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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 JANUARY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6vmq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b04yjtjj)
Epilogue: A Memoir

Ambrosia

A thoughtful gesture breaks down barriers between Will and his new-found family.

Jamie Parker concludes Will Boast's moving account of loss and coming to terms with the past.

Abridged by Miranda Emmerson.

Producer: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vms)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6vmv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vmx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6vmz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04yk50k)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04yk50m)
'We had no idea the debt was so big...it's very hard to see a way out'. Ahead of the elections in Greece, John Humphrys visits his family in Athens and finds out the difficulties of living in a debt-ridden country. Presented by Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04y6vn1)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04y6vn3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b04ykk58)
Churchill's Chartwell in Kent

To mark the 50th anniversary of the death of Sir Winston Churchill, Helen Mark heads to Chartwell in Kent to explore the family home and gardens.

Churchill bought the home in 1922 to live in with his wife Clementine and their children and remained here until his death in 1965. As well as making structural changes to the grounds he used it as an inspiration for writing and painting and it's been maintained to reflect how he kept it. Helen asks what Chartwell tells us about the man - to so many a great leader - but also a father, husband and nature lover.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0501jls)
Farming Today This Week: Agricultural Machinery

In this week's Farming Today This Week Charlotte Smith visits LAMMA, the UK's largest agricultural machinery show. The event in Peterborough attracts around 40,000 visitors, many of whom are farmers, some with the intention of spending thousands of pounds on new equipment. Charlotte speaks to farmers who are buying and the bank who will lend the money.

Farming Today This Week also hears about the shortage of agricultural engineers in the UK and which innovation won 'best in show' in the LAMMA competition.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04y6vn5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0501jlv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0501jlx)
George Clarke

"Restoration Man" and Amazing Spaces presenter George Clarke joins Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles to talk about leaving school at sixteen without any qualifications and his passion for bringing buildings back to life. Find out how a present from his Granddad set him on the road to becoming an architect.

Sherika Sherard quit University to get a job. But it took her almost a year to get work and in that time she busked around London to earn some money. Now the song she wrote 'Give Me A Job' has gone viral and touched the hearts of thousands.

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Sir Winston Churchill. The wartime leader's funeral was the largest state funeral in world history up to that point, with representatives from 112 nations present, along with many thousands of people who had camped out overnight to pay their respects. Among them was a 21 year old David Savage, who 50 years on reflects on that bitter cold night and historic day.

Chris Bates was awarded an MBE in the New Year's Honours list for services as an unpaid Ambassador to the island of Tristan da Cunha.

JP Devlin joins the crowds of well-wishers who attended the funeral of an RAF veteran who died without any family or friends.

Actor Natascha McElhone picks her Inheritance Tracks

Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Karen Dalziel

Inheritance Tracks
"Jamming" by the reggae band Bob Marley & the Wailers from their 1977 album Exodus
"Lean on Me" written and recorded by singer-songwriter Bill Withers from his 1972 album Still Bill.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0501jlz)
Series 9

York

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel programme from York.

Taking questions from a local audience are food historian Annie Gray, DIY food expert Tim Hayward, Scottish-Indian fusion chef Angela Malik and Israeli chef Itamar Srulovich.

The panel discuss York's chocolate-making tradition, sample the ultimate British Rail sandwich, and find out how to make the perfect pork scratchings.

Produced by Miranda Hinkley

Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0501jp7)
Isabel Hardman of The Spectator looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Is the controversy over the party leaders' televised debates descending into farce? Do we know enough about the "dark arts" of election campaigning, and why do parties send "moles" to their opponents' meetings? Does David Cameron have any international role model in mind when he goes on the stump? And the fuss over replacing the clerk to the Speaker of the Commons is resolved.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04y6vn7)
The Revolt Against Austerity

'Crisis' and 'Hope,' two words which have continually cropped up in the Greek election campaign. Chris Morris has been out with campaigners from the leftist Syriza party. Kamal Ahmed talks of chasing the stories in the bubble that is the World Economic Forum in Davos. Devastating floods in Malawi, Rosie Blunt's been meeting families who've lost everything. Kevin Connolly's in Auschwitz where they are getting ready to mark the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the death camp. And the birds are doing well. So are the whales and the seals too. But Juliet Rix, far away in the South Atlantic, finds these are difficult, indeed fatal, times for the rats of South Georgia.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vn9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0501jp9)
Is Citizens Advice ready for the pensions revolution? Cash savings and Lloyds bonds

On Money Box with Paul Lewis: Citizens Advice has given more detail about how it will offer everyone aged 55 or more face-to-face advice about the new freedoms
which begins on 6 April. It says 44 out of its 316 offices in England and Wales will offer Pension Wise guidance with around five members of staff in each office. It is currently recruiting those advisers. However pensions experience is not a criterion to get the job. Some pensions experts have concerns about this. Chief Executive of Citizens Advice, Gillian Guy, and pensions expert Margaret Snowden join the programme.

