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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 JUNE 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndz1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b05wz0k9)
Ghettoside

The Trial

Rhashan Stone reads Jill Leovy's account into the high rates of murder among LA's young black men. The long awaited Bryant Tennelle murder trial opens. The detective John Skaggs who was instrumental in tracking down the suspects looks on hopeful that justice will prevail.

Written by Jill Leovy
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndz3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndz7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndz9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndzc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05wz96q)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Canon Jenny Wigley.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b05wz96s)
'I had a choice between life and death, and I had to choose life'

'I had a choice between life and death and I had to choose life'. iPM looks at a listener's struggle to comes to terms with amputation. How did it change her? Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b05wndzf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b05wndzh)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b05wyq6b)
Series 30

Lyke Wake Walk

Clare Balding undertakes a section of the Lyke Wake Walk on the North York Moors. The route was originally devised sixty years ago by a local farmer who issued a challenge in the Dalesman magazine. He thought it might be possible to cross 40 miles of the Moors from near Osmotherley to Ravenscar in 24 hours, crossing only one or two roads. A club was formed following the first successful crossing, and with a blackly humorous nod to the pain and suffering endured by walkers, a tradition grew of reciting an ancient song known as the Lyke-Wake Dirge which tells of the soul's journey from earth to purgatory. The route was named after this dirge. Clare is joined by veterans and newcomers to the walk, who are known - depending on the number of crossings they've made - as Dirgers, Witches, Doctors of Dolefulness, Masters of Misery or, the most senior of all, Past Masters or Mistresses.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b05xcgp9)
Farming Today This Week: Wool

Charlotte Smith takes a look at the British wool industry. Fleeces from British sheep bring £30 million into the economy - but the wool is found in more places than you might think.
We find out why British sheep shearing talent is on the increase, what happens to the fleeces along the supply chain, how wool is increasingly used as insulation in food packaging, and about some of the high quality British fabric used in upholstery, furnishings and clothing.
Produced in Bristol by Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b05wndzl)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b05xch55)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b05xch57)
Reginald D Hunter

Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles are joined by the American stand-up comic Reginald D Hunter. He talks about growing up in America's Deep South, only being the fourth funniest in his family and how, although having lived in the UK for 17 years, he still gets caught out by our 'common' language.

Andre Anderson comes from an estate in North West London with a reputation for gang violence and crime. He tells us about 'Authors of the Estate' - a project to encourage others to find their voice in the pen, rather than the knife or gun.

Juliet Russell is a singer, composer and vocal coach (including for BBC1's The Voice), working with artists from Damon Albarn to Paloma Faith. She talks to us about vocal bad habits and how singing is good for people with dementia.

Jake McGowan-Lowe is a bone collector and naturalist. He been collecting bones since he was 6. At 13 he's just been nominated as one of the most important conservation heroes in Britain.

40 years ago listener Douglas McGowan bought the Waverley paddle steamer for £1. He tells us about the impact that has had on the rest of his life.

Actor and musician Hugh Laurie chooses his Inheritance Tracks - 'Tumbling Dice' by the Rolling Stones and 'Cantaloupe' by Herbie Hancock.

Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Karen Dalziel

**Tomorrowland starring Hugh Laurie and George Clooney is out in cinemas now.
**Reginald D Hunter's tour continues at venues across the country throughout June.
**Authors of the Estate By Andre Anderson et al is available to buy online.
**Juliet Russell's album is called 'Earth Meets Sky'.
**Jake's Bones by Jake McGowan-Lowe is available from all good bookshops.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b05xch59)
Series 10

Hay Festival

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel programme from the Hay Festival.

On this week's panel are food historian Professor Peter Barham, DIY food expert Tim Hayward, and the former Head of Creative Development for Heston Blumenthal, James "Jocky" Petrie.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun
Producer: Victoria Shepherd
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b05xch5c)
Paul Waugh of the Huffington Post looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The Labour leadership contest, FIFA under political pressure, and the prospect of Boris Johnson leading a NO campaign on the EU referendum. Plus the impact of 56 Scottish Nationalist MPs in Westminster.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b05wndzn)
A Turkish Mosaic

Windows on the world. Today: diverse and contradictory views about the Turkish election and the country's president Recep Tayyip Erdogan from three very different parts of the country; there's now a record number of migrants in the French port of Calais - they're concerned not only about the hostility they face but also about the widespread ignorance in Europe about what's really going on in their home countries; as gloom deepens further at FIFA headquarters in Zurich, we hear Swiss fears the scandal is a further blow to the image the country once enjoyed as a place of chocolate and cheese, competence and quality; there's a visit to the world's biggest shipyard, which is in South Korea, but why does the place remind our correspondent of sepia photographs and old newsreels and it's 'transhumance' time: we're in the Pyrenees as thousands of cattle and sheep set off for their summer pastures on the slopes.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b05wndzq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b05xch5f)
Travel Money: Cards v Cash

What's the best way to take your money on holiday and keep it safe?

Plastic is triumphing over paper where travel is concerned. Thomas Cook stopped issuing travellers cheques in March, after 141 years in that business, citing falling demand. And the Post Office says last financial year it sold ten times the number of pre paid cards than it did travellers' cheques.

Money Box examines the pros and cons of the pre-paid currency cards.

Exactly two months after the beginning of Pension Freedom, some pension providers appear unable to offer complete choice to their customers. Friends Life are only offering two of the Pension Freedom options. Lesley Curwen will be asking a leading pension expert what you can do.

Meanwhile some of those in defined benefit workplace pension schemes are resorting to desperate measures to try and access their pensions pot, as the Financial Conduct Authority looks at strengthening its advice to financial advisers.

The European Commission is looking again at how the recent changes to EU VAT regulations are affecting small digital businesses. They say nearly all the complaints about the new rules and the VAT Mini One Stop Shop (VAT MOSS) are from the UK. So what are the Commission going to do about it?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b05wz90l)
Series 87

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guests Fred Macaulay, Justin Moorhouse and Lucy Porter.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b05wndzs)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b05wndzv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b05wz90s)
Rushanara Ali MP, David Davis MP, Lord Hennessy, Tommy Sheppard MP

Ritula Shah chairs political discussion and debate from from Marden High School in Cullercoats, Tyne & Wear, with Rushanara Ali MP who is standing as a candidate for Labour Party deputy leader, the Conservative back bencher David Davis MP, cross bench peer and constitutional expert, Lord Hennessy, and the new Scottish National Party MP for Edinburgh East Tommy Sheppard.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b05xcj66)
Alcohol, MPs' Pay

The premature death of Charles Kennedy has opened the debate about heavy drinking. Why do so many turn to alcohol and what's the solution? Also, what is an MP worth? More than a nurse? Less than a head teacher?
Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producers: Angie Nehring, Rebecca Wood.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b03pd2n5)
Woman in Mind

Alan Ayckbourn's powerful tragi-comedy about a woman's mental breakdown, starring Lesley Sharp, Ben Miles, Owen Teale and Malcolm Sinclair.

Susan is a middle-aged woman, trapped in a loveless marriage to a smug vicar, and estranged from her son. After a minor accident with a garden rake, her mind starts to conjure up the perfect fantasy family. But the line between imagination and reality soon becomes alarmingly blurred.

Susan.....Lesley Sharp
Dr Bill Windsor.....Ben Miles
Rev. Gerald Gannet.....Malcolm Sinclair
Muriel.....Carolyn Pickles
Andy.....Owen Teale
Lucy.....Emily Beecham
Tony.....John Norton
Rick.....Harry Jardine

Directed by Emma Harding.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b05xcj68)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Anita Dobson, Jodi Picoult

Anita Dobson talks about her part in the new musical film London Road based on the true story of the murder of five women in Ipswich in 2006. We may all love to gossip but what impact does it have on us both in the short and long term and how is social media influencing who we talk about?

It's 70 years since the Pippi Longstocking books were first published in Sweden, Francesca Simon and Julie Eccleshare discuss why she's so loved by adults and children today. Following a phone in earlier in the week we hear listener experiences of IVF and making the decision to stop if it's not working?

The best-selling author, Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha Van Leer talk about the new book they've written together - Between the Lines. Danish women top the polls for being happiest in Europe. We try and find out their secret. And Marilyn Monroe: sex symbol and feminist - Karen Krizanovich and Jacqueline Rose on discuss the screen icon.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed.


SAT 17:00 PM (b05xcj6b)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news with Shaun Ley.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b05wyqqq)
Failure

If your business venture doesn't succeed, how can you be sure it's worth trying again before admitting defeat? More than 50% of businesses fail within 5 years, yet for many, failure is a necessary part of success. Even Bill Gates and Steve Jobs didn't get it right first time. Evan Davis's guests discuss the important lessons they've learned from their business mistakes and speak candidly about the personal and financial impact of failing. How do you overcome the stigma of failure and what skills are required to bounce back when your business has bombed?

Guests:
Bill Cullen, Chairman, Bill Cullen Motor Group
Katarina Skoberne, Co-founder and former CEO, OpenAd
Stuart Miller, Co-founder and CEO, ByBox Group

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05wndzy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b05wnf00)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wnf02)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b05xcktq)
Sara Cox, Mick Hucknall, Nick Hornby, Wayne Hemingway, Alecky Blythe, Mbongwana Star

Clive is joined in studio with guests Sara Cox, Mick Hucknall, Nick Hornby, Wayne Hemingway, Alecky Blythe, Mbongwana Star.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b05xckts)
Series 18

By Helen Cross

The FIFA Women's World Cup begins this weekend as Sepp Blatter resigns and accusations of corruption in the world governing body rumble on.

The England players and their coach are in Canada, psyching up for the opening festivities and the media circus: waving and smiling for the photo-shoot and fielding questions about the shortness of their shorts. How do they feel about being guinea-pigs for artificial playing surfaces and who should take over from Blatter?

But you can put up with anything for the sake of the beautiful game.

Helen Cross writes this lightly surreal comedy.

Director...Mary Ward-Lowery

'From Fact to Fiction' is a reactive drama, which makes a fictional response to events in the week's news.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b05xcktv)
Oresteia, Listen Up Philip, Milan Kundera, Stonemouth, Duane Hanson

A brand new interpretation of the classical story The Oresteia begins a Greek Season at London's Almeida Theatre. How well does it bring an ancient story up-to-date?

Czech writer Milan Kundera has just published his first novel for 12 years The Festival of Insignificance

Iain Banks' 2012 novel Stonemouth about a young man returning - under a shadow - to his Scottish hometown has been dramatised for BBC1

London's Serpentine Gallery has 2 portraiture exhibitions opening - Duane Hanson and Lynette Yiadom Boakye.

The film Listen Up Philip follows the life and relationships of an obnoxious young author who seeks life advice from a similarly obnoxious older writer

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Linda Grant, John Mullan and Frances Stonor Saunders. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b05xcktx)
The War Game Files

Michael Apted investigates previously secret Cabinet Office files revealing how the BBC's Director General and its Chairman collaborated with Whitehall to ban The War Game film.

In 1965, the transmission of the BBC's The War Game, directed by Peter Watkins, was stopped at the eleventh hour with an official announcement that it was too shocking for public viewing. The BBC's Director General, Sir Hugh Carleton-Greene, claimed it had been the Corporation's decision alone - but this programme reveals the part played by senior figures in Whitehall and members of Harold Wilson's government.

Peter Watkins's groundbreaking film went on to win an Oscar and influenced a generation of film makers. The film suggested that the government's Civil Defence plans were hopelessly inadequate and would leave millions of UK citizens to die in the event of a Soviet nuclear attack.

Interviewees in this programme include: former BBC Chairman of Governors Sir Christopher Bland who is "astonished" to see the files; campaigning journalist Duncan Campbell on the factual accuracy of Watkins's film; Hugh Greene's official biographer Michael Tracey; Bruce Kent of CND; and Derek Ware, the stunt co-ordinator on the film.

The programme also includes Professor John Cook, who obtained the previously secret files under a Freedom of Information request.

Michael Apted is perhaps best known for directing the "Up" series of TV programmes, but is also the director of 26 movies including James Bond in The World Is Not Enough, Gorillas In The Mist and Enigma.

Producer: David Morley
A Bite Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b05wnx4m)
Anthony Trollope's The Last Chronicle of Barset

The Way Things Are

by Anthony Trollope
dramatised by Nick Warburton

Part One: The Way Things Are

In the sleepy village of Silverbridge, Henry Grantly has fallen in love again and Mr Crawley is to find that a butcher with a vengeance is someone to be reckoned with.

Music composed by David Tobin, Jeff Meegan and Julian Gallant.
Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

This is the final book in Anthony Trollope's Barchester Chronicles and many of the characters from both "The Small House at Allington" and "Framley Parsonage" return to finish his story of Barsetshire life set between 1855 and 1867. These 4 episodes focus in part on the story of the proud but impoverished vicar of Hogglestock, Josiah Crawley and the accusation that he has stolen and cashed a cheque. The whole of Barset has an opinion about Crawley's guilt or innocence, but no-one is more affected by it than Archdeacon Grantly's son, Henry, who has fallen in love with Crawley's daughter, Grace. Meanwhile, Johnny Eames has returned to try for the hand of Lily Dale, who is still devastated by the betrayal of her amoral fiance, Adolphus Crosbie. Happily, Mrs Baxter returns to tell the tale and give her inimitable opinion on events.

Maggie Steed stars as Mrs Baxter and is joined by Adam Kotz, Tim Pigott-Smith, Samuel Barnett and Scarlett Alice Johnson.

The Barchester Chronicles is Anthony Trollope's much-loved series of witty, gently satirical stories of provincial life set within the fictional cathedral town of Barchester and the surrounding county of Barsetshire. With a focus on the lives, loves and tribulations of the local clergy and rural gentry, the canvas is broad and colourful, with a wonderful set of iconic characters whose lives we become intimately involved in as they grow up, grow old and fall in or out of love and friendship across the years.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b05wnf05)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 What's Left? (b05xxqb2)
Andrew Rawnsley chairs a debate on the future of the Labour Party, following its devastating defeat at the General Election. Despite 5 years of austerity and UKIP eating into the Tory vote, Labour lost more than twenty seats and were two million votes behind the Conservatives. Majorities were overturned across the country: MPs with strong local followings lost their seats. Most significantly, the party was virtually routed in Scotland in perhaps the most significant electoral change in Britain for a generation. Now Labour is looking for a new leader, but there is a wider debate to be had. Where does it - and the wider centre-left - go from here? Do they make a clear pitch for the disaffected voices of their traditional working class supporters? Do they return to Blairism, triangulating between left and right? How do they confront the nationalist surge in Scotland? And how do they deal with the legacy of their own past? Those taking part: Jon Cruddas MP, Hilary Wainwright, Tristram Hunt MP, Torcuil Crichton and Professor Tim Bale.
Producer: Simon Coates.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b05wq1jc)
Series 5

University of Surrey

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from the University of Surrey, The 3rd Degree is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners while delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Politics, Business and Physics and the questions range from Black Friday and the Gang Of Four to Gandhi and George Michael - and the show boasts not one, but two jokes about Quantum Mechanics.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quick-fire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow and Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction.

