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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b051r667)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Letters from Europe (b0549x7d)
Henning Mankell

The Swedish novelist Henning Mankell, author of the Kurt Wallander crime novels, reflects from his home in the South of France on the state of Europe after last month's attacks in Paris.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b051r669)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b051r66c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b051r66f)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b051r66h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b051w4qj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Johnston McKay.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b051w4ql)
'I thought it was a terrible terrible thing that a mother can't be happy'. A mother describes how she felt when her son was told he was cured of cancer. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b051r66k)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b051r66m)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b051vr34)
Tump 53

Helen Mark visits Tump 53 - a family friendly nature reserve built on the history of a 20th century artillery that was once known as 'The Secret City'. This Royal Arsenal was 3 miles long, 1 mile wide covering 1,300 acres employing 100,000 people at it's peak. Today Tump 53 - a former munitions storage site within the arsenal - has been reclaimed for nature.

People's love of the Tump was recognised in 2014 when voters chose the Tump to receive £50,000 in The Big Lottery Fund's The People's Millions awards. London Wildlife Trust has been working in partnership with Gallions Peabody Group, Trust Thamesmead and the local community to manage the site's habitats and run family friendly wildlife activities to reconnect with nature.

It now contains mixed woodland, a glade, a pond, and is surrounded by a reed-fringed moat. Over 60 bird species have been spotted at this unique site, including kingfisher, willow warbler and redpoll but traces of it's military history still intrigue locals to this day.

Helen Mark explores the site with Volunteering Support Officer Jane Clark and industrial archaeology enthusiast Ian Bull before heading off to Crossness Pumping Station which is currently home to a special part of the Arsenal's last remaining narrow gauge railway. Helen also joins former Arsenal workers Ray Fordham and Peter Martin at The Greenwich Heritage Centre as they share their personal memories of working on site before heading back to the reserve to join the children of Windrush Primary School who now use the former ammunitions site as a very special out door classroom.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0520pqv)
Water Management

Charlotte Smith visits a Somerset farm that's installed a £1.5m water recycling plant amid concerns that this most precious of natural resources is being squandered. According to Defra, agriculture uses 184 million cubic metres of water a year, and just 3% is currently recycled. Tom and Rich Clothier of Wyke Farms in Bruton decided to 'future-proof' their cheese-making business after two years of drought.
We also hear about two different schemes to harness the natural environment: one is restoring old peat bogs to store water on the moors; the other is testing measures like settlement ponds and natural dams to keep agricultural run-off pollution from entering fresh watercourses.
The producer is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b051r66p)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0520pqx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0520pqz)
Rachel Khoo

TV presenter Rachel Khoo and bestselling author of The Little Paris Kitchen joins Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles to talk about her new personal cookbook. Kitchen Notebook sees Rachel move on from French cooking to give us a collection of recipes from her around the world travels.

Alan Radbourne was about to graduate from University when he found a pound coin on the floor. He had a thought- could he could turn a quid into a salary after he graduated? Two days after his final exam he bought a bottle of washing up liquid and started a year-long challenge. He charged his mates to wash their dishes - every penny he made he re-invested and it snowballed from there. Exactly a year on he had made £20,000.

They say you're never too old for love and Colin and Patricia Stevens agree. They were only five years old when they first met at primary school and for Colin, it was love at first sight. But the girl of his dreams moved away when she was fifteen years old and they lost touch. Over the years they thought about each other off and on. Occasionally they made contact. But, now in their seventies and approaching their first wedding anniversary they tell us about the rocky path of true love.

The Dull Men's Club has more than 5,000 members who are passionate about everyday mundane things. Archie Workman kicks off a short season focusing on British eccentrics by telling us about his fascination with drain covers and why they're more interesting than we might think.

And meet the swanky senior citizens & glamorous golden girls taking afternoon tea at the Posh Club.

Natalie Merchant, the American singer-songwriter/musician and a former member of the band 10,000 Maniacs, shares her Inheritance tracks. She inherited The Games People Play by Petula Clark and is passing on her own song, Wonder.

Rachel Khoo's Kitchen Notebook. Michael Joseph Hardback 12th February 2015

Natalie Merchant's latest, self-titled album is out now on Nonesuch Records. And this summer a 20th anniversary edition of her Tigerlily album will be released.

Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 10:30 And the Academy Award Goes To... (b0520pr1)
Series 5

Midnight Cowboy

An X-rated picture winning the Oscar for Best Picture?

It was a shock, but not a surprise when 'Midnight Cowboy' won the Oscar for Best Picture of 1969 - not to mention gongs for the director, John Schlesinger, and screen writer, Waldo Salt.

But take a fresh look at this film, 45 years later, and it's obvious why it blasted its way passed the opposition at the Academy Awards. The film was rife with acting talent; a young Dustin Hoffman, messing up his clean cut reputation by taking on the role of a down at heel New York bum; Jon Voight as a naïve but optimistic hustler; Brenda Vaccaro as a lush, fur-coated party girl and Sylvia Miles hilarious in a short but lauded sex scene. .

It also brought one of the most extraordinary scriptwriters, Waldo Salt, and one of the first 'out' directors, John Schlesinger, together with one of the least experienced, but adventurous cinematographers, Adam Holender - a moment of production chemistry.

With fresh interviews with Adam Holender, Sylvia Miles, producer Jerome Hellman, Brenda Vacaro, Waldo Salt's daughter Jennifer, and Schlesinger's long-term partner Michael Childers, Paul Gambaccini presents "And The Academy Award Goes To... Midnight Cowboy."

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0520pr3)
Jim Waterson Of BuzzFeed looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The House of Commons may have emptied for the half term break but MPs will be busy campaigning in their constituencies. How much will be done through social media and how much by pounding the streets and knocking on doors? Plus how the prospect of a hung parliament affects smaller parties.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b051r66r)
A Pig of a Sea

More and more migrants are trying to cross the Mediterranean and there are suggestions the new force charged with rescuing those in danger of drowning isn't up to the job. Emma Jane Kirby's been to Europe's southern shores to see how it's coping. Andrew Harding was in the parliament building in Cape Town when President Zuma's state of the nation speech was interrupted by hecklers. He considers whether the chaos was a sign that democracy's in decline in South Africa. The global crude oil market has collapsed, the price has plummeted. Jon Sopel has been to Texas where the mood is, perhaps surprisingly, not altogether pessimistic. Elections in Nigeria have been postponed. Will Ross says many people there view the decision with deep suspicion. And carnival season's underway in many parts of the world. Dany Mitzman's been witnessing preparations in one Italian town where there were fears this year that this was a party which would never happen.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b051r66t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0520pr5)
Pension Wisdom Questioned, Energy Pricing Wrangles, Sunset for Solar Investors

On Money Box with Paul Lewis:

The third leg of the Government's Pension Wise guidance service went live online this week. And already it is being criticised by regulated advisers for omissions. A Money Box listener tests it for us.

Pensions Minister Steve Webb wants more tax relief for young pension savers to encourage them to put money away. Already millions more employees have been automatically enrolled into a workplace pension. But with contributions of less than 2% of total pay going in - and less than 8% when it is fully in place in 2018 - will it provide enough? Money Box debates the issues with Katie Morley,
Daily Telegraph and Carl Emmerson from the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Energy regulator Ofgem is accused of making comparison websites exaggerate the savings made by switching supplier. The claim is made by comparison website, TheEnergyShop. The arithmetic is complex. But the estimate is that the method favoured by Ofgem inflates the savings people will make by up to £200. That makes it more likely they will switch. And every switcher means money for the comparison site. Ofgem and TheEnergyShop make their case.

An investment in renewable energy which 'guaranteed' a 6.5% return for three years has gone into administration with large debts. The average loss to the 900 green investors is more than £8000. The firm apparently failed to keep its promise to protect their funds in a ring-fenced account. Investment expert David Kuo from The Motley Fool joins the programme to outline the potential risks of buying bonds that are not regulated by the City watchdog, the FCA.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b051w4dt)
Series 45

Episode 6

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches featuring Laura Shavin, Jon Holmes, John Finnemore and Adam Kay.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b051r66w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b051r66y)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b051w4f0)
Sir Ming Campbell MP, Harriet Harman MP, Alex Salmond MSP, Anna Soubry MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Broadcasting House Radio Theatre in London with Sir Ming Campbell MP the former Leader of the Liberal Democrats, Deputy Leader of the Labour Party, Harriet Harman MP, former Leader of the Scottish National Party Alex Salmond MSP and Defence Minister Anna Soubry MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0520pr7)
Tax avoidance and Trident

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?
When it comes to tax avoidance is there one rule for the rich and another for the rest, and can we afford to renew Trident?

Presenter: Anita Anand.
Producer: Angie Nehring.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b0381hqt)
Jake Liebowitz: A Life in Film

A new play by Oscar-winning writer Frederic Raphael about successful American film director Jake Liebowitz, charting the auteur's long career, and drawing on Raphael's own experience of writing for the cinema.

With Eleanor Bron as Alexandra Crawley and William Hope and Jake Liebowitz.

Jake Liebowitz disappears unexpectedly from his home in France, presumed dead by drowning. His friend Alexandra Crawley, a film critic who has followed the ups and downs of his career, presents a look back at his movies. But will she find the truth about his death in the films?

From his days as a kid with a movie camera in Brooklyn, on to Chicago, and finally to Hollywood, where he catches the end of the Golden Age, the play explores five decades of American film-making, through Jake's fast-talking, often shocking lens.

Directed by Dirk Maggs
Producer: Jo Wheeler
A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0520pr9)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Fay Weldon, Self Harm, The Walton Sextuplets

Novelist, screenwriter and essayist, Fay Weldon on her life and new collection of stories. Is Labour's pink battle bus patronising and sexist or a great way to get women talking about politics? Harriet Harman and Anne Perkins give their opinions.
Yomi Adegoke and Emmanuelle Dirix on cultural appropriation: when does mainstream fashion and music labels taking inspiration from ethnic minority cultures become dangerous, offensive or patronising?
Ten years ago Mary Hamilton cut herself deliberately for the last time after almost a decade of self injury. She explains how she managed to stop.
Dementia is being portrayed in films, plays and fiction. But can it ever really capture the reality of the condition and help us deal with it?
Janet and Graham Walton describe what life was like for them as parents of the world's only all female sextuplets. Singer-songwriter and gay activist Melissa Etheridge.

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0520prc)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b051vvgt)
Gold

It's soft, shiny and rare. A symbol of love, of power, of wealth - gold has been prized for thousands of years, its value rises and falls as the economies round it fluctuate. Yet there's only a limited supply of it and demand is high: for jewellery, technology, by central banks and investors. But after more than a decade of rising prices, the value of gold is down. So how to make money from this precious metal? Evan Davis and guests follow its journey from the gold mines of west Africa to the workshops of an east London jewellery maker. What are the risks, responsibilities and rewards for those who mine it, invest in it and manufacture with it?

Guests:

Nolan Watson, CEO, Sandstorm Gold

Mark Bristow, CEO, Randgold Resources

Elizabeth Hunt, Director, Allied Gold

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b051r671)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b051r673)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b051r675)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0520prf)
Maxine Peake, Christopher Biggins, Helen Lederer, Tara Prem, Nikki Bedi, Eduardo Niebla, Southern Tenant Folk Union

Clive's guests are Maxine Peake who stars in 'How To Hold Your Breath' written by Zinnie Harris and directed by Vicky Featherstone at London's Royal Court; Christopher Biggins - host of a special performance of 'Sing-a-long-a Sound of Music' at Hackney Empire, London in aid of Comic Relief and Helen Lederer, one of Britain's best-loved comediennes - who has written 'Losing It' a laugh-out-loud debut novel. Nikki Bedi talks to Tara Prem, producer and script editor of film and TV drama about the BFI Southbank season of Forgotten Dramas - British Television's Neglected Plays. With Music from Eduardo Niebla and Southern Tenant Folk Union.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0520prh)
Lord Green

Mark Coles profiles the former HSBC boss and trade minister Lord Green after an uncomfortable week in which revelations about HSBC's Swiss arm aiding tax evasion dominated the headlines.

Once lauded as Britain's ethical banker, the ordained Church of England minister now finds himself under fire from the press and politicians.

Producers: Keith Moore and James Melley.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0520prk)
Anne Tyler, Indian Summers, Love Is Strange, How to Hold Your Breath, History Is Now

Anne Tyler's latest novel 'A Spool of Blue Thread' (her 20th) follows the dynamics of an American family through several generations
Indian Summers is a sumptuous drama on Channel 4 looking at life in India in 1932. It stars Julie Walters and follows the early stirrings of political opposition to The Raj
Love Is Strange is a film with Jon Lithgow and Alfred Molina as a gay couple who decide to get married after being together for 40 years and their relationship is put under a strain by forces they hadn't expected
Maxine Peake is in a new play at London's Royal Court. How To Hold Your Breath is about personal and political journeys
History Is Now at The Southbank Centre's Hayward Gallery is subtitled "7 Artists Take On Britain" and looks at 70 years of cultural and social history.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0520q63)
Read My Lips: Why Politicians Speak the Way They Do

Tony Blair's former Chief of Staff Jonathan Powell explores the principles which underlie some of the most famous political speeches of the last century. Why do politicians reiterate things three times? Why do they never say "sorry"? How much work goes into the most innocuous phrase? Interviews include American pollster Frank Luntz, and impressionist Rory Bremner.


SAT 21:00 War and Peace (b04w89v2)
Episode 7

Andrei grows ever more bitter about Natasha's behaviour with Anatole Karagin and, after a heated argument with his father, feels he has little choice but to leave Bald Hills in order to rejoin the army and forget the past. Petya, the youngest child of the Rostovs also wants to join the army much to the horror and worry of the Countess.

Meanwhile, Pierre is convinced that he is on a mission to single-handedly save Russia from Napoleon, while his own feelings towards Natasha could be something more than just those of a concerned 'guardian'. As the war continues to spread across Russia, Prince Bolkonsky and Marya are warned by Andrei that troops could be drawing closer to their home near Smolensk. The news is too much for the old Prince.

A dynamic fresh dramatisation by Timberlake Wertenbaker of Leo Tolstoy's epic - from the translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokonsky - follows the fortunes of three Russian aristocratic families during the Napoleonic War. Starring Lesley Manville, John Hurt, Alun Armstrong and Harriet Walter.

The story moves between their past and present as Pierre, Natasha, Marya and Nikolai talk to their children about the events that shaped their lives and the lives of every Russian who lived through these troubled times.

War and Peace reflects the panorama of life at every level of Russian society in this period. The longest of 19th-century novels, it's an epic story in which historical, social, ethical and religious issues are explored on a scale never before attempted in fiction. From this, Timberlake Wertenbaker has created a riveting radio dramatisation in ten episodes.

Leo Tolstoy … Author
Timberlake Wertenbaker … Dramatist

Alex Shiels … Sergei Rostov
Alun Armstrong … Count Rostov
Ben Crowe … Mikhail Mitrich
Charlotte Emmerson … Helen Kuragin
Daniel Flynn … Regimental Commander
David Calder … Prince Vassily Kuragin
David Collings … Shinshin
Ella Dale … Masha Bezukhov
Emerald O'Hanrahan … Julia Karagan
Ferdinand Kingsley … Anatole Kuragin
Harriet Walter … Anna Mikhailovna Drubetskoy
Hazel Ellerby … Julia's mother
Jed Vine … Petya Rostov
Joanna David … Annette Scherer
Joel Maccormack … Boris Drubetskoy
John Hurt … Prince Bolkonsky
Jonathan Slinger … Captain Denisov
Kathleen Keaney … Liza Rostov
Lesley Manville … Countess Rostov
Miss Nelly Harker … Lise Bolkonsky
Natasha Little … Marya Bolkonsky
Paterson Joseph … Pierre Bezuhkov
Phoebe Fox … Natasha Rostov
Pip Donaghy … Colonel of the House
Roger Allam … General Kutuzov
Roger May … Prince Bagration
Sam Blatchford … Andrusha Rostov
Sam Dale … Alpatych
Sam Reid … Nikolai Rostov
Sarah Badel … Maria Demitrievna
Serena Evans … Catiche
Stanley Toyne … Mitya Rostov
Stephen Campbell Moore … Andrei Bolkonsky
Tamzin Merchant … Sonya Rostov
Tom Glenister … Nikolenka Bolkonsky

Director: Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b051r677)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b051s4rg)
Muslim Leadership

When an heir to the throne feels moved to step in to a minefield as potentially explosive as Muslim values you know something is amiss. At the weekend Prince Charles, who has been a self-professed admirer of Islam, gave an interview where he expressed alarm at the extent of the radicalisation of young British Muslims and added "particularly in a country like ours where, you know, the values we hold dear. You'd think that the people who have come here, born here, go to school here would imbibe by those values and outlooks." It must be a difficult time to be a Muslim in Britain. The Rotherham child sex abuse scandal; the number of Muslims in jail in England and Wales has hit an all-time with 1 in 5 of those in top security prisons being Muslim; another murderous video apparently fronted by a British Muslim - there are now said to be more British Muslims fighting for ISIS than for the British Army; the Birmingham Trojan Horse inquiry. It's a grim list which will no doubt appal the majority of Muslims as much as it does anyone else. There are plenty of misleading and malicious interpretations of what's happening. But these issues are so profoundly important to the social cohesion of our society that many people, including Muslims, are now asking is there a crisis of moral leadership in Britain's Muslim community? Each of these stories has its own complex and intricate mix of cause and effect, some of which are unique and some overlapping. Where are the powerful leaders, stepping on to the national stage to address these problems and point to solutions? Islam is a diverse faith, but can it really be just a structural problem? Are the leaders there, but finding their voices are being drowned out by an unrelentingly hostile press? Is there something more fundamental about the nature of faith in the public sphere? Or are the majority paying an unfair price for the distortion of their faith by the radicalised few?


