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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 JULY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0606k29)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b06172qn)
Georgina Howell - Queen of the Desert

Episode 5

The story of Gertrude Bell and her crucial role in the foundation of the state of Iraq.

With the new King, Faisal, safely installed, Gertrude's energies turned to the establishment of a museum in Baghdad to house the extraordinary collection of artefacts that chronicled Iraq's ancient history.

First published in 2006, Queen of the Desert by Georgina Howell has been reissued - partly to coincide with the Werner Herzog film of the same title, but also to provide the long view on the troubled history of a remarkable country.

Using letters written by Gertrude Bell throughout the period, the book tells the story of an extraordinarily talented and determined woman who has often been overshadowed by her more famous friend, T.E. Lawrence.

Read by Sylvestra le Touzel and Deborah Findlay (the letters)

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0606k2c)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0606k2f)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0606k2h)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0606k2k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b060bxr3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Leslie Griffiths.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b060q9b6)
'I realised the crisis was coming for me.' A Greek woman talks to iPM about the financial crisis in her country and the unexpected events which brought her to the UK. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0606k2m)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0606k2p)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b060bf65)
The Lengthsman with Antony Gormley

The Landmark Trust exists to save endangered important buildings and to enable people to inhabit them. For their 50th anniversary they invited one of our most celebrated artists Sir Antony Gormley to create a sculpture at 5 iconic locations across the country. The centre point of these 5 pieces is The Lengthsmans Cottage in Lowsonford which sits on the side of the Stratford-Upon-Avon canal in Warwickshire. Each work of art has been composed in direct response to the landscape which surrounds them and here the figure perches on the very edge of the lock gazing down into the depths of the rushing water as the calm yet industrious life of the canal unfolds below.

Helen Mark meets Sir Antony Gormley as he returns to the site for a final inspection and he explains how for him this figure represents our need to reconnect with our industrial heritage, man's essential drive to make things. As the programme unfolds we hear more about the secret life of the canal, the people who keep it running and the wildlife that live along it. Perhaps an unlikely spot to find the work of such an influential artist, Helen discovers that the canal in fact provides a perfect gallery as those who use it can view and react to the figure as they float by.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b060q9b8)
Farming Today This Week: Flowers

The vast majority of cut flowers sold in the UK are imported. It's estimated than only seven per cent are grown here in the UK, but many British flower producers are determined to change that. For Farming Today This Week, Charlotte Smith visits the Hampton Court Flower Show to talk to those who grow, market, and sell flowers. It's an industry which the government estimates is worth £10 billion pounds to the UK economy.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0606k2r)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b060q9bb)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b060q9jt)
Sally Phillips

Writer and actress Sally Phillips first appeared regularly on our screens in female comedy series Smack the Pony. Roles in Alan Partridge and Bridget Jones soon followed and since then she's carved out a niche as one of the UK's top comedy actors - appearing in Rescue Me, Parents, Skins and Jam and Jerusalem in the UK and Green Wing, Veep and Parents across the pond. On Radio 4 she's Claire in the Community, she's popularised the phrase "bear with..." as posh girl Tilly in TV sitcom Miranda and wrote film The Decoy Bride starring David Tennant. She joins us fresh from wrapping on Austen/ Zombie mash up: 'Pride, Prejudice and Zombies'.

Colin Furze lives in Stamford, Lincolnshire where he was born. A former plumber, he now works as an inventor creating weird and wonderful inventions such as a flamethrower scooter and the world's fastest mobility scooter, for which he set a new world record.

Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich met twelve years ago in an Italian restaurant in Israel. They moved to the UK and worked at Oxo Tower, J Sheekey and Ottolenghi, before setting up their own restaurant, Honey & Co, serving their version of middle eastern food.

Toby Jones is the author of three novels and three works of non fiction including 'The Dark Heart of Italy'. Six years ago he and his wife decided to start an experiment in communal living in Somerset. They bought a house in Windsor Hill Wood, and set about finding guests to create what has become a successful and well known refuge for those needing respite from their ordinary lives.

Ex Jackson 5 member and guitarist Tito Jackson chooses his inheritance tracks. He inherited
Papa's Got a Brand New Bag by James Brown and would pass on Thank You by Sly & The Family Stone.

Two listeners who were caught up in the 7/7 bombings in London in 2005 say special thank yous to two guardian angels.

And Charles Collingwood aka Brian from The Archers tells us about his Saturday passion for cricket.

Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich's The Baking Book
and
A Place of Refuge by Tobias Jones
are out now.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 Pussy Galore (b060q9jw)
Susan Calman finds out why our feline overlords rule cyberspace. In an age where celebrity cats star in films, host talk shows and have lucrative book deals, Susan tries to make her own fur babies into viral internet sensations.

She is inspired by speaking to celebrity cat Lil Bub - who has been viewed over 30 million times on youtube, and Will Braden, cat video maker and winner of the first ever "Golden Kitty", awarded by the Internet Cat Video Festival at the prestigious Walker Art Center. Author Tom Cox whose cats have twitter accounts tells Susan how to tweet like a cat and Jack Shepherd, beastmaster of news and entertainment website Buzzfeed explains why - on the internet - cats beats dogs. Fellow comedians Vikki Stone, Angela Barnes and Pippa Evans advise Susan on what she should film her cats doing - for maximum comedy value.

With all this expert guidance - will Susan be able to capture a moment of spontaneous hilarity to make her cats the next feline internet sensation?

Presenter: Susan Calman

Producer: Rachel Ross.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b060q9jy)
Tom Newton Dunn of the Sun looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Dealing with the threat of Islamic terrorism, what room to manoeuvre does the chancellor have in next week's budget, and is there real benefit for an MP who employs a partner to help in his or her office?
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0606k2t)
Greek Tragedies

Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories. Today: Theopi Skarlatos traces the growing divide in Athens; Nick Thorpe says it's not just Italy and Greece that thousands of migrants are heading for - Hungary is now putting up the barbed wire to stem the tide; Mark Urban is in Bosnia where 20 years ago the flow of mujaheddin fighters was into the former Yugoslavia but now the government there is worried about the consequences of that; Kirsty Land learns why a two and a half thousand year old play from ancient Greece still resonates in a refugee camp in Beirut; and Alastair Leithead checks out of Hotel California - but can he ever really leave?


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b0606k2w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b060q9k0)
IHT threshold, Savings safety limit, Tax credits for new claimants

On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

The amount of savings that are protected if a bank goes bust is to be cut by £10,000. The Prudential Regulatory Authority has announced that the current £85,000 limit will fall to £75,000 from 1 January 2016. The PRA blames the falling euro for the cut. But there's good news too for some savers with temporary higher balances. There will be FSCS protection on balances up to £1mn for up to six months. Anna Bowes, Savings Champion, explains the changes.

This week the Bank of England revealed that buy to let homes now account for nearly one in seven mortgages and about one in five new loans and warned the sector could pose a risk for financial stability. Buy to let landlords can claim the interest on their mortgage as a business expense and offset it against any profit they make before tax is levied. Is it just a normal business expense that must be preserved? Or is it time to look at this tax relief again? Housing experts Professor Michael Ball and economist Angus Hanton, debate the issues.

Chancellor George Osborne's Budget is to confirm the end of inheritance tax on family homes worth up to £1m. He is expected to tell MPs on Wednesday that the threshold at which the tax is levied will rise for couples from £650,000 after April 2017.

The Supreme Court has decided that if a customer is not told fully about the amount of commission earned on an insurance product and who receives it then that could create what is called an 'unfair relationship' between the insurer and the client and that could mean the whole contract was void. This wide ranging judgement over a PPI case was announced on 12 November. But the FCA has still not decided exactly how this court decision will be implemented - either for current sales or for PPI compensation. Money Box unpicks what all this might mean.

Labour MP Frank Field explains to Money Box his plans to phase out the £30 billion a year tax credit scheme completely. Field wants the government to end what he calls the "welfare dependency of large numbers of employers" who pay low wages and then "dip into taxpayers' pockets" to make those wages up to a decent level. But he does think that tax credits could be stopped now for new claimants and phased out by 2020 for existing ones, replacing their need for benefits with higher pay.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b060bwds)
Series 46

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week's news through stand-up and sketches. This week the cast are joined by alternative comedy legend Alexei Sayle and Political Editor for Sky News Faisal Islam.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0606k2y)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0606k30)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b060bxpg)
Chris Grayling MP, Sir Peter Kendall, Khalid Mahmood MP, Vicky Pryce

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Weobley Village Hall in Herefordshire with the Leader of the House of Commons, Chris Grayling MP; Sir Peter Kendall, former President of the National Farmers Union (NFU) and the current chair of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board; Labour MP for Birmingham Perry Barr Khalid Mahmood MP; and the Greek-born British economist, and former Joint Head of the United Kingdom's Government Economic Service, Vicky Pryce.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b060q9k2)
Radicalisation, Greek debt crisis, Milk prices

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? including tackling the radicalisation of young people, the Greek debt crisis, and the impact of low milk prices on farmers.

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producers: Alex Lewis, Angie Nehring.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01qgr4f)
Mark Davies Markham - The Liberty of Norton Folgate

London's rich past as a melting pot of cultures is one of the themes of Madness's 2009 album - The Liberty of Norton Folgate, which has inspired Mark Davies Markham's play. Gazi and Sitara have been serving full English breakfasts at the Union Café on London's Norton Folgate for thirty years. But now the council have served a demolition order, and it looks as if their son Aki's girlfriend's father, Ralph Burke, is behind the plan to develop the site. No one is going to let the Union go without a fight, and soon Gazi and Sitara find that they have the support of pop royalty in the form of Suggs, Chas Smith and Mike Barson from Madness.

Directed by Jeremy Mortimer

Mark Davies Markham writes scripts for TV, theatre and radio. 'Taboo' the West End musical he wrote for Boy George was nominated for an Olivier Award . 'Eric' his recent play for the Liverpool Everyman was also about the music industry.


SAT 15:30 The Kampala Dream House (b06086dq)
Sarah Taylor visits this remarkable children's home in Kampala, Uganda.

Amidst the slums of Kampala, MLISADA is a success story. (Music, life skills and arts for destitution alleviation.)

It's a children's home set up and run by former street kids who learned to play brass instruments. 12 years on, it cares for 90 children, teaches them music and acrobatics and they are safe from the perils of street life. Former pupils like euphonium player, Franke, have gone on to be teachers within the wider school communities of Kampala. It's supported by keen brass players from around the world - including BA pilot and trumpet player, Jim Trott who took star trumpet players Alison Balsom and Guy Barker out there last January to run music workshops with the pupils.

Sarah talks to Alison about how her involvement with the work of Brass for Africa has influenced her approach to performing on concert platforms around the world.

Most importantly, if you get to live in the Dream House, as it's known by the kids, you've got a chance of a future. A future where you can learn to be a teacher, or simply access a better school and then go on to get a better job because you've got the bedrock of living at MLISADA. And you'll be a great trumpet player too!

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b060q9k5)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Woman's Hour 2015 Power List - Influencers

An opportunity to hear some of Wednesday's Programme when we unveiled this year's Woman's Hour 2015 Power List; Influencers.

A global call for DNA samples to identify genetic links with anorexia - and the UK trial that's trying to get early treatment for the disorder.

What's it like to be an agent in the music business? Emma Banks leading agent at CAA Creative Artists Agency, tells us.

Plus Royal Navy Reservist Michelle Ping on her work in Helmand Province in Afghanistan and her role training the Armed Forces and health workers deployed to tackle Ebola in Sierra Leone. And comedian Bridget Christie on A Book For Her - and Him if He Can Read.

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Helen Fitzhenry
Editor Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b060q9tk)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b060bll1)
Burger Battles

The British love fast food. Each year we munch our way through thirty billion pounds worth. On The Bottom Line this week Evan Davis and guests discuss the burgeoning burger market. There are new challengers to the traditional big boys, like Five Guys, who claim to offer better quality burgers and a "casual dining experience." Whilst one old famous brand from the 1970s, Wimpy, is attempting to make a come-back with re-branded restaurants and menu. But what's the recipe for success in this already over-crowded market?

Guests: John Eckbert, Managing Director of Five Guys;
Bruce Layzell, Managing Executive of International Markets at Famous Brands (the South African company who own Wimpy and Steers)
And Martin Breeden, Regional Director of Intu, who own some of Britain's biggest shopping centres.

Producer: Jim Frank.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0606k32)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0606k34)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0606k36)
Doubt cast over Syria family statement

A friend of a teenage member of a UK family, believed to be in Syria, has expressed disbelief at a statement saying they all willingly travelled to join the Islamic State group


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b060q9tm)
Nikki Bedi, Arthur Smith, Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer, Simon Bird, Emily Watson, Nick Robinson, Lucy Rose, Samantha Crain

Nikki Bedi and Arthur Smith are joined in studio with Vic Reeves and Bob Mortimer, Simon Bird, Emily Watson, Nick Robinson, and music from Lucy Rose and Samantha Crain.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b060q9tp)
Series 18

Lexicon

Poet Glyn Maxwell responds to the Greek debt crisis. To complement Radio Four's News and Current Affairs output, our weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. The form and content are entirely lead by the news topic - so drama comes in many guises, as well as poetry and prose.

Directed by Toby Swift
Produced by Emma Harding.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b060q9tr)
Amy, Apple Music, The Book of Aron, As Is, Cornell at the Royal Academy

Amy is Asif Kapadia's documentary telling the story of the short life of the talented singer Amy Winehouse.
We look at the launch of Apple Music - is it an exciting brand new way to explore what's out there or just another option in an already over-serviced market?
Jim Shepard's novel The Book of Aron is about a young boy in wartime Poland occupied by the Nazis. Does it manage to say something new about a familiar subject?
There's a revival in London of the first AIDS play: As Is. It premiered in New York in 1985 and won a TONY. What does it say about the situation today?
The Joseph Cornell retrospective at London's Royal Academy allows visitors to view collages rarely seen in the UK.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b060qbwm)
Tomorrow's World, Today

Everyone knows the iconic TV series Tomorrow's World - and many of us watched it as it made predictions about the future. Was it correct in its assumptions and predictions? James Burke takes a journey through the archive, and explores the story of the past half century of technological development.

Tomorrow's World began in the "White Heat" of the 1960s - as science and technology began to promise a future previously unimaginable.

From the first orbits of the moon, to the first heart transplant; from the nuclear debates of 20th century, to the economic failure of Concorde; from robots to the internet - Tomorrow's World reported on it all. How did the show do it? And did it get it right?

To mark the programme's 50th Anniversary in 2015, James Burke - a reporter on the show from 1966 to 1972 - looks at how it dealt with the often huge changes that occurred in the time from when it was first broadcast, and assesses what it says about our ability to see what's around the corner.

Featuring Judith Hann, Michael Rodd, Maggie Philbin, Howard Stableford, Michael Blakstad and Dame Wendy Hall.

Producer: Polly Weston.


SAT 21:00 The Stuarts (b0606vv7)
William III and Mary II: To Have and To Hold

Mike Walker's epic chronicle considers the early years of William of Orange and his marriage to James II's daughter, Mary Stuart. By marrying his English cousin, Dutch William looks to cement an alliance between the two countries and halt Louis XIV's land-grabbing march across Europe. Neither partnership gets off to an auspicious start.

Harpsichord played by Peter Ringrose
Director - Gemma Jenkins.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0606k38)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b0608nlb)
The Morality of Debt

It's been some time coming but the Greek debt crisis is reaching a climax. On one level this is an issue of political brinkmanship and economics, but at its heart there are profound moral questions. The moral hazard is plain to see - especially if you're a German tax payer faced with funding a seemingly bottomless pit of debt while the Greek's themselves refuse to recognise their obligations. But how moral was it for the European Union and the European Central Banks to not only happily turn a blind eye to the escalating Greek debt, but to keep on offering them more loans? And finally there's you and I and every one of us and our attitude to money and debt. The reality is that we're drowning in a sea of debt. Personal debt levels are at an all-time high. The idea of scrimping and saving until you can afford to buy something seems impossibly old fashioned in our "have it now - pay for it sometime later" society. Pension providers have been overwhelmed by people wanting to cash in and spend their savings - with holidays being the most popular choice. So much more immediately gratifying than prudently planning for an old age. And when it goes wrong of course there are those who will blame it all on politicians, greedy bankers and venal financial advisors. But the banks have to lend to someone and there were two consenting adults in the transaction. Or is money morally neutral - a token of exchange which should carry no burden of judgement? What is the morality debt?


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b06084kq)
Series 29

Heat 4, 2015

(4/13)
Competitors from London and West Sussex join Paul Gambaccini for heat four of the 2015 tournament. Among the musical topics Paul will be quizzing them on are Wagner, the witches in the musical Wicked, and what caused Mrs Mary Whitehouse to have a spat with 'Top of the Pops' in 1972.

