our expert in Middle Eastern cuisine Itamar Srulovich.

The panel discuss all things Tudor and investigate the truths (and myths) surrounding eating in the time of Henry VIII. They sink their teeth into fresh produce from the palace's own kitchen garden and, as always, they answer questions from the amateur chefs in the audience - this week's topics ranging from what you can do with an excess of vine leaves to how best to roast a chicken.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun
Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b06fpk54)
Deja Vu

Is déjà vu a brain glitch, something triggered by the broader environment or a more mystical phenomenon? Bridget Kendall talks to cognitive neuropsychologist Chris Moulin, cognitive psychologist Anne Cleary and Nigerian born novelist and academic Chigozie Obioma, who was recently shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b06d2672)
The Mermaid of Madagascar

Storytelling, writing and looking beyond the news spotlight. Today: warm orangeade, a tot of rum and some chain-smoking - all part of daily life for the fishermen and women of Madagascar who've harnessed new conservation techniques to long-standing traditions. Also, a despatch from south-eastern Turkey, where renewed hostilities between government forces and Kurdish PKK militants have left efforts to establish a long-term peace in shreds; there's an examination of the reasons why Russia has chosen to step up its military activity in the Middle East; The Spanish bullfighting season's coming to an end and many now wonder if the same will soon be said of bullfighting itself. And why tonight's big rugby match at Twickenham might set off some wild, if lonely, rejoicing in a small hotel room in Japan.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b06d2676)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b06f4vqf)
The solicitor defrauded out of £750k of clients' money

Today the incredible story of a solicitor contacted by criminals, posing as her bank, and persuaded to transfer almost three quarters of a million pounds of her clients' money to the crooks. As a result of this crime Karen Mackie has been barred from working as a solicitor. Already facing personal financial pressures, she's now lost her livelihood and stands to lose her home after being declared bankrupt. With reports that three to four solicitors are being targeted this way every week with millions being lost, what is being done to protect our money?

Also, is a line under the costliest financial services redress scheme in history about to be drawn? With over £20bn already paid out , the Financial Conduct Authority is proposing to introduce a two year deadline for PPI complaints.

The level of protection given to deposits held by financial institutions is changing from 1st January 2016 from £85k to £75k. We hear from Money Box listeners about inconsistencies in how this change is being applied.

And why thousands of part time low paid workers are losing out on pension tax relief.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b06d9t31)
Series 88

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp. This week Miles is joined by Susan Calman, Elis James, Andy Hamilton and Emily Ashton to mull over the big stories of the moment.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b06d267g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b06d267l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b06d9t37)
Hilary Benn MP, Louise Bours MEP, Ken Clarke MP, Alice Nutter.

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Winstanley College in Wigan with Shadow Foreign Secretary Hilary Benn, UKIP spokesperson on health Louise Bours MEP, former Chancellor of the Exchequer Ken Clarke MP and the playwright and former Chumbawumba singer Alice Nutter.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b06f4xlp)
Any Answers takes your calls on the week's intervention in Syria. Do you applaud or fear Russia's actions? Must we hold our noses and deal with Assad to rid the world of ISIS? Or with Russia wading in with the Syrian government and the West still dealing with those who oppose him, are we seeing the start of another Cold War?

The hot button issue. In the week where Jeremy Corbyn said "No" to pressing the button, should a leader always be prepared to use the nuclear option?

And reparations for slavery. Is it time to pay for the past?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b06cvjv0)
The Price of Oil

Blood From Stone

Alun Armstrong and Paul Ritter star in Tamsin Oglesby's future oil comedy - set in 2045.

A father and son energy company are struggling with the new economics of the oil market. With their wells running dry in Turkmenistan, and having to fight Chinese companies for the right to frack under Lytham St Annes .... is Ralph wrong about getting out of oil for good?

Or is his dad Charlie more of an addict than a businessman?

Will we ever be able to give up oil?

The Price of Oil season of factual dramas explores the history of oil - and the price we've paid for it. All this week, The Price of Oil takes us from 1951 to 2045, and around the world from Iran to Alaska, Libya, Nigeria, Turkmenistan, Washington and onto Scotland's offshore rigs, to explore the role oil has played in shaping our world.

Tamsin Oglesby's political fire and deftly funny writing have led to a series of theatrical hits, including 'Future Conditional' with Rob Bryden, which opened this season at the Old Vic, 'Really Old, Like Forty-Five' (National), 'The War Next Door' (Tricycle), 'US and Them' (Hampstead), and her adaptation's of Russell Hoban's 'The Mouse and His Child' (RSC) and Feydeau's 'Every Last Trick' (Royal and Derngate, Northampton).

The Price of Oil season is devised by Nicolas Kent, with Jack Bradley & Jonathan Myerson, and produced by Jonquil Panting for BBC Radio Drama. As director of London's Tricycle theatre for almost 30 years, Nicolas Kent championed responsive factual and political drama, including seasons of plays by renowned writers about Afghanistan (The Great Game) and nuclear weapons (The Bomb). Now he brings that experience to BBC Radio 4, to tell the story of oil.

Blood From Stone was directed by Jonquil Panting.


SAT 15:30 When Van Played Cyprus Avenue (b06d2g8z)
"And I'm caught one more time
Up on Cyprus Avenue..."

Van Morrison made a number of references in his songs to the east Belfast neighbourhood in which he grew up, none more directly than in Cyprus Avenue from his 1968 album Astral Weeks. Romantic images of leaves shaking on a tree, rainbow ribbons in a young girl's hair and a mansion on the hill evoke memories of Cyprus Avenue in the years before Van left Northern Ireland to pursue his career in the States.

Cyprus Avenue - with its intricate arrangement of flute, harpsichord and strings - was recorded in New York, far from the well-heeled, tree-lined avenue along which the young Van would pass on his way home to the working class area of Hyndford Street. This was in the years before the Troubles. East Belfast was steadfastly loyalist and protestant.

When the arts broadcaster Marie-Louise Muir moved into the area, she was already aware of the iconic quality of street's name - not just from Van Morrison's song, but from the fact that the Reverend Ian Paisley lived on Cyprus Avenue. Marie-Louise was a Catholic 'blow-in'. So, when Van announced that he'd be celebrating his 70th birthday by playing a gig literally feet from her front door, she was curious to see how the community would respond.

Produced by Alan Hall.
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio Four.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b06f4xlr)
Weekend Woman's Hour

It's fifteen years since the world first met Erin Brockovich through Julia Robert's Oscar winning film portrayal of the single mum who took on a billion dollar gas and electric company in small town America. She joins me to talk about the film' s legacy and women's rights today.

What happens when you turn to Yes Parenting? Parenting coach and creator of Yes Parenting Bea Marshall discusses why she never says no to her children.

We find out about the art of Make up with Lan Nguyen-Grealis who has worked with top photographers Rankin and Bailey.

What is it really like to grow up as a lesbian in rural England?

Tomorrow a bronze statue of Joan Littlewood will be unveiled at the Theatre; Why was she such a significant figure in the cultural life of Great Britain?

The Director of Public Prosecutions, Alison Saunders, talks about how she's been working to make sexual consent guidance clear.

'Overshare' was named word of the year in 2014 by Chambers Dictionary - we hear from two journalists who admit to pouring their lives out to unknowns on social media and the reaction they have received.

And the Opera Soprano Ilona Domnich performs an aria from her upcoming role in The Tales of Hoffman.
Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.
Presented by Jenni Murray.
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed.


SAT 17:00 PM (b06f4xlt)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b06djzl5)
Art and the Business of Taste

How do you value something like a painting? What makes one artist worth more than another? Who decides what is in vogue and why do they have so much power in the art world? Evan Davis presents a discussion on taste and value in the art world with a panel including the British artist Grayson Perry.

Guests:

Grayson Perry - Artist

Valeria Napoleone - Collector and Patron

Ralph Taylor - Director, UK Board Contemporary Art, Bonhams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06d267v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b06d267x)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06d267z)
Former Labour chancellor Denis Healey dies
19 killed in air strike on Afghan hospital


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b06f4xlw)
Clive Anderson, Sara Cox, Paul O'Grady, Morwenna Banks, Larry Lamb, Sam Simmons, McAlmont & Butler

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Paul O'Grady, Morwenna Banks, Larry Lamb and Sam Simmons for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from McAlmont & Butler.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b06f4xly)
Gina Rinehart

Gina Rinehart - one the world's richest women - is about to realise a lifelong dream: to own and operate her very own iron-ore mine. Rinehart's life has been defined by huge success and the staggering speed at which she has accumulated her enormous wealth - but also by family feuds which have pitted generations of her family against each other. Mark Coles profiles the controversial Australian billionaire.

Producers: Ben Crighton and Chloe Hadjimatheou.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b06f4xm0)
Medea, Jeanette Winterson, The Martian, Edmund deWaal's White at the RA, TV crime series

Medea is the latest production in London's Almeida Theatre's Greek season. Written by Rachel Cusk it portrays Medea as a realist and a moralist not a maniac.
The writer Edmund deWaal's interest in porcelain can be seen in an exhibition "White", at London's Royal Academy Library
Jeanette Winterson's latest novel The Gap of Time retells Shakespeare's Winter's Tale, setting it in the modern day.
Matt Damon plays an astronaut stranded on Mars in The Martian: how do you cope with life millions of miles from any other human being? And as 2 new TV crime series begin - Unforgotten and From Darkness - we consider the enduring appeal of police detective dramas.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Iwona Blazwick, Don Guttenplan and Sarah Churchwell. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b06f4xm2)
John Lennon: Verbatim

John Lennon: Verbatim marks the iconic Beatle’s 75th birthday on October 9th with a sound scape incorporating rarely heard archive interviews, poetry readings, studio outtakes and alternative recordings of some of his most acclaimed compositions. It's a personal insight into the creative genius of one of the 20th centuries most diverse artistes.

Long before public figures mastered the art of the sanitised sound bite to protect their privacy, Lennon always spoke openly and honestly about his art and his personal life, whether talking about his earliest childhood memories, the highs and lows of The Beatles or his solo career. Lennon loved radio because he found it more relaxing than coping with the confrontation of a television film crew, so his radio sessions were often very revealing and entertaining.

Collated from conversations recorded between 1962 and 1980, it's an opportunity to hear, in John’s own words, the honesty and passion that fuelled his genius.

Produced by Des Shaw
A Ten Alps production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 21:00 Drama (b06d29bp)
Reading Europe - Germany: Look Who's Back

Episode 1

The next stop on Radio 4's literary journey across Europe is Timur Vermes' transgressive novel which topped the bestseller list in its native Germany.

Look Who's Back shocked and then thrilled over 1.5 million German readers with its bold approach to the most taboo of subjects - Adolf Hitler. David Threlfall stars as the infamous Nazi leader in this provocative satire.

Part 1

When Adolf Hitler wakes up in modern day Germany he is not pleased. The war is lost. The Nazi party is defunct. And his beloved Fatherland is being run by a woman. He decides to re-take control. Only this time, mistaken for a comedy impersonator, his road to power is paved with TV stardom and internet fame.

Theme music composed by Clive Swift and arranged by Stuart Morley.

From the novel by Timur Vermes
Translated by Jamie Bulloch
Dramatised for radio by Marcy Kahan
Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Timur Vermes is a journalist and a ghost-writer. Look Who's Back is his first novel.

David Threlfall is a prominent stage, film and TV actor and director. He is best known for his portrayal of Frank Gallagher in the long running TV show Shameless. He recently played Noah in BBC drama The Ark, has portrayed iconic comedian Tommy Cooper in Not Like That, Like This and real-life cop David Baker in ITV drama Code Of A Killer.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b06d2681)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Jeremy Corbyn and Britain's Place in the World (b06fnmjk)
Gavin Esler is joined by a panel of experts to debate the foreign policies of Labour's new leader. Could the Corbyn effect change British policy towards Syria, Trident, the European Union, NATO and other issues, and open up a debate over matters which have been subject to a cross-party consensus for many years?

The participants are the Shadow International Development Secretary Diane Abbott, the former diplomat Sir Stephen Wall, Mark Leonard of the European Council on Foreign Relations, Bronwen Maddox from Prospect magazine, and the journalist Peter Oborne.

Producer: Gary Connor.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b06d2fys)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 51st series.

In almost forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of celebrity guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the famous panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 4

Comedy writer and director Graham Linehan.
Sports presenter Sally Jones.
Actress and writer Morwenna Banks
Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah band member and Monty Python collaborator Neil Innes

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Producer ... Carl Cooper.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b06d29bt)
Colours

Roger McGough brings poetry of love and of colours: blue, green, crimson, silver... from poets as varied as Christopher Marlowe and ee cummings. The readers are Indira Varma and Tim Pigott-Smith.

Producer Beth O'Dea.



SUNDAY 04 OCTOBER 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b06f4xpf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Opening Lines (b037525f)
Series 15

The Underwater Cathedral

The series which gives first-time and emerging short story writers their radio debut.

In Martin Cathcart Froden's beguiling tale about humankind's desire to conquer the natural world, a young man answers the siren call of the sea and pushes his body to extremes.

Read by Stuart McLoughlin
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xph)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06f4xpk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xpm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b06f4xpp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b06f4ybm)
Bells from St Clement Danes, Strand, London.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b06f4xly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b06f4xpr)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b06f4z33)
The Art of Correspondence

Mark Tully examines the pleasures of correspondence - from beautiful letters to ever increasing opportunities for conversations on social networks, via texts, emails and among those who develop a brilliant gift for talking on the telephone.

In conversation with journalist and writer Simon Garfield, he investigates whether the skill of communicating at a remove is on the wane or whether we are actually corresponding as never before.

And, above all, he celebrates the letter.

There are readings from writers as varied as Carol Ann Duffy, Dylan Thomas and Clementine Churchill, and there’s music from Samuel Barber, Fats Waller and Benjamin Britten.

The readers are Cyril Nri, Francis Cadder and Jane Whittenshaw.

Presenter: Mark Tully

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b06f4z35)
Farming at Heathrow

Colin Rayner's family have farmed land near London since the 17th century. In 1947 some of it was compulsorily purchased under the War Act, to build what is now Heathrow airport. As the years have gone by, more and more of the fields have been covered by concrete. But Colin still grows wheat, maize and oil seed rape on fields chopped in half by runways and the M25. A new railway line is also being built across the farm along with a construction compound for the planned HS2 high-speed rail link. As the modern world gradually swallows up what used to be agricultural land, Charlotte Smith finds out what it's like to grow crops with planes taking off at the end of the field and asks whether the arrival of a third runway at Heathrow would mean Colin is the last generation to farm this land.

Producer: Emma Campbell.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b06f4xpt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b06f4xpw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b06f4z37)
Birmingham Qur'an, Germany reunification, Cardinal Vincent Nicholls

The two-week long Catholic Synod of Bishops at the Vatican, beginning this weekend, will consider how the Church can work better with families in the modern world. The question is: will anything change as a result of this gathering of senior clergy? Bob Walker reports. William Crawley speaks to Cardinal Vincent Nichols, who's leading the Synod delegation from England and Wales.

A Qur'an manuscript dated among the oldest in the world has gone on display in Birmingham this week. Its discovery has led to the questioning of the dating of Qur'an. Kevin Bocquet reports.

As the Saudi authorities launch an investigation into the Hajj stampede, what does last week's event tell us about the Saudi Royal Family? Can they sustain the support of the Muslim world and carry on being custodians of Islam's two holiest shrines? William speaks to Middle East analyst Bill Law.

William talks to Alister McGrath, author of ' Inventing the Universe: Why We Can't Stop Talking About Science, Faith and God'.

Bishop Michael Nazir Ali, expresses his concerns on the latest stage of the government's plans for 'countering extremism' which will be discussed at the Conservative Party Conference this week.

This weekend Germany will be celebrating 25 years of unification but will it be overshadowed by a sense of unease about the influx of up to 1 million asylum seekers into the country? William will discuss this with the Rev Dr Christophe Tylermann and Dr Riem Spielhaus.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Zaffar Iqbal

Editor
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b06f4z39)
Chance for Childhood

Milton Jones presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Chance For Childhood
Registered Charity No 1013587
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Chance For Childhood'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Chance For Childhood'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b06f4xpy)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b06f4xq0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b06f4z3c)
Raise the Song of Harvest Home

In 1843, the Revd Robert Hawker created the first Harvest Festival service - "Let us gather together in the chancel of our church on the first Sunday of next month, and there receive, in the bread of the new corn, that blessed sacrament which was ordained to strengthen and refresh our souls."

Today's Sunday Worship, a traditional service for Harvest, comes from Wallingford Parish Church in rural Oxfordshire, and reflects on the life and legacy of Robert Hawker. It is led by the Rector, the Revd David Rice, and the Preacher is the Acting Bishop of Oxford, the Rt Revd Colin Fletcher OBE. Music includes familiar harvest hymns 'Come, ye thankful people, come' and 'We plough the fields and scatter', led by the Choirs of Wallingford Parish Church, and directed by Sue Ledger. Producer Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b06d9t39)
Will Self: What's in a Name

Will Self reflects on the significance of names, including his own.

