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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 JULY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b061pylk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b061ttfm)
Sixty Degrees North

Episode 5

Only 200 miles from his home in Shetland, and his starting point, Malachy Tallack reaches the west coast of Norway, the final destination on his journey along the sixtieth parallel.

The sixtieth parallel marks a borderland between 'near' and 'far north', Tallack travelled to some of the places that share this latitude, beginning in Shetland, where he has spent most of his life. Focusing on the landscapes and natural environments of the parallel, and the way that people have interacted with those landscapes, Tallack explores themes of wildness and community, of isolation and engagement, of exile and memory.

Reader: Sandy Grierson
Writer: Malachy Tallack
Abridger: Laurence Wareing
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b061pylm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b061pylp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b061pylr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b061pylt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b061ttlf)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b061ttmf)
'If I report too readily the risk is that they're not going to come to therapy.' To report or not to report? A listener's dilemma when counselling paedophiles. Presented by Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b061pylw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b061pyly)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b061tg81)
Ospreys in Cumbria

Caz Graham goes in search of Cumbria's regular visiting ospreys at a selection of locations in the Lake District.

Once extinct in England, Ospreys are now thriving in the UK. Breeding pairs are well established in Scotland and for several years they have become regular visitors to the Lake District.

Caz travels to Foulshaw Moss, a nature reserve on the side of the busy A590, just south of Kendal, where a nesting pair have made their home and are raising three chicks. Whilst there she encounters a host of rare butterflies, dragonflies and moths, along with a big fat toad sheltering from the summer sunshine under a corrugated iron canopy. She also finds several slow worms trying to keep cool and unnoticed by predators that maybe roaming.

A few miles from Foulsahw Moss is Esthwaite Water and here Caz meets with Natalie Cooper from the National Trust. Natalie recounts the relationship Beatrix Potter had with the area and in particular Estwaite Water itself as it is just a short distance from Hill Top Farm, where she once lived.

Then Caz takes to the water, cutting through Jeremy Fisher's lily-pads as she goes in search of the lake's own resident Ospreys, and visits the parts of the lake that the birds are known to hunt. But will she find them?

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b062dh6v)
Tolpuddle Martyrs

Farming Today This Week takes a look at the changing lives and conditions of agricultural workers through the centuries. Felicity Evans visits the Tolpuddle Martyrs Festival in Dorset, and learns about the early trade unions and the fate of the martyrs who were sentenced to seven years transportation after swearing a secret oath of membership. She also meets a retired farm worker who spent more than fifty years on the same farm, and two new recruits just starting out on their careers in agriculture. How have lives, working conditions, and attitudes to unions changed down the generations?

Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Emma Campbell.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b061pym1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b062dh6x)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b062dh6z)
Alfie Boe

The tenor Alfie Boe joins Richard Coles and Suzy Klein to talk about his latest project with Pete Townhend's Classic Quadrophenia, and going to Broadway to star as Jean Valjean in Les Miserables.
Azi Ahmed grew up in a devout Pakistani family in Manchester and set off for Central Saint Martins in London. Leading a double life she set up an internet company and then, with no military experience, entered Chelsea Barracks for selection training hoping to become part of the SAS.
Felicity Finch meets the World's Oldest Siblings. The Tweeds of Coventry are 12 siblings with a combined age of almost 1,020.

Sylvia Holder on why in her 77th year she swapped retirement on the Sussex coast for a school in one of India's poorest districts.
Miles Hunt of The Wonder Stuff talks about his obsession with keeping diaries and memorabilia.
And, as The Proms season starts, Katie Derham shares her Inheritance Tracks. Bachianas Brasileiras No.5 by Heitor Villa-Lobos and Fire and Rain by James Taylor.

Pete Townhend's Classic Quadrophenia is available now on the Deutsche Grammophon label.
Worlds Apart - A Muslim Girl with the SAS, by Azi Ahmed.
The Wonder Stuff Diaries '86-'89 by Miles Hunt is out now, and further instalments are being published.

Produced by Louise Corley.


SAT 10:30 Will Gompertz Gets Creative (b062dh71)
Spoken Word Poetry

Will Gompertz meets young poets from the Roundhouse Poetry Collective in London, and offers them expert advice on composing spoken word pieces from performance poets Hollie McNish and Polar Bear.

If you are inspired to get involved in poetry or spoken word - or indeed any other areas of artistic endeavour - there's lots to discover at the BBC's Get Creative website http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/sections/get-creative

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b062dh73)
Helen Lewis of the New Statesman looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Controversy over English Votes for English Laws, what difference will the new leader of the Liberal Democrats make, the end of the European dream, and how compatible is being an MP with family life.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b061pym3)
Shaping a New World Order

Insight into what's happening around the world. In this edition: the world's great powers strike a deal with Iran over its nuclear capability. Why the agreement can be seen as acknowledgement of Iran's status as a regional power, that in effect nothing can be settled in the modern Middle East without the Iranians. Child trafficking is commonplace in Togo, one of the poorest countries in the world. In a place where children are often regarded as a potential drain on income, trying to make money out of them's become a cultural norm. The Twitter-sphere has been having fun since the spectacular jailbreak of that drugs boss in Mexico, but the escape's dealt a serious blow to the already-tarnished reputation of the country's president. One of the BBC's longest-serving and most-respected reporters is hanging up his microphone. We are told about the lessons he's learned in fifty years on the road. And in Arizona we go on a hair-raising helicopter ride with a man who has millions of dollars to give away to deserving causes.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b061pym5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b062dh75)
Travel money saving tips from listeners, PPI redress, Would you tell colleagues what you earn?

On Money Box with Ruth Alexander:

The last in the series of Money Box travel tips - over to listeners! Ruth speaks to travellers at East Midlands Airport about how they save money on holiday. From currency exchange tips to car hire wheezes.

Compensation specialists are disputing the redress paid out to some victims of the payment protection insurance mis-selling scandal. Different banks are using different methods to calculate the compensation due - methods which can affect the amount you get by thousands of pounds. Michael Robinson reports for Money Box.

How to top up your New State Pension if you are retiring from April 2016. If you do not have the full record of 35 years of National Insurance contributions or credits, or have contracted out of Serps, you will not get the full New State Pension of at least £151.25. But there is a window of opportunity for people to pay extra NI contributions from this October to help boost their New State Pension. It could mean receiving thousands of pounds more in pension payments over the years, for a one off payment of just over £700. Former Pensions Minister, Steve Webb, explains who might benefit.

The government confirmed this week that large companies will have to publish the gap in average wages between male and female staff. The Prime Minister said it would "cast sunlight" on pay discrepancies - on average a woman in full-time work earns ninety pence for every pound earned by a man. But just why don't we talk about what we earn? Well, most of us don't - but they do at Cougar Automation, a small engineering services firm in Portsmouth, which employs about 100 people and is run by Derek Burton, who speaks to the programme.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b061tqvh)
Series 46

Episode 3

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis with Freya Parker and Mitch Benn present the week's news through stand-up and sketches. This week the cast are joined by Sarah Kendall, Andy Zaltzman and film critic Peter Bradshaw.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b061pym7)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b061pym9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b061tsym)
Peter Hitchens, Nicky Morgan MP, Frances O'Grady, Chuka Umunna MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from All Saints Parish Church in Leamington Spa with the Mail on Sunday columnist and author Peter Hitchens, the Education Secretary Nicky Morgan MP, the General Secretary of the TUC Frances O'Grady and the Shadow Business Secretary, Chuka Umunna MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b062dh8q)
Syria, Labour, Union Legislation

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? including embedded British forces in Syria, Jeremy Corbyn's Labour leadership campaign and proposed new Trade Union legislation.

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producers: Mairie Devine, Angie Nehring.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b03hmh3t)
Christopher Lee - Air-Force One

Martin Jarvis directs a stellar American cast, headed by Stacy Keach, Glenne Headly, Susan Sullivan, Steven Weber - and introduced by Josh Stamberg - in Christopher Lee's extraordinary play.

On November 22nd, 1963, President John F Kennedy was assassinated by a sniper while riding in an open-topped limousine in a motorcade in Dallas, Texas.

What happened immediately after the assassination?

Theories explored in Lee's riveting drama are based on Federal, classified and academic research, diaries and recollections, and statements by Mrs Kennedy - a mix of substantiated and contested documentation. He focuses, first, on the hospital mortuary, and then aboard Air Force One where former Vice President Lyndon B Johnson insists that Judge Sarah Hughes conducts the 'swearing-in' before take-off. Also present in the overcrowded aircraft is Kennedy's widow, Jackie, in a state of shock, still covered in blood. The play becomes a tense thriller as surprising events occur on board.

Other parts: Tracy Pattin, Darren Richardson
Sound design: Wesley Dewberry, Mark Holden
Producer: Rosalind Ayres
Director: Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 The Hang Drum Phenomenon (b061qsdr)
The extraordinary story of a bizarre new percussion instrument, The Hang. Looking like a cross between a wok and a flying saucer, virtuoso percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie explores the story of its global success.

Sometimes referred to as a Hang Drum, the Hang is not really a drum at all, but a tuned metal pan that produces a mellifluous, ethereal tone with echoes of the Trinidadian steel pan or Indian ghatam. Some argue that it is not even a musical instrument, but more a work of art, a sound sculpture.

The Hang (meaning Hand in the Bernese Swiss German dialect) was born in the Swiss city of Berne in the year 2000. Played with the hands and fingers, it has become a cult instrument across the globe and demand far outstrips supply. Prospective owners must go in person - by invitation only - to the PANArt workshop in Berne to get their Hang. Applications must be made by writing a letter, not an email. Second hand Hangs can fetch over $10,000 on eBay. Some Hang videos have over 11 million views from a vast online community of enthusiasts.

What makes the Hang so special? What's the appeal of making and playing new analogue instruments in this digital age of Pro Tools and plug-ins?

Evelyn looks for the roots of the Hang and meets up with steel pan master Sterling Betancourt MBE. She speaks to Hang virtuosos Manu Delago and Daniel Waples, as well as Kelly Hutchinson of Hang Out UK, a festival dedicated to the Hang and other handpans. She also talks to Kyle Cox and Jim Dusin of Pantheon Steel, makers of the Halo, a handpan inspired by the Hang.

After making around 7000 instruments, PANArt decided to stop production of the Hang in 2013.

Producer: Tom Woolfenden
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b062dh8s)
Joss Stone, Yazidi women, Karen Blackett

Joss Stone performs a song from her latest album.

An anti-extremism campaign has brought Yazidi Iraqi women to schools to talk about being captured by IS. Baroness Nicholson, founder of the Amar Foundation explains why she wants to help the women tell their story.

One of the new Dragons in BBC Two's Dragon's Den, Sarah Willingham on combining motherhood and business. The supermarket equal pay claims: why are female dominated shopfloor workers paid less than those in male dominated distribution centres?

American crime writer Sara Paretsky talks about her latest book featuring her female private eye V I Warshawski. A school in Stoke on Trent has banned skirts because they are 'distracting' to male teachers. We discuss.

Woman's Hour Power List influencer Karen Blackett OBE runs the largest media agency in the UK, Mediacom. She talks about the world of advertising and its impact on our everyday life.
Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed.


SAT 17:00 PM (b062dh8v)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b061tk9l)
Entrepreneurs and Education

Who needs qualifications for success? Three business leaders tell Evan Davis how they made it to the top after leaving school with just one A'Level between them all. Two of the guests explain how, having dyslexia and being labelled failures at school, made them even more determined to make a success of their lives. And they'll explore whether the skills to be an entrepreneur can be taught in the classroom.

Guests:
Jo Malone, CEO, Jo Loves
Gary Grant, CEO, The Entertainer
Mark Featherstone-Witty, CEO, Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts

Producer:
Jim Frank.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b061pymc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b061pymf)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b061pymh)
R4 1800 18 July 2015

The family of a retired solicitor stabbed to death after a minor road accident have paid tribute to a wonderful father, grandfather and great grandfather


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b062dh8x)
Clive Anderson, Sara Cox, Grace Savage, Tommy Steele, Simon Evans, Louise Brealey, Seun Kuti and Egypt 80

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by guests Tommy Steele, Louise Brealey, Simon Evans and Grace Savage. Music from Grace Savage as well as Seun Kuti and Egypt 80.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b062dhg6)
Series 18

Blood Sports

To complement Radio Four's News and Current Affairs output, this weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. This week, author Ryan Craig responds to the dropping of the vote on the fox-hunting bill in the Commons. Fergus is a newly elected MP. Hailing from a rural farming background, he knows the problems foxes pose, but feels that the present legislation should remain as is. Will mid-week developments change all that?

Produced and directed by Peter Kavanagh.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b062dhg8)
Volpone, The Wonders, Go Set a Watchman, Marc Quinn, Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners

The RSC's latest production is a contemporary setting of Ben Johnson's 17th century comedy play Volpone.
Italian film The Wonders, is a film which won the Jury Prize at this year's Cannes Festival. It's about a family of beekeepers struggling to survive.
Harper Lee is not a prolific author. Her first 'new' work in more than half a century is Go Set a Watchman. Can it possibly match the success of To Kill A Mockingbird (40 million sold)
Marc Quinn's exhibition The Toxic Sublime at White Cube Bermondsey includes hanging works and enormous outsize sculptures of seashells ,
The BBC TV programme Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners looks at how widespread ownership of slaves was before the 1833 act to abolish it.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b062dhgb)
How to Make an Archive on 4

Ever wondered how to make an Archive on 4? Here's your chance to find out!

Alan Dein enters the strange world of instructional records where you can teach yourself just about anything - from yodelling to training your budgie to talk.

It all started in 1901 when Polish émigré Jacques Roston harnessed the new technology of sound recording to teach foreign languages, signing up such luminaries as George Bernard Shaw and JRR Tolkien to lend their support.

By the 50s and 60s you could buy LPs on how to do just about anything - from keep fit to playing a musical instrument, relaxation and passing your driving test.

Perhaps the most surprising are those which help you to train your pet budgerigar to talk - with help from Sparkie, Britain's favourite budgie, who supposedly had a vocabulary of over 500 words.

With help from Sparkie, Alan Dein tells the story of instructional records and, along the way, reveals a few of the secrets of how to make an Archive on 4.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


SAT 21:00 The Stuarts (b061pqlf)
Charlotte Stuart: The Last Stuart

By Mike Walker

At the age of 31, Charlotte Stuart left behind three children and a protector to live with her estranged father Charles Edward Stuart, a hopeless alcoholic who had abused her mother, refused to acknowledge her and whom she had not seen since she was seven. What was it that Charlotte wanted that led her to sacrifice so much? Or had she fallen victim to the curse of the Stuarts, a curse that had plagued the dynasty since Mary Queen of Scots, and had now sought out its latest and final victim? With Kate O'Flynn, David Troughton and Tim McMullen.

Director - Sasha Yevtushenko.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b061pyml)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Inside the Ethics Committee (b061tfmp)
Series 11

Amputation

A dilemma arises for a surgeon when a young woman called Sarah is referred to his clinic.

Six years earlier, Sarah injured her knee in a skiing accident and the intervening years have been dominated by operations to repair her knee, each followed by months of gruelling rehabilitation.

But despite all this, Sarah's knee remains unstable and painful and it's taking its toll on her mental health.

Various surgeons have refused to amputate her leg and recommend that she either accept her existing level of disability or agree to further operations.

But Sarah is adamant - she wants her leg amputated. She doesn't want to live as she is and has lost faith in the medical profession's ability to give her a knee that will enable her to be active.

The surgeon is caught in a dilemma - he appreciates how she feels but should he amputate her leg?

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss the issues.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.

Photo credit: EITAN ABRAMOVICH/AFP/Getty Images


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b061qhsx)
Series 29

Heat 6, 2015

(6/13)
The latest heat of the eclectic music quiz comes from Salford, with Paul Gambaccini welcoming competitors from Leicestershire, Cheshire and West Yorkshire.

They'll have to demonstrate the breadth of their musical knowledge, with questions and extracts ranging from Brahms to Tippett, 60s and 70s pop and the music of war films.

As usual, Paul will also be springing a choice of musical special topics on the contestants, from which they have to pick one on which to answer their own individual questions.

The winner takes another of the places in the semi-finals next month.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry in the Remaking (b061pqlk)
Fiona Sampson and Glyn Maxwell

Six poets re-read Ted Hughes' ground-breaking book about how to write poetry which began life in the 1960s as a series of BBC schools radio broadcasts. The programmes and chapters had titles like Capturing Animals, Meet My Folks, Moon Creatures, and Wind and Weather. Each is full of Ted Hughes' interests and energies. Not one mentions rhyme or metre. With Michael Rosen, Simon Armitage, Glyn Maxwell, Fiona Sampson, Jacob Sam-La Rose and Zaffar Kunial and archive readings from the original broadcasts by Ted Hughes.

Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 19 JULY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b062hb8c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Made in Bristol (b01dj7sv)
Series 2

Reality Check

Tania Hershman's three short pieces of flash fiction commissioned for the More Than Words Festival in Bristol are linked by the theme of science. A professor confronts a childhood ghost during a storm at sea; a scientist is visited in the lab by a character from fiction; and a group of biochemists find themselves the life and soul of a party.

Tania Hershman writes short stories, poetry and flash fiction, is writer in residence at the Science Faculty at Bristol University and has a second short story collection, My Mother Was An Upright Piano: Fictions coming out shortly.

Producer: Sara Davies.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b062hb8f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b062hb8k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b062hb8p)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b062hb8r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b062hdp6)
Church of St Thomas the Apostle, Lymington, Hampshire

Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of St Thomas the Apostle, Lymington, Hampshire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b061t68t)
Questioning Success

Jennifer Kavanagh questions the value of success, arguing that it is the moral content of what we do, rather than doing it well or badly, on which we should judge ourselves.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b062hb8t)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b062hn6j)
Breath, You Invisible Poem

John McCarthy considers the cultural and metaphorical significance of breathing.

For most of us breathing is so continuous, so easy, that it's something we take for granted. But without breath nothing is possible. Breath energizes movement and enables bodily activities. It punctuates speech, and is central to singing and the playing of many musical instruments. And in particular situations, giving birth or meditating, it becomes the focus of our attention and is bound by specific techniques.

John McCarthy explores a range of different breathing experiences. From God's breath of life, blown into Adam's nostrils at the dawning of the World, to the Navajo Indian idea about a Little Wind hidden in our ears, he looks at how the breath has traditionally been understood as something that connects spirit and body. We talk about a first and last breath as marking the beginning and end of life, it's also affected by mood and emotion.

The programme features readings taken from the Sonnets to Orpheus, Book II by Rainer Maria Rilke, Phenomenology of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty's and Breathing by Josephine Dickinson. Music comes from Maria Callas, Nick Cave and the New Zealand All Blacks.

The readers are Helen Bourne and Brian Fenton.

Producer: Emily Williams
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b062hn6l)
The Snakebirds of May

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

Sitting as it does on the junction between the Firth of Forth and the North Sea, the Isle of May acts as a magnet for seabirds. During the breeding season it is home to thousands of birds, along with a small group of seabird ecologists.

In 1993 Lionel Kelleway visited the island for Living World to look at one species in particular, the shag. Here he was joined by Mike Harris and Sarah Wanlass from the Centre of Ecology and Hydrology. After arriving on the island, Sarah and Mike unfurl the up's and down's of seabird ecology.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b062hb8w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b062hb8y)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b062hn6n)
Sunflowers,Punk vicar, 21st-century cloisters

In remembrance of the Maylasian Airline flight MH17 sunflowers are growing as a living memorial to those who died. William talks to Paul McGeough, who had the idea to use sunflowers. We also speak to Thomas Schansman whose 18 year old son Quinn was killed.

A major £7 million building project has been going on to provide Blackburn Cathedral in Lancashire with its own 21st century cloisters. Kevin Bocquet reports.

William talks to Neville Kyrke-Smith, National Director of the Aid to the Church in Need UK who recently visited Northern Iraq and Syria about the plight of Christians and the rise of kidnapped priests.

In the week when Tim Farron an openly committed Christian is appointed Leader of the Liberal Democrats William asks should God be kept out of Politics? Quentin Letts & Poly Toynbee discuss.

Mark Vernon writer and Philosopher explores how ancient Greek philosophers and playwrights might have commented on the European Greek crisis today?

Trevor Barnes has been looking at the impact of work life balance of clergy and what causes them stress?

Punk rock vicar Phil Chew tells William why he takes to the stage with a mohican and a dog collar as he sings with the band 'Revisit'.

Reform Judaism in the UK has made the dramatic decision to change the traditional definition of a Jew which has been universal for the last 2,000 years. What does this mean and what impact will this have? Rabbi Jonathan Romain & Dr Yaakov Wise debate

Producers
Tara Holmes
Carmel Lonergan

Editor Amanda Hancox

Contributors
Thomas Schansman
Paul McGeough
Neville Kyrke-Smith
Quentin Letts
Poly Toynbee
Reverand Phil Chew
Rabbi Jonathan Romain
Dr Yaakov Wise.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b062hn6q)
Rainforest Foundation UK

Charlie Hamilton James presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Rainforest Foundation UK
Registered Charity No 1138287
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Rainforest Foundation'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Rainforest Foundation'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b062hb90)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b062hb92)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b062hn6s)
Buxton Festival

Radio 4 makes its annual visit to Buxton on the edge of Derbyshire's Peak District for a Festival Eucharist from St John's Church, sung to Schubert's Mass in C by the Buxton Madrigal Singers with soloists from the Festival Opera Company directed by Michael Williams. The celebrant is Canon Stephen Shipley and the preacher is the Revd John Hudghton, Rector of Buxton. Producer: Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b061tsyp)
Adam Gopnik: In Praise of Privacy

Although he loves to read collections of private letters by public figures, Adam Gopnik feels disturbed and offended by the lip-smacking ease with which people thumb through Hillary Clinton's or Amy Pascal's once private e-mails and asks what are the proper limits of privacy in the Internet age. Are we putting at risk part of the future historical record?
"The practice of showing what life is really like later depends on keeping some parts of life clandestine while they're happening".
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwvx5)
Barnacle Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Barnacle Goose. Yapping like terriers, skeins of barnacle geese leave their roosts on mud-flats and fly inland at dawn to feed in grassy fields.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b062hpld)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b062hplg)
Please see daily episodes for a detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b062hplj)
Noel Gallagher

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the musician, Noel Gallagher.

He was the principal songwriter of the band Oasis - his younger brother, Liam was the lead singer. Born to Irish parents, as a child he spent his summers visiting his mother's family in rural County Mayo, in sharp contrast to the Manchester council estate where they lived. He taught himself to play the guitar and loved music: he was road manager for the Inspiral Carpets before joining Liam in Oasis.

Their debut album in 1994 marked the beginning of the band's rise to fame as part of the Britpop movement. In 1996 they played in front of 250,000 fans over two consecutive nights at Knebworth and following the Labour landslide in 1997, Noel attended what became known as the Cool Britannia party held in Downing Street by Tony Blair. Oasis won six BRIT Awards and two Ivor Novello Awards before disbanding in August 2009.

He's since formed his own band - Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b062hb94)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b061qht5)
Series 63

Episode 1

The 63rd series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the White Rock Theatre in Hastings where regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Miles Jupp, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Radio Comedy production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b062htl5)
Fast Food Workers

With a new "living wage" announced Sheila Dillon explores the world of fast food workers. In the U.S. a campaign over low pay, started in 2012, has now gone global. Saying they could no longer live on the Federal minimum wage of $7.25 the workers called for a salary based on $15.00 an hour.

The protests spread to more than 200 cities and inspired workers in other parts of the world to stand up for better pay. The campaign received the backing of President Barack Obama and cities including Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles have now increased the minimum wage.

Sheila hears from one fast food work in New York's Bronx, Flavia Cabrell. She holds down two jobs including one at a McDonalds' restaurant and low pay led her to take action and join the protests. She explains why she's motivated by wanting to change the future for her children.

Meanwhile low pay was one of the main targets in Chancellor George Osborne's summer budget. Changes to tax credits and the introduction of a "national living wage" was the outcome. But some workers say the changes will still mean they live a precarious financial existence with zero hours contracts still a dominant model in the food industry and the living wage only applicable to over 25's.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b062hb9l)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b062htl7)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 In Search of the Black Mozart (b05wdsnl)
Episode 1

Chi-chi Nwanoku has spent her career travelling and performing in concert halls the world over as the principal double bassist of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. More recently, she's been on a personal journey seeking out the lives and careers of black classical musicians from the eighteenth century who like her, played and composed music at the highest levels. In some cases, slivers of their lives are on record but you have to be quite determined to find out.

Chi-chi puts the record straight and with the help of some of the finest musical researchers around, she brings to the fore the music and lives of musicians like violinist/composer Joseph Emidy, virtuoso violinist George Bridgetower and composer Joseph Bologne, aka Chevalier de St-George who not only met Mozart in his lifetime, but who was known by all those who heard his music as the 'Black Mozart'.

In today's programme she visits the British Library to find our more about Ignatius Sancho - someone who was born into slavery and ended up being the first person of colour in Britain to have the vote. Also of interest to Chi-chi are his musical compositions which are held at the British Library. Together with music curator, Nicolas Bell and Sancho expert Professor Brychhan Carey the three of them assess Sancho's musical ability and life.

In a more sinister turn of events, Chi-chi talks to Handel scholar, Dr. David Hunter who shares his research which reveals that Handel, whilst composing some of the most beautiful music around was an investor in slavery.

She also hears about the violinist and composer Joseph Emidy who became a musical star of Cornwall's music scene and meets up with one of his musical ancestors.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b061tqv7)
Bedford

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Bedford. Bunny Guinness, Anne Swithinbank, Matthew Wilson answer audience questions.

Matt Biggs reveals his favourite garden of all time and the panel share some topical tips.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b062htl9)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with conversations acknowledging the impact of self-harm, MS and arthritis while finding ways to deal with them, from Cumbria, Glasgow and London. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b062htlc)
Tender Is the Night: A Romance

Episode 1

Between the First World War and the Wall Street Crash the French Riviera was the stylish place for wealthy Americans to visit.

Among the most fashionable are psychoanalyst Dick Diver and his wife Nicole, who hold court at their villa. Into their circle comes Rosemary Hoyt, a young film star, who is instantly attracted to them, but understands little of the dark secrets that hold them together.

A beautiful and poignant novel about marriage, glamour and disintegration.

Regarded by many as F Scott Fitzgerald’s greatest book - dramatised by Robin Brooks.

Dick Diver ..... Simon Harrison
Nicole Diver ..... Melody Grove
Rosemary ..... Kelly Burke
Tommy ..... Finn den Hertog
Abe North ..... Mark McDonnel
McKisco ...... Laurie Brown
Violet/Baby ..... Anita Vettesse
Mother ..... Anne Lacey
Franz/Warren ...... Nick Underwood
Collis/Buddy ..... Alasdair Hankinson
Narrator ..... Sam Dale

Director: Gaynor Macfarlane

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b062hx63)
Judy Blume

Mariella is joined by the American writer Judy Blume who is best known for her groundbreaking teen fiction including Forever and Are You There God? It's Me Margaret. She discusses her new adult novel In The Unlikely Event. It's set against the extraordinary events of 1952 when three planes crashed in Elizabeth, New Jersey over the space of 58 days.

We discuss two books which explore opposite ends of German society just before Hitler came to power. Blood Brothers by Ernst Haffner is set amongst a band of teenage boys in the underbelly of Berlin. While Reunion by Fred Uhlman is a beautifully rendered tale of a friendship which is destined not to survive. Mariella talks to Blood Brothers' translator Michael Hofmann and Rachel Seiffert, who has written the afterword to Reunion.

And the joys of writing a novel with a friend. Gavin Kovite, a former soldier turned army lawyer and writer, and Christopher Robinson, a poet and writer, reveal how they joined forces to create War of the Encyclopaedists, a novel about a friendship conducted partly online.


SUN 16:30 Poetry in the Remaking (b062j06m)
Michael Rosen and Simon Armitage

Six poets re-read Ted Hughes' ground-breaking book about how to write poetry which began life in the 1960s as a series of BBC schools radio broadcasts. The programmes and chapters had titles like Capturing Animals, Meet My Folks, Moon Creatures, and Wind and Weather. Each is full of Ted Hughes' interests and energies. Not one mentions rhyme or metre. With Michael Rosen, Simon Armitage, Glyn Maxwell, Fiona Sampson, Jacob Sam-La Rose and Zaffar Kunial and archive readings from the original broadcasts by Ted Hughes.

Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b061qzx6)
Police Complaints: A Fair Cop?

Complaints against the police are running at a record high. The vast majority, nine out of ten, are rejected from the start. But when complainants appeal to the Independent Police Complaints Commission, one in 2 cases is overturned. Others - disgruntled with the way they've been treated by the police - sue the force. File on 4 hears from people who've been battling for years to pursue a complaint and who claim the process is unfairly weighted in favour of the police.
In the Queen's Speech the Government confirmed its plans to overhaul the complaints system in order to restore public confidence. As part of the reform, Police and Crime Commissioners could be able to decide if they want to handle allegations against their local forces. The Commissioners themselves are divided on whether they want this additional role and critics say they would not have the resources to do it effectively.
So just what recourse do you have when you feel you've been dealt with unfairly by the police? And will the Home Office proposals make any difference? Claire Savage investigates.
Presenter: Claire Savage Producer: David Lewis.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b062dhg6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b062hb9t)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b062hb9w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b062hb9y)
19/07/15 Cameron accused of making up Syria policy "on the hoof"

David Cameron has been accused of making up policy "on the hoof" after saying Britain should help America destroy the Islamic State group in Syria.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b062j2xt)
Julian Worricker

Unusual sounds abound this week....from a newly discovered musical instrument to two prominent beatboxers who need no instrument at all. More than thirty years may have elapsed since Dr David Owen left Labour to join the SDP, but you can hear how much the decision still affects him. Plus Annie Nightingale's fifty years in broadcasting.

Join Julian Worricker, for his Pick of the Week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b062j2xw)
It's the village fete - for one year only at Lower Loxley. The theme is 'Ambridge through the ages' and Lynda's dressed up as a Borsetshire milk maid. Today's events include Morris dancing and welly wanging. Kirsty and Dan are both in town for it. Dan impresses on the coconut shy - his army training clearly coming into its own. Shula laments the absence of Alistair, who's busy covering a practice in Darrington.

Adam worries that a retired Brian will be a nightmare critic of everything he does. Debbie and Charlie get chatting and find some common ground discussing drones and technology. Meanwhile, Brian enjoys the chance to let out his frustration with some crockery smashing.

There's an awkward moment between confident Kirsty and sheepish Tom, as they make polite small talk. She even recalls their own doomed wedding, as Tom talks of Helen's plan to get married. Kirsty mentions the chap she's with - Gareth. He has heard much about Tom.

Shula and Elizabeth are still worried about David and Kenton. Proud Kenton should have sold his hampers at the fete - he'd have made a fortune.

Brian reflects on his forty years on the farm - he remembers the day he bought it. It he gives it up, what on earth is he for, Brian wonders?


SUN 19:15 The Kindness of Strangers (b062j2xy)
Inspired by a random act of kindness, author and poet John Osborne wrestles with the idea of donating one of his kidneys to a virtual stranger in this autobiographical tale.


SUN 19:45 A Pocketful of Rye (b062j2y0)
A Rye Boy

An evocative tale of how a farmer struggles to deal with his wife when a sculptor comes to town. She becomes distressed and things get out of hand.

One of a series of three stories set in and around Rye in East Sussex.

Written by Marian Garvey and read by Niall Buggy.

Producer: Celia de Wolff

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2015.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b061txyz)
The debate over the future of the BBC continues, with the size, structure, funding and remit of the Corporation now up for discussion. As the Department of Culture, Media and Sport open their twelve week public consultation on the future of the Beeb, Feedback listeners speak to Roger Bolton about their views.

Also, Feedback listeners celebrate some good news - the arrival of radio downloads. From this week, almost all radio content will be available for download onto smart phones and tablets via the newly updated BBC iPlayer radio app. Roger speaks to Mark Friend, the Controller of Multiplatform for Radio and Music, to find out about the changes and why downloads for radio have taken so much longer to introduce than the equivalent service for television programmes.

Last year, Tony Hall said he wanted to "break down the walls" between the corporation and the country's artists and artistic institutions. A new Radio 4 series, Will Gompertz Gets Creative, is attempting to go further by exploring the everyday artistic activity of normal people and encouraging all of us to 'get creative'. The first episode visited a life drawing class in Brighton in a bid to inspire people to engage with the arts. Did it work? Will Gompertz calls Feedback listeners to find out whether the programme has given them the artistic bug.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b061txyx)
Rev Joyce Bennett, Prince Saud al-Faisal, Burt Shavitz, Michael Oliver, Ian Allan

Matthew Bannister on

Joyce Bennett who was the first English woman to be ordained as an Anglican priest. It happened in Hong Kong in 1971.

Prince Saud al-Faisal, who was the world's longest serving foreign minister, representing the interests of Saudi Arabia for forty years.

Burt Shavitz, the American beekeeper who developed a popular range of beeswax products.

Professor Michael Oliver, the physician who demonstrated the link between cholesterol and heart disease.