The contenders will also have to choose a special musical subject on which to answer a set of individual questions, with no warning of what the topics are going to be. At stake is a place in the 2015 semi-finals.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b060724c)
John Donne

Roger McGough is joined by expert Katherine Rundell and actor Samuel Barnett for a special programme featuring the beautiful, sensual, clever and passionate poetry of John Donne. Last in the series.
Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 05 JULY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b060xvnn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Original Shorts (b01dvzgc)
Series 5

Elevated Thoughts

Edward is fond of the little oak tree that stands near the 15th tee of his local golf course. But there are club-members who view the tree with less friendly eyes. Chief among them is the club captain. There have been complaints, he says: some branches hang far too low over the tee - the oak should be cut down. So how can the situation be resolved happily for the club and its members?

Over the months, Edward wonders whether Nature herself is becoming involved. And, he recalls, didn't Wordsworth have something to say about all nature being alive, and possessed with a presence that disturbs him with the joy of elevated thoughts? He continues to observe, and witnesses a surprising conclusion.

Broadcaster, novelist and humorist Christopher Matthew has written this story especially for Original Shorts.

Martin Jarvis reads this wry tale of Nature versus petty bureaucracy.

Director: Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b060xvnq)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b060xvns)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b060xvnv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b060xvnx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b060xwcz)
The sound of church bells.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b0608nvd)
A Progressive Case for Authority

Eliane Glaser argues that since everyone is against authority now, the true iconoclast would make a progressive case for authority.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b060xvnz)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b060xyp5)
Desire Lines

Mark Tully follows the paths we choose to take instead of the official routes laid out for us by others.

Literally, desire lines are paths worn over time through a landscape by people taking the shortest or most desirable route, rather than the one provided for them by planners or designers. They can cut across fields or over busy roads, even between countries. But do they represent a desire to break the bounds of convention, or an instinct to follow the crowd?

Arnold Schoenberg and Franz Schubert take a musical detour from the prescribed channels, while Philip Larkin leads the literary trail off-piste, as Mark considers metaphorical desire lines - behaving, thinking or doing as we want, rather than as custom, etiquette or rules would have had us do.

In the end, desire lines could be seen as evidence of human behaviour triumphing over rigid attempts to control and confine - but might they also be physical reminders of our inherent laziness? Is there not something to be said for taking the long way round?

A Unique Broadcasting Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b060xyp8)
Festival Farmer

Sybil Ruscoe meets Pete Nosworthy - Noz to his friends - who runs a summer music festival on his cattle farm in Herefordshire. It started out in 1998 as a family barbecue with friends singing round the campfire on his 70-acre farm. But it's grown into a festival with nine stages, which attracts 5,000 people. We find out how you turn a traditional farm into a party venue - from the licensing and safety, to ticketing and clearing up afterwards!
And we meet Pete's wife and two grown-up children who now work pretty much full time on planning the festival. The producer is Sally Challoner.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b060xvp1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b060xvp3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b060xztd)
The Greek bailout crisis, Salvation Army at 150, 7/7 memories

On Sunday, Greeks vote in a referendum to accept or reject the bailout conditions demanded by their creditors. Amidst the economic and social turmoil, what role has the Greek Orthodox Church played?

Pope Francis starts an 8 day tour of three South American countries on Sunday. Our reporter tells William what's on the agenda and why Pope Francis won't be stopping off in Argentina.

Debbie Hodge is a minister who was at work on the 7th July 2005 when a bomb was detonated on a bus in Tavistock Square. It was one of four explosions that went off in London that day. Debbie, a trained nurse, was one of the first people to attend the scene. She tells William how the events of that day changed her life.

2015 is the 150th anniversary of The Salvation Army which was founded by William and Catherine Booth in the East End of London. Reporter Trevor Barnes has been looking through the archives. Clive Adams, Territorial Commander, joins us ahead of a march of thousands of Salvation Army members down the Mall on Sunday.

How can Muslim communities better participate in the life of British society? A national commission is to be launched to investigate. The Chair is Conservative MP and former Attorney General, Dominic Grieve and he tells William what they hope to achieve.

For over 400 years Heythrop College has taught theology and philosophy. This week it was announced that the Jesuit run college is to close. Jesuit Rev Dr Damien Howard explains what has been going on while Christopher Lamb from The Tablet asks if the Jesuits have a future in Britain.

Contributors:
Bruce Clark
Ignacio de los Reyes
Clive Adams
Christopher Lamb
Rev Dr Damian Howard

Producer:
David Cook
Tara Holmes

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b060xztg)
Personal Support Unit

Lord Judge presents The Radio 4 Appeal for the Personal Support Unit
Registered Charity No 1090781
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Personal Support Unit'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Personal Support Unit'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b060xvp5)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b060xvp7)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b060y0qs)
Violence and the Kingdom of Heaven

A service from St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, in the week of the tenth anniversary of the London bombings, reflecting on how violence deforms the human soul. Most of us would rather denounce violence in others than do the arduous work of resisting violence in ourselves. Led by the Vicar, the Revd Dr Sam Wells, with the American best-selling author, professor, and Episcopal priest, Barbara Brown Taylor. The choir is directed by Andrew Earis and the producer is Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b060bxpj)
Adam Gopnik: Family Reunions

Adam Gopnik's ten-year family reunion brings into focus the passage of time.
"The inescapable material of any family reunion, British or American, Jewish or Celtic, is always the same: each offering a hair-raising or hair-losing seminar on the effects of time on the human body and soul, and especially on the difference between aging and growing."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx944)
Twite

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Twite. Twites are birds of heather moorland and crofting land - a Scottish name is "Heather lintie", as they nest in the shelter of wiry heather clumps and feed on seeds. To see twites, you'll need to visit some of our most scenic spots; the Scottish Isles, the moorlands of northern England or the western Irish coast.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b060y27t)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b060yk4k)
Pat and Tony have an announcement to make, and David takes to the airwaves.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b060yk4m)
Freddie Flintoff

Kirsty's castaway this week is the former England cricketer Andrew 'Freddie' Flintoff.

One of the best players of his generation, he was part of the England team that won the Ashes in 2005, a year that marked his sporting coming of age. On the strength of that historic victory he was awarded an MBE for services to the game, and the public voted him BBC Sports Personality of the Year.

Barely out of his pram when he picked up a cricket ball he turned out to bat for an under-14 match when he was just six years old. His debut was not in crisp cricket whites, but in a second hand Manchester United tracksuit, setting the tone for someone who's made a habit of doing things his way. Not least at a 10 Downing Street reception when, somewhat the worse for wear, he weaved into the cabinet room, plonked himself down in the PM's chair and knocked back yet another bottle of beer.

Since retiring from the game he's had a go at heavyweight boxing and won the bout. One area where he hasn't come out on top: his sons never listen to his cricket coaching tips.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b060xvp9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b06084kz)
Series 72

Episode 7

Nicholas Parsons hosts the perennially popular panel game in which guests Paul Merton, Gyles Brandreth, Lucy Beaumont, and Marcus Brigstocke attempt to talk for 60 seconds with no hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

A BBC Comedy Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b060yk4p)
Feeding the Commons - Part II: Lunch to Lights Out

Following the food operation at the centre of British politics. Lunch to Lights out

The Food Programme team go behind the scenes of one of the most historic food operations in the world.

In the second part of this edition, we hear how dining in Parliament is under new pressures.

Presented by Sheila Dillon & produced in Bristol by Clare Salisbury.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b060xvpc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b060yk4r)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Children of the Olympic Bid (b060yk4t)
Series 9

Episode 1

The thirty youngsters have gone from school life in 2005 to futures involving marriage, jobs and mortgages. In these programme he gets them all together to hear about their lives now and to reflect on the part that the Singapore trip played in shaping what happened next.

Some of them are living oversees - Perry, for instance, who has married an American and now coach's football on the East Coast. Amber has just finished her degree at an American University and is applying for a Green Card whilst Jessica, the promising heptathlete with the potential to have made the Olympics, is happily married in Canada and working in a sports store.

There were some stand out stars amongst the group - Ashley Mitchell went form that Singapore trip with Sebastian Coe to work as the Junior Mayor in the Olympic Village. He has finished his degree and is helping on Tessa Jowell's bid to be Mayor of London. But being Ashley he also has several other plans on the go - a pop up restaurant, a few charity projects and some impromptu family tuition for younger cousins!

For Thomas Brown the London Games offered the hope of Paralympic selection. His dreams fell apart when he left home and moved into a homeless hostel. His life was on hold as he struggled with independent living and wrestled with the training needed to really go all the way. He has now reconciled with his parents and rents a house with his girlfriend.

Perhaps the biggest star of all is a schoolboy who showed such promise in rugby that he was offered the chance to concentrate on it full time. He opted instead for the discus and reached the finals in the 2012 Olympics. Lawrence Okoye is now playing American football for the San Francisco 49ers and has married his girlfriend Pippa. He was touted as a possible medal candidate come Rio 2016 but he loves the path he's chosen instead.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b060bwdl)
Hampton Court

Eric Robson hosts the show from the Hampton Court Flower Show. Chris Beardshaw, Pippa Greenwood, and Matthew Wilson make up the panel.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b060yk4w)
Sunday Omnibus - Liberation of the Channel Islands

Fi Glover introduces conversations from Sark, Guernsey and Jersey, remembering the Occupation that ended 70 years ago and reflecting on the changes wrought by the Second World War, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Stuarts (b060yk4y)
Queen Anne: Myself Alone

Mike Walker's epic chronicle of Queen Anne, the last Stuart monarch. Everything changed when William of Orange at the head of the Dutch army landed in England and James II fled to France. England is now on the path towards constitutional monarchy and in this new climate, Queen Anne must abandon long-held and cherished allegiances if she is to command the loyalty of rebellious Whigs and Tories and rule with authority.

Director - Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b060yk50)
Jon McGregor - If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things

With James Naughtie

Jon McGregor won critical acclaim for his debut novel If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things in 2003.

The novel focuses on one street in a town in the North of England, where ordinary people are going through the motions of their everyday existence - street cricket, barbecues, painting windows.

A young man is in love with a neighbour who does not even know his name. An old couple make their way up to the nearby bus stop. But then a terrible event shatters the quiet of the early summer evening.

This binds together the residents and shows the reader the imperfect lives of ordinary people on a single day.

Recorded with a group of readers at the first ever Derby Book Festival.

August's Bookclub choice : May We Be Forgiven by AM Homes.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Jon McGregor
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 The King's Muse (b060yk52)
In The King's Muse, Peggy Reynolds explores the world of the Tudor court, through the poetry of Henry VIII. Held at the British Library is a songbook that includes poetry and compositions by this Tudor monarch. These were not written by an aged despot with a fondness for divorcing and executing his wives, but instead by a youth who came to the throne as a teenager. These poems were penned by an educated young King who enjoyed games, hunting, and performing his own works in front of his courtiers. Henry's early court was one of the most brilliant in Europe, and a centre for culture and pageantry.

Historian David Starkey joins Peggy Reynolds to put these poems into context, lifting the lid on this cultured youthful King, long overshadowed by the machinations of the older tyrant he was to become. Peggy's journey begins at the British Library, where she is joined by musicologist Professor David Fallows as they leaf through this songbook compiled in the sixteenth century. Professor Raymond Siemens discusses the importance of this poetry in the development of Tudor literature, and delves into some of the reoccurring themes including love and politics, foreshadowing the more complicated monarch that would emerge.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b0608h81)
The Aid Business

The UK's £12 billion pound foreign aid budget is one of the few areas of Government spending protected from cuts. The commitment to spend 0.7% of Britain's gross national income on aid means at least 60 billion pounds will be spent on overseas development in the next five years. Many of these projects are delivered by large companies that receive tens of millions of pounds from DFID (the Department for International Development). They can charge over a thousand pounds a day for a consultant and their directors earn six figure salaries but how effective are they are and the programmes they are paid to deliver? Simon Cox investigates the UK's aid industry and asks how taxpayers can know that they're getting value for money.
Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Gail Champion.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b060q9tp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b060xvpf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b060xvph)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b060xvpk)
The people of Greece have finished voting in a snap referendum that seems likely to either speed their exit from the Eurozone, or bring down their government. Senior sources in Athens have also warned that the banking system will start running out of cash in a few days. George Osborne has indicated that this week's Budget will target the tax credits given to low paid workers - while the BBC will have to meet the cost of free television licences for the over-75s.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b060yngy)
Sarfraz Manzoor

It's been a feature of the British high street for decades but could the Indian restaurant soon be consigned to the great tandoori kitchen in the sky? That's one of the questions Sarfraz Manzoor will be asking along with just WHY are internet cat videos so weirdly popular and what is Benedict Cumberbatch doing back on the radio? He'll also be celebrating the forgotten women writers from the Beat Generation and enjoying Abba as played by Ugandan street children on trumpets.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b060ynh0)
David honours his promise to go along with Pip to see the Fairbrothers' goslings at Hollowtree. David's not pleased to discover a tent set up in the yard. As Toby sleeps there, Rex explains it's just in case they have to sleep over when working late. David offers his advice. They also talk about the flood - Ambridge is a Zone 3 flood risk area, and Rex knows it's a hot topic locally with the challenge to the route B new road.
Pip's clearly attracted to Toby. Sent by Rex to wake him up, Pip finds Toby washing and cops a look at his top half. Pip's keen for the boys (particularly Toby) to come along to the NEC livestock event. Toby can't make it, as he says he has circuit training. Pip's disappointed, but Rex (slightly flirtily) says they'll just have to leave him behind.
Phoebe won't let Kate into her room - Kate wants to talk but Phoebe's angry and upset. Kate spoiled her first time with Alex - she has nothing more to say to her mother. Phoebe tears into Kate about sleeping with anything in trousers - including Toby Fairbrother. Phoebe threatens to never speak to Kate if she breathes a word about what happened with Alex.


SUN 19:15 Dave Podmore (b0612pjc)
Dave Podmore's Toughest Test

It's Ashes time (again) and the world's sleaziest cricketer Dave Podmore is here with his explosive memoir DP. But, in doing so, he's putting at risk his budding career as motivational coach for the England women's team.

Pod's especially proud of emerging star player Danniii (yes, three i's), until he realises his precious second-hand car lot endorsements have a new competitor who's young enough to still be discovered on the Borrowash roundabout at 3am with her pants on her head.

Is Pod's long reign as England's anti-hero finally over? And has he burned his lucrative corporate advertising bridges for good?

It's Pod's toughest test yet.

Starring Christopher Douglas as Dave Podmore.

With Lewis Macleod, Andrew Nickolds, Andy Hamer and Nicola Sanderson.

Scripted by Christopher Douglas, Andrew Nickolds and Nick Newman.

Producer: Jon Harvey
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015. .


SUN 19:45 Yeats: The Man and the Echo (b0612pjf)
What Then?

Three Irish writers choose three Yeats poems as inspiration for a story.

Episode 3/ 3

What Then

Dermot Bolger's reflective story inspired by WB Yeats' poem about the endless doubts writers face.

A young man timidly embarking on a life as a writer meets an old man with a story to tell.

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b061039t)
Roger Bolton looks at the battle for control of language.

More than 120 MPs have written a letter to the BBC's Director General calling for an end to use of the name "Islamic State" in news reporting. David Cameron is among those calling for a change of terminology, saying that many Muslims recoil from the name. Radio 4 and World Service listeners tell us what they think the BBC should call the group and consider whether a change in terminology would weaken Islamic State, or weaken the BBC's impartiality.

There are also concerns about the terminology used by the BBC when reporting immigration. Roger investigates whether listeners' concerns are about inaccuracy or the potential for stoking animosity.

The biggest job in BBC Radio Comedy - the host of The News Quiz - has gone to Miles Jupp. But what do our listeners think of the new appointment, and can Miles fill Sandi Toksvig's tiny shoes?

Miles is a household name for Radio 4 listeners but BBC Radio is also on the lookout for new talent with the 2015 BBC Radio New Comedy Awards. Roger speaks to Marcus Brigstocke and Angela Barnes to find out what it takes to make it in the world of radio comedy.

And why, why, why, did Tom Jones' song Delilah offend one of Feedback's listeners? Roger speaks with Jeff Smith, Head of Music at BBC Radio 2 and 6 Music, to find out how the BBC approaches older songs covering potentially controversial themes.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b060pdqy)
Sir Nicholas Winton, Val Doonican, Nek Chand, James Salter, Lady Rozelle Raynes

Matthew Bannister on

Sir Nicholas Winton who saved 669 children from the advancing Nazis in Czechoslovakia.

Also the Irish singer Val Doonican - known for his cardigans and rocking chair - he was sometimes called Britain's Bing Crosby.

The Indian artist Nek Chand who created the extraordinary Rock Garden of Chandigarh. Jarvis Cocker pays tribute.