"We desire to be recognised for who we really are, and seek out in our very ascription the means of uniting our intimate identities with our social selves.".


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvz9y)
Guira Cuckoo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the guira cuckoo of central South America. Guira cuckoos break all the usual rules of their family. They are very sociable and travel in noisy gangs, feeding and roosting together. But what makes the behaviour of guira cuckoos so different is that several females often lay their eggs in a single nest, sometimes as many as 20 eggs which are tended by the respective mothers . This is known as co-operative breeding. Whether a female recognises her own eggs isn't certain, but it's possible that they can distinguish them by variable markings on the eggshells and single them out for special care.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b06f4xq2)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b06f4z3f)
It is a crucial match for the cricket team, and Lynda looks forward to Christmas.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b06f4z3h)
Alison Balsom

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the musician, Alison Balsom.

Widely considered the finest classical trumpet player of her generation, she's performed in all the great concert halls of the world, winning a huge amount of fans and a string of awards for her ability to exquisitely convey the many voices of her chosen instrument.

As a child she had dreams of being a part-time trumpet player, astronaut and jockey - she's only 36 so there's time yet for the other two; but whilst she is solely devoting her energies to her instrument her belief in the power of music seems endless. In between gigs, rehearsals, recordings and motherhood, she's found time to travel to Uganda and Liberia as patron of Brass for Africa, with the heartfelt conviction that she can transform the lives of street children by teaching them to play.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b06f4xq4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b06d2g56)
Series 15

Episode 6

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Sarah Millican, Victoria Coren Mitchell, Holly Walsh and Katherine Ryan are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as IKEA, marriage, Switzerland and chewing gum.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b06f4z3k)
Bitterness

Dan Saladino hunts down that flavour we call 'bitter', and asks if bitterness is disappearing from our food and drink - and why this matters.

Bitter tastes are found all over the planet; wild leaves, fruits, vegetables and more. Bitterness is also charged with cultural and culinary meaning. It can be revered, sought after - but it is also a sign of toxicity, and is, it seems, increasingly being shunned.

Dan Saladino talks to Jennifer McLagan, author of the James Beard Award-winning book "Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavour", who begun her epic journey into bitter following a conversation about grapefruits. Journalist and science writer Marta Zaraska has been tracking the de-bittering of our food, and reveals her findings, including the 'holy grail' of the assault on bitter. He also seeks out bitterness in the wild with forager and wild food specialist Miles Irving, and discovers the secrets of the bitter gourd (also known as bitter melon or karela) within a food culture that still deeply values bitterness, in the company of food writer and cookery teacher Monisha Bharadwaj.

As Dan delves into the world of bitter flavours, he shares a bitter brew with Professor Peter Barham - author of "The Science of Cooking" - and visits the drinks laboratory run by cocktail experts Tony Conigliaro and Max Venning.

Tasting bitter leaves, crystals, digestifs and more along the way, Dan asks what we stand to lose if we lose the taste for bitter.

Presenter: Dan Saladino
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b06f4xq6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b06f4z3m)
International Development Secretary Justine Greening talks ahead of the Conservative Party Conference. As Russian intervention in Syria continues, we ask what is Putin's endgame? We hear how cavemen might have communicated through the medium of song. Presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Will Cameron Change Britain? (b06f4z3p)
As the Conservatives meet in Manchester for their first party conference since winning May's general election, Janan Ganesh of the Financial Times explores the ambitions of Cameron's Government. Now the Conservatives are no longer shackled by coalition, are they likely to transform Britain, as the Thatcher Government did in the 1980s?
The first Conservative government to have won an overall majority for more than 20 years is starting to implement its plans. Free from the constraints of coalition and energised by their generally unexpected victory, David Cameron and his colleagues may now feel they have the scope to make the United Kingdom into the country they want it to be.
But how likely are they to re-model Britain? Will David Cameron be the kind of prime minister like Attlee or Thatcher who transforms the country by fundamental economic and social reforms? Would the nation let him?
Is Cameron instead a pragmatist who prefers to govern and not to transform? Or is he happy for his Ministers to drive radical reform? Take the Conservatives' intentions for a smaller central state; reforms of pensions, schools and welfare; and the plans for devolution to cities: beyond the substantial, direct impact of these policies, will they also bring deeper, lasting change to Britain?
In this programme Janan Ganesh explores how far-reaching are the government's ambitions, how different UK society might be in five years' time, and whether Cameron's second term as prime minister is likely to go down in British history as a time of fundamental change.
Producer: Rob Shepherd.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06d9rll)
Gartmore

Eric Robson chairs the horticultural panel programme from Gartmore, Stirling. Chris Beardshaw, Bunny Guinness and Christine Walkden answer questions from a local audience.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b06f54rn)
Sunday Omnibus - Having Babies... or Not

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the joys and fears of prospective parenthood - one of them recorded just hours before the baby's arrival - and about not being parents, all recorded during The Listening Project Booth's tour of the UK and featuring in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b06f54rq)
Reading Europe - Germany: Look Who's Back

Episode 2

The next stop on Radio 4's literary journey across Europe is Timur Vermes' transgressive novel which topped the bestseller list in its native Germany.

Look Who's Back shocked and then thrilled over 1.5 million German readers with its bold approach to the most taboo of subjects - Adolf Hitler. David Threlfall stars as the infamous Nazi leader in this provocative satire.

Part 2

Having woken up in modern day Berlin Adolf Hitler decides he needs to re-take control of his beloved Fatherland. But when he is mistaken for a comedy impersonator by TV Executives, rather than running the country, he finds himself the star of a satirical show. As his rants against foreigners and current politics increase in popularity, so does his power over the German people.

Theme music composed by Clive Swift and arranged by Stuart Morley.

From the novel by Timur Vermes
Translated by Jamie Bulloch
Dramatised for radio by Marcy Kahan
Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Timur Vermes is a journalist and a ghost-writer. Look Who's Back is his first novel.

David Threlfall is a prominent stage, film and TV actor and director. He is best known for his portrayal of Frank Gallagher in the long running TV show Shameless. He recently played Noah in BBC drama The Ark, he has portrayed iconic comedian Tommy Cooper in Not Like That, Like This and real-life cop David Baker in ITV drama Code Of A Killer.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b06f54rs)
Tessa Hadley - Married Love

Tessa Hadley talks about her short story collection Married Love with James Naughtie and a group of readers.

Tessa is one of our leading short story and longer fiction writers. Tensions run high in these sharp observational stories about the events in our lives. A young woman marries against her parents' wishes; a young man in the early 20th century wants to do better for himself and inveigles his way into a local businessman's family home; and three grown up godchildren question the life and legacy of their recently deceased godmother.

Tessa is one of the New Yorker magazine's most revered short story writers. She is noted especially for her talent for writing about families and their capacity for splintering, praised for how she handles the passing of time as well as her finely tuned sense of irony.

In this edition of Bookclub Jim, Tessa and readers discuss three of the stories from the collection : Married Love, The Trojan Prince and The Godchildren.

Recorded at the Small Wonder Festival at Charleston Farmhouse, East Sussex.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn
Interviewed Guest : Tessa Hadley

November's Bookclub choice : The City & The City by China Miéville (2009).


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b06f54rv)
Islands

Roger McGough presents a programme in celebration of the islands around the UK, from Sark to Shetland. With poetry by AC Swinburne, TE Brown and Sorley MacLean. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b06d2lzr)
Missing Medicines

Why is the NHS struggling to get hold of some life-saving medicines for its patients? Allan Urry reveals serious concern over the availability of some drugs used in the treatment of cancer and for pain control. Pharmacists and doctors say they face a daily battle to get access to a range of medicines and either end up buying alternatives at a greater cost to the health service or using less effective alternatives which can compromise patient care. So is the Government doing enough to ensure essential supplies are available? And has Whitehall's drive to push down the NHS drugs bill deterred some manufacturers from supplying the UK?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Emma Forde.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b06f4xly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xq8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b06f4xqb)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06f4xqd)
04/10/15 David Cameron insists plans to cut tax credits won't be reviewed

David Cameron says planned cuts to tax credits will go ahead


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b06f4xqg)
James Walton

James Walton chooses his BBC Radio highlights from the past week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b06f54rx)
Eddie loves this time of year - preparing the cider press and getting out ferreting. Rob rides up all dressed in his hunting finery, preparing for autumn hunting. Eddie tries to flog Rob a turkey, but Rob and Helen are considering goose for a change this Christmas - as are Peggy and Chris. Eddie's horrified.

Rob happily tells Helen about his morning - he feels they are clearly valued in the area. Rob's keen for Henry to take part in hunting, but Helen's worried he's too young. Rob wants Helen to rest and not get too involved at Bridge Farm, but then assumes that Helen went over to share their 'good news'.

Carol comforts Jill with the thought that at least Heather's no longer suffering. They discuss Dan and his upcoming 21st- it'll be good to have a family party that everyone's coming to (Jill's 85th has to be put off). Jill admits Lower Loxley doesn't feel like home to her - Julia's bedroom is huge and intimidating. Jill's somewhat on eggshells with Ruth, aware that her presence at Brookfield is a reminder of Heather's absence.

Helen's surprised that Rob wants to come with her to see the doctor. He wants to be with Helen every step of the way. Surely having this baby's the best thing to happen to either of them.


SUN 19:15 Liam Mullone's Disappointing World (b06f54rz)
British comedy's only contrarian libertarian antiquarian, Liam Mullone tackles the universal theme that sums up all human endeavour - disappointment.

In this comedy lecture dedicated to history's losers Liam celebrates some enormously bad ideas from the world of technology.

He tells the hubristic story of Sweden's 17th Century warship, The Vasa, which was even more disappointing than The Mary Rose. Some of NASA's most inspiration-lacking ventures are laid bare. And Frenchman Marcel Lucont honours countryman Jacques Cousteau and his cigarette smoke-filled Conshelf stations in a song.

Performers: Liam Mullone with Alexis Dubus and Eri Jackson
Writer: Liam Mullone
Producer: Aled Evans.


SUN 19:45 Funny Bones (b06f54s1)
Mary and the Fairy

A new series of original stories in which Irish writers showcase their funny bones.

In this fantastically funny series, Yasmine Akram tells a tale of young woe and magical intervention. Tara Flynn takes us into the world of competitive baking and zombie hordes in 'Fete Worse than Death'. Finally, a trip to the cinema takes a surprising turn in a new story by comedian Maeve Higgins.

Writer ..... Yasmine Akram
Reader ..... Yasmine Akram
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b06h2d4x)
Corbyn Coverage

From walkouts to bias and booing, we're kicking off a brand new series of Feedback with the biggest stories in BBC Radio. All told by you.

By far the most talked about man in the Feedback inbox (rivalled only by the villainous Rob from The Archers) is the newly-elected Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. Many Feedback listeners say they think BBC Radio has been too quick to dismiss Mr Corbyn's style of politics and has a tendency to focus too much on what some see as trivial aspects of his leadership, such as why he didn't sing the National Anthem. Jeremy Corbyn's victory took many in the media by surprise, so does the BBC's political reporting need to adapt to a new political landscape to suit the mood of the country? Roger Bolton talks to the BBC's Assistant Political Editor Norman Smith and Richard Clarke, Editor of the BBC Radio newsroom.

Legendary war correspondent Kate Adie joins Roger to discuss 60 years of From Our Own Correspondent. Feedback listeners have getting in touch with their dispatches about why they think the programme's decades-old format still delivers the goods

And BBC Radio 3 have been targeting listeners subliminally, with a special nocturnal broadcast of composer Max Richter's piece 'Sleep'. The piece lasts for the duration of our recommended eight hours of rest and a Feedback listener takes us into his bedroom to tell us whether Radio 3 gave him sweet dreams.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b06d9rlq)
Brian Friel, General Mario Menendez, Tessa Ransford, John Guillermin, Ben Cauley

Matthew Bannister on

The award winning Irish playwright Brian Friel, best known for Dancing At Lughnasa and Translations.

Argentine General Mario Menéndez who was appointed Governor of the Falkland Islands during the invasion.

Tessa Ransford who founded the Scottish Poetry Library.

John Guillermin who directed movie blockbusters like The Towering Inferno, Death on the Nile, and the 1976 re-make of King Kong.

And Ben Cauley, the trumpeter who was the only survivor of the plane crash which killed Otis Redding.

Producer: Neil George.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b06f4vqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b06f4z39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b06d2g5g)
Can We Learn to Live with Nuclear Power?

The Fukushima disaster made many people oppose nuclear power. Michael Blastland asks what it would take to change their minds. In 2011, following a devastating tsunami, Japan's Fukushima nuclear power station went into meltdown, leaking radiation. It was the most serious nuclear accident since Chernobyl. It appeared to send the nuclear power industry into retreat - and not just in Japan. Other nations had second thoughts too. Germany decided to phase out its nuclear reactors altogether. But now Japan has resumed nuclear power generation. At the heart of the 'nuclear wobble' of 2011 is the question of risk. Attitudes to, and understanding of, risk vary surprisingly between nations and cultures. But after one of the most shocking incidents in nuclear power's history, will we be able to cope with our fears? In other words, can we learn to live with nuclear power?
Producers: Ruth Alexander and Smita Patel.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b06f4xqj)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b06f54s5)
Nosheen Iqbal of The Guardian looks at how the newspapers are analysing the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b06d9lhq)
Macbeth, Robbie Ryan, Greensman, Shooting Stars in 1928

With Francine Stock.

Director Justin Kurzel tells Francine why he believes that Macbeth is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Greensman is not the latest super-hero but the name of the person who dresses a set with trees and shrubbery to make the indoors look like the outdoors. Richard Payne of Living Props reveals a few trade secrets.

Cinematographer Robbie Ryan explains why the selfie is making better actors of us all.

Matthew Sweet and Bryony Dixon of the BFI take us behind the scenes of a British film studio in 1928, just as new sound technology was about to change everything.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b06f4z33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 05 OCTOBER 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b06f4xrl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b06d8jrj)
Russia's Red Web - Older Entrepreneurs

The 'Red Web': The Internet in Russia is a totalitarian tool but is also a device by which totalitarianism can be resisted. Laurie Taylor talks to Andrei Soldatov, a Moscow based journalist and co-author of a book which explores the Russian government's battle with the future of the Internet. Drawing on numerous interviews with officials in the Ministry of Communications, as well as the web activists who resist the Kremlin, he exposes a huge online surveillance state. What hope is there for ordinary digital citizens? They're joined by Natalia Rulyova, a Lecturer in Russian at the University of Birmingham.

Also, older entrepreneurs. Oliver Mallett, Lecturer in Management at the University of Durham, discusses the obstacles faced by late entrants to enterprise culture.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b06f4ybm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xrn)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06f4xrq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xrs)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b06f4xrv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06f54vv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Bishop John Arnold.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b06f54vx)
Plastic bags, Armagh apple harvest, Countryside classroom

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner. From today large supermarkets have to charge shoppers for plastic carrier bags, but where does that leave small village shops and community stores? We hear from the Green Party. Armagh in Northern Ireland is known as the Apple County but when the blossom was hit by sharp frosts in the spring, the prospects of a good harvest looked bleak. Now apple growers say nature has performed a remarkable turnaround. All this week we're looking into education and farming, as a new initiative called 'Countryside Classroom' aims to get children thinking about where their food comes from. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Vernon Harwood.


MON 05:56 Weather (b06f4xrx)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxh9)
Common Hawk Cuckoo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the common hawk cuckoo from the Bengal region. The repetitive call of the common hawk-cuckoo, otherwise known as the brain-fever bird, is one of the typical sounds of rural India and on into the foothills of the Himalayas. Its name partly derives from its call sounding like "brain fever" but also what one writer called its repetition being a "damnable iteration". It looks like a bird of prey, and flies like one too, imitating the flapping glide of a sparrowhawk in the region, known as the shikra, often accompanied by mobbing small birds. Unwittingly as they mob her, birds like babblers betray their nest, into which the cuckoo will lay her egg.


MON 06:00 Today (b06fk9pf)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b06fk9ph)
Jonathan Franzen

On Start the Week Tom Sutcliffe talks to the American writer Jonathan Franzen about his latest novel, Purity. One of Franzen's characters compares the internet with the East German Republic and he satirises the utopian ideas of the apparatchik web-users. The head of the Oxford Internet Institute Helen Margetts counters with her research on the success and failure of political action via social media. The artist Tacita Dean laments the ubiquity of digital at the expense of film, and the financial journalist Gillian Tett roots out tunnel vision - both personal and business - in her new book on silos.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b06fkd1l)
Margaret Thatcher: Everything She Wants

Episode 1

In the aftermath of the Falklands victory, Margaret Thatcher's stock was rising. This period of almost five years, up to the 1987 election, could be described as her golden years. With a decisive majority and a pre-eminent place on the world stage she could truly begin to make her mark.

