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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 02 MAY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b05rkq8b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Philip Glass - Words without Music (b05t7kpz)
Episode 5

Asked to write the score for visionary 1982 documentary Koyaanisqatsi, Glass discovered a new avenue for his musical composition.

He later worked with Martin Scorsese, writing the soundtrack for Kundun (1997).

Conclusion of the memoir by Philip Glass, the world-renowned composer of symphonies, operas and film scores.

Read by Kerry Shale.

Abridger: Laurence Wareing
Producer: Kirsteen Cameron

Music details:
Track: "Evening Song" (from Satygraha)
CD: The Essential Philip Glass
Label: Sony

Track: "The Grid"
CD: Koyaanisqatsi
Label: Island

Track: "Closing"
CD: Glassworks
Label: CBS

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2015.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05rkq8f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05rkq8h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05rkq8k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b05rkq8m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05s3szf)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Mike Ford.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b05s3szh)
'Nobody can see anything. Why?' - iPM discovers new information about the secret files on the unsolved murder of Elsie Frost. Why has it been so hard for her brother and sister to find out what they want to know? Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b05rkq8p)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b05rkq8r)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b05s3gzd)
Bristol Green City

In 1985, Bristol's Brandon Hill became the UK's first ever urban nature reserve. 30 years on, Helen Mark discovers how Avon Wildlife Trust is continuing this tradition of environmental trend setting by creating 'wildlife corridors' throughout the city, supporting communal growing at 'Feed Bristol' and developing a brand new reserve - Bennett's Patch and White's Paddock - out of a disused sports site to coincide the city's status as The 2015 European Green Capital.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b05spjs2)
Farming Today Debate: Farming - the Next Generation

Charlotte Smith is at the Bristol Food Connections Festival, to host a special debate about the next generation of agricultural workers. With the average age of farmers in the UK now in the late 50's where will tomorrow's farmers come from? And what does their future look like?
On the panel are Dan Corlett of the charity Farming and Countryside Education; Harriet Warne, a farming apprentice; Jack Stilwell, an agricultural undergraduate; and Charles Cowap who lectures at Harper Adams University.
Asking the questions, an audience of young farmers, and school, college and university students.
The producer is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b05rkq8t)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b05spjs4)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b05spjs6)
Professor Tanya Byron

Clinical psychologist and broadcaster Professor Tanya Byron joins Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir to talk tales of the clinic, how a family tragedy sparked her interest in psychology and destigmatising vulnerable people.

Becoming unexpectedly jobless in 2012 prompted Michelle Thomas to start paying people to tell her their stories. The response was so amazing she's now crowd-funding a book which will feature some of stories.

This week marks 70 years since the end of the second world war in Europe. Listener Liesbeth Langford got in touch to share her family's story of growing up in occupied Netherlands and sheltering a young Jewish woman.

Professor Greg Whyte is the man behind David Walliams successful channel swim attempt, Davina McCall's challenge to run, swim and cycle from Edinburgh to London in seven days and the person that inspired Dermot O'Leary to dance for 24 hours non-stop all for Comic Relief. As a former Olympic Modern Pentathlete he tells us his secret to motivating others.

Violinist Nigel Kennedy shares his inheritance tracks and we speak to some of the very patient died-hard fans who've been waiting and waiting for the second royal baby to make an appearance.

Inheritance Track choices: 'Hymn to Him' from Apocalypse by the Mahavishnu Orchestra and 'Limehouse Blues' performed by Stephane Grappelli.

'The Skeleton Cupboard' by Professor Tanya Byron is published by Pan.

'Salt Beef Jack and Other Londoners' by Michelle Thomas is currently being crowdfunded by Unbound.

'Written by Candlelight' by Liesbeth Langford is the story of her family's experience of the war.

'Achieve the impossible' by Professor Greg Whyte is published by Bantam Press.

Produced by: Alex Lewis
Edited by: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 World War One: The Cultural Front (b05spjym)
Series 2

War on the Mind

In the last in the series covering 1915, Francine Stock looks at how the harrowing effects of World War I began to make themselves apparent in art, music and poetry. For the first time, the condition which would become known as 'shellshock' was becoming apparent, and the full psychological effect of trench warfare on soldiers began to take its toll.

We look at Sigmund Freud's Essay 'Reflections on War and Death' and look at how the newly diagnosed mental conditions were being addressed. Poetry, music and art begin to reveal the underlying traumas of this sustained conflict. Propaganda and patriotism did not always win the day, as we find in the German Expressionist paintings revealing the true nightmare of the trenches.

In music, we find patriotism still a driving force. British concert parties were travelling to the front to help encourage the troops, headed by the remarkable actress, impresario and suffragette Lena Ashwell. The French composer Debussy was deeply affected by the war, yet managed to make 1915 his most creative year.

In poetry, Robert Frost had written 'The Road Not Taken' after taking country walks with an English friend, Edward Thomas. Frost posted a copy of the poem to Thomas as a way of chiding him about indecision, but his friend was not amused. Within a short space of time he decided to enlist and go to war.

By the time 1915 drew to a close, any hope of a quick end to the war had faded, and the cultural front revealed a new fragility in the face of the such a bleak outlook.

With contributions from Dr David Code, University of Glasgow, Dr Anna Farthing, Professor Edgar Jones of King's College London, John Forrester, Dr Dorothy Price, University of Bristol, and poet Matthew Hollis.

Producer Mark Rickards.


SAT 11:00 Campaign Sidebar (b05spjyp)
It's the home straight, the final countdown - and as they enter the last week of campaigning the party leaders are exhausted, but they still have to keep moving. On Campaign Sidebar Hugo Rifkind looks at the tripwires and hazards of the final days before the election, from red eyes to the Royal Baby, from literal stumbles to metaphorical ones, with ex MP Chris Mullin, and former Tory press supremo Amanda Platell.

Plus, when Ireland held the balance. The truly spooky parallels between the 21st century SNP and the Irish MPs of the Victorian and Edwardian era, when they were the pivotal force in the House of Commons.

And when Russell met Ed - a comedian dissects the meeting of minds and mockney accents, when the Labour Leader met the anti-politics guru.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b05rkq8z)
The Lucky Ones

The best in news and current affairs story-telling. In this edition: a week after the quake in Nepal huge problems remain but some believe it could all have been much worse; El Salvador has some of the toughest abortion laws in the world - it's meant some women doing time for crimes they never committed; the double life of a far-right Hungarian politician who was both an anti-Semite and a Jew; forty years after the Vietnam War ended the many families still grieving for someone who was lost in the conflict. And the correspondent who set off for Rome on an improbable mission -- to play the Vatican at cricket!


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b05rkq91)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b05spjyr)
Conservative plans for pensions, taxation and benefits

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne talks to Paul Lewis about his record over the past five years and his plans for taxation, benefits and supporting homebuyers, if the Conservatives win the election.

The Co-op Bank lowered the bar on the 'how low can they go' mortgage contest this week with a two year fixed rate deal at a record 1.09%. Barclays and HSBC have recently announced 1.99% five year fixed rate mortgages. Money Box looks at the strings attached and asks whether such low rates are here to stay.

And Wasps Rugby Club have unveiled an eye-catching 7 year bond designed to raise £35 million. The bonds offer a high rate of return, but could there be a sting in the tail?


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (b05s3r6m)
Series 14

Episode 4

The topical impressions show returns just in time to reflect the build up to one of the most important and incisive votes for decades. Will Austria win again or does Britain's Electro Velvet stand a chance? Satire meets silliness in the flagship comedy for hard working families up and down the country.

Starring Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Duncan Wisbey, Lewis MacLeod, Debra Stephenson.

Producer: Bill Dare.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b05rkq95)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b05rkq98)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b05s3r6t)
Yvette Cooper, Ed Davey, Paul Nuttall, Priti Patel

Jonathan Dimbleby chairs debate from Wisbech Grammar School in Cambridgeshire with Yvette Cooper, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Ed Davey, Deputy Leader of UKIP, Paul Nuttall MEP, and Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, Priti Patel.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b05spjzf)
First-time voters and coalition deals

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? including first-time voters and potential deals in the event of no party winning a majority on 7th May.

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Angie Nehring.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b05spk05)
John Godber - Happy Jack

John Godber's modern stage classic from 1982 re-unites its original cast to tell the touching and funny story of Liz and Jack's life together. A 60 year roller-coaster of a marriage lived in a Yorkshire mining village unfolds from end to beginning.

Liz ..... Jane Godber
Jack ..... John Godber

Directed by Toby Swift.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b05s2x2k)
Series 20

First Cut Is the Deepest

Long before it was a worldwide hit for Rod Stewart, the Cat Stevens song 'First Cut is the Deepest' made a name for the former Ike and Tina Turner backing singer, PP Arnold. In an interview for Soul Music she describes the emotional connection she felt to the lyrics, having emerged from an abusive marriage shortly before recording it.

Also contributing to the programme is the song's original producer, Mike Hurst. He describes how he achieved the huge 'wall of sound' production using double drums, a huge string section, and a harp instead of a guitar to play the signature riff at the the start of the track.

There are many personal stories associated with the track: Carsten Knauff recalls a childhood sweetheart - his first true love - and explains why the Cat Stevens' version brings back bitter-sweet memories for him.

Rosemarie Purdy saw PP Arnold give an extraordinary live rendition at a club in Portsmouth in 1967. Never before had she seen such a heartfelt, emotionally charged performance. It's something she's never forgotten.

The Sheryl Crow version reminds Rachel Batson of a very difficult phase in her life; it's a song she says reflects her own faith journey.

And former Radio Caroline DJ, Keith Hampshire, describes the circumstances that led to him having a No.1 hit with the song in Canada. It was the first time 'First Cut' reached No.1 anywhere in the world.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b05spk25)
Weekend Woman's Hour: The Election Debate

The leading women from Britain's 7 major political parties debate some of the key issues ahead of next week's General Election.

We hear from an employment lawyer to discuss how common cases of sexual discrimination and harassment are in the City.

The number of women becoming Catholic nuns has trebled in the past five years. Theodora Hawksley tells us why at 29 she has decided to enter a convent in London this year.

And music from Marika Hackman.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b05spk27)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b05s3szh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05rkq9c)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b05rkq9f)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05rkq9h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b05spk30)
Miranda Sawyer, Charley Pride, Tracey Thorn, Samantha Bond, Clare Higgins, the Staves

Clive Anderson and guests - Samantha Bond, Clare Higgins and Charley Pride - with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. Also round the Loose Ends table is Miranda Sawyer talking to singer, writer and icon Tracey Thorn. With music from Charley Pride and The Staves.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b05spk32)
Loretta Lynch

Earlier this week, Loretta Lynch was sworn in as the new US Attorney General. Brought up in North Carolina the daughter of a Baptist minister father and a mother who picked cotton as a young girl, Lynch is the first black woman to hold the position of the nation's top law enforcement official. Harvard-educated Lynch worked at several private law firms and has been a federal prosecutor, winning high-profile cases against corrupt New York lawmakers, sex traffickers and mafiosi. But there has been criticism, too. She is accused of being soft on Wall Street wrongdoing. Edward Stourton has been speaking to people who know her well.

Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b05spk34)
Everyman, Far from the Madding Crowd, Empire, Anne Enright, Christopher Williams

Carol Ann Duffy has adapted the 16th century morality play Everyman for London's National Theatre, with Chiwetel Ejiofor in the title role There's a new film version of Far From The Madding Crowd, this time with Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene - is it fair to compare it with the 1969 version?
Empire is a TV phenomenon in the US; a tale of power and intrigue at a hip hop record label - like a black Dynasty crossed with King Lear - it has drawn unprecedented audiences and now it's come to the UK
Anne Enright''s novel The Green Road tells the individual stories of a geographically-dispersed Irish family who are brought back together for a family gathering with all the pressure that unavoidably ensues
A retrospective exhibition of Christopher Williams photography at The Whitechapel Gallery in London looks at the unexpected beauty and cultural resonance of commercial, industrial and instructional photography.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4: The Language of Pain (b05spk3q)
Virginia Woolf lamented that the English language, so rich in words to describe the passions of love and tragedy, has no adequate words for 'the shiver and the headache'. Physical pains like these dominate our lives and yet our language is insufficient to describe them.

Professor Joanna Bourke is fascinated by the way people talk about their pain. Looking back in history, she finds an abundant language through which people have expressed it. Only in recent times has scientific terminology taken over the language of pain, stripping it of its depth and variety.

In this programme, Joanna explores archive from the 19th and 20th centuries to illustrate the metaphors that people have used. The obsession with railways in the mid-19th century entered the vocabulary of pain almost immediately, and so did electrical metaphors and comparisons with the telegraph. The way we talk about pain is a product of the times we're living in.

Through interviews with clinical pain specialists, historians and artists, Joanna examines how far the language we use to talk about pain influences the way we feel it.

Today, pain specialists are increasingly concentrating on the language of their patients. While medicine is now very effective at treating acute pain, chronic pain remains a problem. The experience of chronic pain patients needs to be managed differently and the language we use to talk about it may form part of the answer.

Producer: Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b05rl3w4)
Evelyn Waugh - Decline and Fall

Episode 1

Paul Pennyfeather, a quiet, earnest,scholarly young student at Oxford knows nothing of 1920's high-life until one night he encounters The Bollinger Club ...

Evelyn's Waugh's fast paced roller-coaster is set in the early jazz age, peopled by larger than life characters and a few grotesques

A real gem in the canon of British comic fiction dramatised by Jeremy Front.

Paul Pennyfeather ..... Kieran Hodgson
Dr Fagan ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Grimes ..... John Sessions
Prendergast ..... James Fleet
Philbrick ..... Ben Crowe
Margot Beste-Chetwynde ..... Emilia Fox
Peter Beste-Chetwynde ..... Alex Lawther
Flossie ..... Tilly Vosburgh
Lady Circumference/Dingy ..... Felicity Montagu
Tangent ..... Richard Linnell
Clutterbuck ..... Mark Edel-Hunt
Cholmondley ..... Jude Akuwudike
Mr Davies/Paul's Guardian ..... Stephen Critchlow
Trumpington ..... Sam Valentine
Sniggs ..... Sam Dale
Postlethwaite ..... David Acton
Levy ..... Ian Conningham

Jeremy Front won the Best Dramatisation in the BBC 2014 Drama Audio Awards for Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honour.

Producer: Marion Nancarrow
Director: Tracey Neale

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b05rkq9k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Two Rooms (b05s385x)
Fi Glover hosts a unique experiment as two groups of people share their contrasting experiences, and voice their inner concerns about the way society is developing, as Britain faces arguably the most unpredictable election of modern times.

In the third programme, the groups consider whether they feel the current levels of immigration bring benefits or hindrance to themselves and to Britain.

Producer: Emma Jarvis
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b05rnx80)
Series 5

Cardiff University/Prifysgol Caerdydd

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from Cardiff University, The 3rd Degree is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners while delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Biology, Journalism and Astrophysics and the questions range from the intricacies of relativistic length contraction to the idiocies of homeopathy via Grexit, webinars and a man called Walter Plinge.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quick-fire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction.
The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show also delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. He has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, including The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen, as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called The Genuine Particle.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 The Poet and the Murderer (b05rl3w8)
In 1997, a newly discovered and previously unpublished poem by the much-loved American poet Emily Dickinson was auctioned in New York. There was great excitement at the idea that a new work by this iconic artist had come to light - as if a new Shakespeare Sonnet had been found locked in a trunk in a Stratford attic, or an unknown Picasso had been stumbled upon at a car boot sale.