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b051ryq4)
Heat 7, 2015

(7/17)
Competitors from Norfolk, Gloucestershire, Hertfordshire and Kent join Russell Davies for the seventh heat of the general knowledge quiz.

To win a place in the semi-finals they'll have to face questions such as which of the asteroids is the brightest as seen from earth, and which mainland South American country's coast is just seven miles from the islands of Trinidad and Tobago?

There's also the usual opportunity for a listener to win a prize by stumping the competitors with questions of his or her own, in 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b051r8p8)
Poems about Love

Poetry Please looks at poems about love, presented by Roger McGough.



SUNDAY 15 FEBRUARY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0520qr6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Are You Inexperienced? (b01jxw4n)
Episode 3

For many people, California's Chateau Marmont is a byword for luxury. But when the writer and stand-up performer AL Kennedy visits, in the course of desperately trying to finish her latest novel, she's all too aware of the great and the good who've undone themselves there, from John Belushi to Jim Morrison and Helmut Newton. For her, it's more akin to the Overlook Hotel in Kubrick's horror film, The Shining.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0520qr8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0520qrb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0520qrd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0520qrg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0520r8b)
The bells of St Mary's Church in Dunsford, Devon.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b0520prh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0520qrl)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0520t2c)
Agony and Ecstasy

If you're lucky enough to have felt it, a sudden overwhelming sense of well-being can be life-changing. Where do these crucial moments in our lives come from? Are they just chemicals reacting in the brain or could they originate from the divine?

John McCarthy reflects on the strange and sudden experience of euphoria. He begins with a deeply puzzling euphoric moment from his own life. Did he feel God or simply the release of endorphins? He revisits the trauma psychiatrist that helped him make sense of the bewildering experience.

John reflects on others' euphoric moments and their different sources - like religious ecstasy, brain disorders, drugs, exercise and music. He considers the mystical experiences of saints - Paul the Apostle's awakening on the road to Damascus, and St Teresa of Avila's sudden state of ecstasy consumed by the love of God.

Before his epileptic seizures, Fyodor Dostoevsky would experience staggering seconds of bliss, which influenced his writing and religious sentiments. In The Doors of Perception, Aldous Huxley detailed his euphoric experiences taking the hallucinogenic drug mescaline. Beyond the short-cut of mind-altering drugs, long-distance runners have often experienced euphoria after pushing their bodies to the absolute limit. The conclusion to Wagner's Tristan and Isolde climaxes with a musically-induced euphoria for both the audience and the performers.

Euphoria takes on many forms, but the feeling is often transformative. Euphoria can seemingly spontaneously enter one's life or can be experienced through the very human effort to transcend ordinary humdrum experience.

Producer: Colin McNulty
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b0520t2f)
The Wood Mice of Wytham

In the company of Marc Brouard and Nigel Fisher, Conservator of Wytham Woods, Trai Anfield hears how these small mammals have a vital role to play in the ecology of the woodland.

Wytham Woods, is reputedly, the most studied woodland in World. Marc Brouard is the latest in a long line of scientific researchers to undertake field studies on small mammals. In 1943 Charles Elton, known as 'the father of modern ecology', studied wood mice and bank voles and his work was followed up by H.N. Southern who examined the impact of predation by tawny owls on populations of small mammals. Marc aims to understand how the characteristics of individual wood mice and bank voles can affect the survival of each species.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0520qrq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0520qrs)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0520t2h)
Scottish Catholics; The Pope and the Mafia; Icelandic Pagans

The Catholic Church in Scotland has revealed a proposal to slash the number of parishes across the east of the country. Archbishop Leo Cushley explains why the changes are necessary.

Hundreds of Christians have demanded greater protection in India following arson attacks on a number of churches. Rahul Tandon reports on whether this is a sign of rising Hindu nationalism since Narendra Modi's VJP party swept to power nine months ago.

Manchester and Liverpool Cathedrals are running an innovative project to help the longterm unemployed find a job. Kevin Bocquet visits some of the new volunteers hopeful of a job and hears from those in work as a result.

On Sunday, Mass will be held in Rome for 20 new Cardinals. David Willey reports on the significance of the appointments and why a delegation of Bishops from Ukraine are meeting Pope Francis on Monday.

Sicilian Archbishop Francesco Montenegro is one of those who wil be made a Cardinal this weekend. Commentators say it is a reward for the gutsy stance he's taken against the mafia. John Laurenson travelled to Calabria to meet some of the priests who are taking on the fight against the mafia.

Icelanders will soon be able to worship at a shrine to the Norse Gods, Thor, Odin and Frigg. A temple is being constructed in Reykjavik as a modern version of Norse paganism gains popularity. Hilmar Orn Hilmarsson, a high priest of Norse paganism tell us why Icelanders are attracted to paganism.

As the new GCSE RS syllabus is launched we look at a new book which explores 50 different world religions in "30 seconds".

Contributors:
Archbishop Leo Cushley
Hilmar Orn Hilmarsson
Russell Re Manning
Rahul Tandon
David Willey

Producers:
David Cook
Zaffar Iqbal

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b0520t2k)
React

Sister Frances Dominica presents The Radio 4 Appeal for React
Registered Charity No 802440
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'React'
- Cheques should be made payable to React.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0520qrv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0520qrx)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0520t2m)
Fifty Shades of Love

A service from St Luke's, West Holloway
Dave Tomlinson writer of 'The Bad Christian's Manifesto' and 'How to be a bad Christian' reflects on God, love and passion for Valentine's Day.
Leader: Rhian Roberts
Music Director: Justin Butcher
Organist: Michael Haslam.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b051w4f2)
The Purpose of Satire

Will Self finds himself driven to reconsider the nature and purpose of satire in the wake of the murders at Charlie Hebdo in Paris. "The paradox is this: if satire aims at the moral reform of a given society it can only be effective within that particular society; and furthermore only if there's a commonly accepted ethical hierarchy to begin with. A satire that demands of the entire world that it observe the same secularist values as the French state is a form of imperialism like any other.".


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0vl3)
Ostrich

Michael Palin presents the avian record breaking ostrich in the Kalahari Desert. Ostriches are ornithological record-breakers. The black and white adult male ostrich is taller and heavier than any other living bird, reaching almost 3 metres in height and weighing a whopping 150 kilograms. Females are smaller but lay the largest eggs of any bird. The ostrich's eye measures 5cm in diameter and is the largest of any land vertebrate.

Ostriches live in the wide open landscapes of central, eastern and South-West Africa. As well as being tall and observant, Ostriches also minimise their chances of being predated on, by living in groups and sharing lookout duties, or staying close to sharp-eyed antelope and zebra herds. They can also use their powerful legs to try and outrun a predator, reaching speeds of up to 70 kilometres per hour which makes them the fastest avian runner.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0520t2p)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0520t2r)
Jennifer stands triumphant, and Shula has a shock.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0520t2t)
Mark Rylance

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the actor, Mark Rylance.

Born in Kent and brought up in America where his father was a teacher, Mark played Hamlet for the first time while he was still at school. Since then he has become particularly well known for his acclaimed and award-winning Shakespearean stage roles. He won an Olivier and a Tony award for his portrayal of Johnny 'Rooster' Byron in Jez Butterworth's 'Jerusalem' onstage in both Britain and the United States. He has also appeared in a number of film roles, was the first artistic director of The Globe Theatre - a post he held for a decade - and his portrayal of Thomas Cromwell in the BBC Television adaptation of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall has now brought him to a wider audience.

Producer: Isabel Sargent.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0520qrz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b051ryqd)
Series 71

Episode 1

It's the return of Radio 4's classic panel game in which the contestants are challenged to speak on a given subject for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

This series, the guests include Jenny Eclair, Stephen Fry, Sheila Hancock, Robin Ince Paul Merton, Graham Norton, and trying his hand at the game for the first time, the tenth doctor, David Tennant.

Recorded at the BBC's Radio Theatre and Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury, this long running and popular series enters its 47th year with the same wonderful host, Nicholas Parsons.

Kicking off this first episode in the series are Julian Clary, Stephen Fry, Paul Merton and David Tennant who makes his first impressive appearance on the show. Subjects include Exit, Pursued by a Bear, which is Shakespeare's most famous stage direction.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0520t3d)
Soup and the British

From a hearty warming bowl of chunky soup on a frosty Winter's day to the smooth comfort of home-made chicken soup when you're ill, the British, it seems, love soup. We spend £762million a year and the market's growing with trendy exotic flavours spicing up the choice on offer new gadgets to help make the dish and slimmers replacing juicing with 'souping', it's gaining pace.

Tim Hayward is passionate that this dish is more than simply an appetiser and keen to stamp out memories of wishy-washy, tasteless broths. Past horrors had made it a laughing stock with 'Brown Windsor Soup' being the punchline of many jokes in the 50s and symbolic of austerity and low-quality catering. He searches out the roots of this much-mocked comic dish, alongside Turtle and Bombay duck varieties, and seeks to clear its name.

Along the way he meets the man who made millions and revolutionised the market with fresh soups which are stealing our hearts from the old tins, gets top tips from the 'Soupsayer' and spins the colour wheel at the pub whose soup is always a mystery but 'never vegetarian'.

Presented by Tim Hayward.
Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0520qs1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0520t4k)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 A Love Supreme: 50 Years On (b051s0fp)
Often cited as one of the greatest albums ever made, John Coltrane's A Love Supreme is revered not just by jazz aficionados but music fans the world over. Fifty years after its release, British saxophonist Courtney Pine explores what makes it such a unique and important record.

John Coltrane intended A Love Supreme to be a spiritual record - a declaration of his religious beliefs and personal spiritual quest. However the album also had a wider cultural significance. It was released in February 1965, just days after black rights activist Malcolm X was assassinated and weeks before Martin Luther King led the March on Alabama, and for many the sound and feel of the music captures perfectly the sadness, confusion and anger of America's growing black consciousness movement.

Courtney visits Gaumont State Theatre in Kilburn, North London, where Coltrane performed on a tour in 1961. He is joined by a trio of leading British jazz saxophonists - Nat Birchall, Finn Peters and Jason Yarde - whose lives have been inspired and shaped by A Love Supreme and the music and spirit of John Coltrane.

Our quartet of musicians explore why the album touches so many and continues to do so with each new generation.

Produced by Jim Lister
A Folded Wing production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b051w2zz)
Baslow, Derbyshire

Eric Robson chairs the horticultural panel programme from Baslow, Derbyshire. Chris Beardshaw, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank answer the questions from local gardeners..

Chris Beardshaw and members of the local horticultural society visit nearby Chatsworth in search of the winter crown jewels.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04c9xcn)
Sunday Omnibus

For 40 years Iby kept secret the fact that she'd been held in Auschwitz - she didn't even tell her husband. She finally told someone 30 years ago and one of the conversations introduced by Fi Glover is with that friend; the other is with her granddaughter. Since Iby finally revealed her secret, she has gone on to tell her story to more than 20,000 people, most of them school children, in her determination that the horrors of the Holocaust should never be repeated. And, in a departure for The Listening Project, Iby reads the powerful poem she wrote in her pursuit of this aim.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b0520thv)
Reading Europe - France: Three Strong Women

Episode 2

Reading Europe - France: Three Strong Women - over the next 18 months Radio 4 takes you on a journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature.

In this award winning and best-selling French novel Marie NDiaye explores the immigrant experience and the power of humanity. Caught between France and Africa, three women take flight, and their lives are altered forever.

Part 2

Fanta's story continues, as the lies her husband Rudy told in Senegal begin to catch up with them both. Can Rudy hold on to his life in France or will he be destined to follow his father's murderous path?

Back in Dakar a penniless widow, Khady Demba, is forced to join the masses of migrants embarking on a terrifying journey to reach European shores.

Adapted for radio by Pat Cumper
From a translation by John Fletcher.

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Marie NDiaye is French novelist and playwright. She is the first black woman to win France's most prestigious literary prize - the Prix Goncourt - for Three Strong Women in 2009. The novel was also long-listed for The 2014 International IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award and it was a fianlist for the 2013 Man Booker International Prize.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0520thx)
Anne Tyler on her new novel A Spool of Blue Thread

Anne Tyler's writing career spans fifty years and twenty novels, including Breathing Lessons, The Accidental Tourist and A Patchwork Planet. She's a bestselling author who has won many awards including the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Critic Circle Award. Novelists, including Nick Hornby and Roddy Doyle, love her work. In a rare interview she talks to Mariella Frostrup about her new novel, her twentieth, A Spool of Blue Thread.

Also, the captivating story of the novel lost for over forty years: Australian novelist Elizabeth Harrower reveals why she gave up writing, and her literary admirer Eimear McBride tells Mariella why she finds Harrower's novels an acutely observed portrait of our most intimate relationships.

And Dr Sarah Dillon is back with another undercover investigation into the workings of our classic prose. In Dame Muriel Spark's The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie we see how we, as readers, are just as gullible to Miss Brodie's charms as her students.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0520tj1)
Bubble and Squeak

Roger McGough with something for everyone, from WB Yeats to Elizabeth Barrett Browning by way of Ted Hughes and Derek Walcott. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b051s2m3)
Asylum Seekers

Around 28 thousand people are claiming asylum in the UK. They're accommodated in some of the nation's most deprived areas while their cases are considered. Now, with numbers on the rise, some communities say they're struggling to cope. Allan Urry reports from the Northwest of England where, in some areas, there's concern about growing pressures on health services and schools. In Liverpool the City's Mayor, Joe Anderson, talks of an asylum "apartheid" and says other towns and cities need to take a fairer share. In Rochdale in Greater Manchester, there are more asylum seekers than the whole of the south east of England. The local MP Simon Danczuk says he's worried the pressures could undermine the good community relations that have always existed in the town.
Recent stories of asylum seekers living in fancy hotels have led to outraged newspaper headlines but are they a symptom of bigger failings in the UK's system for housing those who come here seeking refuge?

Reporter: Allan Urry
Producer: Matt Precey.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0520prh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0520qs3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0520qs5)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0520qs7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b052h6wn)
Liz Barclay

Liz Barclay's Pick of the Week features love, laughter and laconic wit - Paul Sinha rewrites the Marga Carta on the grounds that less is more; David Tennant takes the nations favourite panel show by storm and Joan Armatrading remembers her first guitar with love and affection. But there's plenty of gritty reality, a sprinkling of salt and some spicy drama in the mix. Produced by Stephen Garner.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b052h9b6)
Rob wishes Helen had told him about Tina leaving the shop straight away. He suggests that Helen should take the shop on again herself. He's even prepared to put marriage and baby plans on hold if she wants to see how it goes.

Phoebe asks Hayley if there's any hope for her and Roy. Hayley admits she has a lot of things to sort out in her head - and her heart.

Jill remembers Phil and Jethro laying a hedge, which Phil took great pride in and David is now marveling at. David feels he should try and work some stipulations into the contract for Justin Elliott, to preserve some of the wildlife.

David helps Jill with a heavy trunk and digs out some old exercise books. They turn out to be Dan Archer's old farm diaries from the 1920s. David's absorbed. The winter of 1920 was a tough one, with lakes frozen over. Jill and David discover that Brookfield Dairy started in 1930. The diary entries bring Dan and Doris to life. David's not throwing these away.

Jill remarks on the passing on of knowledge - Dan to Phil and Phil to David. Now David is passing it on to Pip. How exciting that they can do the same at Hadley Haugh, as Phil and Dan did at Brookfield.


SUN 19:15 Gloomsbury (b01nbt9b)
Series 1

Trying to Avoid Unpleasantness

The gardener Vera Sackcloth Vest and her husband Henry are obliged to offer hospitality to the writer of very naughty books Mr D H Lollipop and his new flame, Venus Traduces - who formerly harboured a Sapphic passion for Vera.

The guests are accommodated in the dovecote as Henry will not have Lollipop in the house, in case the cook Mrs Gosling is exposed to impertinences. Vera is hoping that Lollipop will be able to improve her prose style, but instead he seems to take pleasure in trashing her garden and redesigning her study. Lollipop is intent on awakening Venus's blood consciousness but, alas, any educational impulse involving Venus is doomed to failure.

As Venus's passion for Lollipop begins to flag, she finds consolation with the gardener Gosling on the potting bench. Despite Henry's precautions, Mrs Gosling is exposed to Lollipop's impertinences, and the outcome is unexpected and inconvenient.