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show also delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. He has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, including The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen, as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called The Genuine Particle.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b05wnx4r)
Contemporary Irish Poets

Recently returned from the Cuirt literature festival in Galway, Roger McGough celebrates contemporary Irish poetry. Featuring the likes of Derek Mahon, Paul Muldoon, Eilean ni Chuilleanain, Paul Durcan, Eavan Boland and the grandaddy of them all, Seamus Heaney. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 07 JUNE 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b05xclvp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 A Father for My Son (b01dhfkx)
Episode 2

The Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott died a hundred years ago, leaving behind a fascinating and talented wife, the sculptor Kathleen Scott. Jenny Coverack's trilogy A Father for my Son is adapted from her own one-woman stage play, written with Robert Edwards, based on Kathleen Scott's autobiography and journals. Having arrived in Paris to study art at the turn of the twentieth century, Kathleen makes friends with the sculptor Rodin, and through him makes friends with the dancer Isadora Duncan. After a series of adventures around Europe, with and without Isadora, Kathleen meets the figure she has been searching for: the one man who is worthy to be a father to the son she desperately desires.

With grateful acknowledgement to the novelist Louisa Young for her biography of her grandmother, Kathleen Scott, 'A Great Task of Happiness'.

Reader: Jenny Coverack
Producer: Sara Davies.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05xclvr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05xclvt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05xclvw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b05xclvy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b05z5m42)
Church bells from St Lawrence, Jewry, City of London.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b05wykhs)
Tim Meek

In the first of four editions from this year's Hay Festival, Tim Meek explains why he and his family have left their old life behind them for a year of adventure on the road.

"We believe that the real measure of modern success is nothing to do with your bank balance or the size of your house, but instead, the amount of free time you have at your disposal."

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b05xclw0)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b05xcqp9)
False Memories

Mark Tully considers the consequences of mis-remembering the past. Why do people have different memories of the same event, and how can we remember things that never happened?

The programme includes ideas from American psychologist Elizabeth Loftus, who suggests that memory works a little bit like a Wikipedia page which you can change, but others can change too. She has warned against the dangers of certain therapies that lead to 'false memory' and unreliable accusations against innocent people.

In poetry, Ravi Shankar describes memories as the 'wobbly beams' on which we build our self-respect, and Carol Ann Duffy explores the dark side of a childhood misremembered.

Perhaps Jane Austen's heroine in Mansfield Park puts it best, when Fanny Price proclaims, "The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control!".

A Unique Broadcasting Company Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b05xcqpc)
The Oldest Salesman in Kent

Agricultural supply salesman Reg Huntley is 96 and shows no sign of retiring any time soon. Born in 1918 he is in his 8th decade of agri business, and has seen the countryside and farming change beyond all recognition. He lets Ruth Sanderson tag along on his rounds for a morning to meet his customers and get some of Reg's philosophy on life, work and growing old disgracefully. Produced and presented by Ruth Sanderson.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b05xclw2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b05xclw4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b05xcqs9)
Religion in Russia Special

This week's edition of Sunday comes from Moscow as Caroline Wyatt explores some of the stories and issues that affect faith groups in Russia.

As President Putin announces he will meet Pope Francis, Kevin Bocquet reports on the complex historical relationship between the Vatican, the Russian State and the Orthodox Church.

This is Putin's first visit to the Vatican since the crisis in Ukraine. Anna Nemtsova, Moscow correspondent for Newsweek, assesses the significance of the meeting.

It's said that the history of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour reflects the story of Russia. Caroline takes a tour and discovers its extraordinary story.

Pinchas Goldschmidt is the Chief Rabbi of Moscow and President of the Conference of European Rabbis. He talks to Caroline about the place of the Jewish community in Russia today.

In the Orthodox church, prayers are still sung in the same language used when Christianity arrived in Russia hundreds of years ago. Oleg Boldyrev hears some of the choirs keeping their religious heritage alive.

There are over a million Muslims in Moscow but only four Mosques. Almaz Shakirov, from the Muftis Council of Russia, explains how this situation has come about and why it is so difficult for new mosques to be built.

What is the relationship between the Russian Orthodox Church and the State and how has it changed? Journalist Konstantin von Eggert and Vakhtang Kipshidze from the Russian Orthodox Church debate.

Contributors:
Chief Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt
Almaz Shakirov
Anna Nemtsova
Professor Zorbov
Father Makariy
Konstantin von Eggert
Vakhtang Kipshidze

Producers:
Carmel Lonergan
David Cook

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b05xcqsc)
Migraine Action

Dr. Sarah Jarvis presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Migraine Action
Registered Charity No 1152973
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Migraine Action'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Migraine Action'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b05xclw6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b05xclw8)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b05xcsml)
A Mass for Corpus Christi

A Mass for Corpus Christi, live from Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. The preacher is the Archbishop of Liverpool, the Most Revd Malcolm McMahon OP. The celebrant is Fr Ged Callacher. The Cathedral Choir will sing Haydn's 'Missa brevis Sancti Joannis de Deo' (Little Organ Mass). Director of Music: Christopher McElroy. Assistant Director of Music: James Luxton. Producer: Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b05wz90v)
AL Kennedy: Creamola Foam remembered

"I'm getting old. Not older, just old" begins AL Kennedy. Through childhood memories of drinking Creamola Foam, her grandfather's voice ...and being kicked by a boy in the shin during playtimes, she reflects on how age changes our perception of the past and the future.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tycf8)
Black-browed Albatross

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the black-browed albatross.

Although they're residents of the Antarctic seas , black-browed albatrosses have turned up in the UK many times. For a while, Albert-or Albert Ross as he was christened by birdwatchers- was one of the most well-known birds in the British Isles. He was first spotted in the gannet colony on Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth in 1967. Sadly he failed to find a mate among the masses of gannets there.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b05xcsmn)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b05xcsmq)
For detailed synopsis please see daily episodes.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b05xcsms)
Lisa Jardine

Professor Lisa Jardine, academic, biographer and public thinker, is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs.

Historian, biographer, public thinker, mathematician - her proclivities are wide ranging and well regarded with prize winning books on subjects as diverse as Sir Christopher Wren, Seventeenth century Holland, Erasmus and women in the time of Shakespeare.

Her current day job is leading the Department of Renaissance Studies at University College London, she's also a prolific writer and broadcaster. If that all seems a little ivory tower for your tastes think again; as Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority for many years she was at the sharp end of the complex conundrums and high emotion that surround the artificial creation of life, leading the world in developing the legal framework that governs IVF treatment.

Her rigour and originality, then, are greatly admired and both seem to have been in evidence since the beginning - her schoolgirl contemporaries had pictures of Elvis by their beds. Lisa had other ideas, as a teenager she gazed lovingly at a photo of a brilliant mathematician.

She says: "I only do things I love, and I love everything I do ..."

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b05xclwb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b05wxx6n)
Series 72

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons hosts the perennially popular panel game in which guests Paul Merton, Sheila Hancock, Mike McShane and Pam Ayres attempt to talk for 60 seconds with no hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

A BBC Comedy Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b05xcv9p)
Barbecue

From the 'slow and low' tradition of the American south to the village of Llantwit Major in South Wales, Dan Saladino explores the revival of one of the food world's most misunderstood words; barbecue.

A world away from the burnt burgers and charred sausages of the British barbecue experience, the 'barbecue belt' of the Carolinas, Georgia, Kentucky and Tennessee to Texas captures a story that goes beyond food. From politics and class to race and gender: barbecue has become a vital American institution.

A cooking technique requiring endless patience, effort and care, Dan Saladino talks to some of barbecue's biggest enthusiasts about how their modern approach is shaping our oldest form of cooking.

Producer: Anna Miles.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b05xclwd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b05xcv9r)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 I Am Nobody's Prime Minister (b05xcv9t)
"Every one of you has a voice to speak or not, it is your choice, but silence is not golden, silence is the truth stolen, and stealing of the truth, is exactly what them do to the youth." From the poem "Revolution" by Dean Atta.

Young voters are failing to pick up the voting habit. Many people think the youth don't care - they are seen as lazy, not interested. In the lead up to May's general election, Dean talked to politicians and to the young voters who think they don't have a role to play.

What will entice this generation into politics? Do the elected have an answer? What do the political parties have to say to encourage Dean to stay politically engaged?

Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith gives Dean some hope, Labour's David Lammy believes this generation has to stay engaged, while Green MP Caroline Lucas has appeal to the young. But it's in East Glasgow, at the office of SNP candidate Natalie McGarry, where the campaign seems at its most lively and dynamic.

Dean grew up in Wembley but he's not into football. "I'd go to the station and see floods of fans in the streets." For him, football felt like a bizarre cult, something he was not part of. For many, political parties are the same, so no one joins them - and because no one joins them, they look ever more like bizarre cults.

Produced by Barney Rowntree
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b05wz0ky)
Isle of Wight

Eric Robson hosts the show from Cowes on the Isle of Wight. Bunny Guinness, Anne Swithinbank, and Bob Flowerdew answer audience questions.

Eric visits the rural retreat of Queen Victoria and Matthew Pottage provides the ultimate guide to hanging baskets and window boxes.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b05xcv9w)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover hears about the the work of a Birmingham foodbank, how Airfix helped a teenager recover from burns, and how art can help cancer patients facing breast reconstruction, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b05xcv9y)
Anthony Trollope's The Last Chronicle of Barset

Propose, Propose

by Anthony Trollope
dramatised by Nick Warburton
Part 2: Propose Propose

Lily's past returns to haunt her, Grace has a difficult letter to write, Johnny makes a new friend and Mr Toogood begins to live up to his name.

Music composed by David Tobin, Jeff Meegan and Julian Gallant
Produced and directed by Marion Nancarrow

This is the final book in Anthony Trollope's Barchester Chronicles and many of the characters from both "The Small House at Allington" and "Framley Parsonage" return to finish his story of Barsetshire life set between 1855 and 1867. These 4 episodes focus in part on the story of the proud but impoverished vicar of Hogglestock, Josiah Crawley and the accusation that he has stolen and cashed a cheque. The whole of Barset has an opinion about Crawley's guilt or innocence, but no-one is more affected by it than Archdeacon Grantly's son, Henry, who has fallen in love with Crawley's daughter, Grace. Meanwhile, Johnny Eames has returned to try for the hand of Lily Dale, who is still devastated by the betrayal of her amoral fiance, Adolphus Crosbie. Happily, Mrs Baxter returns to tell the tale and give her inimitable opinion on events.
Maggie Steed plays Mrs Baxter and is joined by Adam Kotz, Tim Pigott-Smith, Samuel Barnett and Scarlett Alice Johnson.

The Barchester Chronicles is Anthony Trollope's much-loved series of witty, gently satirical stories of provincial life set within the fictional cathedral town of Barchester and the surrounding county of Barsetshire. With a focus on the lives, loves and tribulations of the local clergy and rural gentry, the canvas is broad and colourful, with a wonderful set of iconic characters whose lives we become intimately involved in as they grow up, grow old and fall in or out of love and friendship across the years.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b05xcvb0)
Henry Marsh - Do No Harm

With James Naughtie.

Doctors work under the oath 'do no harm', but the neurosurgeon Henry Marsh says the decision whether to operate on a brain is rarely that simple.

His account of his working life Do No Harm has caught the attention of readers all round the country since its publication a year ago and has this week Do No Harm won the South Bank Award for Literature, as well being shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson, Costa, and Wellcome book prizes this year.

Henry discusses his memoir Do No Harm which is startling in its candour. He gives an extraordinary insight into his own thought processes as well as into the world of neurosurgical briefing meetings and hospital policies. Each chapter's starting point is a real-life case study and the book conveys his fascination with the human brain as well as the compassion required of a brain surgeon.

Henry is honest about how a doctor must strive for balance between personal involvement with the patient and objectivity about their case. He talks about his failures, and the exhilaration of success.

As always on Bookclub a group of readers, this month including members of the medical profession, join in the discussion.

July's Bookcub choice : If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Henry Marsh
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 We Will Arise and Go Now (b05xcvb2)
On the 150th anniversary of WB Yeats' birth, Irish Chair of Poetry Paula Meehan, selects three Irish poets who will arise and go with presenter Marie-Louise Muir to The Lake Isle of Innisfree in County Sligo, a location made famous by Yeats's iconic poem of the same name.

Elayne Harrington, aka 'Temper-Mental Miss-Elayneous' is a hip-hop poet and spoken word artist from Dublin; Stephen Sexton a PhD student at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry in Belfast; Paula Cunningham was brought up in Omagh, County Tyrone, and works as a part-time dentist.

While Yeats's poem speaks of a desire to build 'a cabin of clay and wattles' on Innisfree, Marie-Louise and our three poets will be sleeping under canvas and cooking on a campfire. As they discover if the reality of this tiny uninhabited island on Lough Gill lives up to the bucolic idyll which Yeats so famously portrayed, they'll ask if 'peace comes dropping slow' in the 'bee loud glade' as they each reflect on how The Lake Isle of Innisfree resonates with them and come up with their own poetic responses to it.

Produced by Conor Garrett.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b05wy64q)
Abandoned to their Fate

Next month the National Audit Office is due to report on the outcomes for young people leaving care. There are claims that, under financial pressure, local authorities are pushing too many teenagers into independent living before they're ready. File on 4 investigates new figures that suggest many young care leavers are failing to cope - with large numbers ending up in custody, homeless, sexually exploited or pregnant. Social services chiefs say the welfare of care-leavers must be a key priority for the new government. But who holds them to account when they fail those they are meant to have looked after? And, with more cuts on the way, can the system cope? Fran Abrams reveals how hands-off caring can have tragic consequences.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b05xckts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05xclwk)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b05xclwm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05xclwp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b05xcvb4)
John Waite

There's music from the "Singing War" on Pick of the Week this week.
Ten thousand songs were written during the American Civil War - and many are still being sung today. There was plenty of singing, too, on Friday - BBC Music Day - the nation's biggest ever live music event, so there'll be something tuneful from that. And, from a rather different "day" ...Tuesday on 5Live - "Heart Transplant Day".
With a song in your heart then why not join John Waite for his Pick of the Week this Sunday evening at 6.15.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b05xcvb6)
It's Open Farm Sunday. Brookfield try their best but they can't compete with Berrow Farm who are hoovering up all the punters. Rex helps out but Toby's nowhere to be seen.
Ruth reports there's not much improvement in Heather; she's soon to be moved to the stroke ward. She really does need Ruth there. David reassures her, and gives her a quick update on life back home.

Nervous Helen gives her presentation on the merits of the solar array and meadow planting at Berrow Farm. It's a success. Charlie reports to Adam that Justin has been giving a similar themed talk in the dairy unit, equally well received.

After the sheep dye incident, Kate's avoiding Brian - and trying to contact Toby. Failing to find him at Brookfield she heads to Berrow, where she accepts an Charlie's invitation to their 'after-show' party. Once there she loudly accuses Helen of insincerity; really she knows Berrow Farm's just a massively subsidised industrial site. Mortified Adam apologises for his sister, and tears Kate off a strip. There's a time and a place, and her tirade's embarrassed him. He also reminds her that she can't escape Brian's wrath forever - and then she'll need all the friends she can get.


SUN 19:15 The Rivals (b03brnrj)
Series 2

The Intangible Clue

By Anna Katharine Green

Dramatised By Chris Harrald.

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he is writing his memories and has a chance to get his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. He continues with gifted amateur sleuth Lady Violet Strange trying to solve a horrific murder with apparently no clues.

Producer: Liz Webb.


SUN 19:45 Poem Stories (b05xcvb8)
Hidden by David Harsent

An original short story by the poet David Harsent. Read by Pippa Haywood.