After the poem was sold at auction and brought home to Emily Dickinson's home town of Amherst, with much fanfare, it was revealed to be a brilliant fake. It had been created by a man named Mark Hofmann, a convicted double murderer once dubbed the 'greatest forger of the 20th century'. He had not only matched the paper, handwriting and pencil with astounding historical accuracy, he had produced a new Dickinson work that passed off as authentic.

How was a convicted double murderer able to craft a poem so perfect that it fooled leading Emily Dickinson scholars and experts in historical documents? Dickinson famously lived much of her life as a recluse, producing her works of concentrated brilliance from the bedroom of her father's house in Amherst, Massachusetts. She chose not to publish during her lifetime and hand-sewn booklets containing some 1,800 poems were discovered in a locked box in her room after her death. Why does Dickinson continue to fascinate, and what might Hofmann's fake poem tell us about the true poet's work and life?

The writer and journalist Simon Worrall unfolds a gripping true story of poetry, murder and the art of forgery.



SUNDAY 03 MAY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b05srz1m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Go West (b01r525t)
41 Rue Monge

Five short stories from Bristol.

2. 41 Rue Monge
by Jenny Solomons

Victor is a Parisian piano-tuner who has fallen on hard times - people just aren't having their pianos tuned as often as they used to. Now he's behind on his rent and can't think where to turn except to his estranged businessman brother Claude. It's a visit which changes Victor's life.

Produced by Christine Hall.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05srz1q)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05srz1t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05srz1w)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b05srz20)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b05ss4r6)
Church bells from York Minster.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b05spk32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b05srz27)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b05ss4r8)
Spiritual Economics

Economics is the discipline that politicians obey at all costs. Economists have become the most trusted advisers to those in power. But Mark Tully asks if the economic growth that politicians use to judge their country's state of health is undermining our spiritual well being.

What would society look like if spirituality and economics were linked, if religious organisations were more actively engaged with material concerns, or if the purpose of economic policy was not just to maximise production but to increase a sense of inner peace which spirituality can give?

Mark examines this question with the help of Joseph Prabhu who studied with some of India's greatest economists and who refuses to place the blame solely at the door of governments and policy advisors. He suggests that those who stress the importance of spirituality are also partly to blame for what he calls 'greed-based economics' because they have ignored our material needs. Maybe this, he feels, is one reason why economic thinking that ignores spirituality has such a grip on us that it seems to be the way of life.

A Unique Broadcasting production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b05ss4rb)
Swifts

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

In 1947 David Lack, Director of the Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology began observing swifts around Oxford. His observations, led to the creation of one of the longest continuous studies of a single bird species in the world, the Oxford Swift Research Project. In 2000 Lionel Kelleway joined Chris Perrins high up the Oxford University Museum tower to take Living World closer to these 'devil-birds' than ever before. They begin the programme high up on the outside of the tower, watching swifts feeding in the air.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b05srz2b)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b05srz2d)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b05ss4rd)
Nepal, Church Bells, Fossil Fuels

The Nepalese earthquake saw the destruction of important temples and monuments. Edward speaks to Robin Coningham, UNESCO Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, who has conducted extensive field work in Nepal. Plus, dealing with a massive natural disaster can be a real test of faith. Alison Murdoch, a Buddhist and Ranchor Prime a Hindu reflect on the events and how their respective faiths help in such circumstances.

For some, the sound of bells are an enduring symbol of church and community. For others, they are a frustrating noise which has lead to an increase in complaints. Bob Walker reports.

Muslim authorities replacing an old carpet at the Dome of the Rock in the Old City of Jerusalem have angered Israeli researchers who say previously undocumented ancient floor designs were discovered when the old carpets were removed. Daniel Estrin, a journalist based in Jerusalem, explains why they are angry.

The Methodists and the Church of England have announced their respective plans to cut investment in fossil fuel companies. Stephen Beer from the Central Finance Board of the Methodist Church and Ben Caldecott of the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment discuss.

A senior Church of England Bishop has called for a debate about the protection of children from online pornography. The Right Reverend Mike Hill, Bishop of Bristol wrote on his blog this week that "help for parents will be important but most important would be a robust recognition and conviction that pornography for all ages is essentially corrupting." Trevor Barnes reports.

Producers:
Zaffar Iqbal
Carmel Lonergan

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox

Contributors:
Robin Coningham
Daniel Estrin
Stephen Beer
Ben Caldecott
Alison Murdoch
Ranchor Prime.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b05ss4rg)
BasicNeeds

Helen Lederer presents The Radio 4 Appeal for BasicNeeds
Registered Charity No 1079599
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'BasicNeeds'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'BasicNeeds'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b05srz2j)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b05srz2m)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b05ss4rj)
Methodist Central Hall, Westminster

Gerard Brooks directs the renowned Methodist Central Hall Choir in a feast of traditional hymns live from Methodist Central Hall Westminster, directly opposite the Houses of Parliament. Preacher: The Superintendent, the Revd Martin Turner; Leader: The Revd Tony Miles. The service gives thanks for the freedom of choice and rule of law enshrined in our democratic traditions as prayers are expressed for the future of our national life. Producer: Philip Billson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b05s3r6x)
Leaders Old and Young

David Cannadine reflects on the merits of youth and age in our political leaders and finds the current set taking their parties into next week's election strikingly young.
"It's a curious and unexplained paradox that in earlier times, when life expectancy was much lower than it is today, politicians were generally much older; whereas nowadays, when life expectancy is much greater, it's widely believed, at least in some quarters, that politicians ought to be younger".
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b041yd42)
Heather Moorland Dawn Chorus

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the second of four recordings marking the dawn chorus, this time the heather moors of Allendale in Northumberland. Songs featured are that of the curlew, skylark, golden plover and redshank.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b05ss5gf)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b05ss5gh)
Writer ..... Gurpreet Bhatti
Director ..... Marina Caldarone
Editor ..... Sean O'Connor
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Pip Archer.....Daisy Badger
Kenton Archer.....Richard Attlee
Jolene Archer.....Buffy Davis
Tony Archer.....David Troughton
Helen Archer.....Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge.....Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge.....Angela Piper
Phoebe Aldridge.....Lucy Morris
Susan Carter.....Charlotte Martin
Joe Grundy.....Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy.....Trevor Harrison
Ed Grundy.....Barry Farrimond
Adam Macy.....Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane.....Perdita Avery
Fallon Rogers.....Joanna Van Kampen
Lynda Snell.....Carole Boyd
Rob Titchener.....Timothy Watson
Jess Titchener.....Rina Mahoney
Peggy Woolley.....June Spencer.


SUN 11:16 The Reunion (b05ss5gk)
Peter Brook's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Sue MacGregor reunites cast and creatives to recall how director Peter Brook's revolutionary production of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the RSC changed theatre and Shakespeare forever.

On 27th August 1970, an expectant audience arrived at the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon. Such was the anticipation that the New York Times theatre critic, Clive Barnes, had crossed the Atlantic to join them. He was not to be disappointed. Not only did the performance of A Midsummer Night's Dream receive a resounding standing ovation, it did so at the first interval.

"Once in a while, once in a very rare while," wrote a jubilant Barnes the next day, "a theatrical production arrives that is going to be talked about as long as there is a theatre, a production that, for good or ill, is going to exert a major influence on the contemporary stage...It is a magnificent production."

Although Peter Brook retained the original text, his method of developing the production was far from conventional. Rejecting the notion of 'director's theatre' he urged his actors to let the play 'work through them and do things to them'. He even tested out his ideas on a crowd in a Birmingham social club.

The costumes and scenery were no less radical. Working with designer Sally Jacobs, Brook set the play in a minimalist white space, featuring just two doors at the rear. Actors wore brightly-coloured satin costumes inspired by the Chinese circus and entered on stilts and trapezes.

Sue MacGregor is joined by Peter Brook, designer Sally Jacobs and actors Sir Ben Kingsley (Demetrius), Sara Kestelman (Titania/Hippolyta), Frances de la Tour (Helena) and Barry Stanton (Snug).

Producer: Matt Taylor
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b05srz2v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Dilemma (b05rnz1n)
Series 4

Episode 4

Sue Perkins presents another edition of the show that puts the big moral and ethical questions to a mixed panel to see the direction in their moral compasses point. This week, it's the turn of comedians Iain Stirling and Shappi Khorsandi, journalist Suzanne Moore, and writer and actor Dan Tetsell. Collectively they rate the merits of getting the money or the credit for something's success, as well as quickly resolving issues such as inheritance, racism, childhood dreams and Beyoncé. Episode four of six.

Dilemma is presented by Sue Perkins.

Devised by ... Danielle Ward
Producer ... Ed Morrish.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2015.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b05ss68g)
The Legacy of the BBC Food and Farming Awards

Sheila Dillon reports on how 15 years of the BBC Food and Farming Awards have captured the revolution in the streetfood business, witnessed the rise of a new generation of brewers and distillers, chronicled the rise of new types of food markets and marked major changes in the supermarket supply chain. Over the last decade and a half, through receiving thousands of nominations, the judges have been able to spot early on new ideas and changes in the UK's food culture. Sheila talks to judges past and present and former finalists and winners to describe the big shifts as seen through the awards.

Retail analyst and former judge Robert Clark and Policy Director of Sustain, Kath Dalmeny join Sheila to talk about key stories and innovative ideas they've encountered through the awards.

Presented by Sheila Dillon and produced by Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b05srz31)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b05ss68j)
Global news and analysis, presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b05s3pcj)
South Devon

Peter Gibbs is in Devon to chair the horticultural panel programme. Bunny Guinness, Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Wilson join him to answer an array of gardening conundrums.
Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b05sscm9)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the changes dementia imposes, the importance of colour, and a family gift for ceramics, from Cumbria, Wales and Northern Ireland, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b05sscmc)
Evelyn Waugh - Decline and Fall

Episode 2

Captain Grimes finding himself in 'the soup' again has disappeared and Margot has invited Paul to tutor her son Peter during the school holidays. There he meets the eccentric Otto.

Conclusion of Evelyn's Waugh's fast paced roller-coaster set in the early jazz age dramatised by Jeremy Front.

Paul ..... Kieran Hodgson
Margot ..... Emilia Fox
Otto ..... Tom Hollander
Peter ..... Alex Lawther
Grimes ..... John Sessions
Prendergast ..... James Fleet
Dr Fagan ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Philbrick ..... Ben Crowe
Alastair ..... Sam Valentine
Sir Humphrey/Governor 2/Scout ..... Sam Dale
Inspector Bruce/Warder 1 ..... Stephen Critchlow
Lunatic/Warder 2 ..... Ian Conningham
Lucas-Dockerty/Chaplain ..... David Acton
Jane Grimes ..... Jessica Turner
Bessy ..... Rhiannon Neads

Directed by Tracey Neale

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b05sscmf)
Hisham Matar - In the Country of Men

James Naughtie and readers talk to Hisham Matar about his gripping debut novel In The Country Of Men.

This international bestseller is set in Colonel Gaddafi's Libya of 1979, as the narrator Suleiman looks back on his childhood summer and tries to makes sense of the bewildering world around him. His best friend's father disappears and is next seen on state television at a public execution, a mysterious man sits outside the house all day, gives him sweets and asks for the names of his father's friends; and it seems his father has finally disappeared for good.

Hisham Matar explains now the novel is not autobiographical but that he remembers that time well, how life in Libya 'went indoors' with cinemas closed and access to bookshops restricted. He remembers how fears, secrets and betrayal threatened individuals and families. He also talks about how his own father disappeared in the 1980s.

In The Country Of Men was shortlisted for the 2006 Man Booker Prize.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Hisham Matar
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

June's Bookclub choice is Do No Harm by Henry Marsh.


SUN 16:30 Walt Whitman's War (b05sscmh)
Walt Whitman, the great American poet of Leaves of Grass and Song of Myself gave up poetry one hundred and fifty years ago during the American Civil War to volunteer as a wound dresser for the battle injured. What he saw in the bloody field hospitals had a profound impact on Whitman and on his poetry. He went back to words after the war and wrote some of his best poetry and prose in the grim light of what he'd seen.

An exploration of Whitman's war with archive recordings of Whitman himself, the music of John Adams and contributions from poets Allen Ginsberg, Mark Ford, Galway Kinnell and Mark Doty.


SUN 17:00 The Rape of Berlin (b05sfg37)
As Europe was being liberated from Fascism at the end of World War II, one of the most infamous incidents of mass rape in history was underway. Lucy Ash investigates a story that slipped under the official radar.

Winston Churchill spoke for many when he saluted the Soviet army as heroes. Yet the widespread sexual violence - in part, revenge for the devastating Nazi invasion of the USSR - went unacknowledged. Some estimate there were 100,000 rapes in Berlin alone but, although no secret, social stigma, political repression, guilt and fear of revisionism ensured that for decades the subject was untouchable in Germany. Today it's still an explosive topic - virtually taboo in Putin's Russia. Renewed East-West divisions over the conflict in Ukraine are exposing to what extent the 'Great Patriotic War', as Russians call it, is unfinished business.

Lucy travels first to Moscow and then to Berlin to meet a veteran and a rape survivor. She discovers letters, abortion records and two remarkably candid diaries from spring 1945: one by a young Red Army officer, and the other by a female German journalist, which caused outrage when it was first published in German in 1959, but rocketed to the bestseller lists in 2003. We confront multiple aspects to the story: that as well as German rape victims there were also the Soviet, Polish and Jewish women who had just been freed from Nazi camps; that sexual violence was committed in different ways on all sides, by the Wehrmacht, the Red Army and the Western Allies; and that sexual encounters ranged from the most brutal gang rape to prostitution to romances across enemy lines.

Producer: Dorothy Feaver

Image credit: German-Russian Museum Berlin-Karlshorst, photo correspondent Timofey Melnik.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b05spk32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05srz37)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b05srz39)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05srz3f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b05ssfv8)
Chris Hawkins

This week, Chris Hawkins selects moments to move you, moments to intrigue you and moments to make you laugh. There are words and looks that lead from trust to betrayal and the tragic real-life story of a psychiatrist and his wife dealing with early on-set dementia. As the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo approaches, there are the pre-battle battles between re-enactment hobbyists in all their refinery and we contemplate the beauty of Asia's most elegant of national symbols with Mishal Husain talking about her saris. Be charmed by the curmudgeonly ex minor portrayed by John Godber in Happy Jack, meet the babysitter turned 60s pop sensation and listen to Sir Tim Rice as he reveals his worst lyrical rhymes.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b05ssfvb)
It's International Dawn Chorus Day and Christine, Jim and Jennifer enjoy the sounds at 'Aldridge' Millennium Wood. Jim's horrified to discover that the title's correct when he later checks the map.
Jim and Christine's homes are still undergoing work following the flood. Jim's happy using the time to busy himself with planting in the garden - life goes on after all.
Jennifer mentions the Great Bird Race. It's a competition for bird spotters and fundraiser for the Borsetshire Wildlife Trust. Jim's suspicious but Christine persuades him to form a team, pointing out Robert's possible advantage. However, Jim dismisses 'dilettante' Christine as a team member.
Rachel from the Environment Agency plans to create a printed map incorporating local comments. This will help form flood prevention strategies. Jim's collected testimonies will be a valuable resource.
Thinking about Route B, Jim suggests commissioning an independent consultant to carry out a full flood risk assessment. Jennifer's prepared to underwrite the cost.
David shows Rachel Berrow Farm on the map. He mentions the blocked culvert. Rachel spots a watercourse that the EA maintains, which she says will have been inspected regularly - any blockage would have been removed. She promises to check the records to see when it was last inspected and get back to David.