Cast:
Vera Sackcloth-Vest ..... Miriam Margolyes
Gosling, her gardener ..... Nigel Planer
Henry Mickleton ..... Jonathan Coy
Venus Traduces ..... Morwenna Banks
Mrs Gosling, Housekeeper ..... Alison Steadman
D H Lollipop ..... John Sessions

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Hibernian Homicide: New Irish Crime Stories (b052h9b8)
Faith, by Stuart Neville

Three new stories of mystery and intrigue from some of Northern Ireland's very best crime writers: Colin Bateman, Claire McGowan and Stuart Neville.

Colin Bateman explores how a woman's chance encounter in a supermarket reawakens her painful past and stirs an overwhelming desire for vengeance, while Claire McGowan bring us the story of an archaeological dig which becomes a crime scene upon the discovery of a young woman's body, and Stuart Neville tells of a minister who is asked to commit an unspeakable crime for one of his parishioners. But why? And will he do it?

Writer ..... Stuart Neville
Reader ..... Stuart Graham
Producer ..... Heather Larmour.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b051w4dm)
Almost an entire day on Radio 4 was taken over by a dramatic airing of War and Peace at the start of the year. For some listeners it was a joy that kept them glued to their radios - for others it was a rude interruption to the schedule. Radio 4's Commissioning Editor for Drama, Jeremy Howe, explains why the network decided to broadcast wall-to-wall Tolstoy at the expense of regular programmes.

Also, the BBC's Director General Tony Hall has weighed into the ongoing debate about changes to The Archers. Jeremy Howe gives his reaction to the DG's intervention.

And is the BBC's news output little more than a barrage of bleak and dismal events? Is there space - or even a need - for more good news stories? Professor Charlie Beckett explored this question in his programme, Good News is No News. It generated debate on social media with many people saying they felt overwhelmed by negative news. So is it time for the BBC to give more focus to positive news stories?

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b051w4dk)
John Hopkins, Ena Baxter, Lord Gavron, Andre Brink, Charles Townes, Steve Strange

Matthew Bannister on

John "Hoppy" Hopkins - the photographer who played a pivotal role in the counter culture of the 1960s. He set up the underground magazine International Times and started the UFO club where Pink Floyd made their early appearances. Record producer Joe Boyd and poet Michael Horovitz pay tribute.

Also Ena Baxter the culinary creator behind the success of the Scottish family business Baxter's foods.

Lord Gavron, the Labour peer who made his fortune in the printing business.

Andre Brink, the dissident Afrikaans writer whose work was banned by South Africa's apartheid government.

And Charles Townes, the Nobel Prize winning physicist whose work paved the way for the invention of the laser.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0520pr5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0520t2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b051ryqn)
You Can't Say That

Does free speech include a right to cause offence? Many thinkers have insisted that it must - but debate has raged for millennia over where the limits to insult can be set. While some maintain Enlightenment values must include permission to shock, offend and even injure, there is a growing sense that rights must be balanced by responsibilities to one's community, in speech as well as action. And as technology has given each of us an worldwide platform to express any idea, anywhere, the potential for instant, global offence has only grown. How are we to define how much is too much - and what really distinguishes insult from injury? Edward Stourton speaks to historians, theologians and philosophers to explore the outer limits of free expression.
Producer: Polly Hope.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b052h9bb)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b052h9df)
Mary Riddell of The Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b051vr36)
Love in the Movies

Antonia Quirke presents a valentine to the cinema in a special edition about love in the movies. She talks to Terence Stamp, once described as the most beautiful man in the world, about what it was like to be loved from afar by millions of strangers. And she hears from Sir Richard Eyre who explains why he believes romantic comedy The Philadelphia Story is a perfect movie, and from award-winning documentary maker Kim Longinotto about Love Is All, her evocative compilation of love scenes from over a hundred years of British film history. Sharing the love are critics Jason Solomons and Angie Errigo, who reveal if they ever fell in love with someone because they reminded them of a movie star.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0520t2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0520qt5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b051s4jz)
Harvard Business School – The Construction of Pain

Harvard Business School: Laurie Taylor takes a journey through the complex moral world of what many call the West Point of American Capitalism. Michel Anteby, Associate Professor at Harvard Business School, describes his research into the inner workings, mores and rituals of this highly influential institution.They're joined by Professor Ken Starkey from the Nottingham University Business School.

Also, a cultural history of pain with Dr Louise Hide, Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck. University of London.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0520r8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0520qt7)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0520qt9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0520qtc)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0520qtf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b052z37q)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Johnston McKay.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b052hb3v)
Sheep Thefts, Trees, Soil

In recent weeks there have been a number of thefts of pregnant ewes. Sheep rustling is thought to be more common in spring and winter, just before the main lambing season. Farming Today speaks to a farmer in Wales who lost 50 pregnant ewes worth thousands of pounds. NFU Mutual say many of the thefts are driven by the price of lamb.

It is the UN year of soil and this week Farming Today delves into the hidden wonders of our soils and looks at what British farmers are doing to safeguard the land. Anna Hill goes to a 'soil seminar' in Norfolk and speaks to David Gardner from the Royal Agricultural Society of England.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0520qth)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03jz1hj)
Whooper Swan

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the whooper swan. The elegance and beauty of wild swans has inspired writers and musicians across the centuries - the most familiar perhaps being Tchaikovsky's ballet Swan Lake, which may well have been inspired by the Whooper swan.


MON 06:00 Today (b052hb3x)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b052hdg1)
Joseph Nye on Soft Power

Andrew Marr looks at what happens when political power fractures and how 'soft power' retains its influence. Peter Pomerantsev spent a decade working in Russia's fast-growing television industry and tells the story of a country changing from communism and nascent democracy to a mafia-state and oligarchy. The political analyst Joseph Nye coined the phrase 'soft power' in 1990 and in his latest essay argues that while America's economy may have been overtaken by China, the US century is far from over. Impressionist art continues to grow in popularity and price-tag, and the curator Anne Robbins looks back on the life of Paul Durand-Ruel, the 19th century art dealer and visionary who foresaw its power and marketability worldwide.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b052hdg3)
Alexandra Fuller - Leaving Before the Rains Come

"He looked good on a horse"

"I believed that if I moored myself to Charlie, I would know tranquility interspersed with organized adventure. I could remain here, safely. Our lives would be the 'three rifles, supplies for a month and Mozart' of Out of Africa without the plane crashes, syphilis and Danish accent."

In a follow-up to the award-winning memoir "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight", Alexandra Fuller charts her tempestuous marriage to the man she thought would save her from the eccentricities, chaos and dangers of life with her family in Africa.

In 1992, after her parents had seen off all other suitors, Alexandra Fuller married Charlie Ross, a charismatic polo player, and the only man who seemed able to stand up to her parents. In this witty, frank and courageous memoir, Fuller charts their twenty tempestuous years together, from the brutal beauty of the Zambezi to the mountains of Wyoming - looking at what made her marry this man, and why in the end she had to save herself.

In this opening episode: 'Charlie Ross: Mr Adventure - the man Alexandra hopes will be her saviour.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman.

Abridger: Richard Hamilton

Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b052hffb)
Childcare Costs a Key Election Issue for Voters.

According to pre-election research done for Woman's Hour by TNS BMRB the cost of caring for your family came out as the third most important issue for you as begin to think about how you will cast your vote on May 7th. Today we examine the issue of caring for children.

Anna Lyndsey's memoir 'Girl in the Dark' details her excruciating allergy to light and how she copes with a life in darkness. She discusses how she has survived moments of real despair, the impact her condition has had on her marriage and how she sometimes manages to see the outside world at daybreak and sunset.

As 50 Shades of Grey hits the cinemas we hear from a professional dominatrix about what the community think of the film and explore the British fascination with spanking, including the history of it in popular culture.

Plus how do you decide the best time to try and get pregnant?

Presented by Emma Barnett
Producer Beverley Purcell.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b052hffd)
The Embrace

Episode 1

Iona returns stirring up old conflicts and broken promises.

Linda Marshall Griffiths's unflinching five-part drama about betrayal and the power of money cracks open the impossibilities and difficulties of love.

IONA.....LYNDSEY MARSHAL
CHARLIE.....WILLIAM ASH
GRACE.....OLIVIA HALLINAN
DAN.....BLAKE RITSON
TABBY.....OLWEN MAY
CLEM.....JONATHAN KEEBLE

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015


MON 11:00 Salt (b052hffg)
Episode 2

In part one of 'Salt', BBC Breakfast's Steph McGovern learnt about the varied and profound effects salt has had on areas such as economics, politics and war through history; now she turns her attention to salt's role in our diet. She begins in Anglesey at the Halen Mon sea salt company, learning how they produce their salt from the waters of the Menai Straits, then moves on to learn more about the wide variety of artisan salts that have become so popular in recent years - from French Fleur du Sel to the beautiful pink Himalayan Rock Salt. Steph goes on to address the issue of salt and health, hearing from a campaign group promoting the lowering of salt consumption down to 6 grammes a day through schemes such as reducing the number of holes in chip shop salt shakers. Finally Steph heads down the salt mine at Winsford in Cheshire, with 160 miles of tunnels and an off-shoot storage facility that capitalises on the ideal humidity by storing everything from grand pianos and barrel organs to unwanted waxworks.


MON 11:30 The Architects (b052hffj)
Series 2

Turret

Matt's got a problem with a turret, Sarah's got the clients from hell, Sir Lucien's got family trouble and Tim just got off with his old biology teacher.

Just a regular day at Sir Lucien and Partners.

Comedy set in a struggling architectural practice.

Written by Jim Poyser with Neil Griffiths.

Sir Lucien ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Tim ..... Alex Carter
Sarah ..... Anna Crilly
Matt ..... Dominic Coleman
Jemima ..... Hannah Genesius
Bob ..... David Acton
Jane ..... Jane Slavin
Dave ..... Stephen Critchlow

Director: Toby Swift

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b0520qtk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b052hhcp)
16 February 1915 - Cressida Marshall

Cressida wants to be at the forefront of the women's struggle, but can't be taken seriously.

Written by Melissa Murray
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b052hhcr)
Flood Grants and Cleaner Diesel

Winifred Robinson looks at the grant that's available to claim if you were a victim of the Winter floods last year. And the efforts to clean up diesel engines to satisfy the latest European emissions rules.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0520qtp)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b052hhct)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b052hhcw)
Series 2

The Statistical State

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), brings to life the numbers conveying the big trends that have transformed the shape and scope of the British state.

He looks at what governments through the centuries have spent, borrowed, taxed, regulated and built; and he considers how we came to organise a national life that reaches into every corner of private life, from the delivery of pensions and healthcare to the surveillance of emails or rules about the temperature of a hot cup of tea.

By one measure, the modern British state is roughly 7,000 times bigger than the Tudor state. How and why did that happen?
The story of the state unfolds through muddy fields, smugglers coves and a Victorian village lock-up. Numbers become sound as we hear the dramatic scale of change that has occurred over the centuries.

The evolution of the state may be driven less by party politics than party politicians might like us to think. Although the state's size and functions are a natural subject of fierce political argument, the impetus for the biggest changes has often come from another source - such as war, economic growth, and the power that arises from knowledge.

In this opening programme in the series, Andrew looks at knowledge and power.

Producer: Michael Blastland

A Whistledown production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b052h9b6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b052hptb)
Phonophone

by Timothy X. Atack.

A musician is found dead in strange circumstances. How did he die? The only clue is a text message that says 'Phonophone active'. But what is a phonophone?

Original music by Timothy X Atack

Directed by Marc Beeby

This is Tim Atack's second play for radio. His first play, The Morpeth Carol, won the Radio Academy Gold Award for 2014.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b052hptd)
Heat 8, 2015

(8/17)
'They're young... they're in love... and they kill people' was the promotional tag-line for which 1967 film release?

This and many other general knowledge questions face the competitors in the eighth heat of 'Brain of Britain', who this week come from London, Bath and Belfast. Russell Davies is in the questionmaster's chair - and music, history, politics, mythology, geography, science and popular culture are all fair game for Russell's questions. The winner will take another of the automatic places in the semi-finals of the 2015 contest later in the spring.

There's also a chance for a listener to win a prize by outwitting the contestants with his or her own question ideas, in 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0520t3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b052hptg)
Raymond Blanc

Chef Raymond Blanc chooses his favourite writing, with readers Sinead Cusack and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Recorded at Le Manoir aux Quat'Saisons. Raymond's deep love of literature encompasses poetry by Rimbaud, and excerpts from Cooking in Ten Minutes by Edouard de Pomiane, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran, The Belly of Paris by Emile Zola and The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Also the words of a song, Ne Me Quitte Pas, by Jacques Brel.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b052hptj)
Series 11

What Is the Point of Plants?

What's the Point of Plants?

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by plant biologist Professor Jane Langdale, physicist Professor Jim Al-Khalili and comedian and former horticulture student Ed Byrne to ask, "what's the point of plants?". How would the evolution of life on our planet have differed without plants, and what would our planet look like today? Most crucially that seemingly dull but necessary process of photosynthesis that we all learned about in school, is in fact one of the most important processes in our universe, and as usual it seems, the physicists are trying to take credit for it. Could there be a quantum explanation for how this amazing reaction works, and if so, are plants in fact the perfect quantum computers?


MON 17:00 PM (b052hptl)
With the latest news interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0520qtr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b052hptn)
Series 71

Episode 2

The popular comedy panel game returns with Paul Merton, Tony Hawks, Josie Lawrence and Alun Cochrane, hosted by Nicholas Parsons. Subjects include 'Multitasking', 'Kinky Boots' and 'A Cathedral City' as this edition comes from Canterbury.

This is the second in series 71 of Radio 4's classic panel game in which the contestants are challenged to speak on a given subject for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

This series, the guests include Jenny Eclair, Stephen Fry, Sheila Hancock, Robin Ince Paul Merton, Graham Norton, and trying his hand at the game for the first time, the tenth doctor, David Tennant.

Recorded at the BBC's Radio Theatre and Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury, this long running and popular series enters its 47th year with the same wonderful host, Nicholas Parsons.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b052hptq)
Kate wants to completely refurbish her cottage, but Jennifer feels that Phoebe wants to stay at Home Farm. Jennifer tells Kate the hard truth. It will take time for Phoebe to trust her again.

Ruth's keen to get back up to Hadley Haugh and sort out the milking parlour. Not this week, says David - they're still busy lambing. Ruth was keen to take the boys to see Heather over half term. As they discuss Pip's birthday tomorrow, Ruth notices David's still poring over Dan's old farm diaries.

Ed tells David and Ruth he's selling his herd tomorrow. Mike and Vicky are also selling their cows. Ed feels a weight has been lifted. He's going to pay off his debts and set himself up as a contractor. They congratulate Ed for doing the right thing - and being so brave.

Shula's still feeling rattled by the altercation between Rob and the hunt saboteur.

Ruth has managed to fix a date to visit Hadley Haugh - next Friday. With any luck they can sign and exchange contracts while they're up there. David shows Ruth the hedge he was discussing with Jill - Phil's showpiece. Ruth teases David that he should stand and contemplate while he can. Life is only going to get busier from now on.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b052htk7)
Vasily Petrenko, The Duke of Burgundy Reviewed, Gurinder Chadha, Lynda Benglis

Kirsty Lang is joined by Chief Conductor of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra Vasily Petrenko to talk about its 175th anniversary concert, his hometown St Petersburg and getting high fives in West Everton.

Briony Hansen reviews The Duke of Burgundy, Peter Strickland's dark, erotic drama about the sadomasochistic relationship between two women; starring Chiara D'Anna and Sidse Babett Knudsen, best known for her role as the Danish Prime Minister in Borgen.

Ahead of The Front Row Debate "Does the state owe the artist a living?" filmmaker Gurinder Chadha reflects on her creative journey and the state support she's received.

Artist Lynda Benglis, "one of the most innovative living sculptors in the United States", discusses her fascination with materials and taking a photograph that led to storm in the American art world.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b052hffd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Malcolm X and the 'American Nightmare' (b052zzg3)
Four unique American voices consider the presence of Malcolm X in post-Ferguson USA.

The refusal of the US grand juries to indict police officers involved in the deaths of unarmed black men led to protests in 170 cities. National Guard troops were ordered to Ferguson, Missouri, "Die-ins" were staged in several cities and thousands took to the streets in New York.

The protests have been referred to as a "new Civil Rights Movement", with the name of Malcolm X, and some of his quotes, used on placards and in chants. Many protestors demanded the angry, stronger response reminiscent of his philosophy.

On the 50th anniversary of Malcolm X's assassination, it seems that the Civil Rights leader's legacy is being revived by a new generation - perhaps becoming even more relevant than that of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

With the events surrounding the recent killings of unarmed black men as backdrop, this programme explores the newly framed race problem in the States.

British-born writer Gary Younge considers Malcolm X's life and how he would assess Ferguson.

Rapper-turned-activist Tef Poe describes his experience of the protests in his hometown of St. Louis. Several of his songs invoking the name of Malcolm X have become protest anthems.

Black Arts Movement poet Sonia Sanchez remembers her encounters with Malcolm X in the 1960s.

Professor of History Peniel Joseph examines the current generation's relationship with Civil Rights.

These powerful voices are played against archive of recent American protests and the speeches of Malcolm X, who in some ways may be considered to be talking about today as much as the 1960s.