A new series in which poets adapt their own poems into short stories. 'Hidden' springs from David Harsent's poem sequence 'A Dream Book', from his collection 'Fire Songs', which won the 2014 TS Eliot Prize for Best Poetry Collection.

David Harsent has published twelve volumes of poetry, most recently Salt (2017), Fire Songs (2014) and Night (2011), which won the Griffin International Poetry Prize, all from Faber & Faber. He is Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Roehampton and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Written by David Harsent
Read by Pippa Haywood
Produced by Mair Bosworth


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b05wz90d)
World Cup Migrant Deaths

Qatar migrant worker deaths.
Is the World Cup really responsible for the deaths of 1200 migrant workers in Qatar? We talk to the International Trade Unions Confederation who first published the figure.

The Independent on Sunday had a front page splash this week making a link between the HPV vaccine and one girls serious illness. They article also says that the number of cases of serious side-effects from the HPV vaccine being reported to the MHRA are much higher compared to other vaccines. The Independent have defended their journalism but we have spoken to a doctor who says the article cherry picks data and should be withdrawn.

We tell the story behind the chocolate experiment designed to deliberately fool the press.
And we solve the fiendish GCSE question that perplexed students so much it became a trend on Twitter.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b05wz90b)
Tariq Aziz, Charles Kennedy, Julie Harris, Alan Bond, Peter Cropper

Andrea Catherwood on Iraqi politician Tariq Aziz, former Leader of the Liberal Democrats Charles Kennedy; Oscar winning costume designer Julie Harris; flamboyant Australian property developer and entrepreneur Alan Bond and violinist Peter Cropper who founded the Lindsay Quartet.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b05xch5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b05xcqsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b05wxx6z)
Ritual Sexual Abuse: The Anatomy of a Panic (Part 2)

David Aaronovitch of The Times traces the powerful intellectual influences behind what he sees as one of the most important cultural shifts of the past 40 years: from a society in which accusations of sexual abuse were wrongly ignored to one in which the falsely accused were crushed by a system where the mantra was "victims must be believed".

In the second of two programmes, Aaronovitch re-examines the role played by unproven psychoanalytic theories which, from the 1980s, spread from the world of therapists in Canada and the USA to social work, medicine and then to law enforcement in Britain.

The programme explores the parallels between the belief in ritual abuse with some of the claims being made today about VIP paedophile rings and group murder.

Some of the mistakes of the past - such as the false accusations made against parents in the Orkneys and Rochdale of satanic abuse - have been acknowledged. But, Aaronovitch argues, without a profound understanding of how and why such moral panics arise we are unlikely to avoid similar mistakes in the future. And when such mistakes recur we risk an over-reaction and a return to a culture of denial.

Producer: Hannah Barnes

Contributors:
Rosie Waterhouse - Investigative Journalist; Head of MA in investigative journalism at City University

Debbie Nathan - Investigative Journalist and Author

Tim Tate - Television Producer and Director

Sue Hampson - Former counsellor, and now Director of Safe to Say Trauma Informed Training and Consultancy

Dr Sarah Nelson - Research Associate at the University of Edinburgh

Professor Richard McNally - Professor of Psychology at Harvard University

Anonymous case study.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b05xcvbb)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b05xcvbd)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b05wyq6d)
Jonathan Pryce; Paul Feig; The Misfits

With Antonia Quirke.

Jonathan Pryce discusses his film career as his latest movie Listen Up Philip is released.

The director of Bridesmaids, Paul Feig, on his latest comedy Spy

The Misfits was the last film for stars Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable. Continuity supervisor Angela Allen was on set the whole time and reveals some of the bad behaviour she witnessed.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b05xcqp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 08 JUNE 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b05xclxq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b05wyhp8)
Anthropology - The Future of the A-level; Crime and Blame

Anthropology: the future of the A level. Laurie Taylor talks to Joy Hendry, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at Oxford Brookes University, about the proposed cancellation of this course. At a time of global conflict, is it the right time to axe a discipline which allows insight into cultures and ideas very different from our own?

Also, 'blame' in the criminal justice system. Tim Hillier, Associate Head of Leicester de Montfort Law School, De Montfort University, Leicester, explores the role and parameters of culpability within the legal system. He's joined by Lord Ken Macdonald QC and former Director of Public Prosecutions.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b05z5m42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05xclxs)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05xclxv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05xclxx)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b05xclxz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05xcvc8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Canon Jenny Wigley.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b05xcvcb)
Shortage of skilled UK farm workers, New Waterloo city farm, Soil quality

We hear what an agricultural recruitment firm is doing about what it describes as a shortage of skilled UK farm workers. They're recruiting dairystockmen from the Philippines and eastern Europe.

Charlotte Smith visits London's newest city farm, in Waterloo - less than half an acre in size, squeezed up by the railway sidings, but which enjoys a view of the Houses of Parliament.

And in the week of arable farming's key industry show, Cereals 2015 in Lincolnshire, sustainable farming director Mike Gooding issues a call to arms to preserve soil quality by planting less maize and oil seed rape.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b05xcly1)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk9b)
Bluethroat

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the bluethroat. This is a fine songbird and a sprightly robin-sized bird with a dazzling sapphire bib. Your best chance of seeing one is in autumn when they pass through the north or east coast on migration.


MON 06:00 Today (b05xd447)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b05xd449)
Illness: Psychosomatic and Physical

Tom Sutcliffe explores health and well-being from the musings of a 17th century doctor to the latest research into psychosomatic illness. The GP, Gavin Francis celebrates the marvels of the human body while Hugh Aldersey-Williams looks back at the life of the celebrated and ever-curious doctor Sir Thomas Browne. The consultant neurologist Suzanne O'Sullivan accepts that telling a patient 'it's all in your head' is unhelpful, but how do you treat those whose symptoms are medically unexplained, and may well have an emotional cause? Charlie Howard runs a youth mental health charity which takes the health professionals out of the clinic and onto the streets, and involves young people at all levels of diagnosis and treatment.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xd44c)
Episode 1

Gavin Francis leads us round a cultural map of the body – an adventure in what it means to be human. Taking in health and illness, and offering insights on everything from the ribbed surface of the brain to the unique engineering of the foot.

Drawing on his own experiences as a physician and writer, he blends first-hand case studies with reflections on the way the body has been imagined and portrayed over millennia.

He begins with the moment, age 19, when he first held a human brain.

Read by Bill Paterson
Abridged by Jo Coombs

Produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05xd44f)
Souad Massi, What do we tell our young people about fertility?, Women and Buddhism

Sex education for teenagers is often focused on pregnancy prevention but are we neglecting to warn them not to leave it too late? Algerian singer Souad Massi talks to Jane and performs from her latest album. Who are the women who choose to dedicate their lives to Buddhism? Jane talks to journalist, Christine Toomey and Buddhist nun Ani Rinchen Khandro. Child marriage used to be a taboo subject but it's now firmly on the international and regional agenda. Jane talks to two experts in the field.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xd44h)
HighLites: Dye Another Day

Episode 1

Bev and Shirl, the world's worst hairdressers, come up with a devious plan to pay their enormous tax demand.

The enduring comedy of Bev, the bitter and vindictive Chief Stylist and Shirl, her fond and foolish assistant.

By Phil Nodding and Steve Chambers.

Directed by Liz Webb.


MON 11:00 Ayo Gorkhali: The Gurkhas Are Coming! (b05xd44k)
This year marks 200 years of Gurkha service to the British Crown. Military historian Hew Strachan reflects on this special relationship and the future of this crack fighting force.

Shortly before the devastating earthquakes shook Nepal, he attended Gurkha 200 celebrations in Kathmandu and Dharan. He travelled to Gorkha, where the Gurkha story begins, and Pokhara, the centre of British Gurkha recruitment today and headquarters of the Gurkha Welfare Scheme that helps Gurkha pensioners across Nepal.

His conversations with serving and retired Gurkhas - both in Nepal and back in Britain - reveal a relationship with a rich history.

Today's Gurkhas form a warm, closely-knit and adaptable military community. But will Britain continue recruiting Gurkhas? Will Nepalis still want to join the British army?

Contributors include: Joanna Lumley, Vice Patron, Gurkha Welfare Trust;
Lt Colonel John Cross, WW2 veteran, jungle warfare expert and Nepali citizen;
Captain Rambahadur Limbu VC;
Major Maniprasad Rai, one of the first Gurkha commissioned officers;
Major Tikendra Dewan, President, British Gurkha Welfare Society;
Field Marshal Sir John Chapple;
General Sir Peter Wall, Colonel Commandant, Brigade of Gurkhas and Chairman, Gurkha Welfare Trust;
David Gellner, Professor of Social Anthropology, Oxford University.

The presenter, Professor Sir Hew Strachan, is formerly Chichele Professor of the History of War at the University of Oxford, and now Professor of International Relations at the University of St Andrews.

Producer: Catriona Oliphant
Executive Producer: Mukti Jain Campion

A ChromeRadio production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 So On and So Forth (b05xd44m)
Episode 1

Sketch group So On and So Forth features John Sheerman, Nick Gadd and Martin Allanson, with talented comedy actress Alison Thea-Skot recruited in 2014 to bring some class to the proceedings.

So On and So Forth is a sketch group with a very clear, slightly nihilistic perspective on the world. Everything is funny if you look at it the wrong way.

They formed as a group in 2010 and have been defining their particularly British style of sketch comedy ever since. They've tested out sketches on the comedy circuit, in pubs and theatres, including a full month at the Edinburgh Fringe in 2011 and several trips to Latitude and the Leicester Comedy Festival.

They have also recorded over 30 sketches, which have been posted on their YouTube channel and collectively accrued almost 300,000 views to date.

In 2011 they won the Cofilmic award for Best Online Sketch, and one of their YouTube sketches found its way to the USA where it featured on Comedy Central’s hit US show Tosh.0 as video of the week.

With one thing leading to another, the group was invited to perform in the second series of Sketchorama on Radio 4. It wasn’t long until Radio 4 Comedy saw their potential and commissioned a four part series for the group.

Produced by Gus Beattie.
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b05xcly6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b05xd44p)
8 June 1915 - Kitty Lumley

Florrie still isn't going out, but the Wilsons are learning to work around her.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b05xd44r)
New-Style Train Tickets, NHS Fines, Nautical Chic

Figures obtained exclusively by You & Yours suggest that NHS hospital trusts in England have been fined more this year for missing performance targets than ever before. We ask how patients benefit when hospitals are fined.

Britain's train tickets have been re-designed, to make them clearer, easier and simpler to understand. The new tickets are now being rolled out across the country. But it's claimed that the new tickets are actually more cluttered, more confusing and harder to read than the old ones.

The so-called "free" phone numbers that aren't free when called from a mobile. The phones regulator is changing the rules so calls to 0800 and 0808 numbers will soon be free from personal mobiles.

And the enduring appeal of the nautical look - what is it about blue and white stripes that never goes out of fashion?

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b05xcly8)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b05xd504)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05xd506)
William Jones: Enlightenment Moghul

Professor Sunil Khilnani looks at the contribution Sir William Jones made to our understanding of Indian history and culture. Jones set sail for India at the end of the 18th century where he became one of the greatest advocates for studying the glories of India's past. Already a master of many languages, he learned Sanskrit which he declared "more perfect than the Greeks, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either". He introduced a radical idea: that Sanskrit and Europe's classical languages were all tributaries of a single, lost linguistic river. Professor Khilnani describes Jones as "a man who arrived in India and studied its culture with humility and then sought to awaken the West to its riches. The irony is that he also awakened the East".

Produced by Mark Savage
Researcher: Manu Pillai

With a recital of an Indian composition on harpsichord, from the Oriental Miscellany by Jane Chapman.

Listeners can catch up with the series and see the list of remarkable Indians featured in the series on the Radio 4 website.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b05xcvb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xd508)
doyouwishtocontinue

Original British Dramatists: Discover five new voices over five Dramas

doyouwishtocontinue by Christine Entwisle

Winner of the 2014 BBC Writer's Prize.

A deliciously comic drama about a 40-something woman at the end of her tether who finds a resolution in the most unlikely of places.

The BBC Writer's Prize was established to create a unique opportunity for new and established writers who want to write for Radio Drama. The response was extraordinary, with nearly 800 original scripts submitted to BBC writers room for consideration.

The judges said: "Christine Entwisle has managed to write a play about a severely depressed woman at the end of her tether that is moving, sharp and very very funny. Debra hates the world, hates people, in fact seems to hate everything apart from animals, and yet, as in all the best plays the unexpected happens and when it happens the results are unexpected."

Christine Entwisle has worked in theatre as a director, writer and actress for twenty five years. On winning she said "I cannot believe I have won the BBC Writer's Prize. I am shocked and utterly delighted. I am so grateful that people have taken the time to read my work, and that they have seen enough potential in it to support me. Which gives me all the hope I need to carry on writing."

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b05xd50b)
Series 29

Heat 1, 2015

(1/13)
Paul Gambaccini returns with the first heat in the 2015 series of the wide-ranging music quiz. Amateur music lovers from around the UK tackle Paul's questions on all aspects and genres of music, from the classical repertoire to jazz, show tunes, film music, rock and pop. In a knockout competition the eventual winner will become the 29th BBC Counterpoint champion, at the grand Final in August.

In this first heat the competitors come from Dorset, Norfolk and Surrey. As well as proving the breadth of their general musical knowledge they'll have to select a special topic from a list of which they've had no prior warning, on which to answer individual questions.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b05xcv9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Houses of Horror (b03s9tm7)
It's almost a given that the story of British horror movies belongs to Hammer films. The studio, with its lurid combination of sex and death, lashings of blood and gore, has given it a special stake in British hearts. It made over 200 films such as Dracula and Curse of Frankenstein with a recurring, legendary cast, including Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee, and its 2007 revival drew heavily on past mystique.

Hammer was the most successful British film company of all time but, throughout its heyday in the 60s and 70s, it did battle with a much smaller, poorer, creative, upstart rival - Amicus films. Amicus was a small British horror studio that pioneered the much loved 'portmanteau' picture, such as Tales From the Crypt and Vault of Horror – each movie a composite of four or five short stories, whose connection is revealed at the end.

Horror aficionado and film buff Matthew Sweet explores the productive rivalry between the two contenders for the heart and soul of British horror, in a blood-curdling tale of low budget, gore spattered one-upmanship that's full of chilling atmosphere and fun.

Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping Production

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b05xd54x)
Greece

In January Alexis Tsipras became Prime Minister of Greece and formed a coalition government with the nationalist Independent Greek Party. Tsipras is a radical, committed to ending austerity. He is also an atheist who publicly declared that he wants to move Greece in a secular direction. That would be a radical move, for Greek Orthodoxy is the only legally recognised religion and may command the loyalty of up to 97% of the Greek people. Tsipras did not take a religious oath on taking office. But since then he has been seen attending Orthodox Services; and has been making friendly overtures to Orthodox Clergy. Church attendance in Greece is low; but Orthodoxy appears to be deeply embedded in the identity of the Greek people. It is almost part of their DNA. Why is that? And how does it impact on the lives of ordinary people?

Joining Ernie to discuss the influence of the Orthodox Church within modern Greece are the Rev Vasileios Papathanasiou, priest at the Grreek Orthodox Cathedra; of the Holy Cross and St Michael in Golders Green; Stavroula Pipyrou Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the University of St Andrews; and Daphne Halikiopoulou, Associate Professor in Comparative Politics at the University of Reading.

Producer: Rosie Dawson.