The novelist and former fighter pilot James Salter

And Lady Rozelle Raynes, the daughter of an Earl who became a stoker on a tug boat during the war.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b060q9k0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b060xztg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b06084l6)
Samuel Scheffler on the Afterlife

The American philosopher Samuel Scheffler reveals a hidden force which motivates our actions: our belief in the continuation of humanity after our deaths. In an interview with Edward Stourton, plus a Q&A from an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Scheffler proposes thought experiments which expose the importance of this conception of the afterlife. It is, he argues, this continued existence of the human race in general - and not just of our own descendants - which gives meaning and purpose to much of our lives. With references to Woody Allen, National Porn Shops and Martin Luther. Scheffler is professor of philosophy and law at New York University.
Producer: David Edmonds.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b061035s)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b061035v)
Kevin Maguire of The Mirror analyses how the papers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b060bf67)
Back to the Future, Amy, Audrey Hepburn, I was Brigitte Bardot's double

With Francine Stock.

Back To The Future composer Alan Silvestri reveals why he's added 15 minutes of music to the original score for a new screening of Back To The Future.

The producer and editor of Amy, James Gay-Rees and Chris King, discuss the skill and ethics of editing a documentary about the life of singer Amy Winehouse, and respond to criticism about the film from her father Mitch.

Antonia Quirke visits the National Portrait Gallery's exhibition about Audrey Hepburn to see if it has changed her mind about an actress that she's always considered over-rated.

The job of Colourist is relatively new but increasingly important in the film industry, and Adam Glasman explains the tricks of his trade.

Listener Alan Wilding reveals his 15 seconds of movie fame - he was Brigitte Bardot's double.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b060xyp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 06 JULY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b060xvql)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0608n26)
Factory music, Volunteering post-recession

Factory music:the role that popular music plays in workers' culture. Marek Korczynski, Chair in Sociology of Work at the Nottingham University Business School, talks to Laurie Taylor about his study of a British factory that manufactures window blinds, revealing how pop music can enliven monotonous work, providing a sense of community as well as moments of resistance to the tyranny of the workplace.

Also, volunteering in 'hard times': James Laurence ESRC Research Fellow at the University of Manchester, examines how the 2008-9 recession has affected peoples' willingness to do formal voluntary work as well as informal helping.

Producer:Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b060xwcz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b060xvqn)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b060xvqq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b060xvqs)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b060xvqv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b061bp40)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Leslie Griffiths.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b060yxym)
Neonics ban latest, Badger cull in Northern Ireland, Historic footpaths ruling

The National Farmers Union says its discovered that UK farmers won't be allowed to use neonicotinoid pesticides as the government has turned down its application for an emergency exemption from the current EU ban.

Northern Ireland is to start a limited cull of badgers as part of a research project to combat TB in cattle which costs its taxpayers £30m a year. Despite a long standing eradication programme, Bovine TB still affects around six per cent of herds in Northern Ireland and it's on the rise.

A haulier explains what it's like trying to get chilled carcasses to the continent during the Calais ferry strike.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b060xvqx)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkfw)
Serin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the serin. Serins breed just across the English Channel but they are small finches that continue to tantalize ornithologists here in the UK. Hopes were raised that this Continental finch would settle here to breed, especially if our climate became warmer. However, something about our islands doesn't suit them. They do like large parks and gardens, so keep an ear out for the song of this visitor....a cross between a goldfinch and a goldcrest, and you may be rewarded.


MON 06:00 Today (b060z4ph)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b060z4pk)
Harmony and Balance

Mary Ann Sieghart discusses harmony and balance, in the universe and on a smaller scale. She is joined by Nobel Prize winning physicist Frank Wilczek, whose new book examines whether beauty is one of the organising principles of the universe, and by the choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh, who uses dance to explore our relationship with science and technology. The mathematician and standup comedian Matt Parker outlines things you can make and do in the fourth dimension, and the Canadian baritone opera singer and keen amateur astronomer Gerald Finley brings his perspective to bear.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b060z4pm)
All Day Long

The Lawyer

In 1974, the US broadcaster Studs Terkel talked to Americans "About what they do all day, and how they feel about what they do". His book telling their stories, Working, became a seminal tract in social history, and left an indelible print of how Americans worked and felt in the seventies.

Biggs has revisited Terkel's model in her tour of contemporary Britain - her interviewees including a lawyer, care worker, fishmonger, giggle doctor (yes, there really is such a thing), ballet dancer, quiz writer and potter, among many others. The book is a beautifully-observed portrait of the United Kingdom at work in the twenty-first century.

Episode 1: The Lawyer

Joanna Biggs is an assistant editor at the London Review of Books. She was born in Willesden, North-West London, in 1982.

Readers: Ben Crowe, Teresa Gallagher, David Holt, Colleen Prendergast, Michelle Terry and Thom Tuck

Abridged by Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b060z4pp)
Sue Sim, former chief constable of Northumbria Police; Sculptors Emily Young and Laura Ford

The former chief constable of Northumbria Police, Sue Sim, talks about her career and in particular her handling of the hunt for killer, Raoul Moat and the complaints made against her afterwards by officers in the force. Sim has now lodged a complaint against her accusers, and claims that male officers treated her differently because she was a woman.

Time management Laura Vanderkam has written a book, I Know How She Does it, in which she provides a framework for anyone who wants to thrive at "having it all" in both work and life.

Two very different leading British sculptors, Emily Young and Laura Ford, talk about their work.

Health and Fitness apps are useful for setting goals to help achieve your desired weight. But are there are any safeguards in place for people with eating disorders who could easily use them in an obsessive and unhealthy way?

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b060z4pr)
Dead Clever

Episode 1

Val McDermid's second "Dead" comedy crime drama.

DCI Alma Blair (Julie Hesmondhalgh) and DS Jason Trotter investigate murder in the Geography Department of an unspecified Russell Group university in the North of England. Where academics rub shoulders and, indeed, other parts of the body with students and administrators. A place where the students think they know everything, the academics know they know everything and the secretaries actually know everything.

Alma has worked her way up the ranks from making the tea for the families of murder victims to ordering Jason to make the tea. She knows she knows best. Jason should know better.

In Episode 1, Jason thinks that a professor who is wearing some of his brains on the outside of his head might just be his chance to put Alma in her place.

Written by Val McDermid
Sound Designer and Engineer: Eloise Whitmore

Produced and Directed by Justine Potter
A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Battleships: The Ashes Voyages (b060z6ly)
To mark the start of the latest Ashes Test cricket series, former England captain David Gower relives the days when England and Australia cricketers went by ship to play in the Ashes.

Legendary Australian players taking part include Neil Harvey (who played in Don Bradman's team in 1948), Alan Davidson, Bill Lawry, Bob Simpson, Graham Mackenzie and Colin MacDonald. Ted Dexter leads the England contingent, joined by such names as Peter Richardson, Peter Parfitt, John Murray and David Larter.

The programme is rich in the colours of a 10,000 mile sea voyage. Stories of life on board include everything from the delights of first-class cabins and fabulous food to fancy dress contests and tricks for fending off fans.

It was a different world as far as keeping fit for a sportsman was concerned, with fiery fast bowler Fred Trueman testily able to refuse training runs in favour of long hours in a deck chair.

There are tales of exotic stopping off points. England fast-bowler David Larter tells the story of the day his 'sea-legs' let him down as he tore in to bowl in Colombo - and fell flat on his face. Twice running. Australians Brian Booth and Colin MacDonald re-live the scenes as local traders surrounded their ships on arrival at port after port. There's poignancy, too, as former Times cricket correspondent John Woodcock recalls a pilgrimage by Yorkshire and England cricketers at Naples to lay flowers on the grave of outstanding spin-bowler Hedley Verity, who died fighting in Italy during the Second World War.

What method of travel would these cricketers choose if they were travelling to play now?

Guess.

Producer: Andrew Green
A Singing Wren production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b060z7c5)
Series 2

All Change

It's the return of sisters Trisha and Clare and their Edinburgh coffee shop, Cafe Culture.

Can they rise to the challenge of keeping the business going while coping with a missing chef and dealing with 20 year-old waitress, Lizzie falling off the kleptomania wagon?

Throw in Trisha's married ex-boyfriend and Clare's absent husband and it's emotional carnage all round.

Clare can't cope with change but Trisha positively craves it - praise the Lord for God-fearing Minty (June Watson), an eccentric but helpful customer who won't make a drama out of a crisis.

Series two of Hilary Lyon's caffeine-fuelled sitcom

Trisha ...... Hilary Maclean
Clare ...... Hilary Lyon
Lizzie ...... Pearl Appleby
Minty ...... June Watson

Director: Marilyn Imrie

Producers: Gordon Kennedy and Moray Hunter

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b060xvqz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b060z9rv)
6 July 1915 - Victor Lumley

Victor prepares for a meeting he only ever dreamed about before.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b060z9rx)
Loneliness in old age, Upgrading flight tickets, Scooter culture

Loneliness in Old Age: Eighteen months after the launch of the Silver Line helpline for elderly people who are lonely or isolated, it is about to take its half millionth call. The service has been inundated and on average takes 1,000 calls a day. In a period of spending cuts in the public sector, what more could be done to reduce the misery of loneliness and isolation among older people?

When you hire an estate agent to help sell your home, you would naturally expect them to let you know about all the genuine offers they receive. We investigate how an estate agent failed to pass on a high-priced offer to its customer and a potential buyer tells us how they discovered their offer had not been passed to the vendor.

When is it worth paying a supplement on your flight ticket to upgrade to a higher level of service? We hear from the You & Yours listener who paid nearly £200 extra to improve his flight experience, but was greeted by a tired and dirty cabin and was then served poor food.

The DVLA has reported a big rise in the number of people registering motorcycles in the UK, with over a hundred thousand people registering a new bike last year. It's bringing with it a growing "scooter culture" with enthusiasts meeting up regularly and sharing pictures and films online. We report from the ACE cafe in north London.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b060xvr1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b060z9rz)
What next for the Greek debt crisis following a 'no' vote in the referendum? We hear from Ireland's Europe minister and from the Syriza Government; The MP, Simon Danczuk, has told this programme that he's taking a step back from his work championing child abuse victims because he's suffering from depression.


MON 13:45 What Is a Story? (b060z9s1)
First Times

Starting with an examination of our early experiences of stories, Marina Warner looks at the world of contemporary fiction.

In the company of leading contemporary writers, she considers a story and story writing from a different angle.

Marina speaks with writers as diverse as Julian Barnes, Michelle Roberts, Fanny Howe, Marlene van Niekerk, Alain Mabanckou, Lydia Davis, Edwin Frank, Elleke Boehmer, Wen-Chin Ouyang, Daniel Medin, Nadeem Aslam and Laszlo Krasznahorkai.

There are questions around the boundaries between fact and fiction which Marina believes are central to any consideration of storytelling, since readers' pleasure depends so much on trust built up between the storyteller or writer and the audience.

Over ten episodes, there are discussions on the reasons for writing, writers as witnesses and political interaction.

Marina was Chair of the Man Booker International Prize 2015 and the series draws on the expertise of the International Booker judging panel, the views of the shortlisted writers, as well as other key literary talent.

Producer: Kevin Dawson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio first broadcast in July 2015.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b060ynh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b060zbjp)
Nicholas Gleaves - Another Life

Two strangers bump into each other in the bread aisle of the local supermarket. It's a meeting that will mark both their lives in unexpected places and unexpected ways.

Both are currently following the map of their lives, Glenn makes marble kitchen tops and is married to Claire, surrounded by the monotonous demands of family life, and Suzanne is married to psychotherapist Guy who is definitely 'on the verge'.

An encounter with an attractive stranger releases butterflies in your belly. That attractive stranger is now talking to you and you just can't stop yourself from imagining what their life's like - how their life could revitalize yours and how your new life together would be the answer to all your questions.

It just so happens that this stranger's inventing a version of your life too.

Fast forward ten years and they are reminded of what could have been in 'Another Life'.

Nicholas Gleaves' drama stars Stephen Tompkinson and Natasha Little.

Glenn ...... Stephen Tompkinson
Suzanne ...... Natasha Little
Guy ...... Adrian Lukis
Clare ...... Beth Goddard
Bridget ...... Sara Markland
Adrian ...... James Joyce
Nicholas ...... Richard Attlee

With Jonathan McGougan, Sky Yang and Charlotte Glennister as the children.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2015.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b060zbjr)
Series 29

Heat 5, 2015

(5/13)
What was the name of Louis Armstrong's pianist wife who encouraged him to start his own band in the 1920s? And which musical instrument takes its name from the Greek for 'having a pleasant sound'?

These and many other questions face the competitors in today's fifth heat of Counterpoint, with Paul Gambaccini. The questions and extracts cover every era of the classical repertoire as well as film music, stage musicals, jazz, rock and pop. To win a place in the semi-finals the contestants will have to demonstrate the breadth of their knowledge of music in general, as well as tackling specialist questions on a surprise musical topic.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b060yk4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b060zddx)
Jessica Hynes

Jessica Hynes, who won a Bafta for her role as PR consultant Siobhan Sharpe in W1A, and also co-wrote and starred in the sitcom Spaced, presents the pieces of writing that have meant the most to her throughout her life, in front of an audience at the BBC Radio Theatre.
They include The Queen's Speech by Lemn Sissay, The Wind In The Willows, The Fortress of Solitude by Jonathan Lethem, Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain, Pimp: The Story Of My Life by Iceberg Slim, Coming Up For Air by George Orwell, and poems by Betjeman and ee cummings.
Her readers are Cyril Nri, fresh from playing Lance in Russell T Davies' drama Cucumber, and Angela Thorne, who played Marjory Frobisher in To the Manor Born.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b060zddz)
Series 12

The Infinite Monkey Cage USA Tour: New York

The Infinite Monkey Cage USA Tour: New York

The Infinite Monkeys return for a new series, the first of which will see them head to the USA for their first live tour. This week Brian Cox and Robin Ince can be found on stage in New York asking the question, Is Science a Force for Good Or Evil? They are joined on stage by Bill Nye the Science Guy, cosmologist Janna Levin, actor Tim Daly and comedian Lisa Lampanelli.


MON 17:00 PM (b061czby)
News interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b060xvr6)
Deepening divisions within Eurozone over currency's future.
BBC to take over paying for TV licences for those over 75.
New study predicts hotter summers and warmer winters.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b060zdf1)
Series 72

Episode 8

Paul Merton, Alun Cochrane, Susan Calman, & Gyles Brandreth join host Nicholas Parsons for another edition of the perennially popular panel show.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

A BBC Comedy Production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b060zg88)
Rob takes a look, rather coolly, at Helen and Tom's plans for the new shop. Helen says there are lots of decisions to make, which she'll talk through with Pat and Tom. Rob wonders about the burden on Helen, with Pat and Tony retiring. Pat and Tony are happy to leave the big decisions to Tom and Helen, but they won't exactly be sitting in their armchairs, says Helen.

Tom and Pat go through the layout - whilst they may lose passing trade being on the farm, it's great that they'll all be working together in one location.

Charlie and Adam catch up - Adam's herbal leys are causing quite a stir at Home Farm. Adam has given more thought to their cropping plan at Home Farm. He shocks Charlie with his announcement that he's stopping growing maize for him altogether. Charlie's angry and feels it's very unprofessional of Adam to renege on his contract. Charlie has a great deal of respect for Adam, but feels that this time he's making a big mistake.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b060zg8b)
Shirley Hughes, The Skriker, Adapting novels for the screen, The Choir

Shirley Hughes has been illustrating and writing books for children for more than 50 years, including the classics Dogger and the Alfie series. On the day she receives a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Book Trust she discusses her working process and how she's reflected changes over the years in her work.

When Caryl Churchill's play The Skriker premiered at the National Theatre in 1994, it left the critics dazed and confused. So much so that it's taken 20 years for the play to be staged again in this country. Now it's one of the centrepiece productions of the Manchester International Festival. Charlotte Keatley reviews.

Sadie Jones has just adapted her novel The Outcast as a three-hour BBC1 drama, and Deborah Moggach is currently writing the screenplay of her latest novel Something to Hide for the big screen. Both authors discuss the pros and cons of adapting one's own novel for the screen, and what it's like when another writer is hired to do the job.

The Choir is a new film in which a young boy from a tough neighbourhood suddenly finds himself at one of the most elite private 'boychoir' schools in the country where he faces a tough time trying to come up to scratch under the demands of the headteacher, played by Dustin Hoffman. Antonia Quirke reviews.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b060z4pr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Fighting to Stay the Same (b060zg8d)
For decades some Northern Ireland loyalists protested, rioted, and killed to protect their sense of Britishness. The fearsome ability of their paramilitary groups to put thousands on the streets to challenge - or even at times reverse - decisions that displeased them has gradually been weakened to the point of derision. How did it get to this point?

BBC Ireland Correspondent, Andy Martin, examines the current state of loyalism. Often characterised as the fiery wing of unionism, loyalist protest has failed in recent years to effect change, such as a reversal of a decision to end the routine flying of the Union flag above Belfast City Hall.