From the summer, banks may have to tell us what rate our savings are earning, on statements and online. That is one of the proposals from the Financial Conduct Authority to help persuade people to move some of the £160 billion languishing in accounts paying 0.5% or less into better paying accounts. Chris Woolard speaks to the programme.

First it was the Swiss central bank de-linking its franc from the Euro that sent the single currency plunging. Now the European Central Bank itself has added to the Euro's woes by promising to magic up €1 trillion to embark on eighteen months of Quantitative Easing to stimulate the Eurozone economies as inflation goes negative and growth stalls. The managing director of Currency Index,
Robin Haynes, will explain the personal finance implications of the currency turmoil.

Is Lloyds' word its bond? That's what thousands of investors who have been getting returns of up to 12.5% a year from long-standing investments in bonds from Lloyds are asking. The bank has now said it will end the interest payments and buy back the bonds at their face value. It insists it is entitled to do that under its terms and conditions in the original bond sale prospectus. But many investors say that wasn't clear to them and that they rely on the income. The programme hears from bond expert Mark Taber.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b04yk373)
Series 45

Episode 3

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week's news via topical stand-up and sketches featuring guests Marcus Brigstocke and Nish Kumar.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04y6vnc)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04y6vnf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04yk3w1)
Bea Campbell, Peter Hain MP, Owen Paterson MP, Steve Webb MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Keynsham in Somerset with the writer Bea Campbell, former Welsh Secretary, Peter Hain MP, former Secretary of State for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs Owen Paterson MP, and Pensions Minister Steve Webb MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0501k2c)
Leaders' Debates, Devolution, Wealth, Dairy

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

Will a seven party televised debate tell voters what they need to know?
If the SNP join a Westminster coalition after the next general election, should they be allowed to vote on English only matters?
Should the 1% wealthiest people own 50% of the world's wealth?
Dairy farmers can be asset rich, but have no guarantees of even receiving cost of production for their milk. Is it right that market forces are allowed to work so brutally.

Email: any.answers@bbc.co.uk, tweet us: @bbcanyquestions or using #bbcaq

With Sheila McClennon.

Produced by Beverley Purcell.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b0501k2f)
The Song of Hiawatha

This epic narrative poem, with its picturesque and highly imaginative tales, threads the many aspects of native American mythology concerning life, nature and ritual. Weaving together "beautiful traditions into a whole" as Longfellow intended.

Narrator ...... Henry Goodman
Hiawatha ..... Neet Mohan
Gitche Manito/Mudjekeewis/Pau-Puk-Keewis ...... Ramon Tikaram
Nokomis ...... Shaheen Khan
Young Hiawatha ...... Talia Barnett
Minnehaha ..... Harriet Judd

Chibiabos's song, and original music was composed and performed by Olly Fox

Director: Pauline Harris

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


SAT 15:30 The True Story of Abner Jay (b04yftl1)
Laura Barton pieces together the true story of Abner Jay, a most unusual musical talent.

Abner Jay was an itinerant musician - a modern-day minstrel. He was a one-man band, a songster, a storehouse of history and an off-colour raconteur; he was a direct line to a different era.

He said that his instruments were centuries old, passed down through his family. That his father and grandfather had been slaves. He claimed to have fathered 16 children, that daily doses of water from the Suwannee River kept him young and that he was 25 years younger than you think.

But you never know what to believe with Abner Jay.

What is certainly true is that he travelled the Southern states of the US with a converted mobile home which he opened out into a makeshift stage. And he was possibly the last performer of the 'bones' - a musical tradition that involved playing rhythms on cow and chicken bones dried in the sun.

The writer Laura Barton talks to those who knew him and those who love his music in an effort to dig beneath the myth and misdirection and reveal the true story of Abner Jay.

Featuring Sherry Sherrod Dupree, William Ferris, Jay Martin, Jack Teague and Brandie Watson.