Charles Moore was authorised by Margaret Thatcher to write her biography on the condition that it was published after her death. She also encouraged her former staff and colleagues to readily offer their recollections, diaries and memoirs of their time working with and for her.

This abridgement for Radio 4 of his second volume offers a series of windows onto the key events of her second term - a term that was packed with challenges and drama.

Episode 1:
Margaret Thatcher tackles the problem of Hong Kong.

Music :
The music used to frame this series reflects the title of the book. As the author writes, "I have called this book Everything She Wants - the title of a song of the time by Wham! - because it expresses Mrs Thatcher's appetite for achievement and change and the degree to which she was the commanding personality of the era; but, hard as she fought for everything she wanted, this was not always what she got."
Track: 'Everything She Wants' from the Wham! album Make it Big, 1984

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06fkd1n)
Sari fashion, Conservative Party Conference, The mental pressures of starting university

We hear from Allegra Stratton, Newsnight's political editor, at the Conservative Party Conference.

As students across the country begin to settle in to their first year at university, we take a look at the psychological pressures of making this big transition. Two students join us to share their own experience of struggling in those first few months.

BBC Two programme 'Special Forces: Ultimate Hell Week' has been testing the mettle of some of the UK's fittest men and women, pushing beyond them beyond their mental and physical limits by battle-hardened veterans from the world's toughest special forces. Winner Clare Miller joins Jane to speak about this challenge and is joined by the ex-forces programme adviser Lee Andrew who followed the participants throughout and has his own view on whether women should be on the frontline.

The V&A's new exhibition, the Fabric of India, explores the rich history of the sari. We consider the sari in its contemporary form.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06fkd1s)
30 Eggs

Episode 1

Weary of life in the bustling Rwandan border town of Rusumo, Modeste, a blind and sickly homeless man resolves to return to his home village of Kibuye on the far side of the country with the help of his companion, Innocent, a cheeky seven year-old street orphan. The journey starts well when they stumble upon a small amount of money but little Innocent inadvertently spends the cash purchasing a basket of thirty raw eggs during a mix up in a market melee. With their peculiar bounty of raw eggs the unlikely duo set off on an adventure of a life time along the rising road cresting atop the many rolling hills of Rwanda.

A beautiful, funny and inspirational story which catapults you into life in Rwanda and one remarkable journey.

Irish writer Eoin O'Connor has spent a number of years living in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Having recently returned to Ireland, Eoin is currently working on two further feature scripts, a comedy, Family Remains, currently in development with Grand Pictures, Dublin, and a thriller set in Syria entitled Stolen, currently in development with Epos Films, Dublin.


MON 11:00 Hell Is Other People: A Self-Help Guide to Social Anxiety (b06fkd1y)
Performer Byron Vincent is unfazed when entertaining an audience but is terrified of making conversation with strangers. He embarks on a quest to overcome his paralyzing fear of social situations.

Social anxiety - the fear of social interaction with others - is the most common anxiety disorder. Byron has a bad case of it. Like many people has been held back from enjoying or getting involved in situations he would have liked to.

For those who live with social phobia, life can be a litany of missed opportunities, of people assuming a lack of saying something denotes a lack of something to say. So he's decided to tackle his stranger danger head on and beat his social anxiety. On a journey of trial and error via Californian tranquility gurus, life coaches, fellow 'panickers', dinner parties, the barbers' chair and more, Byron hopes that the mortal dread induced by social interaction will become a thing of the past.

Producer Neil McCarthy.


MON 11:30 All Those Women (b06fkd21)
Series 1

Episode 4

It's Maggie's 60th birthday, so bring on the surprise present! And also some unwelcome revelations and a lot of facts about ballooning...

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

Hetty ...... Sheila Hancock
Maggie ...... Lesley Manville
Jen ...... Sinead Matthews
Emily ...... Lucy Hutchinson
Stu ...... Chris Pavlo
David ...... Denis Lill
Niamh ...... Isy Suttie
Gareth ...... Stephen Critchlow
Announcement ...... George Watkins

Script editor: Richard Turner

Producer: Alexandra Smith

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in October 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b06f4xs0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b064fz9s)
5 October 1915 - Alice Macknade

Roy takes a surprising step to avoid being identified as a deserter.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b06fkd26)
VW used-car sales, Plastic bag charge, National Lottery changes

You & Yours investigates the resale value of used Volkswagens following the emissions testing scandal. Will it make car buyers more or less likely to choose a car on their green credentials?

From today, shoppers in England will have to pay 5p for all single use carrier bags. The charge has already been introduced in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, which are now using far fewer carrier bags. Will England follow suit?

Plus from this week the National Lottery are adding more balls to the draw. It's the biggest change Camelot has made to the Lotto in 21 years. We find out how the odds of winning the jackpot will change, and why the Lotto is promising they will be making more people millionaires.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


MON 12:57 Weather (b06f4xs2)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b06fkg1s)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney. The chancellor George Osborne has said the Conservatives are now the party of working people. A police officer in Merseyside has died after being struck by a stolen car.


MON 13:45 Natural History Heroes (b06fkg22)
Franz Baron Nopcsa von Felso-Szilvás

Franz Baron Nopcsa von Felso-Szilvás was among the first people to think about what fossils can tell us about how extinct animals lived – rather than just giving them a name Nopcsa is therefore considered the father of palaeo-biology. Nopcsa described the first fossil evidence that the Sauropods had gone through a process of island dwarfism – shrinking body size over generations to adapt to living on islands.

Nopcsa was a flamboyant character and was unafraid to make his more wacky and outlandish theories public and was also one of very few openly gay men in the early part of the 20th century.

Paul Barrett, dinosaur research at the Natural History Museum, explains why Nopsca is his Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b06f54rx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b06fkjm2)
Frankie Goes to Flensburg

By Jennifer Howarth and based on a true story. In the spring of 1945, as the war in Europe was ending, Frank Howarth, a Major in the Royal Artillery and a lawyer in civilian life, was taken out of the frontline of the invading Allied army in Holland and sent with two other soldiers to Flensburg in Northern Germany. Their task was to set up a civilian administration - but what they found there was truly surprising.

Starring Paul Popplewell and Sam Troughton, this is a moving account of an experience both different and unexpected for a Major at the end of the second world war.

Directed by Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b06fkjm4)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 51st series.

In almost forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of celebrity guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the famous panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 5

Writer Jeremy Front
Comedian Sarah Kendal
Writer, critic and broadcaster Nicolette Jones
Comedian and Red Dwarf actor Norman Lovett

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Producer ... Carl Cooper.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b06f4z3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Manchester Ballads (b06fkm2g)
The folk singer Eliza Carthy visits Chetham's Library in Manchester to find out about nineteenth century broadside ballads, and to see if she can find a new song to perform. She is joined by Andrew Biswell, Professor of English at Manchester Metropolitan University, who is an advocate of the cultural value of the ballads, which were printed on a single sheet and sold on the streets of Manchester. She meets Michael Powell, Librarian of Chetham's Library, which is one of the oldest public libraries in the English-speaking world, and he tells her more about the collections of ballads there. Many of the ballads reflect the Irish community in Manchester and she goes to the site of Little Ireland with Professor Brian Maidment to find out more about the conditions there. Eliza also has a go at printing a ballad herself, with help from Graham Moss at the Incline Press in Oldham. She talks to Jennifer Reid, the self-styled 'pre-eminent broadside balladress of the Manchester region', who has collaborated with the artist Jeremy Deller. Jennifer and Jeremy describe their work on his exhibition at the recent Venice Biennale which includes some of the ballads. Eliza asks her guests about their favourites then chooses one of her own to sing.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b06fkm2k)
The Family

This week the Catholic Church began its second Synod on the Family. After a year of reflection and discussion, there has been much speculation as to what might emerge. The model for what constitutes a family has posed difficulties for Christianity down through the centuries. The greatly increased divorce rate, the movement for gay and lesbian equality; the possibility for surrogate children, all pose challenges for churches of all denominations which have longstanding theological ideas about what a family is and what it is for.

Joining Ernie Rea to discuss the family is Dr Clare Watkins, Lecturer in Ministerial Theology at the University of Roehamption in London; the Rt Rev Alan Wilson, Anglican Bishop of Buckingham; and the Rev Dr Paul Middleton, Senior Lecturer in New Testament and Early Christianity at Chester University and a minister of the Church of Scotland.

Producer: Amanda Hancox.


MON 17:00 PM (b06fkm2r)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06f4xs4)
George Osborne says councils will be able to set business rates and keep the revenue


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b06fkm2w)
Series 73

Episode 1

Record breaking, Cologne and Street Performers get the Just a Minute treatment in a special edition recorded at the Edinburgh Festival in August 2015. Nicholas Parsons is joined by Janey Godley, Gyles Brandreth, Joe Lycett, and Paul Merton - who disrobes to display his Edinburgh Tattoo. Thank goodness it's Radio. Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b06fkm32)
Lynda has been sneakily looking up BAMDRAM (Borsetshire Amateur Dramatics Association) and printing off play scripts at work. Lynda distracts annoyed Roy with a compliment about how good it is he's staying on at Grey Gable. Kirsty starts there tomorrow and Lynda wonders whether Kirsty will do this year's show. Roy talks about how the community has come together following a disaster (the flood) - which gives Lynda sudden inspiration.

Neil breaks it to Charlie that the village hall committee won't be accepting Justin's offer of money (in return for rebranding) - it will be a community project. Volunteers will do basic work like sanding and tiling but they'll use professional builders. Perhaps Justin would still be willing to make a discreet - or even anonymous - donation? Non-committal Charlie wishes Neil all the best.

It took some persuading for busy Ruth to let Pip and David take over the disbudding of the calves. Pip and David discuss Heather. They've had lots of cards, including one from a rather subdued Helen. There's a particular day coming up which will make Pip really miss her Granny Heather. Eddie gives David a couple of rabbits and talks fondly of Heather. Pip's going to eat at Lower Loxley with Jill and mentions their Christmas Menu is being worked out - which makes Eddie think.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b06fkm34)
Jeanette Winterson, Henning Mankell remembered, Goya, Rod Stewart

Jeanette Winterson discusses her new novel, The Gap of Time, a cover version of Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. The novel launches the Hogarth Shakespeare series in which some of today's bestselling writers reimagine Shakespeare's plays. She reveals why she picked The Winter's Tale, and how she went about writing her version.
Henning Mankell, who wrote the 'Wallander' novels and created the Scandi Noir genre, died today. Arne Dahl, the award winning Swedish writer, was inspired by Mankell to write crime fiction. His 'Intercrime' series was shown on BBC 4 and in 40 countries around the world. Dahl pays tribute to Mankell and assesses his achievement.
The National Gallery's new exhibition of Goya's portraits has already been hailed as the exhibition of the decade. John meets the curator Xavier Bray to discuss some of the paintings and the importance of the Spanish master. The Portraits runs at the National Gallery from this Wednesday 7 October until January the 10th.
Rod Stewart looks back at his career and discusses his new album Another Country.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Elaine Lester.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06fkd1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Spain's Battle for the Bull (b06g7rxl)
Two sides are sharpening their swords in Spain. Between them, half-tonne bulls. One side wants to kill them in the name of culture, the other to save them in the name of animal rights. It's an age-old contest but the balance of power is changing. Spain's economic crisis has hit bullfighting hard. And municipal elections in May brought to power a number of left-wing parties bent on stopping funding for bullfights or even banning them altogether. Spain's national bullfighting association has warned that the tradition is in crisis. This programme goes to the rings and ranches where livelihoods are under threat, and asks what the battle for the bull says about contemporary Spain.

Produced by Mark Savage.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b06fkm3g)
The Iran-Iraq War's Legacy

Lyse Doucet asks how far the Middle East today is defined by the legacy of the Iran-Iraq war? The conflict - the longest convention war of the 20th century- exposed deep fault lines in a region still shattered by violence. Thirty five years after it began, Iraq has imploded. Syria too. And Iran is extending its influence. Lyse retells the story of the war, then is joined by a panel of guests to ask if the events of three decades ago can help us understand what's going on in the Middle East today?
Guests:
Professor Mansour Farhang : Former Ambassador to UN of the Islamic Republic of Iran
Sinan Antoon: Iraqi poet and novelist
Dr Haider al-Safi: BBC Arabic service
Professor Ali Ansari: Historian and Director of the Institute for Iranian Studies, St Andrews University

Producers: Mike Gallagher and Rozita Riazati.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w9dx8)
Crocodiles

Not many creatures can boast being a god, a sports logo, a sly trickster, a bringer of fertility, a producer of false tears and a comic book hero, but then not many animals have lived on earth for as long as the crocodile. It is a cold-bloodied killer, using crude techniques to crush and drown its prey, but it is a master of survival over millions of years. In the Nile, where they grow to 7 metres and 1000 kilogrammes, they were revered as gods; they even had their own city Crocodilopolis where mummified crocs were the subject of long, sacred rituals. Cleopatra viewed herself as a sexy crocodile devouring Mark Anthony. More recently they were used by JM Barrie in Peter Pan to bring us the much loved ticking time-bomb that silently chased Captain Cook. We are in awe of their lightning fast movements and cold, ruthless character. The famous tennis player Rene Lacoste was considered such a ferocious player he was nicknamed The Crocodile, and the iconic sports logo was born. Our relationship with crocodiles is complex, a mixture of fear and reverence. Today we are finding more about the non-predatory side of their lives - how they use tools and cooperate. The crocodile continues to beguile us.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b06fk9ph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b06f4xs6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b06fkm3x)
America says Russian incursion into Turkish airspace was reckless.

NATO has accused Russia of irresponsible and extremely dangerous behaviour.
George Osborne announces devolution of power to local councils;
MSF say attack on Afghan hospital was a war crime;
Founding father of 'nordic noir', Henning Mankell, has died.


MON 22:45 Letters from Europe (b0549x7d)
Henning Mankell

The Swedish novelist Henning Mankell, author of the Kurt Wallander crime novels, reflects from his home in the South of France on the state of Europe after last month's attacks in Paris.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b06d2j1w)
Romance and Romanticism

In a romantic edition, Michael Rosen, Dr Laura Wright and Professor John Mullan explore the clusters of meanings and differences between the words romance and the Romantic poets, romanticism and the romance languages.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 The Digital Human (b01s4764)
Series 3

Isolation

Aleks Krotoski explores our lives in the digital world. This week she asks, are our connected modern lives making us lonelier than ever?



TUESDAY 06 OCTOBER 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b06f4xt9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b06fkd1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xtc)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06f4xtf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xtj)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b06f4xtl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06fvm2g)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Bishop John Arnold.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b06flmb9)
EU referendum, Liz Truss at Conservative Party Conference, Fishing apprenticeships

A hot topic of debate at the Conservative Party conference has been the UK's relationship with Brussels ahead of the planned 'in-out' EU referendum. So how would UK farming be affected if we left the EU; and what would change if we vote to stay in? Agriculture accounts for about 38% of the total EU budget, many British farmers rely on the subsidies they get under the Common Agricultural Policy, and Europe is their biggest export market. But along with those financial benefits come rules and regulations which some argue farming would be better off without. We brought together the Steve Baker MP, the Co-Chairman of 'Conservatives for Britain', the group campaigning for a exit from the EU; and Peter Wilding, Director of the Pro-EU organisation 'British Influence'.

We take a closer look at the priorities laid out by the Secretary of State for Defra, Liz Truss, in her speech at the Conservative Party conference in Manchester.

And Nancy Nicolson meets the new fishing apprentices taking to the sea in Scotland.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Sophie Anton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxj9)
Galapagos Mockingbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents a bird which intrigued Darwin, the Galapagos mockingbird. There are four species of Mockingbird in the Galapagos islands, which probably all descended from a single migrant ancestor and then subsequently evolved different adaptations to life on their separate island clusters, hence their fascination for Charles Darwin. The most widespread is the resourceful Galapagos Mockingbird. Unlike other mockingbirds which feed on nectar and seeds, the Galapagos mockingbird has adapted to its island life to steal and break into seabird eggs and even attack and kill young nestlings. They'll also ride on the backs of land iguanas to feed on ticks deep within the reptiles' skin and will boldly approach tourists for foot. They aptly demonstrate the theory of the "survival of the fittest".


TUE 06:00 Today (b06fwqjx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b06flmbf)
Dame Carol Black on public health

Carol Black was an overweight child who, aged 13, put herself on a diet. Now, as an expert advisor to the government, she's the woman behind recent newspaper headlines suggesting that obese people who refuse treatment could see their benefits cut. In the last decade, Carol has conducted several reviews on work and health, sickness absence and how best to help people with obesity, alcohol and drug problems get back into the workplace. In 2008 she suggested the Sick Note should be replaced with a Fit Note which states what people can do rather than what they can't. Later she recommended that an independent assessor should decide who is, or is not, Fit for Work. Dame Carol Black talks to Jim Al-Khalili about the challenges associated with advising government on these controversial issues; and how, despite relative adversity and several bad decisions, she achieved such a position of power and influence.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b06flmc6)
Steve Backshall and Ed Stafford

Steve Backshall is one of our leading natural history broadcasters; he's also an extreme sportsman who has conquered some of the world's most dangerous mountains. Despite suffering a severe rock-climbing injury in 2008, he continues to set himself extraordinary challenges.