MON 17:00 PM (b05xd556)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05xclyd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b05xd5jw)
Series 72

Episode 4

Nicholas Parsons hosts the perennially popular panel game in which guests Paul Merton, Gyles Brandreth, Lucy Beaumont, and Marcus Brigstocke attempt to talk for 60 seconds with no hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

A BBC Comedy Production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b05xd5jy)
Brian finally catches up with Kate about the sheep dye in the pool. Kate still maintains it wasn't her fault. Unable to stand the arguing any longer, unimpressed Phoebe helps her clean up. Kate announces her intention to move into her cottage on Friday. She's having a house cleansing ceremony, with all the people she loves. Whilst not insisting Phoebe moves in with her, she entreats her to come on Friday, and stay over.

Adam has another run in with Brian over the herbal ley. Adam explains it won't just be temporary grazing, it's a longer term experiment to do with soil erosion. Surely Brian saw what happened during the flood? But that was an extreme, argues Brian. He accuses Adam of hippy romanticism.
Mike and Vicky prepare for Friday's departure from Ambridge. Phoebe helps Vicky pack clothes. Vicky extends an open invitation to Phoebe to come and visit. Finding Mike amid chaos in his shed, Vicky orders him to have a clearout; there's no point in them taking stuff they won't use. Later Mike confides to Adam he's struggling with de-cluttering. Vicky sweeps in declaring she's found an ex-scrap merchant who'll take things off their hands. He's coming on Thursday! Plenty of time to sort everything, asserts Vicky.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b05xd5k0)
The Look of Silence, Waddesdon Galleries at the British Museum, WB Yeats, Interceptor reviewed

The Look of Silence is a new companion documentary to The Act of Killing, about the perpetrators of the Indonesian genocide in the 1960s. Louise Doughty, whose next novel is set during the conflict and has visited Indonesia to research the book, reviews the film.

Thursday sees the opening of new galleries at the British Museum which have been built especially to house the Waddesdon Bequest, a collection of Renaissance artworks and treasures left to the British Museum in the 1890s by Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild. Samira talks to the curators.

Writer Stella Duffy reviews BBC1's new crime drama, The Interceptor, an 8-part series about a new law enforcement team tasked with hunting down some of Britain's most wanted criminals.

The Irish poet W.B. Yeats was born 150 years ago yet such is the potency of his poetry that it was quoted by supporters of equal marriage in Ireland during the recent referendum. Poets Kayo Chingonyi and Bernard O'Donohue discuss his influence on their writing as well the everlasting legacy of the man who, it has been said, dreamed Ireland into being.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xd44h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Every Case Tells a Story (b05xd5k2)
The Case Against Slavery

Clive Anderson looks at a variety of famous and infamous court cases and retells the story that the case brought into the public eye.

In this programme he explores the Somersett Case from 1772.

James Somersett was an escaped slave in London. His master Charles Stuart tracked him down and tried to transport him back to the Caribbean to be sold. The court case that ensued, in which defenders of James Somersett argued in front of the most powerful judge in the country, Lord Justice Mansfield, that a human being cannot be forced out of the country against their will would go on to pave the way for the abolition of the slave trade a generation later.

Featuring Amma Asante, Professor Norman Poser, Professor James Walvin and Steven M. Wise.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b05xd5s1)
Is the Pope a Communist?

Pope Francis' critique of modern economics has made him an icon for the Left and prompted claims that he is a Communist. The leader of 1.2 billion Catholics has called capitalism, at best, a source of inequality and, at worst, a killer.

Edward Stourton examines the Pope's critique of the free market system and explores the origins of his thinking in Latin America and in Catholic Social Teaching. Is Pope Francis, as his critics claim, dragging his church to the Left and promoting a Marxist branch of liberation theology? And what does his insistence on seeing the world through the eyes of the poor mean for modern notions of charity?

We hear from the Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, Vincent Nichols; corporate lawyer turned Catholic priest, Fr Augusto Zampini Davies; Chief Economist at The Heritage Foundation (a free market think tank based in Washington), Stephen Moore; Professor or Finance, Public Policy and Ethics at St Mary's University, Twickenham and Programme Director at the Institute for Economic Affairs, Philip Booth; Labour Peer Maurice Glasman; and Austen Ivereigh, author of The Great Reformer - Francis and the Making of a Radical Pope.

Producer: Helen Grady

Photo Credit: Tim Widden.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b05w99gj)
Monkeys and Apes

Happy Jerry was a mandrill who found his way to London on a slave ship and ended up smoking a pipe and having dinner with the king. It is a curious tale of humanity in search of itself.

Peering into the eyes of a primate we see a reflection of ourselves and that has been an enduring fascination through time. It was thought in the 18th Century that the only reason chimps didn't talk in front of people was because they were afraid we would enslave them.

From King Kong to the PG Tea chimps, we have exploited their similarity to ourselves to create fear and humour. They are so similar yet so different, so close to our behaviour yet they shock and appal us with their distinctly animal like traits.

In Victorian times gorillas were often presented in museums in a ferocious pose charging towards the observer, a pose more reflecting the fact it was being shot at and defending itself rather than a true likeness of the reality of ape life. Today however they are seen as dignified vegetarians of the forest, huge yet gentle, demanding our hushed respect.

Documentaries on primates are always amongst the most popular as we pick apart their lives for yet ever more detailed clues about how we are alike yet still worlds apart.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b05xd449)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b05xclyj)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b05xd69l)
Electoral blow for President Erdogan

Turkey's governing party, the AKP, loses parliamentary majority for the first time in 13 years.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05xd69n)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 6

Continuing his search of his neighbours' house, Michael has an unexpected encounter that will have tragic consequences for all.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


MON 23:00 The Robert Peston Interview Show (with Eddie Mair) (b05xd69q)
Julian Barnes

What happens if you take the warring parties of radio's biggest feud and give them their own show? Radio 4 is about to find out as Eddie Mair and Robert Peston join forces to spring surprise guests on each other in a unique late night interview programme. Expect spontaneous discussions with a wide array of interesting figures.

Eddie and Robert have each chosen three guests of personal interest to them- all in the public eye - who they feel are worthy of a late night interview slot, keeping it secret from the other which guests they have chosen until the interview itself.

The first guest is Robert's choice - Julian Barnes. Having written about losing his wife in his book 'Levels of Life', the three men talk about grief.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05xd69s)
The Home Office minister James Brokenshire makes an urgent statement on the discovery of people hidden on cargo lorries in Essex. And the Scotland Bill has its first debate in the House of Commons. Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 09 JUNE 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b05xclzg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xd44c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05xclzk)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05xclzm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05xclzp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b05xclzr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05xd6nk)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Canon Jenny Wigley.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b05xd6nm)
GM Foods, Water Runoff, Black Grass

The former head of Greenpeace, Stephen Tindale, says it's now 'morally wrong' not to allow farmers to take advantage of GM technology to feed a growing population. He told BBC correspondent Tom Heap that farming that relies on pesticides is no longer acceptable, and scientists should be able to develop GM technology. But campaigners say not enough is yet known about its potential harm to the environment and the public.
And the scientists working with farmers to prevent water run-off from fields which takes soil and pesticides with it.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkb3)
Aquatic Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the aquatic warbler. The stripy aquatic warbler is streaked like the sedges it lives in and is the only globally threatened European perching bird. They sing in the marshes of central and eastern Europe where the small European population has its stronghold. Unfortunately, this specialized habitat is disappearing because of drainage, disturbance and peat extraction. They are migrants so it's vital to protect their wintering areas as well as their breeding sites. It's known that up to 10,000 birds winter in the swamps of North-west Senegal.


TUE 06:00 Today (b05xdc9x)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Listening Project (b05xdc9z)
The Listening Project Live: Live from the Booth outside New Broadcasting House

Fi Glover introduces the new Listening Project mobile recording Booth from the BBC Piazza in central London. With her are two former contributors to the Project, plus Rob Perks - Lead Curator of Oral History at the British Library, and Jacob Low, the Booth's architect.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


TUE 09:30 The Light (b05y4f96)
The author Bernard Hare recalls the day, forty years ago, his dad took him on a terrifying trip down a coal mine - and how that day changed his life. This is a story of fatherhood, fear and learning.
Writer & Presenter: Bernard Hare.
Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.


TUE 09:45 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xdcb1)
Episode 2

Gavin Francis leads us through a cultural map of the body – an adventure in what it means to be human. Drawing on his own experiences as a physician and writer, he blends first-hand case studies with reflections on the way the body has been imagined and portrayed over millennia.

Francis has dissected many human faces during medical training, and as a demonstrator of anatomy, but he has never lost the sense of privilege that doing so brings.

Our faces are key to our human identity – when faces are available, we pay more attention to them than to any part of the visual world. When our ability to use our facial muscles to convey our emotions is harmed, as in Bell’s palsy, it can be socially devastating.

But even when a face is damaged, it’s still vital to our sense of self.

Read by Bill Paterson
Abridged by Jo Coombs

Produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05xdcb3)
Turkish Election, Soprano Anna Devin

What will the outcome of the Turkish Election mean for women?

Women over 55 make the best bosses according to a recent report from the International Labour Organisation. Why? We look at how some companies are finding ways to challenge the glass ceiling: an obstacle for many women in business and management.

Soprano Anna Devin who has battled with severe dyslexia since she was young, talks about 'learning the right way for your brain' and how music can help.

Eliza Kennedy, on her debut author 'I Take You'. Just how did she balance writing a funny novel about a free-spirited woman with more serious questions about monogamy, female sexuality and realities of happily-ever after.

And a look ahead to England's first match in the World Cup in Canada.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer Beverley Purcell.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xdcb5)
HighLites: Dye Another Day

Episode 2

Bev, the world's worst hairdresser, forces her long suffering assistant Shirl to help her pretend to be the beneficiary of a lucrative will.

The enduring comedy of Bev, the bitter and vindictive Chief Stylist and Shirl, her fond and foolish assistant.

By Phil Nodding and Steve Chambers

Directed by Liz Webb.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w99j5)
Sharks

Who can hear the word shark and not the music from the film Jaws? This 1975 film, based on a book from the previous year, is defined as a “watershed moment for sharks.” From being little thought about by most people sharks were suddenly propelled into the lime light as fearsome, ruthless killers whose intent was to harm us humans. An entertaining film became the death warrant for millions of sharks. Our terminology is not helpful.

We find it impossible to speak about sharks without using emotive language: seas are “infested,” sharks “menace” they “cruise around looking for a victim, they “invade” our swimming beaches etc. Crooks are “loan sharks.”

In Hawaiian culture they are often seen as protectors or brave fighters in battle.

We have a difficult relationship with sharks. We have traded their teeth and eaten their fins, so much so that millions are now killed annually for this delicacy for the aristocracy. Damien Hurst has tried to capture the fear of the shark in his famous tank, allowing the viewer to stand next to an open mouth without being in danger. We will always be challenged by this supreme predator, if we allow it to survive in the wild.


TUE 11:30 Minimal Impact (b05xdcb7)
Tailfins and Burgers

The story of the musical aesthetic and the ubiquitous technique of minimalism.

It's now fifty years since the west coast American composer Terry Riley wrote In C, a work that consisted of 53 short musical phrases repeated at will. For New Yorker Steve Reich, this offered a new kind of musical expression for a post-war society of 'tailfins, Chuck Berry and millions of burgers sold'. With origins as much in the art world and the pop music industry as in the experimental musical philosophy of John Cage, 'minimalism' slowly but incontrovertibly assumed a dominant position in the musical landscape.

In this American-inflected first episode, composers from three generations - Steve Reich himself, Julia Wolfe of Bang on a Can and Bryce Dessner, a composer and guitarist with The National - consider the impact of the minimalist aesthetic and the techniques it employed in the USA and abroad, revealing a 'victory for the art school over the music conservatoire'.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b05xclzw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b05xdclb)
9 June 1915 - Thornton Tulliver

Thornton can charm the birds out of the trees, and the money out of Canadian pockets.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b05xdcld)
Call You and Yours: Cosmetic Procedures

Half a million people will elect to have a cosmetic procedure or surgery this year. Nipping, tucking and enhancing has never been more popular. If that's you, how was it? Did you feel fully informed; did you feel pressurised; did it work out as you hoped?

Producer: Kevin Mousley
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b05xclzy)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b05xdcvh)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05xdcvk)
Rammohan Roy: Humanity in General

Prof. Sunil Khilnani profiles Rammohan Roy, the Bengali scholar and reformer who became a worldwide intellectual celebrity and campaigned against Sati, the suicide of widows on their husbands' funeral pyres.

Rammohan Roy was part of an international set of radicals and reformers attacking established religion and ruling despots in the early 19th century, including the East India Company. He urged Indians to judge their society and behaviour by universal values at the very moment these values were emerging in the Enlightenment West. "And ever since Roy," Sunil Khilnani says, "Indians have been part of the global argument about the nature of justice, rights and freedom"

He is best known for his advocacy for women and his opposition to Sati, the Hindu rite in which widows died on their husbands' funeral pyres. His campaign converged with the birth of an international concern with human rights.

With contributions from Nobel prize-winning economist Amartya Sen and from the late Prof. Christopher Bayly, Sunil Khilnani's examination of Rammohan Roy's life takes him from the Sati ghats of Calcutta to a quiet cemetery on the outskirts of Bristol, Roy's last resting place.

Producer: Jeremy Grange
Executive Producer: Martin Smith
Original Music composed by Talvin Singh.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b05xd5jy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xdgrf)
Speechless

Andrew Viner's comedy in which a shy man seemingly magically gains confidence but becomes dangerously enthralled by the visceral power of public speaking.

Directed by Liz Webb

This is the 2nd full length radio play by Andrew Viner after When I Lived in Peru (R4). He has written a comedy book Venn That Tune, articles for the Guardian, for various radio comedies including That Mitchell and Webb Sound (R4), Parsons and Naylor (R2) and Weekending (R4) , for Aardman's Rex the Runt and extensively for children, including: Noddy, Fireman Sam, Thomas and Friends, and Timmy Time.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b05xch59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Shared Experience (b05xggjh)
Series 3

Bullying at School

"At nights I'd find myself praying to God to kill me" - 13 year old James shares his story of being bullied at school. He and two other teenagers George and Paris tell Fi Glover how they came through some very dark days of being physically and verbally attacked by fellow pupils for being different.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b05xggjk)
Bringing Assad to Justice

The civil war in Syria has killed an estimated 200,000 people and forced four million more to flee the country. As far as the United Kingdom and most of the international community are concerned, the person most to blame for the bloodshed is President Bashar al-Assad.

But what are the prospects of bringing him to justice? A team of investigators is already compiling the evidence needed for a criminal prosecution against him. Joshua Rozenberg speaks to Bill Wiley, the man in charge of the Commission for International Justice and Accountability about its work and the prospects of a successful prosecution.

Also in the programme: do men get a raw deal when it comes to divorce? One American law firm certainly thinks so. Cordell and Cordell have brought their service that "men can count on" to the UK in an attempt to help men who feel aggrieved.

But how does that tally with the cases before the Supreme Court this week, where two wives are seeking to add to their original divorce settlements? They claim that their former husbands behaved dishonestly.

And we meet that rare thing - a "sound" lawyer. Dr James Parker tells us about law and "acoustic violence".

Producer: Hannah Barnes.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b05xggjm)
Miranda Sawyer and Tom Robinson

Journalist Miranda Sawyer and songwriter and broadcaster Tom Robinson talk about the books they love with Harriett Gilbert. They are The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion, The Swimming-Pool Library by Alan Hollinghurst and Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b05xggjp)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05xcm0q)
National and international news. Including news that HSBC is to cut 8,000 jobs in the UK, plus other stories from around the world.