So what do the loyalists from the heartlands of the Shankill, east Belfast and the villages of north Antrim think of their predicament? Some still believe they are a force to be reckoned with, some say they have outlived their usefulness to the mainstream unionist political leaders. Amidst this identity crisis, many people outside loyalism are only too happy to portray them all as criminals only interested in self-gain.

Producer: Paul McKillion.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b060zg8g)
Why do American police kill so many black men?

Recent high profile cases of unarmed black men dying at the hands of the US police have sparked outrage, protests and civil unrest in several American cities. The deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Walter Scott and Freddie Gray are - some claim - evidence of long-standing problems with police racism and excessive violence. But what do we really know about what's happening? Helena Merriman explores the issues of racism, bias and police use of force. And the head of President Obama's taskforce on police reform, Charles Ramsey, tells us that fixing the problem will involve much more than just fixing the police.

(Photo copyright: Reuters)


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w9b5b)
Lions

Brett Westwood explores how lions have been harnessed by humans as a symbol of strength and power throughout the ages.

For hundreds of years two beasts lay beneath the mud of the moat surrounding the Tower of London. Only when workmen dug them up in 1935 did the sun warm their bones once more. They were once kept as fearsome gatekeepers, reminding people visiting the king exactly where power lay - or that was the idea. In reality they were diseased, malnourished and died young.

From the exquisitely depicted lions painted on cave walls in the Palaeolithic through to those kept in the Tower of London and the lions sitting around Nelson's column this programme looks at how we have used lions.

Lions are used in literature to represent authority and majesty, and C S Lewis used a lion - Aslan - to be the figure of Christ, a mysterious, wild presence that cannot be tamed.

However, this attention has come at great cost. Barbary lions, the magnificently-maned North African species most used by the Romans for gladiatorial combat and dispatching Christians, were so over-exploited they are now extinct: the first documented example of mass extinction on the mainland at the hands of humans.

We might be able to breed them back again from lions in zoos that have Barbary genes still present, but should we? Would these magnificent beasts become just a curiosity, no different to those in the Tower? Maybe they had best remain as a poignant example of how power can destroy.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b060z4pk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b060xvr9)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b060zg8j)
What will Europe do about the Greek crisis?

We ask if the European Central Bank will continue to finance Greek banks.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b060zg8l)
Elizabeth and Her German Garden

Episode 1

Best known for The Enchanted April, Elizabeth von Arnim's first novel, the semi-autobiographical Elizabeth and her German Garden, was published anonymously in 1898. In it she mines her unhappy marriage to an overbearing Count – the 'Man of Wrath' – and the mores of the German landed gentry. Subversive, witty and a beautiful meditation on the joys of gardening, it was a huge bestseller and firmly established von Arnim's reputation as an author.

Written as a series of diary entries, Elizabeth is a wild spirit whose minor eccentricities (she is happiest when eating salad outdoors) bemuse the servants and shock the high-born neighbours of her husband's family estate in northern Germany. Rather than hating its remoteness and dilapidation, Elizabeth sees her sojourn there as an opportunity to create a beautiful garden in which she can spend time thinking about the world, playing with her beloved daughters and tolerating the occasional visitor.

Reader: Caroline Martin
Writer: Elizabeth von Arnim
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


MON 23:00 The Robert Peston Interview Show (with Eddie Mair) (b060zg8n)
Alan Rusbridger

What happens if you take the warring parties of radio's biggest feud and give them their own show? Radio 4 is about to find out as Eddie Mair and Robert Peston join forces to spring surprise guests on each other in a unique late night interview programme. Expect spontaneous discussions with a wide array of interesting figures.

Eddie and Robert have each chosen three guests of personal interest to them- all in the public eye - who they feel are worthy of a late night interview slot, keeping it secret from the other which guests they have chosen until the interview itself.

Tonight is Robert's third and final guest - Alan Rusbridger.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b060zg8q)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 07 JULY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b060zgnt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b060z4pm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b060zgnw)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b060zgny)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b060zgp0)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b060zgp2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b061bpjh)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Leslie Griffiths.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b060zjrf)
Rural Housing, Pesticide Ban, Algae Farming

Plans announced by the government will give Housing Association tenants the right to buy their homes. It's a controversial policy, and some people now argue that rural areas should be treated as a special case. The Campaign to Protect Rural England is suggesting that rural communities with populations of less than 10,000 should be exempt from the policy, because there are already so few affordable homes in rural areas. It believes the sell-off would make the existing shortage worse.

A petition will be handed in at Downing Street today, asking the government not to lift the current two-year ban on a type of pesticide called neonicotinoids. Farmers say the ban is damaging their ability to grow some crops, but the chief executive of the insect conservation charity Buglife tells Anna Hill that the ban should stay in place. 400,000 people have signed the online petition.

A company in Bedfordshire is looking for farmers to take up the challenge of growing algae for human consumption. Farms in Eastern Europe have been growing algae to add to animal feed for some time. Now the technology has come to the UK, and could be used as a food source.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkc26)
Redwing

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Redwing. The soft thin 'seep' calls of redwings as they fly over at night are as much a part of autumn as falling leaves, damp pavements and the smoke of bonfires. In winter up to a million redwings pour into our islands, most of them from Scandinavia and Iceland.


TUE 06:00 Today (b060zq8k)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b060zq8m)
Dorothy Bishop on language disorders

Dorothy Bishop is a world-leading expert in childhood language disorders.

Since the 1970s, she has been instrumental in bringing to light a little-known language disorder that may affect around two children per class starting primary school.

'Specific Language Impairment', or SLI, was originally deemed to be the fault of lazy parents who didn't talk to their children. But through her pioneering studies on twins, Dorothy found a genetic link behind this disorder, helping to overturn these widespread misconceptions.

Dorothy talks to Jim Al-Khalili about how families react when they discover there's a genetic basis to their problems, and why this language impairment isn't as well known as other conditions, like autism and dyslexia.

A critic of pseudoscience and media misreporting, Dorothy discusses her experiences of speaking out against folk psychology and bad science journalism.

Producer: Michelle Martin.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b060zq8p)
Selina Scott speaks to Canon Paul Greenwell

Selina Scott was recently involved in buying, at an auction in America, a rare edition of one of the most famous ghost stories in the world, Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol'. The book was subsequently returned to its home town of Malton in North Yorkshire which was the inspiration for the novel.

Thus, with ghosts very much on Selina's mind and a suspicion that there is a ghost in her own home, Selina finds out more about the paranormal in this series of One to One.

In the first of her three programmes Selina talks to Canon Paul Greenwell from Ripon Cathedral who carries out 'home blessings' for people who think they have encountered a ghost or spirit.

He joins Selina in her home, a 15th century farm house in North Yorkshire, to try and get to the bottom of the presence in her kitchen.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b061ckdt)
All Day Long

The Giggle Doctor and the Care Worker

In 1974, the US broadcaster Studs Terkel talked to Americans "About what they do all day, and how they feel about what they do". His book telling their stories, Working, became a seminal tract in social history, and left an indelible print of how Americans worked and felt in the seventies.

Biggs has revisited Terkel's model in her tour of contemporary Britain - her interviewees including a lawyer, care worker, fishmonger, giggle doctor (yes, there really is such a thing), ballet dancer, quiz writer and potter, among many others. The book is a beautifully-observed portrait of the United Kingdom at work in the twenty-first century.

Episode 2: The Giggle Doctor and the Care Worker

Joanna Biggs is an assistant editor at the London Review of Books. She was born in Willesden, North-West London, in 1982.

Readers: Ben Crowe, Teresa Gallagher, David Holt, Colleen Prendergast, Michelle Terry and Thom Tuck

Abridged by Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b060zq8r)
Anne Fine, Sian James, Women in local government, PTSD after birth, Seaweed

Anne Fine, the former Children's Laureate talks about the reissue of her book , Madame Doubtfire - on which the successful film Mrs Doubtfire starring Robin Williams and Sally Field was based.

Former Labour MP Sian James, immortalised in the film Pride, launches a manifesto for change in how women and girls are treated by the penal system in Wales.

A look at where women hold power in local government and how they get there. If more powers and responsibilities are devolved from central government - will they end up in the hands of a more diverse section of our population, or less?

Plus a new report suggests that there is a serious lack of awareness and knowledge of Post-traumatic stress disorder after birth . It is often not recognised and there's evidence that some women are being misdiagnosed with post-natal depression and given the wrong treatment. What needs to be done to address the problem?

And although seaweed is now all the rage, it has long been an important ingredient in Britain, even if many of us don't recognize it as such. In her new book Seaweed in the Kitchen writer and natural-food forager Fiona Bird looks at its many uses and the pioneering group of Victorian women whose shared passion for collecting it led them to some interesting biological and photographic discoveries.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer Beverley Purcell.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b060zq8t)
Dead Clever

Episode 2

Val McDermid's comedy crime drama series, starring Julie Hesmondhalgh as DCI Alma Blair and John Hollingworth as DS Jason Trotter.

In episode 2, the news that the Cecil Rhodes Professor of Geography has been beaten to death by his own antique globe is not, as you might suppose, an occasion of deep mourning within the department. Rather, it has provoked a fever of speculation among his colleagues.

But for Detective Chief Inspector Alma Blair, only one question matters. Whodunit?

There's no shortage of suspects lining up to share their motives.

Written by Val McDermid
Sound Designer and Engineer: Eloise Whitmore

Produced and Directed by Justine Potter
A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w9b5j)
Burbot

The burbot is the skulker under the rocks, the flabby, sour-faced cod of cold, fresh water. It is not loved for its looks, but it was once prized for its body. At one time it was common here but has now gone from UK shores, believed extinct in the 1960s. This is the only member of the cod family that lives in fresh water and for centuries it swam in the eastern part of England to be pursued by fishermen for its firm, white flesh and unbelievably rich liver oils.

Barbot Hall in Rotherham and Burbolt Lane in Cambridge show it was once important – and so common that some records say it was fed to pigs. In North America it is a common angling fish; but in the early 20th century, the rich oils were so prized the Burbot Fishing Company processed half a million fish a year. It is still found in Europe and Russia. Chekhov wrote a comic story, The Burbot, showing how this Cinderella of fish could outwit even the aristocracy.

Some want the burbot restored to our waterways, arguing in the present desire to re-wild it should be allowed to live here once more. After all, the burbot was so much a part of our culture; However, others say it is best to leave it as a faint memory as climate change will make its life unbearable.

Either way, the burbot is a reminder of how quickly we forget what was once so common.

Original Producer : Andrew Dawes

Archive Producer: Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio in Bristol


TUE 11:30 Archie Shepp's Message from Paris (b060zq8w)
The American saxophonist Archie Shepp has spent much of his life in Paris and it was there in January that he and his French wife heard about the shootings at the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. They had friends among the staff and the killings shocked them deeply.

As a foreigner in France, an artist with long-standing political convictions and a man who'd grown up among the violence and prejudice of a black ghetto in the States, Archie knows - on a profound personal level - the mechanisms of anger, fear and frustration.

He knows the realities of segregation, the feeling of being trapped in a deprived neighbourhood and the difficulties of not seeing a way out. For Archie, education and music offered an escape route. Looking through the lens of his own experiences, he considers life now in his adopted city of Paris.

Produced by Rikke Houd
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b060zgp4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b060zq8y)
7 July 1915 - Hilary Pearce

Hilary is too impatient to settle for the long game, financially.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b060zq90)
Call You and Yours: Ageing Villages

Do you live in a grey-pocket, a place where younger people can't afford to live?

The National Housing Federation is warning that house prices in many English villages are starting to push all but older residents out. If that's your village, how did it happen and what is it like? How is community life changing, and is some change needed?

Are you concerned about the idea of dozens of new cheaper homes being built near you? Are you concerned at the lack of younger people and families in your community?

Call You & Yours on 03700 100 444 or email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Kevin Mousley
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b060zgp6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b060zq92)
A minute's silence has been observed to honour the fifty-two people killed by suicide bombers in London ten years ago today. Peter Clarke, who was in charge of the investigation into the London bombings, tells us that the threat from terrorists is unlike anything the UK has faced before.
The Conservative Peer, Lord Patten, former chair of the BBC Trust tells us that making the BBC pay for the cost of free TV licence fees for the over 75s was a quick and dirty deal.
Are Sundays really any different from other days of the week, or is it time to let shops open all day? The Bishop of St Albans and a conservative MP discuss.


TUE 13:45 What Is a Story? (b061ckdw)
Why Write Stories?

Why write stories?

Marina Warner looks at the world of contemporary fiction. In the company of leading contemporary writers, she considers a story and story writing from a different angle.

Marina speaks with writers as diverse as Julian Barnes, Michelle Roberts, Fanny Howe, Marlene van Niekerk, Alain Mabanckou, Lydia Davis, Edwin Frank, Elleke Boehmer, Wen-Chin Ouyang, Daniel Medin, Nadeem Aslam and Laszlo Krasznahorkai.

There are questions around the boundaries between fact and fiction which Marina believes are central to any consideration of storytelling, since readers' pleasure depends so much on trust built up between the storyteller or writer and the audience.

With discussions on the reasons for writing, writers as witnesses and political interaction.

Marina was Chair of the Man Booker International Prize 2015 and the series draws on the expertise of the International Booker judging panel, the views of the shortlisted writers, as well as other key literary talent.

Producer: Kevin Dawson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio first broadcast in July 2015.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b060zg88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01pp897)
Trevor Preston - Second Body

BAFTA-winning writer Trevor Preston draws on his own experience as an artist in this dark thriller. Anna is a painter driven to capture the haunting images of death that fill the twilight world of her dreams. But whose death do they foretell?

Directed by Toby Swift

Trevor Preston trained at the Royal College of Art before embarking on a career in television. He wrote for many of the best dramas of the 1970s and 80s, including Ace of Wands, Callan, The Sweeney, Minder, Out and Fox, for which Trevor received a BAFTA in 1981. His film work includes Billy the Kid and the Green Baize Vampire and the Mike Hodges directed I'll Sleep When I'm Dead with Clive Owen. Trevor has written three radio plays, the first of which, Flaw in the Motor, Dust in the Blood, was shortlisted for the Imison Award and a Mental Health in the Media Award in 2009.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b060zqbc)
How can history inform the debate about Britain's relationship with Europe? Tom Holland and guests look to Caruasius, Aethelwold, Henry II and Historians for Britain for valuable pointers.

Tom is joined in the studio by Professor David Abulafia from the University of Cambridge and Professor Justin Champion from Royal Holloway University of London.

David Abulafia leads a new pressure group of historians, called Historians for Britain. Members argue that Britain's history gives it a separate character to the rest of Europe and that this should be taken into consideration if we re-negotiate our relationship with the EU. Justin Champion, on the other hand, is part of a loose coalition of historians called Historians for History who argue that Britain's history is a European one. But, how can history help inform the forthcoming referendum?

In the 3rd Century a leading military man, Carausius, led a break with Europe - the Roman Empire in this case - when he made himself Emperor of Britain. Was this a UKIP-styled revolt or just a simpler way of gaining power while still following Roman ideals? Tom talks to Roman historian Guy de la Bedoyere.

And, in Suffolk, Helen Castor visits the magnificent castle at Orford to hear from the most recent biographer of Henry II, Richard Barber, about how Europe was at the heart of his domestic problems.

Email: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b060zr3d)
Series 6

Perfect People

The Human Zoo is the programme that looks at current events through the lens of psychology. From scandals to markets, elections to traffic jams, discover the nuts and bolts of human behaviour that link public life to our most private thoughts and motivations.

Are people led by the head or by the heart? How rational are we? And how do we perceive the world? The programme blends intriguing experiments that reveal our biases and judgements, explorations and examples taken from what's in the news and what we do in the kitchen - all driven by a large slice of curiosity.

We like to say that all human behaviour could turn up in The Human Zoo, including yours.

This week, is what's expected of us as citizens psychologically absurd? The law punishes us if our attention lapses at the wrong moment. The state says we should be able to judge whether to cash in our pension.

We are all supposed to have read the terms and conditions - famously described as "the biggest lie on the internet". So are these expectations fit for real people? And what are the implications?

Michael Blastland investigates, with resident Zoo psychologist Nick Chater, professor of behavioural science at Warwick Business School, and roving reporter Timandra Harkness.

Special guests this week include Guardian tech reporter Alex Hern; Greg Davies, head of behavioural and quantitative finance at Barclays; from UCL, Professor of law Cheryl Thomas and psychologist Dr David Lagnado; plus writer and comedian Rosie Wilby on dating and pre-nups.


TUE 16:00 Self-Service Nation (b060zr3g)
Ian Marchant, writer and broadcaster, asks who benefits most from the self-service revolution - is it the consumer or big business?
From buying tickets online, to banking, to 'flat pack' shopping and the rise and rise of the supermarket, Ian explores how much the self-service revolution affects every aspect of our lives. He asks how much the consumer benefits from cheaper costs, and sets it against the shopper's own time and labour, which the self-service model relies on.