Producer: Martin Williams.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0501k2h)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Secret Eating; Democracy Day

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Secret Eating - when does it become a problem? Julie Hesmondhalgh. Baroness D'Souza, Helen and Laura Pankhurst and Stephanie Davies-Arai from the campaign No More Page 3 discuss women and democracy. Coming of age films. Sexism in restaurants. Two women tell us their different experience of getting pregnant very early in a relationship.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0501k2k)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b04yk50m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vnh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04y6vnk)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vnm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0501kvb)
Nikki Bedi, Tom Conti, Simon Nicol, Sue Webster, Bidisha, Fairport Convention and Rhiannon Giddens

Clive Anderson is joined by Nikki Bedi, Tom Conti, Simon Nicol, Sue Webster and Bidisha for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Fairport Convention and Rhiannon Giddens.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b0501kvd)
Series 17

My Turn for Lunch

The award-winning series which sees writers create a fictional response to a major story from the week's news.

Cartoonist and author Barry Fantoni's topical drama set against the backdrop of Davos and the World Economic Forum imagines another meeting where money is also on the menu.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0501kvg)
Oppenheimer, A Most Violent Year, Fortitude, Rubens, Sandip Roy

The RSC's latest production is Oppenheimer, a play about the man behind the invention of the nuclear bomb - a flawed hero, is it a flawless production?
A Most Violent Year is set in New York in 1981, a year when more than 1.2m crimes were committed. JC Chandor's film follows a man trying to build up a family business in the face of alarming violence and corruption.
Fortitude is Arctic noir TV. Set in an Icelandic Research Station where mysterious and untoward things start happening, the cast includes Sofie Grabol, Michael Gambon, Christopher Ecclestone and a host of other big names. Will it leave the reviewers cold?
Rubens And His Legacy at the Royal Academy attempts to explore the influence of the great Flemish master on artists over the last three and a half centuries.
Sandip Roy's first novel Dont Let Him Know tells the story of a young man in modern India exploring his sexual identity.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Lionel Shriver, Sophie Hannah and Francis Spufford. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Can You Spot the Hidden Message? (b0501kvj)
What is subliminal advertising? David Aaronovitch investigates the mysterious birth of this modern myth - and introduces a unique new BBC experiment, conducted in collaboration with The Infinite Monkey Cage, to try it out.

Subliminal advertising was first tried out on the public in a cinema in New Jersey in 1956 - but no information about this was formally released for over a year.

And when the man behind the experiment finally went public, the mystery just deepened. James Vicary, a well-known 'motivational researcher', claimed amazing results for his new technique - but refused to reveal details, pleading a patent application.

He thought people would be pleased as his method would mean fewer ad breaks - but instead, he faced an explosion of panic and outrage. Subliminal advertising was damned as "a technique for a Goebbels".

And then a cinema trade paper, Motion Picture Daily, actually investigated the story - and it turned out that the manager of the cinema said the experiment hadn't really had any impact on sales...

In this programme, David Aaronovitch clears away much of the myth and misinformation surrounding Vicary and his strange experiment - and explores what science has to tell us about subliminal influence.

He talks to Professor Wolfgang Stroebe of the University of Utrecht in Holland, who explains how, in strict lab conditions, he has repeatedly made subliminal advertisng work.

But can his laboratory findings be transferred to a public venue?

To test this, David presents a unique new BBC experiment, developed and run by producer Phil Tinline under the guidance of Professor Stroebe.

In our test, almost 100 volunteers from the Infinite Monkey Cage audience are divided into a test group and a control group. Each group is shown the same three-minute clip - but only one contains subliminal flashes of the name of a drink brand.

Then the volunteers are offered a choice of two drinks - the drink brand, and a mineral water. But will the test group pick the subliminally advertised brand significantly more often than the control group?

To find out, listeners will need to stay with Radio 4. The results will be announced during the edition of the Infinite Monkey Cage that follows straight on from this programme...

With: Professor Charles Acland, Kelly Crandall, Professor Timothy Moore, Professor Wolfgang Stroebe

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE

NOTE: Prof Stroebe's research shows that subliminal messages are ineffective if the participants know about them. Participants in our experiment confirmed in writing that they understood and accepted that we could not divulge the full nature of this experiment, or what we were testing, until afterwards.