Produced by Colin McNulty
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b052hvhn)
Downward Social Mobility

Social mobility is a good thing - right? Politicians worry that not enough people from less-privileged backgrounds get the opportunity to move up in life. But are we prepared to accept that others lose out - and move in the opposite direction? Jo Fidgen explores the implications of downward social mobility.
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


MON 21:00 Finding Your Voice (b051s0fm)
Comedy performer and broadcaster Helen Keen, explores a rare condition that she herself once suffered from, known as selective mutism or SM. An anxiety disorder that develops in childhood, those affected by SM can usually speak fluently in some situations, notably at home, but remain silent elsewhere - such as in school, with extended family members, or even parents. Their inability to speak is so severe that it's been likened to a phobia of speaking, and is often accompanied by the physical symptoms of extreme anxiety. Selective mutism can be mistaken for shyness or worse, a deliberate refusal to talk. But in reality, these children are desperate to speak, to share their thoughts and ideas, to make friends and to fulfil the expectations of their teachers and parents, in taking an active part in class activities. Yet somehow the words remain "trapped" inside as the anxiety, frustration and fear, builds.

Though relatively rare, increasing awareness and official recognition of selective mutism in the psychiatric literature has seen an increase in diagnoses. Today, it's estimated to affect about 1 in 150 children in the UK - roughly equivalent to the number of children who are affected by classic autism. The causes of selective mutism are poorly understood but a genetic component is likely as are environmental influences. What's clear is that without early intervention, SM can take hold and persist well into adulthood and in rare cases can develop into more acute mental health problems. As Helen knows only too well, it can be a lonely place to grow up in as the quiet child is so often, 'the forgotten child'. It wasn't until Helen was in her early twenties that she managed to break the silence.

In this programme, Helen meets some of those affected by SM, including parents and former sufferers as well as experts helping children to find their voice again. Producer: Rami Tzabar. Clip of the Alternative Comedy Experience courtesy of Comedy Central.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b052hdg1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b052hwxn)
Egyptian air force carries out raids on IS targets in Libya

Cairo urges EU nations to join fight against IS in Libya -- or face new terror threat


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b052hwxq)
In Certain Circles

You only think of orphans in fairytales

Over a tennis match, orphans Anna and Stephen are welcomed into the rarified world of the Howard family.

Internationally acclaimed Australian author Elizabeth Harrower's novel was written in 1971 and was finally published in 2015.

This tale of love, class and freedom is set among the grand houses and lush gardens of Sydney Harbour just after the Second World War, following the lives of Zoe and Russell Howard.

Charismatic and confident, the children of affluent and loving parents, they welcome into their circle, Stephen and Anna, two orphans, whose lives until now have been very different from those of the Howards. But despite this, these four will spend the rest of their lives moving in and out of each other's shadows.

'Harrower evokes the waste and futility of a decadent class with all the bite and poignancy of F Scott Fitzgerald,' Eimear McBride, New Statesman

Author: Elizabeth Harrower is regarded as one of Australia's most important postwar writers, and is enjoying a recent literary revival. Born in Sydney in 1928, her first novel, Down in the City, was published in 1957 and was followed by The Long Prospect (1958) and The Catherine Wheel (1960). Her most well-known work, The Watch Tower, was published in 1966 to huge acclaim.

Four years later she finished In Certain Circles , but withdrew it before publication for reasons she has never publicly spoken of. The manuscript was rediscovered recently by her publisher who felt it should be published immediately. Harrower has since received rave reviews, including comparisons with Emile Zola and F Scott Fitzgerald.

Reader: Penny Downie

Abridger: Sally Marmion

Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


MON 23:00 Agatha Christie (b01qwd30)
Murder is Easy

2. Enlisting Help

Luke Fitzwilliam can no longer believe that so many deaths in the tiny village of Wychwood-under-Ashe are a coincidence, and he's determined to find out the truth.

So he enlists the help of Bridget, Lord Waynflete's attractive young fiancee...

Agatha Christie's thriller dramatised by Joy Wilkinson.

Luke .... Patrick Baladi
Bridget .... Lydia Leonard
Lord Whitfield .... Michael Cochrane
Miss Waynflete .... Marcia Warren
Miss Pinkerton .... Marlene Sidaway
Billy Bones/Rivers .... Patrick Brennan
Reverend Wake .... Thomas Wheatley
Rose .... Lizzy Watts
Abbott .... Paul Stonehouse
Ellsworthy .... Ben Crowe
Dr Thomas .... Will Howard
Major Horton .... Robert Blythe

Director: Mary Peate

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2013.


MON 23:30 Short Cuts (b04kbjj1)
Series 6

Rabbit Holes

Josie Long dives down a rabbit hole in this sequence of short documentaries, true stories and radio adventures.

We hear tales of a spam email that alters the course of two people's lives and a mysterious monument made out of shoes at a deserted intersection in rural Indiana - and Miranda July leads listeners into another world with her story of swim coaching an elderly team in a town near no large bodies of water.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0520qvp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b052hdg3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0520qvr)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0520qvt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0520qvw)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0520qvy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b053qzj0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Johnston McKay.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b052j0tk)
Soil

Anna Hill meets a Norfolk farmer who's recommending old-fashioned seven-year crop rotation as a way to protect soil for the future. Poul Hovesen is farm manager at Holkham Hall and the Salle Estate in Norfolk. He's brought long-term rotations in to both sites, and believes this has improved the soils significantly.
The Port of Tyne is currently loading what they believe is one of the largest shipments of grain ever to leave the UK. The large bulk cargo vessel 'Rosco Poplar' will spend around seven days loading over 60,000 tonnes of barley which will go to various parts of the world - focussing on the middle east.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03jz828)
Barn Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the barn owl. As soft-plumaged birds which weigh very little Barn Owls avoid hunting in strong winds or heavy rain. Snow is a problem too because it allows voles and mice to tunnel beneath its blanket, out of the owls' reach. But in spite of seasonal perils, barn owls are a welcome sight over grassy fields and verges in many parts of the UK.


TUE 06:00 Today (b052j0tm)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b052j0tp)
The Aliens Act of 1905

Jonathan Freedland examines current debates surrounding immigration and legislation in the light of the 1905 Aliens Act; the first act to introduce immigration and registration controls into Britain from areas outside the British Empire and seen chiefly as a response to East European Jewish immigration.

Jonathan is joined by Mary Riddell, columnist and political interviewer for the Daily Telegraph, Dr David Glover, Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Southampton and the actor Henry Goodman.

The Aliens Act at Work cartoon courtesy (c) The Jewish Museum.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b052j0tr)
John Harris talks to Prof Simon Baron-Cohen

John Harris of The Guardian talks to autism specialist, Professor Simon Baron-Cohen.

John is known for having two consuming passions: music and politics - and luckily he's developed a career that revolves round both. But five years ago, he acquired a third area of expertise and curiosity: autism.

His son James was born in 2006 and, when he was 3, it was discovered he was autistic. For John and his partner, the next two or three years passed in a blur of educational therapy, tussles with officialdom, James's successful entry to a mainstream school, and reading: lots and lots of it.

In these two editions of One to One, John talks to people who can give him greater insight into the condition and to discover how we can all become more accepting of it and those who are affected by it.
In this first programme, John talks to Simon Baron-Cohen, a professor at Cambridge University in psychology and psychiatry, and also the director of the University's Autism Research Centre. Over more than thirty years, his work has made a huge contribution to an increasingly nuanced, sophisticated understanding of autism, and helped a lot of people, including John.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b052j0tt)
Alexandra Fuller - Leaving Before the Rains Come

"Never trust anyone who doesn't drink"

Alexandra and Charlie's first trip ends, portentously, with an elephant attack.

In a follow-up to the award-winning memoir "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight", Alexandra Fuller charts her temptestuous marriage to the man she thought would save her from the eccentricities, chaos and dangers of life in Africa.

In 1992, after her parents had seen off all other suitors, Alexandra Fuller married Charlie Ross, a charismatic polo player, and the only man who seemed able to stand up to her parents. In this witty, frank and courageous memoir, Fuller charts their twenty tempestuous years together, from the brutal beauty of the Zambezi to the mountains of Wyoming - looking at what made her marry this man, and why in the end she had to save herself.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman.

Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b052j0tw)
Kicked Out Kids; The Model Industry; Revenging Revenge Porn

Revenging revenge porn: how best to fight back when you are the victim of revenge porn? Emma Barnett is joined in the studio by Emma Holten who had her email hacked and intimate images published globally. Find out tomorrow how she took control of the situation. A new film - Kicked out kids - explores what happens when children in care reach 18, the age they have to leave. We explore the impact of this on the lives of children, and discuss the best age for children to leave care. Also we have an interview with Carole White, founder of Premier Model Agency, on the fashion industry, perceptions of beauty and being a model matriach. And as a new report finds that women are underrepresented in digital industries, we ask why this is, and what needs to be done to change it? Plus a look at what election issues are concerning Welsh women.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Corinna Jones.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t0f2)
The Embrace

Episode 2

Iona tells Charlie how she was bought and why she left him.

Linda Marshall Griffiths' unflinching drama about betrayal and the power of money cracks open the impossibilities and difficulties of love.

IONA.....LYNDSEY MARSHAL
CHARLIE.....WILLIAM ASH
GRACE.....OLIVIA HALLINAN
DAN.....BLAKE RITSON

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 11:00 The Placebo Problem (b052j0ty)
Whilst the placebo effect is now recognised as a useful therapeutic tool, less familiar is its malign counterpart: the nocebo effect, the capacity of an inert or sham treatment to induce adverse physical and mental effects. Geoff Watts explores the science behind this remarkable phenomenon and its worrying implications.

Acknowledged for decades, the placebo effect only became the subject of serious scientific study in the last ten years. Not only can sham treatments improve clinical outcomes, sometimes as powerfully as pharmacological interventions, but the method of giving the treatment can itself determine a placebo's success. Perception is everything. But if a placebo can reduce symptoms and enhance treatment then presumably the opposite is true. Welcome to the nocebo effect.

Nocebo, meaning "I shall harm", is the wicked sibling of placebo, meaning "I shall please". First remarked on in the medical literature in 1961, it took nearly 40 years for hard evidence to emerge when, on a hunch, an Italian physiologist, Fabrizio Benedetti, conducted a cunning experiment. He injected subjects with two substances that he told them would induce pain. Neither actually would but one substance (unbeknownst to the patients) did in fact have the ability to inhibit anxiety. If there was a specific neurological pathway in the brain that was creating the nocebo effect, could the anti-anxiolytic block it? The answer was emphatically yes and provided the clearest evidence yet that a patient's mere perception of what they expect to happen could induce real, detrimental physical and mental symptoms - in this case anxiety and pain.

Other researchers have attempted to explore the phenomenon further. Studies in Germany and the Netherlands showed that nocebo could be induced merely by relaying verbal or visual information to the subjects. In the US, Parkinson's patients told that their brain pacemakers (for deep brain stimulation) were to be turned off experienced dramatically more negative symptoms even though the pacemakers were left switched on. Patients in a trial looking at lactose intolerance were falsely told they were given lactose when in fact they were given glucose and true to form, nearly half complained of stomach pains.

In some sense this seems obvious - one can induce fear and anxiety by telling scary stories. But the consequences of nocebo go beyond mere medical curiosity. A few years ago the effect hit the headlines when tens of thousands of people were seemingly affected by it in New Zealand, spurred on by alarmist media reporting about the negative side effects of a 'new' drug. Except it wasn't new at all - it simply had a branding re-launch. The pharmaceutical compounds were unchanged. Nevertheless, this lead to a 2000-fold increase in negative side-effect reporting. So what had caused this? We did - the media. News reports began incorrectly attributing side effects such as joint pain and depression to this so-called new drug. The effect snow-balled. Areas of the country with the highest number of media scare stories saw the highest number of complaints about the drug's side effects. It's not that patients were making it up - as far as they were concerned their symptoms were real but they were not related to the pharmacological effects of the drug but to nocebo. Their health had been hijacked by their expectation.

Nocebo is not only more powerful than placebo but it is likely to be more widespread and its implications are far more serious as it not only interferes with the existing treatments but it hinders the development of new drugs. And as clinicians and researchers become more aware of the consequences of nocebo, many reach the same uncomfortable conclusion - that patients are being given too much information about the risks of treatment - be it surgery or drugs - creating anxiety and fear which leads to physical distress. Doctors are caught between a rock and a hard place - First do no harm is the bedrock of medicine. As is informed consent. But what do you do when informed consent leads to harm? And can you even begin to control for what patients can discover for themselves on the internet or through the media?

Producer: Rami Tzabar.


TUE 11:30 Tales from the Stave (b052j0v0)
Series 11

Mozart's Requiem

The manuscript of Mozart's Requiem Mass may have had a starring role in the film Amadeus but in this opening programme of a new series of Tales from the Stave, Frances Fyfield and her guests reveal the equally extraordinary true stories behind the composer's final, unfinished, composition.

The film played fast and loose with the role of Salieri in the decline and death of the composer. In fact his role is relatively minor. But the score - or rather the scores, for Mozart's wife Constanza over-saw work on two separate volumes - tells of contributions, additions, edits and completions by at least two composers and probably more. And yet through these layers of development, a masterpiece of dramatic composition still manages to emerge.

Frances is joined by the music scholar Nigel Simeone, the Viennese conductor Manfred Huss and Jette Engelke, a member of the Wiener Singakademie choir. They help to unpick what is and what isn't in Mozart's own hand and why they believe the completed work is so close to a structure conceived by the composer.

The team is indebted to the host at the Austrian National Library, Dr Thomas Leibnitz, who allows few to see this extraordinarily valuable manuscript. "It is" he points out laconically "quite simply the most valuable piece in our entire collection".

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0520qw0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b052j573)
17 February 1915 - Johnnie Marshall

Johnnie's lowly ambitions meet resistance at all levels.

Written by Melissa Murray
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b052j575)
Call You and Yours: How will the new Care Act affect you?

On today's Call You & Yours we will be answering your questions on care. New laws covering care are coming into force across the UK. They give people who need care and the people looking after them new rights to help from local authorities. Next year in England, the Care Act will cap the cost of care at £72,000 for people who pay for themselves over their lifetime. So if you have any questions about care - we'll have experts on hand to help. We'd like to know what's worrying you about care now and in the future? Email us please - youandyours@bbc.co.uk.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0520qw2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b052j577)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b052j579)
Series 2

State Makes War

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), brings to life the numbers conveying the big trends that have transformed the shape and scope of the British state.

He looks at what governments through the centuries have spent, borrowed, taxed, regulated and built; and he considers how we came to organise a national life that reaches into every corner of private life, from the delivery of pensions and healthcare to the surveillance of emails or rules about the temperature of a hot cup of tea.

By one measure, the modern British state is roughly 7,000 times bigger than the Tudor state. How and why did that happen?

The story of the state unfolds through muddy fields, smugglers coves and a Victorian village lock-up. Numbers become sound as we hear the dramatic scale of change that has occurred over the centuries.

The evolution of the state may be driven less by party politics than party politicians might like us to think. Although the state's size and functions are a natural subject of fierce political argument, the impetus for the biggest changes has often come from another source - such as war, economic growth, and the power that arises from knowledge.

In this programme, Andrew looks at how the state makes war.

Producer: Michael Blastland

A Whistledown production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b052hptq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b03y14n7)
A Kidnapping

Episode 3

Daniel Ryan and Jade Matthew (who won the 2015 BBC Audio Drama Award for Best Debut Performance for her role in A KIDNAPPING) play two British teachers who have kidnapped a 10-year-old child.

Having successfully extracted a ransom from the boy's father, a powerful Filipino politician, getting the money and themselves out of the country is proving more difficult than they had anticipated. On the run in Manila with the authorities closing in, they are haunted by one small detail about the politician - he keeps a pet tiger in his basement.

A fast-paced thriller and a grand, comic morality tale set and recorded in the Philippines.

Original Music: Sacha Putnam
Sound Design: Steve Bond

Producer: Nadir Khan
Writer: Andy Mulligan
Director: John Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b052j57c)
Tom Holland is joined by archaeologist Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe and Tim Loughton MP, Vice Chair of the Archaeology All Party Parliamentary Group.

Dr Matt Pope reports from Shropshire where land close to Old Oswestry Hillfort might be allocated for housing which archaeologists fear will wreck its landscape context.

Tom talks to Professor Andy Beeby from the University of Durham about new research which is analysing ink on medieval parchments.

And Helen Castor joins food historian Pen Vogler in the kitchen to see how people prepared for Lent in medieval times.

Contact the programme by email: making.history@bbc.co.uk - or write to Making History, BBC Radio 4, PO Box 3096. Brighton BN1 1PL.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b052j57f)
The Ice in Iceland

Iceland is warming faster than most countries, two to four times faster than the global average temperature rise. A quirk of geography means that the island's plants and animals are having to cope with rapidly rising temperatures whilst their neighbours in the rest of northern Europe warm much more gradually. Glaciers are melting, trees are growing much faster and arable farming is suddenly possible and profitable.

Tom Heap travels through Iceland to gauge the impact on the landscape and the people. Can the rest of the world learn lessons from Iceland's experience?

