Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 MAY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b05vrj34)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Tom Fort - Channel Shore (b05w84zh)
Episode 5

The Looes. Then Lizard Point. Then Lands' End, where a cream tea is enjoyed, but the place itself?

The end of Tom Fort's maritime journey taking us from the White Cliffs to Lands' End. About 675 miles in all.

Concluded by Jonathan Coy

Abridged by Katrin Williams.

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2015


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05vrj37)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05vrj39)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05vrj3c)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b05vrj3f)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05w8f0b)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Jane Livesey CJ.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b05w8f0g)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b05vrj3h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b05vrj3k)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b05w4dpr)
Series 30

Old Birds, Pegsdon Hills

Clare Balding walks in the Pegsdon Hills, Bedfordshire, with a group of female birders who call themselves the 'Old Birds'. The group initially bonded over their mutual love of nature, but also have many members who have been widowed, so find the gatherings a source of support as well as a way of exploring the local countryside.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b05wn34m)
Agricultural Shows

Felicity Evans is at the Royal Bath and West show, to see how relevant agricultural shows are in 2015. We meet a stockman getting his prize South Devon bull ready for showing, and traders hoping to promote their business. And we find out why farmers still flock to these shows up and down the country.
The producer in Bristol is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b05vrj3m)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b05wn3x8)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b05wn7s9)
Tony Parsons

The journalist and novelist, Tony Parsons, joins Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir.
Tony was working on the night shift at Gordon's Gin Distillery when he was offered his first job as a journalist on the New Musical Express. When he wasn't hanging out with rock stars he was embedded with the Vice Squad at 27 Savile Row, West End Central, where the roots of his crime character, DC Max Wolfe, first began.

Saturday Live listener, Hilary Nicoll, talks about The Museum of Dad. Featuring a music case, a trombone, old jazz 78s, and a chair made of steel tube and leather, it's a blog in remembrance of her architect father, who is now living in a nursing home with Alzheimer's.

Ex-Blue Peter presenter, Janet Ellis, has long been fascinated by the lives of people who were here before us, so much so that she has developed a life-long passion for looking around graveyards. She visits the cemetery at St Nicholas' Church in Chiswick, with Dan Parker. Janet describes Fern Hill by Dylan Thomas, as a possible epitaph.

Sarah Woods describes her travels to Central and South America in an eight year quest to see the Harpy Eagle in the wild. She explains why helping a teenage girl in labour, and seeing the Harpy Eagle up close, were life-changing experiences.

Jonathan Moore is an ex-punk who became an opera director. Art and spirituality are his vocation - as shown in his current play about Ignatius of Loyola.

And the Inheritance Tracks of Dom Joly. He chooses America by Simon and Garfunkel and In a Room by The House of Love.

The Slaughter Man by Tony Parsons is published by Century.
On a Wing and a Prayer, by Sarah Woods, is published by Bloomsbury.
Janet Ellis' first novel, The Butcher's Hook, is scheduled for publication in February 2016.
Inigo, written and directed by Jonathan Moore, runs at the Pleasance in north London until 13 June, 2015.
The exhibition Peter Wilkins - Great British Music from the 1960s - 2010s, is at Dray Walk Gallery, London E1 6QL until 1 June, 2015.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b05wn7sc)
Series 10

New Forest

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel programme from the New Forest.

On this week's panel are food historian Annie Gray; Catalan inspired Scottish cook Rachel McCormack; former Head of Creative Development for Heston Blumenthal, James "Jocky" Petrie; and Israeli chef Itamar Srulovich.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

Produced by Miranda Hinkley
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b05wn7sf)
Isabel Hardman of The Spectator asks if David Cameron's plans could be outvoted in the House of Lords. What are the new intake of Tory MPs like? And can it really be true that all politicians lie ?

Editor: Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b05vrj3p)
Should I Stay or Should I Go?

News and current affairs storytelling, context and colour: the Russians contemplating leaving the country because of what they see as an increasingly harsh and intolerant political climate; Cuba and the US may be close to announcing a date for the re-opening of their respective embassies, but many in Havana still wait for the thaw to bring more products onto the shelves of shops; the Indians driven away from their villages by a bitter conflict between the state and Maoist guerrillas; a leak from upstairs causes an unwanted shower but brings an insight into the interesting peculiarities of plumbing in Paris and how tourism has driven an economic recovery in Iceland and changed the way of life in this Scandinavian outpost.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b05vrj3r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b05wn7sh)
Building a dream home, Tax amnesty anyone? Plus: car rental tips.

On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

Building the dream. The Government would like more of us to build our own homes. The aspiration featured in this week's Queen's Speech. But the numbers self-building have halved over the last few years. So how will the changes boost self-build? Another development is the extension of the Right to Buy to Housing Association tenants. Will all this be enough to increase rates of home ownership? The housing minister, Brandon Lewis, speaks to the programme.

HMRC has confirmed it will waive late penalty fines for people if they missed the deadline for filing their tax return for 2013-14. But only if they've already submitted an appeal and have a valid excuse.
It's not an amnesty. But it is a change of approach. The programme talks to Ruth Owen, Director General of Personal Tax at HMRC and to Chas Roy-Chowdhury at ACCA.

The latest Money Box Travel Tip. Keeping those car rental bills down. One listener, by signing up for more cover with an airport car rental firm, found his bill rose from £38 for four days to £175. How can you keep down the cost of hiring a car? And predict what it will really be at the start? The man who has been hiring cars for thirty years, the Independent's Travel Editor, Simon Calder, shares his tips

Enrolling on. After Money Box revealed last week that no one knew who would pay the extra costs disabled people face when they have to auto-enrol their care worker into a pension - we follow up the story and discover some local authorities won't be paying the cost even though it seems they should.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b05w8dnq)
Series 87

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guests Francis Wheen, Helen Zaltzman and Rebecca Front.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b05vrj3t)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b05vrj3w)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b05wn7sk)
Greg Clark MP, Caroline Flint MP, Julia Hartley-Brewer, George Monbiot

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Ratton School in Eastbourne, with the secretary of state for communities and local government Greg Clark MP, shadow secretary of state for energy and climate change Caroline Flint MP, journalist and broadcaster Julia Hartley-Brewer, and Guardian columnist and environmental campaigner George Monbiot.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b05wn7sm)
Fifa, Right to Buy, Strike Ballots

Your say on some of the issues discussed on Any Questions?, including the FIFA corruption charges and the re-election of President Sepp Blatter; the Government's extension of the Right to Buy to housing association tenants, and proposals to establish a 50% turn-out threshold for trade union strikes.

Presenter: Anita Anand.
Producers: Angie Nehring, Rachel Simpson.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01shqcf)
The Last Tycoon

The celebrated theatre director Bill Bryden adapts F Scott Fitzgerald's last and unfinished novel. Starring Aiden Gillen, Jack Shepherd and Charlotte Emmerson.

Haunted by the death of his wife, 1930s Studio Head Monroe Stahr works eighteen hour days, each one a collision of talent meetings, set visits, script brainstorms and preview screenings. He's the "last of the princes", is making the studio millions and seems bullet proof.

At the end of an epic day, an earthquake breaks two water mains, sending a roaring river of water through the studio. And with it, the huge floating head of the goddess Shiva - a film prop.

As Stahr leaves his office to inspect the damage he sees the head floating by and on it two women, one of them the mesmerising Kathleen.

It's the beginning of a love affair that will destroy him.

As their affair plays out, we follow the disintegration of one of the great Hollywood legends, and also witness the darker heart of the Hollywood machine as a paranoid fear of communism comes to the fore.

It's a gorgeous, excruciating, heady tale - based on Fitzgerald's own painful experiences working in Hollywood as a screenwriter.

Produced by Laurence Bowen
Adapted and directed by Bill Bryden
Production Associate - John Tams
Sound Design - Mark Smith

A Feelgood Fiction production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b05wn7sq)
Amanda Palmer, Glenda Jackson

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Presented by Jenni Murray.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b05wn91k)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news with Jonny Dymond.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b05w4jxk)
Productivity

Why is UK productivity lower than in many other countries?

Evan Davis begins a new series of The Bottom Line by looking at the productivity problem. The programme asks what productivity really means and how different sectors go about measuring it.

Evan hears from three chief executives in three different sectors: manufacturing; advertising and health. How can productivity be measured and improved in these diverse sectors? How, for example, should the productivity of a doctor or nurse be measured?

Guests:
Dame Julie Moore, Chief Executive of University Hospitals Birmingham
Brian Holliday Managing Director, Managing Director for Siemens Digital Factory UK
James Murphy, Founder and Chief Executive of Adam and Eve DDB Advertising

Producer: Jim Frank.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05vrj3y)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b05vrj40)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05vrj42)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b05wn91m)
Phil Gayle, Greg Davies, John Williams, Kay Mellor, Martin Johnson, Eliza Carthy and Tim Eriksen, Tyler Nugent

Clive Anderson and Phil Gayle welcome Greg Davies, John Williams, Kay Mellor and Martin Johnson. With music from Eliza Carthy & Tim Eriksen and Tyler Nugent.

Producer Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b05wn91p)
Series 18

A Roof Over Our Heads

From Fact to Fiction

The award-winning series in which writers create a fictional response to the week's news. In the first of a new series of dramas, Sarah McDonald Hughes takes a look at the government's proposed extension of the right-to-buy housing scheme.

Beth and Sam have just bought the house they previously rented from a housing association. They have big plans for the property, but is Dave the handyman up to the job?

A Roof Over Our Heads by Sarah McDonald Hughes

With sound FX and vocal percussion from Carl Orza aka UK Beatboxer Soundbytz

Directed by Charlotte Riches.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b05wnb7d)
Temple, Man Up, Humans, Sense8, Ryan Gattis, Grayson Perry

Temple is a new play at London's Donmar Warehouse. It imagines what happened behind the scenes when the Occupy Movement took over the steps of St Paul's Cathedral in 2011.
Simon Pegg stars in Man Up - an unconventional rom-com about a blind date that goes hilariously wrong.
We review 2 new TV Sci-fi dramas: Humans on Channel 4 and Sense8 on Netflix - can they compete with the bigger budgets of film?
Ryan Gattis' novel: All Involved is a fictionalised account of the 1992 LA riots which followed the acquittal of policemen for beating African-American Rodney King. 17 separate voices from gang members to firefighters tell their stories
Ceramicist Grayson Perry has a retrospective at Turner Contemporary in Margate, it's a selection from more than 30 years of his work
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Lisa Appignanesi, Gabriel Gbadamosi and Michael Arditti. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b05wnb7g)
The Tokens and the Foundlings

Drawing on an archive of personal testimonies from some of the last foundlings, Caro Howell, Director of the Foundling Museum presents the extraordinary story of the UK's first children's charity; the Foundling Hospital (now CORAM).

The streets of London in the 1720s presented startling contrasts of wealth and poverty, respectability and debauchery, extravagance and utter destitution. Poverty and disgrace resulted in huge number of babies being abandoned. So shocked was he by this situation, that Thomas Coram, a former shipbuilder began a one-man campaign which led 17 years later to the establishment of a "Hospital for the Maintenance and Education of Exposed and Deserted Young Children" which became known as the Foundling Hospital.

Philanthropic acts by artists including Hogarth, Gainsborough, Reynolds and also Handel, not only raised funds for the hospital but transformed it into a fashionable place for art and music, including the first performance of Handel's Messiah. For the 25,000 children who were accepted (until its role changed in 1953), it was a place of 'maintenance and education'.

Today, some of the original hospital furniture, artworks and staircases, have been rehoused in what is now the Foundling Museum, which stands on the same site. The Museum also hosts archive documents and tokens; objects like buttons and coins left by the mothers as a unique means of identification should they ever be able to return at a later date when their fortunes had changed and reclaim their children.

Using personal accounts from 'Coram's children' Archive on 4 tells the astonishing and moving story of the Foundling Hospital and its legacy.

Producer: Sarah Blunt

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b05vsyz1)
Samuel Johnson - Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

An intriguing, contemporary take on Samuel Johnson's classic tale of an African prince in search of happiness.

A star cast is led by Ashley Zhangazha as Rasselas, Jeff Rawle as Samuel Johnson and Lucian Msamati - the RSC's first black Iago - as the poet Imlac. Singer and actor Cynthia Erivo makes her BBC radio drama debut as Princess Nekayah.

Recorded on location at Dr Johnson's House, 17 Gough Square, in the City of London - the very place where over 260 years ago, Johnson compiled his famous dictionary and then in January 1759, wrote his instant bestseller 'Rasselas' in a week, to pay for his mother's funeral.

Acclaimed 18th century philosophy fuels a contemporary desert road trip in this inventive and playful adaptation by Jonathan Holloway. Period and modern collide in a satirical fantasy as Rasselas and his companions follow their quest for happiness and purpose to Cairo, where they encounter Arab Spring revolutionaries.

Jonathan Holloway's drama also incorporates a compelling glimpse of Johnson himself - the lonely, 50-year-old celebrity and writer, in debt, in poor health, and missing his young Jamaican manservant, Francis Barber, who had run away to sea. Born a slave, Barber was freed at Johnson's insistence and
treated kindly by him.

Johnson had struggled through many years of poverty before moving to Gough Square and becoming a highly respected writer. 'Rasselas', his singular, progressive rumination on human happiness, is his only novel and his most popular work.

Samuel Johnson ..... Jeff Rawle
Arthur Murphy ..... Kevin Trainor
Princess Nekayah ..... Cynthia Erivo
Prince Rasselas ..... Ashley Zhangazha
Imlac ..... Lucian Msamati
Aeronaut ..... Richard Cordery
Pekuah ..... Adjoa Andoh
AJ ..... Gabriel Mokaké
Ahmed ..... Amir El-Masry
Mohammed / Intelligence Man ..... Zubin Varla

Sound design: David Chilton

Director: Amber Barnfather
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b05vrj45)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b05w3wkt)
The Law of the Road

Clive Anderson and a panel of legal experts discuss how changes to our traffic laws could reduce the numbers of motorists, cyclists and pedestrians killed or injured on the road.?

Our road traffic laws effectively offer everyone at the age of 17 the opportunity to take to the wheel of a car - even under the influence of a modest amount of alcohol. Our roads are governed by a complex set of rules and regulations which are often hard to understand - and even harder to enforce.

The discussion ranges across raising the legal driving age, lowering speed limits, imposing stricter penalties for drink-driving and other offences, and reversing the burden of proof for the most serious motoring offences.

Do the penalties available to magistrates and judges provide sufficient deterrent to breaking the laws of the road? And do the courts make sufficient distinction between motorists who flout the laws - violators - and those who merely make mistakes? Should a motorist who drives carelessly and collides with a pedestrian be punished more severely than one who collides with a tree?

Clive's guests are Sally Kyd Cunningham, professor of law at the University of Leicester who specialises in road traffic offences; Julian Hunt, former crown prosecutor and now a barrister who both defends and prosecutes in road traffic cases; Richard Monkhouse, chair of the Magistrates Association with over 18 years' experience as a lay justice; and Simeon Maskrey QC, barrister, Deputy High Court Judge, Recorder of the Crown Court and keen cyclist who admits that he's been known to break the law by jumping red lights in order to escape the attention of thundering lorries.

Producer: Brian King
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b05vx4dx)
Series 5

Aston University

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from Aston University, The 3rd Degree is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners while delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Law, Psychology and Computer Science and the questions range from Wile E Coyote and manslaughter to tennis balls, stamp-collecting and the Treaty of Westphalia.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow and Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction.