And the publisher Ian Allan, whose books of locomotive numbers led to the hobby of trainspotting.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b062dh75)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b062hn6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b061qhtf)
Populism

Who are "the people" - and who's keeping power from them? Eliane Glaser explores how across Europe and beyond, populist movements are claiming they can to put back politicians in touch with voters and reinvigorate democracy from the grassroots. From UKIP's millions of voters to the passionately engaged Scottish referendum, from the rise of nationalist parties in northern Europe to burgeoning left-wing movements like Syriza and Podemos further south, traditional politicians are feeling the public's wrath. But how much of the crowd-pleasing rhetoric can be taken at face value - and do politicians really now think of themselves as ordinary people?

Contributors:
Professor PAUL TAGGART, University of Sussex
Professor VERNON BOGDANOR, King's College London
DOUGLAS CARSWELL, UKIP MP for Clacton
SIRIO CANOS, Podemos
PETER OBORNE, journalist and author
Professor CAS MUDDE, University of Georgia

Producer: Polly Hope.

(Photo credit: AFP/Getty Images. Picture shows a woman holding a placard at a demonstration on 5th July 2015)


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b062j3md)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b062j3mg)
Andrew Gimson analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b061tk96)
Michael Douglas, X + Y, The secrets of a storyboard artist

With Francine Stock

Michael Douglas discusses his first super-hero movie, Ant-Man, and explains why he's become the go-to guy for lengthy monologues

Director Morgan Matthews explains why he turned his documentary about a maths Olympiad, Beautiful Young Minds, into a feature film, X + Y.

Martin Asbury lets light in on the magic of the storyboard artist.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b062hn6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 20 JULY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b062hbc7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b061t68c)
Middle-class drug dealers, Globalisation of white collar work

Middle class drug dealers: Laurie Taylor discusses a study into suburban drug selling amongst well heeled teens in a wealthy suburb of Atlanta, USA. The author, Richard Wright, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University, reveals a world which provides a striking counterpoint to the devastation of the drug war in poor, minority communities. Instead, he found that middle class 'dealing' rarely disrupted conventional career paths or involved legal risks and violence. A British perspective is provided by
Richard Hobbs, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Essex.

Also, white collar jobs which move to the Global South. Shehzad Nadeem, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the City University of New York, charts the impact on emerging economies of the globalisation of IT and service sector work. Is it producing upward mobility in countries like India?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b062hdp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b062hbc9)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b062hbcc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b062hbcf)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b062hbch)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0630nxr)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b062j848)
Aquaculture around British Isles, Prawn wars, Rural foodbanks

Felicity Evans hears about the 'coastal harvest' of crustaceans and shellfish from the waters around the British Isles. Donal Maguire, Aquaculture Development Manager for BIM, Ireland's Sea Fisheries Board, explains why from his point of view farmed seafood is the way forward.

Meanwhile, we hear about the conflict at sea between creelers, trawlermen and scallop dredgers off the west coast of Scotland.

Also, the role of rural foodbanks, explored in a report from Pembrokeshire. Professor Pat Caplan of Goldsmiths, University of London is comparing how people relate to urban and rural foodbanks.

Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b062hbck)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thvvc)
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the lesser spotted woodpecker. Lesser spotted woodpeckers are the smallest of our three woodpeckers and about the size of a house sparrow. They have horizontal white stripes across their backs, hence their old name of 'barred woodpecker'. The lesser spotted woodpecker is one of our most elusive birds. For most of the year it's relatively silent but in late February and March, males begin to stake out their territories in old woods and orchards by calling loudly and drumming softly.


MON 06:00 Today (b062jsmq)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b062jsmv)
Series 3

Nigel Lawson

In this series, Peter Hennessy, the historian of modern Britain, asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. Each week, Peter invites his guest to explore the impact of formative influences, experiences and people in his or her life.

In this programme, Nigel Lawson, a self-proclaimed Tory radical and a key ally of Margaret Thatcher in challenging and reforming the post-war economic consensus, discusses his transition from an enjoyable existence at Oxford to journalism and eventually to front-line politics.

Lawson joined the Financial Times in 1956 and five years later became City Editor of the new 'Sunday Telegraph'. His appetite for politics was whetted in 1963, when he was recruited to work in Number 10. After the Conservatives lost power, he returned to journalism and in 1966 became editor of 'The Spectator'. He narrowly failed to win election to parliament in 1970 and finally entered the Commons in 1974.

Lawson found that his radical economic ideas chimed with those of Margaret Thatcher, who won the Conservative leadership in 1975. He became a key architect of Tory economic policy and after the 1979 election was appointed to the Treasury. But it was as Chancellor in the 1980s that Lawson made his greatest impact by extending and entrenching Thatcher's reforms with dramatic cuts in income tax rates, an ambitious programme of privatisation and extensive de-regulation. However, he opposed the poll tax and then in 1989 resigned over the role of Thatcher's special adviser, Alan Walters.

Lawson now sits in the House of Lords. His radicalism on the economy and Europe extends to what he sees as a misguided consensus on global warming policy, of which he is a trenchant critic.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b062jsmz)
On the Move

Leaving and Biking

In the first episode of his vivid and honest memoir Oliver Sacks recounts his passion for motorbikes and his bond with his schizophrenic brother.

In On the Move, Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and best-selling author, who is probably best known for his book, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, recounts his fascinating life story. Here he delves into his early fascination with speed, his experiences as a young neurologist and his work with his patients. He tells how his work with a group of the chronically ill, who lay forgotten in the back wards of a New York hospital shaped his work as a clinician, and led him to write about them movingly in one of his earliest books, Awakenings. He also tells us about his personal highs and lows, his guilt at leaving England for America, his ill health and finally finding love.

Read by Oliver Ford Davies
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b062jsn3)
Family Life

Research done by the Office of National Statistics and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development shows the UK is one of the happiest countries in the world in terms of family. More than 90 per cent of Britons said they were either very or fairly satisfied with the quality of their family life.

This morning the programme asks to hear about your experiences of family life in the Britain today.

If you are sharing the children after divorce or juggling as a working parent - or even living with a group of friends you consider family - why not get in touch. Perhaps you're a single sex couple with kids or a single mum or dad raising children with the support of an extended family. Tell us what family means to you.

Email us now via the website or call Jane Garvey after 9am on Monday morning on 03700 100 444.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Jane Thurlow.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b062jsn5)
Rachel's Cousins

Episode 1

A Glasgow lawyer arrives at a police station to represent three drunken women – only to find they are her relatives.

When they discover they share the BRCA2 cancer gene, they become unexpectedly caught up in each other's lives. By Ann Marie Di Mambro.

Rachel..............................................................TAMARA KENNEDY
Marilyn.............................................................GABRIEL QUIGLEY
Josie.....................................................................KAREN BARTKE
Shirley.................. ............................................ SARAH McCARDIE
Bobby....................................... ............................ALAN McHUGH
Alex ........................................ ...............................ROBIN LAING
Kevin .................................................................STEVIE HANNAN
Becca...............................................................NICOLA JO CULLY
Carol...................................................................VERONICA LEER

Other parts are played by the cast.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


MON 11:00 Mind Changers (b062jsn7)
Carol Dweck and Growth Mindset

Claudia Hammond presents the history of psychology series which examines the work of the people who have changed our understanding of the human mind. This week she interviews Carol Dweck, who identified that individuals tend towards a fixed or a growth mindset regarding what they can learn and achieve. She also showed that a fixed mindset can be changed, and that once people adopt a growth mindset, they can achieve more.

Claudia visits a UK primary school where growth mindset is part of the curriculum, and sees how children who don't like maths soon change their attitude at a summer camp in California, once they're shown that getting the wrong answer actually makes their brains grow more than getting the right answer.

She hears more about Dweck and her work from colleagues Greg Walton and Jo Boaler at Stanford University, and executive head Dame Alison Peacock at the Wroxham Primary School.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


MON 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b062jsn9)
Series 2

Strictly Christmas

It may be nearing Christmas, but it's not all tidings of joy in Edinburgh's Cafe Culture.

Sibling cafe owners Trisha and Clare are being haunted by their ex-partners. Richard gets in touch with Trisha with some surprising news and Clare's almost ex-husband Struan is disconcertingly hovering around the city sticking his beak in.

Meanwhile, multi-talented new chef Callum continues to turn everybody's head with some unexpectedly fancy footwork.

An invitation to a ball sees the sisters and would-be chef Lizzie resembling characters from a well known fairy story but will anyone actually end up kissing their very own prince?

Series two of Hilary Lyon's caffeine-fuelled sitcom

Trisha ...... Hilary Maclean
Clare ...... Hilary Lyon
Lizzie ...... Pearl Appleby
Callum ...... Derek Riddell
Richard ...... Roger May
Struan ...... Stuart McQuarrie

Director: Marilyn Imrie

Producers: Gordon Kennedy and Moray Hunter

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b062hbcm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 A History of Ideas (b062jsnc)
How Should We Live Together?

A history of ideas. Presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Each week Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking 'How should we live together?'.

Helping him answer it are economist Kate Barker, historian Justin Champion and the philosophers Timothy Secret and Angie Hobbs.

For the rest of the week Kate, Justin, Timothy and Angie will take us further into the history of ideas around this question with programmes of their own. Between them they will examine: Adam Smith's idea of the free market; John Locke's prescription for cohesion in a diverse society - Toleration; ideas of ancestor worship as practiced by followers of Confucius; and Plato's idea of the Philosopher Kings - government by the wise.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b062jsnh)
Firefighters' pensions, Click and collect, Illegal pets, International brands

Consumer affairs programme, including a look at the evolution and impact of YouTube after ten years of online video. With Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b062hbcp)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b062jsnk)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Edward Stourton.


MON 13:45 Brits Abroad (b062jsnm)
Berlin

There are nearly 300,000 Brits in Germany and for young musicians and artists, Berlin is the 'happening' place, offering creative opportunities, cheap living , good music and a 24/7 party culture.

In the first of this new series, Sarfraz Manzoor talks to Brits Abroad in Berlin as he looks at
the other side of EU immigration. The city has always lured young Brits and, when the wall came down 25 years ago, empty buildings to squat and cheap rents proved an added attraction.

But what is the impact on existing communities and the effect of the English speaking bubble within the city?

Sarfraz talks to Brits like Asian comedian Dharmander Singh, who's part of a new emerging comedy scene, as well as musician Lucas Hunter and three brothers who've set up a successful cafe cum fashion business cum nightclub, funded by a variety of jobs including working in a call centre.

He finds how expats like the Brits have led to gentrification in some of Berlin's poorest areas, pricing out existing communities. And, through German comedian Karsten Kaie's satirical show, he discovers 'How to become a Berliner in One Hour'.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b062j2xw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b062jy8y)
Paul Sellar - The Gold Killing

Episode 1

Boxer turned businessman Joe Stein wouldn't normally get involved with Mafia money but he's on his uppers; when he hears of a Ghanaian gold mine with incredible deposits he wants a piece of the action. But the returns from the mine begin to pay dividends that Joe would rather be without.

by Paul Sellar

Directed by Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b062jy90)
Series 29

Heat 7, 2015

(7/13)
Music lovers from London and Surrey compete in the seventh heat of the 2015 series. Paul Gambaccini's questions range across all genres of music, from the classics to film and TV music, jazz, Broadway, rock and pop.

The winner goes through to the semi-finals in August and takes a crucial step nearer the 29th annual Counterpoint champion's crown.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b062htl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b062jy92)
Henry Marsh

Neurosurgeon and author of Do No Harm Henry Marsh chooses writing that means something to him, from The Hobbit to The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking to Thinking, Fast and Slow. Recorded at his home with readers Tim Pigott-Smith and Joanna David.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b062jy94)
Series 12

The Infinite Monkey Cage USA Tour: Chicago

Fossil Records and other Archaeological Hits.

Brian Cox and Robin Ince take to the stage in Chicago, Illinois, to discuss fossil records and evolution. They are joined on stage by host of NPR's "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me" Peter Sagal, comedian and Saturday Night Live alumnus Julia Sweeney, palaeontologist Paul Sereno and evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne.


MON 17:00 PM (b062jy96)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b062hbct)
20/7/2015 Cameron tackles extremism

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b062jy98)
Series 63

Episode 2

The 63rd series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the White Rock Theatre in Hastings. Regulars Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by Miles Jupp with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Radio Comedy production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b062jy9b)
Bert lays the ground at the Bull for Freda's rose - to be planted in Autumn. Bert went along to the fete yesterday, for the first time without Freda. . Kenton remembers an embarrassing and highly amusing spoonerism gaff by the mayor during an announcement.
Kenton's bitter about the fete being at Lower Loxley - the Bull lost so much trade.
Phoebe helps Jennifer make a celebration fruit cake. They discuss Brian. Phoebe is getting on much better with Roy - there's just one thing that's still making both Roy and Phoebe sad. Also, Mike's struggling to settle in Birmingham.
The husband of Carol's old Bristol neighbour, Hester, has died. Carol's going to the funeral.
Jill talks to Kenton. Kenton decides that he and Jolene will sort out all their problems on their own, together. Forget everyone else.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b062jz7m)
Amy Poehler, Syrian musicians, Agatha Christie's Partners in Crime

Comedian and actress Amy Poehler discusses her role as Joy, the emotion trying to keep control in the young protagonist's head in Pixar's new animated film Inside Out.

Partners in Crime is a new venture between the BBC and the Agatha Christie Group. Starring David Walliams and Jessica Raine as the lesser-known amateur Christie sleuths Tommy and Tuppence, it's an adventure series set in the 1950s with espionage and humour at its heart. Crime writer Natasha Cooper reviews.

To mark this year's Shubbak Festival, London's biennial festival of contemporary Arab arts and culture, John Wilson speaks to two Syrian musicians - leading electronic artist Samer Saem Eldahr and award-winning Syrian composer Zaid Jabri - about working in exile, and drawing on both Arab and European musical traditions.

And with the announcement of a new medical breakthrough which claims to make human head transplants a reality in the near future, Adam Smith offers advice on how cinema can provide a sober guiding light.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Olivia Skinner.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b062jsn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Ways of Thinking (b05pl2rx)
In an increasingly digital world, it's easy to feel overwhelmed. Many of us conclude that we just don't have the right brain for this kind of thing. Author Naomi Alderman discovers her latent ability to contribute to our digital future. In the early days of computers, only ultra-logical reductionist thinkers could participate. Amateurs were easily frustrated by computers that seemed to lack common sense. 40 years on, it's a very different story. You don't have to think in 1s and 0s to be a digital creative. Naomi already writes storylines for computer games but she has left the coding to others. Now she finds out if she could do it. She meets the coding experts who think that we've all got something to offer to the digital world.

Producer: Alex Mansfield.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0630p11)
Free Movement: Britain's Burning EU debate

Freedom of movement will be a key battleground in Britain's crucial EU debate. It gives EU citizens the right to live and work anywhere in the union and is praised by supporters as boosting prosperity. But critics say it has created unsustainable waves of mass migration and must be restricted. So where does this policy actually come from, and what does it mean in practice? Sonia Sodha discovers why it has become such a crucial issue, and what's at stake as Britain decides its European future.

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Hugh Levinson

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w9b5n)
Nightshades

It is hard to think of a more diverse and wonderful group of plants. They enchant us, poison us, make us feel sexy, give us hallucinations, heal us and feed us.

The screaming mandrakes in Harry Potter and the shamanistic dreams of tribal elders eating giant trumpet flowers testify to the magical powers of this group.

Its culinary properties enhance the ever intricate flavours of modern cuisine while its fatal attractions have been used by murderers, most famously Dr Crippen.

This is the group that contains mandrake, potatoes, chillies, aubergines, deadly nightshade and tomatoes. These are the plants that have entered our culture through food and medicine, drugs and love.

It is strange that the European plants in the group are mainly poisonous yet those that grow in the New World are often spicy and enriching.

Fearing anything that looked like nightshade the first plants that were brought here from the New World were regarded with suspicion, yet quickly we adopted them, so much so that it is impossible to conceive of Italian food without tomatoes or Friday night fish and chips, yet they are aliens in a strange land. We have a lot to thank this group for.

It soothed us before anaesthetics, sent our imaginations flying and tempted us with alluring flavours - and they are still pushing the frontiers of both medicine and food today.


MON 21:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b062jsmv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b062hbcw)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b062k3fj)
David Cameron sets out his response to radicalisation.

PM declares determination to work with Muslim community over "poison" of extremism.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b063jr7f)
The Girl on the Train

Episode 6

Paula Hawkins' international bestseller comes to BBC Radio 4 in this thrilling multi-voice narration starring Sally Hawkins, Lyndsey Marshal and Zoe Tapper.

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. 'Jess and Jason', she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she's only watched from afar. Now they'll see: she's much more than just the girl on the train...

Readers:
Rachel ..... Sally Hawkins
Megan ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Anna ..... Zoe Tapper

Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


MON 23:00 Short Cuts (b05pn672)
Series 7

Here Be Dragons

A baby monitor which opens up a terrifying world, an explorer who ventures into the unknown and a woman who longs to disappear into space - Josie Long hears about dreams, desires and darkness in unmarked territories.