TUE 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b05xggjr)
Series 6

Barnard Castle

"Barnard Castle - The Hidden Gem"

Mark Steel visits the County Durham town of Barnard Castle. A picturesque place - home to a castle, friendly locals and one of the most impressive and surprising museums on earth (really, it's ridiculous). In spite of all this, hardly anyone knows the town exists. Attempting to reach 'Barney' by public transport is not an easy task, taking so long that Mark begins to wonder if in fact it is a real place at all.

Mark speaks to local policeman PC Steven Purchase about the alarmingly low levels of crime in the area; marvels at the majesty of a silver, clockwork swan and tries to get to the bottom of why the people of Barnard Castle seem to keep the place such a secret.

Mark Steel returns for a sixth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Sterling
Producer ... Carl Cooper

A BBC Radio Comedy Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015,.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b05xggjt)
Adam is thinking long-term, and the fete committee faces a tough challenge.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b05xggjw)
Carsten Holler Exhibition; Patrick Marber; New Children's Laureate

Artist Carsten Holler's new exhibition, Decisions, plunges gallery visitors into situations where they are forced to make choices, from whether or not to eat a mysterious pill to whether to leave the exhibition through the door or down a giant slide. Rachel Cooke reviews.

John Wilson talks to playwright Patrick Marber about his latest play for the National Theatre, The Red Lion, which follows the fortunes of a minor league football club, a long way from the glitz and wealth of the premiership.

Channel 4's new Artificial Intelligence drama Humans follows big screen hits Her and Transcendence in exploring the potential of robots. Computer Science lecturer Dr Sean Holden reviews.

Chris Riddell takes over from Malorie Blackman as the new Waterstones Children's Laureate today. Riddell, who is an author of children's books, an illustrator and a political cartoonist, talks to John about what he hopes to achieve in his new two-year role.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Olivia Skinner.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xdcb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b05xggjy)
Housing Blight?

With the urgent need for more housing, Britain's planning laws are under pressure like never before. Greenbelt land and even sites designated as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, are being earmarked for development. So how far can we protect the countryside when the need for houses is so acute? Allan Urry reveals new figures on scale of the problem and investigates claims that the planning system is being stretched to breaking point.

Reporter: Allan Urry
Producer: Emma Forde.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b05xggk0)
PIP Payments, Dolls for Visually Impaired Children

Following a judicial review associate solicitor Anne-Marie Irwin and Geoff Fimister from the Royal Institute of the Blind discuss the transfer from disability living allowance to personal independence payments and how will it affect those on benefits.
Makie Lab designs bespoke dolls for the visually impaired; will they be a hit with children? Lee Kumutat goes behind the scenes of the lab and Peter White speaks to children from the Joseph Clarke School.

Producer: Anna Bailey.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b05xggk2)
Flibanserin; Strokes in young people; Outdoor swimming; Research terminology - Causation v Association

Treating low sex drive in women. Expert panels in the USA have voted in favour of a drug that has been dubbed 'Pink Viagra', but there are serious reservations. Outdoor swimming is the new trend for 2015, but should you take the plunge or go in slowly? Strokes in the under 55's have recently been reported to be on the increase: Dr Margaret McCartney takes a closer look at the evidence. And unpicking tricky terms to understand your health - causation versus association.

Presented by Dr Mark Porter.


TUE 21:30 The Listening Project (b05xdc9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b05xcm19)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b05xghc6)
Mosul a year on - how IS rules the Iraqi city

A year after Islamic State captured the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, we ask how IS governs and finances its areas? As nominations open for the Labour leadership candidates - we talk to activists in a North West of England constituency which was gained by the Tories last month and ask what qualities they are seeking at the top. The family of Jean Charles de Menezes - the Brazilian man shot dead by police nearly 10 years ago - are going to the European Court of Human Rights to challenge the decision not to charge any police officers with his killing. We talk to their lawyer. And we discuss whether girls should be more disruptive in class to do better in the workplace.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05xghc8)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 7

Major McCullen learns the true outcome of his mission and Michael tries to rewrite the truth of what happened in the Nelsons' house.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 23:00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now (b01l7vnm)
Series 1

Welcome

Comedy's best kept secret ingredient gets his own sketch show. Sketches, characters, sound effects, bit of music, some messin' about, you know...

In this episode, a robot king, a 50s Spaceman, a ghastly Lottery, some crabs, a kitten, disco and John Donne.

Kevin Eldon is a comedy phenomenon. He's been in virtually every major comedy show in the last fifteen years, but not content with working with the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan, Armando Iannucci, Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Stewart Lee, Julia Davis and Graham Linehan, he's finally decided to put together his own comedy series for BBC Radio 4.

After all the waiting - Kevin Eldon Will See You Now.

Appearing in this episode are Amelia Bullmore (I'm Alan Partridge, Scott & Bailey), Julia Davis (Nighty Night), Paul Putner (Little Britain), Justin Edwards (The Consultants) and David Reed (The Penny Dreadfuls) with special guest Philip Pope (Radio Active).

Written by Kevin Eldon, with additional material by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris (Flight Of The Conchords, That Mitchell & Webb Sound)

Original music by Martin Bird

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05xghcb)
Susan Hulme and the BBC's parliamentary team report as MPs debate the EU Referendum Bill and peers consider Government proposals to impose a blanket ban on so-called legal highs.
The Government says it would consider a request from the US to base cruise missiles on British soil, should tensions continue with Russia. In the House of Lords, ministers are urged to act against "rip-off" charges following the recent pension reforms.



WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b05xcm6t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xdcb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05xcm6y)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05xcm70)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05xcm72)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b05xcm74)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05xghjt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Canon Jenny Wigley.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b05xghjw)
Sheep Dip Debate, Badger Vaccination Trial, Crop Research

MPs will debate the use of organophosphates today, with some calling for a full public inquiry to be held. The chemical has been linked to chronic illness in some farmers, after its use was made mandatory in the 1970s and 80s to combat sheep scab. We hear from one farmer who says it took several years to get a diagnosis after he was exposed to organophosphate sheep dip since the age of 17.

The National Trust has published results of a badger vaccination trial on one of its estates. It was a four year programme which the charity hoped would show that vaccination could be carried out cost-effectively on a large scale, to tackle bovine TB in badgers. The Trust says the cost per badger worked out at around £240 once the cost of the vaccine itself, plus transport and staffing costs, were taken into account.

And we hear from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BBSRC - whose scientists are working to increase yields of crops to meet a growing global demand for food.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkbj)
Melodious Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the melodious warbler. A lemon-yellow warbler singing on a sunny Spanish hillside will be the well-named Melodious Warbler. They are slightly smaller than blackcaps, moss-green above and pale yellow below. You may occasionally see them in the UK in late summer or autumn. The song is melodious and the bird often includes nasal chattering phrases that sound like house sparrows.


WED 06:00 Today (b05xgkx4)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster. MPs get their first chance to vote on whether to have an in-out referendum on membership of the EU. In Scotland, MSPs consider the effects of taking charge of administering benefits. And in Wales, the Health Minister makes a statement on the decision to put Wales's largest Health Board into special measures.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b05xgkx6)
Craig Revel Horwood, Nick Barratt, Jaega Wise, Robin Plummer

Libby Purves meets Strictly Come Dancing judge Craig Revel Horwood; brewer Jaega Wise; former hostage Robin Plummer and historian Nick Barratt.

Jaega Wise is head brewer at Wild Card Brewery. She founded the company with two friends after leaving Loughborough University where she studied chemical engineering. She was inspired by her aunt who brewed different types of beer and wine. Wild Card Brewery now produces over 4,000 litres of beer a week. Wild Card Brewery, Walthamstow, London E17 9HQ.

Dr Nick Barratt runs specialist record teams at The National Archives in Kew and has compiled family histories for a number of subjects featured on the BBC series Who Do You Think You Are? In his book, The Forgotten Spy, he turns his attention to his own family history. The book tells the story of his great uncle, Ernest Holloway Oldham, who worked for the Foreign Office during the 1920s and 1930s and sold secrets to the Soviet Union. The Forgotten Spy - The Untold Story Of Stalin's First British Mole by Nick Barratt is published by Blink Publishing.

In May 1984 Robin Plummer was an engineer working in Tripoli when he was arrested and imprisoned for nine months. Britain had severed diplomatic relations with Libya in April 1984 after shots fired from the Libyan Embassy killed WPC Yvonne Fletcher. Libya responded by detaining Robin and three other British workers. In his book, A Brush With Madness, Robin writes about coping with captivity including long periods of solitary confinement.

Craig Revel Horwood is an actor, theatre director and choreographer who is best known for his role as a judge on the BBC programme Strictly Come Dancing. He is playing Miss Hannigan in a touring production of Annie, The Musical. His theatrical career began in Australia in West Side Story before he moved to Paris where he joined the Lido Du Paris and became principle singer, performing at the Moulin Rouge. His West End theatre credits include Munkustrap in Cats, Miss Saigon and Harry in Crazy for You. Annie opens at the Theatre Royal, Newcastle and is touring the UK.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xgkx8)
Episode 3

Gavin Francis leads us through a cultural map of the body – an adventure in what it means to be human. Drawing on his own experiences as a physician and writer, he blends first-hand case studies with reflections on the way the body has been imagined and portrayed over millennia.

A serious motorbike crash brings a young soldier to A&E with a badly injured shoulder. His arm is paralysed, and may not recover.

Since Homer wrote the Iliad almost three thousand years ago, military strategists have understood the power of wounds to the brachial plexus, the network of nerves behind our collarbones. Our ‘arms’ are both parts of our body, and weapons of war.

Read by Bill Paterson
Abridged by Jo Coombs

Produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05xgkxb)
How to Get the Right Haircut, Attitudes to Women and Alcohol.

Why are our - and the media's - attitudes to women drinking, and to those women who seem to have a problematic relationship with alcohol, so harsh and judgemental compared to our attitudes to men who booze? Divorce - how common are claims that one party or the other is lying about money? How to get the haircut you want from your hairdresser. Are youth justice agencies failing to give vulnerable girls the support they need because services are too geared towards helping boys?

Presenter : Jane Garvey
Producer : Kirsty Starkey.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b05xgkxd)
HighLites: Dye Another Day

Episode 3

Bev and Shirl, the world's worst hairdressers, pressurize the vicar to do a cheap funeral.

The enduring comedy of Bev, the bitter and vindictive Chief Stylist and Shirl, her fond and foolish assistant.

By Phil Nodding and Steve Chambers.

Directed by Liz Webb.


WED 10:56 The Listening Project (b05xgkxg)
Daveit and Sean – Daily Inspiration

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between two friends, a musician and an artist, who have each chronicled the 365 days of a year in their respective discipline, Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


WED 11:00 Shadow of the Sun King (b05xgkxj)
Episode 2

As we approach the 300th anniversary of the death of Louis XIV, Professor Julian Swann uses a string of historic London locations to tell the story of Louis XIV's major role in the making of modern Britain.

In this second of two programmes, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, Guildhall, Spitalfields, Trafalgar Square and many other sites reveal how resisting the Sun King's military adventurism shaped Britain's parliamentary system and its economy.

Swann tells the story of how the Dutch prince, William of Orange, assembled an invasion force to wrest the Catholic James II from the English throne. His main aim was to ensure Protestant England joined the alliance of European powers fighting Louis XIV. He achieved that objective, but at the price of surrendering key powers as joint-monarch to parliament. Thus, our constitutional monarchy was established, with parliament overseeing all key aspects of government policy.

Finding the cash to fight the Sun King spawned the Bank of England. This was the vital instrument for ensuring, via the National Debt, that Britain's long-term fight against France could be afforded - all the way up to Waterloo.

Swann also considers that the need to protect Britain's growing international trade from the threat of Louis XIV's France was a major factor in the development of empire, and that Britain's industrial revolution was a by-product of the innovation required to resist Louis XIV and his successors.

Triumphant at Waterloo, Britain could look back at Louis XIV's reign as the starting-point for her rise to global superpower status.

Produced by Andrew Green
A Singing Wren production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b05xglm4)
Series 10

Moby Dave

Ed's fortunes have taken a turn for the better as he's been given an advance to write a projected television series perfect for Sunday night viewing. He has comfortable lodgings, money in his pocket and a warm glow, in fact all is going very well indeed until Suzan decides that her new assistant, Jonathan, should help Ed with 'the scripty stuff'. At which suggestion someone loses their temper, and for once it isn't Ed.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.

Producer: Dawn Ellis.

A BBC Radio Comedy production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b05xcm7h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b05xglwj)
10 June 1915 - Gabriel Graham

Telegram girls were employed in hopes of taking the sting out of the news they delivered.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b05xglwl)
Drink Driving, Universal Credit, Mortgage Advice

It's the new benefit system designed to replace six existing benefits with one single payment and is being introduced in phases over the coming years. The Government says it will make getting into work easier and save money. But Universal Credit has been dogged with problems and delays. How is the new system working for those who've made the change and are the problems just teething ones that will iron out over time or signs that it needs a serious rethink. You & Yours investigates.

The number of drink-driving offences recorded in Scotland has dropped by 17% in the first three months since a lower alcohol limit was introduced. The new law means just one drink could put you over the legal limit. Should it be introduced throughout the UK?

And as the property market revives, so too are reports of bad behaviour. We hear from the You & Yours listener who was offered a "discount" if he used the Estate Agent's in-house mortgage broker.


WED 12:57 Weather (b05xcm7q)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b05xgm1w)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05xgm2b)
Lakshmibai, Rani of Jhansi: Badass Queen

Prof. Sunil Khilnani explores the life of Lakshmibai, Rani of Jhansi, the queen who fought against the British and became a heroine of India's 1857 Rebellion.

"The Rani was certainly no ordinary queen," he says of the woman who was listed by Time magazine as one of its 'Top Ten Badass Wives'. A typical day for Lakshmibai involved weightlifting, wrestling and steeplechasing - all before breakfast. Yet, despite her physical prowess, she was a reluctant rebel. She was drawn into the uprising only when the British annexed Jhansi after her husband died. The legend goes that, when the Rani's fort was under siege from the British, she mounted her horse, her young son holding on tight behind her, and leapt to freedom from the ramparts.

The most iconic image of the Rani of Jhansi is at her last stand, in battle: again on horseback with her sword held high and the reins of her horse between her teeth. It's an image that evokes powerful Hindu goddesses like Kali and Durga. However, Sunil Khilnani argues that, by ascribing its heroines extra-human powers, supposedly to celebrate them, India is in fact denying the reality of women's experience.

Producer: Jeremy Grange
Executive Producer: Martin Smith
Original Music composed by Talvin Singh.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b05xggjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xgn2h)
The Sod

Vashti MacLachlan's drama about the impact of Multiple Sclerosis on a young couple.

Sarah and Tom have just taken on an allotment. For Sarah cultivating vegetables is the answer to life's ills. Her partner Tom has Multiple Sclerosis and it is progressing fast. While Tom tries to open Sarah's eyes to the bleak reality of his worsening MS, Sarah does all she can to keep things growing, including their love.

'The Sod' is an unsentimental earthy love story written by a writer new to radio with first-hand experience of Sarah's predicament.

With songs performed by BBC North Staff Choir

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b05xgn2k)
Money Box Live: Saving and Investing

Wondering where to invest a lump sum or get a good return on regular saving? If you'd like to chat to our saving and investing team call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

If you're new to investing what should you consider?