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show also delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. He has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, including The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen, as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called The Genuine Particle.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b05vt6gk)
Children's Poetry and Miscellany

Roger McGough with poetry for children and adults alike, including classics from AA Milne and Spike Milligan, William Blake and WB Yeats, and a celebration of a man filling in Os in the library. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 31 MAY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndhb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 A Father for My Son (b01d28pq)
Episode 1

The Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott died a hundred years ago, leaving behind a fascinating and talented wife, the sculptor Kathleen Scott. Jenny Coverack's trilogy of readings is adapted from her own one-woman stage play, written with Robert Edwards, based on Kathleen Scott's autobiography and journals. These begin with Kathleen's unconventional childhood, when she was farmed out to relatives, before she took the bold and at the time unconventional decision to go to Paris to study art. Here, she mixes in Bohemian circles and is pursued by numerous admirers wanting to start affairs, but what matters most to her is the search for a man worthy of the role of father to the son she longs for.

With grateful acknowledgement to the novelist Louisa Young for her biography of her grandmother, Kathleen Scott, 'A Great Task of Happiness'.

Reader: Jenny Coverack
Producer: Sara Davies.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndhd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndhg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndhj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndhl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b05wnjjh)
The sound of church bells from Saints Probus and Grace, Cornwall.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b05w3wl5)
Brian Lobel

Brian Lobel who was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 20 says surviving cancer does not mean you have to be heroic.

"I thought there must be something for the other 50% or 20% or 90% who would rather watch a box set than run a marathon."

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b05wndhn)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b05wnjjk)
Feeling Groovy

The jazz musician Django Bates has a professional instinct for finding his way into 'the groove'. In 'Feeling Groovy', he reflects on what that means, both musically and in reference to our daily lives - that sense of all things being possible, of being at one with the world.

He draws on the experience of other musicians - such as Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane and Morton Feldman - as well as the poetry of Elizabeth Jennings and the writings of James Baldwin. He also visits Air Studios in London to talk to legendary mastering engineer Ray Staff about the particular appeal of vinyl grooves.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b05wnlyv)
World Darts Champion

Scott Mitchell is best known for his ability to hit a dartboard. He become the British Darts Organisation's World Champion this year. He's perhaps less well-known as a Dorset farmer, but when asked what he would do with the £100,000 championship prize money, his answer was that he would buy his dad a tractor which actually started when you turned the key. In this programme, Charlotte Smith travels to the Mitchell family farm on the edge of the New Forest, and hears how Scott had to find another career when Foot and Mouth disease forced him off the farm in 2001. It meant the farm had to downsize from 300 acres to just 75. Scott found a new role as a gardener, and in his spare time joined a darts team. It set him on a course which culminated in this year's world championship victory. Charlotte hears what that's been like for him. She also talks to the rest of the family about Scott's return to the farm - and she gets to have a look at that new tractor.

Presenter by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b05wndhq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b05wndhs)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b05wnlyx)
Fifa ethics, BBC Music Day, Methodist abuse

In what has been a devastating week for FIFA, Edward Stourton looks at the role of ethics committees. What influence can ethics committees have within organisations? Philippa Foster Back from Institute of Business Ethics and Bishop David Walker, Bishop of Manchester discuss.

Lord Patten talks to Edward about the report he has written for the Vatican on it's media operations and their lack of response to his suggestions.

Dorian Jones reports on the forthcoming Turkish general election which sees three of the four major parties selecting candidates from the country's Armenian minority for the first time in decades.

Edward speaks to Emma Deakin from Arrowe Park Hospital in Wirral, who helps young patients by easing their anxiety through music and play as part of BBC's Music Day season.

Dozens of priceless artefacts, stolen from Churches across England and Wales, have been recovered as part of a major police investigation which has only just been revealed to the public. As Trevor Barnes reports, officers are now appealing for help from the public to track them down.

The Methodist Church in the UK made an "unreserved apology" this week after an independent investigation revealed evidence of abuse. What can the church and other religious institutions now learn from its publication? Rev Dr Liz Smith co-chair of the Joint Safeguarding Liaison Group, Alana Lawrence who is former Chair of Minister and Clergy Sexual Abuse Survivors and Eileen Shearer, Head of Safeguarding and Practice Development at Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service discuss.

Producer:
Zaffar Iqbal
Editor:
Amanda Hancox

Contributors:
Philippa Foster Back
Bishop David Walker
Emma Deakin
Rev Dr Liz Smith
Alana Lawrence
Eileen Shearer.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b05wnlyz)
Winston Churchill Memorial Trust

Ann Pascoe presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Winston Churchill Memorial Trust
Registered Charity No 313952
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Winston Churchill Memorial Trust'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Winston Churchill Memorial Trust'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b05wndhv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b05wndhx)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b05wnlz1)
Meeting the Risen Jesus

International speaker and writer, Becky Pippert, is the preacher at Holy Trinity Platt in Manchester where she reflects on the Resurrection of Jesus. The service is led by the Rector Steve James with lively and uplifting hymns and worship songs directed by Olly Hamilton.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b05w8dnz)
In Praise of Courtesy

AL Kennedy takes the recent death of a friend - the screenwriter Gill Dennis - as her starting point in an exploration of courtesy. "When courtesy walks into a room," she writes, "it seems to turn a light on". She contrasts this with a striking example of discourtesy she encountered on a train journey.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkfhy)
Common Pheasant

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Common Pheasant. The crowing of pheasants is a sound inseparable from most of the UK countryside yet these flamboyant birds were introduced into the UK. The pheasant's coppery plumage and red face-wattles, coupled with a tail that's as long again as its body, make the cock pheasant a strikingly beautiful bird.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b05wnmgg)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b05wnmgj)
It is the annual Single Wicket, and Lynda feels a glimmer of hope.


SUN 11:16 Desert Island Discs (b05wnqwm)
Pamela Rose

Kirsty Young's castaway is Pamela Rose.

Now aged 97, she was a Bletchley Girl who spent her war years working in total secrecy, painstakingly indexing snippets of information that would prove vital to the the war effort. Alan Turing and his fellow cryptanalysts would eventually break the Enigma Code and it's said that this breakthrough shortened the war by two years.

Born into a musical family, she first took to the stage at boarding school. Pamela's lifelong ambition to be an actress was interrupted by the war and the invitation to work at Bletchley. Despite finding the work in the indexing section of Hut 4 something of a disappointment at first, she and her fellow workers still managed to have fun and she met her husband Jim at a hop when he asked her to dance. They married after the war and it wasn't until nearly sixty years later and after Jim's death that she would finally achieve her dream of acting on the West End stage.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b05wndhz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b05vx639)
Series 72

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons hosts the perennially popular panel game in which guests Paul Merton, Alun Cochrane, Susan Calman and Gyles Brandreth attempt to talk for 60 seconds with no hesitation, repetition or deviation on such diverse topics as Nelson's Column and Alice in Wonderland.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.
A BBC Comedy Production.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b05wnqwp)
Rick Stein - A Life Through Food (Part 1)

In Part 1 of a 2 part special, Rick Stein talks to Sheila Dillon about his early years. From growing up on a farm in the Cotswolds and family holidays to Cornwall he discusses a privileged upbringing but with the pressure of being born into a family of academic high achievers and the impact of his father's suicide while a teenager.

Despite failing his A-levels, becoming well-read and his experience travelling won him a place studying at Oxford University and he describes his path into food as 'accidental' - first becoming a DJ and then running a raucous nightclub - serving Vesta meals - which got shut down by the police. His remaining licence allowed him to open a restaurant, starting his path to culinary success. The Seafood Restaurant celebrates its 40th anniversary this year.

This programme was recorded in May in front of a live audience at the Bristol Food Connections Festival.

In Part 2 Rick goes on to discuss being discovered in television - first appearing with Keith Floyd and going on to cook and travel around the world.

Presented by Sheila Dillon and Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b05wndj1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b05wnrkv)
Global news and analysis, presented by Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 The Dark Side of Buddhism (b05wnrkx)
A well respected senior monk groans in pain in a hospital bed. He's been attacked after speaking out against extremist Buddhist groups turning on their Muslim and Christian neighbours. A rally by orange-robed monks in a Muslim area turns into a riot. When order is restored two Muslims and a Tamil security guard lie dead. Christians are threatened and intimidated.

Charles Haviland, the BBC's South Asia editor and former correspondent in Sri Lanka, explores why a militant, violent strain of Buddhism has emerged in recent years. They claim Buddhism in Sri Lanka is under threat and they need to act to preserve a way of life which is being eroded. He meets victims of the militant monks and hears Buddhist elders condemn the violence as against Buddhist principles, but they have no control over the nationalistic, hardline followers of the Bodu Bala Sena group.

Recent elections in Sri Lanka have led to a change in government, and the new Minister for Buddhist Affairs says the law will be applied more rigorously to clamp down on groups agitating religious tensions. But already there is a new flashpoint at a mosque, which the militant monks say is actually an older Buddhist shrine. The government has backed them, and ordered the mosque demolished. Does more religious trouble lie ahead in Sri Lanka?

Translations by Ranga Chandrarathne and Indeewara Thilakarathne
Produced by Vince Hunt.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b05w8dnb)
Newcastle

Eric Robson chairs the programme from Newcastle. Bob Flowerdew, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Wilson answer questions from a local audience.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b05wns1z)
Sunday Omnibus - Living in Rhodesia

Fi Glover with three conversations revealing the reality of life in Rhodesia before 1980, when independent Zimbabwe was born, between women whose memories still inform their lives, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b05wnx4m)
Anthony Trollope's The Last Chronicle of Barset

The Way Things Are

by Anthony Trollope
dramatised by Nick Warburton

Part One: The Way Things Are

In the sleepy village of Silverbridge, Henry Grantly has fallen in love again and Mr Crawley is to find that a butcher with a vengeance is someone to be reckoned with.

Music composed by David Tobin, Jeff Meegan and Julian Gallant.
Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

This is the final book in Anthony Trollope's Barchester Chronicles and many of the characters from both "The Small House at Allington" and "Framley Parsonage" return to finish his story of Barsetshire life set between 1855 and 1867. These 4 episodes focus in part on the story of the proud but impoverished vicar of Hogglestock, Josiah Crawley and the accusation that he has stolen and cashed a cheque. The whole of Barset has an opinion about Crawley's guilt or innocence, but no-one is more affected by it than Archdeacon Grantly's son, Henry, who has fallen in love with Crawley's daughter, Grace. Meanwhile, Johnny Eames has returned to try for the hand of Lily Dale, who is still devastated by the betrayal of her amoral fiance, Adolphus Crosbie. Happily, Mrs Baxter returns to tell the tale and give her inimitable opinion on events.

Maggie Steed stars as Mrs Baxter and is joined by Adam Kotz, Tim Pigott-Smith, Samuel Barnett and Scarlett Alice Johnson.

The Barchester Chronicles is Anthony Trollope's much-loved series of witty, gently satirical stories of provincial life set within the fictional cathedral town of Barchester and the surrounding county of Barsetshire. With a focus on the lives, loves and tribulations of the local clergy and rural gentry, the canvas is broad and colourful, with a wonderful set of iconic characters whose lives we become intimately involved in as they grow up, grow old and fall in or out of love and friendship across the years.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b05wnx4p)
Steve Toltz on Quicksand

Alex Clark talks to Australian novelist Steve Toltz about his new novel Quicksand, the story of an unlikely friendship between Liam a policeman, who also happens to be a writer, and Aldo, an unlucky man who spends some time in prison. The novel is full of one liners, aphorisms, jokes and word play and questions ideas about fate, luck and what it is to be an artist.

Also on the programme, the winner of this year's Independent Foreign Fiction Prize Jenny Erpenbeck discusses her novel The End of Days, a moving and bleak portrait of 20th century Germany seen through the many lives of one woman; Elizabeth Day and Tessa McWatt talk about writing about London and an editor shares her pick of June's new titles.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b05wnx4r)
Contemporary Irish Poets

Recently returned from the Cuirt literature festival in Galway, Roger McGough celebrates contemporary Irish poetry. Featuring the likes of Derek Mahon, Paul Muldoon, Eilean ni Chuilleanain, Paul Durcan, Eavan Boland and the grandaddy of them all, Seamus Heaney. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 The Affordable Housing Crisis (b05vzysp)
The UK has a serious shortage of affordable homes. Lesley Curwen asks whether the current system - where councils do deals with developers to provide cheaper homes - is working.

Lesley examines three case studies - the huge redevelopment schemes at Earl's Court and on the Greenwich Peninsula, as well as a development in rural Suffolk. She asks whether developers are being allowed to duck their obligations to provide affordable homes as a condition of planning permission. Are councils too under-resourced and under-skilled to negotiate with large development companies?

And what of the commuted sum - where developers pay a fee in lieu of providing affordable housing? How is that working?

Lesley hears from New York where the new mayor has instituted a system that spells out what the city needs and wants, cutting the necessity for protracted negotiation.

Produced by Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b05wn91p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05wndj4)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b05wndj6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wndj8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b05wnxgb)
Antonia Quirke

In this week's show we hear about Sufi saints and John Coltraine, the best of Bollywood and the final moments of the tender poet whose name 'lies writ in water'. Tuffers and Aggers and Al Capone - and a story about Handel you are guaranteed never to have heard before.

Join Antonia Quirke for her BBC Radio highlights from the past week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b05wny9g)
Jennifer looks forward to having the young farmers around on Friday. Liam at the Echo may give them a photo - it's all good for the flood relief fund. Brian worries about drunken revellers at Home Farm. Kate turns down Jennifer's suggestion that they compete as a team in the treasure hunt. Brian and Jennifer agree to leave the youngsters to it in the evening. Jennifer has mixed feelings about whether to take part in Open Farm Sunday at Berrow Farm, although it could be good to promote their soft fruits. Kate won't have it though.
Roberts has suggested creating a memorial for Scruff in the garden but Lynda can't face it. Oliver has suggested a holiday and Lynda assures Caroline she'll be able to manage without her.
Eddie throws a birthday bash for his hippy mate, Baggy. They're having it in secret in Joe's room at Grey Gables. Eddie pulls up in a van containing all the booze and food. They need to sneak all this - as well as their guests - past reception. Joe distracts Lynda, inventing a story about seeing some dodgy looking characters trying to break in to a car. Baggy's loud music alerts Caroline, who has had a complaint. It looks like the party's over - but what's Eddie going to do with all the leftover food?


SUN 19:15 The Rivals (b03bdw8c)
Series 2

The Clue of the Silver Spoons

By Robert Barr.

Dramatised By Chris Harrald.

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he is writing his memories and has a chance to get his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. He continues with Food Connoisseur and Detective Eugene Valmont trying to solve a curious series of thefts from private dinner parties

Producer: Liz Webb.


SUN 19:45 Shorts (b05wny9j)
The Time Being

The Love Songs Of Foxes by Amber Lee Dodd

A woman finds there are challenges in taking in her troubled brother when he is released on parole from prison.

Amber Lee Dodd's short story read by Tracy Wiles.

Amber Lee Dodd was a writer for the young playwrights programme at Chichester Festival Theatre. Her plays have featured at the Edinburgh Fringe, New Theatre Royal and the Minerva Theatre. She is currently studying an MA in Creative Writing at Chichester University and her debut children's novel, We Are Giants, is published in spring 2016.

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b05w8dnj)
Seven-day NHS

Seven Day NHS.
As a commitment appears in the Queen's Speech to introduce a 'truly seven day-a-week NHS' we look at David Cameron's assertion that mortality rates are 16% higher for people admitted on a Sunday over those admitted on a Wednesday. And is seven day working really about saving lives.

Productivity?
We're told we have a productivity problem in the UK. What is it, how is it measured and why is it so low in the UK compared to other economies. We get an economist to explain the answers to a listener.