On old maps, the uncharted areas - dangerous or unexplored landscapes - used to be marked with illustrations of sea serpents rising from the water or dragons stalking the land. Sometimes these areas would just be marked with a phrase, 'Here Be Dragons'. In this programme, Josie hears tales of modern exploration - from space travel to the insides of our bodies, from night terrors to new worlds.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

The items featured in the programme are:

Baby Monitor
Produced by Peregrine Andrews

Dangerous Appetites
Feat. Joe Dunthorne

The Blue Nile
Feat. John Blashford Snell

The Call
Produced by Rikke Houd with Sheida Jahanbin.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b062k3fn)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster: The government introduces its flagship welfare changes, including plans to limit child tax credit to two children. The Defence Secretary confirms five members of the British armed forces have been involved in military action in Syria. In the House of Lords, peers vote to protect houses or land donated for charitable purposes from sale through "right to buy".



TUESDAY 21 JULY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b062hbf5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b062jsmz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b062hbf7)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b062hbf9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b062hbfc)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b062hbff)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0630pfb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b062k7ps)
A 25-year plan to boost British food, Future farmers, Would you eat seaweed?

Agriculture Secretary Elizabeth Truss talks about her 25 year plan to boost UK food and farming which was part of the Conservative Party Manifesto at the General Election. Is it just a talking shop or a plan of action to make the UK one of the leading food innovators in the world?

Farming Today joins 5,500 under 11s at the East of England Showground in Peterborough where the agriculture industry is hoping to inspire the next generation to become farmers.

And - would you eat green and slimy seaweed? One harvester collecting seaweed on the shores of the Firth of Forth in Scotland says it's 'the ancient superfood for modern thinkers'!

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Sybil Ruscoe.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwm0)
Golden Pheasant

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the golden pheasant. Golden pheasants are native to the mountains of China where they live in thick bamboo forest. The males are brightly-coloured; gold and scarlet, with a long tail and a cape of black and orange which they use to woo the much duller brown females. From the late 1800's Golden Pheasants were introduced to many bird collections and shooting estates around the UK. Today the strongest colonies are in East Anglia.


TUE 06:00 Today (b062k7pv)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b062k9zz)
Niamh Nic Daeid on forensic science

Forensic chemist Niamh Nic Daeid talks to Jim Al-Khalili about investigating fires and analysing legal highs.

Her team were involved in studying the infamous Philpott case in Derby when six children tragically died in a fire set by their parents, Mick and Mairead. They devised experiments to find out why, despite having smoke alarms fitted inside the house, none of the children woke up.

Chemistry has also been pushed to the limits to identify 'legal highs', or Novel Psychoactive Substances. Around 350 new drugs are released on to the market every month, with Europe a hotspot for buyers.

Plus, Niamh talks about the serious problems facing the world of forensic science. The field, she says, is in crisis. With rock-bottom research budgets, and the list of miscarriages of justice growing, how can we fix forensic science?

Producer: Michelle Martin.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b062kb01)
Selina Scott talks to ghostbuster Hayley Stevens

Selina Scott is intrigued and fascinated by ghosts and believes she has one of her own, which resides in the kitchen of her home, an 15th century farmhouse in rural North Yorkshire.

In the final of her three programmes for One to One, Selina talks to ghostbuster Hayley Stevens who doesn't believe in ghosts.

She offers Selina a rational explanation for the ghostly presence in her house.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b062kb03)
On the Move

Power Lifting and New Directions

In his candid memoir, the physician and best-selling author, Oliver Sacks recalls the start of his work as a clinician. First of all he turns to his days as a power lifter and reflects on a personal struggle.

Read by Oliver Ford Davies.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b062kdd1)
Kanika Kapoor, Depression and the menopause, Women and the Ashes, Sarah Moss

Bollywood star Kanika Kapoor on her singing career. Professor John Studd and Dr Pratibha Nirodi on the links between depression and the menopause. Sarah Moss on her new book 'Signs for Lost Children'. And, as the women's Ashes series kicks off with a one day match in Taunton, former England Captain Clare Connor on the development of women's cricket. Jane Garvey presents.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b062kdd3)
Rachel's Cousins

Episode 2

Unlikely allies Rachel and Marilyn begin to bond - until Rachel accuses Marilyn of stealing.

Glasgow lawyer Rachel is dealing with the wayward relatives she's been brought up to ignore after discovering they share the BRCA2 cancer gene.

By Ann Marie Di Mambro.

Rachel..............................................................TAMARA KENNEDY
Marilyn.............................................................GABRIEL QUIGLEY
Josie.....................................................................KAREN BARTKE
Shirley.................. ............................................ SARAH McCARDIE
Bobby....................................... ............................ALAN McHUGH
Alex ........................................ ...............................ROBIN LAING
Kevin .................................................................STEVIE HANNAN
Becca...............................................................NICOLA JO CULLY
Carol...................................................................VERONICA LEER

Other parts are played by the cast.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w9b5t)
Coral

Coral can take on many forms from branching, tree like structures to flat table tops. They are colourful and bright, often described as underwater gardens. Yet they are double edged beauties.

Their ragged structure tore the hulls from wooden ships, causing the death of many sailors. Poisonous fish lurk amidst the beauty and sharks patrol the edges.

Charles Darwin's ship The Beagle had the task of mapping coral reefs, so dangerous were they to shipping, and they formed the topic of his first book. Darwin couldn't see the reefs underwater, but he still managed to work out how they formed, leaping from top to top with the aid of a "leaping stick".

Coral has entered our literature with tales of paradise islands, from Ballantyne's The Coral Island in the 19th century, where three young boys create paradise, to the flip side in Golding's Lord of the Flies. Paradise though was shattered between 1946 and 1958. This was the dawn of the nuclear age when deep wells were sunk into tropical reefs in the Pacific and bombs detonated. But it was the drilling cores that proved Darwin was right, over 100 years after he proposed his theory.

More recently coral reefs were the setting for the film Finding Nemo, a film so popular it set off a craze for clown fish as pets, causing real concern for the future of clown fish on many tropical reefs. According to National Geographic, demand for clown fish in aquaria tripled after the film was released. In response to the concern some aquarium owners decided to release their fish back into the wild, but unfortunately in the wrong place, causing the clown fish to become an invasive alien species.

Such is the tangled web we humans weave!

But no matter the reality, we seem to crave the vision of paradise that coral reefs provide. They will always be glorious places in our hearts and minds.


TUE 11:30 The Great Songbook (b062kdd5)
France

France's popular music legacy is vast and diverse. Cerys Matthews travels to Paris in search of some of the key classic songs that constitute the French songbook, and talks to a panel of guests including musicologist Catherine Rudent, writer and commentator Catherine Guilyardi and popular music journalist Bertrand Dicale. Whilst some French songs have been chart successes in the UK, and others have become jazz standards, Cerys uncovers a patrimony that ranges from the seductive to the salacious, but which is always delivered with wit and panache. And with some 3,000 French songs including 'Paris' in their titles, the city itself acts as muse as well as backdrop to many of France's greatest popular classics.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b062hbfh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 A History of Ideas (b062kdd7)
Historian Justin Champion on Toleration

Professor Justin Champion examines Locke's theory of Toleration through the inhabitants of Spitalfields past and present. He goes to Brick Lane whose famous mosque was built as a Huguenot Church and became a synagogue before becoming the centre of Bengali life in London. He meets the Bishop of London, himself of Huguenot descent and local politician Abdal Ullah to discuss religious tolerance then and now

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b062kdd9)
Call You and Yours: Organ Donation

On Call You & Yours we're asking if doctors should be able to assume that you'd be happy to donate your organs when you die.

A new report from the NHS Blood and Transplant Service found that the number of people donating organs in the UK has fallen for the first time in a decade. They're calling for a 'revolution' in attitudes towards organ donation. What might bring about that revolution?

What would have persuaded the one hundred and twenty families who denied a relative's stated wish to donate? Were you one of them, would you be willing to tell us how you made your decision?

Perhaps you or someone you love is on a waiting list, willing families to donate to you. Or perhaps you are a grateful recipient who might tell us the affect it has had on your life.

Email us now please youandyours@bbc.co.uk and leave a contact number so we can call you back.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Olive Clancy.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b062hbfk)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b062zzyf)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Edward Stourton.


TUE 13:45 Brits Abroad (b0643t2r)
France

There are so many retired Brits in the South West of France that it has been dubbed 'little England'. Sarfraz Manzoor meets British builders and tradespeople who are meeting the needs of Brits renovating retirement and second homes.

As well as seeing business opportunities, many come to secure a better life for their children with small village schools and a safe rural environment.

They come for a better life but often don't speak French and stick together in English speaking cliques. So how different are they from the immigrants in Britain who are often criticised for not integrating?

Are they under-cutting French builders or offering different skills? And why is that the Brits prefer British builders - and even British hairdressers?

Producer:Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b062jy9b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b062kfmg)
Paul Sellar - The Gold Killing

Episode 2

Boxer turned businessman Joe Stein wouldn't normally get involved with mafia money but he's on his uppers; when he invests the money in a Ghanaian gold mine he sets off a macabre series of murders and Joe finds himself in the biggest fight of his life - a fight to stay alive.

by Paul Sellar

Directed by Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b062kfmj)
Tom Holland is joined by Andrea Wulf and Dr Paul Warde to discuss issues from environmental history.

Helen Castor meets up with Professor Tom Williamson in south Norfolk to hear how our understanding of what makes a wood 'ancient' is changing - and why it matters.

Conservationist Graham White is in Dunbar, the home of John Muir - the father of American conservation.

Paul Warde discusses his work on the history of sustainability and Andrea Wulf previews her up-coming biography of Alexander von Humboldt.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Random Radio (b062kg70)
Hugh Aldersey-Williams

A series which encourages guests to "think with the heart and feel with the intellect". In this first programme, Murray Lachlan Young invites writer Hugh Aldersey-Williams to combine his favourite sounds and his most passionately held ideas in unexpected ways - by feeding them into an electronic device. Murray has not prepared an interview but, instead, he and Hugh respond spontaneously to what the device returns to them in the form of short audio snippets. Neither of them knows which of the sounds, music and speech the device will select, nor how it will combine them. The idea is to throw up connections that might not otherwise have occurred to guests, and to encourage them to think and feel about their concerns and passions in a different way. Hugh's list of sounds include evocations of a childhood spent in central London listening to Guards bands playing marches on their way to Buckingham Palace, and the children's literature he was read by his American mother. From later life, there's the flocking of coastal birds in Norfolk where he now lives and writes. These, and Hugh's other sounds, are knitted together with audio suggested by his passion for linking science and the arts, and for breaking down the barriers between the 'Two Cultures' as expressed by C.P. Snow in the year of Hugh's birth. The unpredictability increases as the device introduces some audio of its own, drawn from the BBC Radio archives, to create even more unusual associations between apparently disparate material, and to alter perspectives on familiar issues. Producer: Adam Fowler An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Document (b062kg72)
The Strange Voyage of the Blonde Angel

Dominic Streatfeild tells the story of The Strange Voyage of the 'Blonde Angel'. Captain Alfredo Astiz had waged a very dirty part of Argentina's 'Dirty War'. As part of the notorious ESMA he had kidnapped and disappeared mothers, daughters, sons - even nuns. As part of 'Operation Alpha' Astiz led a detachment of Argentine commandos to seize South Georgia island, raising the Argentine flag on 2 April 1982, a crucial act in the escalation of the Falklands conflict. His surrender and capture quickly became a problem for the British. Both the French and Swedish governments were under public pressure to discover the fate of their own nationals who Astiz had disappeared, but Britain, anxious over the fate of its own P.O.Ws in Argentine hands and bound by the Geneva convention, felt it could do little to help. What happened next was an extraordinary voyage to Britain for Astiz, the first P.O.W. to be held on British soil since World War Two.

Using newly declassified documents, the writer and historian Dominic Streatfeild explores the dilemmas that Astiz posed and finds those who dealt with the 'Blonde Angel of Death'.

Producer
Mark Burman.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b062kg74)
Adam Hart-Davis and Sue Blackmore

Harriett Gilbert is joined by psychologist Sue Blackmore and her husband the broadcaster and historian of inventions Adam Hart-Davis to discuss favourite books.

These include 'Inventions of The Middle Ages' by Chiara Frugoni, 'The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry' by Rachel Joyce and 'Somewhere Towards the End' by Diana Athill.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


TUE 17:00 PM (b062kg76)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b062hbfm)
The Chancellor has asked some Whitehall departments to consider how to make cuts of up to forty per cent in their budgets over the next four years.


TUE 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b062khlc)
Series 3

Episode 4

What's Lucy Porter's least favourite town to perform in? Has Cornelius's pal Jonathan ever won any money as a result of a tip from Cornelius? Who is Tom Wrigglesworth's all time hero?

All these burning questions, and more, will be answered in the show hosted by Miles Jupp, where panellists are tested on how well they know their nearest and dearest.

In this case, comedian Lucy Porter picks her agent, comedian Tom Wrigglesworth picks his father, and Cornelius Lysaght picks an old school friend.

Producer: Matt Stronge.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b062kcyx)
Jim and Susan discuss the village shop - Susan's keen on a new layout, to make it more customer-friendly. They remember Martha Woodford and Jack Woolley laying the original, now outdated floor plans. Discussing it with Pat and Tony, Susan says it'll be a real destination store.
Kate goes out riding with Alice and Debbie - Kate's a bit rusty at first but comes into her own. They discuss Chris and his work. They also discuss Charlie - Alice thinks he's 'fit'. Kate can't read him at all. Debbie's intrigued when Kate mentions Adam being the only person allowed to get close to Charlie.
Kate talks to Debbie about feeling miserable lately. Kate opens up about why her marriage to Lucas fell apart. Debbie offers advice to Kate to keep in touch with her kids in South Africa. Debbie seems unhappy that she'll never have kids herself. She supports Kate's idea for a rural retreat - she may even invest in the idea.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b062khlf)
Naughty Boy, Best of Enemies, Bellowhead

DJ, songwriter and producer Naughty Boy on the Late Night Prom that marks the 50th anniversary this year of Asian Programmes on the BBC.

Bellowhead, one of the UK's most successful folk bands, announced last month that they are going to split up after eleven years together. As they prepare to play at The WOMAD Festival, two of the band's original members, John Spiers and Jon Boden, reflect on more than a decade of music making and the state of contemporary folk music.

A new film documentary Best of Enemies charts the explosive series of televised debates between the liberal writer Gore Vidal and the conservative and Republican William F Buckley when they were broadcast during the 1968 Democratic and Republican conventions in the US. Guardian writer Jonathan Freedland reviews the film about the clashing egos and their mutual distrust and enmity.

And this year marks the 150th anniversary of the death of Elizabeth Gaskell. The Elizabeth Gaskell Collection at the John Rylands Library, Manchester University, has just been digitised. Archivist Fran Baker talks about the collection's treasures that can now be seen online.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Sarah Johnson.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b062kdd3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Should Extremism Be a Crime? (b062khlh)
John Ware investigates plans to counter the activities of those classed as non-violent extremists. Glorifying terrorism is already a crime. In future, expressing views deemed contrary to British values could be illegal too. A new bill would allow police to impose prevention orders aimed at silencing those who preach an extremist message. The law could be used to shut down the premises used to host such speakers. It is part of the "muscular liberal" approach set out by David Cameron in 2011. But does it risk compromising the liberal values it is designed to protect?

Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou
Reporter: John Ware


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b062khlk)
Holidays

Peter White is joined by experienced blind travellers Hazel Dudley, Julie Smethurst and Mani Djazmi, who share their experiences and advice for getting the best from a holiday if you have little or no sight.
Julie explains why she plans in great detail, Mani gives tips on the key items needed for a stress free break and Hazel explains how her technique of making descriptive videos - with the help of complete strangers - gives her a clearer picture of her immediate surroundings and an audio-described memory to show to friends back home.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b062khlm)
Asthma inhalers, Knee arthroscopy, Pelvic girdle pain, Medically unexplained symptoms

Elite athletes are far more likely to use asthma inhalers than the general population. Do the stresses and strains of competition bring on asthma-type symptoms or does an inhaler give a performance advantage to individual sportsmen and women? Dr Mark Porter talks to sports physician Dr Babette Pluim about her review of the use of inhalers in sport.

One hundred and fifty thousand knee arthroscopies are performed every year in the NHS with most of them involving surgery to smooth, remove or repair damaged cartilage, the meniscus. But there are concerns that we do too many arthroscopies in the light of evidence that intervention isn't always required. Andrew Price, Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences at the University of Oxford, tells Mark when surgery is useful and Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney reviews the mounting body of evidence that has called into question some knee surgery. Dr Annabel Bentley, former Medical Director of Insurance at the private health insurers, BUPA, describes how, back in 2011, there was an instant (and subsequently sustained) reduction of 9% in knee arthroscopy claims. The drop came weeks before a new checking process, to confirm the surgery was in line with best practice, was introduced.