SAT 20:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b04yfsst)
Series 11

Deception

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by author and journalist David Aaronovitch, psychologist Professor Richard Wiseman and neuroscientist Professor Sophie Scott as they tackle the science of deception. They'll be asking why we seem to be so good at telling lies, but not very good at spotting them, and why being good liars could be the secret to our success as a social animal. They will also be carrying out their own act of deception on the monkey cage audience. They reveal the results of an experiment to test the idea of subliminal advertising, carried out by David Aaronovitch for the Radio 4 documentary, "Can You Spot the Hidden Message" . Will they manage to secretly persuade a section of the theatre audience to pick one type of soft drink over another by secretly flashing the name of a certain brand on a screen? All will be revealed.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


SAT 21:00 War and Peace (b04w82wl)
Episode 4

Pierre meets a wise stranger, Bazdeev, and becomes a Freemason. Natasha catches the eye of Captain Denisov who rashly proposes – Countess Rostov sets him straight. Nikolai confesses his huge gambling debts to his father, Count Rostov, and vows never to gamble again. General Denisov vows never to propose again.

Following Lise's death, Pierre visits Bald Hills to try and console a broken Andrei and siblings Andrei and Marya draw close when Andrei's young son, Nikolenka, is dangerously ill. Meanwhile, on the battlefield, Denisov takes drastic action to feed his starving troops but the consequences are harsh. And following a business visit to Count Rostov, Andrei encounters Natasha Rostov and is enchanted – he wants to live again.

A dynamic fresh dramatisation by Timberlake Wertenbaker of Leo Tolstoy's epic - from the translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokonsky - follows the fortunes of three Russian aristocratic families during the Napoleonic War. Starring Lesley Manville, John Hurt, Alun Armstrong and Harriet Walter.

The story moves between their past and present as Pierre, Natasha, Marya and Nikolai talk to their children about the events that shaped their lives and the lives of every Russian who lived through these troubled times.

War and Peace reflects the panorama of life at every level of Russian society in this period. The longest of 19th-century novels, it's an epic story in which historical, social, ethical and religious issues are explored on a scale never before attempted in fiction.

Alex Shiels … Sergei Rostov
Ben Crowe … Mikhail Mitrich
Charlotte Emmerson … Helene Kuragin
Daniel Flynn … Regimental Commander
David Calder … Prince Vassily Kuragin
David Collings … Shinshin
Ella Dale … Masha Bezukhov
Ferdinand Kingsley … Anatole Kuragin
Harriet Walter … Anna Mikhailovna Drubetskoy
Hazel Ellerby … Julia's mother
Jed Vine … Petya Rostov
Joanna David … Annette Scherer
Joel Maccormack … Boris Drubetskoy
John Hurt … Prince Bolkonsky
Jonathan Slinger … Captain Denisov
Kathleen Keaney … Liza Rostov
Nelly Harker … Lise Bolkonsky
Alun Armstrong … Count Rostov
Emerald O'Hanrahan … Julia Karagan
Lesley Manville … Countess Rostov
Natasha Little … Marya Bolkonsky
Paterson Joseph … Pierre Bezuhkov
Phoebe Fox … Natasha Rostov
Pip Donaghy … Colonel of the Hussars
Roger Allam … General Kutuzov
Roger May … Prince Bagration
Sam Blatchford … Andrusha Rostov
Sam Dale … Alpatych
Sam Reid … Nikolai Rostov
Sarah Badel … Maria Demitrievna
Serena Evans … Catiche
Stanley Toyne … Mitya Rostov
Stephen Campbell Moore … Andrei Bolkonsky
Tamzin Merchant … Sonya Rostov
Tom Glenister … Nikolenka Bolkonsky

Director: Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04y6vnp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b04ykd7m)
Human Rights at the Crossroads?

Clive Anderson and guests get behind the political rhetoric to debate the potential impact on the rights of British citizens if the Government carries out a proposal to scrap the Human Rights Act and replace it with a "more British" Bill of Rights.

Barrister Martin Howe QC, who was a member of the Coalition Government's recent commission on human rights, defends the proposals and argues that British citizens and Parliament should not be subject to decisions made by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.

But the proposals are challenged by the other guests - barrister Tom de la Mare QC, legal academic Dr Alison Young and retired Appeal Court judge Sir Stanley Burnton. Sir Stanley totally rejects the suggestion that he and his fellow judges are being dictated to by a foreign court.

The panel also discusses the Government's threat to withdraw from the European Convention of Human Rights unless Parliament is allowed to veto judgments from the European Court. Would it be possible for one member country to have special status, or would such a move threaten British membership of the EU itself?