Animal Slaughter
How many animals are killed each day for food? One claim suggested it was half a billion worldwide, which sounds like a lot to us. Are we really pigging out to such an extent? Are we all so hungry we could all eat a horse? Or is this just a load of bull?

John Nash
The mathematician and scientist, Nobel Laureate and subject of the film a beautiful mind was killed in car accident earlier this month. We look at why he was so important to game theory with the economist Peyton Young.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b05w8dng)
Raymond Gosling, Eileen Gray, Sir Duncan Watson, Denys Darlow, Grace Lee Whitney

Matthew Bannister on

Raymond Gosling, who played a crucial role in the discovery of DNA.

Eileen Gray, who fought tirelessly to gain recognition for women's cycling

Sir Duncan Watson, the blind lawyer who campaigned for more blind people to be involved in running the RNIB.

Denys Darlow, the conductor, composer and organist who founded the Tilford Bach festival and the London Handel Festival.

And Grace Lee Whitney the actress who played Captain Kirk's glamorous assistant in the early episodes of Star Trek.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b05wn7sh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b05wnlyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b05vx63j)
Ritual Sexual Abuse: The Anatomy of a Panic (Part 1)

David Aaronovitch of The Times traces the powerful intellectual influences behind what he sees as one of the most important cultural shifts of the past 40 years: from a society in which accusations of sexual abuse were wrongly ignored to one in which the falsely accused were crushed by a system where the mantra was "victims must be believed".

In the first of two programmes, Aaronovitch will examine the role played by unproven psychoanalytic theories which, from the 1980s, spread from the world of therapists in Canada and the USA to social work, medicine and then to law enforcement in Britain.

From the NSPCC to academia it was believed that children were being sexually abused in group Satanic rituals, which involved murder and animal sacrifice. The programme will explore how these bizarre ideas took hold, how they were related to mistaken psychotherapeutic practices, and how they resonate still.

The programme will look at the influences of four books which played a key role in influencing the intellectual and cultural climate. These are Sybil, Michelle Remembers, The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and The Courage to Heal.

Producer: Hannah Barnes

Contributors:
Rosie Waterhouse - Investigative Journalist; Head of MA in investigative journalism at City University

Debbie Nathan - Investigative Journalist and Author

Tim Tate - Television Producer and Director

Sue Hampson - Former counsellor, and now Director of Safe to Say Trauma Informed Training and Consultancy

Roma Hart - Former Multiple Personality Disorder patient, who has retracted claims she was abused in childhood.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b05wp0ft)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b05wp0fw)
Ian Burrell of The Independent analyses how the papers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b05w4j0w)
Film Set Britain

With Antonia Quirke.

The Film Programme gathers listeners' memories of the day that a film crew rolled into town or took over their street. Antonia Quirke hears from Mr Turner production designer Suzie Davies who transformed a land-locked house in Hertfordshire into the painter's Thames-side residence, by the simple expedient of digging up the garden and filling it with enough water to make it look like a river. And talks to the home's owner, Gloria Thompson, about what it was like to see your manicured lawn dug up.

Antonia also visits Lyme Regis, famously used in The French Lieutenant's Woman and Persuasion, and hears from a shop-keeper who kept the Victorian facade built by an art director twenty years after the crew had left the town. The final stop of the tour is Carnforth Station, the prime location of Brief Encounter, which welcomes thousands of visitors every year to their recreation of the famous refreshment room where Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard first met.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b05wnjjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 01 JUNE 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndkp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b05w3wfc)
The 'Happiness Industry' - The 'Wellness Syndrome'

The Happiness Industry: Laurie Taylor talks to Will Davies, Professor in Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London, who asks why policy makers have become increasingly focused on measuring happiness. Also, 'wellness syndrome': Andre Spicer, Professor of Organisational Behaviour at City University, argues that visions of positive social change have been replaced by a focus on individual well-being. They're joined by Laura Hyman, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Portsmouth. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b05wnjjh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndkw)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndky)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndl0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndl3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05wxqk7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Jane Livesey CJ.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b05wp0y3)
Sheeponomics: lamb and wool prices

It's all about 'Sheeponomics' in Monday's Farming Today, as Felicity Evans finds out why farmers are facing a drop of around 25% in the value of early season lambs compared to last year. There's a note of optimism, though, as the sheep shearing season gets under way. The British Wool Board is predicting that the price of wool will continue its steady climb out of the doldrums in 2015. Plus, Felicity talks to Welsh hill farmer Gareth Wyn Jones about his new BBC TV series which he hopes will help reconnect farmers and consumers.

Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:56 Weather (b05wndl5)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02txxkl)
Dotterel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the dotterel.

Dotterels are waders, rather like small plovers with a broad white-eye stripe. In the UK, they're almost confined as breeding birds to the Scottish Highlands. They don't tend to fly away when approached which led our ancestors to believe that they are stupid. "Dotterel" derives from the same source as "dotard" and this tameness meant that the birds were easy prey for Victorian collectors.


MON 06:00 Today (b05wp3cn)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b05wp3l1)
Saul Bellow and Finding a Voice

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to Zachary Leader about the life and work of Saul Bellow, one of America's most famous novelists. Bellow's vivid prose and mix of high and low culture brought 20th century America to life. Linda Grant reflects on his significance for writers today and on the literature of immigration he represents. Aeschylus' play cycle The Oresteia brought to the stage a world the Ancient Greeks understood only too well - family drama and bloody politics. In a new production Robert Icke radically re-imagines the play for a modern audience. The rapper Speech DeBelle looks back at what inspired her to find her voice, and the challenge to retain it.

Producer: Luke Mulhall.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b05wp70d)
Ghettoside

A Murder

Bryant Tennelle was eighteen years old when we was gunned down one spring evening in his neighbourhood in LA , one of many black Americans senselessly murdered that year. Ghettoside is the gripping story of the murder and of its investigation by John Skaggs, a brilliant, ferociously driven detective - a blond, surfer-turned-cop who is determined to track down the killers.

The award-winning reporter Jill Leovy was embedded with the LAPD for almost a decade and in Ghettoside she takes us on to the streets, inside the homes and into the community (which includes the notorious Watts neighbourhood) wracked by homicide. Here Leovy explores the tragic facts behind the disproportionately high murder rates of young black men.

Read by Rhashan Stone
Written by Jill Leovy
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05wpmkn)
Phone-In: The Rollercoaster of IVF

Every year thousands of women embark on IVF but only 25 per cent will result in a baby. The process is often a painful and emotionally draining rollercoaster to be on, even when there is a successful outcome, but how do you make the decision to stop if it's not working? And how do you come to terms with deciding to stop? Jane is in the Woman's Hour studio taking calls from listeners, and joined by Alison Murdoch, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Newcastle Fertility Centre.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wq18p)
Chronicles of Ait - Magpie

Episode 1

The fourth series of The Chronicles of Ait, set in a remote East Coast settlement. Linus Scott's niece Lollo becomes convinced that reality is being influenced by forces which no-one has the power to stop - and that the plunge towards emotional disaster is unavoidable.

Cast:
Linus Scott..........Greg Wise
Alice Pyper..........Amanda Drew
Lollo...................Gina Abolins
Jason..................Joe Claflin
Marlene..............Heather Craney
Trench/Stanley...Christopher James
Afiz/Lee..............Stewart Scudamore
Mac.....................Mihai Arsene

Writer: Michael Butt

Produced and directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4


MON 11:00 The Hotel Suite (b048jmy7)
Many years ago, Paul Farley was stopping in the Euston Ibis and woke to find a message from a friend asking him to come over to the Savoy for drinks the night before. He wondered whether it was the first time the two hotels had ever opened up a line of communication, and ever since has been fascinated by not just hotels but also the connections between them. In 'Hotel Suite' he heads off to spend the night in three very different hotels - one a former prison, one a luxury London landmark, and one a hard-working provincial inn. Paul reflects on the times he's spent in hotels over the years, and the reasons he - like many other writers - has found them to be creative hotspots, a place at one remove from ordinary life in which inspiration can often be found. Along the way he talks to staff, customers and other writers - and explores the rich history of the hotel as a backdrop for numerous films, books and poems across all sorts of genres, from the horror of 'The Shining' and 'Psycho' to the comedy of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' and the glamour of 'Top Hat' and 'Grand Hotel'.


MON 11:30 On the Rocks (b05wq1bl)
Series 2

Swimming

War is looming and Ben still isn't getting anywhere with Morwenna-May.

Christopher William Hill’s 1930s comedy set on St. Martin's, one of the Isles of Scilly.

Frank Gunwallow ..... Joseph Kloska
Tommy Trenear ..... Stuart Fox
Father Tregarthan ..... Peter Marinker
Ben Trenear ..... Alex Palmer
Len Oliver ..... Ed Gaughan
Morwenna-May ..... Alex Tregear
Pender ..... Christopher William Hill

Director ..... Mary Peate

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b05wndlk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b05wq1bn)
1 June 1915 - Juliet Cavendish

It's Councillor Graham's birthday, and Juliet has a surprise for him.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b05wq1bq)
Financial Abuse, Ikea Complaints, Damart Marketing

The CAB is drawing attention to financial abuse by partners in relationships.
Gillian Guy, Chief Executive of Citizens Advice explains why only 2 in 5 people they surveyed knew that domestic abuse can be financial.

Damart, the retailer famous for its collections of thermal underwear has been criticised for the way it markets to its mainly elderly customers. We hear from a You and Yours listener upset at the high-pressure marketing material sent to her mother.

You and Yours investigates listener complaints about IKEA's customer service. We hear from a man reduced to tears because he bought his wife a new kitchen at Christmas and it's still not been installed.

There are half a million listed buildings in England. Living in a property designated as 'of special architectural and historic interest', comes with responsibilities and restrictions that can mean getting planning permission is tricky. Now though, many owners are reporting that cuts to local authorities are making it more difficult.

We've all spotted them out of the corner of our eye. The shop or van with a witty or painful pun in its name. Pun-tastic brands include Hair Force One (hairdressers); The Codfather (chip shop); Florist Gump (florist). But other than making us groan, are they effective? Comedian Lee Nelson judges the best business pun names sent in by You and Yours listeners.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jo Meek and Maire Devine.


MON 12:57 Weather (b05wndlm)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b05wq1bs)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Shaun Ley.


MON 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05wq1fh)
Akbar: The World and the Bridge

Professor Sunil Khilnani, from the King's India Institute in London, tells the story of Akbar, the greatest ruler of the Mughal Empire. Akbar seems to have managed to combine a ruthless early career with a startling religious tolerance in later life. His empire covered a huge swathe of the Indian subcontinent, from the Bay of Bengal in the east to the Arabian Sea, and southwards to the Deccan. Akbar showed no mercy in his pursuit of power and secured his gains with an iron fist. The defenders of a fort in Rajasthan chose mass suicide rather than surrender and Akbar went on to slaughter, some say, more than 20,000 inhabitants. And yet he seems to have grasped the diversity of beliefs and of culture across the land he ruled and propagated his own syncretic system of religious faith known as Din-I-Lahi. His stance has made him a pet for modern secularists but Professor Khilnani says we should be cautious. "However complex his motivations might have been, his commitment to pluralism yielded clear-cut instrumental advantages: it allowed him to expand his empire and maintain dominion over so many subjects."

Producer: Mark Savage
Researcher: Manu Pillai
Listeners can catch up with the series and see the list of remarkable Indians featured on the Radio 4 website.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b05wny9g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b01p7ddf)
The Loving Ballad of Captain Bateman

The writer Joseph Wilde and musician Tim van Eyken's play is a modern love story based on a very old folk song in which a noble lord goes abroad, lands in prison and falls for the gaoler's daughter. In the play, Captain Bateman is badly wounded in Afghanistan. Sofia and her father give him shelter and succour in accordance with pashtunwali, the code of honour and hospitality. But when Bateman inconveniently refuses to die they face grave danger from the Taliban for harbouring him and from the British army for keeping him prisoner.

Directed by Julian May
Original music by Tim van Eyken.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b05wq1jc)
Series 5

University of Surrey

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from the University of Surrey, The 3rd Degree is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners while delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Politics, Business and Physics and the questions range from Black Friday and the Gang Of Four to Gandhi and George Michael - and the show boasts not one, but two jokes about Quantum Mechanics.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quick-fire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow and Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction.

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show also delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. He has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, including The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen, as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called The Genuine Particle.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b05yx3by)
Rick Stein - A Life Through Food (Part 2)

In this second part of a two-programme special, Rick Stein continues in conversation with Sheila Dillon talking about how he was discovered for TV by Keith Floyd's Director, David Pritchard thirty years ago. Despite being naturally introverted his style as an 'ordinary guy' made him popular with the public - sometimes going wrong, the odd injury and working up a real sweat. The partnership with David has continued to the present day taking them travelling and filming around the world. His new series 'From Venice to Istanbul' will air later this year.

Rick talks about why their dynamic works well but also how a shared love of wine can also cause a few spats while filming. We hear from the fishermen, colleagues and his ex-wife and business partner about why he's been such a success. He talks about who in particular has inspired him while on his travels and what he hopes to do next.

The programme was recorded earlier this month in front of a studio audience as part of the Bristol Food Connections Festival.

Presented by Sheila Dillon. Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


MON 16:00 Another Time, Another Place (b05wq2bw)
For ten years, Crosby Beach near Liverpool has had some strange visitors - 100 figures by Angel of the North creator Antony Gormley. Based on casts from moulds of the artist's body, the sculptures are made out of cast iron and stand staring at the horizon along three kilometres of shore, stretching almost one kilometre out to sea.

The installation, called Another Place, was never meant to be permanent and there was opposition to it - from conservationists, yachtsmen and those who considered the naked form to be pornographic. But the locals came to love the figure and fought to keep them and, nearly a decade on, the sculptures are still there.

Unusually for a piece of art, Another Place is a favourite on the travel site Trip Advisor, with over six hundred reviews rating it an average of five stars. This is an artwork that speaks to people. Visitors dress the figures in hats and scarves. People leave flowers beside them.

Sara Parker meets Antony Gormley in his Kings Cross studio and discovers how the project was conceived out of both an artistic vision and an attempt at economic regeneration. She also visits the Birmingham foundry where the figures were cast and, of course, Crosby beach itself where she meets those whose lives have been touched by this haunting artwork.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b05wxx6d)
Religion and Earthquakes

Kathmandu was a city of temples. Now it is a city of tents." That was the comment of one observer after the two recent earthquakes which struck Nepal. Thousands have died; many more made homeless in one of the world's poorest countries. Nepal is overwhelmingly Hindu; central to the Hindu belief is karma, the conviction that every action produces an equal reaction; that suffering in this life is a consequence of your actions in a previous life. How do such beliefs sit alongside an understanding of plate tectonics? After the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 which killed an estimated 60,000 people, many theologians abandoned the attempt to explain such disasters in terms of God. What might be the effect of this disaster on the religious beliefs of people in Nepal?
Joining Ernie to discuss how religious responses to earthquakes and other Natural Disasters are Edward Simpson, Professor of Social Anthropology at the School of Oriental and African Studies, author of "the Political biography on an earthquake" about the aftermath of earthquakes in Western India: Atreyee Sen, Lecturer in Contemporary Religion and Conflict at the University of Manchester; and The Rev David Chester, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Liverpool Hope University.