Pelvic Girdle Pain is a condition that affects one in five pregnant women. It causes discomfort in the pubic region, the hips and lower back and gets worse as the pregnancy progresses. Some cases can be mild but more severe forms can leave a woman needing crutches, or even a wheelchair, to get around. But there is help out there and official advice is for women to get help early and not to suffer in silence. Mark visits the Rosie Maternity Hospital in Cambridge, and speaks to new mum Joanna Welham and Women's and Men's Health Physiotherapist, Claire Brown, about what treatment is available.

Medically unexplained symptoms, sometimes known as MUS, cause problems for both patient and doctor, and they're common, up to a fifth of a GP's workload, and around half of all specialist referrals, costing the NHS more than £3 billion a year. Rona Moss Morris is Professor of Psychology as Applied to Medicine at King's College London and she believes the NHS fails such patients. She tells Mark what she thinks needs to change, starting with the name, MUS.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b062k9zz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b062hbfp)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b062khlz)
George Osborne: on the political centre ground?

Chancellor launches Spending Review - govt wants savings of £20 billion by 2019/20


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b062k3fl)
The Girl on the Train

Episode 7

Paula Hawkins' international bestseller comes to BBC Radio 4 in this thrilling multi-voice narration starring Sally Hawkins, Lyndsey Marshal and Zoe Tapper.

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. 'Jess and Jason', she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she's only watched from afar. Now they'll see: she's much more than just the girl on the train...

Readers:
Rachel ..... Sally Hawkins
Megan ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Anna ..... Zoe Tapper

Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b062jy94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b062khm8)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster where the Chancellor launches a review of government spending with a view to cutting £20 billion pounds from the budget over the next four years.
The House of Lords backs a call for a joint committee of MPs and peers to look at the Government's plans for English Votes for English Laws.
The Government says that data showing how many people die while claiming out-of-work disability benefits will be published "no later than the autumn".
And the Home Secretary faces questions from MPs about the problems at Calais and on immigration policy.



WEDNESDAY 22 JULY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b062hbgj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b062kb03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b062hbgl)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b062hbgn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b062hbgq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b062hbgs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0630q6c)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b062kphp)
Welsh cockle fishing, Maize and soil quality

Why are the cockle fishermen in Wales facing an unprofitable year this season? There are unexplained issues surrounding early deaths of cockles in South Wales, whilst on the River Dee, over-fishing and illegal fishing have forced the closure of the beds there. Also how does the growing of maize impact on our soil? We look at the arguments for and against this controversial crop. Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Trish Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwdy)
White-fronted Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the white-fronted goose. Flocks of White-Fronted Geese return each year to their favourite wintering areas, the bogs and and saltmarshes of Ireland and the Severn Estuary as well as western Scotland, although smaller flocks are found elsewhere. John Aitchison recorded the musical yapping of white-fronted geese for Tweet listeners as they flew over his home in western Scotland.


WED 06:00 Today (b062kpqj)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b062kqyl)
Melanie Reid

Before her accident Melanie Reid says she lived life at 10 million miles an hour - a working mother, keen horse rider and award winning journalist. That all changed in an instant when her horse refused to go over a jump at a cross country training practice. She fell face first, her body contorted, and realized almost immediately that something terrible had happened:"Everything went bright red and my whole body was suffused by this intense feeling of warmth and I knew I'd done something catastrophic."

She started writing Spinal Column three weeks later - the thought of documenting her experiences coming as she lay in an MRI scanner. It was, she tells Peter, her way of chronicling the war zone that was now her body: "'I remember lying there thinking I've got to tell people how weird and frightening this is. And it was great therapy for me. Being a journalist helped; it helped to process the shock, superficially. And it helped to process the suddenness of the change. Because from being someone who was busy, busy, busy, I was precipitated into the life of someone who's 30 years older than I am."
Producer Susan Mitchell.


WED 09:30 Witness (b0639lr4)
The Death of Walter Rodney

It is 35 years since the Guyanese opposition leader and academic, Dr Walter Rodney, was killed in a bomb explosion. He was one of the leaders of a movement trying to bridge the racial divide in Guyana's politics. His supporters said he had been assassinated on the orders of the government. We hear from his widow, Patricia Rodney, and from Wazir Mohamed who was a young activist at the time.
(Photo: Walter Rodney. Credit: the Walter Rodney Family).


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b062kqyn)
On the Move

Uncovering Forgotten Lives

In his vivid and honest memoir, the neurologist and writer, Oliver Sacks reflects on love and loss. First of all he recalls the extraordinary lives of the patients who inspired his bestselling book, Awakenings.

Read by Oliver Ford Davies
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b062kqyq)
Joely Richardson, Apprenticeships, Leaving after school care

Joely Richardson talks about her latest projects on screen in Maggie and on stage in The Wars of the Roses.

Jane hears about new figures which examine where FGM is happening in England in Wales.

The two contenders in Taiwan's presidential elections are women - so what will this mean for women living in the only Chinese democracy?

Leaving primary school also means leaving after school care-givers. Child minders talk about saying goodbye.

And, with more funding available, will we see more girls taking up higher level apprenticeships? One engineering apprentice talks about her working life and what other girls would get out of joining her.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Ruth Watts.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b062ktl9)
Rachel's Cousins

Episode 3

Josie seeks advice from Rachel when she admits she's been lying to the rest of the family.

Glasgow lawyer Rachel is dealing with the wayward relatives she's been brought up to ignore after discovering they share the BRCA2 cancer gene.

By Ann Marie Di Mambro

Rachel..............................................................TAMARA KENNEDY
Marilyn.............................................................GABRIEL QUIGLEY
Josie.....................................................................KAREN BARTKE
Shirley.................. ............................................ SARAH McCARDIE
Bobby....................................... ............................ALAN McHUGH
Alex ........................................ ...............................ROBIN LAING
Kevin .................................................................STEVIE HANNAN
Becca...............................................................NICOLA JO CULLY
Carol...................................................................VERONICA LEER

Other parts are played by the cast.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b062ktlc)
Kevin and Derek - In the Line of Fire

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a former soldier and a war photographer, both of them artists, about an incident in Bosnia. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Bletchley Girls (b062ktlf)
For decades it was Britain's best kept secret, the huge codebreaking operation centred around a Victorian mansion in Buckinghamshire, Bletchley Park. Despite the fact that at least 8000 people worked at Bletchley, and many others in listening and codebreaking centres across the country, no-one gave the secret away. And when the story did eventually begin to emerge, the star-studded heroes of Bletchley's narrative were men, led by the most famous cryptanalyst of them all, Alan Turing. In recent years, Hollywood blockbusters have cemented the reputation of those clever boffins, who have been credited with shortening the Second World War by many months.
However, if you walked through the gates of Bletchley seventy years ago, you would have been struck not by the number of men working there but the number of young women. That's because by 1944 three quarters of Bletchley's workforce was made up of very young women, or girls, often just out of school.
Tessa Dunlop speaks to some of those Bletchley girls, now in their late 80s and 90s, about their stories. Who were they and what did they do? Why were they selected to work in Britain's most secret organisation and what impact did Bletchley have on the rest of their lives?
Producer: John Murphy.


WED 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b03brkf1)
Series 3

Episode 5

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, presents a third series series of his hit sketch show.

The first series was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Sony award.

This time around, John promises to stop doing silly sketches about nonsense like Winnie the Pooh's honey addiction or how goldfish invented computer programming, and concentrate instead on the the big, serious issues.

This fifth episode of the series reveals the truth behind some famous anecdotes and a curious tale of a hard-bitten dame. Part of this show are in 3-D. Unfortunately, it's a horrible part.

Written by and starring John Finnemore, with Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b062hbgv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 A History of Ideas (b062ktlh)
Economist Kate Barker on the Free Market

Is a Free Market the vital foundation of a fair, dynamic and creative society? The father of economics, Adam Smith certainly thought so. Since the publication of 'The Wealth of Nations' in 1776 Smith's thoughts on trade and money-making have come to be seen as the theoretical foundations of a rational and rather uncaring form of pure capitalism.

Economist, Dame Kate Barker is keen to put the soul back into Smith, revealing the staunch moral principles that underlined his view of a fair and just capitalist society. She wants to measure today's markets against the standards set by the sage of the Scottish Enlightenment. Would Britain's markets in groceries, homes or financial services bring a smile to Smith's stern visage?

Kate is joined in her quest by Smith's latest biographer Jesse Norman, by housing market analyst Yolande Barnes and by Christine Tacon, the government's grocery market regulator.

This is part of a week of programmes examining how we should live together.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b062ktrq)
Counterfeit cigarettes, Make-up tutorials, Energy bills

We speak to Julie Grant who's recently won a Trading Standards Award for her campaigning work against the sale of illicit cigarettes. Her mother died in a house fire caused by a cigarette that didn't extinguish. Regulated cigarettes are designed to go out if they're not being smoked.

Dentists tell us that poor dental health is down to the NHS's pricing structure. It's not worth their while carrying out some jobs because they only get paid for one filling even if patients need a dozen.

A council in Cheshire wants to get rid of out of tune buskers - but the musicians and shoppers are worried it will ruin their city centre. We look at other town centres that wanted to get rid of street musicians.

Talk Talk and BT have been voted as having bad customer service, but what's it like being caught between both firms? Our listeners tell us about the double trouble they've been having.

And online make up tutorials - they're so popular even Kim Kardashian is starting one. Nic Chapman from Pixiwoo tells us why beauty news is changing.


WED 12:57 Weather (b062hbgx)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b062ktrs)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Edward Stourton.


WED 13:45 Brits Abroad (b0645548)
Ibiza

Ibiza has long been associated with clubbing and Brits behaving badly, but it has a very different side - one of tranquil beauty which is increasingly attracting the rich and famous, as well as Brits who live on the island and commute to UK.

In the 1950s, Ibiza was a poor island where locals made a meagre living through farming and fishing. Now many have become rich through tourism and selling their land and farms. And while mainland Spain has high unemployment, Ibiza has seasonal jobs and a service industry supporting those living there all year round.

What will be the long-term impact of the new influx of Brits searching for peace - ranging from Cathal Smyth (Chas Smash) from the very London band Madness, to a single mother with her teenage son starting a new life.

Producer:Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b062kcyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Curious Under the Stars (b062kx4b)
Series 1

Gathering Storm

By Meic Povey

The last in the series set in Glan Don, a wild and mysterious village perched on the Welsh coast.

When a violent storm brings down the Great Oak of Glan Don, legend suggests that the survival of the village is threatened. So the villagers come together to attempt to save the tree. But as the weather worsens, Gareth and Bethan get trapped in the rising floodwaters and the truth of their tempestuous past is laid bare.

Starring Elis James (Crims), Louise Ford (Chickens) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey), Curious Under the Stars takes us deep into a Welsh landscape of myth, magic and mayhem.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b062kx4d)
Money Box Live: Your Pension

What would you like to do with your pension pot, leave it invested, take some cash or is an annuity a good idea? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk with your questions.

The way we access our pension funds has changed dramatically but how do you and should you take advantage of pension freedom?

Before cashing in or switching out of a pension scheme, you need to find out whether you would lose any valuable guaranteed annuity rates (GARs). Offered by some older-style pensions, these rates can be double those available now.

Have you considered the tax you may have to pay when taking income from your pension, how can you manage this sensibly?

If you want income certainty, should you consider buying an annuity, what are the best options at the moment and can you enhance potential payments?

There have also been changes to the way pensions can be inherited.

Or perhaps you have a question about saving into a pension scheme?

Whatever you want to do with your pension, Paul Lewis and guests will be waiting to help with your questions. Joining Paul will be:

Billy Burrows from retirement options website williamburrows.com
Michelle Cracknell, Chief Executive, The Pensions Advisory Service.
Tom McPhail, Head of Pensions Research, Hargreaves Lansdown.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b062khlm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b062kx4g)
The colour black, Mixed-race people

Black: the cultural and historical meaning of the darkest colour. From the 'little black dress' which epitomises chic, to its links to death, depression and evil, 'black' embodies many contrasting values. White Europeans exploited the negative associations of 'black' in enslaving millions of Africans whilst artists & designers have endlessly deployed the colour in their creative work. Laurie Taylor talks to John Harvey, Life Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, about his new book which explores how 'black' came to have such ambiguous and varied meanings. They're joined by Bidisha, the writer and broadcaster.

Also, the last 20 years has seen a major growth in the number of people of mixed racial heritage. Miri Song, Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent, talks about her research into the ways that multiracial parents with white partners talk to their their children about race and identity.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b062kx4j)
The chair of the BBC Trust, Digital news providers, Ofcom's review of BT Openreach

The BBC Trust, the governing body of the BBC, has published its response to last week's government green paper on the BBC Charter Review. The review will look at, amongst other things, how the BBC should be governed and regulated - with many thinking the new charter will spell the end of the Trust. In her first interview for The Media Show, Trust Chair Rona Fairhead discusses her vision for the future of the BBC, her involvement in the recent licence fee deal, and the legitimacy of the BBC's governance system.

A new book, Innovators in Digital News, looks at how some news organisations - some old, some new - are succeeding with digital news. Drawing on first-hand research inside organisations, it explores how The Guardian, The New York Times, Quartz, BuzzFeed and Vice approach the field. Steve Hewlett talks to author Lucy Kung about how clear strategies and strong leaders are winning combinations that are enabling new digital brands to take on 'old stalwarts' to win the attention of online news audiences.

As part of its once in a decade review of the UK digital communications market, OFCOM is considering whether BT should be completely separated from Openreach. Openreach, currently an infrastructure division of the BT Group, is responsible for looking after the fibres, wires and cables, providing wholesale access to broadband and telephone lines. Other providers like Sky and TalkTalk claim it provides poor service and that it gives BT an unfair advantage. BT is strongly opposed to a split saying it would threaten further investment in the network. Steve is joined by Matthew Howett, telecoms and technology analyst from independent consultancy Ovum.


WED 17:00 PM (b062kx4l)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b062hbgz)
The former Prime Minister Tony Blair says Labour has "rediscovered losing".


WED 18:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (b062kx4n)
Series 2

Coffee

Comedian Simon Evans continues his series about the economics of some of the goods - or bads - we are addicted to.

If you crave your daily coffee, can't get by without a cigarette, feel that mid-afternoon slump without your sugar-fix, or can't face an evening without a glass of wine, you are definitely not alone. But have you ever thought about the economics that has made your addiction possible? Who does it profit? And would you want to make some canny investments that take advantage of our human weaknesses?

In this series, Simon Evans looks at the economics, history and health issues behind these oh-so-addictive commodities.

This time it's coffee.

How much are we now drinking as a nation? And how much of the price of a cup of coffee is actually the coffee beans? Are we giving coffee growers the best deal when we buy Fairtrade coffee or should we be seeking out Direct trade coffee? And could this be the least harmful of all addictions? Perhaps even a positive addiction, with the coffee shop being, as Steven Johnson said (in his recent 'Where good ideas come from' TED talk), 'a place where ideas can have sex'?

Simon speaks to specialist coffee experts Onny Loisel and Michael Cleland. He is also joined by economics guru, More Or Less host Tim Harford and the Queen of investment know-how, Merryn Somerset-Webb, as he walks us around the economics of this very familiar commodity and pokes fun at our relationship with it.

Presented by Simon Evans, with Onny Loisel and Michael Cleland, Tim Harford and Merryn Somerset Webb.

Written by Simon Evans, Benjamin Partridge and Andy Wolton.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b062kc9x)
Josh has a 'brilliant' new scheme, having spoken to Toby about the geese - he wants to go in with them and buy in quail.
Pip is prepping to start her new job - heading to Brazil in October - she can't wait to get started. David hasn't found someone to replace Pip yet - she'll take some replacing.
Usha's going to Newcastle tomorrow with work, so is also meeting Ruth to cheer her up. Heather's going into interim care tomorrow.
Adam's busy sorting out his strawberry pickers. Debbie's helping. Debbie advises some compromise with Brian over further plans for his herbal leys - maybe he should suggest 100 hectares for next year. Adam worries what he'll do if Brian doesn't want to come along with him on the journey, now Adam's effectively farm manager. Debbie tells Adam to be true to his word - and be prepared to walk away if after a few months it doesn't work out. Debbie's company would snap him up.
Debbie points out to Brian how the ley in Broad Bank is saving them money on fertilisers. She presses the point that Brian needs to trust Adam - does he really want to drive Adam away? (she's ready to poach him).