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b04yb5g5)
(4/17)
Which is the largest landlocked country in the world? And which word is both an Imperial measurement of weight and the alternative name for the snow leopard?

Russell Davies puts these and many other questions to the four latest competitors in the evergreen general knowledge quiz. They'll each be hoping their general knowledge proves to be good enough to carry them through to the semi-finals, and perhaps even all the way to the 62nd Brain of Britain title.

There's also a chance for a listener to win a prize by suggesting questions that will stump the contestants' collective knowledge, in 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b04y9rj8)
Poems to Make You Laugh

Roger McGough presents poetry to make you laugh, with poets from Wendy Cope to Ivor Cutler, taking in Kit Wright, Clive James and Adrian Mitchell along the way.
There's Carol Ann Duffy's ode to the Kray Sisters, Michael Rosen's mickey-taking brother, and Roger throws a few of his own into the mix for good measure. Producer Sally Heaven.



SUNDAY 25 JANUARY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b05053k8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Showman's Parson: Tales from the Memoirs of the Rev Thomas Horne (b03y00qy)
The Mummer

Thomas Horne was born in 1849 in a caravan at Nottingham Goose Fair. He spent the first part of his life as a working showman - dressing up as a performing bear, running a Penny Bazaar around the Lancashire Wakes, working as a doorman in Mrs Williams' Waxwork, and finally becoming an actor in a Mumming Booth and a partner in an Illusion Show. Latterly, he joined a missionary brotherhood in Oxford, and was ordained as a priest in Leeds in 1885.

Until his death in 1918, Thomas Horne was a vigorous campaigner for the rights of travelling people. With his education, training as a priest, and family association with the fairground, he was their ideal representative. He travelled throughout the country, preaching to showfolk and, in one year alone, he travelled over 12,000 miles, visiting fairs as far apart as Penzance in Cornwall to Ayr in Scotland.

The stories in this series are taken from his memoirs held in the National Fairground Archive in Sheffield.

Today's story concerns the actor, Hervey Hoyne and the terrible events surrounding a fire in the Mumming Booth at Rotherham Statutes Fair.

Read by Tony Lidington

Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05053kb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05053kd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05053kg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b05053kj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0505l2v)
The bells of St Nicholas' Church, Leeds in Kent.


SUN 05:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b04ykd7p)
Series 1

Derivatives

Continuing his quest for understanding, David Baddiel explores derivatives. What are they and how do they work?

David begins by meeting journalist Janice Turner, who initially suggested the subject, and she explains why she believes we should all try to understand derivatives.

Then David visits the London Metals Exchange, the last place with open outcry trading in London, where he discusses the history of derivatives with financial historian D'Maris Coffman. And on a trading floor at Canary Wharf he hears how the market works today.

At the end, he returns to try to explain to Janice what he's learned, with D'Maris ready to pass judgement on his understanding.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b05053kl)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 The Wrath of God (b0505l2x)
The concept of The Wrath of God is a contentious one. Mark Tully asks how we can reconcile the idea of a loving God with a God of Wrath - in conversation with Rabbi Jonathan Sacks.

He discusses the evidence of God as a loving God in the Hebrew Bible and examines the idea of divine anger as a way of obviating the need for human vengeance. He also asks whether anger is an entirely negative force in the first place.

Contrasting views are offered by writers and theologians from Stephen Crane to Miroslav Wolf, and musical argument is provided by artists ranging from Mendelssohn and Britten to Yossele Rosenblatt and the Delmore Brothers.

The readers are David Holt, Adjoa Andoh and Francis Cadder.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0505l2z)
Biocontrols - Using Bugs to Deal with Plant Problems

In Kenya Louise Labuschagne develops bugs rather than pesticides to deal with plant problems. Anna Hill meets her in Rutland to discuss the pros and cons of biocontrols with two local farmers, Andrew Brown and Robert Symington.

Louise made her mark recently at the Oxford Farming Conference when she intervened in a disagreement between environmental campaigner George Monbiot and David Caffall, head of the trade organisation that represents pesticide manufacturers, the Agricultural Industries Confederation. She tells Anna how and why she thinks that pesticide use can be reduced with the judicious use of biocontrols, but that they're far from being mutually exclusive.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b05053kn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b05053kq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0505l31)
Free Schools, Women Bishops Row and Boko Haram

William Crawley looks at the religious power and influence behind the throne as Saudi Arabia mourns the death of King Abdullah.