MON 17:00 PM (b05wxx6l)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wndlv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b05wxx6n)
Series 72

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons hosts the perennially popular panel game in which guests Paul Merton, Sheila Hancock, Mike McShane and Pam Ayres attempt to talk for 60 seconds with no hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

A BBC Comedy Production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b05wxx6s)
Christine talks to PC Burns about the burglary - she can't bear the thought of moving back into Woodbine Cottage. She must stay positive - the insurance will cover all the structural work and redecoration. Christine confides in Jill that she was already feeling so lonely at the cottage - the burglary is the final straw.
Eddie has started his new job so is no longer available to help at Brookfield. Meanwhile, Ed tries to shift some left over food form Eddie's party last night. Jill reminisces about haymaking - it used to be such a community event. If Joe's to be believed, half the village used to turn out for it. It also brings back a certain romantic memory for David and Ruth.
Over a beer at the Bull, Ed tells David the contracting work's going ok. It could get very quiet in winter, warns David. Next year, Ed might buy a forage harvester and go all out for local silaging work - the big money. Ruth calls David home with an emergency. Heather's in hospital having seemingly had a stroke. Ruth's desperate to travel up to Prudhoe to see her, but David manages to persuade Ruth to wait until first thing tomorrow. David will manage plans for Open Farm Sunday - Heather must be Ruth's priority now.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b05wxx6v)
Melissa McCarthy, Giorgio Moroder

John Wilson talks to Melissa McCarthy, star of Bridesmaids, the upcoming Ghostbusters, and new film Spy, about a backroom CIA analyst who goes undercover.

Giorgio Moroder, who pioneered disco music with hits including Donna Summer's Love to Love you Baby and I Feel Love, discusses his first album in 30 years, Deja Vu.

Natalie Haynes reviews Birthday, Sky's new drama by Joe Penhall, in which Stephen Mangan plays a pregnant man.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wq18p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Every Case Tells a Story (b05wxx6x)
Treason on Trial

Clive Anderson looks at a variety of famous or infamous cases and retells the story that the case brought into the public eye.

In this programme he explores the 1945 trial of William Joyce - Lord Haw-Haw - for High Treason.

Featuring Professor Colin Holmes, Geoffrey Robertson QC and Professor Jean Seaton.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b05wxx6z)
Ritual Sexual Abuse: The Anatomy of a Panic (Part 2)

David Aaronovitch of The Times traces the powerful intellectual influences behind what he sees as one of the most important cultural shifts of the past 40 years: from a society in which accusations of sexual abuse were wrongly ignored to one in which the falsely accused were crushed by a system where the mantra was "victims must be believed".

In the second of two programmes, Aaronovitch re-examines the role played by unproven psychoanalytic theories which, from the 1980s, spread from the world of therapists in Canada and the USA to social work, medicine and then to law enforcement in Britain.

The programme explores the parallels between the belief in ritual abuse with some of the claims being made today about VIP paedophile rings and group murder.

Some of the mistakes of the past - such as the false accusations made against parents in the Orkneys and Rochdale of satanic abuse - have been acknowledged. But, Aaronovitch argues, without a profound understanding of how and why such moral panics arise we are unlikely to avoid similar mistakes in the future. And when such mistakes recur we risk an over-reaction and a return to a culture of denial.

Producer: Hannah Barnes

Contributors:
Rosie Waterhouse - Investigative Journalist; Head of MA in investigative journalism at City University

Debbie Nathan - Investigative Journalist and Author

Tim Tate - Television Producer and Director

Sue Hampson - Former counsellor, and now Director of Safe to Say Trauma Informed Training and Consultancy

Dr Sarah Nelson - Research Associate at the University of Edinburgh

Professor Richard McNally - Professor of Psychology at Harvard University

Anonymous case study.


MON 21:00 The Business of Genetic Ancestry (b05vy4kb)
A DNA test can help you find your long lost parents and allow you to build your family tree, but when it comes to our deep ancestry, the story is a lot more uncertain, despite what commercial testing companies may claim.
Dr Adam Rutherford investigates what modern gene sequencing can (and can't) tell us with scientific certainty and separates the hype and hyperbole from the often complex picture presented by modern gene sequencing
At "the world's biggest family history show": Who Do You Think You Are? at the NEC in Birmingham, he talks to the super sleuths tracking down their ancestors and he hears the moving story of Helen and Julia, mother and daughter. Julia spent 20 years fulfilling a promise made when she was just ten years old... to find the identity of her mother's birth parents. Through DNA she found her mother's American GI father and discovered her four half siblings, despite the fact every single piece of information in the adoption file was wrong!
But when it comes to our deeper history, we have millions, even billions of ancestors, and from a mitochondrial DNA or Y chromosome DNA test, being told you're descended from the Romans, the Vikings, the Celts, or that you're a direct descendant of Charlemagne or Genghis Khan is both true, and meaningless. Some population geneticists have likened such story-telling to "genetic astrology".
Adam talks to Professor Mark Jobling from the University of Leicester, Professor Mark Thomas from University College London and to Debbie Kennett, author, blogger and member of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy, about the scientific lines they believe some genetic ancestry companies cross, when they provide people with stories about their ancient ancestors and their ancient genetic homelands.


Producer: Fiona Hill.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b05wp3l1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b05wndm1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b05wxx73)
Hammond suggests UK Govt will "sell hard" advantages of remaining in EU

Foreign Secretary says UK will "sell hard" if a decent deal is done


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05wxx76)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 1

"The event that changed all of their lives happened on a Saturday afternoon in June, just minutes after Michael Turner - thinking the Nelsons' house was empty - stepped through their back door."

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

Owen Sheers is a poet, author and playwright. His first novel, Resistance, was translated into ten languages and adapted into a film. The Dust Diaries, his Zimbabwean non-fiction narrative, won the Welsh Book of the Year. His awards for poetry and drama include the Somerset Maugham Award for Skirrid Hill, The Hay Festival Poetry Medal and the Welsh Book of the Year for Pink Mist. I Saw a Man is his second novel.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley
Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b05vy6f0)
Non-Verbal Communication

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright sob, hum and buzz as they consider whether the sound of a word has any connection with its meaning. With guest Professor Steven Connor.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05wxx78)
Susan Hulme and the BBC's parliamentary team report from Westminster. As MPs debate Britain's global role, Boris Johnson says Britain could have a glorious future outside the EU. There's an urgent statement from the Culture Secretary John Whittingdale on FIFA - with MPs calling for a rival alternative to the World Cup. There's a report on complaints in the House of Lords about Government plans for devolution. And maiden speeches from new MPs are coming thick and fast with some powerful as well as entertaining contributions.



TUESDAY 02 JUNE 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndp4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b05wp70d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndp8)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndpb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndpd)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndpg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05wxxk9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Jane Livesey CJ.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b05wxxkc)
Weevils, Learning to Shear, Welsh Livestock Theft

Livestock theft in Wales went up nearly 20% in 2014 according to new figures from insurers NFU Mutual.

Growers are concerned they may be losing the fight against the Pea and Bean Weevil, which has become resistant to the chemical used to control it. A bad weevil infestation can lead to a decrease in pea yields of up to 30%.

Plus, we learn the art of sheep shearing, on Exmoor.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ty530)
Lesser Black-backed Gull

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the lesser black-backed gull.

These smart gulls are charcoal grey on top and white beneath. Like herring gulls, their close relatives LBBs have moved into urban areas and now breed on flat roofs in the centre of cities. It seems almost any flat surface will do. In just three hours, one bird in Gloucester built a nest on a car roof and laid an egg in.


TUE 06:00 Today (b05wxzxs)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock (b05wxzxv)
TS Eliot was only 22 years old when he wrote The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock - yet many people read the speaker as a middle-aged man contemplating ageing and mortality. This is one of the extraordinary features of the poem that first drew Alan Yentob to it as a teenager. To mark the centenary of its publication, Alan meets others who have found meaning in the poem - from the psychologist Adam Phillips to the singer Emmy the Great. And we hear readings by Jeremy Irons, Ben Whishaw and the poet himself.

One of the poem's most conspicuous themes is indecision, and we hear about Eliot's youthful deliberations over the kind of life he should pursue. In the aftermath of its publication, Eliot referred to The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock as his 'swan's song' to poetry - an indication that he anticipated he might not continue to be a poet in his later life.

Some people find the poem speaks to the trials of adolescence; some detect in it a darkness and morbidity that is disturbing. Poets Simon Armitage and Kayo Chingonyi both read the poem at school and give us their interpretations. The programme also includes literary critics Professors Sarah Churchwell and Hannah Sullivan.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is perhaps most memorable for its imagery. Some of its most quotable lines are those which paint pictures in the mind of 'sawdust restaurants', 'yellow smoke', 'coffee spoons' and 'white flannel trousers'. With this in mind, the artist Mat Collishaw has been commissioned to make a short film in response to the poem. You can hear him interviewed about it in the programme and his film will be available on BBC Arts Online from the date of the broadcast.

Produced by Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b05wxzxx)
Ghettoside

Grief

Rhashan Stone reads Jill Leovy's account into the high rates of murder among LA's young black men. Bryant Tennelle's parents are grief stricken following his murder. His father, an LA police detective, waits patiently for a break through as the search for his son's killers begins.

Written by Jill Leovy
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05wxzxz)
Best-selling author Jodi Picoult, Why we love gossip

Best-selling author Jodi Picoult with her daughter Samantha on the new book they've written together. Parenting and different approaches - we talk to the authors of a book called Kids Don't Come with a Manual. Victoria Lambert talks about gender discrimination and primogeniture. Is God a he or a she? Could the language in services be more inclusive? Gossip - why we love it and the differences social media has made.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wy1bn)
Chronicles of Ait - Magpie

Episode 2

When Afiz looks to do a deal with Trench for a fake passport, her former affair with Linus comes to light, reinforcing Lollo's fears of an unavoidable tragedy.

Cast:
Linus Scott..........Greg Wise
Alice Pyper..........Amanda Drew
Lollo...................Gina Abolins
Jason..................Joe Claflin
Marlene..............Heather Craney
Trench/Stanley...Christopher James
Afiz.....................Stewart Scudamore
Mac.....................Mihai Arsene

Writer: Michael Butt

Produced and directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b05w99gj)
Monkeys and Apes

Happy Jerry was a mandrill who found his way to London on a slave ship and ended up smoking a pipe and having dinner with the king. It is a curious tale of humanity in search of itself.

Peering into the eyes of a primate we see a reflection of ourselves and that has been an enduring fascination through time. It was thought in the 18th Century that the only reason chimps didn't talk in front of people was because they were afraid we would enslave them.

From King Kong to the PG Tea chimps, we have exploited their similarity to ourselves to create fear and humour. They are so similar yet so different, so close to our behaviour yet they shock and appal us with their distinctly animal like traits.

In Victorian times gorillas were often presented in museums in a ferocious pose charging towards the observer, a pose more reflecting the fact it was being shot at and defending itself rather than a true likeness of the reality of ape life. Today however they are seen as dignified vegetarians of the forest, huge yet gentle, demanding our hushed respect.

Documentaries on primates are always amongst the most popular as we pick apart their lives for yet ever more detailed clues about how we are alike yet still worlds apart.


TUE 11:30 In Search of the Black Mozart (b05wy63w)
Episode 2

Chi-chi Nwanoku has spent her career travelling and performing in concert halls the world over as the principal double bassist of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. More recently, she's been on a personal journey seeking out the lives and careers of black classical musicians from the eighteenth century who like her, played and composed music at the highest levels. In some cases, slivers of their lives are on record but you have to be quite determined to find out.

Chi-chi puts the record straight and with the help of some of the finest musical researchers around, she brings to the fore the music and lives of musicians like violinist/composer Joseph Emidy, virtuoso violinist George Bridgetower and composer Joseph Bologne, aka Chevalier de St-George who not only met Mozart in his lifetime, but who was known by all those who heard his music as the 'Black Mozart'.

In today's programme she explores the remarkable life of Chevalier de Saint-Georges, the son of a slave who ended up being one of the finest violinists, composers and swordsman in Europe. And he also led the first all black regiment during the French Revolution against the King, whilst teaching music to Marie Antoinette.

Chi-chi also hears about the life of the child prodigy violinist George Bridgetower who delighted all who heard him included the Prince of Wales. He went on to play with Beethoven and inspire him to write one of the most difficult violin sonatas of the period.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b05wndpr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b05wy63y)
2 June 1915 - Thornton Tulliver

A day at the flapping, and Thornton has his eye on another prize in Folkestone.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b05wy640)
Call You and Yours: The Cost of Childcare

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b05wndpw)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b05wy642)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Shaun Ley.


TUE 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05wy644)
Malik Ambar: The Dark Fated One

Prof. Sunil Khilnani profiles the life of Malik Ambar, an Ethiopian slave who rose to become a power-broker and king maker.

Malik Ambar's story challenges some of our familiar perceptions of slavery. He was part of a tradition of military slavery which created elite warriors, educated and nurtured by their masters and treated almost like sons. Once freed, his power base grew. He took on the mighty Mughal Empire of the north using sophisticated guerrilla tactics and an ability to harass his enemy under cover of darkness.

Emperor Jahangir became obsessed with the Ethiopian, calling him "the ill-starred Ambar" and "Ambar of dark fate". A painting commissioned by Jahangir shows the Ethiopian's severed head on a spear and the Emperor firing arrows into it. However, as Prof. Khilnani reveals, all is not what it seems in that image.

Sunil Khilnani contrasts the rise to power of a black African in 16th century India with contemporary Indian attitudes towards people of African descent - a racism even shared by Mahatma Gandhi during his South African years.

Producer: Jeremy Grange.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b05wxx6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b05qjs7r)
Have You Seen This Child?

As Pat catches up with an old friend in the park, it suddenly dawns on her that her four year old grandchild is no longer in the playground.

Clare Dwyer Hogg has emerged as one of Ireland's most exciting new playwrights. Her first play Farewell, directed and starring Stephen Rea, premiered in December 2012 and launched the reforming of Field Day Theatre Company. It was also broadcast on R3 in March 2013. As well as her theatre work, Clare is an award-winning journalist having received the Premio Luchetta award for Human Rights journalism. Clare grew up in Northern Ireland, studied at Cambridge and lives in London.

Writer ..... Clare Dwyer Hogg
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b05wn7sc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Shared Experience (b05wy646)
Series 3

After an Accident

Life is going fantastically well and the world is full of promise, and then it takes a dramatically different turn one day when an accident changes things for ever. This happened to the three guests in this week's programme - David broke his neck diving into a shallow ocean pool in Australia, Sian was hit by a taxi on holiday and Kelly suffered severe burns and injuries to her leg following a car crash. Their injuries were life changing. They share their experiences of dealing with the after effects with each other and host Fi Glover

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b05wy648)
Migrants and Maritime Law

Joshua Rozenberg returns with a new series of BBC Radio 4's legal magazine programme.

What does the law say about commercial ship captains' duty to help those they find in distress at sea? Captain Andy Lewington explains how he, and his 18 man crew, took aboad more than 400 migrants in the seas north of Tripoli earlier this year. And Stephen Fietta a lawyer at Volterra Fietta, explains the legal position.

How easy is it to get rid of your MP? A petition has been filed which seeks to overturn the election of Alistair Carmichael MP. Professor Bob Watt explains what the petitioners would have to prove in order to succeed.

As Michael Gove, the new justice secretary, begins work on the new British Bill of Rights that the Conservatives promised in their election manifesto, we have a guide to this fiendishly complex area of law which even a seven-year-old could understand.

And government lawyers will soon be in Strasbourg to defend the United Kingdom against a claim that it failed to respect the most fundamental right of all - the right to life. The claim has been brought on behalf of Jean Charles de Menezes, who was shot dead by police officers at a London Underground station almost 10 years ago. Solicitor Harriet Wistrich, representing the Menezes family, explains their case.