WED 19:15 Front Row (b062kx4q)
Leif Ove Andsnes, Mack & Mabel, Choman Hardi, EL Doctorow remembered

Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes comes to the end of a long journey at the Proms - he's travelled around the world performing and conducting Beethoven's five Piano Concertos with the Mahler Chamber Orchestra. The performances and recordings have won praise and awards including Recording of the Year from BBC Music Magazine. Andsnes discusses devoting himself to one composer for four years.

Michael Ball plays Mack Sennett, a silent-movie director in a revival of the 1974 musical Mack & Mabel at the Chichester Festival Theatre. Based on a true story, Mack is so struck by Mabel Normand, the girl delivering the studio lunch sandwiches, that he puts her in the movies. Matt Wolf reviews.

The American author E. L. Doctorow has died aged 84. In an extract from a 2014 interview he explains why he never liked the label of historical novelist, and the writer Michael Carlson discusses Doctorow's work.

Iraqi Kurdistan poet Choman Hardi explores statelessness, genocide, conflict and Kurdish identity in her poetry. She talks to Samira about the challenges of capturing the complexities of war in verse and the insights that poetry can give into conflict.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Ellie Bury.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b062ktl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b062kx4s)
Public Interest and the Press

The home movie footage of the Queen giving a Nazi salute may have been grainy and over eighty years old, but it's brought into sharp focus the issue of public interest. The publication of the clip by the Sun has been widely condemned. Buckingham Palace said the Sun was exploiting a private family film. The paper says it provides a fascinating insight in to the warped prejudices of Edward VIII and that it's the job of journalists is to bring to light things that happened. Whether publishing the film was in the public interest or just of interest to the public is a moot point, but it highlights what is becoming an increasingly contentious area - what the public has a right to know and who should decide? Operation Elveden, a three year, twenty million pound investigation in to journalists and their sources has been left in what some people have described as in tatters after convictions were overturned in the court of appeal. A former head of the Crown Prosecutions Service is now arguing that we need tougher laws to defend journalists and that phone-hacking, bribery of public officials, "sting" operations, refusal to name sources should all have a public interest defence in law. At the same time the government has launched a review of the Freedom of Information Act amid claims that it is stifling discussion on policy and encouraging politicians and civil servants to be more secretive. The Act was introduced in 2000. Tony Blair described himself as an "irresponsible nincompoop" for bringing it in. This week an FoI request revealed that British military pilots were involved in Syrian air strikes and activists believe that any changes will lead to more secrecy, more mistakes and bad decisions. What should we, the public, have a right to know and who ought to decide?


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b062kx4v)
Pirates and Puritans

Tom Feiling tells a story about the relationship between pirates and puritans on the small Caribbean island of Old Providence.

Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton.


WED 21:00 Past Imperfect (b062kx4x)
Startling new research shows how false memories can be artificially generated and used to change behaviour - with implications for advertising, military intelligence and the treatment of addictions.

Memory is more of a creative than a mechanical process. Like a Wikipedia entry, we can make changes to our autobiographical history - but so can other people.

Martin Plimmer meets experts and observes experiments demonstrating the fragility of memory and the ease with which false memories can be implanted.

At Warwick University, Prof Kimberley Wade has implanted false memories of childhood experiences such as taking a hot air balloon ride. Martin follows an experiment in which participants form vivid memories of activities they have not actually experienced.

At Hull University, Prof Giuliana Mazzoni reveals how implanted false memories can change people's behaviour. Working with unsuspecting volunteers, she explores whether she can alter their food preferences by creating false memory of an adverse reaction to eating turkey sandwiches.

Martin discusses the implications of this research with US psychologist Prof Elizabeth Loftus who believes it could be used to treat obesity and addictions by introducing false memories of disliking fatty foods, alcohol or drugs.

Professor Loftus has also worked with the US military on ways of implanting false memories of their interrogator in enemy prisoners - raising admitted ethical issues and concerns about the abuse of these techniques.

And Martin Plimmer learns how our memories are all being subtly altered by advertising - as certain types of adverts can create false memories of experiencing and liking a product.

An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b062kqyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b062kx4z)
Kurdish armed group the PKK says it murdered two Turkish policemen

PKK says murders were in retaliation for suicide bomb attack close to the Syrian border.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b062kx51)
The Girl on the Train

Episode 8

Paula Hawkins' international bestseller comes to BBC Radio 4 in this thrilling multi-voice narration starring Sally Hawkins, Lyndsey Marshal and Zoe Tapper.

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. 'Jess and Jason', she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she's only watched from afar. Now they'll see: she's much more than just the girl on the train...

Readers:
Rachel ..... Sally Hawkins
Anna ..... Zoe Tapper

Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


WED 23:00 Bunk Bed (b062kx53)
Series 2

Episode 6

Two men in darkness, sharing a bunk bed and a stream of semi-consciousness about family, relationships, work and imagined life.

We all crave a place where our mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place from daily life. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, the restless mind can wander.

After an acclaimed reception by The Independent, The Sunday Telegraph, The Observer and Radio 4 listeners, Bunk Bed returns with its late night stream of semi-concsciousness.

In this episode, toe-curling accounts of professional blunders, the meaning of hackneyed, writing Alan Partridge, the sadness of Chas and Dave and Peter Curran's horror at his tally of 7,000 interviews.

Elsewhere in the series, Patrick and Peter deal with Therapy, children's happiness, JRR Tolkien, Babycham, Aldous Huxley, and correction fluid - among a ragbag of subjects.

Written and performed by Patrick Marber and Peter Curran
Producer: Peter Curran
A Foghorn production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 I, Regress (b01s0dlz)
Series 2

Mirrors

Matt Berry plays a a corrupt and bizarre regression therapist in this dark, Lynch-meets-Kaufman-style comedy.

Unsuspecting clients are taken on twisted, misleading journeys through their subconscious.

Each episode sees the doctor dealing with a different client who has come to him for a different phobia. As the patient is put under hypnosis, we 'enter' their mind, and all the various situations the hypnotherapist takes them through are played out for us to hear. The result is a dream (or nightmare-like) trip through the patient's mind, as funny as it is disturbing.

With:
Daisy Beaumon
Sally Okafor
Julia Deakin : Acting (adult)
Michael Shelford

A compelling late night listen: tune in and occupy someone else's head!

Producer: Sam Bryant.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b062kx55)
Peers debate the government's policies on renewable energy and a committee takes evidence about the factors driving tens of thousands of migrants out of Africa and towards Europe.



THURSDAY 23 JULY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b062hbhw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b062kqyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b062hbhy)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b062hbj0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b062hbj2)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b062hbj4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0630g5w)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b062mf8r)
Royal Welsh Show

Farming Today is at the Royal Welsh Show at Llanelwedd near Builth Wells, for a special edition of the programme. Felicity Evans asks farmers what's on their minds, and puts their concerns to the Welsh Government's Deputy Minister for Farming and Food, Rebecca Evans. She also finds out about a new scheme to help small-scale pig farmers, and learns the best way to prepare a joint of pork.

Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwxg)
Black-throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the black-throated diver. Black-throated divers are strong contenders for our most beautiful bird. Their breeding plumage with a neck barcoded in white, an ebony bib and a plush grey head, is dramatic. The black dagger-like bill and broad lobed feet are perfect for catching and pursuing fish which the divers bring to their chicks in nests on the shoreline of the Scottish Lochs on which they breed.


THU 06:00 Today (b062mfqv)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Inside the Ethics Committee (b062mhnl)
Series 11

Suicide

Samantha is coping with the recent death of her mother. It's been a turbulent few years - drug binges in her teens, then bulimia. She's now twenty two and is finding it difficult to cope.

She's prescribed antidepressants but stops taking them when she's plagued by terrifying thoughts and images of killing herself. These persist and, over the coming months, she makes two serious suicide attempts and is admitted to hospital several times.

Samantha is detained under the Mental Health Act for her own safety and is diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The recommended treatment is psychotherapy. She's also offered antidepressants but the team don't think she's overtly depressed.

Samantha refuses all treatment - she's terrified of antidepressants and doesn't want to talk.

Three months on, she's discharged as the team don't think being in hospital is helping her. But her family believe it's the safest place for her.

When Samantha gets home she spends most of her time online on suicide chatrooms. The family monitor her activity and their concerns about her suicidal thoughts trigger further admissions to hospital.

However, the team are reluctant to keep her in hospital for long. They want to encourage her to take control of her life and engage with treatment, which she is still refusing. In contrast to most patients who are suicidal, Samantha seems to have the capacity to refuse treatment.

The senior psychiatrist on the team feels uneasy about the pattern that's emerging. He consults the clinical ethics committee to consider the best course of action. He also wants to know what constitutes capacity in this suicidal young woman.

Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss the issues.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.

Photo credit: Chris McGrath/ Getty Images


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b062mhnn)
On the Move

The Leg Incident

In his vivid memoir, the neurologist and writer, Oliver Sacks explores how breaking his own leg led to new insights into how the brain works. He also recalls the difficulties that followed when he decided to write a book about this disquieting experience.

Read by Oliver Ford Davies.
Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b062mhnq)
Commonwealth Games 2014 - Two volunteers on how it changed their lives

A year ago today the Commonwealth Games opened in Glasgow. It was the largest sporting event ever held in Scotland with nearly 5 thousand athletes from 71 countries and territories competing in 18 different sports. The success of the games relied on thousands of volunteers to help the events go smoothly Two of the volunteers Rebecca Smith and Jane McLaughlin tell us how volunteering twelve months ago for the Games has given them a whole new perspective on their lives.

What would you do if your teenager became violent towards you? Aggression and physical abuse are hidden issues that many parents are afraid to talk about for fear of being labelled bad parents. Advice on how to cope with angry and aggressive teenagers.

Who are the Queens of Crime fiction? Kicking off a new series looking at some of the top women writers, we talk about the Golden Age of crime fiction and its influence today

Plus as the Insolvency Service's annual figures show that for the first time the individual insolvency rate for women is higher than for men. We hear one woman's experience of filing for bankruptcy and look at what's behind the increase.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b062mxfg)
Rachel's Cousins

Episode 4

Bobby seeks out his ex-wife and daughter to explain the risks of the BRCA2 gene.

Glasgow lawyer Rachel is dealing with the wayward relatives she's been brought up to ignore after discovering they share the BRCA2 cancer gene.

By Ann Marie Di Mambro.

Rachel..............................................................TAMARA KENNEDY
Marilyn.............................................................GABRIEL QUIGLEY
Josie.....................................................................KAREN BARTKE
Shirley.................. ............................................ SARAH McCARDIE
Bobby....................................... ............................ALAN McHUGH
Alex ........................................ ...............................ROBIN LAING
Kevin .................................................................STEVIE HANNAN
Becca...............................................................NICOLA JO CULLY
Carol...................................................................VERONICA LEER

Other parts are played by the cast.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b062mxfj)
South Africa Unplugged

South Africa is in crisis as the national electricity generator, Eskom, struggles to provide an adequate power supply and rolling blackouts hit the country on a regular basis. As Neal Razzell reports, there's now concern that jobs and growth are at risk from the power cuts, and the ruling ANC - which blames the problem on inheriting an apartheid-era network designed only for the white population - stands accused of complacency and incompetence.

Michael Gallagher producing.


THU 11:30 Time Noodles (b062mxfl)
In the West we are used to stand-up comics but in Japan they have sit-down comedy.

In Time Noodles, Chie Kobayashi introduces Radio 4 to the ancient comic story-telling art of Rakugo which dates back to the 18th Century and has changed little over the centuries. The comedian sits on his knees wearing traditional Kimono and performs entertaining dialogues between characters, taking on the different voices, expressions and mannerisms. Time Noodles is the title of a classic Rakugo tale based on two noodle-shop owners and their customers.

The style, structure and rich tradition of Rakugo has been handed down from generation to generation and from master to student - known as Deshi - over a number of years. Traditionally there were no female Rakugo-ka (performers) but now, thanks to Kimie Oshima that's changing fast. She's determined to translate and export this ancient art of laughter to English speaking audiences and poke fun at the stereotypical image of the humourless Japanese. English language Rakugo is inevitably different from the original, she says, but her ultimate goal is to make Rakugo as internationally popular as an art form as sushi is in global cuisine. Will she succeed - or is too much simply lost in translation?

Producer: Ruth Evans
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b062hbj6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 A History of Ideas (b062mxfp)
Philosopher Angie Hobbs on Plato's Philosopher Kings

Professor Angie Hobbs asks if the key to harmonious living could be found in Plato's Republic where he proposes that the ideal state be run by philosophers and not by those who seek power for their own ends.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b06301g8)
Missed flight connections, Wine ingredients, Narcolepsy drugs

Airlines are being accused of deliberately selling flights with connections that customers are likely to miss. One company which acts on behalf of delayed air passengers says it has seen a rise in the number of complaints about exactly that. EUClaim has told You & Yours the same flights are regularly responsible for missed connections, and has come up with a "Top 10" of problem flights.

A really effective drug for treating narcolepsy, the condition where people fall asleep involuntarily, has been ruled as too expensive for the NHS. Only the most severe cases qualify, aside from a group of 80 people who developed the condition after taking the vaccine for swine flu. Others with the condition, who do not qualify, say that is unfair. Winifred Robinson hears from a woman whose daughter has the condition.

Plus, the You & Yours team has been studying the ingredients in a bottle of wine. We had heard about sulphites, but eggs and milk? We ask a regular vineyard visitor to explain.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


THU 12:57 Weather (b062hbj8)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06301gb)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Edward Stourton.
Rise of death in police custody; Labour leadership woes; America's cup returns to UK.


THU 13:45 Brits Abroad (b0645fwv)
Warsaw

Poland's growing economy is attracting an increasing number of Brits to Warsaw in search of business opportunities. Sarfraz Manzoor meets them and compares their experience with the half a million or so Poles who have settled in the UK.

Some, like the Cowen brothers, have brought British expertise to the Poland through business clubs - and an expanding chain of fitness gyms. Two other brothers also teach English, which is seen by Poles
as a passport to success and even a job requirement in Warsaw. Other Brits have left family and friends behind in UK to develop themselves and their careers.

Whatever the reason, the Polish offer a much warmer welcome to Brits than many Poles get in Britain.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b062kc9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b036twsz)
Alistair McGowan - Three Pieces in the Shape of a Pear

Alistair McGowan's witty and poignant drama about his musical hero - the visionary and eccentric French composer Erik Satie and the three key relationships in his life.

Starring Alistair McGowan as Erik Satie, Nathaniel Parker as Claude Debussy, Imogen Stubbs as Suzanne Valadon and Charlotte Page as Paulette Darty.

Satie is now most famous for his delicate and dreamlike 'Gymnopedies', but he was a man ahead of his time - turning his back on the musical conventions of his day and composing spare, 'white' pieces with strange titles, such as 'Flabby Preludes for a Dog' and 'Three Pieces in the Shape of a Pear'

But he was also a complex and solitary man. McGowan's drama looks at three key figures in Satie's life - his friend and rival, Claude Debussy; his first love, the artist Suzanne Valadon and the society soprano, Paulette Darty, for whom he nurtured a long, but undeclared, devotion.

But despite the poignancy of Satie's romantic life, this is a fresh and funny portrayal of an engagingly eccentric figure - a man who saved time deciding what to wear by buying seven, identical, yellow, corduroy suits (one for every day of the week) and who, for a time, consumed only white foods in the hope of instilling that simplicity and purity into his own body and music.

All other parts played by members of the company.

Directed by Emma Harding.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b062n1f5)
The North Antrim Coast

Helen Mark takes to the seas to explore the North Antrim Coastline, taking in Giant's Causeway and Carrick-a-Rede from the water.

She meets Robin Ruddock who teaches people to kayak along this coast and is joined by experts from Ulster Wildlife who tell her about the Living Seas project and the richness and diversity of marine life found in the waters off the North Antrim Coast.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: martin Poyntz-Roberts.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b062hn6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b062hx63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b062n1f7)
Robert Carlyle, Pete Docter on Inside Out, Joseph Losey

With Francine Stock

The Full Monty and Trainspotting star Robert Carlyle discusses the challenges of directing himself in The Legend Of Barney Thomson and reveals which part of the job made him want to stick a fork in his eye.

Up director and producer Pete Docter and Jonas Rivera delve into the mind of a 11 year old for their latest animation, Inside Out, and discuss the research they conducted into human emotions, and the surprising conclusions they came to.

Joseph Losey, the director of The Servant and Modesty Blaise, is remembered by his wife Patricia who tells Francine what it was like on board Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor's super-yacht. 'Mes Annees Avec Joseph Losey' by Patricia Losey is available now, in French.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b062n1f9)
Pluto's surface, Increased Arctic ice in 2013, Linking brains together, Signals of fertility

The New Horizons probe is now millions of miles past Pluto, journeying throgh the Kuiper Belt, but still sending back gigabytes of data coming in via the Deep Space Network. Its latest image of Pluto's surface was released by NASA on Wednesday, of huge mountains emerging from an otherwise flat plain, Dr John Spencer one of the lead scientists on New Horizons, a planetary geologist, discusses what's to be read into the surface images captured over the last week

A new paper just published in Nature Geoscience shows that in 2013, which was a slightly cooler summer than average, arctic ice had grown, by 41% on the previous year. The study, uses data from ESA's Cryosat 2, which incorporates not just the surface area of ice, but the all-important number - the volume Adam examines the results with Rachel Tilling from University College London.