For One to One Steve meets two other extreme adventurers to discover what drives them to significant levels of danger and physical discomfort in order to complete challenges that are almost superhuman.

In this first programme he meets Ed Stafford. Ed was the first person to walk the entire length of the Amazon River - 6000 miles over two and a half years. Ed acknowledges that explorers have a 'chink in their armour, an insecurity, a fear of something in life... Doing something tangible, something remarkable, enables you to prove yourself'.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b06flmck)
Margaret Thatcher: Everything She Wants

Episode 2

In the aftermath of the Falklands victory, Margaret Thatcher's stock was rising. This period of almost five years, up to the 1987 election, could be described as her golden years. With a decisive majority and a pre-eminent place on the world stage she could truly begin to make her mark.

Charles Moore was authorised by Margaret Thatcher to write her biography on the condition that it was published after her death. She also encouraged her former staff and colleagues to readily offer their recollections, diaries and memoirs of their time working with and for her.

This abridgement for Radio 4 of his second volume offers a series of windows onto the key events of her second term - a term that was packed with challenges and drama.

Episode 2:
A momentous lunch at Chequers turns into a meeting with 'a man we can do business with'.

Music :
The music used to frame this series reflects the title of the book. As the author writes, "I have called this book Everything She Wants - the title of a song of the time by Wham! - because it expresses Mrs Thatcher's appetite for achievement and change and the degree to which she was the commanding personality of the era; but, hard as she fought for everything she wanted, this was not always what she got."
Track: 'Everything She Wants' from the Wham! album Make it Big, 1984

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06flmct)
Student mental health, Women's magazines, Jessa Crispin

What's being done to support students who find the move to university difficult to cope with? We discuss with Dr Ruth Caleb, Head of the Counselling Service at Brunel University London and the Chair of the Mental Wellbeing Working Group of Universities UK and Dr Nicola Byrom, the Founding Director of Student Minds, the student mental health charity.

How do women's magazines balance talking about feminism with the needs of advertisers? Editor of Elle, Lorraine Candy and Editor of Stylist, Lisa Smosarski discuss their feminist themed editions.

In today's Woman in One from Liverpool: we talk to a young woman working in a tattoo parlour.

The Dead Ladies Project: following erratically in the footsteps of some of her favourite literary exiles Jessa Crispin travels around Europe to see if their lives have anything to teach her about recovering from depression and making a satisfying way of life for herself as a woman, a writer and a resolute rule-breaker.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06g6rx6)
30 Eggs

Episode 2

Weary of life in the bustling Rwandan border town of Rusumo, Modeste, a blind and sickly homeless man resolves to return to his home village of Kibuye on the far side of the country with the help of his companion, Innocent, a cheeky seven year-old street orphan. The journey starts well when they stumble upon a small amount of money but little Innocent inadvertently spends the cash purchasing a basket of thirty raw eggs during a mix up in a market melee. With their peculiar bounty of raw eggs the unlikely duo set off on an adventure of a life time along the rising road cresting atop the many rolling hills of Rwanda.
A beautiful, funny and inspirational story which catapults you into life in Rwanda and one remarkable journey.

Irish writer Eoin O'Connor has spent a number of years living in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Having recently returned to Ireland, Eoin is currently working on two further feature scripts, a comedy, Family Remains, currently in development with Grand Pictures, Dublin, and a thriller set in Syria entitled Stolen, currently in development with Epos Films, Dublin.

Writer ..... Eoin O'Connor
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w9dxn)
Anemone

Sea anemones are also known as the flowers of the sea. They inspire whimsy and fancy, poetry and art. The Victorian craze for aquariums which Philip Henry Gosse encouraged with his 1860 book "A History Of The British Sea-anemones and Corals" was intense, though short lived, and had an ecological effect in nature.

Today the collection of anemones for aquariums is devastating places like the Philippines, especially since the Hollywood blockbuster Finding Nemo was released. Bizarrely the complexity of anemone nerves means they are more closely related to humans than to flies and worms. Some species are as close to immortal as you can get. Cut them in half and you get two, cut off the mouth and it will grow a new one. They seem to go on and on, leading some scientists to use them in the search for eternal youth. The Natural History Museum in London owns delicate, anatomically accurate and beautifully crafted glass models of anemones are so realistic they look like the real thing crystallised from the sea. They were made by father and son glass blowers called Blaschka in the 19th century. These models allowed ordinary people to see the wonders beneath the sea.

Original Producer : Andrew Dawes
Archive Producer : Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio

Revised Repeat : First Broadcast BBC Radio 4; 6th October 2015


TUE 11:30 Something Old, Something New (b06flmcw)
What happens when your Dad's an African-American soul star and your Mum's a music-loving girl from working class Sheffield? Are your roots on the terraces at a Sheffield United match, or in the stylings of a Spike Lee film? For writer and photographer Johny Pitts, whose parents met in the heyday of Northern Soul, on the dance floor of the legendary King Mojo club, how he navigates his black roots has always been an issue. Not being directly connected to the Caribbean or West African diaspora culture, all he was told at school was that his ancestors were slaves, so for BBC Radio 4, he heads off to the USA, to trace his father's musical migration, and tell an alternative story of Black British identity.
From Pitsmore in Sheffield, to Bedford Stuyvesant in New York, and all the way down to South Carolina, where his grandmother picked cotton, Johny Pitts heads off on a journey of self-discovery. On the way he meets author Caryl Phillips, Kadija, a half sister he never knew, and historian Bernard Powers. He visits the Concorde Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, and the Bush River Missionary Baptist Church, in Newberry, South Carolina. He tracks down a whole host of long-lost cousins, and talks to Pulitzer winning writer Isabel Wilkerson. On the way he shines a light on the shadows of his ancestry, and finds stories and culture that deliver him to a new understanding of his own mixed race identity and history.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b06f4xts)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b064fz77)
6 October 1915 - Gabriel Graham

Gabriel begins to suspect Dolly Clout may not be the real thing

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b06fwr13)
Call You and Yours: End-of-Life Care - Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

A new report suggests that the UK has some of the highest standards of palliative care in the world. In its 2015 Quality of Death Index, the Economist Intelligence Unit has ranked the UK first out of eighty countries for the standard of its end of life care.

The report says that palliative care has become well integrated into the NHS, the UK has a strong hospice movement and also the public has a good understanding of the issues surrounding end of life care.

But it also says that standards could still improve and the UK's ability to provide care will be stretched by its ageing population and the expected increase in diseases such as dementia, cancer and diabetes.

The report has been welcomed by the National Council for Palliative Care, which represents people involved in end of life care in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. But the charity says many people are still being failed as they reach the end of their lives. It suggests that dying people cannot consistently rely on access to pain relief, 24/7 care or being able to die in the place of their choice.

What was your family's experience? Did your relative receive a good quality of care at the end of their life, or did you feel the system let them down?

Email us on youandyours@bbc.co.uk and leave a contact number so we can call you back.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b06f4xtv)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b06fwr15)
Latest news from the Conservative Conference including an interview with Theresa May. Analysis of the European Court of Justice ruling on data transfers from Europe to the USA. Plus NATO response to Russian aircraft entering Turkey. Presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 Natural History Heroes (b06flmd3)
Evelyn Cheesman

Evelyn Cheesman was an entomologist and the first female curator hired by London Zoo. An intrepid traveller and collector who defied expectations at a time when science, exploration and natural history were still heavily dominated by men.

A formidable character her 8 solo research trips to the Islands of the Pacific South Seas left Cheesman laid low by fever, septic sores, malaria and lack of food, found herself trapped in spiders webs and came close to falling to her death - but she always learned from her experiences and had an indomitable spirit.

Beulah Garner takes us into the beetle collections at the Natural history museum to explain why Evelyn Cheesman is her Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b06fkm32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b06flmdp)
David Spicer - Kempton and the Duke

Kevin Whately stars as Kempton Bunton, the pensioner who stole Goya's portrait of the Duke of Wellington from the National Gallery in 1961.

Comedy drama by David Spicer.

In 1961, a portrait of the Duke of Wellington by the great Spanish artist Francisco de Goya was bought by an American collector for £140,000. Following a public outcry the British Government stepped in, matched the bid and saved the painting for the nation.

It was put on display in the National Gallery from where, three weeks later, it was stolen by Kempton Bunton - a 61 year old retired lorry driver from Newcastle who was protesting about having to buy a television licence.

He was a dedicated campaigner who had already served time in jail for refusing to pay for his TV licence. His plan was to get the Government to pay another £140,000 for the return of the painting and then use this money to buy TV licences for OAPs. Once he had the painting safely stored in a wardrobe at his home in Newcastle, he started writing letters explaining his plan to the press and Chairman of the National Gallery. However, no one took his letters seriously.

This is a play about a heist, a manhunt and a marvellously English eccentric character. It also looks at art - highbrow Goya versus lowbrow TV - and the relative values we place upon it. Kempton Bunton was a man who, although he had a 19th century masterpiece in his wardrobe, just wanted to watch Emergency Ward 10 for free.

Kempton Bunton ...... Kevin Whately
Lord Robbins ...... Hugh Fraser
Mrs Bunton ...... Madelaine Newton
Inspector Greene ...... Simon Greenall
Sergeant Entwistle ...... Matt Addis

Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in October 2015.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b06f4vqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b06flmf1)
Lungs, Lies and Automobiles

Have we been lied to about the quality of the air we breathe? Do car manufacturers, regulators and farmers have some explaining to do about their emissions to the atmosphere? Tom Heap investigates.

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b06flmfc)
Inventing Brand Names

Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright look into how new commercial brand names are invented, with Greg Rowland, the semiotician who came up with the name of a new perfume for Calvin Klein. Which words and sounds work, and which don't, and why? Professor Will Leben talks about how his company came up with the name Blackberry, and the uses of sound symbolism.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b06flmfm)
Caroline Lucas and Rod Liddle

Green MP Caroline Lucas and columnist Rod Liddle debate books with Harriett Gilbert. Under discussion are Flight Behaviour by Barbara Kingsolver, Red or Dead by David Peace and Fun Home by Alison Bechdel. No prizes for guessing who chose the novel about climate change, but there are some surprises along the way. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (b06fwr17)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06f4xty)
The Home Secretary Theresa May announces tough new plans to reduce immigration


TUE 18:30 Reluctant Persuaders (b06flmfv)
Series 1

Vorsprung Durch Technik

Things are looking up for Hardacre's. They may still be London's worst ad agency, but business has begun to trickle in.

Moreover, thanks to a herculean effort by accounts chief Amanda Brook, the agency will be featured in an article in industry bible Campaign. It's a chance to answer their critics and take control of their image. A reporter is coming by today to interview the team, and Amanda needs them at their very best. Or - failing that - their least incompetent.

But the team has other things on their mind. Like Joe's divorce lawyer, who seems to have developed a sideline as a blacksmith. Or their campaign for Hardacre's mysterious gentlemen's club. Or why Teddy is covered in spiders.

Or what to do when the office lift breaks down, stranding Joe, Teddy, Amanda, and Hardacre between floors, with the woman from Campaign due any minute.

Edward Rowett's sitcom starring Nigel Havers as Rupert Hardacre, Mathew Baynton as Joe, Josie Lawrence as Amanda Brook and Rasmus Hardiker as Teddy.

Director: Alan Nixon
Producer: Gordon Kennedy

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b06flmfx)
Eddie feels threatened, and Adam needs to hold his nerve.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b06fwrcx)
BBC National Short Story Award

John Wilson hosts the BBC National Short Story Award live from the BBC Radio Theatre. With special guests William Boyd and Ian Rankin.

This year's shortlisted authors are Hilary Mantel, Jeremy Page, Frances Leviston, Jonathan Buckley and Mark Haddon.

The winner of the £15000 prize will be announced by Chair of Judges, Allan Little.

The BBC National Short Story Award is presented in conjunction with BookTrust.

William Boyd's latest novel is Sweet Caress.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06g6rx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b06flmfz)
Dirty Money UK

What does the theft of a billion dollars from Europe's poorest country have to do with a run-down housing estate in Edinburgh? Moldova was robbed of 12% of its GDP by the bafflingly complex financial scam uncovered earlier this year. It involved a web of companies in the ex-Soviet country, with the money thought to have ended up in Russia via Latvian banks.

But the trail also goes via a number of UK-registered companies, including one based in the district of north Edinburgh made famous by "Trainspotting", the novel about heroin addicts. It's not the only example of Eastern European fraudsters using the UK to launder their dirty money in this way. So why is it allowed to happen? Why is it so easy to set up an opaque shell company in the UK? And what is the role of so-called company formation agents? Tim Whewell investigates

Reporter: Tim Whewell Producer: Simon Maybin.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b06flmg1)
Chen Guangcheng, Lynn Cox

Chen Guangcheng, the blind Chinese activist talks to Peter White about his life since escaping from China. He now lives in Washington, since being offered residencey by the United States.
Chen has written a book about his experiences and says the hardest part for him to write about was the abuse inflicted upon his mother and family during his imprisonment.
He says that he still feels he can make a difference to the lives of blind and disabled people in China, thanks to the internet. Guangcheng does envisage that he will be able to return to China at some stage in the future. Stephen Hallett provides the translation.

Plus artist Lynn Cox was frustrated by printed greetings cards she could neither read nor enjoy, so decided to create her own range of tactile and scented cards. She has some sighted help, but her art background informs her designs and helps her to achieve the movement and energy in the outlines of the subjects she is depicting.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b06flmg7)
Pregabalin and gabapentin misuse, Natural birth after caesarean, Adrenaline auto-injectors

Prescriptions for nerve drugs pregabalin and gabapentin have risen dramatically in recent years and at the same time, concerns about abuse. Former prisoner and addict "Patrick" tells Dr Mark Porter that "gabbies" or "pregabs" are drugs of choice in jail and Dr Iain Brew, a GP who works in prisons, says misuse is a growing problem and there are examples of doctors being pressurised into prescribing them. Dr Cathy Stannard, consultant in pain medicine at Southmead Hospital in Bristol, chaired an expert group that drew up new prescribing guidelines for pregabalin and gabapentin and she tells Mark that more attention needs to be paid to emerging evidence of misuse.

Many women say that if they've had one caesarean section, they feel pressurised to have another one and Sara describes how her medical team planted "a seed of doubt" about the potential risks to her baby which she says for her meant another C-Section was inevitable. But new guidelines from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists spell out that vaginal birth after a previous caesarean is a clinically safe choice, with a 75% success rate, the same as for first-time mothers. Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney discusses the history of changing attitudes to natural birth after caesarean and says why the new guidelines should give future mothers the confidence to discuss, well in advance of their birth, the best option for them.

How do you fill in health check forms that ask for family history if you don't know who your family was? Inside Health listener Jessica is adopted and her heart health check suggested a very low risk of a stroke or heart attack when she couldn't answer the family history question. Mark and Margaret discuss how common this is, and what difference family knowledge would make to Jessica's risk (not much).

Adrenaline auto injectors were first used in the 1960s when they were developed for soldiers to use during nerve gas attacks allowing them to self administer the antidote. But is a device designed to be used by fit, trained soldiers just as suitable for use in children and adults of widely varying size and weight? These concerns were raised by a coroner conducting the inquest into the death of a 19 year old student who died of anaphylactic shock caused by a nut allergy, despite her using her auto injector. The Medicine and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority and also the European Medicines Agency have been looking into issue and Dr Robert Boyle, allergy specialist at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington and Director of the Paediatric Research Unit at Imperial College, London provided expert advice. He talks to Mark about the limitations of auto injector design and urges everybody who might use the devices to ensure they are confident about exactly how to use them.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b06flmbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b06f4xv2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b06fwrd5)
Theresa May outlines changes to asylum policy.

As protestors gather at the Tory conference, is this a return to class war?
What is Turkey hoping to gain in talks with Europe?;
A rare glimpse into the world of 'locked in' syndrome;


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06fkm47)
Reading Europe - The Truth and Other Lies

My love, this is not going to end well

In 'Reading Europe', Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature with this hugely successful German thriller set on a small cliff-top town in which everyone has a secret.

Famous novelist, with a beautiful wife, grand house in the country and more money than he can spend - Henry Hayden has it all. Or so it seems. His perfect life rests on one carefully constructed lie, a lie he will stop at nothing to protect. He has been lucky until now, but when he makes one fatal error, the whole dream begins to unravel.
Today: Henry's editor - and mistress - has some news...
Reader: Jamie Parker
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett
Writer: Sascha Arango is one of Germany's most renowned screenwriters, whose award-winning crime dramas are television events of the year. This, his first novel, has been a huge bestseller in Germany.
Translated by Imogen Taylor.