This is a programme about the pros and cons of self-service, of apparently limitless choice of brightly coloured brands - branding which is in part brought about by allowing the shopper the freedom to make their own choices. But self-service also led to a smaller and less skilled workforce, a process which continues today with the self-scanning checkouts at supermarkets.

And Ian wrestles with flatpack furniture - can he build his very own chest of drawers, cheap and convenient to buy, but is it worth the effort?

Producer: Mark Smalley.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b060zr3j)
Julian Clary and Janet Ellis

Comedian Julian Clary and former Blue Peter presenter Janet Ellis talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert. Choices under discussion are Mischief, a collection of short stories by Fay Weldon, English Passengers, Matthew Kneale's tale of the colonisation of Tasmania, and Anne Tyler's best-known novel The Accidental Tourist. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (b060zw8b)
Interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b060zgp8)
7/7/2015 The London bombings remembered, a decade on

Bombing remembrance services held; Greece's creditors say no fresh deal proposals made


TUE 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b060ztxq)
Series 3

Episode 2

What was Seann Walsh's worst gig? What was Dane Baptiste's nickname at school? What is Sara Cox's all time favourite food?

All these burning questions, and more, will be answered in the show hosted by Miles Jupp, where panellists are tested on how well they know their nearest and dearest.

In this case, comedians Seann Walsh and Dane Baptiste pick their old school mates, and DJ Sara Cox asks her best friend to answer questions about each other.

Producer: Matt Stronge.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b060zvnb)
Shula reports to Caroline that her paranoid twin Kenton is convinced that the family is plotting against him - he's angry about the village fete being relocated from the Green to Lower Loxley this year. Jill's getting very worried.

Kenton and Kate both feel like grabbing their backpacks and abandoning Ambridge. Both feel like pariahs - Kate's daughter Phoebe hates her, and Kenton's is on the other side of the world.
Aware that she's possibly the only sibling against whom Kenton doesn't hold a grudge, Shula gets Kenton to talk to her. He talks about his rivalry with David from when they were kids. Kenton opens up about his and Jolene's money problems - he built her hopes up around the sale of Brookfield and now they're facing ruin. Shula's firm but sympathetic - there's nothing they can do about Brookfield.

Oliver and Caroline are suffering negative reviews for Grey Gables. They've had one glowing review from a 'long term resident', which they've been accused of planting. Caroline suspects it was from a Grundy. Oliver suggests to Caroline a nice long holiday to get away from it all - how about Tuscany?

Kate has promised to keep what she knows about Phoebe and Alex secret. But as Jennifer insists on knowing what's going on between Kate and Phoebe, Kate can't help revealing that she caught them having sex.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b060ztbq)
National Gallery Soundscapes, Caine Prize winner, Agent Carter

Soundscapes, a new exhibition at the National Gallery in London, presents six new music and sound installations the Gallery has commissioned to accompany individual works of art from its permanent collection. Samira Ahmed hears from contributing artists Nico Muhly, Susan Philipsz and George Miller.

The Zambian writer Namwali Serpell has just been announced as the 2015 winner of The Caine Prize for African Writing. She talks about her winning story The Sack.

Naomi Alderman reviews Marvel's Agent Carter, a TV spin-off of Marvel's Captain America starring Hayley Atwell.

Plus playwright Rebecca Lenkiewicz speaks to Samira about The Invisible, her new play examining the human impact of cuts to the legal aid system.

Presenter : Samira Ahmed
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b060zq8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b060zvnd)
Off Track: Network Rail

Works behind schedule; costs going up; an inquiry into poor performance announced by the industry regulator. It's a depressingly familiar story on our railways. From brand new station escalators at a standstill in Birmingham, to only 10 per cent of trains on time at one of London's busiest stations, even the Chancellor's planned Northern Powerhouse is threatened as line upgrades between Manchester and York are delayed.
Allan Urry investigates Network Rail's woes as pressure mounts to deliver £24 billion of infrastructure improvements.
Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Rob Cave.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b060zvng)
Lord Holmes Report, Brendan Magill

Lord Chris Holmes talks to Peter about his recent report on shared spaces. Chris Fry from Unity Law talks about the legal action being brought against several councils by blind pedestrians who are angry about the new layouts.

And visually impaired listener Brendan Magill talks about being in continuous employment for the past 50 years. He's been employed, self-employed and now helps other visually impaired people into work.

Producer: Cheryl Gabriel
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b060zvnj)
Gestational diabetes, Low-carb diets, Needle pain

Diabetes in pregnancy, gestational diabetes, is on the increase, and the risks to mother and baby if this condition is untreated, are very serious. Around one in fourteen pregnant women will develop GD, but the risk is much greater according to age and weight of the mother, whether there's a history of diabetes in the family and in certain ethnic groups.
Dr Mark Porter visits The Rosie Maternity Hospital in Cambridge, where Dr Helen Murphy introduces him to the specialist teams that enable 70% of the women diagnosed there to manage their diabetes through diet and exercise, rather than medication.
The UK's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, NICE, has introduced new guidelines for diagnosing gestational diabetes which differ from international thresholds backed by the World Health Organisation.
Mark talks to researcher Dr Claire Meek from The Rosie, one of the authors of research published in the journal Diabetologia, which found that up to 4,000 women, at risk of serious birth complications, would be missed under the new UK criteria. The teams at The Rosie are shunning the new NICE guidelines and continuing to follow the WHO thresholds.
Professor Rudy Bilous, who runs the Diabetes in Pregnancy Service at the James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough and chaired the development group at NICE that produced the new diagnostic guidelines, tells Mark that he's confident that the thresholds, which were drawn up using the latest available evidence, are set at the right level.

Weight loss properties and low carbohydrate diets: listener Mark Robins from Southampton describes his success following a low carb diet (he lost nearly four stone in a year) and Inside Health's Dr Margaret McCartney and Susan Jebb, Professor of Diet and Population Health at the University of Oxford discuss the evidence behind weight loss and low carb diets.

The number of children who say they are afraid of injections is increasing and Dr Amy Baxter, a paediatric emergency doctor from Atlanta, Georgia and an expert in needle pain, has shown a link between the number of jabs and fear of needles. UK children have up to 15 vaccinations, with the new Meningitis B on the horizon, so managing that fear is important. Dr Baxter tells Mark what parents and health care professionals can do to help, and saying "Sit still, don't move, this will only hurt a bit", isn't recommended!

Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b060zq8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b060zgpb)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b060zw8d)
Summit of eurozone leaders ends in frustration after Greece fails to deliver its plan.

We speak to Malta's finance minister about the meeting
We debate whether the real crisis is a bigger one - of the whole European project.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b060zw8g)
Elizabeth and Her German Garden

Episode 2

Elizabeth von Arnim's semi-autobiographical first novel - first published in 1898 and written as a series of diary entries - details the joys and frustrations of creating a garden on her husband's family estate in northern Germany.

Elizabeth is a wild spirit whose minor eccentricities (she is happiest when eating salad outdoors) bemuse the servants and shock her high-born neighbours. Rather than hating the estate's remoteness and dilapidation, Elizabeth sees her sojourn there as an opportunity to create a beautiful garden in which she can spend time thinking about the world, playing with her beloved daughters and tolerating the occasional visitor.

Reader: Caroline Martin
Writer: Elizabeth von Arnim
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b060zddz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b060zw8j)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster. MPs debate English Votes for English laws. Meanwhile Labour uses an Opposition Day debate to argue against cuts to in-work tax credits.



WEDNESDAY 08 JULY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b060xvs5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b061ckdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b060xvs7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b060xvs9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b060xvsc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b060xvsf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b061brxx)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Leslie Griffiths.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0610171)
Farming in Greece, Housing on Exmoor, Farm payments in Wales.

People in rural Greece are finding some small positives among the financial gloom and uncertainty. Lucy Burton reports from an Apricot festival in the Peloponnese.

The Welsh Government has announced that farmers will be able to claim a single flat rate of subsidy for all types of land from 2019. Its previous proposals had to be dropped following a judicial review last year.

And young people from Exmoor have been to Westminster to tell MPs what it's like not to be able to afford to buy, or even rent, a home.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkc54)
Red-legged Partridge

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Red-legged Partridge. The red-legged partridge, which are sometimes called French partridges, are native to Continental Europe and were successfully introduced to the UK as a game bird in the 18th century. Seen from a distance, crouching in an arable field, they look like large clods of earth, but up close they have beautiful plumage.


WED 06:00 Today (b0610173)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b0610175)
Julia Donaldson, Iain Sinclair, Gary Bell, Michael Booth

Libby Purves meets children's writer Julia Donaldson; author Iain Sinclair; QC Gary Bell and journalist and food writer Michael Booth.

Michael Booth is a travel and food writer who became something of a a cultural phenomenon in Japan after his book Sushi and Beyond became a bestseller. The book, which traces his culinary journey across Japan, was transformed into a cartoon series on Japanese television featuring Michael and his family as characters. Michael is attending this year's Hyper Japan Festival to talk about starring in his own animated series. The Hyper Japan Festival is at various locations at the O2 Arena, London.

Gary Bell QC is a defence barrister who specialises in fraud cases and is known as BBC's The Legalizer. He grew up in poverty on a Nottingham council estate and his career history includes stints as a lawnmower mechanic, fireman and forklift truck driver. He was also a self-confessed football hooligan who was convicted of fraud before turning his life around and becoming a Queen's Council. His autobiography, Animal QC - My Preposterous Life, is published by Monday Books.

Julia Donaldson MBE is former Children's Laureate and the author of over 120 books and plays. Her breakthrough book was the Gruffalo, illustrated by Axel Scheffler, which has sold over 13m copies, won several prizes for children's literature and played in the West End and on Broadway. The shows Gruffalos, Ladybirds and Other Beasts - with Julia Donaldson and the Scarecrow's Wedding - both based on her books - are showing at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Edinburgh.

Iain Sinclair is a writer, poet and filmmaker, long associated with psychogeography - the study of the effects of the geographical environment on people's emotions and behaviour. In his new book, Black Apples of Gower, he takes a rare excursion out of London to walk along the cliff-top paths of his childhood in South Wales and rediscovers the Gower Peninsula, a place he first explored in his youth. Black Apples of Gower is published by Little Toller Books.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b061d0fp)
All Day Long

The Ballet Dancer

In 1974, the US broadcaster Studs Terkel talked to Americans "About what they do all day, and how they feel about what they do". His book telling their stories, Working, became a seminal tract in social history, and left an indelible print of how Americans worked and felt in the seventies.

Biggs has revisited Terkel's model in her tour of contemporary Britain - her interviewees including a lawyer, care worker, fishmonger, giggle doctor (yes, there really is such a thing), ballet dancer, quiz writer and potter, among many others. The book is a beautifully-observed portrait of the United Kingdom at work in the twenty-first century.

Episode 3: The Ballet Dancer

Joanna Biggs is an assistant editor at the London Review of Books. She was born in Willesden, North-West London, in 1982.

Readers: Ben Crowe, Teresa Gallagher, David Holt, Colleen Prendergast, Michelle Terry and Thom Tuck

Abridged by Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0610177)
Annie Nightingale, Jenny Valentine, Sadia Azmat

Annie Nightingale on her 45 year career as a DJ at Radio 1. Stand up comedian Sadia Azmat. Author Jenny Valentine on her new book Fire Colour One.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b0610179)
Dead Clever

Episode 3

As we romp through the University cloisters to Episode 3, it is the world of modern Geography that is even more of a puzzle to DCI Alma Blair than whodunit.

But while Alma is employed with the suspects in the case, DS Jason Trotter realises there is very little he knows about his boss's private life, so determines to play detective. However, asking CSM Jo Black to share what Alma keeps so private may well be taking his life into his own hands.

Written by Val McDermid
Sound Designer and Engineer: Eloise Whitmore

Produced and Directed by Justine Potter
A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b061017c)
Pat and Cheryl - Senior Moments

Fi Glover with two stalwarts of the Black Mountain Lions charity sharing their reflections on aging and on how giving to charity can give a lot back. Recorded in the Listening Project Booth at the Hay Festival. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 New Wave at Westminster (b061017f)
Arcane and bewildering - that's how new members often find the House of Commons. Following the General Election there are 182 of them, who have been adjusting to their new life at Westminster.

Over the past few weeks, BBC Radio 4 has been following six of the new intake, recording their experiences, exploring their hopes and seeing whether this class of 2015 are going to make a difference.

Johnny Mercer was the unexpected Conservative winner for the seat of Plymouth, Moor View. A former captain in the British Army, he completed three combat tours of Afghanistan.

Maria Caulfield is the Conservative MP for Lewes, and until the election was a nurse at the Royal Marsden Hospital and a part-time shepherd.

Tulip Siddiq kept the seat of Hampstead and Kilburn for Labour by the slimmest of majorities. She is the granddaughter of the first President of Bangladesh and niece to the current Bangladeshi Prime Minister.

Jess Phillips is the Labour MP for Birmingham, Yardley, with a background of working with victims of domestic and sexual violence.

Tommy Sheppard is the new SNP MP for Edinburgh East and one of the older newbies at 56. He was previously Scottish Labour's Assistant General Secretary but more recently a comedy club owner.

Natalie McGarry is the SNP MP for Glasgow East and was a founder member of Women for Independence in 2012.

Martha Kearney looks at how these MPs from very diverse backgrounds are coping with the pressures of Westminster life and asks whether the class of 2015 is making an impression in the new parliament.

Producer: Kate Dixon.


WED 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b03b0yf2)
Series 3

Episode 3

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, presents a third series of his hit sketch show.

The first series was described as 'sparklingly clever' by The Daily Telegraph and 'one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time' by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Sony award.

This time around, John promises to stop doing silly sketches about nonsense like Winnie the Pooh's honey addiction or how goldfish invented computer programming, and concentrate instead on the the big, serious issues.

This third episode of the series features a song about an unheralded inventor, a touching reunion and a normal man.

Written by and starring John Finnemore, with Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan. Original music is by Susannah Pearse.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b060xvsh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b061017h)
8 July 1915 - Mervyn Harris

When Mervyn returns home on leave, only Maisie is unchanged by the war, for better or worse.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 Summer Budget 2015 (b061017m)
Coverage of the chancellor's Budget speech with analysis and reaction.


WED 13:56 Weather (b060xvsk)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b060zvnb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Curious Under the Stars (b061017r)
Series 1

Gone West

By Meic Povey

The first of a new series set in Glan Don, a wild and mysterious village perched on the Welsh coast.

When Gareth finds his wife Diane in bed with a stranger, the couple attempt to salvage their marriage by uprooting from London to run a pub in West Wales. But The Druid's Rest has seen better days - the wallpaper is peeling, there's something growing out of the pool table and a mysterious man called Emlyn is living in the customer toilets.

Starring Elis James (Crims), Louise Ford (Chickens) and Ifan Huw Dafydd (Gavin and Stacey), Curious Under the Stars takes us deep into a Welsh landscape of myth, magic and mayhem.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b061017t)
Money Box Live: Summer Budget 2015

Do you have a question about the summer Budget 2015? Call 03700 100 444 from noon to 3.30pm on Wednesday 8 July or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now with your questions.

You may want more detail on the expected revamp of inheritance tax, in which a family home worth up to £1m in some circumstances, will be exempt from IHT?

Or you may want to know more about the planned benefits cap, the total amount a family can claim each year, to be cut to between £23,000 and £20,000, and how it could affect you?

Or if you earn more than £150,000 a year, how will any pension contributions you make get less tax relief in the future?

Presenter Lesley Curwen and her expert guests will be ready to answer your tax, benefits and pension questions as a result of this Wednesday's Budget.

Alan Higham, Fidelity; Jane Moore, ICAEW; and Eddy Graham, Carers UK, join the programme.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply.


WED 15:30 The Listening Project (b04mh75g)
Sunday Omnibus - Christine and Adam

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a mother and son from Carlisle about whose right it was to reveal he was gay, and the depression which both he and his father have experienced, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 15:45 What Is a Story? (b061017p)
It's All Absolutely True

Marina Warner considers whether “it’s all absolutely true”.

A look at the world of contemporary fiction. In the company of leading contemporary writers, she considers a story and story writing from a different angle.

Marina speaks with writers as diverse as Julian Barnes, Michelle Roberts, Fanny Howe, Marlene van Niekerk, Alain Mabanckou, Lydia Davis, Edwin Frank, Elleke Boehmer, Wen-Chin Ouyang, Daniel Medin, Nadeem Aslam and Laszlo Krasznahorkai.

There are questions around the boundaries between fact and fiction which Marina believes are central to any consideration of storytelling, since readers' pleasure depends so much on trust built up between the storyteller or writer and the audience.