Computing has taken a Sci fI step forward this month. Professor Miguel Nicollelis of Duke University, a specialist in brain machine interface experiments, has linked together the brains of four individual rats in order to use the computational power of their brains to carry out tasks including image processing, data retrieval, and even weather predictions. But could this have a therapeutic use in brain damage? Professor Andrew Jackson from Newcastle University, an expert in called 'neural prosthetics' examines the potential.

Across the animal kingdom, signals advertising when females are at their most fertile can be pretty striking. Humans are more subtle, though plenty of studies have shown that female behaviour and physiology does change during the menstrual cycle. A new study by Dr Robert Burriss from Northumbria University suggests that faces may be advertising a woman's most fertile time of the month. But are the traits too subtle for most people to notice?

Producer Adrian Washbourne.


THU 17:00 PM (b06301gd)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b062hbjb)
23/07/15 Discord in Labour leadership battle escalates

The discord and recriminations in the Labour leadership contest have intensified with one of Jeremy Corbyn's opponents saying it would be a disaster if he won.


THU 18:30 It's a Fair Cop (b062n1fc)
Series 2

Property Predicament

Policeman turned comic Alfie Moore gives himself a headache seizing items from a real-life Bob the Builder.

Series in which the audience makes the policing decisions as Alfie takes them through a real-life crime scenario.

Written and performed by Alfie Moore.

Script Editor: Will Ing

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b062kcdv)
Ruth's up in Prudhoe as Pip updates her on farm progress over the phone. Ruth won't leave her mum Heather until she can get her to understand her situation - Heather needs proper care and will need to move into a home permanently. Ruth confides in Usha, who has travelled up with work and uses the trip for a catch up. Ruth feels guilty for sneaking around looking at places.

Toby invites Pip to join him round at Hollowtree for curry and a few beers. She teases him for his lack of knowledge about feed. Pip spells out her plans with the new job, which takes her to Brazil. Toby says that's terrible that she's going so soon. He flirtily thanks her for all her help in getting his business off the ground and they end up kissing.

Brian and Charlie agree details for some important shoots in November and December - Justin's inviting important guests to these ones and Brian says he and Will will be very accommodating. Brian asks Charlie for his advice - talking confidentially about Adam. Charlie says it was a mistake for Adam to give up on the maize, but tells Brian he should support Adam all the way. What's the alternative - getting a complete stranger in to run the farm?


THU 19:15 Front Row (b062n1ff)
Handel's Saul, Paul Murray, The Monkees, Life in squares

Samira Ahmed talks to opera director Barrie Kosky about his Glyndebourne production of Handel's Saul.

Irish writer Paul Murray talks about the follow-up to his hugely successful novel Skippy Dies. The Mark and The Void is a timely satire about the European financial crisis.

Priya Parmar reviews the BBC's new drama series about the Bloomsbury group, Life in Squares.

Plus Monkees fan Iain Lee, who has tracked down original mastertapes of Micky Dolenz's unreleased songs, and is now releasing them as a vinyl-only album.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b062mxfg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b0612hjs)
Jehovah's Witnesses and Child Sexual Abuse

In June, the High Court ruled that the Jehovah's Witnesses organisation was liable for sexual abuse committed by one of its members.

The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Britain - to give the group its official name - had failed to take adequate safeguarding steps when senior members of the organisation were aware that a fellow Witness was a known paedophile.

It was the first civil case in the UK of historical sexual abuse brought against the Christian-based religious movement.

The BBC's Religious Affairs Correspondent, Caroline Wyatt, explores the implications of the Court's decision and investigates the Jehovah's Witnesses explicit policy of attempting to deal with all allegations of sexual abuse in-house.

The Report has gained access to confidential internal documents, sent out only to those who are senior in the Jehovah's Witnesses. These reveal the organisation's reluctance to involve the secular authorities in cases where a crime has been committed by one Witness against another.

Caroline Wyatt hears from former Witnesses who have suffered abuse and who claim that the organisation's doctrine and procedures have allowed offenders within the congregation to avoid prosecution.

Presenter: Caroline Wyatt
Producer: Hannah Barnes.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b062n1fk)
Supermarkets

Food deflation, the rise of the discount grocers and continuing price wars. Evan Davis and guests discuss who are the long-term winners in the supermarkets' battle to gain market share.

Guests:
Mark Price, Managing Director, Waitrose
Steve Murrells, CEO, Co-operative Foods
Kevin Gunter, Chairman, Fulton's Foods

Producer:
Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b062n1f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Punt PI (b049p9yp)
Series 7

The Baker Street Bank Robbery

Steve Punt turns gumshoe, investigating curious rumours surrounding the Baker Street bank robbery of 1971.

Quite possibly the most audacious heist in British history, the robbers tunnelled into the bank's vault from the basement of a shop two doors down. They escaped with a haul worth an estimated £30 million today.

Though four robbers were convicted, intriguing claims persist - most notably that the security services mounted the heist to secure compromising photographs of a senior public figure.

Punt sifts the evidence, calls in the experts and attempts to establish fact from fiction.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0630hf8)
Obama tells BBC his biggest disappointment is lack of progress on gun control.

President speaks exclusively to BBC's North America editor on eve of visit to Kenya


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b062n1fm)
The Girl on the Train

Episode 9

Paula Hawkins' international bestseller comes to BBC Radio 4 in this thrilling multi-voice narration starring Sally Hawkins, Lyndsey Marshal and Zoe Tapper.

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. 'Jess and Jason', she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she's only watched from afar. Now they'll see: she's much more than just the girl on the train...

Readers:
Rachel ..... Sally Hawkins
Megan ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Anna ..... Zoe Tapper

Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


THU 23:00 Jeremy Hardy Speaks to the Nation (b04hyy1f)
Series 10

How to Define Oneself in Terms of Regional, Cultural and Geopolitical Identity Without Tears

Jeremy Hardy dispassionately examines the questions of nationality, identity and accents. The noo.

Helping him get to grips with the new world will be stand-up comedian Susan Murray and, broadly speaking, Scotsman Moray Hunter (Absolutely).

Few can forget where they were when they first heard "Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation". The show was an immediate smash-hit success, causing pubs to empty on a Saturday night, which was particularly astonishing since the show went out on Thursdays. The Light Entertainment department was besieged, questions were asked in the House and Jeremy Hardy himself became known as the man responsible for the funniest show on radio since Money Box Live with Paul Lewis.

Since that fateful first series, Jeremy went on to win Sony Awards, Writers Guild nominations and a Nobel Prize for Chemistry. He was a much-loved regular on both The News Quiz and I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Written by Jeremy Hardy

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014. .


THU 23:30 China's Football Revolution (b05wz0kh)
Episode 1

China may be the most populous country in the world with growing importance on the global stage but, as football fan Clive Anderson discovers, international success at the world's most popular sport has eluded this vast country.

In Beijing and Guangzhou, Clive explores why China ranks only 82nd in the world and has only qualified for one World Cup, despite the huge popularity of football among fans.

Football in China has been plagued by years of corruption scandals, match fixing and bribery, and over 50 football officials were imprisoned in a crackdown in 2012. Clive speaks to a former Chinese player who found himself involved in the scandal, discussing how it has affected the game.

Does football really matter when the country is becoming so successful economically? The country's President Xi Jinping thinks it does. A football fan himself, he's issued a major reform to try and turn the game around and put China on a course to win the World Cup. He's even invited stars such as David Beckham to become an ambassador for the game.

Clive visits clubs, matches, and the largest football academy in the world, built by a multi-billion dollar property tycoon, to find out whether efforts to improve the national game are paying off.

The European leagues are also keen to get in on the Chinese game by training coaches. In the second programme, Clive considers what impact China's desire for football success has had on its relationship with the rest of the footballing world.

Produced by Jo Wheeler
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 24 JULY 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b062hbk8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b062mhnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b062hbkb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b062hbkd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b062hbkj)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b062hbkl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b062ztc0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sarah Joseph.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b062ncyj)
Neonics, Badger vaccines

Farming Minister George Eustice gives more details on Defra's decision to allow farmers to use controversial neonicotinoid seed treatments on 5% of the oilseed rape crop area. The pesticide has been linked to declines in bee populations and there's a two year ban on their use at EU level. Mr Eustice tells Charlotte Smith the ban is still in place - but emergency use has been granted for farmers in Suffolk. It's area worst hit by damage from flea beetles, which they claim has increased in number since the ban was put in place.
Also - why there's a shortage of badger vaccine for some vaccination programmes in England.
The producer is Sally Challoner.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03tj99h)
Wigeon

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the wigeon. Wigeon are dabbling ducks and related to mallards and teal but unlike these birds Wigeon spend much of their time out of the water grazing waterside pastures with their short blue-grey bills. The drakes are handsome-looking birds with chestnut heads and a cream forehead which contrasts well with their pale grey bodies.

John Aitchison recorded a flock of wigeon, for Tweet listeners, on a pool in Norfolk where they had found a safe place to roost on an island.


FRI 06:00 Today (b062n4n2)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b062hplj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b062n4n4)
On the Move

Ill Health and Love

The writer and physician Oliver Sacks finds love in today's episode of his candid memoir. First of all he confronts his own ill health and the effects on his eyesight which are disabling but also "enthralling".

Read by Oliver Ford Davies
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b062ncyl)
Abortion clinics and protest, Power List influencer Zanny Minton Beddoes, Prom composers

Tansy Davies joins fellow composer Shiori Usui to talk about the inspiration behind two very different pieces of work they've created for the Proms. Are protests outside abortion clinics having an impact on the provision of services to women? Labour MP Diane Abbott and Genevieve Edwards of Marie Stopes UK discuss. Power List influencer Zanny Minton Beddoes on reaching the eyes and ears of world leaders as editor-in-chief of The Economist. With hard working families high on the political agenda, we ask whether the needs of the traditional family - often with a stay at home parent - are being overlooked.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Anne Peacock.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b062n4n6)
Rachel's Cousins

Episode 5

When her boss offers her a promotion Rachel has to decide where her loyalties lie.

Glasgow lawyer Rachel is dealing with the wayward relatives she's been brought up to ignore after discovering they share the BRCA2 cancer gene.

Conclusion of Ann Marie Di Mambro's five-part drama.

Rachel..............................................................TAMARA KENNEDY
Marilyn.............................................................GABRIEL QUIGLEY
Josie.....................................................................KAREN BARTKE
Shirley.................. ............................................ SARAH McCARDIE
Bobby....................................... ............................ALAN McHUGH
Alex ........................................ ...............................ROBIN LAING
Kevin .................................................................STEVIE HANNAN
Becca...............................................................NICOLA JO CULLY
Carol...................................................................VERONICA LEER

Other parts are played by the cast.

Directed at BBC Scotland by Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


FRI 11:00 Who Wants to Be a Nurse? (b062n4n8)
Episode 2

Professional nursing bodies have long debated how best to train our nurses so that they have the mix of skills they need to serve patients well. Jenny Clayton follows a variety of nurses in training, to explore the purpose and future of nursing in the modern NHS.

In this second programme, Jenny meets nurses at Princess Alexandra Hospital in Harlow, Essex, who have carried on their training since they first qualified. She follows them as they reflect on their roles, from treating patients in A&E, to managing a complex care ward.

Ruth Palmer is an Emergency Nurse Practitioner, which means she's trained to diagnose and treat a range of injuries and illnesses - someone with a broken arm, for example, might be assessed, put in plaster and discharged by Ruth, without ever seeing a doctor. "Some people don't want to be seen by 'just a nurse', but that's fine, that's their choice. Quite often the queue for the doctor's twice as long, but that's fine if that patient wants to see a doctor. But that very rarely happens."

Caroline Ashton is Ward Manager of a Complex Care Ward, which deals with patients with long term chronic conditions. "I'm probably known on the ward as the person that baths the most patients, because I think that's the time you have the opportunity to find out how the patient is."

Meanwhile, there's a shortage of nurses across the country. In the year to March 2014, hospitals in Essex spent £18 million on agency staff. We hear from a former nurse who left Princess Alexandra ten years ago, but who's now completed a Return to Practice course - part of an initiative to draw on the pool of nursing talent not currently working in the field.

Producer: Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Clare in the Community (b062n4nb)
Series 10

Sisters

Clare and her estranged sister are forced to co-operate with one another, in between some Sparrowhawk team lead self-defence training.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Clare continually struggles to control both her professional and private life In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden.

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Nali/ Megan ...... Nina Conti
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Helen ...... Pippa Haywood
Simon ...... Andrew Wincott
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Joan/ Sarah Barker ...... Sarah Thom
Scarlett ...... Eleanor Curry
Stine Wetzel ...... Amelia Lowdell
Hunter ...... Neet Mohan
Dylan ...... Elliot Steel

Producer Alexandra Smith.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b062hbkn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 A History of Ideas (b062n4nd)
Philosopher Timothy Secret on Ancestor Worship

If we're to live well together we must first learn to live well with the dead, says Timothy Secret.

At traditional Chinese funerals money, and sometimes paper effigies of goods like washing machines and aeroplanes are burned so that the dead might be adequately equipped in the afterlife. To the Western onlooker this can feel strange but Timothy Secret believes we have something to learn.

For Confucius, the Chinese teacher and thinker, respect for and obedience to your parents is one of the most important rules to follow in life and Frances Wood, an expert in Chinese history and society explains why this applies even after their death: observing proper mourning rituals and then honouring your ancestors through twice yearly grave tending.

Darian Leader, a psychoanalyst, sets out how Western attitudes towards mourning and the dead have become disrupted veering between the two extremes of determined "closure" and "moving on" on the one hand and excessive obsession with the dead on the other.

Producer: Natalie Steed.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b062ncyn)
Bothies, Rail passenger assistance, Choose what you pay

Bothies: the beautiful places where you can stay for free. It's fifty years since a charity was set up to maintain basic shelters in remote parts of Britain. We spend the night at one in Kielder Forest in Northumberland and head to the Isle of Skye where the charity's first new-build bothy is about to open.

Passengers who need help getting on and off trains can book assistance in advance. But how reliable is the service?

As the Halle Orchestra becomes the latest outfit to let audiences choose what they pay we assess the success of similar schemes.

Presenter: Andrea Catherwood
Producer: Jon Douglas.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b062hbkq)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b062ncyq)
As Turkish military aircraft have for the first time carried out air strikes inside Syria on the group that calls itself Islamic State, what does this mean for IS, and the Kurdish population of Syria and Turkey, who so far have led the fightback against IS?
We've the latest on plans to deal with Operation Stack, which is causing widespread disruption in Kent.
A report on why stress is causing a recruitment crisis amongst head teachers.
Former Environment Secretary Lord Deben passes the slide rule across the Government's Green credentials.
And...how much does motherhood damage careers?With Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:45 Brits Abroad (b0645fz0)
Bulgaria

Sarfraz Manzoor meets the British retirees who are moving to rural villages in Bulgaria and can have a good life on their UK pensions.

They can buy a house for as little as the cost of a 'second hand car', as younger Bulgarians abandon their homes for the city lights or opportunities in the cities or other countries like Britain.

Despite the fact that life is hard for Bulgarians, they welcome the Brits, recognising the benefits they bring to village life and the local economy. Retired Brits also benefit from the reciprocal health care and, when Sally Rickard had breast cancer, all her treatment was free and there were no waiting lists.

By contrast, Bulgarians often have to pay for medication and towards treatment. Such is the plight
of some of their Bulgarian neighbours that a group of Brits have set up a charity to help them.

None want to go back to UK and are worried that, if Britain left the EU, they wouldn't be able to afford to continue living in Bulgaria.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b062kcdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b062n4ng)
Rumpole

Rumpole and the Tap End

Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Rumpole in a story written by John Mortimer and adapted by Richard Stoneman.

Tony Timson finds himself in hot water when charged with the attempted drowning of his wife April, while sharing a bath with her. Rumpole not only defends Tony but also protects Judge Guthrie Featherstone QC as he upsets women everywhere with sexist pronouncements about their proper place in the tub.

Rumpole and Tony Timson have a conference in Brixton Prison where Timson explains that April had been planning to wear outrageous clothes to a party on the night in question. The party was at the home of a friend, Chrissie. One of the party guests would be Peter ‘Peanuts’ Molloy. Molloys vs Timsons equals Montagues vs Capulets. Tony Timson says that April wound him up by suggesting Peanuts was more virile than he was.