How can the Church of England stop the slow decline in the number of people attending services? It's an issue that will be discussed in depth at next month's meeting of the General Synod. Bob Walker reports.

We'll hear the remarkable spiritual journey of Slovakian Jewish Holocaust survivor - Miriam Freedman - who went on to become a teacher of yoga in London and then a follower of Sufism.

The Catholic Archdiocese of St Paul in Minneapolis has filed for bankruptcy protection saying it's the best way for the church to get as many resources as possible to victims of clergy sexual abuse. Madeleine Baran talks to William about this unprecedented move.

This week, a Christian Free School in Durham became the third free school to be closed by the government. Twenty-four hours later another Christian free school in Sunderland was put into special measures. Trevor Barnes looks at the situation now and asks whether these examples point to wider issues in religious free schools?

The Catholic Archbishop of Jos, Ignatius Kaigama calls for military intervention from the west to curb attacks by Boko Haram.

On Monday Libby Lane will be consecrated, becoming the first female Bishop in the C of E. The Archbishop of York will lay hands on Rev Libby Lane when she becomes Bishop of Stockport on Monday, but will not do the same when Rev Philip North becomes Bishop of Burnley. Ruth Gledhill explains the new measures.

Contributors
Miriam Freedman
Madeleine Baran
Archbishop of Jos, Ignatius Kaigama
Ruth Gledhill

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Peter Everett

Editor
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b0505l33)
Motor Neurone Disease Association

Charlotte Hawkins presents the Radio 4 Appeal for Motor Neurone Disease Association
Registered Charity No 294354
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'MND Association'.
- Cheques should be made payable to Motor Neurone Disease Association.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b05053ks)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b05053kv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0505l35)
Keep the Memory Alive

This week sees the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The choir and pupils of Blue Coat Church of England School & Music College in Coventry, help 'keep the memory alive' as they mark this and other genocides. Given political tensions and outright warfare in various parts of the globe, can we find hope for the future in remembering the past?
Preacher: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Director of Reconciliation Canon David Porter; Leader: The Revd Canon Dr David Stone; Music Director: Philip Formstone; Accompanists: Kerry Beaumont and Paul Leddington-Wright.
The God of Abraham Praise (Leoni); God, as with silent hearts we bring to mind (The Supreme Sacrifice); The Servant Song (Gillard); Adonai Ro'i Lo Echsar (Cohen); I asked the Lord (arr. Formstone); Go down, Moses (Trad arr. L'Estrange); Si njay njay njay (Zulu trad arr. L'Estrange).


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04yk3w3)
The Power of Art

AL Kennedy reflects on the importance of the beauty and creativity of art to sustain the human spirit.

"Art is a power and most of its true power is invisible, private, memorised and held even in prison cells and on forced marches, so you can see why totalitarians of all kinds dislike it."

Producer: Sheila Cook
Editor: Richard Knight.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0skg)
Horned Screamer

Michael Palin presents the Venezuelan horned screamer. Soundling as if someone is using a giant plunger in the Venezuelan marshes, these are the mating calls of the Horned Screamer. They're sounds that only another Horned Screamer could love, but then screamers are very odd birds. Over the years ornithologists have struggled to classify them, modern thinking puts their closest living relatives as the primitive Australian Magpie Goose.

Protruding from its head is a long wiry horn made of cartilage, which could rightfully earn it the title of "unicorn of the bird world" Usually seen as pairs or, outside the breeding season in small groups in the marshes and savannas of the northern half of South America, as you'd expect from their name , they are very vocal and these primeval bellows which sound more cow like than bird like and can be heard up to 3 kilometers away.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0505l37)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0505l39)
There is bad news for Ed and a horrible shock for Lilian.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0505l3c)
Professor Peter Piot

Kirsty Young's castaway is the Director of London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Professor Peter Piot.

As a microbiologist he is known for his research into viruses and into the public health aspects of sexually transmitted diseases, and, more recently, on the politics of AIDS and global health. Born in Leuven in Belgium, he studied medicine and in 1976, as a young researcher at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, he was sent a blood sample of a Belgian nun living in what was then Zaire who had fallen ill with a mysterious disease. On investigation, Piot and his colleagues realised it was a virus they'd not seen before which they went on to identify as Ebola. He then travelled to Zaire to help quell the outbreak.