TUE 23:00 Alice's Wunderland (b06flmgr)
Series 3

Episode 4

A genderwar has broken out in Wunderland, the Poundland of magical realms. Can the narrator help genderwar poet Penny Beard to bring peace between men and women?

New series by Alice Lowe, featuring Marcia Warren as the narrator, with Richard Glover, Simon Greenall, Rachel Stubbings and Clare Thompson.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


TUE 23:30 The Digital Human (b042jcx6)
Series 5

Broken

Digital devices operate in binary ways; either they're working or they're a brick! Aleks Krotoski asks what this means for our natural instincts as tool builders and tool breakers?

As technology becomes more resistant to prying fingers and minds are we losing the ability to imagine it differently? Take the dying art of tuning an engine it can make cars faster and more efficient but only comes through a symbiotic relationship between mechanic and machine and of course every child knows the joy of taking something apart to see how it works at least until they're caught doing it

Are these the same sensibilities we see in the digital world? From hacking to playing a video game in such a perverse way as to see if it can be broken? Do the constraints of digital technology lock us out of our devices; licensing us to only use them in the prescribed ways, that while convenient are also dis-empowering?

Producer: Peter McManus.



WEDNESDAY 07 OCTOBER 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b06f4xw9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b06flmck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xwc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06f4xwg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xwj)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b06f4xwl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06fvlf2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Bishop John Arnold.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b06fmnyq)
'Free-range' milk, Joe Henson tribute, Teaching children about food production

Dairy farmers in the North East of England are marketing their milk as 'free range'. But it's not the first such scheme: Somerset farmer Neil Darwent launched the free range dairy network a couple of years ago. He responds to the new initiative.

The Rare Breeds Survival Trust has announced the death of one of its founders, Joe Henson, father of Adam from Countryfile. Gail Sprake of the Trust pays tribute to the man who helped save endangered British livestock from becoming extinct.

Also, teaching children about where the food on their plate comes from. Caz Graham joins pupils from a primary school in Carlisle on their farm visit.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxn6)
Crested Lark

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the crested lark found from Europe across to China. The west coast of Europe is one edge of the huge range of the crested lark. Much like many larks it is a streaky brown bird but supports, as its name suggests a prominent crest of feathers on its head. Its song is delivered in a display flight over its territory as a pleasant series of liquid notes. Unlike skylarks which are rural birds, crested larks often nest in dry open places on the edge of built-up areas. Its undistinguished appearance and behaviour were cited by Francis of Assisi as signs of humility and he observed that like a humble friar, "it goes willingly along the wayside and finds a grain of corn for itself".


WED 06:00 Today (b06fvlf5)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b06fmnys)
Brian Blessed, Satish Kumar, Mark Harris, Alinah Azadeh

Libby Purves meets actor Brian Blessed; midwife Mark Harris; artist Alinah Azadeh and environmentalist and peace campaigner Satish Kumar.

For 20 years Mark Harris has worked as a qualified midwife, delivering hundreds of babies. He is one of just a small number of male midwives currently practising in the UK. Mark is also founder of the birth education programme Birthing For Blokes, a service providing antenatal classes designed to prepare men for fatherhood. Men, Love and Birth by Mark Harris is published by Pinter and Martin.

Actor Brian Blessed is the son of a miner who left school at the age of 15 and worked as an undertaker's assistant before training at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. He has played a variety of roles on stage, television and in film including Z-Cars, I, Claudius, the Blackadder series, Flash Gordon and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. He is also an explorer and mountaineer, becoming the oldest man to reach the North Magnetic Pole on foot and to reach 28,000 feet up Everest without oxygen. His autobiography, Absolute Pandemonium, is published by Sidgwick and Jackson.

Alinah Azadeh is an artist. She is taking part in a special evening of activities at the Freud Museum in London as part of the Museums at Night Festival. The night will include the first public screening of Alinah's film Burning the Books which is based on her personal experience of debt and explores the themes of gift and generosity, debt and gratitude. All About the Gift is at the Freud Museum, London NW3 5SX.

Satish Kumar is a peace and environmental activist. A former Jain monk, he is editor-in-chief of Resurgence and Ecologist magazine which celebrates its 50th anniversary next year. Born in Rajasthan, India, at nine he decided to follow a spiritual life and became a Jain monk, travelling from village to village with few possessions. In 1962, inspired by Bertrand Russell, he embarked on an 8,000-mile peace pilgrimage from India to the US, via Moscow, London and Paris. He is hosting The Resurgence Festival of Wellbeing in London.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b06fmnyv)
Margaret Thatcher: Everything She Wants

Episode 3

In the aftermath of the Falklands victory, Margaret Thatcher's stock was rising. This period of almost five years, up to the 1987 election, could be described as her golden years. With a decisive majority and a pre-eminent place on the world stage she could truly begin to make her mark.

Charles Moore was authorised by Margaret Thatcher to write her biography on the condition that it was published after her death. She also encouraged her former staff and colleagues to readily offer their recollections, diaries and memoirs of their time working with and for her.

This abridgement for Radio 4 of his second volume offers a series of windows onto the key events of her second term - a term that was packed with challenges and drama.

Episode 3:
Arthur Scargill vs Margaret Thatcher.

Music :
The music used to frame this series reflects the title of the book. As the author writes, "I have called this book Everything She Wants - the title of a song of the time by Wham! - because it expresses Mrs Thatcher's appetite for achievement and change and the degree to which she was the commanding personality of the era; but, hard as she fought for everything she wanted, this was not always what she got."
Track: 'Everything She Wants' from the Wham! album Make it Big, 1984

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06fmppr)
Suffragette screenwriter Abi Morgan, Hollywood actress Geena Davis

Suffragette - the film's screen writer, Abi Morgan, and its historical advisor, Professor Krista Cowman, on bringing the fight for women's right to vote powerfully to life on screen.

Plus, Hollywood actress Geena Davis on her mission to address gender inequality in film and TV, and her role in that ultimate female road-trip movie, Thelma & Louise.

How well does the Conservative party connect with working women? As this year's party conference continues, Isabel Hardman of The Spectator and Rosie Campbell of Birkbeck, University of London, consider the evidence.

And the suffragettes' importance today and their modern day torchbearers: Sam Smethers of the Fawcett Society and Hillary Margolis of Human Rights Watch discuss.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Emma Wallace.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b06g6sjj)
30 Eggs

Episode 3

Weary of life in the bustling Rwandan border town of Rusumo, Modeste, a blind and sickly homeless man resolves to return to his home village of Kibuye on the far side of the country with the help of his companion, Innocent, a cheeky seven year-old street orphan. The journey starts well when they stumble upon a small amount of money but little Innocent inadvertently spends the cash purchasing a basket of thirty raw eggs during a mix up in a market melee. With their peculiar bounty of raw eggs the unlikely duo set off on an adventure of a life time along the rising road cresting atop the many rolling hills of Rwanda.
A beautiful, funny and inspirational story which catapults you into life in Rwanda and one remarkable journey.

Irish writer Eoin O'Connor has spent a number of years living in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Having recently returned to Ireland, Eoin is currently working on two further feature scripts, a comedy, Family Remains, currently in development with Grand Pictures, Dublin, and a thriller set in Syria entitled Stolen, currently in development with Epos Films, Dublin.

Writer ..... Eoin O'Connor
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b06fmsy4)
Glyn and Hywel – Dark Suits and Blazers

Fi Glover hears two of the first basses from the Cor Meibion Aberystwyth consider whether or not some swaying in time to the music would enhance the male voice choir experience. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, this one recorded in the mobile Booth on the Promenade at Aberystwyth.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


WED 11:00 Recycled Radio (b06fmsy6)
Series 4

Travel

Today Recycled Radio invites you on a wondrous journey. Famous travellers including Colin Thubron, Bruce Chatwin and Paul Theroux are all jostling for a seat, while presenter Gerald Scarfe attempts to steer the wheel. This is the archive hour at breakneck speed, chopped up, looped up and mashed up with breathtaking results.

So, do four males out of five really start life predisposed in favour of adventure? Why does Lucy Mangan want to stay at home? And is that John Prescott on the last ever edition of Excess Baggage?
Thought-provoking silly fun with an unusually starry cast - Sue MacGregor, Sir John Betjeman, Nicholas Parsons, Benedict Allen, Sarah Wheeler, Humphrey Lyttleton and Clive James.

The producer is Miles Warde.


WED 11:30 The Sinha Carta (b051s4qh)
Magna Carta is a document, over 800 years old, that surprisingly few people have read, considering how important it is.

Luckily for you, comedian and quizzer Paul Sinha (The Chase) has read it, and it turns out it's ace, especially if you love keeping your own timber and hate fishing traps in the River Medway.

Get ready as Paul will be explaining why what’s in it is in it - how it came to be - and guide you through some of its 63 clauses of medieval Latin.

He'll also supply some new, modern clauses, for a Magna Carta fit for a modern Britain.

Written and performed by Paul Sinha.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b06f4xwn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b064fzt6)
7 October 1915 - Dorothea Winwood

Dorothea writes to Ralph with news that will shake their marriage.


Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b06fn26c)
Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b06f4xwq)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b06fvlv3)
Latest news from the Conservative Conference including an interview with Justice Secretary Michael Gove.
Presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Natural History Heroes (b06fn26f)
George Verrall

George Verrall was an entomologist who loved lists. In a time when his peers were busy chasing butterflies and beetles Verrall made himself extremely busy attempting to list all the species of ‘true’ fly of the British Isles. His initial list of around 2000 flies from the late 1800’s has been updated over the years and at the last revision included over 7000 species.

Verrall’s love of wildlife and his concern for the British countryside inspired him along with the better known naturalist Walter Rothschild to start buying up the fenland around Cambridge.

On his death this land was gifted to the National Trust increasing the size of their very first nature reserve – Wicken Fen. Fellow fly expert Erica McAllister explains why Verrall is her Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b06flmfx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b067w6ts)
Frank and the Bear

Written by Emily Steel and inspired by real life experiences.

Baby Frank is just hours old when his breathing becomes difficult and he's whisked from his mother's arms. The situation is critical. Hours turn into days as the doctors try to make him better. Whilst they wait Frank's parents tell make-believe stories of their baby son and his pal Bear, as they desperately long for a happy ending.

A truthful and emotional drama about motherhood, hope and endless love.

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

Eve Myles is best known for playing Gwen Cooper in Torchwood, alongside her roles in Broadchurch, Belonging and Frankie.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b06fvlzn)
Money Box Live: The Finances of Bereavement

The loss of a loved one can be an overwhelming time emotionally and while financial decisions may be the last thing on your mind, you might be faced with paying for funeral costs or dealing with wills, probate and inheritance tax. To help you through this difficult time, Lesley Curwen and guests will answer your questions about the financial implications of bereavement. Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30 pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

How much will a funeral cost? Adam Heath from the National Association of Funeral Directors will be here to talk you through the likely costs, from the service itself to the flowers and newspaper announcements, plus sources of financial help for those on a low income.

If you're the executor of a will you may have a question about your role in sorting out the estate of a relative or friend. When and how do you apply for probate, the legal document which gives you the authority to share out the estate? What should you do about bank accounts, debts, inheritance tax or notifying beneficiaries?

Or perhaps you want to plan your own affairs by making a will. What are the key considerations about property, investments, pensions and personal possessions? Who do you want to provide for and how can you ensure that your wishes are carried out after your death?

Gary Rycroft, Solicitor at Joseph A Jones & Co and Alan Barr, Tax Practitioner at Brodies LLP in Scotland will be here to answer your legal questions.

Whatever you need to know, presenter Lesley Curwen and guests will be waiting for your call.

Phone lines are open from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, call 03700 100 444, standard geographic call charges apply. Or email us at moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b06flmg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b06fn26h)
Female Serial Killers, Secular Stagnation

Female Serial Killers: Although there is much written on male serial killers, there's less analysis of their female equivalent, perhaps because of their comparitive rarity. Elizabeth Yardley, Associate Professor of Criminology at Birmingham City University, talks to Laurie Taylor about her new study into the social context in which such killings occur. They're joined by Lisa Downing, Professor of French Discourses of Sexuality at the University of Birmingham.

Also Secular Stagnation: the impossibility of an economic future for our grandchildren? Kevin O'Rourke, the Chichele Professor of Economic History at All Souls College Oxford, discusses the recent revival of the hypothesis that 'secular stagnation' - negligible or zero economic growth - could lead to permanently depressed economies, if no policy counter-measures are taken. What's the history of this theory and how applicable is it today?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b06fn26k)
Peston's move to ITV, Desmond newspaper prices, Dennis Publishing CEO on Coach

An investigation by BBC's Panorama into alleged VIP Paedophile rings has questioned whether there was in fact any reliable evidence to support claims. It questioned the methods of investigative website Exaro News - who have led the way in covering this story. Mark Watts, Editor in Chief of Exaro News, gives his response to Steve Hewlett.

BBC journalist and presenter Robert Peston is to join rival broadcaster ITV as its new political editor. The BBC's economics editor has been lured to switch networks with a reported salary of around £350,000 and the promise of a Sunday morning chatshow. Steve Hewlett talks to former Editor-in-Chief and CEO of ITN news Stewart Purvis about the reasons why ITV is so keen to hire him.

Express Newspapers, the newspaper arm of Desmond's Northern & Shell, has cut the cost of the weekday Daily Star, and the Saturday and Sunday editions. The move, which the company has described as a "very bold move to inject some overdue sales and excitement to the category", will challenge rivals including Trinity Mirror's Mirror and Sunday People and News UK's Sun. Douglas McCabe from Enders Analysis explains the thinking behind the decision.

Dennis Publishing today makes its first foray into the freemium magazine market with Coach, a title aimed at 'ABC1 men in the 24-55 age range.' Founded in 1974, Dennis Publishing's magazine portfolio includes the paid-for titles The Week, Viz and Men's Fitness. Coach comes less than 3 weeks after the re-launch of The NME as a free title. The CEO of Dennis Publishing in the UK, James Tye, joins Steve to examine the strategy behind the freemium model for Dennis.
Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b06fn26m)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06f4xws)
Cameron's vision for a "Greater Britain"

The PM promises an all-out assault on poverty and attacks "Britain-hating" Corbyn. Russia launches missiles from the Caspian Sea to Syria. Sepp Blatter provisionally suspended.


WED 18:30 Sami Shah's Beginner's Guide to Pakistan (b06fn26p)
Episode 2

Sami Shah is an award-winning comedian and best-selling author, and one of Pakistan's most successful comedians. Yes, Pakistan has comedians. In A Beginner's Guide To Pakistan he has travelled to Birmingham - or, to give it its full name, the Islamic Republic of Birmingham - to give Radio 4 a quick guide to the country who have directly and/or indirectly provided the UK with 1.8% of its population: Pakistan.

In this second episode he looks at Pakistan's social and cultural history, from its music and cinema, to its increasing religious conservatism as the nature of Islam in the country has changed through the years, all the way to the best brewery in Pakistan. Alright, the only brewery in Pakistan.

Written and performed by ... Sami Shah
The Voice of the Guide ... Anita Anand
Producer ... Ed Morrish

A Beginner's Guide To Pakistan is a BBC Radio Comedy production first broadcast in 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b06fn26r)
Fallon and Harrison look around at Woodbine before they move in properly and joke about the space, which includes some awful colours and prints. Fallon eyes up some work space, as her business is starting to thrive - she and Emma are getting bookings, including a January wedding in Borchester. Ed and Emma still can't move back into No 1 The Green for a while though.

Alan's taking donations for harvest supper on Sunday 25th and Pat and Jazzer discuss the many flood 'refugees'. Pat's happy to host the event in her barn. Jazzer meets the chap who has bought Mike's business and hopes to keep his job. Later, Jazzer tells Fallon and Harrison he's safe carrying on as normal but doesn't know where he stands for the future.

Adam tells Pip her parents are lucky to have her - but she's not sure they see it the same way. Pip wonders whether she should be travelling. Adam tells her not to worry and enjoy what she's doing. Adam feels that something's bound to go wrong with his venture at some point, having introduced so many changes. Adam's thinking about share farming, which could be a headache if you don't find the right people. Adam points out to Pip that she's clearly not the only one in Ambridge who has a lot to prove.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b06fn26t)
Ted Hughes biography, Frank Auerbach, Suffragette, Beasts of No Nation

Ted Hughes, The Unauthorised Life, a new biography by Jonathan Bate, has attracted attention because of its scandalous revelations about the poet's adulterous relationships; including the fact he was in bed with another woman the night Sylvia Path took her life. Jonathan Bate talks about the connection between the poet's life and work.

For more than 60 years Frank Auerbach has lived and worked in the same place, painting almost every day of his life. Tomorrow a major retrospective, of more than 70 of his portraits and landscapes, made almost abstract by his bold brushwork, opens at Tate Britain. The writer and art critic Sue Hubbard reviews.