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b052j57j)
The Strange Case of the Salted Snack

In this week's Law in Action we tell the cheesy story of the 6-year-old boy excluded from school because of the salted snack in his lunch box. We ask what the law has to say about this - can a child be excluded because of what his or her parents have done?

Also: a senior appeal judge says that the UK is way behind the times when it comes to online justice. He is ashamed, he says, by the piles of paper that accumulate in the British legal system, especially when he encounters sleek online systems overseas. A report out this week announces plans to overhaul the way civil disputes are handled by adopting the model pioneered by eBay - resolving them online. But how feasible is this and what's the timescale?

And: the man who spent 17 years in jail for a crime he says he didn't commit. The Court of Appeal freed him more than a year ago, but he's now been told he's ineligible for financial compensation for the years he spent behind bars. Victor Nealon tells us his story and we ask if the system for determining compensation for miscarriages of justice is fair.

Presenter: Joshua Rozenberg
Producers: Tim Mansel and Chloe Hadjimatheou.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b052j57l)
John Sergeant and Helen Lewis

Political editor turned Strictly contestant John Sergeant and Helen Lewis, Deputy Editor of the New Statesman, tell Harriett Gilbert about their favourite books. They include Sebastian Faulks' new Jeeves and Wooster novel, The Turkish Embassy Letters by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and children's classic The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b052j57n)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0520qw4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Trodd en Bratt Say 'Well Done You' (b047c476)
Series 1

Episode 2

Nominated for Best Comedy in the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2015, Trodd en Bratt Say 'Well Done You' is a comedy sketch show written and performed by Ruth Bratt and Lucy Trodd, stars of Radio 4's Showstoppers.

This week there's a robbery in the Fings and Bobs shop, but Anja and Benjio are only too happy to help the robber find his way around. Meanwhile, Mary's dark secret threatens to ruin her church choir's concert; and Ruth tries to confront a colleague with a distracting verbal tick.

Written and performed by Ruth Bratt and Lucy Trodd

Supporting cast: Adam Meggido and Oliver Senton

Script Editor: Jon Hunter

Composer: Duncan Walsh Atkins

Producer: Ben Worsfield

A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b052j57q)
Kenton's excited about heading off for Australia, confident that Fallon can run things at the Bull.

Kenton plays Master of Ceremonies at the Bull's Shrove Tuesday events. George Grundy wins the pancake race. Jim and his SAVE comrades are there, armed with banners and petitions. The Borchester Echo and Radio Borsetshire are in attendance. Lynda's rather put out when Jennifer (aka the Boudicca of Borsetshire) gives her impassioned speech. Jim says let Jennifer have her moment - it's all good publicity.

Jim is also keen to know how Robert's doing with his tick chart, as their bird watching rivalry continues.

Mike tells Jennifer about his problems selling the house. Jennifer shares that Phoebe is staying on at Home Farm.

Ed's pleased to get a good price for his cows. He can now look to the future. Eddie believes Ed has done the right thing. Mike's pleased to get a cheque from Ed, and Eddie reminds him what fine looking beasts they've parted with.

Mike feels pulled in different directions, by Vicky and Beth on one side and the business on the other. Ed asks whether Mike really has to leave Ambridge. But Mike's adamant he can't change his mind. It would be like Ruth and David pulling out of moving. It's far too late now.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b052j57s)
Jacqueline du Pre, Wilson Twins, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Report Findings on UK Arts

John Wilson looks back 50 years to Jacqueline du Pré's historic recording of Elgar's Cello Concerto, with cellist Steve Isserlis and record producer Andrew Keener.

Ahead of The Front Row Debate, "Does the state owe the artist a living?", the Wilson Twins discuss living off Thatcher's Enterprise Allowance as they made their name in the art world of the 1980s.

As a Charles Rennie Mackintosh exhibition opens at RIBA in London, the architect Amanda Levete assesses the man behind the Glasgow School of Art building that was destroyed by fire in May last year.

And is creativity and culture open to all of us? Vikki Heywood, who chaired a 12-month inquiry commissioned by Warwick University on the role of the arts in Britain, is here with her findings.

Producer: Craig Templeton Smith.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t0f2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b052j57v)
Islamic State: Looting for Terror

Satellite images reveal the extent to which sites of important historical interest have been looted in Syria. Some of these are in areas controlled by Islamic State where looters are believed to pay a tax to allow them to operate. Iraqi military say evidence from a senior IS member revealed the group is making millions of pounds from the trafficking of looted antiquities
Simon Cox investigates the global trade in stolen artefacts and traces smuggling routes through Turkey and Lebanon and onto the international antiquities market.
He hears concerns that dealers and collectors are not doing enough to verify the provenance of ancient works of art and asks whether the authorities in the UK and elsewhere are doing enough to prevent the trade.
Why, for example, does the UK remain the most significant military power not to have ratified a UN convention to protect cultural property during armed conflict?
Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b052j57x)
Disability Discrimination

The Disability Discrimination Act was introduced in 1995. Twenty years on we ask how effective the legislation, the Equality Act, is at preventing disability discrimination. Peter White hears from Jean French, Legal Manager at the RNIB, Disability Rights barrister Catherine Casserley and John Dickenson Lilley, a visually impaired man who has brought more than forty cases.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b052j57z)
Heart and Exercise, Smoking and Alcohol, Weight Management, Hepatitis C

After recent headlines that running too much can be bad for your heart, Mark Porter talks to the Medical Director for the London Marathon to get an insider's perspective. A novel psychological approach to weight loss that asks why people are eating too much rather than just giving dietary advice. Plus new treatments for Hepatitis C and statistics showing a reduction in binge drinking in young adults.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b052j0tp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0520qw6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b052j581)
Russian-backed rebels push deep into eastern Ukraine

Rebels surround hundreds of Ukrainian soldiers in strategic town of Debaltseve


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b052j583)
In Certain Circles

"Just don't develop a social conscience now"

Zoe struggles with her emotions when she discovers that Stephen is leaving.

Internationally acclaimed Australian author Elizabeth Harrower's novel was written in 1971 and was finally published in 2015.

This tale of love, class and freedom is set among the grand houses and lush gardens of Sydney Harbour just after the Second World War, following the lives of Zoe and Russell Howard.

Charismatic and confident, the children of affluent and loving parents, they welcome into their circle, Stephen and Anna, two orphans, whose lives until now have been very different from those of the Howards. The impact of this meeting will resonate for decades.

Reader: Penny Downie

Abridger: Sally Marmion

Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b052hptj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Short Cuts (b04l0tvs)
Series 6

Connections

A message in a bottle, cast into the ocean, reaches a woman who needs it, a lifeboat adrift and isolated in icy waters and a crackling, radio connection offers a lifeline between friends. Josie Long hears tales of making contact.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.



WEDNESDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0520qx1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b052j0tt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0520qx3)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0520qx5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0520qx7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0520qx9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b053r1m2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Johnston McKay.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b052j5g6)
Milk Quotas, Crofting, Biodiversity, Methane

Europe is in denial about how serious things will be for the diary industry after the Milk quotas are removed in April. That's according to MEP Jim Nicholson who thinks Europe should be doing more to bolster dairy farmers. Scottish MPs are taking evidence on controversial plans to simplify the rules around the Right to Buy croft land. The government has proposed amendments to the twelve year old land reform act, to make it easier and less bureaucratic for crofting communities. MSP Rob Gibson who is chair of the Rural Affairs, Climate Change and Environment Committee explained why crofting was so important for the survival of rural communities. Radio Wiltshire's Marie Lennon visits the Marlborough Downs.Its been part of a 3 year DEFRA scheme to fund wildlife friendly land management over large areas. It's the only farmer-led project and is now helping to inform the government on conservation policy. All this week Farming Today is taking a look at soil, Sally Challoner talks to Professor Richard Evershed a bio-geochemist at Bristol University. He's investigating ways to harvest a bacterium that occurs naturally in soil, and converts harmful methane into carbon dioxide. He told her that if the bacteria could be harvested and added to soils, it could be an important tool in the fight to control greenhouse gases. Presenter Anna Hill. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k21n6)
Blackbird

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs

Chris Packham presents the blackbird. Resident blackbirds are on the alert just now because their territories are under siege. Large numbers of Continental blackbirds pour in to the UK each winter to escape even colder conditions elsewhere.


WED 06:00 Today (b052j5n5)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b052j5n7)
Mark Strong, Maggie Alphonsi, Daphne Todd, Carol Grimes

Libby Purves meets actor Mark Strong; former rugby player Maggie Alphonsi; artist Daphne Todd and blues and jazz singer Carol Grimes.

Carol Grimes is a jazz and blues singer and songwriter. Her new show, The Singer's Tale, recreates her life story through spoken word and original music. Carol spent her early life as a busker in London before eventually coming to prominence in 1969 as a member of the band Delivery. The Singer's Tale is at St James Studio Theatre, London.

Mark Strong is a film, television and theatre actor. He plays Eddie Carbone in the award-winning production of Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge for which he was named best actor at the 2015 Critics' Circle Theatre Awards. His many television credits include Our Friends in the North and the Buddha of Suburbia. He also starred in Oscar-winning films Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Zero Dark Thirty. A View from the Bridge is at Wyndham's Theatre, London and will be broadcast live to over 550 cinemas across the UK as part of National Theatre Live.

Maggie Alphonsi MBE is a former England rugby union player and was part of the team which won the Women's Rugby World Cup in 2014. Following her retirement from rugby, Maggie is now focussed on her bid to compete in the shot put at the 2016 Rio Olympics. A former Sunday Times Sportswoman of the Year, she is the first woman in 50 years to be awarded the prestigious Pat Marshall award, a sports personality award chosen by the Rugby Union Writers' Club.

Daphne Todd OBE is an artist who is part of the judging panel on BBC One series The Big Painting Challenge in which 10 artists compete to become Britain's best amateur artist. She also has a solo exhibition featuring portraits and landscapes inspired by the Kent and Sussex borders where she lives. The first female president of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters, she won the BP Portrait Award for a painting of her 100-year-old mother shortly after her death. The Big Painting Challenge is on BBC One. Daphne Todd's exhibition is at Messum's gallery in London.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b052j5n9)
Alexandra Fuller - Leaving Before the Rains Come

"A nice leg for a riding boot"

Alexandra looks to her family's colourful past in order to make sense of the present.

In a follow-up to the award-winning memoir "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight", Alexandra Fuller charts her temptestuous marriage to the man she thought would save her from the eccentricities, chaos and dangers of life in Africa.

In 1992, after her parents had seen off all other suitors, Alexandra Fuller married Charlie Ross, a charismatic polo player, and the only man who seemed able to stand up to her parents. In this witty, frank and courageous memoir, Fuller charts their twenty tempestuous years together.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman.

Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b052j5ns)
Caring for the Elderly, Meryl Streep, Author Helena Coggan

According to pre-election research done for Woman's Hour the cost of caring for a family came out as the third most important issue for women. Jenni looks at the rising cost of caring for the elderly. This year Meryl Streep received her 19th Oscar nomination for her supporting role in 'Into the Woods'. From the Woman's Hour archive, the actress speaks to Sue MacGregor about coping with fame, how she never set out to be a movie star and the joys of motherhood. Viv Grant discusses leaving her job as a head teacher to provide leadership and support for people in her former profession. Fifteen year old Helena Coggan discusses her debut novel The Catalyst.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Claire Bartleet.


WED 10:40 15 Minute Drama (b052t1gz)
The Embrace

Episode 3

Grace's revelation pushes Charlie further towards Iona.

Linda Marshall Griffiths' unflinching drama about betrayal and the power of money cracks open the impossibilities and difficulties of love.

IONA.....LYNDSEY MARSHAL
CHARLIE.....WILLIAM ASH
GRACE.....OLIVIA HALLINAN
DAN.....BLAKE RITSON
TABBY.....OLWEN MAY
CLEM.....JONATHAN KEEBLE

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b051s3g1)
Mark and Mayra - Remembering Andrew

Fi Glover with a conversation between Andrew's mother and a family friend, recalling the exceptional 15 year old who had already made a huge impact on all who knew him.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Recycled Radio (b052j8v9)
Series 3

Recycled: Lawyers

Welcome to the chopped up, looped up, sped up world of Recycled Radio.

Gerald Scarfe introduces the subject of the law and lawyers.

Our journey to court includes contributions from Clive Anderson, Harry Potter, Tom Wrigglesworth, Moses and Douglas Hurd.

There's also a breakneck journey to the land where every other person is a lawyer, while retired judge Elizabeth Butler-Sloss reveals the advice her father gave her about succeeding in this most competitive of professions.

Fun, silly, thoughtful radio ... recycled.

Producer: Miles Warde.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 11:30 Alun Cochrane's Fun House (b01s0dld)
Bedroom

Comedian Alun Cochrane has a 25 year mortgage which he can only pay off by being funny. In this series he takes us on a room by room, stand up tour of his house.

He has a fridge that beeps at him when he doesn't move quickly enough and a fire alarm he can't reach. His relationship with his house is a complicated one.

A hoarder of funny and original observations on everyday life, Alun invites us to help him de-clutter his mind and tidy his ideas into one of those bags that you hoover all the air out of and keep under your bed. This show will help Alun and his house work through their relationship issues and prevent a separation that Alun can ill afford; at least not until the market picks up anyway.

Starring ... Alun Cochrane and Gavin Osborn

Written by ... Alun Cochrane and Andy Wolton

Produced by ... Carl Cooper.

First broadcast by BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b0520qxc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b052j8vc)
18 February 1915 - Fraser Chadwick

Fraser's day is one of constant negotiation, and not just on union matters.

Written by Melissa Murray
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b052jk2j)
Housing

Now if you get your gas and electricity from one of the Big Six Energy suppliers - and most people do - then check if you're being charged their standard variable tariff. Most people are. If you are, you could almost certainly save between £159 and £234 a year. That's what the competition regulator, the Competitions and Markets Authority, has concluded so far in its investigation into the industry and whether competition works the way it should for customers. It's also looking at whether some of the rules imposed to try to get a grip on the Big Six energy companies have had unintended consequences and damaged competition.

The big 6 have more than 90 per cent of the market share. So how do smaller companies get a look in? One of them Spark energy has a tie in with letting agents. It pays them a fee in return for supplying power. The problem is some tenants then find it very difficult to swap to any other supplier. Our reporter Melanie Abbott has been looking into this

Some people who live in touristy places are making extra money renting out rooms or whole houses and flats through the website AirBNB.
There are 33,000 places in the UK offered for rent on AirBNB - two thirds of them are in London. Some councils in London thinks it's gone far enough and they're clamping down on it using old planning laws from the 1970s. These laws ban people renting their homes short term without planning permission. Not everyone is happy.

People don't use directory enquiries services much these days - they go online for numbers instead. But if you do have to telephone for help finding a number then beware because calling 118 can be extremely expensive. That's according to new research by Which? It's warned that some calls to 118 have cost people as much as seventy five pounds.

The budget for making public information films has shrunk drastically. They've been among the casualties of the downturn. The budget for all these films last year was a million pounds and you can't make many films for that.
Our reporter Bob Walker has been looking back at the heyday of the public information film with the help of Sue Woods, a curator with the British Film Institute and Dr Tessa Langley, assistant professor at University of Nottingham. And thanks to the BFI National Archive for allowing us to use those clips.

Parents in the UK spend a higher proportion of their income on childcare than parents in any other western country do.
Now some nurseries are adding to their costs by charging up to £125 for a place on their waiting lists. And the money is never refunded - even if the child never gets a place. It's really hard for parents in some areas where you have to get your name down on a lot of lists to have any hope of finding somewhere.

It's madness but house prices have continued to rise across the UK. They rose by nearly ten percent in 2014. The figures were released this morning by the Office for National Statistics. That's despite the fact that new mortgage lending rules are limiting the amount people borrow.
The prices are high because there are relatively few properties on offer. That's been the story since the start of the downturn and some market experts think it's the new norm.

Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Chas Watkin.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0520qxf)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b052jk2l)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b052jk2n)
Series 2

War Makes The State

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), brings to life the numbers conveying the big trends that have transformed the shape and scope of the British state.

He looks at what governments through the centuries have spent, borrowed, taxed, regulated and built; and he considers how we came to organise a national life that reaches into every corner of private life, from the delivery of pensions and healthcare to the surveillance of emails or rules about the temperature of a hot cup of tea.

By one measure, the modern British state is roughly 7,000 times bigger than the Tudor state. How and why did that happen?

The story of the state unfolds through muddy fields, smugglers coves and a Victorian village lock-up. Numbers become sound as we hear the dramatic scale of change that has occurred over the centuries.

The evolution of the state may be driven less by party politics than party politicians might like us to think. Although the state's size and functions are a natural subject of fierce political argument, the impetus for the biggest changes has often come from another source - such as war, economic growth, and the power that arises from knowledge.

In this programme, Andrew discovers how war makes the state.

Producer: Michael Blastland

A Whistledown production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b052j57q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b050zy3q)
Hattie Naylor - A Northern Soul

Two men settle old scores, 35 years after their involvement in the Northern Soul scene.