SUN 19:15 The Vote Now Show (b05s3sth)
Series 2

Episode 4

A series of election specials from the Now Show team. Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guests to give their own unique take on the week's election shenanigans.

Episode four features Laura Shavin, John Robins, Ben Partridge, Deborah Orr and Adam Kay.

Producers; Alexandra Smith, Joe Nunnery and Rachel Wheeley.

Executive Producer Alison Vernon-Smith.


SUN 19:45 Above Ground (b05ssfvf)
You Want?

Nearing retirement, feeling jaded by life, Karl is in France to sell his aunt's rapidly dilapidating house. Caught up in a snowstorm, he finds himself engulfed by a memory of an encounter with a local woman during an earlier visit to the country.

Vivid short story by Jane Rogers.

Story series in which writers consider themes of age and ageing. The series title, Above Ground, is inspired by a quote from Carol Shields's novel The Stone Diaries: "Here's to another year and let's hope it's above ground."

The story first appeared in Jane Rogers' story collection Hitting Trees With Sticks, published by Comma Press in 2012.

Read by David Acton
Written by Jane Rogers
Produced by Kirsteen Cameron


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b05sfd0r)
Polls, Nuns, Life Partners

Is the number of Catholic nuns on the up? It was recently reported in the news that the number of Catholic nuns has trebled in the past five years, reaching its highest level since 1990. The number of women training to become Catholic nuns in Great Britain has reached a 25-year high. Are we witnessing the so-called 'Pope Francis effect'? What's the long-term trend - are more women becoming nuns? Tim Harford looks at figures from the UK and across the world.

On the eve of the UK's general election, Tim Harford takes a look at what polling data can tell us about predicting elections.

Plus, Matt Parker the stand-up mathematician is invited back to the programme to respond to a listener's query about his theory on the best way to find a life partner.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b05s49k3)
Sir Philip Carter, Andrew Lesnie, Margaret Harrison, Tom McCabe MSP, Claire Gordon

Matthew Bannister on:-

Sir Philip Carter the chairman of Everton football club who presided over a successful period in the club's fortunes.

Andrew Lesnie the cinematographer who won an Oscar for his work on the Lord of the Rings.

Anti-nuclear campaigner Margaret Harrison who helped to start the protest camp at Faslane.

Tom McCabe, the Labour MSP who brought in the smoking ban in Scotland.

Claire Gordon, the actress known as Britain's answer to Brigitte Bardot who married the author of the Henry Root letters.

And Ben E King, the singer best known for his hit single Stand By Me.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b05spjyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b05ss4rg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b05s3kdz)
Immigration - The Business View

Immigration is one of the key issues of the General Election campaign. Peter Day asks businesses, big and small, what they think about immigration. How dependent is Britain on workers from other countries in Europe, and beyond? What impact have tighter visa restrictions for migrants from outside Europe had on British business?

Producer: Caroline Bayley.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b05ssh14)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b05sshbl)
Kevin Maguire of The Mirror analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b05s3gzg)
Far from the Madding Crowd; Christopher Doyle; Polish Cinema; DVD Review

With Francine Stock

Festen director Thomas Vinterberg discusses his latest adaptation of Far From The Madding Crowd and why he hasn't seen all of John Schlesinger's 1967 version with Terence Stamp and Julie Christie.

Cinematographer Christopher Doyle reveals some tricks of his trade and tells Francine what's the colour of love.

Director Krzysztof Zanussi talks about what it was like working under state censorship in communist-era Poland.

Critic Sophie Monks-Kaufman makes her pick of the best DVDs of the month.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b05ss4r8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 04 MAY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b05srz58)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b05s36cg)
Post Traumatic Stress; Managing Beds in the NHS

Post traumatic stress in male combat veterans: Laurie Taylor talks to Nick Caddick, Research Assistant at Loughborough University, and co-author of a study exploring the relationship between masculinity, militarism and mental health. Do conventional notions of male bravery and resilience impede soldiers' ability to access to support? They're joined by Anthony King, Professor in Sociology at the University of Exeter.

Also, managing beds in the NHS. Pressure on beds is an acute challenge to the health service.
Davina Allen, Professor of Healthcare Organisation at Cardiff University, discusses her study into bed utilisation from the point of view of UK hospital nurses. How is access to beds granted or denied and who decides?

Producer: Natalia Fernandez.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b05ss4r6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05srz5b)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05srz5g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05srz5j)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b05srz5l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05tvw32)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Mike Ford.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b05ssmn8)
Bunny Guinness's Smallholding

Could you provide most of the food needed for your family from eight acres of land? Anna Hill meets the garden designer and Radio 4 Gardeners' Question Time panellist Bunny Guinness, who produces beef, pork, lamb and eggs on her smallholding in northern Cambridgeshire. Bunny talks frankly about rearing her animals, and despatching them in the field, with the help of her slaughterman Paul Smith. She says if she is going to eat meat then she should be responsible for the quality of the animal's life, and its death as well.

Produced and presenter by Anna Hill.


MON 05:56 Weather (b05srz5p)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020vp4h)
Little Egret

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Little Egret. The colonisation of the UK by these small brilliant-white herons with black bills and yellow feet, has astonished ornithologists because of its speed.


MON 06:00 Today (b05ssnfy)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b05ssng0)
Vikram Seth

Tom Sutcliffe talks to the Indian writer Vikram Seth about his latest collection of poetry, Summer Requiem, which traces the dying days of summer and is haunted by loss and decay. The cuckoo's song may celebrate the arrival of spring, but as Nick Davies explains the cuckoo is also a signal of doom, as he explores how cheating evolves and thrives in the natural world. The writer Olivia Laing finds inspiration in a murmuration of birds to ask questions about the beauty of patterns and freedom of movement, and Nick Groom celebrates and regrets the passing of the English seasons and folklore.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b05ssng2)
Antony Sher - Year of the Fat Knight

Episode 1

Antony Sher recounts the year in which he created and performed his version of Shakespeare's Falstaff - despite never intending to undertake such an iconic role.

Thirty years ago, a promising young actor published his account of preparing for and playing the role of Richard III. Antony Sher's Year of the King has since become a classic of theatre literature.

In 2014, Sher - in his 60s - was cast as Falstaff in Gregory Doran's Royal Shakespeare Company production of the two parts of Henry IV. Both the production and Sher's Falstaff were acclaimed by critics and audiences alike, with Sher winning the Critics' Circle Award for Best Shakespearean Performance.

Year of the Fat Knight is Antony Sher's account of researching, rehearsing and performing one of Shakespeare's best-known and most popular characters.

He tells us how he had doubts about playing the part at all; how he sought to reconcile Falstaff's obesity, drunkenness, cowardice and charm; how he wrestled with the fat suit needed to bulk him up; and how he explored the complexities and contradictions of this comic yet often dangerous personality.

On the way, Sher paints a uniquely close-up portrait of the RSC at work.

Read by Antony Sher

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05ssng4)
Women in Music: With Cerys Matthews and Nancy Sinatra

BBC 6 Music's Cerys Matthews joins Jane Garvey in the presenter's chair for a programme dedicated to women in music. Nancy Sinatra reflects on her musical career, and the influence of producer and singer Lee Hazlewood and her father Frank. Pauline Black of The Selecter discusses making music in the multicultural era of 2 Tone. Emily Eavis of Glastonbury, and founder of the Green Man festival, Fiona Stewart, discuss what it takes to put on a major music festival. Plus singer songwriter Nadine Shah plays live from her new album Fast Food and talks about her Pakistani influences, and singer songwriter Amy Wadge describes how she came to write the Ed Sheeran number one smash hit Thinking Out Loud.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05ssqpj)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 4

Episode 1

When farmer Mewa Gul wakes in the night to discover someone is stealing his cows, he stops the intruders but not before they have shot a valuable animal. Recognising one of the intruders as the Khan's son, he gingerly approaches the warlord to complain. Instead of compensating him, Akbar Khan is outraged by his suggestion, claiming has dishonoured him.

Will the pitifully poor farmer and his family have to flee from the village in the face of his threats? It was their place of refuge when they fled from the fighting many years ago. Now Mewa Gul's son urges him to return to their home village and take back their land there. But his sister, Zarlakhta, married to the Khan's son, is horrified by this possibility.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is a slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pakistan-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, electricity or phone - and warlords are hard to contain. It is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for Afghans.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey

Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas

Executive Producer: John Dryden
Producer: Anne-Marie Cole

An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 The Audio Describers (b05ssqpl)
Matthew Sweet enters a whole new cinematic world that sighted people know little or nothing about - audio description. It's the voice in your ear that tells you what's happening if you can't see the pictures.

The audio description profession has its own stars, its own virtuosi. How do they allow visionary cinema to exist beyond the realm of vision? This is cinema for radio.
Matthew meets the men and women who do this work - the invisible co-stars of the world's greatest actors, invisible collaborators of the greatest writers and directors.

In fact, the practice of using evocative and poetic language to bring moving pictures to life has a much longer tradition. In early 20th-century Japan, Benshi narrators would interpret - and often elaborate on - Western and home-grown films for Tokyo audiences. The art form continues today.

In Edwardian Britain, film explainers would bring an aural addition, often with musical accompaniment, to silent films. Matthew Sweet finds this tradition is also alive and well - at a film festival in Scotland.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice (b05ssqpn)
Series 1

Episode 4

Comedian Deborah Frances-White was adopted as a baby in Australia and has only recently discovered her true life mother. Now, in the last of the series, Deborah attempts to find her real father.

Unfortunately, her birth mother's recall is none too good and, despite much probing, she seems unable to remember which of her partners could be the true dad.

So, with the voices of Thom Tuck, Alex Lowe and Celia Pacqola, Deborah sets out on one last Google-driven attempt to complete the circle.

Producer: Alan Nixon
A So Television production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b05srz5s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Across the Board (b05ssqpq)
Series 3

Steve Davis

Across The Board is a series of interviews conducted by Dominic Lawson over a game of chess. Today, Dominic challenges the snooker legend Steve Davis. Davis dominated the green baize for much of the eighties. But can he dominate Dominic on the chess board?

Producer: David Edmonds
Editor: Richard Knight.


MON 12:16 You and Yours (b05ssqzg)
SMS Spam

Spam on your mobile phone is the marketing messages sent without consent. It's against the law to text marketing messages to people who haven't opted in to receive them. A lot of these texts are from obviously dodgy outfits who'll offer something you can only claim by calling them back on a premium rate line. But sometimes they come from reputable companies. When Terence Eden got a spam text from the bookmakers Paddy Power he decided to find out how they got his mobile number. Terence is a mobile technology and we found the story of what happened next on his blog. If you receive an unwanted marketing text you did not opt-in to receive, then forward it to 7726 (the letters on those keys on the mobile, spell out the word spam)

Imagine the scene - you arrive at Malaga airport and head off with your family of four to pick up the hire car. You bought this holiday because it came with a free hire car - a Ford Fusion or equivalent. But then you see the car and despite what's written on your contract, the car isn't a Fusion, or anything like it, it's a tiny Renault Twingo or Peugeot 107. This is what happened to listener Reverend Richard Hancock when he found he would have to squeeze himself his wife and two sons, and 80 kilos of baggage allowance into a micro car.

There are around 4000 removal companies across the UK but only 500 are signed up with a professional body. There are two main trade groups and they both offer resolution and arbitration services when things go wrong. If the company you use isn't signed up - you're on your own.

Whether it is a little extra help with long division, cramming for the 11 plus or after school piano lessons, parents are increasingly employing private tutors to help with the children's education. The education think-tank The Sutton Trust say 23% of young people say they have private tutoring, with those better off families 3-4 times more likely to pay for this kind of help. Our reporter Catherine Carr investigates.

Unfortunately, in England & Wales, an agreement to buy or sell a house is worthless until Exchange of Contracts. Until then, it is not legally binding. The conveyancing process takes weeks, and while the lawyers do their checks, problems arise. But now a new service that promises to "end gazumping forever" has been launched this week. Can it really live up to its promise?


MON 12:57 Weather (b05srz5v)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b05ssqzj)
News and current affairs presented by Martha Kearney, plus Election Call with UKIP leader Nigel Farage.
Becky Milligan investigates allegations of historical child abuse by prominent figures and hears David's story. Women and children are rescued from Boko Haram. Plus Down's Syndrome discussed in the Listeners' Election.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b05ssfvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Tommies (b05sst61)
4 May 1915

by Nick Warburton
Series created by Jonathan Ruffle.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

Through it all, we follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

A day of rest behind the lines is not easy for Mickey Bliss and his Signals colleagues. A time for not only parcels, a haircut, a drink or two, and the sourcing of valuable equipment but also bad temper.

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: David Hunter.


MON 15:00 Food and Farming Awards (b05sst63)
The 2015 BBC Food and Farming Awards

Now in its fifteenth year, the BBC Food and Farming Awards continues to shed light on those farmers, food producers, suppliers and innovators whose hard work and ingenuity highlight the 'best of the best' in British food and drink.

Earlier this year we asked for your nominations, and you responded in your thousands. Our judges have travelled the length and breadth of the country visiting the finalists and sampling food and drink from an array of producers, cooks, retailers and markets.

At the ceremony in College Green in Bristol, host Sheila Dillon and chefs Tom Kerridge, Angela Hartnett and Thomasina Miers take us through the inspirational stories of the finalists and announce this year's winners. Award givers include Richard Corrigan, Cyrus Todiwala and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

Producer: Anna Miles.


MON 16:00 The Invisible College (b05sst65)
Series 1

Episode 1

Dr Cathy FitzGerald presents a series of little lessons in creative writing with help from a ghostly array of great novelists, poets and playwrights.

In episode one, Maya Angelou faces dragons, Ted Hughes wrestles goblins, Charles Bukowski interrupts, Susan Sontag gets drunk on books, and Elizabeth Bowen catches a bad case of Henry James.

Original music by Joe Acheson

Produced by Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b05sstc6)
Series 7

Rear Window

Aleks Krotoski explores the basic human impulse of people watching. We are aware how we perform when we know we are being looked at online but hear little about those watching.


MON 17:00 PM (b05sstc8)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05srz60)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Dilemma (b05sstcb)
Series 4

Episode 5

Sue Perkins puts the big moral and ethical questions to a mixed panel to discern their own personal codes of ethics.

With comedians Nathan Caton and Celia Pacquola, historian Dan Snow, and writer and broadcaster Natalie Haynes.

Up for discussion are unusual meals, lying to children, and the best way to deal with noisy, but happy, neighbours .

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2015.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b05ssth9)
It's May Day and the barbecue's going on The Green. Lynda wants today to do everyone proud. Kenton's keen to make some cash for the sake of the Bull. Meanwhile, David's collecting for the anti-Route B fighting fund.
Rex Fairbrother asks David for a chat about his geese farming plans. He points out their loose family connection. David shares this with Jill as they remember Robin Fairbrother, who had an affair with Elizabeth. Jill and Shula also discuss Robin.
Mia's crowned May Queen but is upset when she loses her crown. It seems the Button girls are the culprits as it's later found stuffed in a hedge.
David helps stubborn Kenton on the burger stall. David's keen to put their differences behind them, but Kenton's not interested. Kenton does let out some of his feelings. He's angry with David for letting him spend money he thought he'd be coming into from the Brookfield sale - and then pulling the plug.
Jill has a thought - is there some way they can help Kenton and stop the pub going under?
Shula's disappointed when Richard Locke has to cancel their dinner tomorrow.
Lynda's pleased that today was such a triumph. In changing times, it's so important for a village to keep its traditions going.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b05ssthc)
Philip Glass

John Wilson is joined by the American composer Philip Glass, one of the towering figures of late 20th century classical music.