Producer: Hannah Barnes
Editor: Richard Knight.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b05vy6f2)
Series 36

Val McDermid on PD James

Val McDermid thinks crime writing is most definitely a suitable job for a woman. She believes women are good at observing the minutiae of life and incorporating them into clue development. Despite writing a book entitled 'An Unsuitable Job For A Woman', PD James evidently thought the same. Val McDermid discusses her life with the help of James' friend, the literary critic Peter Kemp.

PD James died in November 2014 aged 94.

Producer: Maggie Ayre

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 17:00 PM (b05wy64d)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wndq0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b05wy64j)
Series 6

Shrewsbury

"Floreat Salopia - May Shrewsbury Flourish"

Mark visits the Shropshire Town of Shrewsbury, birthplace of Charles Darwin and home to the oldest building in the world to house a McDonalds.

Mark finds Shrewsbury to be a beautiful place with an identity crisis. Once in Wales, but now in England, Shrewsbury is a peaceful town with a bloody history. As one local points out, "We killed Owain Glyndwr outside WH Smith".

An Idyllic setting in a loop of the river Severn, with its beautiful public gardens designed by Percy Thrower, patrolled daily by a Croatian nightclub bouncer.

Voted the politest town in Britain, the locals have very little to complain about. Apart from the disagreements over the buildings... and the statues... and the one-way system... and most of all, how to pronounce the name of the place.

Mark Steel's sixth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Sterling
Producer ... Carl Cooper
A BBC Radio Comedy Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015. .


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b05wy64l)
Ruth has gone up to Prudhoe to be with Heather. Meanwhile, Tom helps David sort the lambs for the abattoir. Pip has an exam today, and a second job interview tomorrow to prepare for.
Ahead of Open Farm Sunday, Charlie butters Susan up, mentioning her local knowledge. He'd like Susan to make a display board for Berrow Farm , all about the values of a community shop.
Toby plays it cool with Pip, teasing her that he may not make the pub quiz tonight. But then he shows up and they flirt a bit. Pip enjoys learning about Toby's farming plans - they can talk more on Friday.
Jolene worries what David will think about she and Kenton doing the bar for Berrow Farm on Open Farm Sunday. Kenton couldn't give a flying fig.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b05wy64n)
Hanif Kureishi, Agnes Martin Exhibition, Tristan and Isolde at 150, Queen and Country

Playwright, screenwriter, novelist and film-maker Hanif Kureishi explains his rediscovery of the essay form as he discusses his new book of short stories and essays, Love and Hate. The collection includes the account of how he was cheated out of his life savings by his financial advisor.

A new exhibition at Tate Modern traces the career of the minimalist artist Agnes Martin, best known for her understated abstract paintings. Charlotte Mullins reviews.

Wagner's opera Tristan and Isolde changed the course of music history, with its explosion of harmony and sensuality. To mark the 150th anniversary of its premiere, composer Julian Anderson and Wagner expert John Deathridge reflect on the impact of this operatic classic.

Queen and Country is the sequel to writer and director John Boorman's 1987 classic Hope and Glory, set in WW2. The film picks up the story nearly a decade later during the Korean War. Jason Solomons reviews.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Ellie Bury.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wy1bn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b05wy64q)
Abandoned to their Fate

Next month the National Audit Office is due to report on the outcomes for young people leaving care. There are claims that, under financial pressure, local authorities are pushing too many teenagers into independent living before they're ready. File on 4 investigates new figures that suggest many young care leavers are failing to cope - with large numbers ending up in custody, homeless, sexually exploited or pregnant. Social services chiefs say the welfare of care-leavers must be a key priority for the new government. But who holds them to account when they fail those they are meant to have looked after? And, with more cuts on the way, can the system cope? Fran Abrams reveals how hands-off caring can have tragic consequences.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b05wy6wg)
Discrimination; Blind Veterans UK

College disability officer Mike Lambert describes his personal struggle against discrimination in the workplace and his recent employment tribunal victory.
And as Blind Veterans UK prepares to mark its centenary with a party at Buckingham Palace, British and American former soldiers share stories of being blinded in battle, learning to walk on prosthetic legs while coping with sudden sight loss and some innovative rehabilitation techniques.


TUE 21:00 The Search for the Perfect Office (b036wfzv)
More and more of us work in open plan offices, which can be noisy and lead to strife between those staff who are tidy and their neighbours who like to leave papers and dirty plates on their desks and between those who are quiet and their colleagues who talk loudly on the phone.

Claudia Hammond explores what the perfect office would look like if the latest psychological research was applied. She discovers that it is possible to work in open plan spaces and be able to concentrate, be creative and communicate well with colleagues. And she asks why many architects aren't aware of the research of psychologists or ignore it.


TUE 21:30 The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock (b05wxzxv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b05wndq3)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b05wy6wk)
Fifa president Sepp Blatter announces his resignation.

Reaction from FA chairman Greg Dyke and sports minister Tracy Crouch.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05wy6wm)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 2

Michael and Caroline start a new life together in Wales, but Caroline feels the pull of her old foreign reporting life.

'The event that changed all of their lives happened on a Saturday afternoon in June, just minutes after Michael Turner - thinking the Nelsons' house was empty - stepped through their back door.'

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 23:00 The John Moloney Show (b05wy6wp)
Series 1

The Feckless Youth

John meets a disengaged charity worker, before challenging some relationship problems.

John Moloney has been headlining comedy clubs all over the world. We've captured him at his very best performing in front of an appreciative audience at The Stand Comedy Club in Edinburgh

Written and performed by John Moloney.

Featuring Richard Melvin and Fred MacAulay.

Producer: Alan Lorraine

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2015.


TUE 23:15 Richard Marsh (b01rlswh)
Love and Sweets

Jess

Winner of Best Scripted Comedy in the BBC Audio Awards 2014, poet and playwright Richard Marsh fuses poetry and prose to tell a heart-breaking and witty tale of losing love, falling for a seductive-looking lady called Sorrow, and learning to put himself back together.

Richard's marriage has fallen apart, and he's a broken man locked in a flat full of memories, rattling around like sweets in a bowl. Siobhan's moved out; the flat, half-full, is the emptiest thing. On the plus side, his friends cook him a lot of meals - but there's only so much consolation chicken a man can eat.

When moping at the pub, Richard meets the seductive Sorrow, who tries to stop him recovering or moving on with his life. Will she succeed, or will Richard learn to love again?

Contains some explicit language.

Written and performed by Richard Marsh.
Producer: Ben Worsfield
A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05wy6wr)
Sean Curran reports on tributes to Charles Kennedy who's died. MPs debate the government's health reforms. There's a host of maiden speeches. And peers sound the alarm over the new 'right-to-buy' scheme.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 03 JUNE 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndrn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b05wxzxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndrq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndrs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndrv)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndrx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05wy74t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Jane Livesey CJ.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b05wy74w)
Coffee Shop Chain Stops Using Milk From Badger Cull Zone, Mangold Fly Infestations, British Wool Scouring

Coffee shop chain, Caffe Nero has said that it will no longer use milk from the badger cull areas, following a campaign run by the pressure group Stop the Cull. Farming Today reports on the reaction.
Farmers on the east coast are struggling with infestations of the mangold fly on their sugarbeet crops, Anna Hill visits the affected area.
Some of our British wool is sent all the way to China to be washed, but 100 tonnes a week are still scoured in West Yorkshire. We visit the plant.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tycf8)
Black-browed Albatross

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the black-browed albatross.

Although they're residents of the Antarctic seas , black-browed albatrosses have turned up in the UK many times. For a while, Albert-or Albert Ross as he was christened by birdwatchers- was one of the most well-known birds in the British Isles. He was first spotted in the gannet colony on Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth in 1967. Sadly he failed to find a mate among the masses of gannets there.


WED 06:00 Today (b05wyhnd)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b05wyhng)
Graham Fellows, Matthew Oates, William McLellan, Kate Waters

Libby Purves meets Graham Fellows and his alter ego John Shuttleworth; poet and naturalist Matthew Oates; artist and writer William McLellan and fight director Kate Waters.

Graham Fellows is an actor and musician who is best known for creating the character John Shuttleworth. John is a fictional singer and songwriter from Sheffield whose back catalogue includes the track Pigeons in Flight. Graham is also the man behind Jilted John who had an eponymous hit in 1978. John Shuttleworth hosts A Knight At the Palladium in aid of multiple sclerosis charities. Guests include Chas and Dave and Sooty and Sweep. A Knight At the Palladium is at the London Palladium.

Matthew Oates is a naturalist, writer and poet who has been obsessed by Britain's butterflies since childhood. He has studied many butterflies but no butterfly has entranced him so much as the elusive purple emperor. In his book, In Pursuit of Butterflies, Matthew recaps on a lifetime of butterfly observation with the help of the detailed diaries he has kept since 1971. In Pursuit of Butterflies - A Fifty-Year Affair is published by Bloomsbury Publishing.

William McLellan is an artist, writer and musician. His memoir How I got into Art School (and out of prison) tells the story of his imprisonment in the notorious Modelo jail in Barcelona in 1972. During his incarceration he contemplated the activities that led him to prison and his difficult childhood. It is only when he began to sketch in prison that he confronted his troubled past. How I Got Into Art School (and out of prison) is published by Old Street Publishing.

Kate Waters - also known as Kombat Kate - is a fight director. She directed the fight choreography for Peter Pan at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre and previously worked on the Old Vic's revival of Michael Frayn's farce Noises Off and the National Theatre's One Man, Two Guvnors. She is also a regular fight director for Coronation Street. Peter Pan is at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre, London.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b05wyhnj)
Ghettoside

A Breakthrough

Rhashan Stone reads Jill Leovy's account into the high rates of murder among LA's young black men. The ferociously driven detective John Skaggs takes on the investigation into the murder of Bryant Tennelle, the son of a fellow detective. Finally, there is a major break through as efforts to track down the killers continues.

Written by Jill Leovy
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05wyhnl)
Why are older women in Denmark the happiest in Europe?

Danish women top the polls for being the happiest in Europe. What's their secret? What impact is the Everyday Victim Blaming campaign having on the portrayal of domestic and sexual violence and abuse in the Media. A celebration of Pippi Longstocking at 70. Plus the first Women's Equality Select Committee what difference could it make.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b05wyhnn)
Chronicles of Ait - Magpie

Episode 3

Linus remains bitter over what he sees as Alice's betrayal of their affair, unaware of the developments in her relationship with Afiz.

Cast:
Linus Scott..........Greg Wise
Alice Pyper..........Amanda Drew
Lollo...................Gina Abolins
Jason..................Joe Claflin
Marlene..............Heather Craney
Trench/Stanley...Christopher James
Afiz.....................Stewart Scudamore
Mac.....................Mihai Arsene

Writer: Michael Butt

Produced and directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:56 The Listening Project (b05wyhnq)
Leo and Mary - A Model Patient

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a brother and sister recalling the third degree burns he suffered in his teens and how Airfix kits helped him to recover. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Shadow of the Sun King (b05wyhns)
Episode 1

As we approach the 300th anniversary of the death of Louis XIV, Professor Julian Swann assesses the Sun King's life and achievements - and also examines his key role in unwittingly spurring Britain to become a global super-power.

In the first of two programmes, Swann travels to Paris to visit many of the sites that can claim to be haunted by Louis XIV's legacy - from Versailles and the Louvre to the Palais Royal and Les Invalides.

Louis has often been portrayed as a kind of totalitarian dictator within France and a triumphant warlord abroad. Swann argues that he was neither. As King, he was dependent on negotiating power-sharing with France's nobles - the splendour of Versailles was a political honey-trap, designed to entice the nobility rather than intimidate them. The glorious, glamorous picture we have of Louis was largely the result of frighteningly modern PR on the part of his right-hand man, Jean-Baptiste Colbert.

Abroad, the Sun King's obsessive military adventurism all but bankrupted the country, leaving Louis deeply regretful on his deathbed. His persecution of France's Huguenot Protestants was an appalling own goal, alienating other European powers and seriously harming the French economy.

However, Louis remains one of the most significant monarchs in European history, not least as he embedded a sense of France's greatness into the national consciousness.

It's intriguing to reflect then that the Sun King's birth was the result of a very rare liaison between his parents, that France was in utter chaos when he was a child - and that his coronation was a fiasco.

Produced by Andrew Green
A Singing Wren production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b05wyhnv)
Series 10

Joan of the Junction

Week four of Ed Reardon's 'No Fixed Abode' status finds him tramping along the canal trying to find someone to take him, and Elgar, in. When he fortunes upon the somewhat colourful Joan he hits the jackpot in more ways than one as not only does he gain a rather comfortable cabin bed, but as the pair chat about Joan's rather picaresque life over a can of cider, Ed discovers she has lived her life in the manner for a perfect Sunday night TV drama. Cue a call to his agent, Ping.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas.
Produced by Dawn Ellis.
Ed Reardon's Week is a BBC Radio Comedy production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b05wnds2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b05wyhnx)
3 June 1915 - Florrie Wilson

A succession of visitors to the Wilson household can't tempt Florrie out of doors.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b05wyhnz)
Charity Fundraising, Buying Breast Milk Online, Pet Treats

Some of the most well known UK charity brands have told You & Yours they buy files containing thousands of names and addresses to help with their charity appeals. We look into the companies that compile and manage the files, and how they know who is most likely to donate.

You can buy anything online these days - including breast milk. Winifred Robinson hears from one woman who can make £50 from half a pint of breast milk. Public health experts are saying the industry needs more regulation.

Plus when did you last check the calories on your pets treats? Research suggests some leading brands of chews and biscuits can be more fattening than human hot dogs.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


WED 12:57 Weather (b05wnds6)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b05wyhp1)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05wyhp3)
Dara Shikoh: The Meeting Place of the Two Oceans

Prof. Sunil Khilnani profiles one of the most beguiling intellectual figures of his age, a man whose story resonates today as one of India's great 'what if' moments. Dara Shikoh was the scholar and heir to the Mughal throne whose war against his brother Aurangzeb ended in humiliation, the prince condemned to death and paraded through the streets of Delhi on a miserable, worn-out elephant.

Dara was the eldest - and favourite - son of Emperor Shah Jahan. He became known in the Mughal court as Baba Dara - a Mughal Daddy's Boy - and spent his princely allowance pursuing his passion for religious ideas and translating scriptures. In doing so he opened a door to Indian religion and philosophy for later Western scholars.

Dara believed that all religions converged to a single monotheistic truth, like rivers meeting together in the ocean. This was enough for his brother to label him an apostate and to wage a war of succession for the Mughal throne. Sunil Khilnani is in Delhi where, after his capture, Dara Shikoh's public humiliation and execution were played out. He considers how different the course of Indian history might have been if Dara had been victorious and Aurangzeb had been the one paraded through the city dressed in rags.

Producer: Jeremy Grange.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b05wy64l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01rgj1b)
The Manhattan Bee Testimonials

For as long as anyone can remember, there have been rumours of a man living somewhere on the island of Manhattan and keeping 250,000 bees in his apartment. Max Callaghan is obsessed with finding him and has spent 15 years building up an audio library of sometimes contradictory accounts - The Manhattan Bee Testimonials.

When Daisy Lucas overcomes a severe case of meningitis thanks to a pot of honey left anonymously by her hospital bed, she tries to find the donor, her father, who she believes to be the Manhattan Bee Man.

Featuring the real voices of New Yorkers describing their version of the story, alongside original drama written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz.

Written by Sebastian Backiewicz
Sound design: Eloise Whitmore
Producer and Director: Joby Waldman
Executive Producer: Polly Thomas

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b05wyhp6)
Money Box Live: Mortgages

With fixed rate mortgages hovering just above 1% and others offering cash back or fee free deals it could be a great time to get a mortgage, but how do you choose between them and what's the true cost?

We'll have three mortgage advisors waiting to answer your questions on Money Box Live, so why not call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

What type of mortgage should you consider?