It's 1978 and the Northern Soul scene is at its peak. UK Manufacturing is thriving, Unions are strong, and blue-collar labourers have money in their pockets. Working class black Americans have moved from the Deep South to work in the car factories of Detroit and what has emerged from them is a new kind of soul music - upbeat, rhythmic and aspirational. British car factory workers have also found that the music's mood and rhythm speaks for them and Northern Soul has become an exclusive music and dance scene with its own code and culture, focussing on Friday all-nighters.

Mark, a 17-year-old, middle class lad, gets his first job - in a car factory in Wolverhampton. Super cool factory worker Jerry introduces him to Northern Soul and Mark is hooked. He wants to be a part of it - the music, clothes, and all-nighters. Winning Jerry's friendship, he asks to go to Wigan Casino, voted the best club in the world - but Jerry questions Mark's authenticity and is undecided whether to take him.

35 years later and Mark, now a married father and a journalist living in London, interviews Jerry about the end of the Northern Soul scene. For Jerry, the memories recall a tainted time of union power and working class freedoms confronted by the rise of the political right. For Mark, the memories hold emotional confusions. Buried hurts resurface between the two men and old scores are settled about class, music and identity.

Jerry.................Craig Edwards
Older Mark........Patrick Baladi
Younger Mark....Tom Glenister
Maureen............Sally Orrock
Phil....................Ben Crowe
Stan..................Paul Currier
Sophie...............Jessica Hayles

Writer: Hattie Naylor
Director: Marc Jobst

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in February 2015


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b052jk2q)
Mortgages

Looking for a mortgage? Whether you're buying your first home or you need to remortgage, Ruth Alexander and guests answered your questions.

With fixed and variable rate mortgages charging less than 2% which is the better bet?

What are the associated fees and how much will you need to pay in Stamp Duty?

What are the best deals for first time buyers? Halifax say that there's been a 50% rise in first-time buyers in the past two years due to low interest rates and the greater availability of loans requiring smaller deposits.

How will you be assessed and how do you find the most suitable mortgage for you?

Whatever your mortgage question, joining presenter Ruth Alexander to share their experience were:

Melanie Bien, Mortgage and Property Finance Expert.
Ray Boulger, Senior Technical Manager, John Charcol.
Kevin Gardiner, First Mortgage.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b052j57z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b052jk2s)
Conservatism, Emotional Labour in a Care Home

Conservatism: Roger Scruton, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, London, talks to Laurie Taylor, about the intellectual roots of Conservative values and ideology.

Also, the emotional labour of care workers in a private residential care home. Eleanor Johnson, Researcher in Social Sciences at the University of Cardiff, talks about her case study of carer's practical and emotional work.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b052jk2v)
Do advertisers influence editorial?; British drama overseas; Immigration Street

The chief political commentator at the Daily Telegraph, Peter Oborne, has resigned from the paper, saying its lack of coverage of HSBC and allegations of tax avoidance amounts to a form of "fraud on readers" - a charge the paper strongly denies. Mr Oborne said there had been serious lapses of editorial judgement. It's raised questions about the extent to which advertisers influence editorial decision making, as newspapers come under increasing financial pressures. Steve Hewlett talks to Chris Blackhurst, former city editor of the Evening Standard and former editor of The Independent, about whether the balance of power is shifting.

British TV drama is becoming big business overseas. From the popularity of Downton Abbey, Sherlock, Parade's End and Doctor Who, to more recent exports like Broadchurch and Fortitude, a global audience is now enjoying home-grown productions. Steve Hewlett discusses what is driving the growing interest with Ben Donald, Executive Producer of International Drama at BBC Worldwide, Jane Millichip, MD of Sky Vision, and Mammoth Screen founder and producer Michele Buck.

A controversial documentary on immigration that was filmed in Southampton has been reduced from six programmes to one. Channel 4 has announced it will show "Immigration Street" as a one-hour documentary next Tuesday. The station originally commissioned six episodes of the Benefits Street spin-off, made by Love Productions. Steve Hewlett asks executive producer Kieran Smith what has led to the decision, and he speaks to Satvir Kaur, Southampton councils cabinet member for communities about the impact the documentary has had on residents.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b052jk2x)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0520qxh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Chain Reaction (b052jk2z)
Series 10

Adam Buxton talks to Reece Shearsmith

Comedian, actor, technophile and one half of 'Adam and Joe', Adam Buxton talks to the co-creator and star of The League of Gentlemen, Psychoville and Inside No. 9, Reece Shearsmith.

Chain Reaction is the long running hostless chat show where last week's interviewee becomes this week's interviewer.

Producer: Charlie Perkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b052jk31)
Shula has given up biscuits for Lent. She feels she has a lot to atone for. In confidence, Shula admits to Caroline that, for the sake of Rob and the hunt, she lied to PC Burns about what happened with the hunt saboteur. Rob started it and hit the man.

Tormented Shula has it out with Rob, who's simply pleased that no further action will be taken. Shula angrily tells him that he put her in an impossible position. She only did it for the hunt - and for Helen, who is family.

Shula reports back to concerned Caroline that she has seen another side to Rob and it was horrible.

Tom helps Helen at Ambridge Organics. The shop's looking better already for Helen's presence. Pat says well done.

Tom and Pat talk about Tony, who seems brighter - and poor Brian who's coping with Lilian staying at Home Farm. Tom mentions that Helen could go back to the shop permanently. Perhaps Tina has done them all a favour after all.

However, Rob mentions to Helen that he thinks Henry is playing up because he misses his mum. This makes Helen decide that she should put the shop behind her. Her life has moved on. Rob suggests getting rid of the shop altogether. Helen immediately agrees that it's the only option. It's obvious.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b052jkwy)
Marigold Hotel Director John Madden, The Museum of the Mind, Kwabs, Maidan

John Madden, director of The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, discusses making a sequel with the all-star cast including Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Richard Gere, Maggie Smith and Dev Patel, and the power of older cinema audiences.

Curator Victoria Northwood and Psychiatrist Dr David O'Flynn on the re-opening of the Museum of the Mind at the Royal Bethlem Hospital. The museum explores the history of the hospital, which was known in the past as 'Bedlam' and was featured in Hogarth's Rake's Progress, and the relationship between art and mental health.

Maidan, a documentary filmed in Kiev during the anti-government protests in Ukraine, chronicles the unfolding events, filming the crowd as the situation deteriorates. Writer and former Eastern Europe correspondent Matt Potter reviews.

Ahead of next Monday's Front Row Debate 'Does the State owe the artist a living?', up and coming singer-songwriter Kwabs explains how an inspiring teacher at school led to his interest in music.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Olivia Skinner.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t1gz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:40 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b052jkx0)
Is it a Moral Duty to Vote?

Is it immoral to be apathetic about politics? The Bishops of the Church of England clearly think so. This week they sent a letter to parishes advising 'Christian men and women how to vote". So we all have a duty to join in the arguments and it's wrong to be a 'don't know'!
As the election gets closer, however, the prevailing view seems to be that politicians are a sleazy and self-serving bunch of hypocrites. Whatever the bishops say, at least a third of us won't be voting; half of young people aren't even registered to vote. But when politicians focus their efforts on ingratiating themselves with pensioners (the people who vote the most) we say that's cynical.
Party membership has fallen off a cliff. More of us belong to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds than to all our political parties combined. It was revealed last week that Russell Brand ('Don't vote it only encourages them') has three times as many Twitter followers as all our MPs put together.
Polls show that we hate the idea of state funding for political parties, but we also hate the idea of 'dodgy donors' buying political influence. We laugh at last week's Tory fund-raising dinner featuring an auction in which lots included 'a shoe-shopping trip with Theresa May'; we recoil from the idea of a Labour government in hock to its trade union sponsors. Some say that political donations from wealthy individuals are to be applauded - it's philanthropy, just like giving to charity. But do we really believe it's a coincidence that so many millionaire donors happen to have ended up in the House of Lords?
Should 16-year-olds have the vote? Should voting be made compulsory? Is it a moral duty to vote? Or are there other ways, just as morally cogent, to get involved in the political process?


WED 20:45 Why I Changed My Mind (b052jkx2)
Series 1

Sean O'Callaghan

Dominic Lawson asks Sean O'Callaghan about why he became an informer within the IRA.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b052j57f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b052j5n7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b052jkx4)
European Central Bank agrees to increase emergency funding to Greek banks

ECB raises limit to 68 billion euros, Athens preparing to ask for 6 month extension of bailout loan


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b052jkx6)
In Certain Circles

"This is not my life"

Anna strikes out on her own, and finds a new life.

Internationally acclaimed Australian author Elizabeth Harrower's novel was written in 1971 and was finally published in 2015.

This tale of love, class and freedom is set among the grand houses and lush gardens of Sydney Harbour just after the Second World War, following the lives of Zoe and Russell Howard.

Charismatic and confident, the children of affluent and loving parents, they welcome into their circle, Stephen and Anna, two orphans, whose lives until now have differed from those of the Howards in almost every way.

Reader: Penny Downie

Abridger: Sally Marmion

Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 23:00 Irish Micks and Legends (b052jkx8)
Series 2

Diarmuid and Grainne

Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram get romantic (not like that) to tell the tale of the famous young lovers Diarmuid and Grainne. It's an affair which ended like most Irish stories - terribly.

Series two of the duo's unique comedic, highly irreverent take on Irish folklore.

Still the very best pals, Aisling and Yasmine take their role explaining Irish legends to the British nation very seriously indeed. That said, it would appear that they haven't had the time to do much research, work out who is doing which parts, edit out the chat or learn how to work the sound desk.

With a vast vault of fantastical myths, mixed with 21st century references to help you along, prepare for some very silly lessons in life, love and the crazy shenanigans of old Ireland and modern Irish.

Producer: Raymond Lau

A Green Dragon Media production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 23:15 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b052jkxb)
Series 3

Love

In the first of a series, Tim Key grapples with the concept of love by telling the story of one man's romance with a beautiful cashier. Musical accompaniment is provided by Tom Basden.

Written and presented by Tim Key
With Tom Basden and Katy Wix

Produced by James Robinson

A BBC Cymru Wales Production

The Edinburgh Comedy Award-winning comedian returns for a third series of his Late Night Poetry Programme. Since series two Tim has been busy touring his latest acclaimed live show, Single White Slut, thrilling audiences at the Old Vic in Daniel Kitson's Tree, as well as filming movies such as Steve Coogan's Alpha Papa and Richard Ayoade's The Double. But now he's back on late night Radio 4 doing what he does best - attempting to recite poetry whilst tormenting his friend and musician, the equally brilliant Tom Basden.

Praise for Tim Key

"...You never know when Key will suddenly toss you a fantastic joke or startlingly well-constructed line." Radio Times

"The show... has a kind of artistry and strange beauty that makes it unlike any other hour of stand-up you are likely to see." The Observer

"In any other sphere apart from comedy, we'd probably class this way of looking at the world as certifiable. Here it feels like genius." The Telegraph.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


WED 23:30 Short Cuts (b04lq28m)
Series 6

Behind the Curtain

Secret telephone discos for cold calling salesmen, moral dilemmas which emerge behind the scenes on a reality television show and Joe Dunthorne attempts to gain access to the OULIPO.

Josie Long peers behind the curtain to reveal stories from behind the scenes.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0520qy7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b052j5n9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0520qy9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0520qyc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0520qyf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0520qyh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b053r1ph)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Johnston McKay.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b052ln51)
Beef Code, Precision Ploughing, Common Land, Vehicle Wrist Tags

A voluntary code has been introduced which aims to give more stability and improve relationships between beef farmers and meat processors. Stephen Rossides from the Meat Processors Association told Anna Hill that it was a moral code which built on systems which were already in place, but aimed to bring greater transparency across the whole supply chain. All this week Farming Today has been looking at the issue of soil, how its used, what is good for it and how it can be improved. Sarah Falkingham reports on how improved precision ploughing can also improve soil nutrition and yield. The Hawk and Owl Trust have taken management of common land in North Norfolk. The trust say that many communities don't quite realise the scale of work and conservation effort needed, and also lack the skills to maintain the land. A midlands company has introduced a wrist band which means only the wearer can operate tractors and quad bikes, its in a bid to lower the figures of farm machinery theft. Presenter by Anna Hill. Produced by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k279n)
Fieldfare

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the fieldfare. Fieldfares are thrushes, and very handsome ones. They have slate-grey heads, dark chestnut backs and black tails and their under parts are patterned with arrows. Although birds will stick around if there's plenty of food available, fieldfares are great wanderers and are quick to move out in freezing conditions.


THU 06:00 Today (b052ln53)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b052ln55)
The Wealth of Nations

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Adam Smith's celebrated economic treatise The Wealth of Nations. Smith was one of Scotland's greatest thinkers, a moral philosopher and pioneer of economic theory whose 1776 masterpiece has come to define classical economics. Based on his careful consideration of the transformation wrought on the British economy by the Industrial Revolution, and how it contrasted with marketplaces elsewhere in the world, the book outlined a theory of wealth and how it is accumulated that has arguably had more influence on economic theory than any other.

With:

Richard Whatmore
Professor of Modern History and Director of the Institute of Intellectual History at the University of St Andrews

Donald Winch
Emeritus Professor of Intellectual History at the University of Sussex

Helen Paul
Lecturer in Economics and Economic History at the University of Southampton

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b052ln57)
Alexandra Fuller - Leaving Before the Rains Come

"They didn't roar and battle and laugh"

Alexandra struggles to keep afloat, when her safe and risk-fee life in the US turns out to have been an illusion.

In a follow-up to the award-winning memoir "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight", Alexandra Fuller charts her temptestuous marriage to the man she thought would save her from the chaos of life in Africa.

In 1992, after her parents had seen off all other suitors, Alexandra Fuller married Charlie Ross, a charismatic adventurer and polo player, and the only man who seemed able to stand up to her parents. In this witty, frank and courageous memoir, Fuller charts their twenty tempestuous years together.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman.

Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b052ln59)
DSK, what do French women think? Why do parents keep quiet about their children's mental ill-health?Jean Harrod

The ongoing trial of the former head of the International Monetary Fund Dominique Strauss-Kahn for pimping prostitutes has been headline news inside and outside France. Since 5 out of 6 plaintiffs dropped their cases against him earlier this week, it looks increasingly likely that he will be acquitted, as the prosecutor has advised the judge to do. Guilty or innocent - do French women care about the outcome? Jenni is joined by French journalist Agnes Poirier to discuss. A study carried out by a children's charity has found that almost a third of parents of children aged 5 - 18 years old admit they would feel embarrassed if their child wanted counselling in school. Jenni is joined by Dr. Fiona Pienaar Clinical Director at Place2be and from Allie who suffered mental health problems as a child.
Former diplomat Jean Harrod spent her working life travelling the world. She has now published her first novel, "Deadly Diplomacy," which tells the story of a British consul caught up in a murder investigation in Australia. So, how much did her real life experience influence her fiction? And how did Jean's local coffee shop in Yorkshire help her get into print? Modern day slavery in the UK, Jenni hears from a domestic worker who escaped from an abusive employer and from Marissa Begonia who helps rescue women from forms of modern day slavery. A feminist, satirical drama The Last of the De Mullins set in 1908 which dealt with working, single mothers who refused to be tied to the institution of marriage, is being revived in London. How did such a controversial play slip through the censors then and why it is still relevant today?

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Caroline Donne.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t1z3)
The Embrace

Episode 4

Tabby attempts to hide the truth but Iona plays her at her own game.

Linda Marshall Griffiths' unflinching drama about betrayal and the power of money cracks open the impossibilities and difficulties of love.

IONA.....LYNDSEY MARSHAL
CHARLIE.....WILLIAM ASH
GRACE.....OLIVIA HALLINAN
DAN.....BLAKE RITSON
TABBY.....OLWEN MAY
CLEM.....JONATHAN KEEBLE

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b052ln5c)
Please Mick! Not Boring.

The correspondent's trade: memories of the late Ian McDougall who filed for the BBC from more than 40-countries and once told this programme he'd broadcast from the only radio studio in the world equipped with a bidet! Also in this edition: Steve Evans on perceptions of the north/south divide in Korea; Linda Yueh asking if American workers will really countenance a return to the factory floor; James Hassam on a surprise at the dinner table in Ethiopia and Chris Bockman meets 144 new French citizens in Toulouse.


THU 11:30 Writing a New South Africa (b052ln5f)
Johannesburg, City of Recent Arrivals

Writing a new South Africa

A picture of South Africa now, as seen by a new generation of writers and poets.

In programme 1 Thabiso talks to Johannesburg-based writers and poets about the changing cityscape and how the past impacts on the present in their work. He takes a walk through the bustling University district of Braamfontein with Ivan Vladislavic, who has documented the city in his novels and non-fiction work 'Portrait with Keys', and they explore writing about Hillbrow, the troubled inner city district, where the social integration and dynamic culture looked in the early 1990s as though it might be a positive future vision of the country. He talks to the prominent poet Lebo Mashile, an inspiration to the younger poets coming through now, about the emergence of the black female voice in the past twenty years, and the legacy of the past. And he meets Niq Mhlongo, whose most recent book 'Way Back Home' looks critically at the struggle against apartheid, and the way those who went into exile to fight for the movement are haunted by their experiences.