Philip Glass came to prominence in 1976 with the sensational premiere of Einstein of the Beach. He has composed over 25 operas and 30 film scores, including The Hours.

As he publishes his memoir, Words Without Music, Glass looks back at his life and how he helped forge a new musical language.

PLAYLIST:

Live improvisation

Koyaanisqatsi - Resources

Dance 8

Einstein on the Beach - Train

Facades

Einstein on the Beach - Knee Play

Koyaanisqatsi - The Grid

Einstein on the Beach - Spaceship

Einstein on the Beach - Bed

Einstein on the Beach - Knee Play

Koyaanisqatsi - Koyaanisqatsi

The Hours - The Hours.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05ssqpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Allergic to the 21st Century (b05nvfqz)
Every day we're exposed to a multitude of man-made chemicals in the food we eat, the air we breathe and the products we clean our homes and wash our bodies with. For some people, like journalist Jane Little, the burden can be almost too much to bear. Certain chemicals trigger extreme physical reactions, leaving her ill and exhausted for days at a time. It's a debilitating condition for her and many thousands of fellow sufferers. Some estimates suggest that 15% of the American population believe they experience ill effects from domestic chemicals.

The trouble is that most members of the medical establishment in the US and the UK refuse to accept that Multiple Chemical Sensitivity is a disease. It's not a straightforward allergy and there's no diagnostic test or clearly defined treatment programme. So what is Jane actually suffering from? To find out she takes a global road trip from the foothills of Cumbria to the deserts of Arizona.

Jane suffered her first extreme reaction whilst staying on the family farm in Cumbria. Exposed, alongside her father, to the cocktail of disinfectants used during the Foot and Mouth outbreak of 2001, she believes this could be the origin of her condition. In Texas she meets clinicians who say that they can explain MCS with a new theory of disease whilst in Arizona she drops in on a community that's retreated completely from a chemically-based society. Living in self-built homes stripped of plastics and petro-chemicals they discourage visitors tainted by perfumes, deodorants and detergents.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b05s3gz2)
Wrestling out of Poverty

In rural India, wrestling often attracts larger crowds than cricket. And for poor, farming communities in Maharashtra, a wrestler in the family can also mean a ticket out of poverty. For Crossing Continents, Rupa Jha meets the young fighters and their families, and explores how this ancient sport is breaking down caste barriers. Linda Pressly producing.


MON 21:00 Forensics in Crisis (b05s2x2h)
Crisis in the Lab

There is a growing sense of crisis inside the world of forensic science. Recent high profile cases such as Jill Dando and Amanda Knox have highlighted serious problems with the way testing is carried out.

In this series, science journalist Linda Geddes investigates why forensic science has fallen into crisis, and what can be done to restore confidence in the field.

Programme 2:

This week, Linda looks at the crisis in the laboratory. Leading experts fear that severe budget cuts, together with an increased reliance on police laboratories, could throw our criminal justice system into jeopardy.

She hears from a former police laboratory worker who says that vital tests are being missed, and visits a forensic fibre laboratory to find out why specialist techniques used to catch killers, paedophiles and rapists, are in danger of dying out.

Producer: Michelle Martin.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b05ssng0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b05srz63)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b05ssx05)
Politicians spend the bank holiday appealing for votes.

Labour considering possibility of minority coalition with Liberal Democrats


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05ssx07)
The Green Road

Episode 1

A story of family, selfishness and compassion on Ireland's Atlantic coast, from the Man Booker Prize-winner, Anne Enright.

The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined, in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age, their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she has decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for one final Christmas together in the family home, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two collections of stories (grouped together as Yesterday's Weather), one book of non-fiction (Making Babies) and five novels, including The Gathering (which was the Irish Novel of the Year and won the Irish Fiction Award along with the 2007 Man Booker Prize) and The Forgotten Waltz (which was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction).

Read by Brid Brennan

Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 The Vote Now Show (b05ssx09)
Series 2

Episode 5

A series of election specials from the Now Show team. Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guests to give their own unique take on the week's election shenanigans.

Episode five features Sarah Kendall, Andrew O'Neill, Laura Shavin, Philip Collins and Mitch Benn.

Producers; Alexandra Smith, Joe Nunnery and Rachel Wheeley.
Executive Producer Alison Vernon-Smith.


MON 23:30 Word of Mouth (b05s3079)
Naming Family Relationships - Step, Half or 'Blended'?

Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright consider the names we give to our family relationships: stepmother, half-brother or "blended" family. Author and social critic Dr Wednesday Martin has strong opinions on the effects of these linguistic choices. Where do the words we use for our relatives come from and what do the choices we make say about us?
Producer Beth O'Dea.



TUESDAY 05 MAY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b05srz72)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b05ssng2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05srz75)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05srz77)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05srz79)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b05srz7c)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05twjlt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Mike Ford.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b05stg05)
Rural Payments Agency Latest; First Milk Changes; Puppy Farms in Wales

We hear the latest instalment in what's becoming the long running saga of farmers attempts to negotiate the subsidy payments system. As reported on Farming Today, the computer based application process in England was replaced by paper forms after major problems with it. The Rural Payments Agency promised that those forms would be with farmers by the end of April. But by the end of last week many farmers were still waiting.

For years Wales has been dubbed the puppy farm capital of the UK by animal lovers who say some breeders have kept dogs in poor conditions and bred dogs with genetic weaknesses for profit.
However, stricter rules for puppy farms have now come into force in Wales, so more people who breed dogs will have to apply for a license. Some welfare charities question how effective this will be. Abigail Neal of BBC Wales tells us why puppy farms have become such an issue, particularly in rural west Wales.

The dairy co-operative First Milk has announced that it is cutting jobs and prices in a plan designed to turn around the struggling business. Rob Harrison, the chairman of the National Farmers Union's Dairy Board gives us his reaction.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020vp98)
Common Sandpiper

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Common Sandpiper. This bird can look slightly pot-bellied as it bobs nervously on the edge of an upland lake or on a midstream boulder. Get too close though and it will be off - flickering low over the surface on bowed wings.


TUE 06:00 Today (b05stg07)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture (b05t5jxf)
Alistair Cooke was a British journalist and broadcaster, who presented Letter from America on BBC Radio for nearly 60 years. To commemorate his life and work, the BBC has invited historian Prof David Blight of Yale University to present the 2015 Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture.

Prof Blight is author of the acclaimed Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, which explores what he sees as a romanticized history of the American Civil War.

Blight says the great issues of the war were never truly resolved - especially the issue of equal rights for emancipated slaves.

At a time when the issue of race is at the forefront of debate in America, Prof Blight will explore how the role and experience of African-Americans during and after the war is often overshadowed by stories of brave men from the North and South.

Crucially, the schism over equal rights versus states' rights, which continued to divide the country after the war, has often gone ignored in favour of a more positive historical slant.

In his lecture, Professor Blight explores the politics of memory and how, 150 years on, the way the American Civil war is remembered continues to haunt American society today.

The programme is chaired by Razia Iqbal, and was recorded in front of a live audience at WABE public radio in Atlanta.

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith
Editor: Hugh Levinson.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b05t609j)
Antony Sher - Year of the Fat Knight

Episode 2

Antony Sher recounts the year in which he created and performed his version of Shakespeare's Falstaff - despite never intending to undertake such an iconic role.

Thirty years ago, a promising young actor published his account of preparing for and playing the role of Richard III. Antony Sher's Year of the King has since become a classic of theatre literature.

In 2014, Sher - in his 60s - was cast as Falstaff in Gregory Doran's Royal Shakespeare Company production of the two parts of Henry IV. Both the production and Sher's Falstaff were acclaimed by critics and audiences alike, with Sher winning the Critics' Circle Award for Best Shakespearean Performance.

Year of the Fat Knight is Antony Sher's account of researching, rehearsing and performing one of Shakespeare's best-known and most popular characters.

He tells us how he had doubts about playing the part at all; how he sought to reconcile Falstaff's obesity, drunkenness, cowardice and charm; how he wrestled with the fat suit needed to bulk him up; and how he explored the complexities and contradictions of this comic yet often dangerous personality.

On the way, Sher paints a uniquely close-up portrait of the RSC at work.

Read by Antony Sher

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05stg0d)
Xinran, Ella Woodward

Tania Branigan discusses attitudes to domestic violence in China; Xinran talks about her new book, Buy Me the Sky, looking at the effect of the one child policy introduced in China in 1980; Karen Patterson presenter of 'Good Morning, Ulster' explains what's happening in the General Election in Northern Ireland; health-eating blogger, Ella Woodward, reveals her first cookery book; the London Festival of Baroque Music 2015: Ruth Rendell's last interview on Woman's Hour in August 2014;

Presenter : Jane Garvey
Producer : Kirsty Starkey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05stg0g)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 4

Episode 2

Mewa Gul has inadvertently dishonoured the Khan. Now he must flee with his family, leaving his daughter to live with her husband and new family - the family of Akbar Khan. Zarlakhta is devastated by their departure but her brother, Taza Gul, has been finding out about the incentives for returning refugees. He is hopeful that they can claim back their land in the village they fled from many years ago.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is a slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pakistan-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, electricity or phone - and warlords are hard to contain. It is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for Afghans.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey

Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas

Executive Producer: John Dryden
Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Forensics in Crisis (b05stg0j)
Crisis in Court

In this series, science journalist Linda Geddes investigates why forensic science has fallen into crisis, and what can be done to restore confidence in the field.

Programme 3:

In March 2015, Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito were finally acquitted of the murder of Meredith Kercher. The case hinged on DNA results that were later overturned in court.

In this episode, Linda Geddes looks at why this evidence was unreliable and how it was misinterpreted in the courtroom.

DNA testing is being increasingly relied upon by UK police to secure convictions. But leading experts such as Prof Peter Gill, who helped to pioneer DNA fingerprinting in the 1980s, are concerned that the technique is being overstretched.

As we become able to detect ever smaller amounts of DNA, from more than one person, the sources of error and uncertainty are increasing.

Defence lawyers fear that DNA evidence isn't being adequately cross-examined in court, due to complexity of the analysis needed to produce results.

Could our unwavering faith in DNA evidence be misplaced?

Producer: Michelle Martin.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b05stg0l)
Series 20

Scarborough Fair

"Tomorrow we're going in search of a song and in search of a dream of England which has travelled right around the world" - Will Parsons

No one can be sure of the true origins of the song Scarborough Fair. It's a melody of mystery, of voices of old, of ancient days. It's travelled through land and time, drawing singers and listeners in where ever they maybe.

For Will Parsons and Guy Hayward it's a song that has inspired a pilgrimage through a landscape that is embodied in the lyrics. Setting off from Whitby Abbey, they journey to Scarborough on foot, sensing the song as they go, learning to sing it, interpreting it in a new way just as thousands of traditional singers have done throughout time.

This too is the landscape of Martin Carthy, the 'father of folk' who has made his home along the Yorkshire coast. It was from this legendary singer that Paul Simon first learnt Scarborough Fair, creating a version that came to represent a generation continuing its journey far and wide, weaving its spell in many different guises, never truly being pinned down.

Decades on Harpist Claire Jones recorded a version of her own. Arranged by her husband, the composer Chris Marshall, hers is a very personal journey through unexpected illness to recovery. Whilst for Mike Masheder it is a song that brings memories of his wife Sally, who approached the journey of life with love and equanimity.

"It can change or stay the same. And the more it changes, the more it stays the same" - Martin Carthy

Produced by Nicola Humphries
With expert contribution from Sandra Kerr, musician and lecturer at Newcastle University School of Arts and Culture.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b05srz7j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Across the Board (b05stg0n)
Series 3

Garry Kasparov

He dominated the chess world for fifteen years. In Across The Board, Dominic Lawson interviews Gary Kasparov over a game of chess - and asks him not just about the 64 squares, but also about his life post-chess, as a staunch opponent of President Putin.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b05stg0q)
Call You and Yours: Do you pay for private tuition?

The private tuition market in the UK is estimated to be worth six billion pounds, with one in four children tutored at some point. Is this so-called tiger parenting, imported from cultures where children are expected to work long hours to get into top schools? Or is it just parents doing what they can to ensure a good life for their children?

Today we're asking if you've employed a private tutor. Have you paid somebody to get your child into a particular school or to give them the edge in exams? How did it work out? Are you somebody who provides these extra-curricular classes? Do the children you teach thrill to the idea of extra tuition after school? Or are you somebody who was forced into extra tuition as a child and hated every minute of it, even if it got you into the right school.

Email the programme now - YouandYours@bbc.co.uk, and join Winifred Robinson at quarter past 12.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b05srz7l)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b05stg0s)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b05ssth9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b05stg0v)
Higher

Year of the Rat

Higher: Year of the Rat by Steve May

Return of the comedy series about the UK's worst university. Jim is sent to China to recruit new students. But the new interim Vice Chancellor seems to be setting him up to fail.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b05stkq6)
Series 7

Songlines

Josie Long hears stories of music and memory. From the song that proves your parents right - rock and roll really will lead you down a dangerous path of drugs and destruction - to the symphony that haunted one man's dreams for decades.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

The items featured in the programme are:

96 Tears
Feat. Anthony Bourdain
Produced by Ann Heppermann, Kara Oehler and Rick Moody

Piano Man
Feat. Barry Colson
Produced by Sindre Leganger

The Stage
Feat. Grace Savage
Produced by Hana Walker-Brown

Lullaby
Feat. Colin Dexter
Produced by Phil Smith

Dream Symphony
Feat. Stuart Sharp
Produced by Olivia Humphreys with Jodie Taylor.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b05stkq9)
Britain's Environment: The Debate

How will the next government tackle Britain's environmental problems?

The politics of the environment and our food supply are vital for the future of the planet.

Tom Heap hosts a debate asking if this election campaign has raised the issues that need addressing.

What specific commitments have the political parties made on nature? Where are the big ideas to tackle climate change? How can we secure our food supplies without wrecking the planet?

Tom Heap will put these challenging issues to a panel that features philosopher, Roger Scruton, former Executive Director of Friends of the Earth, Tony Juniper, Chief Executive of the Soil Association, Helen Browning, Director of Forum for the Future, Jonathon Porritt and Heather Hancock, lead author of the independent review of the BBC's coverage of rural affairs.

Presenter: Tom Heap
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b05stkqm)
Colour Words

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk to Dr Carole Biggam about colour words. Where do they come from and how do they vary between cultures and change meanings through time? How can it be that pink used to mean yellow..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b05stkqz)
Series 36

Wendy Cope on John Clare

"John Clare, I cried last night for you" wrote Wendy Cope in a poem dedicated to the earlier poet, who overcame monumental setbacks such as a poverty-stricken upbringing and a long struggle with mental illness. However, Clare managed to write some of the most sensitive poetry in the English language. At one point he was known as "the English Robert Burns" but then his fame dropped away and many people now remember him solely for his cri de coeur, "I Am."

Expert witness is John Clare's biographer, Sir Jonathan Bate.