How much can you borrow and what will you have to tell your lender?

Does a fix, a variable or an offset mortgage make sense?

Or perhaps you need help from a family member?

Whatever your question, whether you're a first time buyer, moving house or trying to remortgage you can talk to the team on Wednesday.

Joining presenter Sarah Pennells to tackle your mortgage questions will be:

Simon Collins, Mortgage Technical Team, John Charcol.
David Hollingworth, Associate Director, London & Country Mortgages.
Tracey Peden, Mortgage Adviser, Aspire 2011.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 The Search for the Perfect Office (b036wfzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b05wyhp8)
Anthropology - The Future of the A-level; Crime and Blame

Anthropology: the future of the A level. Laurie Taylor talks to Joy Hendry, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at Oxford Brookes University, about the proposed cancellation of this course. At a time of global conflict, is it the right time to axe a discipline which allows insight into cultures and ideas very different from our own?

Also, 'blame' in the criminal justice system. Tim Hillier, Associate Head of Leicester de Montfort Law School, De Montfort University, Leicester, explores the role and parameters of culpability within the legal system. He's joined by Lord Ken Macdonald QC and former Director of Public Prosecutions.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b05wyhpb)
Charlie Hebdo editor-in-chief, Britain's Hardest Worker, Disabled people in TV

Charlie Hebdo, the satirical French magazine, was attacked in January over its cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Two gunmen stormed its offices shooting dead several people including the magazine's editor Stephane Charbonnier and four of its cartoonists. Witnesses said they shouted "Allahu Akbar" and "we have avenged the prophet". The attack followed a number of serious threats and a 2011 firebombing for Charlie Hebdo's satire on Islam. Gérard Biard has worked at the magazines since 1992, and has been editor in chief for the past 10 years. Steve talks to him about how the magazine can continue to publish in the same way, and whether free speech can exist alongside the threat of extremism.

A petition calling on the BBC to abandon its plans for a series, 'Britain's Hardest Worker' which will pitch unemployed and low paid people against each other for a cash prize, now has over 25000 signatures. It's been dubbed by critics as 'poverty porn' and a 'Hunger Games style game show'. Steve Hewlett talks to Labour MP Louise Haigh who fears the programme will demonise working class people, and to executive producer Tim Carter from Twenty Twenty.

A workforce survey by Creative Skillset, the creative industry skills body, has found that just five percent of the TV workforce considers themselves to have a disability, compared to eleven percent of the wider UK working population. It's calling on broadcasters and indies to 'urgently' improve the number. Amongst its other findings, it revealed a marked rise in the number of people doing unpaid work in the creative industries. Steve talks to Dr Kion Ahadi, Head of Research at Creative Skillset about the findings and what needs to be done.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b05wyhxk)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wndsj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Clare in the Community (b03ts6jg)
Series 9

Come Dine With Me

Clare has finally managed to find some time for romance.

Meanwhile Brian discovers that a cheap flat comes with some unusual conditions and Nali has an eventful first day in her new job.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Clare continually struggles to control both her professional and private life

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden.

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Nali ...... Nina Conti
Leonard ...... Richard Lumsden
Howard ...... Richard Lumsden
Simon ...... Andrew Wincott
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Joan ...... Sarah Thom
Miss Braithwaite ...... Carolyn Pickles
Mrs Scudimore ...... Carolyn Pickles

Producer: Alexandra Smith.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b05wykhn)
Pip has her second job interview for the technical manager role today, sent on her way with lots of encouragement from David and Jill. Jill notices how tired David looks, but he's not keen to get a relief milker in. Ruth's still away, so David struggles on alone with his list of jobs to do before Open Farm Sunday. David has left it too late to borrow Adam's combine - Adam's sorry but he's promised it to Berrow Farm. Adam doesn't seem too happy that Rob will probably be selected for the next cricket match - he's not Adam's favourite person, but Adam admits he's a good player. David reports that Heather's frail, so Ruth may not be home for a bit.

Eddie plays the eccentric entrepreneur in front of a businessman, Vince, he meets at the Bull. Vince seems impressed that Eddie lives full time in a hotel. Sensing opportunity, Eddie grabs his stash of beer and party food, offering to undercut the Bull and feed the Vince's group of delegates.
Pip's delighted to be offered the job at Agri Webster. David's really pleased for her, but privately to Jill he admits he'll miss Pip terribly.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b05wykhq)
The winner of the 2015 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction joins Samira live from the awards ceremony.

In Liverpool The Cunard Building becomes a liner itself in a new play based on a recently discovered short story by George Garrett. He was a working class writer - he guided George Orwell around Liverpool when he was researching 'The Road to Wigan Pier' - who was almost forgotten but whose reputation is growing again. 'The Maurie' is set in the opulence of the Mauretania, and the somewhat less luxurious conditions below decks, where Garrett slaved as a stoker. Joe Riley reviews 'The Maurie'.

Dark comedy 'Listen Up Philip' stars Jason Schwartzman as a narcissistic young writer who flies into furious rages against his girlfriend, friends and publishers as he struggles to write his next book. He is offered a country retreat by his literary hero Ike Zimmerman, played by Jonathan Pryce, but it's not the restful stay that Philp hopes for. Catherine Bray reviews.

Samira also meets the author Jonathan Ames, best known for his revealing and deeply personal essays, has written a novel based on Jeeves and Wooster. Fusing Wodehouse's set up with Woody Allen's New York humour, Wake Up, Sir! follows the trials of young writer Alan Blair, who turns to his manservant Jeeves when he meets with disasters.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wyhnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 What's Left? (b05xxqb2)
Andrew Rawnsley chairs a debate on the future of the Labour Party, following its devastating defeat at the General Election. Despite 5 years of austerity and UKIP eating into the Tory vote, Labour lost more than twenty seats and were two million votes behind the Conservatives. Majorities were overturned across the country: MPs with strong local followings lost their seats. Most significantly, the party was virtually routed in Scotland in perhaps the most significant electoral change in Britain for a generation. Now Labour is looking for a new leader, but there is a wider debate to be had. Where does it - and the wider centre-left - go from here? Do they make a clear pitch for the disaffected voices of their traditional working class supporters? Do they return to Blairism, triangulating between left and right? How do they confront the nationalist surge in Scotland? And how do they deal with the legacy of their own past? Those taking part: Jon Cruddas MP, Hilary Wainwright, Tristram Hunt MP, Torcuil Crichton and Professor Tim Bale.
Producer: Simon Coates.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b05wykhs)
Tim Meek

In the first of four editions from this year's Hay Festival, Tim Meek explains why he and his family have left their old life behind them for a year of adventure on the road.

"We believe that the real measure of modern success is nothing to do with your bank balance or the size of your house, but instead, the amount of free time you have at your disposal."

Producer: Lucy Proctor.


WED 21:00 The Mother of the Sea (b04g7rd5)
Every year in Uto, a remote town at the Southern tip of Japan, a festival is held to celebrate a woman known locally as the Mother of the Sea.

She's not a figure from folklore, or an ancient goddess, but a British scientist, who never even visited Japan.

She was Kathleen Drew, and her work studying the lifecycle of edible seaweed on the North Wales coastline in the 1940s revolutionised the Japanese production of nori – that dried edible seaweed you find wrapped around sushi in high-end restaurants and convenience stores around the world.

Her discovery, picked up by chance 6000 miles away from her lab in Manchester, enabled nori farmers in Japan to turn this nutrient rich food stuff from a gambler's harvest to a reliable large scale crop.

Now they gather each year on 14th April at the Drew Monument, inscribed with Kathleen's image, to give thanks to her with Shinto prayers, offerings and specially composed songs. Looking out over the nori fields of the Ariake sea they ask Kathleen, who died not long after publishing her ground breaking study, to watch over them and increase their yields.

Quentin Cooper has been fascinated by Kathleen's remarkable story since he heard about it by chance several years ago. He travels to Uto to celebrate the Drew Festival with the fishermen there and to hear why a scientist all but forgotten in her home country means so much to them.

Producer: Hannah Marshall

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in September 2014.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b05wyhng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b05wykhv)
One of the world's best known athletics coaches is at the centre of doping allegations

We'll hear details of a major BBC investigation.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05wykhx)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 3

Michael receives devastating news from Caroline's colleague.

"The event that changed all of their lives happened on a Saturday afternoon in June, just minutes after Michael Turner - thinking the Nelsons' house was empty - stepped through their back door."

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


WED 23:00 John Kearns (b05wykhz)
Episode 3 - Lunch Break

John and his work colleagues test each other's patience at the Dinosaur Museum.

The third of four 14-minute vignettes in a series from John Kearns, the winner of the main prize at the 2014 Edinburgh Comedy Festival, as well as the Best Newcomer Award in 2013.

Producer: Arnab Chanda

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b05wykj1)
Series 3

Episode 3

Ian Leslie presents the show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of the world's best known writers.

In this episode, we gain some understanding of the force that was to be reckoned with in the case of William Blake, and how his spiritual leanings came to bear on his copy for public signs in London parks.

We also hear the beginnings of Will Self's acerbic style in his submission as a child, re-working a classic fairy tale for an adolescent magazine.

There's also the much loved poet Pam Ayres and her sadly unused submission for a reworking of the 3 minute warning in the event of a nuclear bomb.

Finally, we hear another of the questionable offerings from Henrik Ibsen to the joke department of a Christmas cracker manufacturer.

Producer: Claire Broughton

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2015.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05wykj3)
David Cameron faces his first Prime Minister's Questions of the new Parliament.. and warm tributes are paid to the former Liberal Democrat leader, Charles Kennedy.



THURSDAY 04 JUNE 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndtq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b05wyhnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndts)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndtv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndtx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndtz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05wylp0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Jane Livesey CJ.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b05wylp2)
Tackling sheep rustling; Bird flu in America

Lancashire police are working with the NFU to train its officers to be able to spot and tackle sheep rustlers. Livestock theft costs around two million pounds a year.
Nearly 45 million birds have now been affected by a serious bird flu outbreak in America. The number of birds - and US states - affected has doubled in a month. There are no reports of the infection being passed to humans.
Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Sally Challoner.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcnt)
Red-throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the red-throated diver. The eerie wails of a red-throated diver were supposed to foretell rain. In Shetland the red-throated diver is called the "rain goose" but anyone who knows the island knows that rain is never far away. Like all divers, red-throats are handsome birds with sharp bills, perfect for catching fish. In summer they have a rusty throat patch and zebra-stripes on the back of their neck but in winter they're mainly pearly grey and white.


THU 06:00 Today (b05wyq5k)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b05wyq5m)
Prester John

In the Middle Ages, Prester John was seen as the great hope for Crusaders struggling to hold on to, then regain, Jerusalem. He was thought to rule a lost Christian kingdom somewhere in the East and was ready to attack Muslim opponents with his enormous armies. There was apparent proof of Prester John's existence, in letters purportedly from him and in stories from travelers who claimed they had met, if not him, then people who had news of him. Most pointed to a home in the earthly paradise in the Indies, outside Eden, with fantastical animals and unimaginable riches. Later, Portuguese explorers thought they had found him in Ethiopia, despite the mystified denials of people there. Melvyn Bragg asks why the legend was so strongly believed for so long, and what facts helped sustain the myths.

With

Marianne O'Doherty
Associate Professor in English at the University of Southampton

Martin Palmer
Director of the International Consultancy on Religion, Education, and Culture

And

Amanda Power
Senior Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Sheffield.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b05wyq5p)
Ghettoside

A Witness

Rhashan Stone reads Jill Leovy's account into the high rates of murder among LA's young black men. Today, detective John Skaggs's dogged determination to track down Bryant Tennelle's killers starts to pay off.

Written by Jill Leovy
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05wyq5r)
Marilyn Monroe, Revenge Porn, Book of Breasts

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world. Presented by Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wyq5t)
Chronicles of Ait - Magpie

Episode 4

While Lollo is convinced that events are moving inexorably towards a tragic conclusion, Linus desperately seeks to stave off the inevitable.

Cast:
Linus Scott..........Greg Wise
Alice Pyper..........Amanda Drew
Lollo...................Gina Abolins
Jason..................Joe Claflin
Marlene..............Heather Craney
Trench/Stanley...Christopher James
Afiz.....................Stewart Scudamore
Mac.....................Mihai Arsene

Writer: Michael Butt

Produced and directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b05wyq5w)
Context and colour. In today's edition: Turkey at the crossroads ahead of Sunday's election; the Spanish city where there's only one Christian family left in a neighbourhood of 12-thousand people; the farmers of Namibia are being urged to go easy on the big cats they feel threaten their livestock. Why the picturesque but cash-strapped Darjeeling Himalayan Railway won't be receiving private investment any time soon and why the followers of the controversial Reverend Moon believe they might hold the formula which could ensure a peaceful future for north east Asia?


THU 11:30 Notes From a Northern Irish Childhood (b05wyq5y)
Amidst the violence and bloody conflict of the early 1970s, youth orchestras sprang up across Northern Ireland.

Aged 7, Marie-Louise Muir took a bus to orchestra practice every Saturday morning, carrying her cello across a landscape marred by bomb blasts, riots and civil unrest. While the violence raged, she met children from other religious backgrounds for the first time. She formed friendships - and a love of music - that would endure long after the sound of gunfire had faded.

But life moved on for Marie-Louise. Her cello was set aside in her attic where it languished for 25 years. Even her own children never heard her play.

Now Marie-Louise dusts down her cello and allows it to reverberate with memories of a troubled but life-changing period.

She joins young musicians on stage for a grand concert in her home town of Londonderry, a city once gripped by some of the worst violence of the Troubles. In between lessons with her cello teacher David, struggling to play John Williams' classics, Marie-Louise meets old friends and tutors to discover the true impact of music on their lives. In Omagh, she revisits the school assembly hall where they used to practice with Mary Scully, now one of the world's top double bass players. Paul Cassidy, of the world famous Brodsky Quartet, recalls carrying his violin through riots in Derry and the impact of hearing Grieg's piano concerto for the very first time. John, Frank and Gordon came from different religious backgrounds but found a shared love of music amid hormones and sneaky cigarettes on the bus to orchestra practice.

For Marie-Louise Muir, this is a personal and emotionally charged journey, taking her back to a time when her cello, the orchestra and music provided protection, friendship and hope.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b05wndv2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b05wyq60)
4 June 1915 - Howard Argent

Ralph is impressed by Howard's different approach to treating the wounded.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b05wyq62)
Tesco revival, Social care, Drum pants

New Tesco boss on the challenge of guiding the UK's biggest grocer back to growth.

Crisis in social care; budget cuts in England pushing system to the brink warns report.

The man who turned his pants into a drum machine and wants the world to 'feel the rhythm'.

Penalty ticket chaos on Britain's busiest toll bridge.

Call to boost bank account switching by allowing customers to'port' their account number.

Government takes control of controversial pension scheme if you are affected you can find out more here: piu.north@insolvency.gsi.gov.uk.


THU 12:57 Weather (b05wndv4)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b05wyq64)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05wyq66)
Shivaji: Dreaming Big

Shivaji was the 17th century warrior-king who challenged the Muslim Moghul Empire and today stands as a symbol of Hindu pride. Prof. Sunil Khilnani explores Shivaji's multiple incarnations, the latest of which is as a role model for corporate networkers and deal-makers.

Shivaji is the presiding spirit of the state of Maharashtra and its capital, Mumbai. The city's airport and main railway station are named after him and there are plans for a statue of Shivaji, twice the size of the Statue of Liberty, to be built out to sea from the city. His martial image, sword in hand, is a symbol of regional and Hindu identity. But Sunil Khilnani argues that Shivaji was a self-made man, the product of relentless self-improvement: "From relatively small beginnings, he plotted, sweated, and traded up to glory."