In a three part series, street poet 'Afurakan' Thabiso Mohare explores the major cities of Johannesburg and Cape Town, talking to 'Born Frees', writers of the freedom generation - those born under apartheid but whose adult years have been spent in a new democracy, and gaining insights from an older generation who only began to publish their work in the new democratic era.

Thabiso looks at South Africa two decades after the fall of apartheid, through the themes writers are choosing to engage with in their work. These authors, poets and playwrights are exploring the past and present, from apartheid's legacy to political corruption, and the chaos of the inner city; some are exorcising ghosts, and some tackling current issues, or looking to an imagined future. There is plenty to write about after the end of the struggle.

Thabiso talks to new voices who are just making their names, and those who are already established, addressing the problems they face, causes for optimism, and the way conditions and opportunities have changed for writers in the past two decades. He looks at what they feel to be their literary heritage, and who they take inspiration from in a culture still feeling the inequalities of the educational legacy of apartheid. Literacy issues and the lack of a culture of reading more widely mean that the market for books is small, and the road to the arts truly blossoming into normalcy in South Africa after the end of apartheid has been uneven and complex. Other outlets for storytelling too - poetry and spoken word events, plugging into older traditions - are supporting the flowering of a diversity of voices as hoped for when the political landscape changed so radically in 1994, with writers of all ethnicities pitching in to the fray. Radio 4 explores the range of voices now being heard and the picture they present.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b0520qyk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b052lntr)
19 February 1915 - Luke Lyle

Luke has low expectations of an assignment, until he meets Esther O'Leary.

Written by Melissa Murray
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 Face the Facts (b052lntt)
Britain's Legal Slaves

As Parliament passes a new law to abolish modern slavery, John Waite tracks down victims whose lives as slaves in Britain will continue unabated.

We hear from domestic workers, who come to the UK on visas "tied" to their employers - meaning their right to be here is solely at the behest of their employers. As it stands campaigners say it's a charter for cruelty and abuse.

Protection is even less for similarly employed domestic workers who come here to clean, cook and childmind for diplomats. Even when their working conditions are deemed unacceptable by an employment tribunal - the employer need only cite "diplomatic immunity" to defeat their claim. One worker tells us that the long, unpaid hours she worked, were, in effect defended by our own Foreign and Commonwealth Office, as being within the scope of "diplomatic immunity."

Finally we hear how a "transit visa" is being used to bring in recruits to the fishing industry who (they are told), have no right to set foot on dry land. Instead the workers spend weeks at a time out at sea, sleeping in cramped conditions. As a final insult, they can find they haven't been paid at all by the Filipino agent who fixed the job for them.

Face the Facts asks why the new legislation has failed to address the dismal lives of these hidden but perfectly legal slaves who've been tricked and trapped into a life of exploitation.

Presenter: John Waite
Producer: Sarah Shebbeare
Editor: Andrew Smith.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0544f16)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b052lntw)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b052lnty)
Series 2

Tax

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), brings to life the numbers conveying the big trends that have transformed the shape and scope of the British state.

He looks at what governments through the centuries have spent, borrowed, taxed, regulated and built; and he considers how we came to organise a national life that reaches into every corner of private life, from the delivery of pensions and healthcare to the surveillance of emails or rules about the temperature of a hot cup of tea.

By one measure, the modern British state is roughly 7,000 times bigger than the Tudor state. How and why did that happen?

The story of the state unfolds through muddy fields, smugglers coves and a Victorian village lock-up. Numbers become sound as we hear the dramatic scale of change that has occurred over the centuries.

The evolution of the state may be driven less by party politics than party politicians might like us to think. Although the state's size and functions are a natural subject of fierce political argument, the impetus for the biggest changes has often come from another source - such as war, economic growth, and the power that arises from knowledge.

In this programme, Andrew explores tax.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b052jk31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b05126z7)
Shamed

Shamed by Furquan Akhtar.
Shabana's son has been arrested for a very serious crime. She feels shunned by her community. Yet she believes that the son she has lovingly nurtured cannot be capable of such a callous crime. She determines to be supportive and to clear his name. Hard hitting drama by the 2014 winner of the Alfred Bradley Bursary Award for new writers.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

Furquan Akhtar is a Broadcast Magazine Hot Shot (2014) and Guardian Newspaper "One to Watch" (2012). He cut his creative teeth in the Coronation Street Editorial Department and currently works as a Script Editor for Hollyoaks. This is his first drama for radio.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b052lpl5)
Series 29

Bonding Walks: Stiperstones, Shropshire

In this new series of Ramblings, Clare Balding explores the way walking can help us bond with other people, the countryside and our history. In this first programme she's invited to take part in the 20th annual walk up to the top of the Stiperstones in Shropshire with a group of men who came together to bond as fathers. Quentin Shaw started the tradition when his sons were at primary school as a way of encouraging the men to get to know each other.
The group has grown from the original five fathers to about fifty men, from teenagers to some in their seventies: fathers, colleagues, friends, sons, friends of sons. The aim is now to keep the group as diverse as possible, introducing men who would not otherwise meet: men working in mental health, children's services, housing, health, education, ex-army, scouting, craftsmen, tradesman etc. Quentin explains to Clare that overall ethos has always been to celebrate fatherhood and friendship in a low key way, and to give men a reason for a day off when they are stressed out just before Christmas.
Clare is the first woman ever to be invited to join the group, who end their morning walk with a large cooked breakfast at a local pub.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0520t2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0520thx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b052lryw)
Dreaming of Oscar

Antonia Quirke talks to three Oscar nominees as they head off to the Academy Awards for the first time.

Anthony McCarten, the writer and producer of The Theory Of Everything, is up for two awards - best adapted screenplay and best film. He reveals why he's turned down an invitation to Madonna's after-party.

Production designer Suzie Davies is nominated for her work on Mr Turner, and confesses to behaving like a star-struck fan at the nominees lunch, and has the photographs to prove it.

Mat Kirkby, who got the nod for best short film, admits that he wouldn't have made it to the ceremony if it wasn't for the generosity of a Radio 4 listener.

Critic Tim Robey assesses the chances of British success at this Sunday's ceremony.

Photo: Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b052lryy)
Alzheimer's Disease, False Memory, Diamond Light Source, Twins in Space

Alzheimer's disease is becoming increasingly common as the global population ages. It is estimated that currently 44 million victims of Alzheimer's dementia exist in the world and that this will grow to more than 100 million cases by 2050. The announcement this week of the creation of the Drug Discovery Alliance - a network of labs to fast track dementia treatment aims to address the urgent need to identify drugs that prevent, slow the progression, or improve the symptoms of Alzheimer's. But what are the scientific hurdles and what's missing in our knowledge in fuelling an ambition to achieve a disease modifying therapy for dementia? Adam Rutherford speaks to Cambridge University neuroscientist Rick Livesey, and to Eric Karran, Director of Research at Alzheimer's UK

How is it possible to remember something initially and then change your account of the experience later on? Possibly, giant swathes of your own personal history are partially fictional if not completely false. The problem isn't that our memory is bad, but that we believe it isn't. Adam talks to forensic psychologist Julia Shaw whose astonishing new research examines the ability to implant completely made-up rich false memories into ordinary people in a lab setting and points to circumstances under which police officers can extract false confessions.

There's a visit to the UK's synchrotron light source at Harwell in Oxfordshire which since it started operations in 2007 has illuminating research on subjects ranging from Egyptology to virology and this year is opening its doors to the public

Adam meets Mark Kelly, one of NASA's twin astronauts taking part in a year-long space experiment to examine the impact of space travel using identical twins as subjects. With one twin orbiting on the International Space Station whilst the other remains confined to Earth, the aim is to examine how individuals with the same genetic profile respond to radically different environments - in particular the genomics of humans as they prepare to move away from their home planet.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.


THU 17:00 PM (b052lrz0)
With the latest news interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0520qym)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Britain Versus the World (b04wjsvk)
Series 1

Episode 3

The comedy panel show pits two British comedians against a team of comics from overseas to find out which side is superior.

Joining the British captain, Hal Cruttenden, is the English comedian Holly Walsh while the captain of the Rest of the World - Henning Wehn - is teamed with Swedish stand-up Fredrik Andersson. The contest is overseen by Irishman Ed Byrne who does his very best to stay impartial.

Host
Ed Byrne

Guests
Hal Cruttenden
Henning Wehn
Holly Walsh
Fredrik Andersson

Programme Associate Bill Matthews
Devised and produced by Ashley Blaker.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b052lrz2)
Clarrie measures Emma for her wedding dress and starts to pin the material.

Jill worries about exhausted David, who is very busy lambing while Ruth gets everything sorted with Hadley Haugh. He's snappy with Jill and then apologises. Yes, he's tired but he has to just get on with it.

Jill remembers how pleased Phil was when David set up the Hereford beef herd.

Watching the Herefords graze, David finds himself talking to them - apologizing for the upheaval of the move and wrestling with his conscience. In this moment, David can hear the voice of his father, Phil, who had to face the prospect of Brookfield going in a very different direction. Phil spoke of how committed David was to the farm. Hearing Phil's voice, David becomes emotional.

David is suddenly desperate to get to the jumble sale before it ends. Susan and Clarrie are sorting through what's left of the jumble. David asks desperately after a toy farm that was for sale. Clarrie mentions that a lady called Janice, or Janet, from Grange Spinney may have bought it. Susan knew her from coming into the shop a few times. It's David's old toy farm.

Jill understands why he's so keen to not lose it. They set off to track it down. David is so grateful. He wants to keep his farm.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b052lrz4)
Johnny Vegas, Alan Howard remembered, novelist Javier Marías, Julianne Moore looks ahead to the Oscars

Ahead of next Monday's Front Row Debate 'Does the State owe the artist a living?', Johnny Vegas explains how he made his way in the traditionally unsubsidised world of comedy.

The actor Alan Howard, celebrated for his portrayal of kings in Shakespeare's history plays at the RSC, has died aged 77. The company's former Artistic Director Terry Hands remembers his close friend.

As part of Radio 4's Reading Europe series, Spanish writer Javier Marías discusses his book Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me, which is being dramatised on Radio 4.

And John looks ahead to Sunday's Oscars talking to Best Actress favourite Julianne Moore.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Ellie Bury.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t1z3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b052j57j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b052lt1l)
Inventors

Artificial snow, a plastic hairbrush and a non-spill baby beaker: How do you turn an idea into a successful business? Three entrepreneurs discuss with Evan Davis the process of designing a product and getting it onto the market. How do you finance the project and what's the best way to protect your design from copycats? We'll hear how one inventor risked everything in a legal battle against a company that stole her design. And discover how to create more than 200 types of fake snow.

Guests:
Shaun Pulfrey, Founder and CEO, Tangle Teezer

Mandy Haberman, Founder, Haberman Products

Darcey Crownshaw, Founder and MD, Snow Business

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b052lryy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b052ln55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b052lt1n)
Berlin rejects request from Athens for a six-month assistance package

German, Greek leaders speak for nearly an hour on phone in attempt to reach compromise


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b052lt1q)
In Certain Circles

"He's not easy"

After the death of her beloved mother, Zoe makes an unexpected choice.

Internationally acclaimed Australian author Elizabeth Harrower's novel was written in 1971 and was finally published in 2015.

This tale of love, class and freedom is set among the grand houses and lush gardens of Sydney Harbour just after the Second World War, following the lives of Zoe and Russell Howard.

Charismatic and confident, the children of affluent and loving parents, they welcome into their circle two orphans, Stephen and Anna. the impact of this meeting will resonate for decades.

Reader: Penny Downie

Abridger: Sally Marmion

Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


THU 23:00 Brian Gulliver's Travels (b01m5n7s)
Series 2

Gravinia and Plumpf

Brian Gulliver, a seasoned presenter of travel documentaries, finds himself in a hospital's secure unit after claiming to have experienced a succession of bizarre adventures.

More memories as Brian relives his adventures in Gravinia, a land where the military are revered above everything.

Brian Gulliver ..... Neil Pearson
Rachel Gulliver..... Mariah Gale
Fillick ..... Marcus Brigstocke
Chaplain ..... Adrian Scarborough
Guest ..... Tracy Wiles
Host..... Patrick Brennan
Stegga ..... Barunka O'Shaughnessy
Barista..... Harry Livingstone
Dragit ..... Nick Mohammed
Glugas Hold ..... Dan Tetsell

Producer: Steven Canny

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2012.


THU 23:30 Short Cuts (b04mcp9f)
Series 6

After Dark

Love found after a blackout, telephone counselling for bereaved rock star managers and erotica for the elderly. Josie Long presents tales of blackouts, late nights and bedtime stories.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 20 FEBRUARY 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0520qzk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b052ln57)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0520qzm)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0520qzp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0520qzr)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0520qzt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b053r1sl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Johnston McKay.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b052lzn5)
Neonics in Soil, Rural Payments Agency

We debate whether neonicotinoid pesticides can persist in the soil for years, as claimed by a leading biologist. Professor Dave Goulson of Sussex University describes his research into the half lives of pesticide residues being retained in the soil, sometimes years after usage ended. Nick von Westenholz of the
Crop Protection Association responds. He represents the agrichemical industry, manufacturers of pesticides.

Farmers are still reporting problems completing their on line forms for the new EU subsidy system, the Basic Payment Scheme. Richard Betton is a farmer and senior case worker at UTASS, the Upper Teesdale Agriculture Support Service. He tells us that his colleagues are rushed off their feet helping local farmers make their applications from the charity's computers. The Rural Payments Agency responds.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k2gq8)
Teal

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the teal. Teal are our smallest duck and the drakes are striking birds, heads burnished with chestnut surrounding a green mask fringed with yellow. They whistle softly in a piping chorus which sounds, from a distance, like the chime of tiny bells. That sound of the male's call is probably the origin of the bird's name, teal.


FRI 06:00 Today (b052m59j)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0520t2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b052m59l)
Alexandra Fuller - Leaving Before the Rains Come

"It's not supposed to happen this way"

A tragic accident threatens to change everything.

In a follow-up to the award-winning memoir "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight", Alexandra Fuller charts her temptestuous marriage to the man she thought would save her from the chaos of life in southern Africa.

In 1992, after her parents had seen off all other suitors, Alexandra Fuller married Charlie Ross, a charismatic adventurer and polo player, and the only man who seemed able to stand up to her parents. In this witty, frank and courageous memoir, Fuller charts their twenty tempestuous years together from brutal beauty of the Zambezi to the mountains and plains of Wyoming.

Concluded by Tracy-Ann Oberman.

Abridger: Richard Hamilton
Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b052m59n)
Family Fertility Donors; Eliza Haywood; Beth Orton; Playing with Children

Mary Portas made headlines this week when she announced that they had turned to Mary's brother Lawrence to be a sperm donor for the child she has with her wife Melanie Rickey. What's the reality of asking a relative to become an egg or sperm donor and does that muddy the waters of parenting? Joining Jenni are sisters Eleanor and Alice, Eleanor has a 22 month old daughter who was conceived thanks to Alice donating her egg, and Laura Witjens, the Chief-Executive of the National Gamete Donation Trust and herself an egg donor.

'The Female Spectator' was written and edited by Eliza Haywood at the end of the 18th century. It's believed to be the first magazine by women, for women. An early proto-feminist, she was writing romances well before Jane Austen. The Female Spectator only lasted for 4 volumes, but it was extremely popular and marked the beginning of magazines written by women, for a female audience. Jenni will be talking to Dr Holly Luhning about Eliza Haywood's extraordinary life.

In its 18-year history the Mercury Prize has only been awarded to five women. Beth Orton has been nominated twice, but has not yet won. This week she has been leading a week-long all-women musical residency in Manchester, due to culminate in a live show on Friday night. She'll be joining Jenni in the studio with one of the musicians involved, Josephine Oniyama, to talk about women in music and the equality gap they still face and they'll both be performing a new song live.

Playing games with her daughter is dull, repetitive and even on occasion humiliating, so says journalist Esther Walker. But does refusing to play with a child make a bad parent? Jenni will be speaking to Esther and to an expert in child development and play, Dr Amanda Gummer.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t2yv)
The Embrace

Episode 5

As the repercussions of Tabby's betrayal unfold, Iona and Charlie come to understand the price of their love.

Linda Marshall Griffiths' unflinching drama about betrayal and the power of money cracks open the impossibilities and difficulties of love.

IONA.....LYNDSEY MARSHAL
CHARLIE.....WILLIAM ASH
GRACE.....OLIVIA HALLINAN
DAN.....BLAKE RITSON
TABBY.....OLWEN MAY
CLEM.....JONATHAN KEEBLE

Director: Nadia Molinari

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


FRI 11:00 A Country Practice (b052m59q)
In the Lake District village of Coniston, the small GP practice that treats the rural community is losing a third of its core funding and faces closure. The patients and doctors there say it's an essential service for both locals and the millions of tourists that visit the area each year.

If it has to close down, it will effectively merge with a surgery in the next town. But locals say that poor public transport and the natural barriers of lakes and fells would make it a false economy - leading to more ambulance call outs and more hospital admissions. But NHS England - the body that commissions GP services - argues patients will get better care from larger practices.

Caz Graham joins the doctors at work to discover the realities of running a rural practice in a climate of NHS cuts and talks to campaigners as they try to save their surgery. She also hears from NHS England about whether small rural practices like this are practical and sustainable in the long term.