Producer Christine Hall

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2015


TUE 17:00 PM (b05stkr5)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05srz7p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Lemn Sissay's Homecoming (b05stkr9)
Addis Ababa

We all leave. We all migrate from childhood to adulthood, from village to town to city, from single to married. We all hate and love where we are from. We are all immigrants of time. There are problems with home and a need to leave. There is a love of home and a need to leave. Goodbye is who we are.

Lemn Sissay explores what "home" means through stand-up, poetry and conversation. It's surely not just a physical location - it's the people, the memories, the feeling. It's not home if you don't belong there, it's just where you live.

The first of these two shows was recorded at the Ghion Hotel, in Addis Ababa.

Addis is a place that Lemn feels at home in - but why? He wasn't born there, doesn't live there, and can't even speak the language. Helping Lemn understand this are two Ethiopians who were brought up in Europe but who, unlike Lemn, moved back to Addis in adulthood; a social anthropologist who is an Ethiopian with a famous English name; and his own sister, who is Addis born and bred.

Written and performed by Lemn Sissay,

Lemn Sissay is the author of five collections of poetry. He’s also written plays for stage and BBC radio. He was the first poet to write for the Olympics 2012 and received an MBE from the Queen for Services to Literature. He is associate artist at London’s Southbank Centre, and an (hon) doctor of letters. If you should google "Lemn Sissay" all the returning hits will be about him. There is only one person named Lemn Sissay in the world.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b05stkrf)
Fallon's bunting seems to have been stolen. Ed suspects the Button girls - he remembers being just like them at that age. Harrison teases Fallon, who explains that it's part of her livelihood. She finds it sweet when Harrison launches his own private investigation, asking Charlie who says he hasn't seen a thing.

Ed asks Charlie if he can end his tenancy on the Estate- as the Fairbrother lads are interested in the land for geese farming. Charlie explains it's a Borchester Land decision - he'll speak to Graham Ryder. Ed hopes that if he can get out of his tenancy he might start being paid for the hedge trimming work, but Charlie makes no promises. Ed also mentions some drilling work he's been doing with Adam at Home Farm - a new grass ley.

Ed's anxious to give Emma a honeymoon. Eddie asks Ed for help getting rid of Jethro's old sideboard at Keepers Cottage - the sight of it is upsetting Clarrie.

Eddie hints to Ed that his best man should be closer to his own age. However, Ed says he's happy for Eddie to do it.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b05stkrh)
Spooks, Meklit, Christopher Hope, The Spalding Suite

Spooks: The Greater Good brings the popular TV spy thriller series which ended in 2011 to the big screen with Kit Harington and Peter Firth. Will the move work? Antonia Quirke reviews.

Ethiopian American singer songwriter Meklit Hadero tells Kirsty about her second album We Are Alive and explains how it was influenced by a project to bring the nations of the Nile Basin together through music.

The theatre director Benji Reid, and the writer and poet Inua Ellams, discuss their new show, The Spalding Suite. Set in the world of British basketball, it uses live beatboxing, hip-hop, movement, and poetry.

The South African novelist Christopher Hope on his latest book, Jimfish, which - inspired by Voltaire's Candide - tells the story of an unusual young man's encounters with some of the most notorious tyrants of the 20th century.

And a piece of audio art will be broadcast tonight on Radio 4. The piece, The Quarryman's Daughters, was commissioned from artist Katrina Palmer by the BBC and Artangel. She discusses the differences between creating art for a gallery and for radio.

Presenter: Sarah Johnson
Producer: Kirsty Lang.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05stg0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b05stkrm)
Targeting the Vulnerable

It's taken a long time to break through the culture of denial, but child sexual exploitation cases from Rochdale to Oxford have shown that grooming of children can happen in any community.

There seems to be a growing acceptance that what the Deputy Children's Commissioner says is true: 'there isn't a town, village of hamlet in which children are not being sexually exploited'.

Councils that thought they were immune from groomers and traffickers, are now training staff to spot child sexual exploitation. And children are being taught how to avoid falling prey.

But, as children become more aware of grooming, are abusers increasingly turning their attention to people with learning disabilities?

In the first of a new series, File on 4 hears warnings from disability workers and detectives that abusers are increasingly targeting people with disabilities - because they're less likely to know what grooming is, less likely to tell, and if they do, their case is far less likely to go to court.

Jane Deith visits the only safe house in the UK for women with learning disabilities who've been victims of rape and sexual exploitation, and hears even this secret address is now on the radar of gangs trying to groom the residents.

Women with learning disabilities tell their stories of being groomed and exploited, how they eventually broke their silence, only to be told the crimes would not be prosecuted. Of an estimated 1400 cases of sexual abuse each year, only 1% result in a conviction.

If offenders aren't being punished, can we prevent the abuse by protecting those at risk? Councils worried someone is being exploited can go to the Court of Protection for permission to restrict their relationships on the grounds they don't have the mental capacity to consent to sex. But it's a difficult thing to rule on. File on 4 hears from disability workers who say men and women are being left open to rape and abuse, but also from campaigners who say the state is denying people their fundamental human right to sexual relationships.

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b05stkrr)
Dinosaurs and Dogs

Professor Paul Upchurch is a Palaeobiolgoist at London's UCL. His interest in dinosaurs and the living world began when he was a small boy and he now regards his hobby as his work. Paul is registered blind and talks to Peter about the way his visual impairment impacts on his work and his personal life.

Lee Kumutat has travelled to Torquay in Devon, to meet Steph Read. Steph has the hereditary connective-tissue disorder known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and she uses a wheelchair. Steph has a dual assistance dog, called Vegas, to help her with both her visual impairment and her physical disability and she talks to Lee about the difference Vegas makes to her daily living.

Producer: Cheryl Gabriel.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b05stkrt)
Claudia Hammond with the latest in psychology, neuroscience and mental health. This week her studio guest is neuroscientist Phil Beaman from Reading University. His latest research suggests a novel way to prevent those irritating earworms that plague most of us at one time or another. Plus that dress: earlier in the year pictures of a dress went viral and it divided families. But does it matter if you think it's blue and black or white and gold? Researcher Brad Pearce asks an audience at the Wellcome Collection. And how to be invisible: researchers in Sweden have discovered a way to trick the brain so people feel invisible.


TUE 21:30 Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture (b05t5jxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b05srz7r)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b05stkry)
Final push for Downing Street - party leaders finish their nationwide tours

Thoughts are turning to the possibility of the electorate delivering a hung parliament.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05stks0)
The Green Road

Episode 2

A story of family, selfishness and compassion on Ireland's Atlantic coast, from the Man Booker Prize-winner, Anne Enright.

The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined, in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age, their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she has decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for one final Christmas together in the family home, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two collections of stories (grouped together as Yesterday's Weather), one book of non-fiction (Making Babies) and five novels, including The Gathering (which was the Irish Novel of the Year and won the Irish Fiction Award along with the 2007 Man Booker Prize) and The Forgotten Waltz (which was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction).

Read by Brid Brennan
Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Open Art (b05stl7n)
The Quarryman's Daughters

An audio excavation of the island of Portland by artist Katrina Palmer.

Since being awarded a commission from Artangel and Radio 4's open call for emerging British artists, Katrina Palmer has based herself on the Isle of Portland in south Dorset to create a major new project on land and on air. The Quarryman's Daughters is the radio element of the project. It tells the story of the Horrocks sisters, eccentric daughters of a dead quarryman who live in two huts on either end of the island.

Beginning in the style of an intimate reading enhanced by a spectral soundtrack, the narration is interwoven with the voices of the Horrocks sisters and field recordings from Portland - the swell of the tide, the banging and cutting of quarry work - conveying an unsettling atmosphere.

This audio artwork is preceded by a short documentary that explores the historical riches of this unique place. The listener is transported to Portland to hear key chapters from the island's past and to find out why it continues to capture the imagination. Portland has been shaped and hollowed out over centuries by convicts and quarrymen to provide stone for some of London's best-known buildings - one million square feet of Portland stone is said to have been quarried for St Paul's Cathedral.

Katrina Palmer has undertaken her own excavations into this elemental place, marked by unsettling absences and deviant goings-on.

The other elements in this project are The Loss Adjusters (a site-specific audio walk on Portland), and the book End Matter.

Produced by Katrina Palmer and Hana Walker-Brown
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:45 Jigsaw (b01r9rtx)
Series 1

Episode 5

Dan Antopolski, Nat Luurtsema and Tom Craine piece together a selection of silly, clever, dark sketches.

Producer: Colin Anderson.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2013.



WEDNESDAY 06 MAY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b05srz8l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b05t609j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05srz8p)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05srz8r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05srz8t)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b05srz8w)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05tlm36)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Mike Ford.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b05stlzq)
Antibiotics, Rural Education, Small Farms

2 sisters, one of the largest poultry producers in the UK, is aiming to protect antibiotic effectiveness in humans, by giving less to their chickens. Laura Higham from the Farm Animal Initiative is helping them to find alternative methods of dealing with chicken health and says that its crucial if humans are to continue getting benefit from antibiotics.
The election is nearly upon us, and Education has always been near the top of any political agenda. Matthew Barlow visits Hollinsclough Church of England Primary School in Staffordshire which has around 50 pupils. Their head teacher Janette Mountford-Lees argues that more resources go to city schools which is bad news for rural education.
This week, Farming Today is taking a look at the fortunes and future of small farms. Rebecca Laughton has a small market Garden in Dorset and told Charlotte Smith that small farms were more sustainable in the long term future of agriculture. Meanwhile Sally Challenor talks to Jules Moore who runs smallholder courses in South Gloucestershire for those wanting to set up small farms of their own.
Presenter Anna Hill. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020xv0f)
Savi's Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Savi's Warbler. Count yourself very lucky if you hear the buzzing song of a Savi's Warbler, these are very rare birds indeed, especially breeding pairs and the nests are almost impossible to find, so their song is the best clue that they're about.


WED 06:00 Today (b05stmml)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b05stmmn)
Anita Harris, Vanessa Nicolson, Paul Rose, Zoe Phillips

Libby Purves meets singer and actor Anita Harris; polar explorer Paul Rose; art historian Vanessa Nicolson and Zoe Phillips, assistant armourer at the Royal Opera House.

Zoe Phillips is senior assistant armourer at the Royal Opera House. She makes and maintains weaponry for opera and ballet productions. Her work ranges from knives, swords, and retractable daggers to leather holsters and scabbards and she is currently working on items for a new Royal Opera House production of Rossini's William Tell.

Vanessa Nicolson has worked as an art historian and curator. The daughter of Ben Nicolson and granddaughter of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, she was brought up in London and Florence with holidays at Sissinghurst Castle. In her memoir, Have you been Good? she writes about her parents' marriage and the death of her daughter, Rosa, at 19. Have you been Good? is published by Granta Books.

Paul Rose is a polar explorer and ocean diver. He presents a new BBC Two four-part series to mark the 50th anniversary of the 268-mile Pennine Way. He was the base commander of Rothera Research Station in Antarctica for the British Antarctic Survey for ten years and was awarded The Queen's Polar Medal. The Pennine Way is broadcast on BBC Two.

Anita Harris is a singer, dancer and actor who is sharing her stories and songs as part of the London Festival of Cabaret. Spotted ice-skating at 15 by a talent scout for the Bluebell Girls, she soon found herself performing with the troupe in Las Vegas. She has worked with acts including Morecambe and Wise; Tommy Cooper and Frankie Howerd and appeared in two Carry On films. Anita Harris is performing at the Pheasantry as part of the London Festival of Cabaret.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b05t620v)
Antony Sher - Year of the Fat Knight

Episode 3

Antony Sher recounts the year in which he created and performed his version of Shakespeare's Falstaff - despite never intending to undertake such an iconic role.

Thirty years ago, a promising young actor published his account of preparing for and playing the role of Richard III. Antony Sher's Year of the King has since become a classic of theatre literature.

In 2014, Sher - in his 60s - was cast as Falstaff in Gregory Doran's Royal Shakespeare Company production of the two parts of Henry IV. Both the production and Sher's Falstaff were acclaimed by critics and audiences alike, with Sher winning the Critics' Circle Award for Best Shakespearean Performance.

Year of the Fat Knight is Antony Sher's account of researching, rehearsing and performing one of Shakespeare's best-known and most popular characters.

He tells us how he had doubts about playing the part at all; how he sought to reconcile Falstaff's obesity, drunkenness, cowardice and charm; how he wrestled with the fat suit needed to bulk him up; and how he explored the complexities and contradictions of this comic yet often dangerous personality.

On the way, Sher paints a uniquely close-up portrait of the RSC at work.

Read by Antony Sher

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05stnp4)
Crowdfunding Cosmetic Surgery

An increasing number of British women are signing up to a US website that allows women to raise money for breast implants. Jane Garvey talks to Natalie who recently funded her surgery through the site and to Brian who's a donor. Plus the sex columnist for The Times Suzi Godson, on her reservations about the site especially for women with low self-esteem and those who may be suffering from body dysmorphia.

According to the Uganda Bureau of Statistics, over 20 percent of women living there reported that their first sexual experience was rape.. Phoebe Tansley, is the founder of AND - Attacked Not Defeated, a charity with volunteers based in London and Uganda which hopes to open up facilities offering both physical and mental help for victims.

Giulia Enders is a 25 year-old medicine student and author of 'Gut: the inside story of our body's most under-rated organ', which argues that the gut has been unfairly neglected and that we're only now beginning to truly understand its power.

Plus what made you choose the clothes you're wearing today? Did you want to feel powerful, attractive, comfortable, clean? Or to fit in with the people you work with? Leanne Shapton is one of the authors of a book - Women in Clothes - which explores the questions we ask ourselves while getting dressed every day.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Beverley Purcell.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b05stnp6)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 4

Episode 3

When Akbar Khan finds his son has ransacked the village shop, he decides it's time for him to grow up - by marrying. But Mashal does not want to marry his brother's widow any more than she wants to marry him. She stands on her widow's rights and hopes to persuade her father to support her at a village meeting (the jirga). But her father, shopkeeper Sardar Aka and his two wives know that this might be such a dangerous course of action that they too, could be forced to flee

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is a slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pakistan-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, electricity or phone - and warlords are hard to contain. It is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for Afghans.

Cast:
Sardar Aka.....................Madhav Sharma
Gulnara..........................Rina Fatania
Sakina............................Rakhee Thakra
Kashmala.......................Betsabeh Emran
Akbar Khan....................Sagar Arya
Durranai........................Sudha Bhucher
Mashal...........................Muzz Khan

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey

Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas

Executive Producer: John Dryden
Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:56 The Listening Project (b05stp7g)
Nancie and Neil - Feeling Cheated

Fi Glover with an emotional conversation in which a 90-year-old and her son acknowledge for the first time how the loss of a child in 1959 affected them then, and continues to.


WED 11:00 AA: America's Gift to the World (b05pmrv0)
Author AL Kennedy tells the story of Alcoholics Anonymous and its methods.

Eighty years ago, Bill Wilson and Doctor Bob Smith created a route to recovery from a fatal addiction along with an enduring organisation. With more than two million members worldwide, AA is still considered by the majority to be the most effective rehabilitation treatment available to alcoholics. In an age of heavily commercialised recovery programmes, "The Fellowship" continues to work with no active promotion and a consciously anarchistic and non-commercial structure. But few of us really know what happens.

Through conversations with AA members, their partners, parents and children in Al-Anon and Alateen, AL Kennedy explores the method and treatment of the organisation, along with the story of its foundation and survival.

With statistics showing alcohol consumption in the UK on the rise in contrast with the rest of Europe, she asks whether AA is still the best 'cure' for addicts given new science and treatments.