Cast:
Horace Rumpole ….. Benedict Cumberbatch
Hilda Rumpole ….. Jasmine Hyde
Claude Erskine-Brown ..… Nigel Anthony
Tony Timson ..... Stephen Critchlow
Guthrie Featherstone ..... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Charles Hearthstoke ….. David Shaw-Parker
Phillida Erskine-Brown ….. Cathy Sara

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Catherine Bailey
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b062n4nj)
Summer Garden Party

Eric Robson hosts the GQT Summer Garden Party from the National Botanic Garden of Wales.

Chris Beardshaw, Bob Flowerdew, Pippa Greenwood and Bunny Guinness answer questions from the marquee, Terry Walton provides the ultimate guide to running a greenhouse, and we listen in to some top tips from the Potting Shed.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 The Computer Speaks (b062n4nl)
Secondary Memory

An original short story for radio by Danielle McLaughlin.

Our relationship with computers is an intimate one. What do they know of our lives? And what would they say about us if they could speak? The second of three stories about computers finding their voice.

Danielle McLaughlin's stories have appeared in newspapers and magazines such as The Stinging Fly, The Irish Times, The Penny Dreadful, Long Story, Short and The New Yorker. She is currently Editor for Short Stories in English at Southword Journal. Her debut collection of short stories, Dinosaurs on Other Planets, will be published in Ireland in October 2015 by The Stinging Fly Press, and in the UK (John Murray), US (Random House) and Germany (Luchterhand) in 2016.

Producer: Mair Bosworth
Reader: Samuel Barnett.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b062ndjr)
Scot Breithaupt, E. L. Doctorow, Claudia Alexander, Ron Pollard, Magali Noel

Matthew Bannister on space scientist Claudia Alexander, bookie Ron Pollard, author E.L. Doctorow, BMX pioneer Scot Breithaupt, actress Magali Noel.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b062ndjt)
The Government has opened the public consultation period on the future of the BBC - but how much impact will your views have on their decision? The BBC Trust has also launched its own public consultation. Some Feedback listeners say they're confused about the process and what they're being consulted on. Roger Bolton sheds some light on the process.

For the last three weeks, Radio 4's One to One interview has featured Selina Scott looking at the world of ghostly apparitions. The series has drawn criticism from some listeners, who felt that a more scientific and challenging approach was needed. Series Producer Lucy Lunt discusses whether there is a place on Radio 4 for the spiritual and non-scientific.

Feedback about the quality of science reporting often appears in our inbox - some listeners cry 'oversimplification' and 'sensationalism'. But in this week's programme we hear from a listener with cautious praise for a Today Programme report on a possible link between tobacco and psychosis. Journalists dealing with health and science have to report in a world of competitive academia and commercial pharmaceuticals, with reports and studies vying for influence and publicity. Roger speaks to the BBC's Health Correspondent Jane Dreaper, to find out how she approaches reporting scientific research and potential medical breakthroughs.

And finally, Oasis songwriter Noel Gallagher sat down with Kirtsy Young to choose his Desert Island Discs this week. While some listeners thought that the Britpop Mancunian wasn't really Desert Island Discs material, many others praised the programme for revealing Gallagher's softer side.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b062n4nn)
Jo and Louis - Dream School

Fi Glover with a conversation between a mother and her nine-year old son. Being home-schooled is preferable to his experience at school, but he knows what would suit him better. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b062ndjw)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b062hbks)
24/07/15: Aylesbury child sex ring convicted

Six men found guilty of repeatedly abusing two schoolgirls over several years
Turkey to continue attacks against Islamic State
And the new bomb-proof "flybag" for planes


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b062n4nq)
Series 46

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis with Gemma Whelan, Jon Holmes and Mitch Benn present the week's news through stand-up and sketches. This week the cast are joined by Elis James and BBC Technology Correspondant Rory Cellan-Jones.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b062kcpf)
Debbie's heading home. Jennifer wonders why Kate is meeting up with a friend who did Business studies. (Debbie knows about Kate's business idea but says nothing).

Jim grapples with his crossword - something he usually does with Christine. Kenton says he can always pop round to see her at the Lodge. Jim's clearly a bit down. He admits he's nervous about Susan's plans for the village shop - it could lose all its character. Kenton's planning the renovation for The Bull, eagerly showing Jim the ground plans.

Brian's considering bringing someone in to Home Farm to work with Adam and oversee him. Debbie can't believe it and warns Brian not to drive Adam away. Debbie worries about going back to Hungary and leaving her family in 'melt down'. After some persuasion from Debbie, Brian accepts that Adam has earned the right to fail. Brian admits that David has been raving about Adam's ability. Charlie seems to think he's God's gift!

Debbie senses that something went on between Charlie and Adam and asks him about it - he just seems different around Charlie. She points out that he and Ian still haven't set a date for their wedding. Adam assures Debbie there's nothing going on. Debbie accepts this, but not without pointing out what a bad idea casual flings are.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b062ndjy)
The Legend of Barney Thomson, Annie Nightingale and Pete Tong, Michael Morpurgo, York galleries

Robert Carlyle's directorial debut The Legend of Barney Thomson, in which he stars alongside Emma Thompson, is reviewed by Hannah McGill.

As DJ Pete Tong prepares to host the first Radio 1 Prom at the Albert Hall next week, he and Annie Nightingale reflect on the rise and rise of dance music.

Writer Michael Morpurgo and Cornwall-based Kneehigh Theatre's artistic director Emma Rice discuss 946, a new stage adaptation of his book The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips, set amid the secretive and tragic Second World War D-Day landing rehearsals in South Devon.

Yorkshire Art Gallery re-opens next week after a £8m redevelopment. Janet Barnes, CEO of Yorkshire Museums Trust, discusses the new space and the gallery's controversial decision to charge an entry fee.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b062n4n6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b062n4ns)
Frank Field MP, Claire Fox, Robert Halfon MP, Michael Morpurgo

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Exeter Further Education College with a panel including the new Chair of the Work and Pensions Select Committee Frank Field MP, the founder and director of the think tank the Institute of Ideas, the Minister without Portfolio and Deputy Chairman of the Conservative Party, Robert Halfon MP, and the former Children's Laureate, writer and founder of Farms for City Children Michael Morpurgo.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b062n4nv)
Peter Aspden: In Love with Greece

Peter Aspden thinks the powerful influence of Greece, both ancient and modern, on European sensibilities makes the current economic crisis full of emotionally charged symbolism.
"I often think that the hostility between Greece and its harshest current antagonist Germany, for example, is best seen as a furious tiff between former lovers."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 A History of Ideas (b062n4nx)
Omnibus

How Should We Live Together?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices. An opportunity to hear all this week's programmes in this Omnibus edition.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking 'How should we live together?'

Helping him answer it are the historian Justin Champion, economist Kate Barker, and the philosophers Angie Hobbs and Timothy Secret.

Across the week Justin, Kate, Angie and Timothy took us further into the question, with programmes of their own. They examined ideas about tolerating others, respecting our ancestors, the morality of the Free Market, and Plato's ideas about the importance of philosopher rulers.

This omnibus edition has all five programmes together.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b062hbkv)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b062ndk0)
Amber Rudd: I'm no climate change denier

New Climate Secretary says Conservatives committed to taking action


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b062n4nz)
The Girl on the Train

Episode 10

Paula Hawkins' international bestseller comes to BBC Radio 4 in this thrilling multi-voice narration starring Sally Hawkins, Lyndsey Marshal and Zoe Tapper.

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. 'Jess and Jason', she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she's only watched from afar. Now they'll see: she's much more than just the girl on the train...

Readers:
Rachel ..... Sally Hawkins
Megan ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Anna ..... Zoe Tapper

Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b062kg74)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 China's Football Revolution (b05xj1ql)
Episode 2

China, a country of over 1.3 billion people, is riding high on the global stage. But success at the world's most popular sport is eluding the nation.

In the second part of his series on the growth of football in China, Clive Anderson explores the relationship between Britain and China as President Xi Jinping embarks on a massive football reform programme.

Clive visits a school in Beijing where PE teachers are being trained by Premier League coaches, and he explores how foreign players are being imported to improve the Chinese game. Even David Beckham has been hired as a Chinese football Ambassador.

But can China achieve the same success at football as it has in Olympic sports - and what impact might this have on its relationship with the rest of the world?

Produced by Jo Wheeler
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b062n4p1)
Nabbs and Maria - The Relapse and the Relationship

Fi Glover with a couple whose happy relationship was put at risk by his relapse into addiction, but who are making tentative steps to re-build what was lost. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b062jsn5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b062jsn5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b062kdd3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b062kdd3)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b062ktl9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b062ktl9)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b062mxfg)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b062mxfg)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b062n4n6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b062n4n6)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b062kg74)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b062kg74)

A History of Ideas 12:04 MON (b062jsnc)

A History of Ideas 12:04 TUE (b062kdd7)

A History of Ideas 12:04 WED (b062ktlh)

A History of Ideas 12:04 THU (b062mxfp)

A History of Ideas 12:04 FRI (b062n4nd)

A History of Ideas 21:00 FRI (b062n4nx)

A Pocketful of Rye 19:45 SUN (b062j2y0)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b061tsyp)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b062n4nv)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b061qhtf)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0630p11)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b062dh8q)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b061tsym)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b062n4ns)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b062dhgb)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b062n1f9)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b062n1f9)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b062hdp6)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b062hdp6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b063jr7f)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b062k3fl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b062kx51)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b062n1fm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b062n4nz)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b061ttfm)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b062jsmz)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b062jsmz)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b062kb03)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b062kb03)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b062kqyn)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b062kqyn)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b062mhnn)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b062mhnn)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b062n4n4)

Brits Abroad 13:45 MON (b062jsnm)

Brits Abroad 13:45 TUE (b0643t2r)

Brits Abroad 13:45 WED (b0645548)

Brits Abroad 13:45 THU (b0645fwv)

Brits Abroad 13:45 FRI (b0645fz0)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b062hpld)

Bunk Bed 23:00 WED (b062kx53)

China's Football Revolution 23:30 THU (b05wz0kh)

China's Football Revolution 23:27 FRI (b05xj1ql)

Clare in the Community 11:30 FRI (b062n4nb)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b061qhsx)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b062jy90)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b062mxfj)

Curious Under the Stars 14:15 WED (b062kx4b)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b062hplj)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b062hplj)

Document 16:00 TUE (b062kg72)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b062htlc)

Drama 14:15 MON (b062jy8y)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b062kfmg)

Drama 14:15 THU (b036twsz)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b062n4ng)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b062dh6v)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b062j848)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b062k7ps)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b062kphp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b062mf8r)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b062ncyj)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b061txyz)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b062ndjt)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b061qzx6)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b061t68t)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b062kx4v)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b062dhg6)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b062dhg6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b061pym3)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b062jz7m)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b062khlf)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b062kx4q)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b062n1ff)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b062ndjy)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b061tqv7)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b062n4nj)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (b061qht5)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b062jy98)

I, Regress 23:15 WED (b01s0dlz)

In Search of the Black Mozart 13:30 SUN (b05wdsnl)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b062khlk)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b062khlm)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b062khlm)

Inside the Ethics Committee 22:15 SAT (b061tfmp)

Inside the Ethics Committee 09:00 THU (b062mhnl)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 TUE (b062khlc)

It's a Fair Cop 18:30 THU (b062n1fc)

Jeremy Hardy Speaks to the Nation 23:00 THU (b04hyy1f)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 11:30 WED (b03brkf1)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b061txyx)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b062ndjr)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b062hn6l)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b062dh8x)

Made in Bristol 00:30 SUN (b01dj7sv)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b062kfmj)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b061pylk)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b062hb8c)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b062hbc7)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b062hbf5)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b062hbgj)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b062hbhw)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b062hbk8)

Mind Changers 11:00 MON (b062jsn7)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b062dh75)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b062dh75)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b062kx4d)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b062kx4s)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w9b5n)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w9b5t)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b061pylt)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b062hb8r)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b062hbch)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b062hbff)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b062hbgs)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b062hbj4)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b062hbkl)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b062hb8t)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b061pym5)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b062hb94)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b062hbcm)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b062hbfh)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b062hbgv)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b062hbj6)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b062hbkn)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b061pylw)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b062hb8y)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b062hb92)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b061pyml)

News 13:00 SAT (b061pym9)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 09:00 WED (b062kqyl)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 21:30 WED (b062kqyl)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b062kb01)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b062hx63)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b062hx63)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b061tg81)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b062n1f5)

PM 17:00 SAT (b062dh8v)

PM 17:00 MON (b062jy96)

PM 17:00 TUE (b062kg76)

PM 17:00 WED (b062kx4l)

PM 17:00 THU (b06301gd)

PM 17:00 FRI (b062ndjw)

Past Imperfect 21:00 WED (b062kx4x)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b062j2xt)

Poetry in the Remaking 23:30 SAT (b061pqlk)

Poetry in the Remaking 16:30 SUN (b062j06m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b061ttlf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b0630nxr)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0630pfb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0630q6c)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0630g5w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b062ztc0)

Punt PI 21:30 THU (b049p9yp)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b062hn6q)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b062hn6q)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b062hn6q)

Random Radio 15:30 TUE (b062kg70)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 09:00 MON (b062jsmv)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 21:30 MON (b062jsmv)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b03hmh3t)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b062dh6z)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b062dhg8)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 MON (b062jsn9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b061pylp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b062hb8k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b062hbcc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b062hbf9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b062hbgn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b062hbj0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b062hbkd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b061pylm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b061pylr)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b061pymc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b062hb8f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b062hb8p)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b062hb9t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b062hbc9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b062hbcf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b062hbf7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b062hbfc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b062hbgl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b062hbgq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b062hbhy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b062hbj2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b062hbkb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b062hbkj)

Short Cuts 23:00 MON (b05pn672)

Should Extremism Be a Crime? 20:00 TUE (b062khlh)

Simon Evans Goes to Market 18:30 WED (b062kx4n)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b061pymh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b062hb9y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b062hbct)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b062hbfm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b062hbgz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b062hbjb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b062hbks)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b062hn6j)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b062hn6j)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b062hn6s)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b062hn6n)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b062hplg)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b062j2xw)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b062j2xw)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b062jy9b)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b062jy9b)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b062kcyx)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b062kcyx)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b062kc9x)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b062kc9x)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b062kcdv)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b062kcdv)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b062kcpf)

The Bletchley Girls 11:00 WED (b062ktlf)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b061tk9l)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b062n1fk)

The Computer Speaks 15:45 FRI (b062n4nl)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b061tk96)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b062n1f7)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b062htl5)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b062htl5)

The Great Songbook 11:30 TUE (b062kdd5)

The Hang Drum Phenomenon 15:30 SAT (b061qsdr)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b062jy94)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b062jy94)

The Kindness of Strangers 19:15 SUN (b062j2xy)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b062k9zz)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b062k9zz)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b062htl9)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b062ktlc)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b062n4nn)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b062n4p1)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b062kx4j)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b061tqvh)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b062n4nq)

The Report 20:00 THU (b0612hjs)

The Stuarts 21:00 SAT (b061pqlf)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b062dh73)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b062htl7)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b062k3fj)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b062khlz)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b062kx4z)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0630hf8)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b062ndk0)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b061t68c)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b062kx4g)

Time Noodles 11:30 THU (b062mxfl)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b062k3fn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b062khm8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b062kx55)

Today 07:00 SAT (b062dh6x)

Today 06:00 MON (b062jsmq)

Today 06:00 TUE (b062k7pv)

Today 06:00 WED (b062kpqj)

Today 06:00 THU (b062mfqv)

Today 06:00 FRI (b062n4n2)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03dwvx5)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03thvvc)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03thwm0)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03thwdy)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03thwxg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03tj99h)

Ways of Thinking 20:00 MON (b05pl2rx)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b061pyly)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b061pym1)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b061pym7)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b061pymf)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b062hb8w)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b062hb90)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b062hb9l)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b062hb9w)

Weather 05:56 MON (b062hbck)

Weather 12:57 MON (b062hbcp)

Weather 21:58 MON (b062hbcw)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b062hbfk)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b062hbfp)

Weather 12:57 WED (b062hbgx)

Weather 12:57 THU (b062hbj8)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b062hbkq)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b062hbkv)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b062j3md)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b062j3mg)

Who Wants to Be a Nurse? 11:00 FRI (b062n4n8)

Will Gompertz Gets Creative 10:30 SAT (b062dh71)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b062jy92)

Witness 09:30 WED (b0639lr4)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b062dh8s)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b062jsn3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b062kdd1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b062kqyq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b062mhnq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b062ncyl)

World at One 13:00 MON (b062jsnk)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b062zzyf)

World at One 13:00 WED (b062ktrs)

World at One 13:00 THU (b06301gb)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b062ncyq)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b062jsnh)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b062kdd9)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b062ktrq)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b06301g8)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b062ncyn)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b061ttmf)