Producer/Presenter: Caz Graham.


FRI 11:30 Cleaning Up (b052m59s)
1. New Recruit

Every night, as time is called and people are spat out onto the streets and squeezed into rides home to dream -tossed beds - others are hard at work. Teams of cleaners are in office spaces scrubbing, vacuuming and cleaning up.

And right at the bottom of the food chain we find our gang - Spit n' Polish tackling the floors of a plush tower block in Manchester city centre.

In the first of four episodes, a new cleaner reports for duty. Turns out he and his boss have met before.

Written by Ian Kershaw and with a top hole Northern cast, this is a funny, sometimes dark comedy about people who always get the fuzzy end of the lollipop.

Julie ..... Julie Hesmondhalgh
Nobby ..... Paul Barber
Dave ..... John Thompson
Shiv ..... Lauren Socha
Nita ..... Bhavna Limbachia
Our Bri ..... Jack Deam

Produced at BBC Salford by Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0520qzw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b052m59v)
20 February 1915 - Edie Chadwick

Johnnie Marshall's attentions to Edie don't go unnoticed.

Written by Melissa Murray
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b052m59x)
Parking Fines; Hydrogen Cars; eBay ID Theft

Drivers could be paying millions of pounds in parking fines that wouldn't hold up in court. Ahead of a test case in the High Court, You & Yours has found a 31% increase in requests to the DVLA for driver information from private parking firms, in order to issue fines.

Hydrogen car technology has been in development for more than twenty years, but it's claimed that a new fuel cell going on sale this year could transform the market for them.

And like many people, Joe Burrows just used eBay to buy and sell items occasionally, until a demand for a £2000 refund revealed that his identy had been copied for fraudulent selling. What impact would ID theft have on someone's credit rating?

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Joel Moors.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0520qzy)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b052m59z)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b052m5b1)
Series 2

Public Spending

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), brings to life the numbers conveying the big trends that have transformed the shape and scope of the British state.

He looks at what governments through the centuries have spent, borrowed, taxed, regulated and built; and he considers how we came to organise a national life that reaches into every corner of private life, from the delivery of pensions and healthcare to the surveillance of emails or rules about the temperature of a hot cup of tea.

By one measure, the modern British state is roughly 7,000 times bigger than the Tudor state. How and why did that happen?

The story of the state unfolds through muddy fields, smugglers coves and a Victorian village lock-up. Numbers become sound as we hear the dramatic scale of change that has occurred over the centuries.

The evolution of the state may be driven less by party politics than party politicians might like us to think. Although the state's size and functions are a natural subject of fierce political argument, the impetus for the biggest changes has often come from another source - such as war, economic growth, and the power that arises from knowledge.

In this programme, Andrew looks at public spending.

Producer: Michael Blastland

A Whistledown production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b052lrz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b052m6dm)
Bridge

By Donna Franceschild.

A witty and moving real-time drama. A woman's sitting on a bench when a stranger approaches her and nothing she says will make him leave.

Cast:

Davy ... Iain Robertson
Woman ... Eilidh McCormick

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b052m6dp)
Galleywood, Essex

Eric Robson is in the village of Galleywood, Essex. Chris Beardshaw, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson join him to answer the questions from local gardeners.

Also, Chris Beardshaw explores the gardens of Great Chalfield Manor used in the BBC adaptation of Wolf Hall and the team visit RHS Hyde Hall to share some topical tips.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Sitters' Stories (b052mbjl)
Strandgade 30 by Elizabeth Kuti

Captured in a moment in time with faces forever staring at them and fingers ever pointing, the sitters from some well-known paintings get a chance to escape from the canvas, set the story straight, or tell us their particular version of the story behind the image.

Characters from famous paintings finally get a chance to tell their story in this series of readings from Elizabeth Kuti, Sophia Hillan, and Niall Williams.

Strandgade 30 by Elizabeth Kuti

Painting: Hammershoi’s Interior, 1899, National Gallery London.

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/vilhelm-hammershoi-interior

Vilhelm Hammershoi’s sparse interior of the home he shared with his wife Ida – Strandgade 30 - shows Ida with her back to us. But could it be that she is holding something, something obscured from our view? Writer Elizabeth Kuti ponders the secret that Ida is hiding from us – and her husband.

Writer ..... Elizabeth Kuti
Reader ..... Trine Garrett
Producer ..... Heather Larmour


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b052mbjq)
Michele Ferrero, Lady Platt of Writtle, John McCabe, Louis Jourdan, Anne Naysmith and Lesley Gore.

Julian Worricker on

Michele Ferrero - confectioner, creator of Nutella, Tic Tacs and Kinder Eggs and Italy's richest man. He was famously shy and died having only given one newspaper interview.

Beryl Platt, a wartime aeronautical engineer, who went on to promote women in science and engineering as chairwoman of the Equal Opportunities Commission.

The composer and pianist John McCabe, who was responsible for more than 200 compositions during his lifetime.

Louis Jourdan, the French film actor blessed with what were described as 'incredible good looks', who became famous for his role in Gigi.

And Anne Naysmith, who enjoyed a promising career as a pianist in the 1960s before she fell on hard times and lived rough on the streets of west London.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b052mbjs)
The allied bombing of Dresden was one of the most controversial episodes of the Second World War - but was Radio 4's coverage of the 70th Anniversary too one-sided? The editor of Radio 4's Today programme, Jamie Angus, discusses how the BBC reflected on this historic event with a senior lecturer in War and Media at King's College London, Dr Peter Busch.

And the story behind how the BBC obtained a startling piece of audio from the shootings in Copenhagen. Toby Castle was duty editor in the BBC Newsroom at the time and he talks to Roger Bolton about why he decided the shocking audio could be put on air.

Also, an epic tale of endurance and self-sacrifice - listeners tell us how they managed to hear ten hours of War and Peace in one sitting.

Producer: Will Yates

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b051w4dp)
Debbie and Beth: I Just Want My Child to Be Happy

Fi Glover hears two mothers celebrate the individual qualities of their children with Down's Syndrome and manage their own and society's expectations for their children's prospects, in another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b052mgr7)
With the latest news interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0520r00)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b052mjzd)
Series 86

Episode 1

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, who is joined by Susan Calman, Samira Ahmed and Phill Jupitus, alongside regular panellist Jeremy Hardy.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b052mjzg)
Hayley is back at Willow Farm to see Roy. He begs her to come back properly. But Hayley has thought long and hard. She's sorry, but she wants a divorce.

David and Jill knock on a door in Grange Spinney and speak to a rather bemused lady called Janet. They ask desperately whether she bought a toy farm from the jumble sale. Janet finds the farm set she bought, but it's not the one David is looking for. David's ready to give up, but Jill says no way.

Susan reveals that Hilary Noakes threw out an old toy farm. David starts rummaging through the bins. Here it is! David recognizes several pieces, like the tractor that Kenton snapped the buckrake off. Best of all, there's a written tag: "Happy Birthday, David. From Mum and Dad with love". Phil never wrote the labels usually, so why this one, wonders David?

David tells Jill about hearing his dad, clearly, earlier. Nothing strange there, says Jill, who admits she hears Phil all the time. Jill knows that it's not just the toy farm that David is thinking about. David knows that he can't sell Brookfield. But he's left it so late. Nothing's impossible, says Jill. But how on earth is David going to tell Ruth?


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b052mjzj)
Iestyn Davies, Sheila Hancock, Kumiko, London Fashion Week

Countertenor Iestyn Davies discusses playing Farinelli alongside Mark Rylance at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse; actress Sheila Hancock looks back on the support she received in her career; Japanese film Kumiko the Treasure Hunter is reviewed by Sophia McDougall; and production designer Es Devlin and set designer Simon Costin go behind the scenes at London Fashion Week

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b052t2yv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b052mjzl)
Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Lumen Christi College in Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland. On the panel: the former Chief Executive of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, Jim Gamble; Sinn Fein MP for Fermanagh and South Tyrone, Michelle Gildernew; writer and political commentator, Simon Heffer; and Democratic Unionist Party MP for North Antrim, Ian Paisley.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b052mjzn)
The Power of Fiction

Will Self reflects on the power of our relationship with fictional characters. "People need people whose lives can be seen to follow a dramatic arc, so that no matter what trials they encounter, the people who survey them can be reassured that when the light begins to fade, these people - to whose frail psyches we've had privileged access - will at least feel it's all meant something."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b052mjzq)
16-20 February 1915

The country may be at war, and the factories at peak production, but there's time for romance in industrial Tynemouth.

Written by Melissa Murray
Story-led by Shaun McKenna
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0520r02)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b052mjzs)
Bomb and gun attack on a hotel in the Somalian capital, Mogadishu.

Ten people killed -- Somali jihadist group, Al Shabaab, claims responsibility


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b052mjzv)
In Certain Circles

'I'm marvellously happy'

The unlikely marriage between Zoe and Stephen continues to raise eyebrows.

Internationally acclaimed Australian author Elizabeth Harrower's novel was written in 1971 and was finally published in 2015.

This tale of love, class and freedom is set among the grand houses and lush gardens of Sydney Harbour just after the Second World War, following the lives of Zoe and Russell Howard.

Charismatic and confident, the children of affluent and loving parents, they welcome into their circle two orphans, Stephen and Anna. It's a meeting that will resonate for decades.

Reader: Penny Downie

Abridger: Sally Marmion

Producer: Justine Willett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2015.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b052j57l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Short Cuts (b04nrwp4)
Series 6

The Double

Josie Long hears stories of seeing double.

Tales of doppelgangers, identity theft and a woman who offered a living counterpart to dead composers. Featuring a new 'documentary song' from Gaggle.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b051w4fd)
Helen and Virginia - Marriage and Mistakes

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who have both been married twice, but with totally different results, in in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b052hffd)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b052hffd)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b052t0f2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b052t0f2)

15 Minute Drama 10:40 WED (b052t1gz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b052t1gz)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b052t1z3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b052t1z3)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b052t2yv)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b052t2yv)

A Country Practice 11:00 FRI (b052m59q)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b052j57l)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b052j57l)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 MON (b052hhcw)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 TUE (b052j579)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 WED (b052jk2n)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 THU (b052lnty)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 FRI (b052m5b1)

A Love Supreme: 50 Years On 13:30 SUN (b051s0fp)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b051w4f2)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b052mjzn)

Agatha Christie 23:00 MON (b01qwd30)

Alun Cochrane's Fun House 11:30 WED (b01s0dld)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b051ryqn)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b052hvhn)

And the Academy Award Goes To... 10:30 SAT (b0520pr1)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0520pr7)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b051w4f0)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b052mjzl)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0520q63)

Are You Inexperienced? 00:30 SUN (b01jxw4n)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b052lryy)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b052lryy)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0520r8b)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0520r8b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b052hwxq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b052j583)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b052jkx6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b052lt1q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b052mjzv)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b052hdg3)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b052hdg3)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b052j0tt)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b052j0tt)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b052j5n9)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b052j5n9)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b052ln57)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b052ln57)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b052m59l)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b051ryq4)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b052hptd)

Brian Gulliver's Travels 23:00 THU (b01m5n7s)

Britain Versus the World 18:30 THU (b04wjsvk)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0520t2p)

Chain Reaction 18:30 WED (b052jk2z)

Cleaning Up 11:30 FRI (b052m59s)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b052j57f)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b052j57f)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0520t2t)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0520t2t)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b0520thv)

Drama 14:15 MON (b052hptb)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b03y14n7)

Drama 14:15 WED (b050zy3q)

Drama 14:15 THU (b05126z7)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b052m6dm)

Face the Facts 12:15 THU (b052lntt)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0520pqv)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b052hb3v)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b052j0tk)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b052j5g6)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b052ln51)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b052lzn5)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b051w4dm)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b052mbjs)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b051s2m3)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b052j57v)

Finding Your Voice 21:00 MON (b051s0fm)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b051r66r)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b052ln5c)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b052htk7)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b052j57s)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b052jkwy)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b052lrz4)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b052mjzj)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b051w2zz)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b052m6dp)

Gloomsbury 19:15 SUN (b01nbt9b)

Hibernian Homicide: New Irish Crime Stories 19:45 SUN (b052h9b8)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b052mjzq)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b052hhcp)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b052j573)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b052j8vc)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b052lntr)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b052m59v)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b052ln55)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b052ln55)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b052j57x)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b052j57z)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b052j57z)

Irish Micks and Legends 23:00 WED (b052jkx8)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b051ryqd)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b052hptn)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b051w4dk)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b052mbjq)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b052j57j)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b052j57j)

Letters from Europe 00:30 SAT (b0549x7d)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b0520t2f)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0520prf)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b052j57c)

Malcolm X and the 'American Nightmare' 20:00 MON (b052zzg3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b051r667)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0520qr6)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0520qt5)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0520qvp)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0520qx1)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0520qy7)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0520qzk)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b052j5n7)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b052j5n7)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b052jk2q)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0520pr5)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0520pr5)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b051s4rg)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b052jkx0)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b051r66h)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0520qrg)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0520qtf)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0520qvy)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0520qx9)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0520qyh)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0520qzt)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0520qrl)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b051r66t)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0520qrz)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0520qtk)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0520qw0)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0520qxc)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0520qyk)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0520qzw)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b051r66k)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0520qrs)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0520qrx)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b051r677)

News 13:00 SAT (b051r66y)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b052j0tr)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0520thx)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0520thx)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b051vr34)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0520prc)

PM 17:00 MON (b052hptl)

PM 17:00 TUE (b052j57n)

PM 17:00 WED (b052jk2x)

PM 17:00 THU (b052lrz0)

PM 17:00 FRI (b052mgr7)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b052h6wn)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b051r8p8)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0520tj1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b051w4qj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b052z37q)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b053qzj0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b053r1m2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b053r1ph)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b053r1sl)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0520prh)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0520prh)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0520prh)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b0520t2k)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0520t2k)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0520t2k)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b052lpl5)

Recycled Radio 11:00 WED (b052j8v9)

Salt 11:00 MON (b052hffg)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b0381hqt)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0520pqz)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0520prk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b051r66c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0520qrb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0520qt9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0520qvt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0520qx5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0520qyc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0520qzp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b051r669)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b051r66f)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b051r671)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0520qr8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0520qrd)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0520qs3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0520qt7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0520qtc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0520qvr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0520qvw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0520qx3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0520qx7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0520qy9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0520qyf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0520qzm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0520qzr)

Short Cuts 23:30 MON (b04kbjj1)

Short Cuts 23:30 TUE (b04l0tvs)

Short Cuts 23:30 WED (b04lq28m)

Short Cuts 23:30 THU (b04mcp9f)

Short Cuts 23:27 FRI (b04nrwp4)

Sitters' Stories 15:45 FRI (b052mbjl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b051r675)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0520qs7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0520qtr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0520qw4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0520qxh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0520qym)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0520r00)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0520t2c)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0520t2c)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b052hdg1)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b052hdg1)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0520t2m)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0520t2h)

Tales from the Stave 11:30 TUE (b052j0v0)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0520t2r)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b052h9b6)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b052h9b6)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b052hptq)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b052hptq)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b052j57q)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b052j57q)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b052jk31)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b052jk31)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b052lrz2)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b052lrz2)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b052mjzg)

The Architects 11:30 MON (b052hffj)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b051vvgt)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b052lt1l)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b051vr36)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b052lryw)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0520t3d)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0520t3d)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b052hptj)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b052hptj)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04c9xcn)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b051s3g1)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b051w4dp)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b051w4fd)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b052j0tp)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b052j0tp)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b052jk2v)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b052mjzd)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b051w4dt)

The Placebo Problem 11:00 TUE (b052j0ty)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0520pr3)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0520t4k)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b052hwxn)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b052j581)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b052jkx4)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b052lt1n)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b052mjzs)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b051s4jz)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b052jk2s)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:15 WED (b052jkxb)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0520pqx)

Today 06:00 MON (b052hb3x)

Today 06:00 TUE (b052j0tm)

Today 06:00 WED (b052j5n5)

Today 06:00 THU (b052ln53)

Today 06:00 FRI (b052m59j)

Trodd en Bratt Say 'Well Done You' 18:30 TUE (b047c476)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0vl3)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03jz1hj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03jz828)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03k21n6)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03k279n)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03k2gq8)

War and Peace 21:00 SAT (b04w89v2)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b051r66m)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b051r66p)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b051r66w)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b051r673)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0520qrq)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0520qrv)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0520qs1)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0520qs5)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0520qth)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0520qtp)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b0520qw2)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b0520qw6)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0520qxf)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0544f16)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0520qzy)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b0520r02)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b052h9bb)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b052h9df)

Why I Changed My Mind 20:45 WED (b052jkx2)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b052hptg)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0520pr9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b052hffb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b052j0tw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b052j5ns)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b052ln59)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b052m59n)

World at One 13:00 MON (b052hhct)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b052j577)

World at One 13:00 WED (b052jk2l)

World at One 13:00 THU (b052lntw)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b052m59z)

Writing a New South Africa 11:30 THU (b052ln5f)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b052hhcr)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b052j575)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b052jk2j)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b052m59x)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b051w4ql)