Contributors include Professor Hugh Montgomery, Dr Andrew McQuillin (Molecular Psychiatrist), Dr Mike McPhillips (Psychiatrist in addictive disorders) and Professor Sir Ian Gilmore.

Producer: Kate Bland
A Cast Iron production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (b03yqcws)
Series 1

Books and Booksibility

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is 'Help!'.

King of the one-liners, Milton Jones returns BBC to Radio 4 for an amazing 10th series in a new format where he has decided to set himself up as a man who can help anyone anywhere - whether they need it or not. Because, in his own words, "No problem too problemy".

But each week, Milton and his trusty assistant Anton set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. So when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

This week, Milton Jones is asked to help out with the local book festival because the townsfolk are too distracted by their smartphones to.... Sorry, what was I saying? Sorry, just got a text.

Written by Milton with James Cary ("Bluestone 42", "Miranda") and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show "House Of Rooms") the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton," returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill ("Spamalot", "Mr. Selfridge") as the ever-faithful Anton, and Dan Tetsell ("Newsjack"), and features the one and only Josie Lawrence working with Milton for the first time.

Producer David Tyler's radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, Another Case Of Milton Jones, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, The Brig Society, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, The Castle, The 3rd Degree and even, going back a bit, Radio Active.

Produced and Directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b05srz8z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Across the Board (b05stqsl)
Series 3

Rex Sinquefield

Across The Board is a series of interviews conducted over a game of chess. In this programme Dominic Lawson interviews the game's leading philanthropist. Mega-rich financier Rex Sinquefield is ploughing millions of dollars into the game. But why?


WED 12:16 You and Yours (b05stqsn)
BeautifulPeople.com, KwikFix Plumbers, Audiobooks

The boss of online dating site BeautifulPeople.com tells us why the British don't have much success when they apply to become members of the site.

The boiler insurance firm that's been fined for cold-calling elderly and vulnerable people to take out insurance they don't need. KwikFix Plumbers respond to our listener's complaints.

We're downloading more audiobooks than ever, popular voiceover artist Lorelei King tell us why we love them.

People with learning disabilities are more likely to become victims of sexual abuse. We speak to the charities teaching disabled people how to stay safe.

And how competitions that pop-up on your smartphone can charge you with just one click.

Producer: Lydia Thomas
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b05srz91)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b05stqsq)
Rigorous analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Martha Kearney. Plus Election Call with the Liberal Democrat Business Secretary Vince Cable.

Editor: Nick Sutton.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b05stkrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b05stqss)
Higher

Creative Solutions

Higher: Creative Solutions by Steve May
Comedy series about Hayborough University, ranked 132nd in the UK. Jim has returned from China in triumph and is rewarded by being promoted to Makeshift Vice Chancellor. But a rather shady educational company is working with the board of governors and wants to do a deal with the university.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b05strvj)
Money Box Live: Consumer Rights

Retail therapy gone wrong? To ask about consumer rights, returns and refunds call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your questions to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

If you've saved hard to make a purchase, shopped around to find value for money, install a new kitchen or send a gift, it's frustrating to find poor quality goods and services, or wait for a delivery that never arrives.

So what are your rights to redress? Presenter Ruth Alexander will be waiting for your questions on Wednesday.

Chief Retail Ombudsman Dean Dunham will be here to help with complaints about goods and services bought in-store or online.

Solicitor Joanne Lezemore can explain your legal rights and how to take a claim to the small claims court.

Adam Mortimer from the UK European Consumer Centre can tackle your cross-border disputes about shopping, car hire or timeshare and holiday clubs.

Whatever your problem, for free and impartial advice call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b05stkrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b05strvl)
Division of Domestic Labour - Gentrification and Working-Class Residents

Gentrification: its impact on working class residents. Laurie Taylor talks to Kirsteen Paton, lecturer in the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds, about her groundbreaking research in a neighbourhood undergoing urban renewal and improvement. Many such studies have focused on middle class lifestyles rather than the experience of less well off members of the community. Are working class residents inevitably displaced by gentrification and must traditional ways of life always disappear? Or can poorer people re-work the process and gain on their own terms? They're joined by Melissa Butcher, lecturer in Human Geography at Birkbeck, University of London.

Also, 'sharing the load': the division of domestic labour amongst couples where women are the higher earners. Clare Lyonette, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Warwick, asks if men do more when they earn less.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b05strvn)
Journalists on the Election Trail, Alex Crawford from Sky News, CEO of Bloomberg Media

On the final day of election campaigning, we hear from the front line journalists who have been on the trail with candidates. There have been reports that this election has been more stage-managed by spin doctors than any previously, with national journalists even being excluded from covering events. Steve Hewlett is joined by some leading political journalists; Michael Crick from Channel 4; Patrick Wintour from the Guardian; Andrew Grice the political editor of the Independent, and Isabel Hardman from the Spectator. They discuss how easy, or not, it's been to get access to politicians, why press conferences are now few and far between, and why the growth of social media is making advisers ultra-cautious in their media management strategy.

Bloomberg, the financial news provider, has become the latest media agency to launch a dedicated European digital edition. Bloomberg rents out terminals which provide real time data to financial professionals, and currently most of its audience are subscribers. In an effort to attract a more general business audience, it's launched Bloomberg Business Europe - an online site that's free to all. Steve Hewlett talks to CEO of Bloomberg Media Justin B. Smith about expanding the portfolio, and how the company's strategy to build its digital assets will impact on business.

And danger, excitement and the challenge of making British TV viewers care about news happening in distant places - Sky News' Alex Crawford talks about life as a foreign correspondent, as she receives the Charles Wheeler Award for outstanding contribution to broadcast journalism.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b05sts7b)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05srz93)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Clare in the Community (b03pjcyf)
Series 9

In Blog We Trust

Clare is convinced that the Sparrowhawk Centre is the home of a blogger called 'The Secret Social Worker' and sets out to track them down. Meanwhile Brian accepts Simon's help to find a date.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Clare continually struggles to control both her professional and private life.

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden.

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Megan ...... Nina Conti
Nali ...... Nina Conti
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Helen ...... Liza Tarbuck
Simon Andrew Wincott
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Joan ...... Sarah Thom
Delphine ...... Sarah Thom
Teacher ...... Arthur Hughes
Student ...... Arthur Hughes

Producer: Alexandra Smith.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b05stt42)
Pip goes to look over the heifers in Ashfield before getting the sheep in.
Adam hears that Ed and Jazzer are shearing at Brookfield tomorrow. He might book them himself next year.

Adam tells Pip about his plans for some land on Broad Bank. David jokes that Adam will end up with a mixed farm, like Brookfield, if he's not careful. Adam says that's no bad thing.
The devastation from the flood is getting Caroline down, so she's spending more time at Grey Gables working. As Ed now can't use the barn for his wedding reception, they're keen to do something, Caroline suggests to Oliver that they buy Clarrie a wedding outfit - as she's struggling to find one.

Will is at Grey Gables tonight for the hunt landowners' dinner. Pip's there too. Ruth is attending a 'Women in Farming' event.
David introduces Rex and Toby Fairbrother to Pip. David learns that Rex used to play rugby. His brother Toby has worked in the City. David suggests share farming to them.
There's a spark between Toby and Pip as he says he'll be back tomorrow to roll fleeces for Ed and Jazzer. Pip then suggests to David that perhaps her friend Barney might not be the best choice of catcher after all. She'll sort something out...


WED 19:15 Front Row (b05stt44)
Kate Atkinson, Carrie the Musical, Arab Fiction, Venice Biennale

Kate Atkinson discusses her latest novel, A God In Ruins, which is a companion piece to her award-winning Life After Life. In this she continues her exploration of the Second World War and what comes after for those involved in it.

Carrie, the musical adaptation of Stephen King's bestselling novel, was a huge musical flop on Broadway in 1988. This month a newly-reworked version has its London premiere. Samira Ahmed speaks to lyricist Dean Pitchford and director Gary Lloyd about its revival.

Every two years Venice plays host to contemporary artists from around the world for its Biennale. Art critic Rachel Campbell-Johnston has been to the first day of the previews and reports live from Venice to review this year's 56th Biennale.

As the winner of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction is announced, one of the judges, Ayman A. El-Desouky, discusses the restrictions on the publishing industry in some parts of the Arab world and the challenges that publishers and authors in Syria and Gaza currently face.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Rebecca Armstrong.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05stnp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b05stt6d)
The Law and Parenthood

In the first of a news series, Clive Anderson and a panel of senior lawyers, judges and other experts discuss how the law balances the sometimes conflicting interests of parents and their children.

The law states clearly that the welfare of the child is "paramount", but how is this to be established and what happens when the interests of a child conflict with those of a parent? Who should decide what is in the best interests of a child in the first place - the parents or the state? What exactly are the responsibilities and rights of parents in relation to a child's education, medical care or home?

Sir Mark Potter, former President of the High Court Family Division, and senior lawyers experienced in representing children and parents shed light on the difficult decisions the courts have to wrestle with - such as the case of Ashya King, removed by his parents from Southampton General Hospital, raising a raft of legal, ethical and moral issues.

How are legal decisions arrived at when separating parents disagree about how a child should be educated, or where one parent wants to take the child to another country? And if the welfare of the child is paramount, should it be made easier for children to take their parents to court to fight for their rights?

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b05sttjh)
John Williams: Unexpected Joy

Comedian John Williams finds unexpected joy in his autistic son's view of life, despite the inevitable struggles.

"I have learnt far far more about the human condition, and what it truly means to be alive from just being with those with learning diabilities than I have from any eminent teacher or book."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b05stkq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b05stmmn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b05sttjk)
A round-up of the election campaign as the polls get ready to open

We have a special report from the East Midlands about the economic recovery.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05stw87)
The Green Road

Episode 3

A story of family, selfishness and compassion on Ireland's Atlantic coast, from the Man Booker Prize-winner, Anne Enright.

The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined, in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age, their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she has decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for one final Christmas together in the family home, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two collections of stories (grouped together as Yesterday's Weather), one book of non-fiction (Making Babies) and five novels, including The Gathering (which was the Irish Novel of the Year and won the Irish Fiction Award along with the 2007 Man Booker Prize) and The Forgotten Waltz (which was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction).

Read by Brid Brennan
Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Book at Bedtime (b05stw89)
The Green Road

Episode 4

A story of family, selfishness and compassion on Ireland's Atlantic coast, from the Man Booker Prize-winner, Anne Enright.

The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined, in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age, their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she has decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for one final Christmas together in the family home, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two collections of stories (grouped together as Yesterday's Weather), one book of non-fiction (Making Babies) and five novels, including The Gathering (which was the Irish Novel of the Year and won the Irish Fiction Award along with the 2007 Man Booker Prize) and The Forgotten Waltz (which was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction).

Read by Brid Brennan
Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 The Music Teacher (b03brt31)
Series 3

Episode 5

Richie Webb returns as multi-instrumentalist music teacher Nigel Penny.

Nigel tries to get his online music lessons up and running but finds himself hampered by an inability to speak Portuguese. Meanwhile, with the Arts Centre having been commandeered as a refuge for local flood victims, Belinda is attempting to keep four hundred wet members of the public from dripping on the carpet.

Directed by Nick Walker
Audio production by Matt Katz

Written and produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Twin Peaks (b05pktlc)
Twin Peaks is one of the most influential and innovative programmes in television history - writer and broadcaster Danny Leigh goes for a walk in the woods to explain why.

Before The Killing, True Detective and The X Files, there was Twin Peaks. The programme made its debut in America in the spring of 1990. By the time it arrived in the UK six months later, millions of people in Britain too were asking 'Who killed Laura Palmer?

At first glance Twin Peaks simply looked to be a quirky murder mystery. But it soon revealed itself to be much, much more. Its creators David Lynch and Mark Frost brought the experimental edge of art house cinema into the living room, and though the series ran for only 15 months, its 30 episodes changed the television landscape and popular culture forever.

It's been 25 years since we first entered the 'cherry pie' logging town and met Agent Dale Cooper, the Log Lady, and the terrifying Bob. To mark the anniversary Danny will have 'water-cooler moments' with Lynch-inspired director Richard Ayoade and crime writer Denise Mina. We'll pay homage to the soundtrack that influenced musicians from the 90s to today with DJ Rob da Bank. Andy Burns, author of Twin Peaks history Wrapped in Plastic, explains how the programme still ripples through popular culture today. And Dr Kirsty Fairclough-Isaacs, senior lecturer in media and performance at Salford University, gives us a lesson on how Twin Peaks transformed television. But in 2015 as in 1990, the owls may not be what they seem...



THURSDAY 07 MAY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b05srzb0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b05t620v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05srzb3)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05srzb5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05srzb7)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b05srzb9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b05twkvh)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Mike Ford.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b05sxq9b)
US Bird Flu; Michael Eavis Wins Dairy Prize; UK's Largest Single Grain Export; Crofting

21 million birds have been killed as the USA tries to halt a bird flu epidemic. The virulent H5N2 strain of the disease has affected 14 states across the Mid West. Chief Executive of Minnesota Turkey production, Steve Olsen, explains why millions of turkeys and laying hens on affected farms are being culled.

The biggest ever shipment of wheat to be exported from the UK is leaving port this morning. It's taken a week just to load the ship which will take grain from 300 farms in the East Midlands to Thailand. The 66,000 tonnes of wheat will be used to feed animals in SE Asia. Jonathan Lane of Gleadall Agriculture explains that the low price for wheat in Europe means that it's now worth farmers looking further afield than traditional markets in the UK and Europe.

Michael Eavis, founder of the Glastonbury Festival - and Somerset's best known dairy farmer - tells Farming Today why he's delighted to've won what for him is the biggest prize of all - the prestigious National Milk Records/Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers Gold Cup.

When small is beautiful: while in the past many of Scotland's 18,000 crofts have lain abandoned, that's no longer the case. Nancy Nicolson meets Toni Clark who runs courses for would-be crofters in Ross-shire in the Highlands.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020xvlw)
Marsh Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Marsh Warbler. Marsh warblers are astonishing mimics and when you hear one singing you could be forgiven for thinking that there's a flock of different species in the bush.


THU 06:00 Today (b05sxv75)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b05sxv7b)
Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore was the first non-European to win a Nobel Prize for Literature. He has been called one of the outstanding thinkers of the 20th century and the greatest poet India has ever produced. His Nobel followed publication of Gitanjali, his English version of some of his Bengali poems. WB Yeats and Ezra Pound were great supporters. Tagore was born in Calcutta in 1861 and educated partly in Britain; King George V knighted him, but Tagore renounced this in 1919 following the Amritsar Massacre. A key figure in Indian nationalism, Tagore became a friend of Gandhi, offering criticism as well as support. A polymath and progressive, Tagore painted, wrote plays, novels, short stories and many songs. The national anthems of India and Bangladesh are based on his poems.

With

Chandrika Kaul
Lecturer in Modern History at the University of St Andrews

Bashabi Fraser
Professor of English Literature and Creative Writing at Edinburgh Napier University

And

John Stevens
Leverhulme Postdoctoral Fellow at SOAS, University of London

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b05t63jh)
Antony Sher - Year of the Fat Knight

Episode 4

Antony Sher recounts the year in which he created and performed his version of Shakespeare's Falstaff - despite never intending to undertake such an iconic role.

Thirty years ago, a promising young actor published his account of preparing for and playing the role of Richard III. Antony Sher's Year of the King has since become a classic of theatre literature.