Do you want to put away a lump sum or small regular amounts?

What are your investment options?

Perhaps you want to know about index-tracker funds, unit trusts or investment trusts?

Should you pay for financial advice or do the research yourself?

What will a financial adviser consider?

How do investment platforms work, what do they offer and how do you compare them?

Or perhaps risk isn't for you, where can you find the best home for your cash savings?

Whatever your saving and investing question, our team will be here to share their views and experience.

Joining presenter Lesley Curwen will be:

Brian Dennehy, Chartered Financial Planner, FundExpert.
Louise Oliver, Certified Financial Planner, Piercefield Oliver.
Mark Polson, The Lang Cat, which analyses the investment, platform and pensions markets.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b05xggk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b05xgn2m)
Lesbian Lives in Russia; Big Data

Lesbian lives in Russia: Laurie Taylor talks to Francesca Stella, Research Fellow in Sociology at the University of Glasgow, and author of a study which explores the changing nature of same sex relationships amongst women since the demise of state communism. From the metropolis to the provinces, she finds evidence of women negotiating visible, as well as closeted lives.

Also, is 'big data' leading to the pervasive 24/7 surveillance of every moment of our lives? Frank Pasquale, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland, argues that unlimited data collection is having unforeseen and risky consequences.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b05xgn2p)
Channel 4 chief executive David Abraham on pay and privatisation; Police on TV

The chief executive of not-for-profit Channel 4 has enjoyed a 16 per cent pay increase to £855,000 following an 'exceptional performance', according to the broadcaster's annual results published yesterday. This, despite Channel 4 reporting its lowest audience share since 1984. David Abraham received a maximum bonus of £166,000, but insisted the company was not taking fewer creative risks to hit bonus targets. David joins Steve Hewlett in the studio to discuss the annual report findings, rumours about privatisation, and Channel 4's plans to support start up businesses through advertising.

A new BBC 1 five part series about the Met Police began this week. Filmed over the course of a year 'The Met: Policing London' follows the police as they go about their work. But do series' like this and others such as '24 Hours in Police Custody' and 'The Detectives' shine a credible and authentic light on the reality of the police at work, or are they just good PR for the police? Steve is joined by Aysha Rafaele, executive producer of 'The Met: Policing London', and Roger Graef who has made over fifty films about the police and the criminal justice system. Also joining him are Stafford Scott, a community activist based in Tottenham, and Andy Trotter, former Chief Constable who served as ACPOs lead on the media.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b05xgn2r)
News interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05xcm8j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Big Problems with Helen Keen (b05xh31b)
Series 1

Death

The biggest problem of them all - death.

From praying for life everlasting to uploading our minds into a giant cloud of data - is there anything at all we can do to avoid it?

Comedy series that explores the triumphs and disasters of human ingenuity.

Helen Keen together with co-stars Peter Serafinowicz and Susy Kane look at the biggest problems that have faced our species since the dawn of time, and describe humanity's incredible and sometimes absurd solutions.

Written by Helen Keen and Miriam Underhill

Producer: Gareth Edwards

A BBC Radio Comedy production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b05xh31d)
Peggy comforts Christine, encouraging her to accept what she's lost and try and move on with life after the burglary. But Chris is struggling; where should she go from here? As a distraction Peggy and Jill accompany her to an open garden. Chris tries her best to be cheerful, but they're worried about her. She's adamant she can't face going back to Woodbine. They're horrified that she's contemplated going into The Laurels. She's still so full of life! They resolve to support her, whatever she decides.
Neil's having trouble getting Mike to part with the contents of his shed. Mike declares there's a lot of history in there and it goes against the grain to chuck it out. Eddie comes to the rescue, offering to help sort it out and take stuff off Mike's hands for him. He and Neil divide the spoils between them, and Neil ends up with a somewhat useless homemade rat trap. Job done, the three of them treat themselves to a celebratory drop or two in the cider shed. They reminisce, ruminating on good times and bad. Mike reckons he wouldn't have got through it all without his mates. Eddie's touched; they're glad to have been there for him.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b05xh31g)
Chris Pratt, London Road, A Damsel in Distress, The Hook

Chris Pratt, star of The Lego Movie and Guardians of the Galaxy, discusses his role in the new Jurassic Park film and explains why he's happy to be objectified over his newly-sculpted physique.

London Road is the new film adaptation of the National Theatre's stage musical about the 2006 murders of five women in Ipswich. The NT's new Artistic Director Rufus Norris directed the original version on stage and has now directed the film. Dreda Say Mitchell reviews.

Rob Ashford, Tony award-winning director and choreographer, and Jeremy Sams, musician and writer, join Kirsty to talk about the first stage musical version of A Damsel in Distress in Chichester, the story of an heiress living in a castle who bumps into an American composer of hit musicals. It's based on a PG Wodehouse novel with songs by George and Ira Gershwin including the classics Nice Work If You Can Get It and A Foggy Day.

Arthur Miller's The Hook was originally written as a screenplay, but remained unproduced after the FBI suppressed the drama for fear of it causing unrest amid the political tensions of the 50s. It has now been adapted for the stage and has received its world premiere at the Royal and Derngate Theatre in Northampton. Sarah Hemming reviews.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Rebecca Armstrong.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xgkxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b05xh31j)
What is our moral duty to Mediterranean migrants?

The figures for migrants crossing the Mediterranean are startling. The Royal Navy ship HMS Bulwark rescued 1,200 people from their leaky boats this weekend. More than 43,000 people have already made the crossing this year - a 50% increase on the numbers for last year. It's estimated that more than 1,600 people have drowned trying to make the journey. The statistics can't tell the story of the misery and suffering of the individuals seeking a better, safer life. But what are our moral responsibilities here? The imperative to save the life of those in peril on the sea is long established. But does the fact that many of these people are on the point of drowning put them in a different moral category? To put it bluntly, have they jumped the queue? Does choosing to take the risk and paying large sums of money to people traffickers, make them any different from those left behind? And if so how do you make that judgment? Is there a moral difference between an asylum seeker and an economic migrant? Or is that a moral cop-out demanding Solomon like judgment of degrees of suffering? Because of the overwhelming numbers, those rescued at sea will in many cases effectively be allowed to stay in Europe as Italy and Greece are keen to move them on. The Thai, Malaysian and Indonesian governments have all been criticised for refusing to let the Rohingya boat people land and there was an outcry when the international search and rescue effort in the Med was stopped. But does actively seeking out migrant boats create a moral hazard? Is it any fairer to try and destroy the boats before the refugees can take to the sea? Or does stranding them in the very place they're trying flee just mean we can turn a convenient blind eye to their suffering?


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b05xh31l)
Caroline Ingraham

In the second of four editions recorded at the Hay Festival, Caroline Ingraham explains why we should give animals choices. She is the founder of a new approach to animal welfare which gives domestic and captive animals the chance to "self-medicate" as, she says, research shows they would in the wild.

"Maybe it's time to re-evaluate our relationship with animals, and start perceiving them as active, rather than passive, beings."

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b05xh31n)
Series 1

The Bone Wars

The Bone Wars

In the first of a new series looking at amazing events and characters from science history, Tracey Logan takes us back to the wild west of America, and looks at the extraordinary feud that came to be known as the Bone Wars. This is a tale of corruption, bribery and sabotage - not by cowboys, but by two palaeontologists, Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh, who would stop at nothing in their race to find new dinosaur fossils. This was the golden age of dinosaur discovery, and their bitter war led to the discovery of some of our most iconic dinosaur species: Stegosaurus, Triceratops, Diplodocus and Camarasuarus to name a few. What led these two seemingly respectable men of science to behave in such an unseemly way, and what was the legacy of this now infamous feud? Tracey Logan investigates.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem


WED 21:30 Midweek (b05xgkx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b05xh31q)
Carney to City: "the age of irresponsibility is over"

Bank of England Governor uses annual Mansion House speech to attack ethics of the City


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05xh3nf)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 8

Josh returns home to make a horrific discovery while Michael gets his story straight, writing himself out of the truth of that day's events.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


WED 23:00 John Kearns (b05xh3nh)
Episode 4 - Day Off

John struggles to enjoy his fantasy day of doing nothing.

The last of four 14-minute vignettes in a series from John Kearns, the winner of the main prize at the 2014 Edinburgh Comedy Festival, as well as the Best Newcomer Award in 2013.

Producer: Arnab Chanda

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2015.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b05xh3nk)
Series 3

Episode 4

Ian Leslie presents the show that brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of the world's best known writers.

In this episode, the author of Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk is found to have started out doling out questionable advice as editor of the letters page of a US newspaper's children's supplement.

Next up, we hear Marcel Proust's unexpected ornithological leanings and previously undiscovered entries from Raymond Chandler's adolescent diaries.

To finish, there's another of Henrik Ibsen's uncomfortable Christmas cracker jokes.

Producer: Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05xh3nm)
Continuing as acting Labour leader, Harriet Harman says David Cameron is doing too much 'sneering' and 'gloating'. Sean Curran reports on some surprising exchanges at Prime Minister's Question time in the Commons.
Also on the programme:
* David Cameron describes what happened at the summit meeting of leading industrialised nations.
* The motives of the Scottish Nationalists come under attack in the Commons.
* Opposition MPs criticise the proposals of the Government to let housing association tenants buy their own homes.



THURSDAY 11 JUNE 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b05xcmb4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xgkx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05xcmb6)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05xcmb8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05xcmbb)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b05xcmbd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05xh3xb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Canon Jenny Wigley.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b05xh3xd)
GM crops; Sheep dip debate; Large animal rescue

A US Government advisor says Europe should provide more up to date information about genetically modified crops. Jack Bobo was speaking at the Cereals 2015 event in Lincolnshire. He said many Europeans believe GM technology is banned in Europe, while in fact it is a major importer of GM crops used for feed.

Campaigners for a public inquiry into the effects of organophosphates (OPs) in sheep dip say they'll fight on despite a lack of government support. A debate in Westminster heard from MPs who said hundreds of farmers suffered physical and neurological problems after the use of OP was made mandatory in the 1970s and 80s. The farming minister George Eustice told them the government had invested millions of pounds looking into a link between OPs and ill health, but none had been found.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkcg)
Great Reed Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the great reed warbler. As you'd expect from their name, Great Reed Warblers are a much larger version of the Common Reed Warbler and breed in Continental Europe where their very loud song echoes around reed-beds, it can be heard up to half a kilometre away. We can hear one or more singing Great Reed Warblers in the UK each spring.


THU 06:00 Today (b05xhwqc)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b05xhwqf)
Utilitarianism

A moral theory that emphasises ends over means, Utilitarianism holds that a good act is one that increases pleasure in the world and decreases pain. The tradition flourished in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill, and has antecedents in ancient philosophy. According to Bentham, happiness is the means for assessing the utility of an act, declaring "it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that is the measure of right and wrong." Mill and others went on to refine and challenge Bentham's views and to defend them from critics such as Thomas Carlyle, who termed Utilitarianism a "doctrine worthy only of swine."

With

Melissa Lane
The Class of 1943 Professor of Politics at Princeton University

Janet Radcliffe Richards
Professor of Practical Philosophy at the University of Oxford

and

Brad Hooker
A Professor of Philosophy at the University of Reading

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xhwqh)
Episode 4

Gavin Francis leads us through a cultural map of the body – an adventure in what it means to be human. Drawing on his own experiences as a physician and writer, he blends first-hand case studies with reflections on the way the body has been imagined and portrayed over millennia.

The liver is a mysterious organ - essential to life, multifarious in its actions, its tissue unusual in being able to regenerate.

Ancient cultures used the livers of sacrificed animals to predict events; Biblical kings planned wars according to what the liver foretold. Livers appear in the proverbs of eastern Europe and in the folk tales gathered by the Brothers Grimm. And when a young gardener scratches her finger on a thorn and falls into a coma, it might be her liver which saves her life.

Read by Bill Paterson
Abridged by Jo Coombs

Produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05xhwqk)
Marguerite Patten: A celebration of the late cookery writer and wartime broadcaster

A celebration of the life and achievements of cookery writer Marguerite Patten who has died aged 99, including a recording of Jane Garvey's last interview with Marguerite at her home in Brighton. Author of over 170 books, Marguerite began teaching the British to cook when she joined the Ministry of Food during the Second World War. As a host of the BBC's Kitchen Front, she helped the nation to make the most of wartime rations. She made her first television appearance in 1947 and was a regular guest on both Masterchef and Ready Steady Cook, but always refused the title of celebrity chef preferring the term "home economist". She was made a CBE for services to the art of cookery in 2010.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xhwqm)
HighLites: Dye Another Day

Episode 4

Bev and Shirl, the world's worst hairdressers, meet their match, in a feisty American customer.

The enduring comedy of Bev, the bitter and vindictive Chief Stylist and Shirl, her fond and foolish assistant.

By Phil Nodding and Steve Chambers.

Directed by Liz Webb.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b05xhwqr)
The Battle for Aden

Insight, colour, context, detail. In this edition, war rips the heart out of old Aden as the warring parties in Yemen prepare for peace talks; a day of reckoning in Canada as extensive, painful details are released about the way the country's aboriginal children were treated over more than a century; a British man, fighting against Islamic State in Syria, tells us why it's time for him to leave the battlefield and head home; a controversy in Moscow about a plan to erect a huge statue of St Vladimir - Christianity is well and truly back as part of Russia's new identity; and a bronze Jacques Cousteau stares out to sea as our man dives into the water off Mexico to swim with a shark.


THU 11:30 My Life on Paper (b05xhwr2)
Across Britain, sixth formers are preparing to write and embellish their UCAS personal statements as they apply to university.

Actress, playwright and mother Jane Godber explores how creative you can get in 4000 characters - the limits of a personal statement - what if you really had to tell the truth about your life?

If you wrote that the most influential people in your life are not Jack Kerouac and Tennyson, but your mum or your dad, who is paralysed. That you are more mature than most sixth-formers because you've been the main carer for your mum and sisters since you were thirteen.

Jane hears from students, admissions tutors and heads of sixth-form, as well as creative writing tutors Ian Marchant and Helen Cross. She also attempts to write her own short biog, with the help of daughter Martha and a large packet of marshmallows.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b05xcmbg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b05xhwrd)
11 June 1915 - Ivy Layton

Time moves so quickly, Ivy hasn't had the opportunity to mourn Archie.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b05xhwrg)
Charity Fundraising, Smart Meters, Dartford Crossing Fines

The head of the Charity Commission, William Shawcross, has added his voice to the worries about the way fundraising is carried out. In a speech, Mr Shawcross said concerns about direct fundraising risk damaging confidence in charities. The Fundraising Standards Board tells Peter White how they think the sector should change.

Around 1.5 million people have had smart meters installed now, but if you switch energy provider they stop being 'smart'. Smart Energy GB explain when technology should work to make it easier to save energy and get the best deal.

Plus more than 600,000 people have been sent penalty notices in five months for passing the Dartford Crossing without paying the toll. The booths were removed in November 2014, and since then, more than £1m has been paid in fines for Highways England.