Prof. Khilnani discovers Shivaji's legacy in a gym in a working class neighbourhood of Mumbai and among career-minded pilgrims on a corporate bonding trip to the mountaintop site of Shivaji's coronation.

Producer: Jeremy Grange
Original music composed by Talvin Singh.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b05wykhn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Stone (b05wyq68)
Series 5

Broken

The final drama in the crime series Stone created by Danny Brocklehurst.

In Broken by Vivienne Harvey, when a heavily pregnant woman goes missing fears grow for her safety and DCI Stone finds himself dealing with a life and death situation.

Sound design by Steve Brooke
Directed by Nadia Molinari.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b05wyq6b)
Series 30

Lyke Wake Walk

Clare Balding undertakes a section of the Lyke Wake Walk on the North York Moors. The route was originally devised sixty years ago by a local farmer who issued a challenge in the Dalesman magazine. He thought it might be possible to cross 40 miles of the Moors from near Osmotherley to Ravenscar in 24 hours, crossing only one or two roads. A club was formed following the first successful crossing, and with a blackly humorous nod to the pain and suffering endured by walkers, a tradition grew of reciting an ancient song known as the Lyke-Wake Dirge which tells of the soul's journey from earth to purgatory. The route was named after this dirge. Clare is joined by veterans and newcomers to the walk, who are known - depending on the number of crossings they've made - as Dirgers, Witches, Doctors of Dolefulness, Masters of Misery or, the most senior of all, Past Masters or Mistresses.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b05wnlyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b05wnx4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b05wyq6d)
Jonathan Pryce; Paul Feig; The Misfits

With Antonia Quirke.

Jonathan Pryce discusses his film career as his latest movie Listen Up Philip is released.

The director of Bridesmaids, Paul Feig, on his latest comedy Spy

The Misfits was the last film for stars Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable. Continuity supervisor Angela Allen was on set the whole time and reveals some of the bad behaviour she witnessed.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b05wyq6g)
Origins of life, Earthquakes in London, Frog plague, Ancient pollen

Think of earthquake cities and places like San Francisco or Los Angeles spring to mind. But London is also seismically active. 200 years ago, there was an earthquake under Trafalgar Square. Dr Richard Ghail from Imperial College London meets Adam Rutherford on the banks of the Thames to discuss the fault lines under their feet and what engineering challenges this poses.

In the beginning, there were chemicals. A geological blink of the eye later, there was LUCA, the last universal common ancestor; a complex cell. How the chemistry became biology is one of the biggest mysteries in science. New studies from University of North Carolina researchers chips away at this unknown, offering evidence on how the genetic code developed in two stages. Adam meets Dr Matt Powner, a chemist at University College London studying the origins of life, to find out how researchers try to answer this fundamental question.

How do we know what our landscape used to landscape? Pollen, from buried mud layers, offers a picture of sorts. By gathering tiny pollen grains, and identifying the plant species at different ages, Dr Ralph Fyfe from Plymouth University builds up a picture of European landscapes thousands of years ago. Peak deforestation happened several thousand years ago, as our pyromaniacal ancestors started forest fires to clear land for agriculture. Roland Pease reports.

A plague is killing thousands of common frogs in ponds across the UK. Ranavirus causes ulcers on the skin and haemorrhaging. A team at Exeter University has noticed that ponds with fish are more likely to have an outbreak of this virus. Amber Griffiths urges Radio 4 listeners to leave their ponds to the wildlife, and keep frogs and goldfish apart.


THU 17:00 PM (b05wyq6j)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wndv7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Best Behaviour (b05wyq6l)
Episode 5

Holly Walsh presents the comedy panel show that defines the do's and don'ts of modern manners.

The guest panellists are comedians Sarah Kendall, Justin Edwards and Phil Wang, who are all competing to deliver the best new ideas for navigating the minefield of modern manners.

In this edition, the etiquette of new technology comes under comic examination - from emoticons to mobiles in theatres - and there are tips on how to compliment your friend's new tattoo. The panel also tackles a problem from a member of the studio audience: 'How can I tell my co-worker that they have really bad breath?'

Produced by Aled Evans
A Zeppotron production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b05wyq6n)
Hungover Eddie is late for work - he has made Clarrie late for work at Bridge Farm too, as she tried to wake him. Eddie has to work late, and gets an earful from Clarrie back at home, who insists he gets rid of the leftover food. Lilian ribs Eddie over his pretence last night in the bar. Eddie ruefully remarks that Tom's pigs will be getting a treat in the morning.
Helen and tom have had no joy selling the Organics shop - the woman who made an offer has pulled out. Helen's worried about Anya, given the uncertainty. Tom has made some sketches of renovation plans for the old parlour. They should talk to an architect, but obviously want Pat and Tony to be on board.
There's a big advertisement in the Echo for Open Farm Sunday, with posters all over the village too.
Lilian accompanies Peggy to The Laurels, where Peggy spots Christine. Peggy's there catching up with her friend Ted, whose wife Violet is a resident. Meanwhile, Lilian's happy to be avoiding Martyn Gibson - he and Pam are having dinner with Brian and Jennifer. Peggy's shocked when Christine says she's thinking of moving in to The Laurels. Chris feels so lonely at home and Peggy understands. However, this isn't the Christine she knows. Chris admits that the woman Peggy knows might not exist anymore.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b05wyq8m)
Malorie Blackman, Stonemouth, Louise Welsh, Mahsa and Marjan Vahdat

As she comes to the end of her tenure as Children's Laureate, Malorie Blackman reflects on the experience and discusses how the racist abuse she received made her more determined to push for greater diversity in children's books.

The first TV adaptation of an Iain Banks novel broadcasts next week on the BBC. Stonemouth is a romantic mystery delving into love, loyalty and vengeance. Stuart Kelly, who reviewed the book when it came out, and also interviewed the author shortly before his death, reviews the drama.

Louise Welsh's latest novel, Death is a Welcome Guest, portrays Britain devastated by a plague in which there are very few survivors. It explores what happens to those left alive and what sort of society might emerge. Louise Welsh explains her fascination with this subject.

Mahsa & Marjan Vahdat are Iranian sisters who live in Tehran but must pursue their musical careers abroad. They sing, but although the lyrics are from classical poets - Rumi and Hafez - they can't appear in Iran as women are banned from singing on television and radio. They tell Kirsty about their lives and music - and sing.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Sarah Johnson.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wyq5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b05wy648)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b05wyqqq)
Failure

If your business venture doesn't succeed, how can you be sure it's worth trying again before admitting defeat? More than 50% of businesses fail within 5 years, yet for many, failure is a necessary part of success. Even Bill Gates and Steve Jobs didn't get it right first time. Evan Davis's guests discuss the important lessons they've learned from their business mistakes and speak candidly about the personal and financial impact of failing. How do you overcome the stigma of failure and what skills are required to bounce back when your business has bombed?

Guests:
Bill Cullen, Chairman, Bill Cullen Motor Group
Katarina Skoberne, Co-founder and former CEO, OpenAd
Stuart Miller, Co-founder and CEO, ByBox Group

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b05wyq6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b05wyq5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b05wyqqs)
Ukraine's President warns armed forces of full-scale invasion from Russia.

Poroshenko warns of possible large-scale offensive by rebel groups -- says military "must stand ready"


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05wyqqv)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 4

Michael grows closer to his new neighbours. Finding their back door open one day, he steps inside.

"The event that changed all of their lives happened on a Saturday afternoon in June, just minutes after Michael Turner - thinking the Nelsons' house was empty - stepped through their back door."

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 23:00 Seekers (b05wyrqg)
Series 2

So What Did I Miss?

Stuart is back from America, and there's been big changes at the Essex job centre while he's been away.

Series 2 of the job seeking sitcom starring Mathew Horne, Daniel Mays, Tony Way and Zahra Ahmadi.

Written by Steve Burge.

Stuart ------ Mathew Horne
Joseph ------ Daniel Mays
Terry ----- Tony Way
Nicola ------ Zahra Ahmadi
Vanessa ----- Natalie Walter
Gary Probert ----- Steve Oram
Ralph ------ Ian Conningham
Mr Thompson ------ Sam Dale

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05wyrqq)
Sean Curran and the BBC's parliamentary team report as MPs conclude their Queen's Speech debate with clashes over the Government's economic plans.
Labour hits out at new plans to turnaround failing health authorities in England. And the Culture Secretary backs calls for re-runs of the World Cup bids for 2018 and 2022.



FRIDAY 05 JUNE 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b05wndw8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b05wyq5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05wndwb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05wndwd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05wndwg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b05wndwj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05wys85)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sister Jane Livesey CJ.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b05wys87)
World Environment Day

The Department of Food and Rural Affairs is facing an extra £83 million pounds of cuts this year. Where will the axe fall?

Today is United Nations World Environment Day - what are the environmental challenges facing British farmers as the world tackles climate change?

All this week we're looking at British wool. Today - wrapping up food in waste wool. We've been to Staffordshire to find out about a new way of using one of our oldest farm products.

This Sunday is Open Farm Sunday when farmers open the farm gate to the public. Sophie Anton is at Fosse Farm, near Bath, where they're gearing up to welcome 3,000 visitors.

Presenter Charlotte Smith.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcq9)
Fulmar

Series of stories about British birds, inspired by their calls and songs. Kate Humble presents the fulmar.


FRI 06:00 Today (b05wz0k7)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b05wnqwm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:16 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b05wz0k9)
Ghettoside

The Trial

Rhashan Stone reads Jill Leovy's account into the high rates of murder among LA's young black men. The long awaited Bryant Tennelle murder trial opens. The detective John Skaggs who was instrumental in tracking down the suspects looks on hopeful that justice will prevail.

Written by Jill Leovy
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05wz0kc)
Anita Dobson, Mary McCartney, Eugenia Cheng

Anita Dobson talks about her latest film, London Road. Eugenia Cheng explains why it's worth persevering with difficult maths. The story of Mr Muruga's nine year quest to develop a low cost sanitary pad for the women of India. There's an interview from the Woman's Hour archive with Linda McCartney discussing her photography. And, her daughter Mary McCartney cooks the perfect pea and watercress soup and talks photographing food.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Ruth Watts.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wz0kf)
Chronicles of Ait - Magpie

Episode 5

Events in Ait have persuaded Lollo that her predictions of disaster are about to be fulfilled and that Linus' reunion with Alice is about to come to a tragic theatrical conclusion.

Cast:
Linus Scott..........Greg Wise
Alice Pyper..........Amanda Drew
Lollo...................Gina Abolins
Jason..................Joe Claflin
Marlene..............Heather Craney
Trench/Stanley...Christopher James
Afiz/Lee..............Stewart Scudamore
Mac.....................Mihai Arsene

Writer: Michael Butt

Produced and directed by John Taylor
A Fiction Factory production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 11:00 China's Football Revolution (b05wz0kh)
Episode 1

China may be the most populous country in the world with growing importance on the global stage but, as football fan Clive Anderson discovers, international success at the world's most popular sport has eluded this vast country.

In Beijing and Guangzhou, Clive explores why China ranks only 82nd in the world and has only qualified for one World Cup, despite the huge popularity of football among fans.

Football in China has been plagued by years of corruption scandals, match fixing and bribery, and over 50 football officials were imprisoned in a crackdown in 2012. Clive speaks to a former Chinese player who found himself involved in the scandal, discussing how it has affected the game.

Does football really matter when the country is becoming so successful economically? The country's President Xi Jinping thinks it does. A football fan himself, he's issued a major reform to try and turn the game around and put China on a course to win the World Cup. He's even invited stars such as David Beckham to become an ambassador for the game.

Clive visits clubs, matches, and the largest football academy in the world, built by a multi-billion dollar property tycoon, to find out whether efforts to improve the national game are paying off.

The European leagues are also keen to get in on the Chinese game by training coaches. In the second programme, Clive considers what impact China's desire for football success has had on its relationship with the rest of the footballing world.

Produced by Jo Wheeler
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b05wz0kk)
Series 3

A Slanging Match Made in Heaven

Vera Sackcloth-Vest has promised her husband Henry, that her affair with Venus Traduces is at an end - but when Venus writes Vera a secret billet-doux, Vera is powerless to resist and makes hurried plans to meet Venus in London.

However, before she can leave Sizzlinghurst, Lady Utterline Amoral and Lytton Scratchy arrive unexpectedly to take a tour of the garden. Keen to see them leave, Vera's patience is put to the test in the face of Lady Utterline's snobbishness, insisting that Vera should follow her example and hold an annual garden party to raise money for the Red Cross.

Meanwhile, Henry is chased round the sofa by Lytton who, as an irrepressible gossip, lets slip that Vera and Venus are back together. His suspicions now confirmed, Henry insists on accompanying Vera down to London.

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b05wndwm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b05wz0km)
5 June 1915 - Jessie Moore

Even Folkestone's younger residents make the most of the Canadians being in town.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b05wz0kp)
Commissioning.gp, Cannabis farms, Scented candles

We investigate the website Commissioning.gp who persuaded counsellors to sign up to their register with the promise of more work. But the therapists say they don't receive any work and they can't get their money back.

A leading insurer warns landlords about the rise in cannabis farms and the costs you can end up liable for.

Leading health experts are coming together to stop people paying to use online allergy testing kits. They're not recommended by the NHS and the results are not scientifically proven.

Private Clubs - They were once the haven for Edwardian Gentleman to drink and smoke, but their numbers declined in the 20th Century. They're now making a comeback with female members.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b05wndwp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b05wz0kr)
Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b05wz0kt)
Nainsukh: Owner Transfixed by Goose

Prof. Sunil Khilnani profiles Nainsukh, the 18th century artist whose intimate and engaging portraits of a prince's life created a new vision for Indian art.

In his paintings of his patron, Balwant Singh, Nainsukh departed from the rigid formality of traditional Indian painting. Instead he showed the prince in his most unguarded moments: having his beard trimmed by a barber, being mimicked by a performer, huddled ill and depressed under a bulky quilt, and writing a letter bare-chested in his tent. "It's an almost modern, instagram-esque familiarity" says Sunil Khilnani.

The artist Howard Hodgkin, an appreciator and collector of Nainsukh's work, describes Nainsukh as "the first great modern artist of India". In his favourite painting, Balwant Singh and his pet goose stare at each other, both bird and prince transfixed.

Prof. Khilnani tells the story of two men: one a painter with a unique talent to express humanity and individuality, warmth and humour; the other a prince who unreservedly, unselfconsciously gave himself to the artist as subject.

Producer: Jeremy Grange
Executive Producer: Martin Smith.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b05wyq6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b05wz0kw)
The Man Who Wore Sanitary Pads

Mr Muruga is a builder from Tamil Nadu who wants to send a rather curious love letter to his wife: a low cost sanitary pad. But when his desire to help his countrywomen turns to obsession, his community and even his family turn their backs on him. Can he achieve his taboo-breaking mission? A compelling, real-life story of a great man, told with humour and admiration by Jon Sen.

Other voices.....the BBC Tamil Service
Cultural and language consultants.....Sangeetha Rajan, Sivaramakrishnan Parameswaran, Jagadheesan Leklapoodi

Directed by Sarah Bradshaw

Notes

Jon Sen began his professional career as a documentary editor, making his break into drama as writer/director of the award-winning comedy short The Love Doctor (BBC Films/BBC2). He has subsequently worked for all the major terrestrial channels, directing high-profile shows such as the British Asian drama Second Generation (Channel 4), Frances Tuesday (ITV), Stan (BBC2/BBC4). He has also directed serial drama including 55 degrees North and Waterloo Road (BBC1).