Director Sarah Gavron on the film Suffragette, starring Carey Mulligan as a working class foot soldier of the feminist movement and Meryl Streep as Emmeline Pankhurst.

Beasts of No Nation, starring Idris Elba, is based on the novel by Nigerian author Uzodinma Iweala. The film follows the story of a child soldier trapped in the civil war of an unspecified African country. Elba, who made his name in The Wire and Luther, plays the warlord who leads the band of child soldiers into battle. The film, the first feature film acquired by Netflix, marks a new strategy in film distribution with a brief, limited cinema release before appearing on Netflix's home subscription service a week later. Briony Hanson reviews the film and discusses the changing landscape of feature film distribution.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06g6sjj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 The Bottom Line (b06jt518)
Crisis at VW: A Bottom Line Special

Volkswagen is dealing with a corporate crisis following the emissions rigging scandal. Evan Davis and guests discuss.

Guests:

Sir John Egan, former CEO, Jaguar, former Chairman, Severn Trent

Lord Browne, former CEO, BP

Lucy Marcus, CEO, Marcus Venture Consulting

Arndt Ellinghorst, Senior MD, Evercore ISI

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b06fngrq)
Why Run?

In this thoughtful essay Adharanand Finn provides a subtle answer to a simple question: why do we run? After all, he says, "running is hard. It requires effort. And after all the pain you usually end up right back where you started, having run in a big, pointless circle".

With reference to childhood, hunter-gatherers and even the monks of mount Hiei, who run the equivalent of 1,000 marathons in 1,000 days, Adharanand arrives at an answer: running brings us joy. Recorded at the End of the Road music festival.

Producer: Richard Knight.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b06flmf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b06fmnys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b06fvlzq)
Is David Cameron returning to compassionate conservatism?

Prime Minister addresses Tory party conference.
Obama's Afghanistan headache.
Russia launches cruise missiles into Syria from warships.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06flmgm)
Reading Europe - The Truth and Other Lies

Don't worry, I'll take care of things

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature with this hugely successful German thriller set on a small cliff-top town, in which everyone has a secret.

Famous novelist, with a beautiful wife, grand house in the country and more money than he can spend - Henry Hayden has it all. Or so it seems. His perfect life rests on one carefully constructed lie, a lie he will stop at nothing to protect. But when he makes one fatal error, the whole dream begins to unravel.
Today: Henry prepares to meet his mistress on a remote clifftop.
Reader: Jamie Parker
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett
Writer: Sascha Arango is one of Germany's most renowned screenwriters, whose award-winning crime dramas are television events of the year. This, his first novel, has been a huge bestseller in Germany.
Translated by Imogen Taylor.


WED 23:00 The Celebrity Voicemail Show (b06fnh5p)
Series 1

Katie Hopkins

Kayvan Novak imagines what it might be like to hear the answerphone messages of the rich and famous.

This time, we listen into the voicemail of controversial media personality, Katie Hopkins.

An entirely fictitious comedy show written, improvised and starring Kayvan Novak.

Producer: Matt Stronge

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


WED 23:15 Dreaming the City (b02224wv)
Ashes

Four journeys into the dark, recurring dreams of the city. In each episode, leading writers collaborate with documentary-makers Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta to uncover the unsaid obsessions of city life.

Episode 1: Ashes by Craig Taylor.

When an urban explorer suffers a fatal accident, two friends are charged with the task of scattering his ashes. They travel to London and revisit the derelict buildings, river barges and train sidings he used to explore, to find the most appropriate location for his final resting place.

These experimental radio features blend archive, fiction and documentary footage. What's real and what's fiction becomes unclear, just like in the city.

A city isn't just a location on the map, it's a place we imagine, dream about, invent. A place to love, to endure or to resent. A place where you can find anything - but it always has a price.

You don't need to live in a city - it's part of the universal imagination. But the way we think of it has common dark undertones, recurring dreams that come round again and again. These late night woozy dreamscapes uncover those unsaid obsessions, each taking a different theme, and question why these ideas seem to keep coming back in the way we imagine urban living.

Featuring the voice of Joseph Kloska.

Producers: Russell Finch and Francesca Panetta
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 The Digital Human (b01nt3y2)
Series 2

Last Word

At the Digital Death Day Aleks meets with Vered Shavit from Israel who having dealt with her late brother's digital legacy set up a website called Digital Dust to help others going through the same experience.

Hearing Vered's story Alek's asks how are we using the web to adapt the rituals that we have used for centuries to help us transition between the living and the dead?

Aleks discovers that since Vered's brother's death people continue to communicate with him through his Facebook profile. Dr Elaine Kasket a Counselling Psychologist who practices psychotherapy with the bereaved likens Facebook to a modern day medium. She also explains how Facebook is enabling people to continue bonds with the deceased.

The distinction between our physical selves and mental states is a philosophical construction, but it signifies a line in the sand between those who believe our bodies make us human and those who define humanity by our thoughts and social lives. But after our death can our persisting digital selves continue our presence for those left behind?

Produced by Kate Bissell.



THURSDAY 08 OCTOBER 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b06f4xxs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b06fmnyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xxv)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06f4xxx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xxz)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b06f4xy1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06fpvnf)
A special Prayer for the Day marking National Poetry day with Simon Russell Beale.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b06fnjlh)
New Crop - Ahiflower, Farming at Yorkshire Career Fair, Piers Plowman

A new crop is launched in the UK, Ahiflower, which contains Omega 3. Derived from a weed, it's trademarked globally, with a view to seizing some of the global supplements market. However, nutritionists say that it doesn't replace a well-balanced diet.

Sarah Falkingham visits a Yorkshire schools career fair to find out what farming and farm-related jobs are on offer for school leavers.

As part of Radio 4's survey of English poetry, Farming Today finds out what the fourteenth century epic, 'Piers Plowman' tells us about rural life in the middle ages.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mg1dc)
Song Thrush (Winter)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the song thrush and reads a passage from Thomas Hardy's poem, The Darkling Thrush.

Written at the end of the 19th century, this poem is about the hope that birdsong can bring at the bleakest time of the year. This episode examines how often song thrushes sing in winter.


THU 06:00 Today (b06fpvnh)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 We British (b06g1m60)
Foundation Stones

The British are brilliant at writing poems. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story.

In this opening episode Andrew looks at the various origins of our story found in some of the earliest verses written in these islands. Then he plunges into the majestic weirdness and strange familiarity of the medieval world. Before, in the figure of Chaucer he finds the first stirrings of an English ascendancy.

With Simon Armitage, Patience Agbabi, Gillian Clarke, Carol Ann Duffy and Jacob Polley.

We'll hear the origins of our British poetry, and of our national character, in poems like The Ruin, Y Goddodin and the Canterbury Tales. And fans of Lord of the Rings and King Arthur will recognise the mediaeval landscapes of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b06fnjlt)
Margaret Thatcher: Everything She Wants

Episode 4

In the aftermath of the Falklands victory, Margaret Thatcher's stock was rising. This period of almost five years, up to the 1987 election, could be described as her golden years. With a decisive majority and a pre-eminent place on the world stage she could truly begin to make her mark.

Charles Moore was authorised by Margaret Thatcher to write her biography on the condition that it was published after her death. She also encouraged her former staff and colleagues to readily offer their recollections, diaries and memoirs of their time working with and for her.

This abridgement for Radio 4 of his second volume offers a series of windows onto the key events of her second term - a term that was packed with challenges and drama.

Episode 4:
The Iron Lady and the Queen.

Music :
The music used to frame this series reflects the title of the book. As the author writes, "I have called this book Everything She Wants - the title of a song of the time by Wham! - because it expresses Mrs Thatcher's appetite for achievement and change and the degree to which she was the commanding personality of the era; but, hard as she fought for everything she wanted, this was not always what she got."
Track: 'Everything She Wants' from the Wham! album Make it Big, 1984

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06fpwx3)
Nightclub racism, Andrew Marr on poetry, Lee Miller WWII photos, Children and sexuality

Racism and Nightclub Door Policies - Clubber Zalika Miller who claims that she and her friends were turned away from a London club because of their skin colour and weight and Reni Eddo-Lodge, a journalist who specialises in gender and race relations discuss nightclub entrance practices.

On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr examines the work of women poets Edna St Vincent Millay, Claudia Rankine and Margaret Cavendish with British poets Helen Mort and Ruth Padel.

To discuss when children become aware of their own sexuality and how we should talk to them about it, Jenni is joined by Mel Gadd, Projects Co-ordinator at the Family Planning Association, and Polly Shute, Fundraising Director for London LGBT Pride.

As never-before-seen photos by Lee Miller are displayed in a new exhibition at The Imperial War Museum, curator Hilary Roberts and Miller's son Tony Penrose talk about the World War 2 photographer's vision of gender.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Rebecca Myatt.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06g6t40)
30 Eggs

Episode 4

Weary of life in the bustling Rwandan border town of Rusumo, Modeste, a blind and sickly homeless man resolves to return to his home village of Kibuye on the far side of the country with the help of his companion, Innocent, a cheeky seven year-old street orphan. The journey starts well when they stumble upon a small amount of money but little Innocent inadvertently spends the cash purchasing a basket of thirty raw eggs during a mix up in a market melee. With their peculiar bounty of raw eggs the unlikely duo set off on an adventure of a life time along the rising road cresting atop the many rolling hills of Rwanda.
A beautiful, funny and inspirational story which catapults you into life in Rwanda and one remarkable journey.

Irish writer Eoin O'Connor has spent a number of years living in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Having recently returned to Ireland, Eoin is currently working on two further feature scripts, a comedy, Family Remains, currently in development with Grand Pictures, Dublin, and a thriller set in Syria entitled Stolen, currently in development with Epos Films, Dublin.

Writer ..... Eoin O'Connor
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b06fpwx5)
A Tunnel of Stories

Insight, writing, storytelling. In this edition Nick Thorpe reflects on the many tales he's heard in months covering the migrant crisis at the gateways of Europe; Gabriel Gatehouse is in Germany where the influx of refugees has caused a surge in the popularity of right-wing anti-immigration parties; Stephanie Hegarty talks of her visit to the Central African Republic where UN-troops are trying to restore peace after violent clashes between Christian and Muslim militias; Jonathan Fryer goes to Astana in Kazahstan, a capital city with awe-inspiring architecture and a president determined that nothing will stand in the way of his plans for the country's future and Kieran Cooke goes to Ireland's holy mountain, Croagh Patrick in County Mayo, to investigate a claim that 'nature's greatest cathedral in the west is being severely damaged'.


THU 11:30 We British (b06g1m62)
The Rise of England

The British are brilliant at writing poems. To celebrate National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story. In this episode Andrew Marr examines the long 16th century - from the rise of the Tudors to the elegance of Shakespeare. The 16th century is as elegant and brutal as a deft execution. This is a story of English power - entrenched in the South East of the country and never really relinquished. But also of Scottish elegance - the poets of the age reading and re-writing Virgil and the classics long before their Southern brethren.

Joining Andrew are a great cast of poets, historians and experts who help guide us through this golden age of poetry.

Black Country poet Liz Berry opens the programme, reclaiming Shakespeare for the Midlands with Sonnet 18 - 'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?'.

We follow the path of Tudor aggression to Ireland, where professor Andy Orchard explores Seamus Heaney's reinterpretation of one of the great Irish anti-colonial poems: Brothers. And we observe the rise of power in the South East as Barry Rutter, founder of Northern Broadsides theatre company, describes his theatrical rebellion against it.

Diane Purkiss takes us to the heart of Tudor London: poets like Isabella Whitney chronicling the growth of the city, it's wealth and its dangers. We hear the torment of one the earliest-known female poets, Anne Askew, as she prepares to be burned at the stake.

A high-water mark in poetic brilliance is reached, as the sonnet arrives on these shores. Poet Don Paterson reads one of his own, and we hear Ben Jonson's extraordinary sonnet written for his dead son.

And do you know which Scottish poet outshone Shakespeare in his day? Professor Robert Crawford introduces us to George Buchanan.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b06f4xy3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:03 We British (b06gymyn)
The People's Shipping Forecast

The poet Murray Lachlan-Young presents his own poetic take on the Shipping Forecast.


THU 12:06 Home Front (b064g04b)
8 October 1915 - Sylvia Graham

Sylvia Graham finds her family at the centre of an unexpected theatrical incident

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


THU 12:18 You and Yours (b06fvgpy)
Mindfulness, High street revival, Fly-tipping

Mindfulness is a form of meditation based on paying attention to the present. A new report says it's so effective at treating depression that doctors and teachers should be given training in how to teach it. But some research raises questions - how can we be sure it is doing the good we think it is? We visit a school in Cumbria that includes mindfulness on the curriculum and talk to Florian Ruths Dr Miguel Farias who has reservations.

New figures suggest that our high streets are starting to revive - the story of the downturn has been empty shops, as shoppers go online and big retailers consolidate their shops. But there are fewer empty shops around now than at any time since 2010. What sorts of shops are filling those empty space and what does it say about the way we shop now? Samantha Fenwick is live in Bootle where they've turned their vacancy rates around.

And the tricky balancing act between financial freedom, and protecting vulnerable elderly people from crime. We'll speak to the son of a man who, despite being a consistent victim of fraud, was still lent money by his bank. Where should the line be drawn if a vulnerable person is borrowing money to hand it to fraudsters?


THU 12:57 Weather (b06f4xy5)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06fvgq0)
As NATO meets to discuss Russia's intervention in Syria, one of President Putin's allies tells us that Russia's bombing campaign has secured Moscow a position of influence in future political talks to resolve the crisis.
Lord Owen, who helped to broker the famous Dayton peace deal which brought an end to the war in Bosnia reflects on how a political solution might be agreed over the future of Syria, and what those involved would have to concede before negotiations could begin in earnest.

We take you on an extraordinary journey - our reporter Manveen Rana has followed one Syrian family on their trek from the Middle East right across Europe. We hear her first report.

And...Was David Cameron's speech to Conference a triumph of Blairite Centrism, or One Nation Conservatism? Tony Blair's former head of strategy, and David Cameron's former chief of staff discuss.


THU 13:45 Natural History Heroes (b06fnjlw)
Alfred Russel Wallace

Alfred Russel Wallace is best known as the co-publisher of the theory of evolution by Natural Selection along with Charles Darwin. Yet this most famous of his achievements should not eclipse his equally important contributions to science. The ‘father’ of the study of evolutionary biogeography - the Wallace line is the place where the biogeography of Asia becomes distinct from Australia.

Well known in his time as an explorer, collector, naturalist, geographer, anthropologist and political commentator Wallace was above all driven by a wonder and enchantment for the natural world that would be considered childlike if it weren’t for the hugely important contribution he made to further our understanding of the natural world.

Entomologist George Beccaloni explains why Alfred Russel Wallace is his Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b06fn26r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 We British (b06g1m64)
Things Fall Apart

The British are brilliant at writing poems. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story.

Episode three watches the world fall apart as Britain descends into war. Elizabeth I is dead. The Scottish King has inherited the English throne. After the Tudor age, came the greatest crisis in British history - civil war, religious fanaticism, King Vs Parliament, family vs family, faith vs faith in all corners of the land. As the poet John Donne bewailed "'Tis all in pieces, all coherence gone".

But this period of turbulence produced some of Britain's finest poetry; we hear great poems by Andrew Marvell, George Herbert, John Donne and John Milton, together with lesser known works by Anne Bradstreet and Margaret Cavendish.

With readings by Fiona Shaw, Alice Oswald, Barrie Rutter and Simon Russell Beale.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b06fnkdg)
Series 31

Nun Appleton House, North Yorkshire

Clare Balding goes in search of Nun Appleton House in North Yorkshire, the subject of one of Andrew Marvells most famous poems. She's accompanied by contemporary landscape poet,
John Wedgwood Clarke and Stewart Mottram a Lecturer in Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Hull University.
Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b06f4z39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 We British (b06g1m6b)
Restoration to Revolution

The British are a people of poetry. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using the best British poems to tell our story. Episode 4 brings us into the 18th century. An age in which we tried hard to be civilised whilst enjoying the fact that we were not. The Age of Reason? No - an uneasy peace, not sedate, or reasonable, or ordered, and least of all enlightened. With literary scholars, John Mullan and Judith Hawley, the cartoonist Martin Rowson and a song from the times sung by Lucie Skeaping. Reader: Siobhan Redmond.


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b06fvgq2)
Robert Zemeckis on The Walk, Joe Wright on Pan

With Francine Stock.

The director of The Walk and Back To The Future, Robert Zemeckis explains the rules of employing 3D in film, and why it shouldn't just be used for effect.

Foley artist Barnaby Smyth demonstrates how he followed in the footsteps of Emmeline Pankhurst and co for the sound effects to Suffragette, which required him to wear specially adapted high heels.