In 2014, Sher - in his 60s - was cast as Falstaff in Gregory Doran's Royal Shakespeare Company production of the two parts of Henry IV. Both the production and Sher's Falstaff were acclaimed by critics and audiences alike, with Sher winning the Critics' Circle Award for Best Shakespearean Performance.

Year of the Fat Knight is Antony Sher's account of researching, rehearsing and performing one of Shakespeare's best-known and most popular characters.

He tells us how he had doubts about playing the part at all; how he sought to reconcile Falstaff's obesity, drunkenness, cowardice and charm; how he wrestled with the fat suit needed to bulk him up; and how he explored the complexities and contradictions of this comic yet often dangerous personality.

On the way, Sher paints a uniquely close-up portrait of the RSC at work.

Read by Antony Sher

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05sxv7j)
Sheila Kitzinger, Minette Walters, Joy Williams

Minette Walters, crime writer, returns with The Cellar, her first novel in 8 years. It tells the story of Muna whose fortunes change for the better on the day that Mr and Mrs Songoli's younger son fails to come home from school. But everything is not quite what it seems.

Sheila Kitzinger spent fifty years campaigning for women to have choice in the way they give birth. She died on April 11th. Her daughters Celia and Jenny recorded their mother's final thoughts. They share these with Jenni and discuss their mother's autobiography, A Passion for Birth.

Musician Joy Williams is best known for being part of the duo The Civil Wars. The country folk band broke up in 2014, and this year Joy has decided to make a music come back. She joins Jenni to talk about her career, winning four Grammys and performs her new single.

Eva Fernandes, organiser of A Celebration of Breast Feeding in Bristol on breast milk as food.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05sxv7l)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 4

Episode 4

Mewa Gul and his family have fled Akbar Khan for the home village they left during the fighting many years ago. But the returning refugees find the village partly ruined by war, and their land and house occupied.

They have an agreement with the powerful local Malik that if they repay their mortgage they can take back their land - but now he shows no sign of honouring that agreement. Worse, a local Taliban fighter is anxious to recruit Taza Gul to their cause.

In the village they have left on the Pak-Afghan borders, their daughter mourns their departure, while Shah Bibi and Wisal fear that Kashmala is next in line for Akbar Khan's fury.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is a slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pakistan-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, electricity or phone - and warlords are hard to contain. It is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for Afghans.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey

Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas

Executive Producer: John Dryden
Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b05sxv7p)
Georgia: Orthodoxy in the Classroom

Natalia Antelava asks if the creeping influence of the Orthodox Church in Georgia's schools is turning them into a breeding ground for radical Christianity. Georgia's liberal politicians say only alignment with Europe and US will allow Georgia to overcome its post-Soviet past and survive as an independent nation. But in the way of Georgia's pro-Western course stands its Orthodox neighbour Russia and, increasingly, the country's own Orthodox Church. Natalia Antelava visits her old school in Tbilisi to see how the country's most conservative, anti-Western institution is influencing the next generation. Wesley Stephenson producing.


THU 11:30 The Folk of the Pennines (b05sxv7r)
Edale to Top Withens

In 1965, after 30 years of campaigning led by the rambler Tom Stephenson, the Pennine Way was officially opened on Malham Moor in the Yorkshire Dales. Stretching from Edale in Derbyshire to Kirk Yetholm in the Scottish borders, the 268 mile route has attracted tens of thousands of walkers over the intervening years.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary this year, Mark Radcliffe travels the route and meets up with poets, folk musicians, historians and local people along the way.

In the first of three programmes, Mark travels from Edale to Top Withens near Haworth. He talks to the poet Simon Armitage about his experience of walking the Pennine Way, and finds out why the tiny Yorkshire village of Heptonstall is the burial place of one of the 20th century's most revered authors, Sylvia Plath. Singer Bella Hardy performs her song 'Peak Rhapsody' at the starting point of the Pennine Way, and Mark bumps into Kate Rusby at Top Withens - the supposed inspiration for Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights. Kate and Damien O'Kane perform 'The Lark' sat in the ruins of the old farmhouse, looking out over Haworth Moor and the Pennine Way.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b05srzbd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Across the Board (b05sxv7t)
Series 3

Antony Beevor

Across The Board is a series of interviews conducted over a game of chess. In this programme Dominic Lawson talks to the best-selling military historian Antony Beevor. What are the parallels between chess and warfare?


THU 12:16 You and Yours (b05sxv7w)
Tesco Kitchens, Gold, How to Complain

Confusion over who is responsible for warranty claims at Tesco's collapsed bathroom & Kitchen business.

The 21st century California Gold rush.

The telecoms regulator Ofcom says there are reasonable grounds to believe a telecommunications company misled its customers.

Trapped in customer services hell? How to take your complaint to the top.

The growth in trendy niche magazines

On the beat with London's anti pickpocket unit.

The European Court Justice general Court is appearing before itself for failing to deal with its caseload effectively.


THU 12:57 Weather (b05srzbg)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b05sxw98)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b05stt42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Stone (b05sxx23)
Series 5

Dirt

Dirt by Martin Jameson. First drama of Stone: a detective series created by Danny Brocklehurst.

When a body is found in a flooded gravel pit DCI John Stone and his team embark upon an investigation that leads to the discovery of suspicious activity on a remote farm.

But with his personal life in tatters and still reeling from the mishandled shooting of Callum Gartside, a gunman who had murdered his own family, Stone struggles to hold it all together.

Sound design by Steve Brooke

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b05sxx6z)
Landscape Art in Northumberland

Caz Graham visits the Northumberland countryside to discover stunning art in the landscape, produced by Iranian artist Khosro Adibi.

Khosro is a visual artist from Iran. He's lived in Europe for several years now and has created site-specific environmental sculptures and land art pieces in the landscape.

He has been artist in residence at Tarset in Northumberland since August last year. His work involves carving directly into sandstone, reminiscent of the pre-historic cup and ring marks that can be found in Northumberland.

Caz also meets some archaeologists who spot similarities in Khosro's work to the ancient markings that are found in the area.

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b05ss4rg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b05sscmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b05sy25p)
Peter Firth, Raging Bull, Celine Sciamma, The Secrets of ADR

With Francine Stock

Peter Firth talks about bringing Spooks to the big screen and a film career that's included Equus and Roman Polanski's Tess and tells Francine why his mother was proud of his nude scenes in the stage production of Equus.

Neil Brand explains why a famous Italian opera provided the unlikely soundtrack for the boxing movie Raging Bull

Director Celine Sciamma explains why she auditioned over 300 non-professional actresses to play the lead in her hard-hitting Parisian tale of gang life, Girlhood

Glen Cathard and Peter Hanson reveal some secrets of ADR (automated dialogue replacement) and why most movies are re-dubbed after shooting.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b05sy25r)
Listeners' Science Questions

Adam Rutherford investigates the news in science and science in the news.


THU 17:00 PM (b05sy25t)
Eddie Mair presents news interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05srzbk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Best Behaviour (b05sy25w)
Episode 1

Holly Walsh presents the comedy panel show devoted to clarifying the etiquette rules for modern life.

The guest panellists are Clive Anderson, Sarah Millican and Joe Lycett, who compete to supply the most entertaining ideas for best behaviour in the 21st century.

Knowing how to conduct yourself used to be simple - there were books, finishing schools and often a stern nanny to make sure you did the right thing. But nowadays the world is such a social minefield - made worse by the fact that every time you mess up, someone's inevitably filming it on a camera phone.

In this episode, etiquette at work is under comic scrutiny with the notion that 'the customer is NOT always right' being one of the main conclusions. The case for never sharing food during meals is also up for debate, and the panellists solver an etiquette problem from the studio audience - 'how can I tell my friends that I'm not as interested in their kids as they are?'

Producer: Aled Evans
A Zeppotron production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b05sy25y)
Helen missed the Hunt dinner last night, as Henry was unwell - Rob had mentioned that Henry seemed under the weather. Rob reports that she didn't miss much. Helen jokes about PC Burns' ongoing investigation into Fallon's missing bunting.
Helen and her family agree to close Ambridge Organics, although Pat was reluctant. Rob's pleased though and Helen feels a huge burden lifted. Helen and Tom want to sell it as a going concern. Rob hopes Helen won't be lumbered with the work selling the shop - he's available to help.

Pip steps in to replace Barney as catcher for the Brookfield sheep shearing. Ed and Jazzer do the shearing and Toby Fairbrother rolls and collects the fleeces, with a bit of coaching from Jazzer. Ed's embarrassed to nick his first sheep with the shears. Rex joins them and meets Pip and Jazzer.
Since Ed spoke to Charlie, asking to transfer his Estate land tenancy to the Fairbrothers, Rex and Toby have pressed ahead with a detailed business plan.
Pip goes to vote in the General Election, and manages to persuade Jazzer to go with her. This is the first time voting for both of them. Jazzer laughs - he's never been near a polling station before. His Ma won't believe her ears when he tells her.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b05sy260)
The Affair, Michael Craig-Martin, Girlhood, Mother Courage in Wales

British actors Dominic West and Ruth Wilson star as clandestine lovers in a Long Island beach town in the Golden Globe-winning drama The Affair. Julia Raeside reviews.

Artist Michael Craig-Martin reflects on his life and career as he publishes his memoir On Being an Artist.

Girlhood is a French drama which explores the lives of young black women living in Paris. Gaylene Gould reviews.

John Wilson reports from Merthyr Tydfil where the National Theatre of Wales are preparing to stage a production of Brecht's Mother Courage in a Labour Club.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Ellie Bury.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05sxv7l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b05sy262)
Drug Resistance

Why drug resistance is now regarded by the UK government as one of the most severe threats to public safety. Peter Marshall reports.

Producer: Lucy Proctor
Researcher: James Melley.


THU 20:30 In Business (b05sy264)
Thinking Machines

One of the most famous computer systems in the world is called Watson, developed by IBM. It's best known in for beating two human contestants to win the American game show, Jeopardy. Watson may now be leading a revolution in 'machine learning'.
Peter Day reports from New York City, fast becoming a high tech rival of Silicon Valley, to find out how smart our machines are becoming and whether we should be worried about the impact Artificial Intelligence will have our lives.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Image credit: Science Photo Library

Programme includes clips from:
Clip 1
Her, director: Spike Jonze, producers: Spike Jonze, Megan Ellison and Vincent Landay, distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Clip 2
Mayor Bloomberg via "We Are Made In Ny" campaign
Clip 3
Jeopardy!, Sony Pictures


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b05sy25r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b05sxv7b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 Election 2015: BBC Radio 4 (b05wcgy2)
Comprehensive coverage of the results of the general election, with expert analysis, studio guests and live results from around the country.



FRIDAY 08 MAY 2015

FRI 06:00 Today (b05sy633)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b05ss5gk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:16 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b05t67cg)
Antony Sher - Year of the Fat Knight

Episode 5

Antony Sher recounts the year in which he created and performed his version of Shakespeare's Falstaff - despite never intending to undertake such an iconic role.

Thirty years ago, a promising young actor published his account of preparing for and playing the role of Richard III. Antony Sher's Year of the King has since become a classic of theatre literature.

In 2014, Sher - in his 60s - was cast as Falstaff in Gregory Doran's Royal Shakespeare Company production of the two parts of Henry IV. Both the production and Sher's Falstaff were acclaimed by critics and audiences alike, with Sher winning the Critics' Circle Award for Best Shakespearean Performance.

Year of the Fat Knight is Antony Sher's account of researching, rehearsing and performing one of Shakespeare's best-known and most popular characters.

He tells us how he had doubts about playing the part at all; how he sought to reconcile Falstaff's obesity, drunkenness, cowardice and charm; how he wrestled with the fat suit needed to bulk him up; and how he explored the complexities and contradictions of this comic yet often dangerous personality.

On the way, Sher paints a uniquely close-up portrait of the RSC at work.

Read by Antony Sher

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05sy636)
Jenni Murray and guests debate the new political landscape and women's role in it.

Jenni Murray and guests debate the outcome of the General Election and what it means for women at Westminster and beyond. What are the stories of the night, who are the surprise winners and losers? How well did the political parties reach out to women? In the studio Dr Michelle Harrison of the research agency TNS, Sarah Childs, Professor of Politics and Gender at the University of Bristol, and writer and comedian Viv Groskop has a view from the sofa. Jane Garvey joins us fresh from an election night count in Sunderland, while Newsnight's Political Editor Allegra Stratton has the latest morning developments.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Anne Peacock.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b05sy638)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 4

Episode 5

Mashal Khan does not want to marry his brother's widow as tradition dictates. And Kashmala asserts her widow's right to choose, persuading her father to argue her case at the village jirga.

But the case doesn't get that far.

When Akbar Khan learns he is being opposed he sets out to find her and settle matters with his gun. Kashmala must flee, with her father, Sardar Aka, and his two wives. They set off behind Mewa Gul to the village they left long ago during the fighting. For older wife Gulnara this is fine as she has land and family in the old village. But younger Sakina feels she is losing everything. As for Kashmala, she relishes this new beginning.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is a slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pakistan-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, electricity or phone - and warlords are hard to contain. It is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for Afghans.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey

Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas

Executive Producer: John Dryden
Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 The Glass Delusion (b05sy63b)
Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips explores the extraordinary psychiatric phenomenon where people believe they have turned into glass.

Cases of the delusion spiked across early modern Europe. Even King Charles VI of France was a sufferer and was reported to have wrapped himself in blankets to prevent himself from shattering.

Andy Lamejin, a psychiatrist from Leiden in the Netherlands, recalls his search for contemporary cases, and remembers the astonishing moment that a case cropped up in his own hospital and he was offered the chance to probe the meaning of this enigmatic delusion with a living patient.

Adam Phillips believes the 'glass delusion' has powerful contemporary resonance in a society where anxieties about fragility, transparency and personal space are pertinent to many people's experience of living in the modern world. The feeling of being made of glass could be a useful way of understanding how we negotiate society - a society that is increasingly crowded, but also one in which modern technological advances isolate us and offer apparently boundary-less communication.

Professor Edward Shorter, a historian of psychiatry from the University of Toronto suggests that it is the material of glass itself, and its newness in 17th Century Europe which holds the key to understanding the disorder. Throughout history the inventive unconscious mind has pegged it's delusions onto new materials. In the 19th century cement delusions appeared when cement emerged as a new building material, just as common delusions of recent decades include the fixed, false belief that the CIA or other security services can download thoughts through micro-transmitters.

Produced by Victoria Shepherd
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Paul Temple (b038hfpt)
Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair

News of Mr Gregory

Part 8 of a new production of a vintage serial from 1946.

From 1938 to 1968, Francis Durbridge's incomparably suave amateur detective Paul Temple and his glamorous wife Steve solved case after baffling case in one of BBC radio's most popular series. Sadly, only half of Temple's adventures survive in the archives.

In 2006 BBC Radio 4 brought one of the lost serials back to life with Crawford Logan and Gerda Stevenson as Paul and Steve. Using the original scripts and incidental music, and recorded using vintage microphones and sound effects, the production of Paul Temple and the Sullivan Mystery aimed to sound as much as possible like the 1947 original might have done if its recording had survived. The serial proved so popular that it was soon followed by three more revivals, Paul Temple and the Madison Mystery, Paul Temple and Steve, and A Case for Paul Temple.

Now, from 1946, it's the turn of Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair, in which Paul and Steve go on the trail of the mysterious and murderous Mr Gregory.

Episode 8: News of Mr Gregory

Steve goes in search of a trumpeter at the Hammersford Palais.