His first play for Radio 4 was 4.4.68 about the assassination of Martin Luther King - a part of the Sony award winning 1968 season. He has also written The Prospect, The Phone, an adaptation of Hardy's Two on a Tower and Vanunu - A Time To Be Heard. His TV writing credits include Touching Infinity a biopic about of the mathematical genius Ramanujan and series drama including Casualty, Holby and Waterloo Road (BBC1).


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b05wz0ky)
Isle of Wight

Eric Robson hosts the show from Cowes on the Isle of Wight. Bunny Guinness, Anne Swithinbank, and Bob Flowerdew answer audience questions.

Eric visits the rural retreat of Queen Victoria and Matthew Pottage provides the ultimate guide to hanging baskets and window boxes.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Shorts (b05wz908)
Welcome to Your Holiday!

Namaste by Deepti Kapoor

Three specially commissioned stories in which writers from around the world explore the idea of getting away from it all. What do we experience as tourists dabbling in the lives of others? How do those who host these fleeting visitors regard them and is there any way in which it is genuinely possible to find ‘the real thing’?

In the first story, Namaste, Deepti Kapoor considers the Western tourists who have long headed to Goa for a dose of healing spirituality - and an Indian woman tries to find a solution to her own troubles by offering the visitors what they seek.

Deepti Kapoor lives in Goa and published her first novel, A Bad Character, in 2014.

Reader: Tania Rodrigues

Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b05wz90b)
Tariq Aziz, Charles Kennedy, Julie Harris, Alan Bond, Peter Cropper

Andrea Catherwood on Iraqi politician Tariq Aziz, former Leader of the Liberal Democrats Charles Kennedy; Oscar winning costume designer Julie Harris; flamboyant Australian property developer and entrepreneur Alan Bond and violinist Peter Cropper who founded the Lindsay Quartet.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b05wz90d)
World Cup Migrant Deaths

Qatar migrant worker deaths.
Is the World Cup really responsible for the deaths of 1200 migrant workers in Qatar? We talk to the International Trade Unions Confederation who first published the figure.

The Independent on Sunday had a front page splash this week making a link between the HPV vaccine and one girls serious illness. They article also says that the number of cases of serious side-effects from the HPV vaccine being reported to the MHRA are much higher compared to other vaccines. The Independent have defended their journalism but we have spoken to a doctor who says the article cherry picks data and should be withdrawn.

We tell the story behind the chocolate experiment designed to deliberately fool the press.
And we solve the fiendish GCSE question that perplexed students so much it became a trend on Twitter.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b05wz90g)
Helen and Roger – Feeding the 5000

Fi Glover with a conversation between the manager and a volunteer at a Birmingham Foodbank, reflecting on the generosity of donors and the dignity of those who use their service. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


FRI 17:00 PM (b05wz90j)
News interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05wndwr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b05wz90l)
Series 87

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guests Fred Macaulay, Justin Moorhouse and Lucy Porter.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b05wz90n)
Adam accepts Charlie's offer to help move the combine for Open Farm Sunday - Jennifer was going to help but it's the least Charlie can do. Charlie admits he's nervous about OFS- ambitious Justin wants to make it a big success.

It's the day of the Young Farmers' treasure hunt, followed by a party at Home Farm. Pip's disappointed to be paired up with Rex to find the clues (she was hoping to get Toby). Toby's paired up with Kate, who's pretty flirty. Rex and Pip do well finding clues but Toby and Kate ditch the hunt and head to the party early.

As things get more raucous, Toby and another young farmer pick Kate up and throw her into Brian's pool. She loves the attention, but Pip looks on embarrassed and slightly hurt. Toby then pours sheep dye into the pool, turning everything purple - including Kate's hair. She laughs it off - she's had purple hair before. Rex is very apologetic, admitting that Toby isn't one for making apologising. Adam suggests Toby should think about offering one to Brian.

As the party continues, Pip gets a call. Her Granny Heather has had a massive stroke.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b05wz90q)
Composer Nico Muhly, Greek drama, Four Corners

The classical composer Nico Muhly has worked with Philip Glass, written film scores including The Reader, collaborated with Björk and Antony and the Johnsons, and written a full-scale opera, Two Boys. Muhly discusses Sentences, his new song cycle on Alan Turing with a libretto by Adam Gopnik.

Recently Kristin Scott Thomas has played Electra, Juliette Binoche, Antigone and Helen McCrory, Medea. Tonight The Oresteia opens at the Almeida Theatre in London - one of four productions of the trilogy this year - which opens a festival of Greek drama at the theatre. Kirsty Lang talks to Rupert Goold, the artistic director responsible for the festival, Blanche McIntyre, who will be directing The Oresteia in Manchester, and Paul Cartledge, the distinguished scholar of Greek drama, about the power of these plays written millennia ago and their relevance today.

A new film Four Corners is a drama set against a backdrop of gang culture and violence in South Africa's Cape Flats. Writer Lindsay Johns reviews.

And Kevin LeGendre considers the art of the spoken interaction between the musical performer and the audience in a live show.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05wz0kf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b05wz90s)
Rushanara Ali MP, David Davis MP, Lord Hennessy, Tommy Sheppard MP

Ritula Shah chairs political discussion and debate from from Marden High School in Cullercoats, Tyne & Wear, with Rushanara Ali MP who is standing as a candidate for Labour Party deputy leader, the Conservative back bencher David Davis MP, cross bench peer and constitutional expert, Lord Hennessy, and the new Scottish National Party MP for Edinburgh East Tommy Sheppard.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b05wz90v)
AL Kennedy: Creamola Foam remembered

"I'm getting old. Not older, just old" begins AL Kennedy. Through childhood memories of drinking Creamola Foam, her grandfather's voice ...and being kicked by a boy in the shin during playtimes, she reflects on how age changes our perception of the past and the future.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b05wz90x)
1-5 June 1915

Second omnibus edition of Season 4 of the epic drama series set in Great War Britain. Folkestone is making the most of the influx of Canadian troops.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Lucy Collingwood
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b05wndwt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b05wz90z)
Opposing sides in Yemen have agreed to UN-brokered peace talks.

We hear how the country is struggling to cope


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05wz911)
Owen Sheers - I Saw a Man

Episode 5

On a Nevada air base, Major Daniel McCullen is given a new mission. One which will have shattering consequences for the Turners.

"The event that changed all of their lives happened on a Saturday afternoon in June, just minutes after Michael Turner - thinking the Nelsons' house was empty - stepped through their back door."

After the sudden loss of his wife, writer Michael Turner moves to London and develops a close friendship with the Nelsons, who live next door - Josh, Samantha and their two young daughters Lucy and Rachel. The family seem to represent everything Michael fears he may now never have: intimacy, children, stability and a family home. The new friendship at first seems to offer the prospect of healing, but then a catastrophic event changes everything.

Owen Sheers' compelling story of the search for truth, the burden of secrets and the desire for redemption. It explores how our lives are interconnected, even in today's increasingly depersonalised, globalised world.

Written by Owen Sheers
Abridged by Lauris Morgan-Griffiths
Read by Mark Bazeley

Producer: Mair Bosworth

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b05vy6f2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05wz913)
Mark D'Arcy and the BBC parliamentary team report from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b05wz915)
Sarah and Rhian - Reconstructing Ourselves

Fi Glover with a conversation between an artist and clinical anthropologist, comparing notes on the project they run for breast cancer patients undergoing reconstruction. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b05wq18p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b05wq18p)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b05wy1bn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b05wy1bn)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b05wyhnn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b05wyhnn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b05wyq5t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b05wyq5t)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b05wz0kf)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b05wz0kf)

A Father for My Son 00:30 SUN (b01d28pq)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b05w8dnz)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b05wz90v)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b05vx63j)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b05wxx6z)

Another Time, Another Place 16:00 MON (b05wq2bw)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b05wn7sm)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b05wn7sk)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b05wz90s)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b05wnb7g)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b05wyq6g)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b05wyq6g)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b05wykj1)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b05wnjjh)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b05wnjjh)

Best Behaviour 18:30 THU (b05wyq6l)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b05wxx6d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b05wxx76)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b05wy6wm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b05wykhx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b05wyqqv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b05wz911)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b05wp70d)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b05wp70d)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b05wxzxx)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b05wxzxx)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b05wyhnj)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b05wyhnj)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b05wyq5p)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b05wyq5p)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b05wz0k9)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b05wnmgg)

China's Football Revolution 11:00 FRI (b05wz0kh)

Clare in the Community 18:30 WED (b03ts6jg)

Desert Island Discs 11:16 SUN (b05wnqwm)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b05wnqwm)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b05vsyz1)

Drama 14:15 MON (b01p7ddf)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b05qjs7r)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01rgj1b)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b05wz0kw)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 WED (b05wyhnv)

Every Case Tells a Story 20:00 MON (b05wxx6x)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b05wn34m)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b05wp0y3)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b05wxxkc)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b05wy74w)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b05wylp2)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b05wys87)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b05wy64q)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b05w3wl5)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b05wykhs)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b05wn91p)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b05wn91p)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b05vrj3p)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b05wyq5w)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b05wxx6v)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b05wy64n)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b05wykhq)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b05wyq8m)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b05wz90q)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b05w8dnb)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b05wz0ky)

Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b05wz0kk)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b05vy6f2)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b05vy6f2)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b05wz90x)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b05wq1bn)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b05wy63y)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b05wyhnx)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b05wyq60)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b05wz0km)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b05wyq5m)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b05wyq5m)

In Search of the Black Mozart 11:30 TUE (b05wy63w)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b05wy6wg)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 MON (b05wq1fh)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 TUE (b05wy644)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 WED (b05wyhp3)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 THU (b05wyq66)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 13:45 FRI (b05wz0kt)

John Kearns 23:00 WED (b05wykhz)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b05vx639)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b05wxx6n)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b05w8dng)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b05wz90b)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b05wy648)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b05wy648)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b05wn91m)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 TUE (b05wy64j)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b05vrj34)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b05wndhb)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b05wndkp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b05wndp4)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b05wndrn)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b05wndtq)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b05wndw8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b05wyhng)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b05wyhng)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b05wn7sh)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b05wn7sh)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b05wyhp6)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b05w8dnj)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b05wz90d)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b05w99gj)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b05vrj3f)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b05wndhl)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b05wndl3)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b05wndpg)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b05wndrx)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b05wndtz)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b05wndwj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b05wndhn)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b05vrj3r)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b05wndhz)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b05wndlk)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b05wndpr)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b05wnds2)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b05wndv2)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b05wndwm)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b05vrj3h)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b05wndhs)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b05wndhx)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b05vrj45)

News 13:00 SAT (b05vrj3w)

Notes From a Northern Irish Childhood 11:30 THU (b05wyq5y)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b05wnlyv)

On the Rocks 11:30 MON (b05wq1bl)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b05wnx4p)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b05wnx4p)

PM 17:00 SAT (b05wn91k)

PM 17:00 MON (b05wxx6l)

PM 17:00 TUE (b05wy64d)

PM 17:00 WED (b05wyhxk)

PM 17:00 THU (b05wyq6j)

PM 17:00 FRI (b05wz90j)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b05wnxgb)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b05vt6gk)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b05wnx4r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b05w8f0b)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b05wxqk7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b05wxxk9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b05wy74t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b05wylp0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b05wys85)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b05wnlyz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b05wnlyz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b05wnlyz)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b05w4dpr)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b05wyq6b)

Richard Marsh 23:15 TUE (b01rlswh)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01shqcf)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b05wn7s9)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b05wnb7d)

Seekers 23:00 THU (b05wyrqg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b05vrj39)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b05wndhg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b05wndky)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b05wndpb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b05wndrs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b05wndtv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b05wndwd)

Shadow of the Sun King 11:00 WED (b05wyhns)

Shared Experience 15:30 TUE (b05wy646)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b05vrj37)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b05vrj3c)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b05vrj3y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b05wndhd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b05wndhj)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b05wndj4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b05wndkw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b05wndl0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b05wndp8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b05wndpd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b05wndrq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b05wndrv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b05wndts)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b05wndtx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b05wndwb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b05wndwg)

Shorts 19:45 SUN (b05wny9j)

Shorts 15:45 FRI (b05wz908)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b05vrj42)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b05wndj8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b05wndlv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b05wndq0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b05wndsj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b05wndv7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b05wndwr)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b05wnjjk)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b05wnjjk)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b05wp3l1)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b05wp3l1)

Stone 14:15 THU (b05wyq68)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b05wnlz1)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b05wnlyx)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b05vx4dx)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b05wq1jc)

The Affordable Housing Crisis 17:00 SUN (b05vzysp)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b05wnmgj)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b05wny9g)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b05wny9g)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b05wxx6s)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b05wxx6s)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b05wy64l)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b05wy64l)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b05wykhn)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b05wykhn)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b05wyq6n)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b05wyq6n)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b05wz90n)

The Barchester Chronicles 15:00 SUN (b05wnx4m)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b05w4jxk)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b05wyqqq)

The Business of Genetic Ancestry 21:00 MON (b05vy4kb)

The Dark Side of Buddhism 13:30 SUN (b05wnrkx)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b05w4j0w)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b05wyq6d)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b05wnqwp)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b05yx3by)

The Hotel Suite 11:00 MON (b048jmy7)

The John Moloney Show 23:00 TUE (b05wy6wp)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b05wn7sc)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b05wn7sc)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b05wns1z)

The Listening Project 10:56 WED (b05wyhnq)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b05wz90g)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b05wz915)

The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock 09:00 TUE (b05wxzxv)

The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock 21:30 TUE (b05wxzxv)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b05wyhpb)

The Mother of the Sea 21:00 WED (b04g7rd5)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b05w8dnq)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b05wz90l)

The Rivals 19:15 SUN (b03bdw8c)

The Search for the Perfect Office 21:00 TUE (b036wfzv)

The Search for the Perfect Office 15:30 WED (b036wfzv)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b05wn7sf)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b05wnrkv)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b05wxx73)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b05wy6wk)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b05wykhv)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b05wyqqs)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b05wz90z)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b05w3wfc)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b05wyhp8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b05wxx78)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b05wy6wr)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b05wykj3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b05wyrqq)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b05wz913)

Today 07:00 SAT (b05wn3x8)

Today 06:00 MON (b05wp3cn)

Today 06:00 TUE (b05wxzxs)

Today 06:00 WED (b05wyhnd)

Today 06:00 THU (b05wyq5k)

Today 06:00 FRI (b05wz0k7)

Tom Fort - Channel Shore 00:30 SAT (b05w84zh)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03bkfhy)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b02txxkl)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02ty530)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b02tycf8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03zrcnt)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03zrcq9)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b05w3wkt)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b05vrj3k)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b05vrj3m)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b05vrj3t)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b05vrj40)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b05wndhq)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b05wndhv)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b05wndj1)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b05wndj6)

Weather 05:56 MON (b05wndl5)

Weather 12:57 MON (b05wndlm)

Weather 21:58 MON (b05wndm1)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b05wndpw)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b05wndq3)

Weather 12:57 WED (b05wnds6)

Weather 12:57 THU (b05wndv4)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b05wndwp)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b05wndwt)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b05wp0ft)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b05wp0fw)

What's Left? 20:00 WED (b05xxqb2)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b05wn7sq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b05wpmkn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b05wxzxz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b05wyhnl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b05wyq5r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b05wz0kc)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b05vy6f0)

World at One 13:00 MON (b05wq1bs)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b05wy642)

World at One 13:00 WED (b05wyhp1)

World at One 13:00 THU (b05wyq64)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b05wz0kr)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b05wq1bq)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b05wy640)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b05wyhnz)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b05wyq62)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b05wz0kp)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b05w8f0g)