Later, back in Antwerp, he developed an interest in sexually transmitted diseases and joined the World Health Organisation's Global Programme on HIV/AIDS in 1992. Appointed as Executive Director of the newly created Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS in late 1994 his major successes were putting AIDS on the political agenda and achieving a reduction in the price of antiretroviral drugs.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b05053kx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b05061zg)
Series 14

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Ed Byrne, Holly Walsh, Richard Osman and Henning Wehn are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Ancient Egypt, ice, rubbish and British food.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0505l3f)
The Secret Formula

With one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in Europe, many parents in the UK feed their babies formula milk. But what's actually in it?

Sheila Dillon discovers why it's an industry steeped in science and secrecy as well as controversy.

Journalist Ella McSweeney reports from a lab to explain how its made and why formula is at the heart of Ireland's ambition to become a powerful global food player.

Producer: Ruth Sanderson.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b05053kz)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0505l3h)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Secretaries of Juliet (b04xnczn)
Every year, 10,000 lovelorn people write to Juliet, Shakespeare's great romantic heroine. Some leave their letters in a postbox at the "House of Juliet", a museum in Verona. Others simply address them to "Juliet, Verona, Italy". Someone has to answer those letters, and the task falls to a committee of a dozen local women who style themselves "The Secretaries of Juliet".

Some of the letters celebrate love, but most of them are sad. The Secretaries, all of them volunteers, try to answer all letters, even those that are not written in Italian or English. Sometimes there is a backlog while they hunt for a local speaker of, say Russian. Despite the unremitting sadness of the letters (and in some cases their own personal experiences), all the Secretaries are incurable romantics by disposition.

Jolyon Jenkins travels to Verona to meet the Secretaries, and finds himself unexpectedly co-opted as a temporary secretary. How to answer the American woman facing marriage and asking how to be a submissive wife? What about the 15 year old girl needing to choose between her dull but safe boyfriend and the "bad boy who offers rampant lust"? Are the correspondents really looking for advice or do they just want empathy and reassurance?

Producer/presenter: Jolyon Jenkins.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04yjzvy)
Arundel Castle

Eric Robson chairs the programme from Arundel Castle, West Sussex. Taking questions in the Barons' Hall are Matt Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank.

Anne takes a tour of The Collector Earl's Garden with Arundel's Head Gardener Martin Duncan while Eric has a look around the castle built to last for a thousand years...

Produced by Howard Shannon.

Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0505l3k)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces couples who have dealt with serious head injury and with wrongful accusation at work, plus the musician brothers who form the successful band Tinlin in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b0505l3m)
Cloud Howe

Episode 1

Lewis Grassic Gibbon's powerful sequel to Sunset Song dramatised by Donna Franceschild.

Atmospheric drama about Grassic Gibbon's best-loved character, Chris.

Now married to Robert, a young and idealistic minister, Chris and her family move from the crofting village of Kinraddie to the mill town of Segget in Aberdeenshire. Living in the wake of the Great War and during the build up to the General Strike, they find themselves instrumental in the small town's epic class struggle.

Starring Amy Manson and Robin Laing.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0505t2p)
David Lodge on his memoir Quite a Good Time to Be Born

David Lodge is a novelist, critic and academic and now - as he approaches his 80th birthday -he's publishing his first memoir, Quite A Good Time To Be Born. He talks to Mariella about his Catholic faith, his long marriage and how his life and novels - which include Changing Places, How Far Can You Go? and The British Museum is Falling Down - have overlapped.

Stewart Bain of Orkney Library reveals to Mariella how their twitter feed became a social media sensation.

Ted Hogkinson from the British Council is just back from Amman in Jordan and reports on the literary scene and why Petra is inspiring a new generation of writers. And an editor looks beyond her own books pile to recommend a title from another publisher.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0505t2r)
A Burns Supper

Roger McGough celebrates the poet Robert Burns by hosting a Poetry Please Burns supper, with favourites including John Anderson my Jo, To a Mouse and A Man's a Man for A' That, read by John MacKay. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b04yk7h6)
Benefit Sanctions

Benefit sanctions are supposed to be part of a system helping people back to work. But critics say they penalise the vulnerable and are among the reasons for the growing use of food banks. So how fair is the Government's system of withholding state payments for those who don't comply with welfare rules? Allan Urry hears from whistleblowers who allege some JobCentrePlus staff are setting claimants up to fail in order to meet internal performance targets. Why did a recovering amputee lose his benefits because he didn't answer the phone?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Nicola Dowling.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b0501kvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b05053l1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b05053l3)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05053l5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0505t2t)
This week we discover that Ewan MacColl and Robert Burns share a birthday, and find out the various ways people have of commemorating their dead; from Churchill's simple grave in Bladon, to the oak tree planted for MacColl in Russell Square. We investigate the secret life of sperm donors - and of Robert Burns - and explore what happens to secrets when they explode. Plus more to celebrate with Ivor Cutler, Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington and Karinne Polwort. But watch out, parents, when you have parties for your five-year-olds...