With discussions on the reasons for writing, writers as witnesses and political interaction.

Marina was Chair of the Man Booker International Prize 2015 and the series draws on the expertise of the International Booker judging panel, the views of the shortlisted writers, as well as other key literary talent.

Producer: Kevin Dawson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio first broadcast in July 2015.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b061017w)
Arab Londoners - Migrants and British identity

Being Arab in London: diaspora and difference in the city. Laurie Taylor talks to Ramy M. K. Aly, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the American University in Cairo, about his seven year study of the everyday experiences of young, British-Arab people and the ways in which London has shaped and changed their ethnic identities.

Also, British identity among migrant groups. Dr Saffron Karlsen, Senior Lecturer in Social Research, explores the degree to which ethnic and religious minorities feel themselves to be British.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b061017y)
The new deal for the BBC in today's budget. Good for the corporation? Good for the audience?

In today's budget, the Chancellor George Osborne announced that responsibility for the policy and delivery of free TV licences for the over 75s is to be shifted from the government to the BBC - at a cost of more than half a billion pounds.

To balance that, says the BBC's Director General Tony Hall, the government has committed to let the licence fee increase by inflation; to close the so-called catch-up loophole which permits viewers to watch TV without a licence; and to return the ring-fenced money from the licence fee which is currently being used to support broadband roll-out.

Is it a good deal for the audience and the BBC? Does it mean cuts or continuity? We investigate.


WED 17:00 PM (b0610180)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b060xvsm)
Osborne uses first Tory budget since 1996 to soften austerity promised before election


WED 18:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (b0610182)
Series 2

Alcohol

Comedian Simon Evans returns with a series about the economics of some of the goods - or bads - we are addicted to.

If you crave your daily coffee, can't get by without a cigarette, feel that mid-afternoon slump without your sugar-fix, or can't face an evening without a glass of wine, you are definitely not alone. But have you ever thought about the economics that has made your addiction possible? Who does it profit? And would you want to make some canny investments that take advantage of our human weaknesses?

Simon looks at the economics, history and health issues behind these oh-so-addictive commodities.

With the help of economics guru, More Or Less host Tim Harford and the Queen of investment know-how, Merryn Somerset-Webb, Simon walks us around the economics of these very familiar commodities and pokes fun at our relationship with them.

Written by Simon Evans, Benjamin Partridge and Andy Wolton.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0610184)
Jennifer is sensitive and supportive as Phoebe explains how she and Alex had carefully planned her first time, which was destroyed by Kate walking in. Jennifer remembers her own experience, with her first love - and her own pregnancy. Jennifer's happy to offer advice on contraception. Phoebe's worried about what Alex thinks of her now. They're going to meet up - could he be about to break it off? Phoebe wishes she had stood up to Kate.

Pip goes with Adam, Rex and Charlie to the NEC Livestock event in Birmingham. Rex is pretty awed by the event, and also keen to stick close to Pip. Pip introduces Rex to Charlie, who's looking at the latest technology. Pip mentions that she's not so passionate about new technology these days - having spoken with Rex and Adam. As Pip asks about Toby, and his rather oddly timed rugby training, Rex covers. Pip learns a bit more from Rex about Toby and how he doesn't like to be pinned down. Rex also asks about Pip leaving Brookfield - a great set up. She's ready to stretch her wings - her relationship was going nowhere and she's young free and single.

Adam and Charlie have a heated discussion about business and Adam bailing on his maize contract. Charlie has always been straight with Adam, and trusted him to do the same.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b06101bb)
Henry Goodman in Volpone, Dear White People, Peter Gelb, The Demon Barbers

Henry Goodman discusses his role in Ben Jonson's Volpone at the RSC, a play about financial greed, directed by Trevor Nunn.

Satirical film Dear White People, about the lives of four black people at an Ivy League college, is reviewed by critic Yomi Adegoke.

As New York's Metropolitan Opera House celebrates 10 years of its pioneering live cinema broadcasts, Kirsty talks to General Manager Peter Gelb.

The Demon Barbers, winners of the 2009 Radio 2 Folk Awards for Best Live Act, mix traditional forms with hip-hop and contemporary dance, and as they tour the country they discuss their folk music and dance extravaganza.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0610179)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b06101bd)
Moral Luck and the Budget

"Do you feel lucky?" Well do you? Perhaps you should ask yourself that question on Wednesday as the Chancellor delivers his budget because moral luck - good or bad and what the state should or shouldn't do about that luck is at the heart of it all. Take two policies - the first, the decision to scrap inheritance tax on family homes worth up to £1m. Many people are now sitting on a small fortune that's been earned because they got lucky, bought a house at the right time in the right place and now they're going to be able to pass on that good fortune to their descendants. The second is the proposal to repeal the legally binding targets on child poverty. Whatever the arguments about the accuracy of such measurements, will it make it much harder for those who are unlucky enough to be born to poor parents to escape their poverty? What role should the Fates have in determining our ability to lead a good life and what, if anything should be the role of the state in rebalancing the scales? There are many ways to define social justice - creating a fair and decent society by rewarding human endeavour, self-reliance and people who are morally responsible and do "the right thing", get a job, set up home, look after their family. All compelling, but when inequality is created by luck should the state put a finger in the scales? Isn't good and bad luck just part of life and the idea that governments can do anything about it nonsense? Shouldn't we just stand back and let fate take its course because any attempt by the state to do anything about it will create new injustices in the process. Or in the interests of social solidarity should the state load the dice a little in favour of those who are less fortunate due to no fault of their own?


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b06101bg)
A Response to Terror

Hashi Mohamed re-interprets a recent British response to terrorism, arguing that the episode tells us a great deal about our nation.

Producer: Katie Langton.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b06101bj)
Series 1

Seeing is Believing - The Leviathan of Parsonstown

Today, astronomers believe the universe is a violent, constantly changing place. But it was not always the case.

At the beginning of the 19th century, many believed fervently that the celestial sky was a constant, divinely perfected, completed creation.

But as telescopes got larger, the mystery of the number, origin and role of the "nebulae" - those colourful, cloud-like smudges on the sky – grew and grew. Were they really vast clouds of gas and dust as they sometimes appeared? Or were they merely closely packed, very distant clusters of stars, as some of them allegedly appeared when magnified through the great reflecting telescopes?

When some astronomers and writers suggested they were in fact a vision of creation in action, matter condensing to form stars and planets like our own, some establishment religious figures cried foul, fearing the social implications.

Could bigger telescopes resolve the crisis?

For most of the 19th century, the biggest telescope in the world was in Birr, Ireland, then known as Parsonstown. It was built by an Anglo-Irish nobleman, Willam Parsons, Earl of Rosse, in the midst of the Irish famine. 50 feet long, 6 feet in diameter, the monster instrument was dubbed "The Leviathan".

But even thus equipped, in the days before photography and spectroscopy, observers could only describe and sketch what they saw, and it was hard to be objective.

As Simon Schaffer, James Bennet, and Chris Lintott narrate, the debate as to the truth of the "Nebular Hypothesis", and the concern as to whether the Irish astronomers really saw what they claimed to see, paved the way for the Darwinian debates in the coming decades.

Producer: Alex Mansfield


WED 21:30 Midweek (b0610175)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0610349)
George Osborne unveils National Living Wage in the Budget.

We debate the policy with the PCS union and the CBI
plus - General Sir Mike Jackson on the surprise decision to spend 2% of GDP on defence


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b061034c)
Elizabeth and Her German Garden

Episode 3

Elizabeth von Arnim's semi-autobiographical first novel - published in 1898 and written as a series of diary entries - details the joys and frustrations of creating a garden on her husband's family estate in northern Germany.

Elizabeth is a wild spirit whose minor eccentricities bemuse the servants and shock her high-born neighbours. In particular, she constantly rails against the constraints placed upon her gender. In this episode she revisits her childhood home, which she had to leave when her father died and it was inherited by her (male) cousins.

Reader: Caroline Martin
Writer: Elizabeth von Arnim
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


WED 23:00 Bunk Bed (b061034f)
Series 2

Episode 4

Two men in darkness, sharing a bunk bed and a stream of semi-consciousness about family, relationships, work and imagined life.

We all crave a place where our mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place from daily life. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, the restless mind can wander.

After an acclaimed reception by The Independent, The Sunday Telegraph, The Observer and Radio 4 listeners, Bunk Bed returns with its late night stream of semi-concsciousness.

In this episode, under cover of darkness, the bedfellows touch on how your name forms the character, alarms in biscuit tins, a child called Typhus, and the enduring strength of The Night Chicago Died by Paper Lace.

Elsewhere in the series, Patrick and Peter deal with therapy, Chas and Dave, children's happiness, JRR Tolkien, Babycham, Aldous Huxley and correction fluid - among a ragbag of subjects.

Written and performed by Patrick Marber and Peter Curran

Producer: Peter Curran
A Foghorn production for BBC Radio 4


WED 23:15 I, Regress (b01rr6cg)
Series 2

Cats

Matt Berry plays a a corrupt and bizarre regression therapist in this dark, Lynch-meets-Kaufman-style comedy.

Unsuspecting clients are taken on twisted, misleading journeys through their subconscious.

Each episode sees the doctor dealing with a different client who has come to him for a different phobia. As the patient is put under hypnosis, we 'enter' their mind, and all the various situations the hypnotherapist takes them through are played out for us to hear. The result is a dream (or nightmare-like) trip through the patient's mind, as funny as it is disturbing.

With:
Steve Pemberton
Daisy Haggard
Sally Okafor

A compelling late night listen: tune in and occupy someone else's head!

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b061034h)
Sean Curran and team report from Westminster on the Budget and Prime Minister's Question Time. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



THURSDAY 09 JULY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b060xvtv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b061d0fp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b060xvtx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b060xvtz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b060xvv1)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b060xvv3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b061bry4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Leslie Griffiths.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b06123jh)
Fox hunting, Livestock event, Rural housing

Moves to amend the 2005 hunting act has meet fierce opposition from campaigners. Robbie Marsland from the League Against Cruel Sports says it would be tantamount to a reintroduction of fox hunting. Tim Bonner from the Countryside Alliance thinks it's a sensible move to help farmers have efficient pest control.
The National Rural Housing conference takes place today in London and all this week Farming Today has been looking at the problems faced by those who cant afford to buy in the countryside. Professor Mark Shuksmith from Newcastle University warns that rural areas could become 'ghettos for the wealthy'
The National Livestock event is one of the biggest events of the year for cattle, sheep and pig farmers. BBC Midlands correspond David Gregory Kumar has been gauging the temperature amongst cattle farmers at the event in Birmingham
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkcwq)
Eider

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Eider. Eiders are northern sea-ducks perhaps most famous for the soft breast feathers with which they line their nests. These feathers were collected by eider farmers and used to fill pillows and traditional 'eider –downs'. Drake eiders display to the females with odd moaning calls which you can hear in the programme.


THU 06:00 Today (b06125z9)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b06125zc)
Frida Kahlo

Born near Mexico City in 1907, Frida Kahlo is considered one of Mexico's greatest artists. She took up painting after a bus accident left her severely injured, was a Communist, married Diego Rivera, a celebrated muralist, became friends with Trotsky and developed an iconic series of self-portraits. Her work brings together elements such as surrealism, pop culture, Aztec and Indian mythology and commentary on Mexican culture. In 1938, artist and poet Andre Breton organised an exhibition of her work in New York, writing in the catalogue, "The Art of Frida Kahlo is a ribbon around a bomb." She was not as widely appreciated during her lifetime as she has since become, but is now one of the most recognised artists of the 20th century.

With

Patience Schell
Chair in Hispanic Studies at the University of Aberdeen

Valerie Fraser
Emeritus Professor of Latin American Art at the University of Essex

And

Alan Knight
Emeritus Professor of the History of Latin America at the University of Oxford

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b061d16d)
All Day Long

The Fishmonger

In 1974, the US broadcaster Studs Terkel talked to Americans "About what they do all day, and how they feel about what they do". His book telling their stories, Working, became a seminal tract in social history, and left an indelible print of how Americans worked and felt in the seventies.

Biggs has revisited Terkel's model in her tour of contemporary Britain - her interviewees including a lawyer, care worker, fishmonger, giggle doctor (yes, there really is such a thing), ballet dancer, quiz writer and potter, among many others. The book is a beautifully-observed portrait of the United Kingdom at work in the twenty-first century.

Episode 4: The Fishmonger

Joanna Biggs is an assistant editor at the London Review of Books. She was born in Willesden, North-West London, in 1982.

Readers: Ben Crowe, Teresa Gallagher, David Holt, Colleen Prendergast, Michelle Terry and Thom Tuck

Abridged by Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b06125zf)
Prom mania, Men's biological clock, Supermarket women, Budget 2015

Prom Night - How the ritual of the American Prom has become a fixture of the school calendar in the UK. Reporter Donna Birrell joins students from Mounts Bay Academy in Penzance, Cornwall as they celebrate at a hotel overlooking St Ives Bay.

Do men have a biological clock? How much is this part of the conversation when a couple decides whether or not to have children? Dr Jackson C. Kirkman-Brown, Science Lead at Birmingham Women's Fertility Centre and Sheena Lewis, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Queen's University Belfast discuss why fertility is seen as a female concern.

Supermarket women - In the last of our Sylvia Pankhurst series about the lives of working women, Emma Barnett talks to women who work in retail and Dr Brendan Burchell, Reader in the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Magdalene College about how in the last 50-years the rise of the large supermarket chains has changed the life of shop workers. .

Sarah Pennells, independent finance journalist analyses 2015's budget and its impact on women.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Rebecca Myatt.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b06125zh)
Dead Clever

Episode 4

Jo is starting to wonder whether it's time for Alma to stop protecting the line between her professional and private life.

Meanwhile, the academics implicated in the murder of their professor seem interested only in how it will transform their career prospects.

The pursuit of an important piece of forensic evidence leads them into danger.

Written by Val McDermid
Sound Designer and Engineer: Eloise Whitmore

Produced and Directed by Justine Potter
A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b06125zk)
Fear and Fun in Baghdad

Reporters. In this edition: a sign reads: 'Welcome to Baghdad'. But residents in the Iraqi capital fear their city, and the country, are doomed. What will Greeks say, fifty years from now, about what happened in their country during the turbulence of summer 2015? As the talks in Vienna over Iran's nuclear programme inch, perhaps, towards a deal, our correspondent sees evidence of Iran's continuing suspicion of the United States on the streets of the capital, Tehran. We're overwhelmed by music as we trace the route of the first missionaries along the River Congo in Africa and find out how a million dollars, raised in the United States, is helping to train dogs to save lives.


THU 11:30 People Talking (b06125zm)
Exploring the poetic sound world of postwar radio documentary pioneer, Denis Mitchell.

From 1953 to 1959, Denis Mitchell was the producer of the seminal radio series People Talking, made at the BBC North Region. Throughout these years, Mitchell roamed the streets of Manchester and Liverpool, recording voices of everyday people and becoming one of the first radio producers in the country to exploit the potential of new portable tape machines.

For his documentaries, Mitchell sought out people sleeping in doorways and under bridges. He was drawn to those who were usually voiceless and hidden. He recorded with prisoners at Strangeways and with lorry drivers on the road. He was a good listener. Fellow radio producer Philip Donnellan described his approach as, "...with scarcely a word, holding the mic with one hand and a ciggie with the other, he encouraged people only with his look of battered and opaque world-weariness... It was remarkable."

When he returned to the studio, Mitchell made use of another new technology - magnetic tape - to splice together voices with ambient sound, becoming the first radio producer to experiment with the sound montage. His impressionistic assemblages of everyday voices were presented without commentary or questions.

This programme explores Mitchell's sound world, a revolutionary and democratic approach to long-form radio and his innovation as a sound artist.

Contributors include filmmaker Ken Loach, folk singer Peggy Seeger, radio critic and writer Gillian Reynolds, BFI historian Patrick Russell and Kevin Macdonald, director of One Day in September and Touching the Void.

Producers: Simon Hollis and Eve Claxton
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b060xvv5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b06125zp)
9 July 1915 - Mickey Macknade

The day that Mickey Macknade put away childish things, and grew up.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b06125zr)
Old rockers, Facebook trolling, Dementia cure

A year ago the Prime Minister announced his intention to improve diagnosis and treatment of dementia, and find a cure by 2025. Today on You & Yours we hear from World Dementia Envoy, Dr Dennis Gillings, who has been charged with making that happen. Plus we speak to hear from Alzheimer's Society Ambassador, Keith Oliver, about his experience with the disease.

Charities have been criticised for the way they put pressure on donors to give them money. Save the Children has said today it will stop the practice of cold calling to raise cash. But will other charities follow suit? Dame Hilary Blume tells Winifred Robinson she thinks the sector has a long way to go to reform itself.