Presented by Peter White
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


THU 12:57 Weather (b05xcmbj)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b05xhww1)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05xhww3)
Jyotirao Phule: The Open Well

A portrait of the social reformer and anti-caste campaigner. Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the India Institute, King's College London, visits Pune where Jyotirao Phule set out to educate women and promote the cause of the lower-caste members of Indian society. Phule and his wife were castigated for challenging the caste system. In a defiantly symbolic act, he allowed all comers to drink from the well at his house, in an age when members of the lower castes were barred from drinking water used by the upper castes. Today there are many government funding schemes for schools which bear either Phule's or his wife's name but discrimination against the Dalits, then known as Untouchables, hasn't gone away. "Phule wanted to rock the system," says Professor Khilnani "not just to create tiny islands of equality".

Produced by Mark Savage
Researcher: Manu Pillai
Listeners can catch up with the series and see the list of remarkable Indians featured in the series on the Radio 4 website.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b05xh31d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xhx5x)
A Thing Inside a Thing Inside a Thing

ORIGINAL BRITISH DRAMATISTS
Discover five new voices over five dramas

Joy is 89 years old and has spent most of her life living and working on the Mechanism, a giant machine that floats in the shadow of Pluto, mincing up and recycling all the debris from history. Joy's only company is Lana, but the two women can't stand each other. The monotony of their daily grind is disrupted when they discover a giant space craft with a sleeping crew of thousands, hurtling towards the grinding teeth of the Mechanism.

Only one person can save the universe: an 89 year old woman with a bad attitude and a dark sense of humour.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production

The Writer

Iain AJ Ross had his first play performed when he was 17, and went on to study Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia. He was a finalist in the BBC Writer's Prize competition in 2013, and co-wrote and performed a stage show at the Edinburgh Fringe last year. He now splits his time between writing radio, TV and film scripts, and playing in an electro-indie band.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b05xhx5z)
Series 30

The Malvern Hills

Clare Balding joins Team Zulu, a group of walkers, led by Tarquin Shaw- Young, who prepare for long distance charity walks by training on the majestic Malvern hills. Tarquin became obsessed by the 1964 epic war film, depicting the Battle of Rorke's Drift, as a small child and now uses Zulu as the motif for bringing friends and family together to embark, each year, on completing the Worcestershire Way.

As Clare marches across the hills with the group she talks to Tarquin's wife, Kelly about what it means to be married to a man who turned up at their wedding in a pith helmet.

Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b05xcqsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b05xcvb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b05xhx61)
Rufus Norris, John Boorman, Joshua Oppenheimer, John Akomfrah

Director of the National Theatre Rufus Norris talks about the film adaptation of 'London Road'

Francine Stock visits the Sheffield Documentary Festival to talk to Oscar nominated film maker Joshua Oppenheimer about his latest work 'The Look of Silence'. Fellow documentary maker John Akomfrah discusses the psyche of non fiction film making.

Director John Boorman on 'Queen and Country' and how movie making has changed.

Presenter Francine Stock. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b05xhx64)
Stars, Fracking, Ice Cores, Drunken Chimps

The ALMA telescope array in the Atacama Desert is one of the most sensitive earth based telescopes. It has now captured images of the very first galaxies. Adam talks to Dr Mark Swinbank of Durham University who's part of the team who've unleashed data this week from that universal hinterland that's set to fill in the missing gaps in our understanding of the evolution of the universe.

The European Parliament voted this week to place a moratorium on new licences for member states to frack for shale gas until proven safe for the environment. But how dangerous is fracking? A set of articles out this week in the journal Seismological Research Letters attempts to address and dispel some of the myths and misconceptions about fracking, and to get to the root of the very real, increasing frequency of seismic activity. US Geologist Justin Rubinstein and University of Strathclyde geologist Zoe Shipton discuss the evidence

As global temperatures increase Ice Core scientists searching for clues to Earth's past climatic history face a ticking clock to gather enough core samples before they melt. Only a tiny amount of mountain glacial ice has ever been collected and studied, and in 2016 ice cores from the Alps will be moved to safer storage in Nature's freezer - a giant vault in Antarctica. Marnie Chesterton meets Ice Core researchers from British Antarctic Survey to find out why they need this archive.

A new paper shows the first recorded instances of alcohol drinking in wild chimpanzees. Tanya Humle from the University of Kent describes the novel behaviour. With anthropologist Professor Catherine Hill, Dr Humle discusses whether "wild" chimp research is even possible in an age when human and chimp habitats overlap.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.


THU 17:00 PM (b05xhx66)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05xcmbl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Best Behaviour (b05xhyrk)
Episode 6

Holly Walsh presents the comedy panel show that defines 21st century etiquette.

The guest panellists are comedians Sarah Millican, Rob Beckett and Katherine Ryan, who are all seeking to supply the new best behaviour rules to navigate modern life.

The etiquette of love and relationships comes under comic examination, along with the new rule of 'not having to talk to other parents on the school run' and the need for all pedestrians to have indicators.

The panel also tackle a problem from the studio audience: 'How can I persuade my flatmate to do their share of the washing up?'

Produced by Aled Evans
A Zeppotron production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b05xhyrm)
Rex shows hung over Toby an Echo item featuring Toby and scantily clad Kate frolicking at the Home Farm pool party. Rex points out they should be earning people's respect and networking; Kate's father's an influential man in the area. If Toby doesn't stop messing around and start acting like a grown-up, he can forget all their big plans; Rex is out. Kate's getting the same message from Jennifer; bad publicity like this is the last thing they need. Reluctantly Toby apologises to Kate, winding up the conversation with indecent haste. They meet later, Kate inviting Toby to her housewarming. But she soon gets the message that she's superfluous to Toby's requirements and leaves. Rex brings the news they've been outbid on Pear Tree Farm, their latest prospect. The party's definitely over; they need to redouble their efforts. Toby can't argue.
Neil's also nursing a hangover. Susan's not impressed, but softens when she realises the reason. They agree they'll really miss the Tuckers. It's not going to be the same for Neil without Mike. Susan wants to mark their departure. Scorning Jennifer's idea of beer and sandwiches, Susan prefers the classier cocktail party option. Mike and Vicky will have the best send-off ever.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b05xhyrp)
Playing Iago; Bridget Riley; Stephen Witt; Christopher Lee and Ron Moody remembered; Soweto Kinch on Ornette Coleman

Hugh Quarshie and Lucian Msamati discuss playing Othello and Iago in the RSC's first production to cast a black actor as Iago.

Kim Newman remembers the actor Christopher Lee who has died aged 93 and Tony Robinson remembers the actor Ron Moody who he appeared with in the original stage production of Oliver!

Richard Cork reviews a new retrospective of Bridget Riley's work at the De La Warr Pavilion in Sussex.

Saxophonist Soweto Kinch pays tribute to Ornette Coleman, the legendary jazz saxophonist who has died aged 85.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xhwqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b05xggjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b05xhyrr)
Corruption

The scandal at FIFA is just the latest story of corporate corruption to dominate the news. What steps can businesses take to avoid getting caught up in corruption, particularly in countries and sectors where bribery is the norm? What is legitimate business conduct and what crosses the line into illegality?
Evan Davis and his guests discuss:

Emma Sharma, Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer for the Supreme Group
Hugh Miles of The Al Shafie Miles Consultancy
Leo Martin of Good Corporation

Producer: Jim Frank.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b05xhx64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b05xhwqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b05xhzgz)
European Games begin tomorrow in Baku -- not everyone is welcome

We ask why some people are not being let in, and whether sport and politics can ever be kept apart.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05xhzh1)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 9

Michael receives an unexpected letter. The Nelsons try to move on with their lives but Josh is becoming suspicious of Michael and his motives.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 23:00 Seekers (b05xhzh3)
Series 2

The Wedding Crushers

Stuart and Vanessa are keen to plan their wedding, but not everyone is happy for them.

Series 2 of the job seeking sitcom starring Mathew Horne, Daniel Mays, Tony Way and Zahra Ahmadi.

Stuart ------ Mathew Horne
Joseph ------ Daniel Mays
Terry ----- Tony Way
Nicola ------ Zahra Ahmadi
Vanessa ----- Natalie Walter
Gary Probert ----- Steve Oram
Mr Putter ------ Ian Conningham
Kenny ------ Sam Dale

Written by Steve Burge.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05xhzjb)
Labour criticises the Chancellor's decision to sell off the Government's stake in the Royal Bank of Scotland. Susan Hulme follows the arguments in the Commons.
Also on the programme:
* Where does the balance lie between keeping the nation secure and the surveillance of personal Emails and phone calls?
* Peers debate the rights and wrongs of Zero-hours contracts.
And
* Do supermarkets create too much food waste each week?



FRIDAY 12 JUNE 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b05xcmck)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xhwqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05xcmcm)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05xcmcp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05xcmcr)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b05xcmct)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05xhzth)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev'd Canon Jenny Wigley.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b05xhztk)
The case against GM; Court battle to protect bats; Agriculture and the Archers

The pro-organic charity The Soil Association has described as a 'Red Herring' claims that the UK will need to grow genetically modified crops if we're to feed a growing global population. Chief Executive Helen Browning said GM technology only allowed farmers to use specific pesticides, but didn't increase crop yields. She was talking after the former head of Greenpeace, Stephen Tindale, said it was now 'immoral' not to grow GM crops.

The Devon Wildlife Trust is taking the local county council to court over its approval for 230 homes to be built near a bat roost in Chudleigh, Devon. The Trust says the greater horseshoe bat is very rare, with just 6,000 left in the UK. The last remaining stronghold is in Devon, and inappropriate developments can disrupt their feeding and flight paths. The Judicial Review is being held in Bristol.

And we meet the editor and agricultural advisor for BBC Radio 4's The Archers and ask, has the programme returned to its agricultural roots?

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkck)
Tawny Pipit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the tawny pipit. Tawny pipits have never bred in the UK in real life but they have in fiction. Released in 1944 the film, 'The Tawny Pipit', featured a pair found in an English village. Their rarity causes the village to rally round to protect the birds when the field in which they are nesting is marked out for ploughing. The film leaves the audience with the message that nothing can change traditional village life.


FRI 06:00 Today (b05xj1qb)
Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b05xcsms)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis (b05xj1qd)
Episode 5

Gavin Francis leads us through a cultural map of the body – an adventure in what it means to be human. Drawing on his own experiences as a physician and writer, he blends first-hand case studies with reflections on the way the body has been imagined and portrayed over millennia.

His journey ends at the foot – a marvel of engineering often overlooked by anatomists and medical students.

It’s thanks to the arches of our feet that we stepped into our humanity more than two million years ago.

Read by Bill Paterson
Abridged by Jo Coombs

Produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05xj1qg)
Gemma Chan, Women's Institute at 100, Ginny Mancini

Gemma Chan talks about her role in the new Channel 4 series Humans.

As the Women's Institute reaches its centenary, we hear about the its remarkable history.

Amanda Vickery discusses why the women of Victorian London were so fascinated with Verdi's La Traviata.

Ginny Mancini on the song her late husband composed, the Oscar winning Moon River.

And, Woman's Hour 2015 Power List: Influencers: We hear about the women who influence what we eat.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Ruth Watts.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xj1qj)
HighLites: Dye Another Day

Episode 5

Bev and Shirl, the world's worst hairdressers, finally hear Bev's alleged father's will. But will Bev get her hands on Albert's money?

The enduring comedy of Bev, the bitter and vindictive Chief Stylist and Shirl, her fond and foolish assistant.

By Phil Nodding and Steve Chambers.

Directed by Liz Webb.


FRI 11:00 China's Football Revolution (b05xj1ql)
Episode 2

China, a country of over 1.3 billion people, is riding high on the global stage. But success at the world's most popular sport is eluding the nation.

In the second part of his series on the growth of football in China, Clive Anderson explores the relationship between Britain and China as President Xi Jinping embarks on a massive football reform programme.

Clive visits a school in Beijing where PE teachers are being trained by Premier League coaches, and he explores how foreign players are being imported to improve the Chinese game. Even David Beckham has been hired as a Chinese football Ambassador.

But can China achieve the same success at football as it has in Olympic sports - and what impact might this have on its relationship with the rest of the world?

Produced by Jo Wheeler
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b05xq6z7)
Series 3

Relishing the Gentleman

Having declared that she would rather die than take any of Lady Utterline's advice, Vera has decided to open her garden to the public.

Ginny and Lionel have come down to help without realising that Vera is planning to dress up as a man (to avoid being recognised), so that she can indulge in a secret liaison with Venus, who is planning to dress up as a Russian Fortune Teller - Mrs Pullova.

And all of this charade just to deceive Henry.

But from the moment Vera asks Ginny and Lionel to be co-conspirators in her plot by luring Henry away from the garden party, things start to go wrong.

Eventually, Henry finds out about the clandestine meeting in the fortune teller's tent and - despite an unwanted furore when the police arrive to arrest DH Lollipop for selling the vicar his pornographic novel (Lady Hattersley's Plover) - Henry manages to put a stop to Vera and Venus's elopement.

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b05xcmcw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b05xq7fc)
12 June 1915 - Jessie Moore

Jessie and Adam find ingenious ways of making money.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b05xq7ff)
Energy Complaints; Phone Technology; Flight Changes: Renewable Energy

Scottish Power has been named as the most complained about energy company in the UK -receiving more than twice as many complaints as its closest rival. But will naming and shaming gas and electricity suppliers force them to treat their customers better?

Women's feet are apparently getting wider. Shoes designed for women often seem not to be foot-shaped, and with the pleasure of a beautiful slender pair of stilettos comes the pain of wearing them. An exhibition at the V&A Museum in London explores the perversity of our relationship with shoes.

Phone companies have started to turn on a service called HD Voice, which promises to make broken-up conversations and muffled voices a thing of the past. But is it just marketing hype, or will it make smartphones finally excel as actual phones?

The listeners who've been waiting more than five months to receive goods they bought from an
online department store in Northern Ireland.

If you book a flight there's a chance the airline might alter the time of departure. A few minutes here or there hardly matters....but what can you do if the flight is rescheduled to leave several hours earlier than its original departure time, robbing you of a day's holiday in the process?

Although the Germans have been doing it for years, we've never been able to store surplus energy... until now. We hear how a small company in Sheffield is converting left-over renewable energy into hydrogen to power cars.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b05xcmcy)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b05xqbm6)
Chris Mason reports on growing disquiet within Shadow Cabinet with Labour's position on the European Referendum.
A senior member of the Shadow Cabinet tells the programme that there is a feeling that the leadership is 'panicking' over the issue and that a group of frontbenchers are planning to set up a pro-European group to unashamedly campaign to stay in. MPs on both sides of the argument join us to discuss the issue.
We report from Australia where there are suggestions that border officials bribed people traffickers to turn their boats around.
The Labour leadership hopeful, Jeremy Corbin, outlines his vision and the DJ Giles Peterson sings the praises of the British hi-fi industry as part of our 5oth anniversary series.


FRI 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05xqbm8)
Birsa Munda: Have You Been to Chalkad?

Prof. Sunil Khilnani profiles Birsa Munda, the young, charismatic healer who led his tribal community in revolt against the British and whose life, more than a century after his death, poses the question: 'Who owns India?'

Scattered across the subcontinent, India's tribal peoples or Adivasis, match in size the populations of Germany or Vietnam. Yet the land rights of India's original inhabitants are regularly overridden in the name of development. One of history's great defenders of Adivasi rights was Birsa Munda, born in the late 19th century in what is now the north-eastern state of Jharkhand. At a time of famine and disease across northern India his community looked to the Birsa for healing and leadership. The young man who claimed he could turn bullets to water led a rebellion against the British, their Indian middlemen and Christian missionaries.