Joe Wright, the director of Pan explains why Nirvana's Smell Like Teen Spirit makes an unlikely appearance in his new adaptation of J.M. Barrie's classic children's tale.

Denis Villeneuve reveals the pressure of making the sequel to Blade Runner.


THU 16:30 We British (b06g1mcd)
Hopeful Romantics

The British are brilliant at writing poems. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story.

The British are supposedly poor at romance, but they make excellent Romantics. The Romantics dominate our sense of what a poet is. Infact they loom pretty large in our sense of what an individual is. An outpouring of poetic genius not seen before or since. Yet this might just be the period when poetry went completely off the rails.

With Richard Holmes and Lucy Newlyn. Poems by Wordsworth, Byron, Coleridge and Clare and a new one by Andrew Motion; plus the archteypal romantic artist - a singing nightingale. Reader: Siobhan Redmond.


THU 17:00 PM (b06fvgq6)
PM at 5pm - Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06f4xy7)
FIFA suspends President Blatter and potential successor, Platini. Syrian army says major ground offensive underway. VW America blames rogue engineers for emissions scandal.


THU 18:29 We British (b06gyppz)
The People's Shipping Forecast

The poet Murray Lachlan-Young reads a poetic reimagining of the Shipping Forecast, based on listeners' suggestions.


THU 18:31 The Brig Society (b06fnkdj)
Series 3

The Housing Crisis

In this nicely-furnished affordable programme with very attractive views, Marcus Brigstocke decides to solve the housing crisis. He'll also be building a basement under the studio and knocking down a party wall he shares with The Archers.

With him on the show are stay-at-home twenty-somethings Margaret Cabourn-Smith ("Miranda"), William Andrews ("Sorry I've Got No Head") and Tom Crowley, all of whom should really have fled the nest by now.

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt and Dan Tetsell

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b06fnkdl)
Jim's pleased to bump into Jazzer and they enjoy a pint and catch up at the Bull, where they both admit that they're tired of being out of their normal home - and miss each other's company. Jazzer also admits he can't make out his new boss. Neil stops in to put up an appeal for help with the village hall restoration. Kenton has also shared his plans for renovating the Bull.

Ruth thanks Rex for him and Toby playing touch rugby with Ben. Rex shares his thoughts about being a young lad and not being able to show your feelings - remembering when he lost his Gran. Ruth remembers her own childhood, before coming to Brookfield and joining a huge extended family. At times she just needed to talk to her own Mum.

Rob drives an edgy Helen to the clinic for her appointment at Borchester General, where her pregnancy becomes official. Afterwards, happy Rob vows to take the best care of her and looks forward to telling Pat and Tony.

Pat's delighted. But why didn't they tell her sooner?! She gives Rob a big hug. Helen says don't tell anyone, except for Tony and Tom. Rob shares some other news - he's going to complete a step-parental responsibility agreement for Henry - so they're on the way to having their own complete, perfect little family.


THU 19:15 We British (b06g1mn7)
Previously on We British

The British are brilliant at writing poems. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story. To start the evening Andrew presents a recap of the highlights of the day.


THU 19:35 We British (b06g1mn9)
The Victorians

The British are brilliant at writing poems. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story. By the middle of the evening Andrew has reached the Victorian Age accompanied by Sir Ian McKellen, Siobhan Redmond, Dinah Birch, Daljit Nagra, Michael Rosen & Matthew Sweet

The Victorians were a confident bunch but also terribly anxious. 'Play up, play up and play the game' pales against the tectonic anxiety of poems like Dover Beach. And we are still caught in Victorian dilemmas about capitalism, social justice, colonialism, marriage, science and faith.

We'll be guided through the 19th century by poems like Tennyson's In Memoriam, Edward Lear's The Owl and the Pussycat, and Modern Love - George Meredith's portrait of a failing marriage; and we'll hear Victorians at their most unbuttoned in Elizabeth Barratt-Browning's seduction poem, Lord Walter's Wife.


THU 20:15 We British (b06g1nfp)
20th-Century Jukebox

The British are brilliant at writing poems. On National Poetry Day, Andrew Marr is using them to tell our story. The 20th century arrives and so does the BBC archive. Simon Armitage, Juliet Gardiner, Kate Tempest, Kei Miller and Glyn Maxwell help Andrew to paint a fresh portrait of the 20th century in poems.


THU 21:15 We British (b06g1nfr)
The Afterparty

Contemporary poetry and music broadcast live from the Radio theatre to celebrate the final act of We British: A Epic in Poetry will include live poetry performed by some of our new and best loved British poets including Simon Armitage, Mike Garry, Hollie McNish and Roger McGough. Music is provided by singer/songwriter Ricky Ross and Pauline Black of the Selecter.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b06fvkbr)
US officials say a number of Russian cruise missiles fired at Syria have crashed in Iran.

Will Russia's intervention in Syria make any difference to Britain's policy?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06fnh5m)
Reading Europe - The Truth and Other Lies

Darling, can you guess how it ends?

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature with this bestselling German thriller set on a small cliff-top town, in which everyone has a secret.

Famous novelist, with a beautiful wife, grand house in the country and more money than he can spend - Henry Hayden has it all. Or so it seems. His perfect life rests on one carefully constructed lie, a lie he will stop at nothing to protect. But when he makes one fatal error, the whole dream begins to unravel.
Today: After the incident on the cliff, Henry has a most unexpected visitor.
Reader: Jamie Parker
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett
Writer: Sascha Arango is one of Germany's most renowned screenwriters. This, his first novel, has been a huge bestseller in Germany.
Translated by Imogen Taylor.


THU 23:00 BBC Inside Science (b06fvgq4)
Ethiopian genome, Coral nutrients, The hunt for gravitational waves, Seven Brief Lessons on Physics

As evidence grows about the vulnerability of our ocean corals to climate change, what's often overlooked are the more subtle changes in the ocean waters that contribute to coral resilience. Adam visits Southampton's Oceanography Centre where new research is showing how an imbalance of nutrients in reef waters is increasing the vulnerability of reef corals to high water temperatures which could help direct future coastal management.

The long awaited hunt for gravitational waves gets underway as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the United States begins its first observational run. The waves, generated by some of the most dramatic events in space such as the explosion of stars and the merging of two black holes, were first postulated by Einstein in 1916. So far they've never been detected but if LIGO is successful it'll not only provide proof of Einstein's Theory of Relativity but also provide the first direct evidence of the existence of black holes.

And Adam meets theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli whose new book Seven Brief Lessons on Physics examines in seven short essays how 20th century physics is shaping our world view. In Italy, it's outsold 50 Shades of Grey and the Pope's Encyclical and has now been translated into English. What's been the key to its success?


THU 23:30 The Digital Human (b04mc1hf)
Series 6

Abandon

What happens when we abandon a place? And why is it so difficult for us to leave these places behind?
In this episode, Aleks explores abandon both on and offline. We tell the story of the only permanent resident of Fukushima's radiation exclusion zone. Naoto Matsura stayed in Tomioka while everyone around him fled. He's now the unofficial caretaker of this abandoned town.

Aleks contrasts this with a remarkable example of digital abandon. Meridian 59 was the first massively multiplayer online game. When newer competitors arrived on the scene, many players left. The game has been abandoned and restarted several times over since. Aleks hears from the hardcore community of players who refuse to let the game disappear entirely.



FRIDAY 09 OCTOBER 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b06f4xz8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b06fnjlt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xzb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b06f4xzd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b06f4xzg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b06f4xzj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b06fpy7n)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Bishop John Arnold.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b06fpyzb)
Fake Russian cheese, Dairy costs, Land-based education

Russia's agricultural watchdog has found that a quarter of all dairy products on sale are not true dairy. The picture's worse for cheese, where more than three quarters of those examined were found to be fake, in that palm oil had been added rather than just using milk. We hear that the report's led to denials and recriminations from different government departments, but how bothered are consumers?

"Golden hellos" and subsidised housing are just a few of the tactics some local authorities in Scotland are having to use to recruit enough teachers to keep their schools fully staffed. Attracting new teachers has become such a problem that six councils in the north and north east of Scotland have held a summit this week to try and come up with some solutions.

The majority of dairy farmers don't know how much it costs them to produce milk. That's according to five leading dairy consultancy groups who say that around 60% of producers who don't know, must get to grips with exactly what goes into producing a litre of milk, and make sure that figure includes costs like family labour and saving for retirement. With the price of milk remaining stubbornly low, farmers are being urged to do everything they can do reduce production costs and adopt more long term financial planning, so they're more able to withstand an increasingly volatile global market. We ask farmers at the Dairy Show in Somerset whether they know their cost of production.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04kjgy6)
Pied Butcherbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the virtuoso songster the pied butcherbird of Australia. Australian parks, gardens resonate to the flute like calls of a medium sized black and white bird with stout blue-grey bills, and a black hood. They earned their name 'butcherbird' from their habit of storing prey by impaling it onto thorns or in a tree crevice before feeding on it with their hooked bill. They can sing for up to twenty minutes at a time, appearing to improvise as they perform a mellifluous, but unpredictable performance which they deliver as a solo or a duet with another butcherbird. Australian composer David Lumsdaine, described its call as..... "a virtuoso of composition and improvisation".


FRI 06:00 Today (b06fpy7q)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b06f4z3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b06fntm5)
Margaret Thatcher: Everything She Wants

Episode 5

In the aftermath of the Falklands victory, Margaret Thatcher's stock was rising. This period of almost five years, up to the 1987 election, could be described as her golden years. With a decisive majority and a pre-eminent place on the world stage she could truly begin to make her mark.

Charles Moore was authorised by Margaret Thatcher to write her biography on the condition that it was published after her death. She also encouraged her former staff and colleagues to readily offer their recollections, diaries and memoirs of their time working with and for her.

This abridgement for Radio 4 of his second volume offers a series of windows onto the key events of her second term - a term that was packed with challenges and drama.

Episode 5:
What was she really like?

Music :
The music used to frame this series reflects the title of the book. As the author writes, "I have called this book Everything She Wants - the title of a song of the time by Wham! - because it expresses Mrs Thatcher's appetite for achievement and change and the degree to which she was the commanding personality of the era; but, hard as she fought for everything she wanted, this was not always what she got."
Track: 'Everything She Wants' from the Wham! album Make it Big, 1984

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06fpy4m)
Nigella Lawson

A celebration of all things food with Nigella Lawson. She'll be talking about her journey from Domestic Goddess to Simply Nigella. Is it an evolution or a revolution ? She'll be Cooking the Perfect salmon, avocado, watercress and pumpkin seed salad.

And joined by food writers Diana Henry, Bee Wilson and Cara Nicoletti, tackling the thorny issue of food and feminism and talking about why we should ditch the guilt and just enjoy the many pleasures that cooking and eating has to offer.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06g6vn8)
30 Eggs

Episode 5

Weary of life in the bustling Rwandan border town of Rusumo, Modeste, a blind and sickly homeless man resolves to return to his home village of Kibuye on the far side of the country with the help of his companion, Innocent, a cheeky seven year-old street orphan. The journey starts well when they stumble upon a small amount of money but little Innocent inadvertently spends the cash purchasing a basket of thirty raw eggs during a mix up in a market melee. With their peculiar bounty of raw eggs the unlikely duo set off on an adventure of a life time along the rising road cresting atop the many rolling hills of Rwanda.
A beautiful, funny and inspirational story which catapults you into life in Rwanda and one remarkable journey.

Irish writer Eoin O'Connor has spent a number of years living in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Having recently returned to Ireland, Eoin is currently working on two further feature scripts, a comedy, Family Remains, currently in development with Grand Pictures, Dublin, and a thriller set in Syria entitled Stolen, currently in development with Epos Films, Dublin.

Writer ..... Eoin O'Connor
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


FRI 11:00 Two Men and a Mule (b06fntmd)
To the Last City of the Incas

Hugh Thomson and Benedict Allen, along with their trusty mule Washington, continue their exploration of Peru's Inca past as they journey from the high Andes, deep down into the steamy Amazon jungle, searching for Espíritu Pampa, the extraordinary Last City of the Incas.

Espiritu Pampa means 'the Pampa of Ghosts' and this romantic and evocative site has been a magnet for every explorer in this part of Peru since Hiram Bingham, with its enormous plaza so overgrown that it is impossible to see from side to side, its towering ceiba trees and jungle birds like the oropendula with their long, looping calls. This is where the Incas escaped when on the run from the Spanish conquistadors in the 16th Century, and where the very last Inca emperor, Tupac Amaru, was finally captured and brought back to be executed in the main square of Cuzco.

Produced by Ruth Evans
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Shush! (b06fntmg)
Series 1

New Romantics

A wandering poet, a bottle of Calpol and some Roman bathing techniques cause trouble for Snoo and Alice. And just what is Dr Cadogan's unexpected skill?

Meet Alice, a former child prodigy who won a place at Oxford aged 9 but, because Daddy went too, she never needed to have any friends. She's scared of everything - everything that is, except libraries and Snoo, a slightly confused individual, with a have-a-go attitude to life, marriage, haircuts and reality. Snoo loves books, and fully intends to read one one day.

And forever popping into the library is Dr. Cadogan, celebrity doctor to the stars and a man with his finger in every pie. Charming, indiscreet and quite possibly wanted by Interpol, if you want a discrete nip and tuck and then photos of it accidentally left on the photocopier, Dr Cadogan is your man.

Their happy life is interrupted by the arrival of Simon Nielson, a man with a mission, a mission to close down inefficient libraries. Fortunately, he hates his mission. What he really wants to do is once, just once, get even with his inexhaustible supply of high-achieving brothers.

Written by Morwenna Banks and Rebecca Front

Alice ...... Rebecca Front
Snoo ...... Morwenna Banks
Simon Neilson ...... Ben Willbond
Dr Cadogan ...... Michael Fenton Stevens

Based on an idea developed with Armando Iannucci

Producer: David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in October 2015.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b06f4xzl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b064g0nr)
9 October 1915 - Lilian Frost

Lilian Frost sees Roland in a new light as they share a day of photographic discoveries.


Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b06fpy4p)
Rural homes, Lease cars, Rugby World Cup

Are planners failing to act on planning guidance supposed to make it easier to build new homes in the countryside?

It's been a bumper year for car sales but not many consumers are buying them outright- they are leasing them; are these Personal Contract Purchases(PCP'S) any good?

Complaints that a furniture retailer is taking up to six months to deliver goods - why do some firms get their supply chains wrong and can the consumer tell if a store is as good as its word?

The Scottish tourist town making the most of dark nights.

The host has left the party but is England's exit from the Rugby World Cup really a disaster for the organisers and sponsors?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b06f4xzn)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b06fpy4t)
We hear how the NHS is in the worst financial position for a generation. As the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to four organisations in Tunisia, we find out what they've done to deserve it. Manveen Rana reports on the journey of a family of Syrian refugees across Europe. And a Professor of Disability tells us why new adverts for the Royal Institute for the Blind featuring Dame Shirley Bassey make him shudder. Presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Natural History Heroes (b06fnw13)
Antoni van Leeuwenhoek

The development of the microscope unlocked the tiny and enchanting world of microorganisms. Antony van Leeuwenhoek, a draper with an interest in the natural world spent 50 years making his own lenses and developing unique techniques to light and view his subjects. Leeuwenhoek’s descriptions of the movements and appearance of the organisms he observed, some of which he scraped from his teeth, are remarkably accurate given that the single lens he viewed them through was tiny itself – only 1mm in diameter.

He was the first person to see a red blood corpuscle, bacteria and sperm. His observations led to the conclusion that fertilisation occurred at the point that an individual sperm cell penetrates the egg. With lenses that were almost microscopic in size themselves Leeuwenhoek opened up a miniature world captivating and disturbing the public in equal measure.

Scientist Andrew Parker explains why the father of microbiology is his Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2015.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b06fnkdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b06fpbxf)
Cuttin' It

Charlene James' multi award-winning drama set in South London.

Winner of 'Best Single Drama' in the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2016, winner of the Alfred Fagon Award for 'Best Play' and the George Devine Award for 'Most Promising Playwright' in 2015.

Two Somali teenagers, Muna and Iqra, go to the same school. They are from the same place but they are strangers; strangers who share a secret embedded in their culture.

Producer/Director ..... Jessica Brown.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b06fpbxh)
Beaulieu Motor Museum

Peter Gibbs hosts the horticultural panel programme from the Beaulieu Motor Museum in The New Forest.

Bob Flowerdew, Matt Biggs, and Pippa Greenwood answer questions from the audience of local gardeners.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Enduring Land - Extracts from Sunset Song (b06fpbxk)
Episode 1

One of the most important Scottish novels of the 20th century, Sunset Song follows the childhood and coming of age of its heroine Chris Guthrie in rural Aberdeenshire. Set at the begnning of the last century, the novel is a beautifully wrought depiction of a rural community coming to terms with a rapidly changing modern world and the devastating impact of the Great War.