Plus the oldies headlining the main stages at this year's music festivals. Research has found that over the past 15 years the average age of the headline acts has increased by around the same number of years. Promoters are concerned that in a few years there won't be enough big bands to go around. We ask what's stopping the younger bands from taking centre stage.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


THU 12:57 Weather (b060xvv7)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b06125zt)
It was dubbed a low tax, low welfare, high pay budget, but the Institute for Fiscal studies says it's the poorest families as well as higher earners who will bear the brunt of the Government's plans.
A senior banker warns the Chinese stock exchange turbulence carries risks for the global economy.
Martha takes to the skies over the Isle of Wight to explore Ordnance Survey maps as part of our WATO at 50 series.
And we speak a man who has won Wimbledon thirty seven times... not in Tennis but Croquet, as research says the sport is now less well known than Quidditch.


THU 13:45 What Is a Story? (b061d16g)
Bearing Witness

Marina Warner looks at, 'Bearing Witness'

A review of the world of contemporary fiction. In the company of leading contemporary writers, she considers a story and story writing from a different angle.

Marina speaks with writers as diverse as Julian Barnes, Michelle Roberts, Fanny Howe, Marlene van Niekerk, Alain Mabanckou, Lydia Davis, Edwin Frank, Elleke Boehmer, Wen-Chin Ouyang, Daniel Medin, Nadeem Aslam and Laszlo Krasznahorkai.

There are questions around the boundaries between fact and fiction which Marina believes are central to any consideration of storytelling, since readers' pleasure depends so much on trust built up between the storyteller or writer and the audience.

With discussions on the reasons for writing, writers as witnesses and political interaction.

Marina was Chair of the Man Booker International Prize 2015 and the series draws on the expertise of the International Booker judging panel, the views of the shortlisted writers, as well as other key literary talent.

Producer: Kevin Dawson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio first broadcast in July 2015.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0610184)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b0612b30)
The Dad Who Fell to Earth

Tom had been struggling to come to terms with his dad's sudden death, but that was before he found out his dad was secretly an alien from a distant planet.

Tom finds his whole world shifting to a new perspective, a perspective that might just also include saving Earth from imminent destruction.

Comedy drama by Toby Hadoke.

Tom ...... Toby Hadoke
Russell ...... Ronald Pickup
Jan ...... Cherylee Houston
Wendy ...... Alexandra Mathie
Pete ...... Lee Fenwick
Steve ...... Lee Fenwick
Chelsea ...... Zoe Iqbal

Director: Charlotte Riches

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b0612bn9)
Celebrating Golowan in Cornwall

Golowan is the Cornish tradition of lighting Midsummer Bonfires. This ancient tradition which hopes to prolong the summer sun for a good harvest was revived by The Old Cornish Society. Helen Mark meets some of their members to learn how they hope to keep the unique identity of this place alive and well.

On Bodmin Moor and Kit Hill there are reminders of man's habitation going back 5000 years. The fires they light on Bodmin Moor each year hark back to pre-historic times and scattered around the moor are Neolithic monuments which bear testament to man's long history in this 'ritual landscape'. Writer Philip Marsden explains how his search for the 'Spirit of Place' began on the moors and then spread deep into the heart of the Cornish landscape and its people.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b060xztg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b060yk50)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0612bnc)
Dear White People, Training animal actors, I was Julie Christie's double

With Francine Stock.

Director Justin Simien discusses his controversial comedy Dear White People and Priscilla Igwe of the New Black Film Collective discusses the difficulties of releasing the film in this country.

The Film Programme visits Amazing Animals, who train animals and insects, from wolves to flies, for the movies.

Listener Jan Johnson reveals how she was promoted from cabbage seller to Julie Christie's double on the set of Far From The Madding Crowd, and why it changed her life.

Corrina Antrobus of The Bechdel Test Fest picks her three DVDs of the month.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0612hjg)
Intrusive memories, Silent aircraft, Nuclear fusion, Pluto

Adam Rutherford talks to Emily Holmes from the Medical Research Council’s Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge, about two new studies on preventing intrusive memories. She discusses why stopping someone from sleeping after seeing a lab based film of traumatic events like a news reel or car crash may actually stop people from forming intrusive memories about those films. This offers an intriguing insight in to the role that sleep has in consolidating intrusive and possibly traumatic memories. She also explains how if memories of a traumatic event are laid down, why playing a computer game like Tetris could disrupt that memory and stop it from becoming intrusive.

Silent Aircraft: The Davies report recently recommended a new, third runway should be built at Heathrow airport but as flight numbers increase how quiet can planes of the future become? Adam talks to Jeremy Astley from Southampton University and Michael Carley from Bath University about where the noise in jet engines comes from, how engineering can make them quieter and will the silent aircraft initiative ever make a truly silent aircraft.

Nuclear Fusion. For decades scientists have tried to harness the power of the Sun to smash atomic nuclei together to create a clean, limitless energy source from nuclear fusion. Marnie Chesterton talks to scientists from Tokomak energy about their new design for a Tokomak machine that has already exceeded previous records. Could it be a vital step forward in the quest for nuclear fusion on Earth?

New Horizons: On 14th July 2015 the spaceship, New Horizons will complete its 10 year mission to flyby Pluto. BBC Science correspondent Jonathan Amos gives Adam a preview and tells him why he's so excited about the mission and what they hope to discover about the darker regions of our Solar System.


THU 17:00 PM (b0612hjj)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b060xvv9)
The IFS says millions worse off after Budget changes. The head of a child sex abuse investigation says it'll be ambitious. Police took three days to investigate fatal car crash.


THU 18:30 It's a Fair Cop (b0612hjl)
Series 2

Stop Search

Policeman turned comic Alfie Moore carries out a stop search and asks ‘Are the police institutionally racist?’

Series in which the audience makes the policing decisions as Alfie takes them through a real-life crime scenario.

Written and performed by Alfie Moore.

Script Editor: Will Ing

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0612hjn)
Ruth's back from Prudhoe, where she has been looking after her mum Heather. They're pleased to have Eddie's back at Brookfield to do the milking - with Pip doing mornings, so Ruth can relax. Jill tells Ruth about the Fairbrothers and their goslings at Hollowtree Farm. They discuss the Fairbrother boys - Ruth's rather annoyed not to have been consulted - and she hopes they behave. Jill also finds it rather strange. David sensitively tells Ruth to leave the farm to him and Pip while she's busy dealing with Heather.

Carol and Jill are pleased that Bert's turning his attention to his own garden, back at the bungalow. It's what Freda would have wanted. They also discuss Kenton, and the village fete - there's no sign of Kenton offering David a truce. Jill hopes Shula can help.

Toby and Pip flirt a bit as she checks on how things are with Toby's website for the business. At Pip's suggestion they relocate to the Bull, where there's wifi. Rex and Toby later talk about Pip - Rex confronts Toby over messing Pip around. However, Toby sees eligible Pip as a bit of a prize.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0612hjq)
Oliver Hirschbiegel, Mike Nicol, Song of the Sea, Camelot

Oliver Hirschbiegel, director of the Oscar nominated film Downfall - about Hitler's final days - on returning to the Third Reich for 13 Minutes, a new film about the failed assassin Georg Elser, who almost blew up the Fuhrer in 1939.

Song of the Sea is an Irish film that was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. The traditionally animated film is inspired by Irish folk tales and stories of mythical sea creatures, the Selkies. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews.

Author Mike Nicol on his latest novel Power Play, a tale of gang warfare on the Cape Flats of South Africa, with a plot based on Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus.

Camelot: The Shining City is a retelling of the Arthurian legend in which a future divided England is united by new leader. Director Alan Lane and writer James Phillips discuss their play which begins in Sheffield's Crucible theatre and then spills out onto the streets of the steel city.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b06125zh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Is the European Dream Over? (b063m4yl)
The European project is in crisis. Greece teeters on the brink of bankruptcy. Other members are split over whether to shore it up or let it leave the European single currency - a project that was supposed to be irreversible.

Whatever happens, this Greek drama is a potential turning point - not just for Greece, but for Europe. Donald Tusk, the Polish President of the European Council, has called it the most critical moment in the EU's history.

So, in this programme, Bridget Kendall and guests look beyond the immediate crisis to assess the future of Europe. Has the project reached its high water mark? What might it look like in ten years' time? Indeed: is the European dream over?

Producer: Chris Bowlby.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0612hjv)
Newspapers - to pay or not to pay?

Despite widespread predictions of their demise and amid falling numbers of readers, newspapers are still with us. How are they adapting to the challenges of digital technologies? The industry is split on the issue of whether or not to charge readers for online. What is the best business model for newspapers to survive and prosper? Evan Davis and guests discuss.

The guests this week are: John Ridding, Chief Executive of the Financial Times; Ashley Highfield, Chief Executive of the Johnson Press and Andrew Miller, out-going Chief Executive of the Guardian Media Group.

Producer: Jim Frank.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0612hjg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b06125zc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0612hjx)
Foreign Office tells all British tourists to leave Tunisia.

British government says threat of another attack is highly likely.
We ask one Tunisian MP about the impact on her country.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0612hjz)
Elizabeth and Her German Garden

Episode 4

Best known for The Enchanted April, Elizabeth von Arnim's first novel, the semi-autobiographical Elizabeth and her German Garden, was published anonymously in 1898. In it she mines her unhappy marriage to an overbearing Count – the 'Man of Wrath' – and the mores of the German landed gentry. Subversive, witty and a beautiful meditation on the joys of gardening, it was a huge bestseller and firmly established von Arnim's reputation as an author.

Reader: Caroline Martin
Writer: Elizabeth von Arnim
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


THU 23:00 Seekers (b0612hk1)
Series 2

The Boy With the Wogan Tattoo

It's the morning after Stuart's stag night, his back hurts, and Mr Big is looking for him.

Mathew Horne, Daniel Mays, Tony Way and Zahra Ahmadi star in the sitcom set in a jobcentre.

Stuart ------ Mathew Horne
Joseph ------ Daniel Mays
Terry ----- Tony Way
Nicola ------ Zahra Ahmadi
Vanessa ----- Natalie Walter
Gary Probert ----- Steve Oram

Written by Steve Burge.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0612hk3)
Labour says the Chancellor's Budget will 'harm those in work'. Susan Hulme covers the second day of Commons debate on George Osborne's measures.
Also on the programme:
* Ministers signal a possible re-think on the controversial plan for English votes for English laws.
* Will MPs be allowed a vote on fox hunting next week?
* Peers debate whether the converting of buildings in Whitehall into hotels poses a security risk.
* Should Channel Four TV be sold off to private companies?
* More maiden speeches are made in the Commons.



FRIDAY 10 JULY 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b060xvx6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b061d16d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b060xvx8)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b060xvxb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b060xvxd)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b060xvxg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b061brym)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Leslie Griffiths.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0612jp1)
Brandon Lewis, Rural housing, Fell ponies, Wool to China

Brandon Lewis the minister in charge of planning and communities responds to warnings that the budget will exacerbate the rural housing crisis. Charlotte Smith talks to people attending the Rural Housing conference at the House of Lords, they say that it's the biggest problem effecting the countryside and means that rural communities are losing young people who simply cant afford to live there.
A Chinese delegation is in the UK looking at the British wool process from shearing to shipping, Farming Today talks to Xhang Pei Wi - the woman responsible in charge of selling wool to China. She says British farmers should be more switched on when it comes to pushing their brand
Caz Graham visits an auction of the few remaining semi-feral herds of Fell ponies, which has come under the auctioneer's hammer in Cumbria. Fell ponies are highly sought after and rumour has it that the Queen rides one every day.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkdkt)
Ortolan Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Ortolan Bunting. Ortolan Buntings are smart relatives of our yellowhammer. They're migrants which winter in Africa and small numbers of birds heading south for the winter may turn up on our coasts in autumn. But until recently in parts of southern Europe, their arrival was welcomed by hunters with nets.

The sound archive recording of the ortolan bunting featured in this programme was sourced from:
Volker Arnold, XC139765. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/139765.


FRI 06:00 Today (b0612wdc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b060yk4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b061czhm)
All Day Long

The Quiz Writer and the Potter

In 1974, the US broadcaster Studs Terkel talked to Americans "About what they do all day, and how they feel about what they do". His book telling their stories, Working, became a seminal tract in social history, and left an indelible print of how Americans worked and felt in the seventies.

Biggs has revisited Terkel's model in her tour of contemporary Britain - her interviewees including a lawyer, care worker, fishmonger, giggle doctor (yes, there really is such a thing), ballet dancer, quiz writer and potter, among many others. The book is a beautifully-observed portrait of the United Kingdom at work in the twenty-first century.

Episode 5: The Quiz Writer and the Potter

Joanna Biggs is an assistant editor at the London Review of Books. She was born in Willesden, North-West London, in 1982.

Readers: Ben Crowe, Teresa Gallagher, David Holt, Colleen Prendergast, Michelle Terry and Thom Tuck

Abridged by Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0612wdf)
Evelyn Glennie; Teen Emergency Contraception; The Handmaid's Tale

Dame Evelyn Glennie on a musical career that's spanned more than thirty years. Profoundly deaf since the age of 12, the solo percussionist will be returning to the Proms with a special concert in August that will also mark her fiftieth birthday. New guidelines are issued today for medical professionals on the care of women with female genital mutilation and safeguarding of girls at risk - what impact will they have? Thirty years after the publication of Margaret Atwood's classic novel The Handmaid's Tale, we ask how much of the future it describes is born out by current trends in the world today. Emergency contraception is now licensed for sale to girls under the age of 16 - we discuss the issues raised by teen access to the 'morning after pill'.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0612k64)
Dead Clever

Episode 5

When a killer strikes close to home, in the world of academia it's every man - or woman - for himself. Or herself. Whereas in law enforcement, they close ranks. Kick one and they all limp.

Val McDermid's second comedy crime drama series - and the University murder investigation - concludes.

Written by Val McDermid
Sound Designer and Engineer: Eloise Whitmore

Produced and Directed by Justine Potter
A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 CSI Whale (b0612k66)
Six hundred cetaceans (whales and dolphins) are stranded on British coasts every year.

The UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme team works out of a laboratory and office at London Zoo and attend as many strandings as they can in order to try to find out why the animals have died.

Philip Hoare, author of Leviathan, attends the necropsy of a harbour porpoise that was washed up dead on a Welsh beach. As Rob Deaville and Matt Perkins scrutinise the dead animal for clues as to what might have killed it, Philip reflects more widely on what going inside a whale might tell us metaphorically as well as literally.

Whales are so big and such creatures of another realm that getting close to them has long spurred the human imagination to ambitious reflection. Among the fruits of this are the Bible story of Jonah, Herman Melville's Moby Dick, and George Orwell's essay Inside the Whale. Why have we been so fascinated - so bewitched and terrified at once - by these animals?

Producer: Tim Dee.


FRI 11:30 Clare in the Community (b0612n9l)
Series 10

My Kinda Town

Clare gets involved with a devious TV producer who's making a documentary about the Sparrowhawk estate.

Brian has gone on a fitness kick and joined a men's group, which is threatened by the arrival of a new member.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Clare continually struggles to control both her professional and private life In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden.

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Alan ...... Richard Lumsden
Carl ...... Richard Lumsden
Simon ...... Andrew Wincott
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Lou ...... Lizzie Roper
Caspar ...... Karl Theobald
Malcolm ...... Anil Goutam

Producer: Alexandra Smith.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2015.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b060xvxj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b0612n9n)
10 July 1915 - Ralph Winwood

Reverend Winwood finds ministering to a diverse flock of parishioners far easier than his own household.

Written by Richard Monks
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b0612n9q)
Mental illness, Graduation costs, Junk mail, Food substitutes

Why has an opt out scheme to stop the deluge of junk mail being posted through our doors been quietly swept under the rug?

We follow the medical staff and police officers who work with a pioneering mental health triage unit in Birmingham which is helping to keep people with mental illness out of police custody.

As retailers in England rev themselves up for the introduction of a 5p levy on plastic bags we examine how effective it can be in reducing the number of bags we use.

Graduating from university is one of the proudest days of your life, but the trouble is it can also be one of the most expensive. What is the cost of the average graduation ceremony, and should universities be charging for it?

The ready meal which could mean you never have to worry about buying, preparing or eating conventional food again.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b060xvxl)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b0612wdh)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.
British tourists are evacuated from Tunisia, government planning changes, should Britain leave the EU and join the European Free Trade Association? we have a debate. Plus Spitfire vs Hurricane - which plane had the bigger impact in the Battle of Britain?


FRI 13:45 What Is a Story? (b061d24z)
History for the Record

Marina Warner explores History for the Record.

A look at the world of contemporary fiction. In the company of leading contemporary writers, she considers a story and story writing from a different angle.

Marina speaks with writers as diverse as Julian Barnes, Michelle Roberts, Fanny Howe, Marlene van Niekerk, Alain Mabanckou, Lydia Davis, Edwin Frank, Elleke Boehmer, Wen-Chin Ouyang, Daniel Medin, Nadeem Aslam and Laszlo Krasznahorkai.