The question 'Who owns India' takes Sunil Khilnani to a tribal community who are losing their land and access to food, fuel and water with the growing encroachment of luxury housing complexes - second homes for city dwellers. We also hear from author and political activist Arundhati Roy. "The fact that Adivasis still exist," she says, "is because people like Birsa Munda staged the beginnings of the battle against the takeover of their homeland.

Though he died at the age of just 25, Birsa Munda has become a lasting symbol of tribal resistance. He's the only Adivasi whose portrait hangs in the Indian Parliament. "His was a firework of a life," says Sunil Khilnani, "but a life whose embers still burn".

Producer: Jeremy Grange
Executive Producer: Martin Smith
Original Music composed by Talvin Singh.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b05xhyrm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xqbmb)
Triple Word Score

Ben Tagoe's warm-hearted drama set in the high octane world of competitive Scrabble set in Nigeria.

When Yomi travels from his native Scotland to his father's homeland to try out for the national Scrabble team, he has a lot more to learn than strategic two letter words.

Produced/directed by Gaynor Macfarlane

Ben Tagoe is a Scottish Ghanaian writer who writes for continuing drama on tv and for the theatre. This is his first radio drama.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b05xqbmd)
Bristol

Eric Robson hosts the show from Bristol, the European Green Capital City 2015. The panel includes Christine Walkden, Chris Beardshaw, and Matthew Wilson.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Shorts (b05y178q)
Welcome to Your Holiday!

As Far as We Could Go by Thomas Morris

Three specially commissioned stories in which writers from around the world explore the idea of getting away from it all. What do we experience as visitors in the lives of others? For those who prefer to regard themselves as travellers, the urge to seek out the authentic is matched only by the fear of ‘looking like a tourist’.

In As Far as We Could Go, by Thomas Morris, a group of visiting writers on a creative retreat in Ireland are determined that they will discover the authentic experience of local life.

Thomas Morris is editor of the Irish literary magazine The Stinging Fly. His first collection of short stories We Don't Know What We're Doing will be published in August.

Reader: Nathalie Buscombe

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b05xqbmj)
Christopher Lee, Marguerite Patten, James Last, Major Roy Homard, Ron Moody

Andrea Catherwood on
film star Christopher Lee, internationally famous for his villainous, on screen roles. Cookery writer and broadcasting pioneer Marguerite Patten, explorer Major 'Roy' Homard who made the first crossing of the Antarctic, German born band leader and purveyor of 'Happy Music' James Last and actor Ron Moody, best known for playing Fagin in Oliver.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b05xqbml)
Obesity Projections, Global Footprint, Street Value of Drugs

It's the last in the series so we're packing in the statistical goodies so that you can go into numerical hibernation until August. We're looking at the street value of drugs: when police claim that they've confiscated hundreds of millions of pounds worth of narcotics, where do those numbers come from? And how has the dark internet changed drug prices?
We'll also be looking at claims that those of us who aren't binging on drugs are binging on biscuits instead. Apparently much of the UK and almost the entire population of Ireland is going to be obese before long. But how have such alarming forecasts fared in the past?
We're often told that we consume so much that we need one and a half planets - and not just to provide room for all those obese people. What does that number even mean, and is it helpful?


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b05xqbw6)
Clare and Chris - In My Head

Fi Glover introduces two friends who recognise the impact acquired brain injury has on their friendship and on his ability to get on with life. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b05xqbw8)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05xcmd1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b05xqdty)
Series 87

Episode 5

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guests Andy Hamilton, Bob Mills and Rebecca Front.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b05xqdv0)
Pip's exams are over. She can't wait to get back to some real farming. As they admire the sunset Pip and David's thoughts turn to Ruth's mum and the future. With no improvement imminent Pip wants to be around to help now she has more time. David's pleased, and grateful.
Kate's commandeered the kitchen at Home Farm for her housewarming prep, leaving Brian marooned. Not feeling the need to be 'house-cleansed', he departs for a bath and an early night. Kate continues campaigning for Phoebe to stay over at the cottage to no avail. Seeing Kate's polished off Brian's vintage burgundy, Phoebe exclaims to Fallon how embarrassing it all is. Fallon defends Kate; this is a big deal for her. As Kate pumps Fallon for information on being her own boss, Phoebe wonders where this is all heading.
The house-cleansing ceremony's in full swing, but something in the air's getting in people's eyes and throats. Unfortunately Kate's forgotten the cottage has a fire alarm. The herbs catch alight, setting it off and triggering an alert for Brian. Furious Brian arrives to the scene of chaos and depleted burgundy. In despair he gives up and leaves. To Kate's horror Phoebe goes with him, declaring Kate's on her own, for good.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b05xqg4h)
Alistair McGowan as Jimmy Savile, Amitav Ghosh, Richard Dadd

Alistair McGowan plays the role of Jimmy Savile in a controversial new play by Jonathan Maitland which opened last night. McGowan and Maitland discuss their mixed feelings about the project and how and why they chose to portray the serial paedophile.

The novelist Amitav Ghosh talks about the final part of his Ibis Trilogy, Flood of Fire, which follows the Man Booker Prize-shortlisted Sea of Poppies and River of Smoke, set during the turbulent times of the Opium Wars.

A new exhibition by the Victorian artist Richard Dadd shows paintings from his early career, when he was seen as one of the most talented and promising artists of his generation, to paintings completed after he suffered a breakdown and was admitted to Bethlem psychiatric Hospital. Historian Kathryn Hughes reviews.

As Wagner's German opera house Bayreuth prepares for the 150th anniversary performance of Tristan and Isolde, music critic and writer Norman Lebrecht considers the almighty row that is taking place between Wagner's two great-grand-daughters who run the festival.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05xj1qj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b05xqg4k)
Diane Abbott MP, Dan Hannan MEP, Agnes Poirier, Duke of Wellington

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from St John's Church, Waterloo, in London. The church is hosting the Waterloo Festival, marking the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo and the panel includes Diane Abbott MP who is hoping to become the Labour candidate for the London mayoral elections in 2016, the Conservative MEP Dan Hannan, the French journalist and broadcaster Agnes Poirier and the 9th Duke of Wellington, Charles Wellesley. Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b05xqg4m)
AL Kennedy: The Worth of Education

"A school's core strength is that it's a school" writes AL Kennedy. She argues that the "monetisation" of learning - where its value is assessed in purely monetary terms - risks destroying the very essence of learning. She says we need to rethink this "quiet mess" before it's too late.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b05xqg4p)
8-12 June 1915

The third omnibus edition of Season 4 of the epic drama series set in Great War Britain which was first broadcast a hundred years after it is set.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Story-led by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b05xcmd3)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b05xqg4r)
EU officials reported to have had formal talks about Greece defaulting on debts.

Athens denies that possible Greek exit from the Eurozone was discussed


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05xqg4t)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 10

Josh doubts Michael's version of events and tries to find evidence against him. But can he reveal the truth without exposing his own shame?

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Concluded by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b05xggjm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05xqh0y)
Mark D'Arcy and the BBC parliamentary team report from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b05xqh10)
Donna and Matt - In Tune

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between the tenor and soprano halves of Bella Voci, who recognise that they cannot live without singing. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b05xd44h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b05xd44h)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b05xdcb5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b05xdcb5)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b05xgkxd)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b05xgkxd)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b05xhwqm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b05xhwqm)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b05xj1qj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b05xj1qj)

A Father for My Son 00:30 SUN (b01dhfkx)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b05xggjm)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b05xggjm)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b05wz90v)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b05xqg4m)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 09:45 MON (b05xd44c)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 00:30 TUE (b05xd44c)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 09:45 TUE (b05xdcb1)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 00:30 WED (b05xdcb1)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 09:45 WED (b05xgkx8)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 00:30 THU (b05xgkx8)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 09:45 THU (b05xhwqh)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 00:30 FRI (b05xhwqh)

Adventures in Human Being by Gavin Francis 09:45 FRI (b05xj1qd)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b05wxx6z)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b05xd5s1)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b05xcj66)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b05wz90s)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b05xqg4k)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b05xcktx)

Ayo Gorkhali: The Gurkhas Are Coming! 11:00 MON (b05xd44k)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b05xhx64)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b05xhx64)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b05xh3nk)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b05z5m42)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b05z5m42)

Best Behaviour 18:30 THU (b05xhyrk)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b05xd54x)

Big Problems with Helen Keen 18:30 WED (b05xh31b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b05xd69n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b05xghc8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b05xh3nf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b05xhzh1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b05xqg4t)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b05wz0k9)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b05xcvb0)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b05xcvb0)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b05xcsmn)

China's Football Revolution 11:00 FRI (b05xj1ql)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b05xd50b)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b05xcsms)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b05xcsms)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 WED (b05xglm4)

Every Case Tells a Story 20:00 MON (b05xd5k2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b05xcgp9)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b05xcvcb)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b05xd6nm)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b05xghjw)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b05xh3xd)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b05xhztk)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b05wy64q)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b05xggjy)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b05wykhs)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b05xh31l)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b05xckts)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b05xckts)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b05wndzn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b05xhwqr)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b05xd5k0)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b05xggjw)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b05xh31g)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b05xhyrp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b05xqg4h)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b05wz0ky)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b05xqbmd)

Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b05xq6z7)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b05xqg4p)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b05xd44p)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b05xdclb)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b05xglwj)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b05xhwrd)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b05xq7fc)

Houses of Horror 16:00 MON (b03s9tm7)

I Am Nobody's Prime Minister 13:30 SUN (b05xcv9t)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b05xhwqf)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b05xhwqf)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b05xggk0)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 MON (b05xd506)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 TUE (b05xdcvk)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 WED (b05xgm2b)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 THU (b05xhww3)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 FRI (b05xqbm8)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b05xggk2)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b05xggk2)

John Kearns 23:00 WED (b05xh3nh)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b05wxx6n)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b05xd5jw)

Kevin Eldon Will See You Now 23:00 TUE (b01l7vnm)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b05wz90b)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b05xqbmj)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b05xggjk)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b05xggjk)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b05xcktq)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 TUE (b05xggjr)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b05wndz1)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b05xclvp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b05xclxq)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b05xclzg)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b05xcm6t)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b05xcmb4)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b05xcmck)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b05xgkx6)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b05xgkx6)

Minimal Impact 11:30 TUE (b05xdcb7)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b05xch5f)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b05xch5f)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b05xgn2k)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b05xh31j)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b05wz90d)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b05xqbml)

My Life on Paper 11:30 THU (b05xhwr2)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b05w99gj)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w99j5)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b05wndzc)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b05xclvy)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b05xclxz)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b05xclzr)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b05xcm74)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b05xcmbd)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b05xcmct)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b05xclw0)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b05wndzq)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b05xclwb)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b05xcly6)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b05xclzw)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b05xcm7h)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b05xcmbg)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b05xcmcw)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b05wndzf)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b05xclw4)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b05xclw8)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b05wnf05)

News 13:00 SAT (b05wndzv)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b05xcqpc)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 MON (b05xd508)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 TUE (b05xdgrf)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 WED (b05xgn2h)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 THU (b05xhx5x)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 FRI (b05xqbmb)

PM 17:00 SAT (b05xcj6b)

PM 17:00 MON (b05xd556)

PM 17:00 TUE (b05xggjp)

PM 17:00 WED (b05xgn2r)

PM 17:00 THU (b05xhx66)

PM 17:00 FRI (b05xqbw8)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b05xcvb4)

Poem Stories 19:45 SUN (b05xcvb8)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b05wnx4r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b05wz96q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b05xcvc8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b05xd6nk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b05xghjt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b05xh3xb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b05xhzth)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b05xcqsc)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b05xcqsc)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b05xcqsc)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b05wyq6b)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b05xhx5z)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b03pd2n5)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b05xch57)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b05xcktv)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b05xh31n)

Seekers 23:00 THU (b05xhzh3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b05wndz7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b05xclvt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b05xclxv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b05xclzm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b05xcm70)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b05xcmb8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b05xcmcp)

Shadow of the Sun King 11:00 WED (b05xgkxj)

Shared Experience 15:30 TUE (b05xggjh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b05wndz3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b05wndz9)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b05wndzy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b05xclvr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b05xclvw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b05xclwk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b05xclxs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b05xclxx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b05xclzk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b05xclzp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b05xcm6y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b05xcm72)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b05xcmb6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b05xcmbb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b05xcmcm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b05xcmcr)

Shorts 15:45 FRI (b05y178q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b05wnf02)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b05xclwp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b05xclyd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b05xcm0q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b05xcm8j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b05xcmbl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b05xcmd1)

So On and So Forth 11:30 MON (b05xd44m)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b05xcqp9)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b05xcqp9)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b05xd449)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b05xd449)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b05xcsml)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b05xcqs9)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b05wq1jc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b05xcsmq)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b05xcvb6)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b05xcvb6)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b05xd5jy)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b05xd5jy)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b05xggjt)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b05xggjt)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b05xh31d)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b05xh31d)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b05xhyrm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b05xhyrm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b05xqdv0)

The Barchester Chronicles 21:00 SAT (b05wnx4m)

The Barchester Chronicles 15:00 SUN (b05xcv9y)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b05wyqqq)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b05xhyrr)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b05wyq6d)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b05xhx61)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b05xcv9p)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b05xcv9p)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b05xch59)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b05xch59)

The Light 09:30 TUE (b05y4f96)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b05xcv9w)

The Listening Project 09:00 TUE (b05xdc9z)

The Listening Project 21:30 TUE (b05xdc9z)

The Listening Project 10:56 WED (b05xgkxg)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b05xqbw6)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b05xqh10)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b05xgn2p)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b05wz90l)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b05xqdty)

The Rivals 19:15 SUN (b03brnrj)

The Robert Peston Interview Show (with Eddie Mair) 23:00 MON (b05xd69q)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b05xch5c)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b05xcv9r)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b05xd69l)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b05xghc6)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b05xh31q)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b05xhzgz)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b05xqg4r)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b05wyhp8)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b05xgn2m)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b05xd69s)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b05xghcb)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b05xh3nm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b05xhzjb)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b05xqh0y)

Today 07:00 SAT (b05xch55)

Today 06:00 MON (b05xd447)

Today 06:00 TUE (b05xdc9x)

Today 06:00 WED (b05xgkx4)

Today 06:00 THU (b05xhwqc)

Today 06:00 FRI (b05xj1qb)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b02tycf8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b038qk9b)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b038qkb3)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b038qkbj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b038qkcg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b038qkck)

We Will Arise and Go Now 16:30 SUN (b05xcvb2)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b05wndzh)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b05wndzl)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b05wndzs)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b05wnf00)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b05xclw2)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b05xclw6)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b05xclwd)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b05xclwm)

Weather 05:56 MON (b05xcly1)

Weather 12:57 MON (b05xcly8)

Weather 21:58 MON (b05xclyj)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b05xclzy)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b05xcm19)

Weather 12:57 WED (b05xcm7q)

Weather 12:57 THU (b05xcmbj)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b05xcmcy)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b05xcmd3)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b05xcvbb)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b05xcvbd)

What's Left? 22:15 SAT (b05xxqb2)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b05xcj68)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b05xd44f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b05xdcb3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b05xgkxb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b05xhwqk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b05xj1qg)

World at One 13:00 MON (b05xd504)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b05xdcvh)

World at One 13:00 WED (b05xgm1w)

World at One 13:00 THU (b05xhww1)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b05xqbm6)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b05xd44r)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b05xdcld)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b05xglwl)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b05xhwrg)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b05xq7ff)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b05wz96s)