The extracts focus on Chris coming into her womanhood: the first shows her inheriting the farm in its entirety from her father, meeting and falling for Ewan Tavendale; the second, after he enlists, his return from military training, brutalised; and the third, the final pages from the book, in which Chris learns of his fate at the Front.

Terence Davies's eagerly anticipated film of Lewis Grassic Gibbon's classic get its UK premiere at the London Film Festival on 15th October and will go on general release at the beginning of December.

Reader: Hannah Donaldson

Writer: Lewis Grassic Gibbon

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b06fpyzd)
Lord Denis Healey, Carmen Balcells, Henning Mankell, Revd Kenneth Leech and Captain Bob Arnott

Lucy Ash on the former Labour politician Denis Healey who was Chancellor of the Exchequer during the Winter of Discontent in 70s; Catalan literary agent Carmen Ballcells known as Big Mamma to her Nobel Prize winning authors;Captain Bob Arnott, beloved by his passengers on the QE2; Swedish crime writer Henning Mankell and radical priest Reverend Kenneth Leech, who founded the homelessness charity Centrepoint.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b06fpbxm)
Does satire stand the test of time?

Influential comedy producer John Lloyd speaks to Roger Bolton about radio satire, as one of his earliest programmes comes under scrutiny from listeners.

When Radio 4 Extra rebroadcast a 1976 edition of the satirical programme News Huddlines, listeners were taken back to the days of Wilson, Callaghan and the rising star Margaret Thatcher. They were also exposed to an era with very different sensibilities about matters of race, gender and sexuality - and some listeners took offence. So should old comedy, with material many would consider racist and sexist by today's standard, ever be heard again? Roger discusses with John Lloyd and Radio 4 Extra's Head of Planning and Scheduling, Tony Pilgrim.

You might balk at the thought of hearing one man talk about themselves, uninterrupted, for an entire hour. But not when that man is John Lennon - according to many listeners. Last week's Archive on 4, John Lennon Verbatim, used the wealth of archive recordings to tell Lennon's story in his own voice, without a presenter or critics to interject. And many listeners loved it. Roger speaks to the programme's producer, Des Shaw, to find out why he thought Lennon was the best man to tell his story.

While John Lennon Verbatim was crammed with old material, we've also heard from listeners who think Archive on 4 isn't always living up to its name. Roger speaks to commissioning editor Mohit Bakaya to find out whether it's becoming just another documentary programme.

And Radio 4's Jim Naughtie recently suffered a bovine interruption as he recorded an episode of Radio 4's Bookclub at Charleston Farmhouse in Sussex. In a hard-hitting investigation by a listener we find out why the cows came home.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b06fpc93)
Harry and John - Chelsea Pensioners

Fi Glover introduces two residents of the Royal Hospital Chelsea, reflecting on their life there, and whether or not they will remain there after they've passed on... Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b06fpyzg)
News interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b06f4xzq)
NHS deficit almost a billion pounds

Health trusts in England have racked up a deficit of almost a billion pounds.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b06fpc99)
Series 88

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp. This week, the programme comes from the Lyceum Theatre in Crewe and Miles is joined by Susan Calman, Hugo Rifkind, Terry Christian and Holly Walsh.

Producer: Richard Morris

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b06fpc9f)
Ruth deals with a calving and she and David discuss the funeral next week. Ruth hasn't decided yet whether she's going to speak at the funeral? Ruth's keeping busy and won' relax until she's cleared Heather's bed. David later finds Ruth upset. She has been through Heather's suitcase and found the graduation gift for Pip. Ruth bursts into tears and David encourages her to let it all out. Ruth asks him to do one thing for her - get rid of this bloody bed!

The turkeys are plumping up nicely, but Eddie fears they won't sell many. They discuss Rob, who has 'wheedled' his way into the Archer fortune according to Joe. Eddie's bribe of a rabbit didn't work. At least Fallon and Emma's business is doing ok. Eddie rues the Fairbrothers stealing their trade, after years of building up their business. Eddie thinks they can add some value to the cost of their cider by saying it comes from a conservation site.

Ed's keeping a look out for poachers for Will and spots some with guns and dogs. Will arrives a few minutes after they've gone. Ed saw them carrying something away in a grey van - they follow, to no avail. Eddie thinks they were lamping for deer. Brian's following it up with the police. Will's convinced the poachers will be back.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b06fpz3r)
Abi Morgan, Rita Dove, British Art Show 8, Zygmunt Miloszewski

Bafta-winning screenwriter Abi Morgan - best known for The Hour, a 2011 cold war espionage drama set in a 1956 television newsroom - discusses her new TV crime drama River, starring Stellan Skarsgård (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) as John River, a brilliant police officer whose genius and fault-line is the fragility of his mind.

Every five years, the British Art Show tours the UK to showcase the work of artists who are making an important contribution to the British art scene. This year, British Art Show 8 opens at Leeds Art Gallery and features the works of forty-two artists. Art critic Richard Cork takes a look at this year's show.

Rita Dove, the first African American Poet Laureate of America, talks to Kirsty ahead of delivering the Annual Poetry Society Lecture, and explains how poetry can bring hidden histories to light, using the case of the mixed race violinist George Bridgetower, to whom Beethoven first dedicated what we now call The Kreutzer Sonata.

Polish author Zygmunt Miloszewski, who regards crime fiction as the best literary form of exploring his society. His thriller 'Entanglement', is now available in English, and has been dramatized for Radio 4's 'Reading Europe' Season.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Ella-mai Robey.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06g6vn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b06fpcgb)
David Aaronovitch, Diane Abbott MP, Charles Moore, Grant Shapps MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Therfield College in Leatherhead, Surrey, with a panel including The Times columnist David Aaronovitch, Shadow Secretary of State for International Development, Diane Abbott MP, Charles Moore the political journalist and authorised biographer for Margaret Thatcher and Internationanl Development Minister Grant Shapps MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b06fpcgd)
Will Self: Looks Matter

Will Self says we can't pretend that looks don't matter or that everyone is beautiful, including the obese.

"That different cultures, during different eras, have found different aspects of the human form beautiful is another straw the sub-gorgeous clutch for."

Producer:Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b064g17k)
5-9 October 1915

Omnibus edition of the epic drama series set in Great War Britain in which individual losses in Folkestone increasingly fuelled an interest in spiritualism.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b06f4xzt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b06fwxmq)
Pressure on Merkel over migrant policy

A report from Bavaria -- growing rebellion over German government policy


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b06fnkqq)
Reading Europe - The Truth and Other Lies

We've found your wife

Radio 4 continues its journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature with this hugely successful German thriller set on a small cliff-top town, in which everyone has a secret.

Famous novelist, with a beautiful wife, grand house in the country and more money than he can spend - Henry Hayden has it all. Or so it seems. His perfect life rests on one carefully constructed lie, a lie he will stop at nothing to protect. But when he makes one fatal error, the whole dream begins to unravel.
Today: as the search for his wife begins on the windswept local beach, Henry prepares to tell his mistress what really happened on the cliffs.
Reader: tbc
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett
Writer: Sascha Arango is one of Germany's most renowned screenwriters. This, his first novel, has been a huge bestseller in Germany.
Translated by Imogen Taylor.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b06flmfm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 The Digital Human (b04p7yg3)
Series 6

Ethics

If a driverless car has to choose between crashing you into a school bus or a wall who do you want to be programming that decision? Aleks Krotoski explores ethics in technology.

Join Aleks as she finds out if it's even possible for a device to 'behave' in a morally prescribed way through looking at attempts to make a smart phone 'kosher'. But nothing captures the conundrum quite like the ethical questions raised by driverless cars and it's the issues they raise that she explores with engineer turned philosopher Jason Millar and robot ethicist Kate Darling.

Professor of law and medicine Sheila MacLean offers a comparison with how codes of medical ethics were developed before we hear the story of Gus a 13 year old whose world was transformed by SIRI.

Producer Peter McManus.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b06fwx5y)
Andy and Josh – The Garden

Fi Glover introduces a visitor from Alabama and a much younger local from Bangor, whose honest conversation shows how quickly it's possible to develop a meaningful relationship. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b06fkd1s)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b06fkd1s)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b06g6rx6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b06g6rx6)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b06g6sjj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b06g6sjj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b06g6t40)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b06g6vn8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b06g6vn8)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b06flmfm)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b06flmfm)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b06d9t39)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b06fpcgd)

Alice's Wunderland 23:00 TUE (b06flmgr)

All Those Women 11:30 MON (b06fkd21)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b06d2g5g)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b06fkm3g)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b06f4xlp)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b06d9t37)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b06fpcgb)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b06f4xm2)

BBC Inside Science 23:00 THU (b06fvgq4)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b06f4ybm)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b06f4ybm)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b06fkm2k)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b06fkm47)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b06flmgm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b06fnh5m)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b06fnkqq)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b06fkd1l)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b06fkd1l)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b06flmck)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b06flmck)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b06fmnyv)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b06fmnyv)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b06fnjlt)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b06fnjlt)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b06fntm5)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b06f54rs)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b06f4xq2)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b06flmf1)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b06flmf1)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b06f4z3h)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b06f4z3h)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b06cvjv0)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b06d29bp)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b06f54rq)

Drama 14:15 MON (b06fkjm2)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b06flmdp)

Drama 14:15 WED (b067w6ts)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b06fpbxf)

Dreaming the City 23:15 WED (b02224wv)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b06f4vk2)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b06f54vx)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b06flmb9)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b06fmnyq)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b06fnjlh)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b06fpyzb)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b06h2d4x)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b06fpbxm)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b06d2lzr)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b06flmfz)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b06fngrq)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b06d2672)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b06fpwx5)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b06fkm34)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b06fwrcx)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b06fn26t)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b06fpz3r)

Funny Bones 19:45 SUN (b06f54s1)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b06d9rll)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b06fpbxh)

Hell Is Other People: A Self-Help Guide to Social Anxiety 11:00 MON (b06fkd1y)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b064g17k)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b064fz9s)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b064fz77)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b064fzt6)

Home Front 12:06 THU (b064g04b)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b064g0nr)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b06flmg1)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b06flmg7)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b06flmg7)

Jeremy Corbyn and Britain's Place in the World 22:15 SAT (b06fnmjk)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b06fkm2w)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b06d9rlq)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b06fpyzd)

Letters from Europe 22:45 MON (b0549x7d)

Liam Mullone's Disappointing World 19:15 SUN (b06f54rz)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b06f4xlw)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b06d266f)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b06f4xpf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b06f4xrl)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b06f4xt9)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b06f4xw9)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b06f4xxs)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b06f4xz8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b06fmnys)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b06fmnys)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b06f4vqf)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b06f4vqf)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b06fvlzn)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w9dx8)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w9dxn)

Natural History Heroes 13:45 MON (b06fkg22)

Natural History Heroes 13:45 TUE (b06flmd3)

Natural History Heroes 13:45 WED (b06fn26f)

Natural History Heroes 13:45 THU (b06fnjlw)

Natural History Heroes 13:45 FRI (b06fnw13)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b06d266p)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b06f4xpp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b06f4xrv)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b06f4xtl)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b06f4xwl)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b06f4xy1)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b06f4xzj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b06f4xpr)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b06d2676)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b06f4xq4)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b06f4xs0)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b06f4xts)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b06f4xwn)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b06f4xy3)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b06f4xzl)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b06d266s)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b06f4xpw)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b06f4xq0)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b06d2681)

News 13:00 SAT (b06d267l)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b06f4z35)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b06flmc6)

Opening Lines 00:30 SUN (b037525f)

PM 17:00 SAT (b06f4xlt)

PM 17:00 MON (b06fkm2r)

PM 17:00 TUE (b06fwr17)

PM 17:00 WED (b06fn26m)

PM 17:00 THU (b06fvgq6)

PM 17:00 FRI (b06fpyzg)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b06f4xqg)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b06d29bt)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b06f54rv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b06d9tgq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b06f54vv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b06fvm2g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b06fvlf2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b06fpvnf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b06fpy7n)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b06f4xly)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b06f4xly)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b06f4xly)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b06d2fys)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b06fkjm4)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b06f4z39)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b06f4z39)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b06f4z39)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b06d9blf)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b06fnkdg)

Reading Europe 00:30 SAT (b06f23n4)

Recycled Radio 11:00 WED (b06fmsy6)

Reluctant Persuaders 18:30 TUE (b06flmfv)

Sami Shah's Beginner's Guide to Pakistan 18:30 WED (b06fn26p)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b06f4vq9)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b06f4xm0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b06d266k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b06f4xpk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b06f4xrq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b06f4xtf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b06f4xwg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b06f4xxx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b06f4xzd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b06d266h)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b06d266m)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b06d267v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b06f4xph)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b06f4xpm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b06f4xq8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b06f4xrn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b06f4xrs)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b06f4xtc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b06f4xtj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b06f4xwc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b06f4xwj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b06f4xxv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b06f4xxz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b06f4xzb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b06f4xzg)

Shush! 11:30 FRI (b06fntmg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b06d267z)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b06f4xqd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b06f4xs4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b06f4xty)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b06f4xws)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b06f4xy7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b06f4xzq)

Something Old, Something New 11:30 TUE (b06flmcw)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b06f4z33)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b06f4z33)

Spain's Battle for the Bull 20:00 MON (b06g7rxl)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b06fk9ph)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b06fk9ph)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b06f4z3c)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b06f4z37)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b06f4z3f)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b06f54rx)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b06f54rx)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b06fkm32)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b06fkm32)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b06flmfx)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b06flmfx)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b06fn26r)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b06fn26r)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b06fnkdl)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b06fnkdl)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b06fpc9f)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b06djzl5)

The Bottom Line 20:00 WED (b06jt518)

The Brig Society 18:31 THU (b06fnkdj)

The Celebrity Voicemail Show 23:00 WED (b06fnh5p)

The Digital Human 23:30 MON (b01s4764)

The Digital Human 23:30 TUE (b042jcx6)

The Digital Human 23:30 WED (b01nt3y2)

The Digital Human 23:30 THU (b04mc1hf)

The Digital Human 23:27 FRI (b04p7yg3)

The Enduring Land - Extracts from Sunset Song 15:45 FRI (b06fpbxk)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b06d9lhq)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b06fvgq2)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b06f4z3k)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b06f4z3k)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b06fpk54)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b06f4vqc)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b06f4vqc)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b06flmbf)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b06flmbf)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b06f54rn)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b06fmsy4)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b06fpc93)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b06fwx5y)

The Manchester Ballads 16:00 MON (b06fkm2g)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b06fn26k)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b06d9t31)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b06fpc99)

The Sinha Carta 11:30 WED (b051s4qh)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b06d2g56)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b06f4z3m)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b06fkm3x)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b06fwrd5)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b06fvlzq)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b06fvkbr)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b06fwxmq)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b06d8jrj)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b06fn26h)

Today 07:00 SAT (b06f4vk4)

Today 06:00 MON (b06fk9pf)

Today 06:00 TUE (b06fwqjx)

Today 06:00 WED (b06fvlf5)

Today 06:00 THU (b06fpvnh)

Today 06:00 FRI (b06fpy7q)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04dvz9y)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04hkxh9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04hkxj9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04hkxn6)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03mg1dc)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04kjgy6)

Two Men and a Mule 11:00 FRI (b06fntmd)

We British 09:00 THU (b06g1m60)

We British 11:30 THU (b06g1m62)

We British 12:03 THU (b06gymyn)

We British 14:15 THU (b06g1m64)

We British 15:30 THU (b06g1m6b)

We British 16:30 THU (b06g1mcd)

We British 18:29 THU (b06gyppz)

We British 19:15 THU (b06g1mn7)

We British 19:35 THU (b06g1mn9)

We British 20:15 THU (b06g1nfp)

We British 21:15 THU (b06g1nfr)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b06d266w)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b06d266y)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b06d267g)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b06d267x)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b06f4xpt)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b06f4xpy)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b06f4xq6)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b06f4xqb)

Weather 05:56 MON (b06f4xrx)

Weather 12:57 MON (b06f4xs2)

Weather 21:58 MON (b06f4xs6)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b06f4xtv)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b06f4xv2)

Weather 12:57 WED (b06f4xwq)

Weather 12:57 THU (b06f4xy5)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b06f4xzn)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b06f4xzt)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b06f4xqj)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b06f54s5)

When Van Played Cyprus Avenue 15:30 SAT (b06d2g8z)

Will Cameron Change Britain? 13:30 SUN (b06f4z3p)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b06f4xlr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b06fkd1n)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b06flmct)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b06fmppr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b06fpwx3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b06fpy4m)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b06d2j1w)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b06flmfc)

World at One 13:00 MON (b06fkg1s)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b06fwr15)

World at One 13:00 WED (b06fvlv3)

World at One 13:00 THU (b06fvgq0)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b06fpy4t)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b06fkd26)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b06fwr13)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b06fn26c)

You and Yours 12:18 THU (b06fvgpy)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b06fpy4p)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b06d9tgs)