There are questions around the boundaries between fact and fiction which Marina believes are central to any consideration of storytelling, since readers' pleasure depends so much on trust built up between the storyteller or writer and the audience.

With discussions on the reasons for writing, writers as witnesses and political interaction.

Marina was Chair of the Man Booker International Prize 2015 and the series draws on the expertise of the International Booker judging panel, the views of the shortlisted writers, as well as other key literary talent.

Producer: Kevin Dawson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio first broadcast in July 2015.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0612hjn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b0612n9s)
Rumpole

Rumpole and the Bubble Reputation

Rumpole meets Erskine-Brown in Pommeroy’s. Erskine-Brown is depressed because he’s doing a sordid ABH and affray which allegedly occurred in a Soho night club.

Rumpole tells him to visit the scene of the crime to get the lay of the land, which they do. They drink with Maurice Machin, the editor of the Daily Beacon, who tells Rumpole that an article in his paper by one “Stella January” alleged that Ameila Nettleship, an author of historical novels, has affairs with married men. She is suing the paper, and Maurice Machin, for libel.

Will Rumpole defend? He agrees.

Meanwhile Erskine-Brown, due to get married to Phillida Trant in a couple of weeks, doesn’t realise his photo has been taken as he ogles the topless dancers. When this photo is published in the papers, Phillida is furious.

Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Rumpole in a story written by John Mortimer and adapted by Richard Stoneman.

Cast:
Horace Rumpole ….. Benedict Cumberbatch
Hilda Rumpole ..… Jasmine Hyde
Phillida Erskine-Brown ….. Cathy Sara
Claude Erskine-Brown ..… Nigel Anthony
Maurice Machin ….. Ewan Bailey
Porky Peppiatt ….. Stephen Critchlow

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Produced by Catherine Bailey
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0612rhl)
County Antrim

Eric Robson hosts the programme from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Matt Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and James Wong answer questions from Antrim Castle Gardens.

Matt Biggs explores the folklore of the Shamrock Garden at Mount Stewart - and there's the ultimate guide to maintaining a cut flower border.

Produced by Darby Dorras.
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Rapunzel (b0612rhn)
The Switch

The last of three specially-commissioned tales by Julie Mayhew - her first stories for radio - taking their inspiration not only from the Rapunzel story made familiar by the Brothers Grimm, but also from some of the traditional European tales that influenced them.

In modern settings, each story features a girl with a tall tower of her own and the possibilities of an open window...

Episode 3: The Switch
Set in the not-too-distant future, a woman sits watching events on ‘Earth’. But who is the crying girl with the crazy hair?

Julie Mayhew has written three plays for radio, including A Shoebox Of Snow which was nominated for Best Drama at the BBC Audio Drama Awards in 2012. Her first novel, Red Ink (2013), was nominated for the 2014 CILIP Carnegie Medal. Her second, The Big Lie, will be published in the summer of 2015. Julie is a founder and host of the short story cabaret, The Berko Speakeasy.

Reader: Indira Varma

Produced by Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b0612wdk)
Omar Sharif, Stanley 'Steve' Moore, Jules Wright, Yevgeny Primakov, Ernest Tomlinson

Matthew Bannister on

Actor Omar Sharif

Flying squad detective Stanley Moore - always known as Steve, he helped to catch some of the Great Train Robbers.

Theatre Director Jules Wright who co-founded the Women's Playhouse Trust and set up the Wapping Project arts venue.

Former Russian Foreign and Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov.

And the composer Ernest Tomlinson, best known for his light orchestral works.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b0612rhq)
The Licence Fee and the future of the BBC.

Director General Tony Hall has agreed to fund licences for the over 75s but says he's got a good deal for the corporation, citing the agreement that the Licence Fee will rise in line with inflation and those who only use catch-up services such as iPlayer may also need to buy a licence. Meanwhile, the Chair of the BBC Trust - your representative - was locked out of negotiations and others in the worlds of media and politics have been scathing about the lack of public consultation. Roger Bolton hears the views of Feedback listeners.

The Proms are coming back to the World Service - five years after they were cut to save money. Roger speaks to controller of the BBC World Service in English, Mary Hockaday, to see where the money is coming from at a station with an even more tightly squeezed budget, following the transfer of financial responsibility for the network from the Foreign Office to the BBC last year.

Apple Music launched its new internet radio station Beats 1 last week, and some people said that it sounded a great deal like BBC Radio 1. So should the BBC be worried about having their younger listeners poached? Feedback puts 19 year old radio DJ Oré Olukoga on the case to see whether Apple can inspire a generation which is increasingly uninterested in live radio broadcasts.

The five part Radio 4 series Me, My Selfie and I, presented by snowboarder Aimee Fuller, took on the subject of the selfie - but some listeners thought this was a shallow attempt to pick up a younger audience. Roger puts their concerns to the series producer Phillip Revell.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b0612rhs)
Ian and Matthew - A Farming Family History

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a farmer and son about the pull of the land and the responsibility of tradition. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b0612wdm)
Eddie Mair presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b060xvxn)
British tourists return from Tunisia amid warnings of another terrorist attack. Government proposes a relaxation of planning laws in England. Greek MPs to vote on bail-out deal.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b0612rhv)
Series 46

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0612rhx)
As the pickers work, Jennifer's looking forward to the Borchester Street Market tomorrow. Phoebe and Alex seemed all loved up again. Adam has no idea about what happened, but notices that Phoebe's still hardly talking to Kate.

Usha shows Charlie the Echo, featuring the SAVE campaign and caption: 'Ambridge Perseverance Rewarded'. Ruth opens up to Usha about looking after her mum Heather. Ruth feels out of the loop with David and Pip and the management of Brookfield.

Brian's keen to chat to Brian before Charlie gets to him. But he's too late. Brian's aghast to learn from Charlie about Adam's announcement - this year's maize harvest is going to be their last for Charlie/ the Estate. Brian reminds Adam that he owns the land - Adam should give that some serious thought.

Adam thinks about this and comes back to Brian with an ultimatum - if the contract stays then Adam walks. He's prepared to find work elsewhere.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0612wdp)
Mike Leigh, Omar Sharif, Yves Saint Laurent, Online Orchestra

50 years ago, Mike Leigh directed the premiere of David Halliwell's play Little Malcolm and his Struggle Against the Eunuchs. As a 50th anniversary revival of the revolutionary play opens, its director Clive Judd joins Mike Leigh to discuss the challenge of the play and its lasting relevance.

Omar Sharif made a huge impact with his performances in Lawrence of Arabia and Dr Zhivago and became the first internationally famous Arab actor. He is remembered by Rita Tushingham, a fellow star in Dr Zhivago, and by the film historian Ian Christie.

The first British retrospective of the haute couture of Yves Saint Laurent goes on display at the Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle. Shahidha Bari reviews Yves Saint Laurent: Style is Eternal.

The Online Orchestra will make its premiere performance at Truro Cathedral on Sunday. Run by Falmouth University and funded by the AHRC, its aim is to create an orchestra that will allow people who live hundreds of miles apart to make music together for the first time.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0612k64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b0612rhz)
Tim Farron MP, Lord Lamont, Chris Leslie MP, Merryn Somerset Webb

Shaun Ley presents political debate from the Runway Visitor Centre at Manchester Airport with Tim Farron MP who is standing as a candidate in the Liberal Democrat leadership contest, former Chancellor of the Exchequer Lord Lamont, the Shadow Chancellor Chris Leslie MP and the Editor in Chief of Moneyweek Merryn Somerset Webb.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0612wdr)
Adam Gopnik: Power, Persecution and Pluralism

Adam Gopnik wonders why religious people are feeling "persecuted" following the US Supreme Court ruling making same sex marriage legal in all fifty states. Can a religious person free to practice their religion actually feel persecuted? Are they just offended by the practices of a pluralistic society, or do they have a point?
"Their complaint is, in its way, one that seems fixed in the political choices of the late Roman Empire: the only alternatives they can recognise as real are either power or persecution. Either you are the magistrate making rules, or else you are the martyr being sacrificed to them."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b0612rj1)
6-10 July 1915

Omnibus edition of Home Front. Soldiers home on leave find home so different to the one they thought they were fighting for.

Written by Richard Monks
Story-led by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b060xvxq)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0612wx2)
Greece and its creditors try for agreement on new bail-out deal

Will the EU accept Alexander Tsipras's latest proposals?


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0612rj3)
Elizabeth and Her German Garden

Episode 5

Elizabeth von Arnim's semi-autobiographical first novel, written as a series of diary entries, was published anonymously in 1898.

The central character, Elizabeth, is a wild spirit whose minor eccentricities bemuse the servants and shock the high-born neighbours of her husband's family estate in northern Germany. Rather than hating its remoteness and dilapidation, Elizabeth sees her sojourn there as an opportunity to create a beautiful garden in which she can spend time thinking about the world, playing with her beloved daughters and tolerating the occasional visitor.

Reader: Caroline Martin
Writer: Elizabeth von Arnim
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b060zr3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0612x36)
Mark D'Arcy and the BBC parliamentary team report from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b0612rj5)
Sarah and Andy – Doctors are Human Too

Fi Glover introduces a conversation betweeen a doctor and her husband about the strain of dealing with life and death every day. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b060z4pr)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b060z4pr)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b060zq8t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b060zq8t)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b0610179)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0610179)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b06125zh)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b06125zh)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b0612k64)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b0612k64)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b060zr3j)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b060zr3j)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b060bxpj)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0612wdr)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b06084l6)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b060zg8g)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b060q9k2)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b060bxpg)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b0612rhz)

Archie Shepp's Message from Paris 11:30 TUE (b060zq8w)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b060qbwm)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0612hjg)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0612hjg)

Battleships: The Ashes Voyages 11:00 MON (b060z6ly)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b060xwcz)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b060xwcz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b060zg8l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b060zw8g)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b061034c)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b0612hjz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b0612rj3)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b06172qn)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b060z4pm)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b060z4pm)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b061ckdt)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b061ckdt)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b061d0fp)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b061d0fp)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b061d16d)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b061d16d)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b061czhm)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b060yk50)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b060yk50)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b060y27t)

Bunk Bed 23:00 WED (b061034f)

CSI Whale 11:00 FRI (b0612k66)

Children of the Olympic Bid 13:30 SUN (b060yk4t)

Clare in the Community 11:30 FRI (b0612n9l)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b06084kq)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b060zbjr)

Curious Under the Stars 14:15 WED (b061017r)

Dave Podmore 19:15 SUN (b0612pjc)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b060yk4m)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b060yk4m)

Drama 14:15 MON (b060zbjp)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01pp897)

Drama 14:15 THU (b0612b30)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b0612n9s)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b060q9b8)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b060yxym)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b060zjrf)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0610171)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b06123jh)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0612jp1)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b061039t)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b0612rhq)

Fighting to Stay the Same 20:00 MON (b060zg8d)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b0608h81)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b060zvnd)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b0608nvd)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b06101bg)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b060q9tp)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b060q9tp)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0606k2t)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b06125zk)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b060zg8b)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b060ztbq)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b06101bb)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0612hjq)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0612wdp)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b060bwdl)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0612rhl)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b0612rj1)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b060z9rv)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b060zq8y)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b061017h)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b06125zp)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b0612n9n)

I, Regress 23:15 WED (b01rr6cg)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b06125zc)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b06125zc)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b060zvng)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b060zvnj)

Is the European Dream Over? 20:00 THU (b063m4yl)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 TUE (b060ztxq)

It's a Fair Cop 18:30 THU (b0612hjl)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 11:30 WED (b03b0yf2)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b06084kz)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b060zdf1)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b060pdqy)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b0612wdk)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b060q9tm)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b060zqbc)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0606k29)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b060xvnn)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b060xvql)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b060zgnt)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b060xvs5)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b060xvtv)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b060xvx6)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0610175)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0610175)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b060q9k0)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b060q9k0)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b061017t)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b0608nlb)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b06101bd)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w9b5b)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w9b5j)

New Wave at Westminster 11:00 WED (b061017f)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0606k2k)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b060xvnx)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b060xvqv)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b060zgp2)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b060xvsf)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b060xvv3)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b060xvxg)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b060xvnz)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b0606k2w)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b060xvp9)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b060xvqz)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b060zgp4)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b060xvsh)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b060xvv5)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b060xvxj)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0606k2m)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b060xvp3)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b060xvp7)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0606k38)

News 13:00 SAT (b0606k30)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b060xyp8)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b060zq8p)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b060bf65)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b0612bn9)

Original Shorts 00:30 SUN (b01dvzgc)

PM 17:00 SAT (b060q9tk)

PM 17:00 MON (b061czby)

PM 17:00 TUE (b060zw8b)

PM 17:00 WED (b0610180)

PM 17:00 THU (b0612hjj)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0612wdm)

People Talking 11:30 THU (b06125zm)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b060yngy)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b060724c)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b060bxr3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b061bp40)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b061bpjh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b061brxx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b061bry4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b061brym)

Pussy Galore 10:30 SAT (b060q9jw)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b060xztg)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b060xztg)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b060xztg)

Rapunzel 15:45 FRI (b0612rhn)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01qgr4f)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b060q9jt)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b060q9tr)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b06101bj)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 MON (b060z7c5)

Seekers 23:00 THU (b0612hk1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0606k2f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b060xvns)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b060xvqq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b060zgny)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b060xvs9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b060xvtz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b060xvxb)

Self-Service Nation 16:00 TUE (b060zr3g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0606k2c)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0606k2h)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0606k32)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b060xvnq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b060xvnv)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b060xvpf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b060xvqn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b060xvqs)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b060zgnw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b060zgp0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b060xvs7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b060xvsc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b060xvtx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b060xvv1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b060xvx8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b060xvxd)

Simon Evans Goes to Market 18:30 WED (b0610182)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0606k36)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b060xvpk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b060xvr6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b060zgp8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b060xvsm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b060xvv9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b060xvxn)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b060xyp5)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b060xyp5)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b060z4pk)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b060z4pk)

Summer Budget 2015 12:15 WED (b061017m)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b060y0qs)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b060xztd)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b060yk4k)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b060ynh0)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b060ynh0)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b060zg88)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b060zg88)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b060zvnb)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b060zvnb)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0610184)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0610184)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0612hjn)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0612hjn)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0612rhx)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b060bll1)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0612hjv)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b060bf67)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0612bnc)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b060yk4p)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b060yk4p)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b060zr3d)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b060zddz)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b060zddz)

The Kampala Dream House 15:30 SAT (b06086dq)

The King's Muse 16:30 SUN (b060yk52)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b060zq8m)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b060zq8m)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b060yk4w)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b061017c)

The Listening Project 15:30 WED (b04mh75g)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b0612rhs)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b0612rj5)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b061017y)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b060bwds)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b0612rhv)

The Robert Peston Interview Show (with Eddie Mair) 23:00 MON (b060zg8n)

The Stuarts 21:00 SAT (b0606vv7)

The Stuarts 15:00 SUN (b060yk4y)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b060q9jy)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b060yk4r)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b060zg8j)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b060zw8d)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0610349)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0612hjx)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0612wx2)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0608n26)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b061017w)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b060zg8q)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b060zw8j)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b061034h)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b0612hk3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b0612x36)

Today 07:00 SAT (b060q9bb)

Today 06:00 MON (b060z4ph)

Today 06:00 TUE (b060zq8k)

Today 06:00 WED (b0610173)

Today 06:00 THU (b06125z9)

Today 06:00 FRI (b0612wdc)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03dx944)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b038qkfw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03bkc26)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03bkc54)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03bkcwq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03bkdkt)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b0606k2p)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b0606k2r)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b0606k2y)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b0606k34)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b060xvp1)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b060xvp5)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b060xvpc)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b060xvph)

Weather 05:56 MON (b060xvqx)

Weather 12:57 MON (b060xvr1)

Weather 21:58 MON (b060xvr9)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b060zgp6)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b060zgpb)

Weather 13:56 WED (b060xvsk)

Weather 12:57 THU (b060xvv7)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b060xvxl)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b060xvxq)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b061035s)

What Is a Story? 13:45 MON (b060z9s1)

What Is a Story? 13:45 TUE (b061ckdw)

What Is a Story? 15:45 WED (b061017p)

What Is a Story? 13:45 THU (b061d16g)

What Is a Story? 13:45 FRI (b061d24z)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b061035v)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b060zddx)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b060q9k5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b060z4pp)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b060zq8r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0610177)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b06125zf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0612wdf)

World at One 13:00 MON (b060z9rz)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b060zq92)

World at One 13:00 THU (b06125zt)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0612wdh)

Yeats: The Man and the Echo 19:45 SUN (b0612pjf)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b060z9rx)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b060zq90)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b06125zr)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b0612n9q)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b060q9b6)