Producer Patrick Rayner

Francis Durbridge, the creator of Paul Temple, was born in Hull in 1912 and died in 1998. He was one of the most successful novelists, playwrights and scriptwriters of his day.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b05srzcx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Across the Board (b05sy63d)
Series 3

Piers Morgan

Across The Board is a series of interviews conducted over a game of chess. In this programme Dominic Lawson talks to the outspoken journalist and broadcaster Piers Morgan. The game turns out to be a brutal affair.


FRI 12:15 World at One (b05t6pn0)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:57 Weather (b05srzcz)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b05sy25y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b05syb62)
Shakespeare's Fire

Queens, fools and bickering playwrights set the world alight on the Jacobean South Bank. Jane Horrocks, Adam Gillen and Jasper Britton star in this original comedy by New Generation poet Glyn Maxwell about the burning of the Globe Theatre in 1613.

On a hot summer afternoon, the Kings Men in Southwark are performing John Fletcher and William Shakespeare's Famous History of the Life of Henry VIII. On that scorching day in June, the jewel of London's playhouses, The Globe, burnt down.

So much we know - we have eye witness accounts. Many questions remain unanswered though.

Are rumours of royal involvement to be credited? Did the Burbages really do well out of the fire? What is the connection between these events and the end of the career of England's most illustrious playwright? And where do a clown's trousers come into all this?

The cast includes Jane Horrocks (Ab Fab, Little Voice), Jasper Britton (RSC), Adam Gillen (Benidorm) and Simon Greenall (I'm Alan Partridge)

Director/ Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique Broadcasting production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 VE Day Silence (b05vdxl6)
A two-minute silence to commemorate the seventieth anniversary of VE Day, which marked the end of the Second World War in Europe.


FRI 15:02 Gardeners' Question Time (b05syb64)
Lewes

Eric Robson chairs the programme from Lewes, East Sussex. Matt Biggs, Pippa Greenwood and Christine Walkden answer questions from an audience of local gardeners.

Eric goes in search of a bohemian garden and we follow Matthew Wilson's journey to the Chelsea Flower Show.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Blood, Sweat and Tears (b05syb66)
The Hollow King

John Connolly, best known for his series of novels starring Charlie Parker, writes the final episode in a new series of specially commissioned short stories by three of Britain's top crime writers. 'The Hollow King' is a dark and gruesome fantasy tale about a childless King and Queen who possibly love each other too much.

These stories were recorded in front of an audience in the MCT theatre, Alleyns School, Dulwich - and introduced by Mark Billingham.

Read by Pennie Downie.

Producer: Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b05t6pnb)
Jean Nidetch, Baroness Ruth Rendell, Geoff Duke OBE, Katharine Worth, Errol Brown

Matthew Bannister on

The founder of Weight Watchers Jean Nidetch who turned a self help group in her basement into a multimillion dollar global business.

The crime novelist and Labour peer Baroness Rendell.

The motorcyclist Geoff Duke who won both the Isle of Man TT and the World Championships six times.

The drama professor Katharine Worth who was a close friend of Samuel Beckett and produced his work.

And the Hot Chocolate singer Errol Brown, best known for hits like "You Sexy Thing" and "Everyone's A Winner".


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b05syb68)
Election and Adultery Special

On the day after the election, Tim Harford hosts a live edition of More or Less. We bring together a panel of experts to discuss how the pre-election opinion polls tallied up to the results. Plus, researchers and journalists tell Tim about the process of fact checking the election, and give examples of some of the more dubious uses of statistics by the parties.

And, is Beeston in Nottinghamshire really the most adulterous town in the country?


FRI 16:56 The Listening Project (b05sycdg)
Ade and Kitty - Passing It On

Fi Glover introduces a conversation where a mother raised in England and Nigeria worries that her daughter doesn't take on the expectations of her Nigerian relatives. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b05t6pnk)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05srzd1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (b05sycdj)
Series 14

Episode 5

The topical impressions show returns just in time to reflect the build up to one of the most important and incisive votes for decades. Will Austria win again or does Britain's Electro Velvet stand a chance? Satire meets silliness in the flagship comedy for hard working families up and down the country.

Starring Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Duncan Wisbey, Lewis MacLeod, Debra Stephenson.

Producer: Bill Dare.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b05sycdl)
Worried Jill is keen to lend Kenton some money, but David feels if anyone is to help it should be him and Ruth. David and Kenton must talk soon, for the sake of their relationship and the pub.
Rachel from the Environment Agency reports back to David on the stream and culverts up near Berrow Farm. They were checked last November. As one of them has since been blocked, was someone not doing their job properly?

David's putting together a best practice document for protecting buildings in future. He asks Rob about why the dairy was unaffected during the flood. Rob says that Berrow took no special precautions.

Pip's got her job interview and David and Ruth agree it'd be a great opportunity. David mentions his chat with Rob - if the culvert hadn't been blocked, Berrow could have come off very differently. They'll probably never know exactly what happened.

Eddie jokes about Jazzer voting in the Election. Joe lays into non-voters, mentioning Russell Brand.

Joe and Eddie practice singing a couple of traditional songs for Ed's wedding reception, before Joe heads with Ed to Grange Farm, enjoying the new tractor (Joe can remember the first tractor arriving in Ambridge.)

Joe presses Ed about asking Will to be his best man - Eddie would happily step aside. Ed says he'll think about it.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b05sycdn)
Jeremy Bowen on Rosewater, Artist John Craske, Grace and Frankie, Phill Jupitus on Viv Stanshall

Rosewater, the directorial debut from The Daily Show presenter John Stewart, is based on a memoir by Maziar Bahari, a journalist who was imprisoned in Iran in 2009. Jeremy Bowen, the BBC's Middle East Editor, reviews.

The Norfolk fisherman, painter and embroiderer John Craske had a few famous champions when he was alive including Sylvia Townsend Warner and Peter Pears, but he remains an obscure figure. A new a biography by Julia Blackburn, Threads, and an associated exhibition hope to might change that. John Wilson finds out more about him from Julia Blackburn and the exhibition curator Neil Powell.

Grace & Frankie stars Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin as long term rivals who discover their husbands have been having an affair with each other for twenty years and now plan to marry. Boyd Hilton reviews the bittersweet comedy about starting over in your 70s.

Comedian Phill Jupitus celebrates the life of Vivian Stanshall, the maverick singer and entertainer, famous for the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and the radio series Sir Henry at Rawlinson End, who died 20 years ago.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b05sy638)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b05sycdq)
Charles Clarke, Michael Howard, Shirley Williams, Gordon Wilson

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Radio Theatre at London's Broadcasting House with former Home Secretary, Charles Clarke; former Leader of the Conservatives, Lord Howard of Lympne; the Liberal Democrat peer, Baroness Williams of Crosby; and former Leader of the Scottish National Party, Gordon Wilson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b05sycds)
Election View

The American writer PJ O'Rourke gives his view of the UK election. "In the once solidly red-rosette glens and braes and lochs and heather the Scottish National Party snatched the sporran, ripped the kilt off and walked away in the ghillie brogues of Labour"

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Voices of the First World War (b05tcjyb)
Omnibus 1

There are now no living veterans of WW1, but it is still possible to go back to the First World War through the memories of those who actually took part. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, two sound archive collections featuring survivors of the war are brought together for the first time. The Imperial War Museums' holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. The interviews were done not for immediate use or broadcast, but because it was felt that this diminishing resource that could never be replenished, would be of unique value in the future. Speakers recall in great detail as though it were yesterday the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, the experience of seeing their first casualty and hearing their first shell, their daily and nightly routines as soldiers, pilots or navy members of all ranks, and their psychological state in the face of so much trauma. This series will broadcast many of these recordings for the first time. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict a century ago, are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war.

Dan Snow narrates this new oral history, which will be broadcast in short seasons throughout the commemorative period.

This is an omnibus edition of five programmes that were first broadcast October 2014, in which soldiers recall their journeys to the front line, their first impressions of the war, the Battle of Mons and the Great Retreat, the battles at sea of the British and German navies, and soldier's experiences at night on the battlefields of the Western Front.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b05srzd5)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b05sycdv)
Cameron defies polls to secure overall majority of 12 for the Conservatives.

Miliband., Clegg, Farage all resign - and near clean sweep for SNP in Scotland


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05sycdx)
The Green Road

Episode 5

A story of family, selfishness and compassion on Ireland's Atlantic coast, from the Man Booker Prize-winner, Anne Enright.

The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined, in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age, their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she has decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for one final Christmas together in the family home, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two collections of stories (grouped together as Yesterday's Weather), one book of non-fiction (Making Babies) and five novels, including The Gathering (which was the Irish Novel of the Year and won the Irish Fiction Award along with the 2007 Man Booker Prize) and The Forgotten Waltz (which was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction).

Read by Brid Brennan
Producer: Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 The Vote Now Show (b05wpwcn)
Series 2

Episode 6

The last in a series of election specials from the Now Show team. Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guests to give their own unique take on the week's shennanigans and the election outcome.

Episode six features John Finnemore, Holly Walsh, Isabel Hardman and Pippa Evans.

Producers; Alexandra Smith, Joe Nunnery and Rachel Wheeley.

Executive Producer Alison Vernon-Smith.


FRI 23:30 Great Lives (b05stkqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b05sydgr)
Jackie and Julie - Loss, Love and Living

Fi Glover introduces a moving conversation between two mothers who both lost daughters to Sanfilippo Syndrome, but who still celebrate the love they have for them. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b05ssqpj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b05ssqpj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b05stg0g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b05stg0g)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b05stnp6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b05stnp6)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b05sxv7l)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b05sxv7l)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b05sy638)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b05sy638)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b05s3r6x)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b05sycds)

AA: America's Gift to the World 11:00 WED (b05pmrv0)

Above Ground 19:45 SUN (b05ssfvf)

Across the Board 12:04 MON (b05ssqpq)

Across the Board 12:04 TUE (b05stg0n)

Across the Board 12:04 WED (b05stqsl)

Across the Board 12:04 THU (b05sxv7t)

Across the Board 12:04 FRI (b05sy63d)

Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture 09:00 TUE (b05t5jxf)

Alistair Cooke Memorial Lecture 21:30 TUE (b05t5jxf)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b05stkrt)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b05stkrt)

Allergic to the 21st Century 20:00 MON (b05nvfqz)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b05spjzf)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b05s3r6t)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b05sycdq)

Archive on 4: The Language of Pain 20:00 SAT (b05spk3q)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b05sy25r)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b05sy25r)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b05ss4r6)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b05ss4r6)

Best Behaviour 18:30 THU (b05sy25w)

Blood, Sweat and Tears 15:45 FRI (b05syb66)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b05ssx07)

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Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b05t63jh)

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Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b05sscmf)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b05sscmf)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b05ss5gf)

Campaign Sidebar 11:00 SAT (b05spjyp)

Clare in the Community 18:30 WED (b03pjcyf)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b05stkq9)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b05stkq9)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b05s3gz2)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b05sxv7p)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (b05s3r6m)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (b05sycdj)

Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice 11:30 MON (b05ssqpn)

Dilemma 12:04 SUN (b05rnz1n)

Dilemma 18:30 MON (b05sstcb)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b05spk05)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b05rl3w4)

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Drama 14:15 TUE (b05stg0v)

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Election 2015: BBC Radio 4 22:00 THU (b05wcgy2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b05spjs2)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b05ssmn8)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b05stg05)

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File on 4 20:00 TUE (b05stkrm)

Food and Farming Awards 15:00 MON (b05sst63)

Forensics in Crisis 21:00 MON (b05s2x2h)

Forensics in Crisis 11:00 TUE (b05stg0j)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b05sttjh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b05rkq8z)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b05ssthc)

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Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b05s3pcj)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:02 FRI (b05syb64)

Go West 00:30 SUN (b01r525t)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b05stkqz)

Great Lives 23:30 FRI (b05stkqz)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b05s3kdz)

In Business 20:30 THU (b05sy264)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b05sxv7b)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b05sxv7b)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b05stkrr)

Jigsaw 23:45 TUE (b01r9rtx)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b05s49k3)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b05t6pnb)

Lemn Sissay's Homecoming 18:30 TUE (b05stkr9)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b05ss4rb)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b05spk30)

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Midweek 09:00 WED (b05stmmn)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b05stmmn)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b05spjyr)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b05spjyr)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b05strvj)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b05sfd0r)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b05syb68)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b05rkq8m)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b05srz20)

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News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b05srz27)

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News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b05rkq8p)

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News 13:00 SAT (b05rkq98)

Open Art 23:00 TUE (b05stl7n)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b05s3gzd)

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PM 17:00 SAT (b05spk27)

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PM 17:00 FRI (b05t6pnk)

Paul Temple 11:30 FRI (b038hfpt)

Philip Glass - Words without Music 00:30 SAT (b05t7kpz)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b05ssfv8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b05s3szf)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b05spk32)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b05spk32)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b05spk32)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b05ss4rg)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b05ss4rg)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b05ss4rg)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b05spjs6)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b05spk34)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b05rkq8h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b05srz1t)

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Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b05srz77)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b05rkq8f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b05rkq8k)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b05rkq9c)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b05srz1w)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b05srz37)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b05srz79)

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Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b05stkq6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b05rkq9h)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b05ss4r8)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b05ss4r8)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b05s2x2k)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b05stg0l)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b05ssng0)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b05ssng0)

Stone 14:15 THU (b05sxx23)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b05ss4rj)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b05ss4rd)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 11:30 WED (b03yqcws)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b05rnx80)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b05ss5gh)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b05ssfvb)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b05ssfvb)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b05ssth9)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b05sy25y)

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The Audio Describers 11:00 MON (b05ssqpl)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b05sstc6)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b05s3gzg)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b05sy25p)

The Folk of the Pennines 11:30 THU (b05sxv7r)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b05ss68g)

The Glass Delusion 11:00 FRI (b05sy63b)

The Invisible College 16:00 MON (b05sst65)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b05sscm9)

The Listening Project 10:56 WED (b05stp7g)

The Listening Project 16:56 FRI (b05sycdg)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b05sydgr)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b05strvn)

The Music Teacher 23:15 WED (b03brt31)

The Poet and the Murderer 23:30 SAT (b05rl3w8)

The Rape of Berlin 17:00 SUN (b05sfg37)

The Report 20:00 THU (b05sy262)

The Reunion 11:16 SUN (b05ss5gk)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b05ss5gk)

The Vote Now Show 19:15 SUN (b05s3sth)

The Vote Now Show 23:00 MON (b05ssx09)

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The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b05ss68j)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b05ssx05)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b05s36cg)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b05strvl)

Today 07:00 SAT (b05spjs4)

Today 06:00 MON (b05ssnfy)

Today 06:00 TUE (b05stg07)

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Tommies 14:15 MON (b05sst61)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b041yd42)

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Twin Peaks 23:30 WED (b05pktlc)

Two Rooms 22:15 SAT (b05s385x)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b05stt6d)

VE Day Silence 15:00 FRI (b05vdxl6)

Voices of the First World War 21:00 FRI (b05tcjyb)

Walt Whitman's War 16:30 SUN (b05sscmh)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b05ssh14)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b05sshbl)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b05spk25)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b05ssng4)

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Word of Mouth 23:30 MON (b05s3079)

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World War One: The Cultural Front 10:30 SAT (b05spjym)

World at One 13:00 MON (b05ssqzj)

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You and Yours 12:16 MON (b05ssqzg)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b05s3szh)

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