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0505t2w)
Jolene's pleased that Burns Night at the Bull is more popular than she expected.

Lilian has thought about Kenton's offer and says she's happy to sell her shares of the pub. Kenton's delighted but Jolene hopes Lilian's absolutely sure it's what she wants. Lilian just wants it all settled and Kenton's equally keen to press David about the sale of Brookfield.

With Adam dressed in tartan and Charlie sporting a kilt, the two men have a proper, honest chat about what happened on New Year's Eve. Adam's keen not to give their kiss more importance than it warrants and Charlie seems to agree. Charlie hopes Adam knows that they can still be friends.

Eddie reflects that David won't be here to see the next Burns Night. David updates Eddie on the move plans. It'll be expensive just moving the cows

Lilian reveals to Jolene that Matt has left her. He has also cleaned out the bank accounts and taken whatever wasn't nailed down. Lilian didn't say anything in the hope that he was coming back. But now Lilian feels sure she won't see Matt again.


SUN 19:15 Gloomsbury (b01mx2sp)
Series 1

The Trials of Attempting an Elopement

A stellar cast of Miriam Margolyes, Alison Steadman, Nigel Planer, Morwenna Banks, Jonathan Coy and John Sessions breathes life into the colourfully chaotic characters of Gloomsbury, a riotous comedy about the Bloomsbury Group.

The six-part series from the pen of Sue Limb is an affectionate send up of the infamous literary group whose arty and adulterous adventures dominated the cultural scene in the early 20th century.

The series follows the fortunes of Vera Sackcloth-Vest (Margolyes) - writer, gardener and transvestite - and her urge to escape from the tranquillity of her rather cramped little castle in Kent which she shares with her doting but ambiguous husband Henry (Coy), who is 'something in the Foreign Office'. Vera's heart is forever surging with exotic passion for Ginny Fox (Steadman), a highly-strung novelist who adores her, or the beautiful but shallow Venus Traduces (Banks).

As the scene shifts from Kent to London, and Cornwall to Monaco, this close-knit coterie is divided by misunderstandings, jealousies and rows.

In episode one, Vera longs to elope to Mediterranean sunshine with one of her bosom chums. But her first choice, Ginny, is stubbornly impervious to adventure and Venus Traduces is fully booked for elopements until next April. Will Vera run off instead with the perky waitress at Lyons' Corner house? Meanwhile, what is Vera's husband Henry up to as telegrams fly between him and Archie Pinkerton-Poker at the Foreign Office?

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Subway (b0505t2y)
In Praise of Radical Fish

A multi-contributor series of specially-commissioned stories with subterranean settings.

Episode 3 (of 3): In Praise Of Radical Fish by Alison MacLeod
Believing themselves to be bound for Syria, three not-very radical young men prepare on Brighton beach.

Alison MacLeod lives in Brighton. She was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award in 2011 and her story 'Solo, A Capella', about the Tottenham riots, featured in the Radio 4 series Where Were You ... in 2012. Her previous works include The Changeling and The Wave Theory of Angels. Her novel Unexploded was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize and was a Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4. Alison is Professor of Contemporary Fiction at the University of Chichester.

Read by Amir El-Masry

Produced by Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b04yk0jf)
Is Anti-Semitism Widespread in the UK?

Are 95% of hate crimes in the UK directed against Jewish people? Tim Harford and Ruth Alexander fact-check an unlikely statistic. Meanwhile the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism (CAA) says surveys show that almost half of adults believe at least one anti-Semitic statement shown them to be true and that half of British Jews believe Jews may have no long-term future in the UK. But how robust are these findings? More or Less speaks to Gideon Falter, chairman of the CAA and Jonathan Boyd, executive director of the Institute for Jewish Policy Research.

Who is in the global 1% of wealthiest people, and where do they live?

More than 200 of the MPS voting on the 2012 NHS reform have recent or current financial connections to private healthcare, a recent editorial in the British Medical Journal claimed. Richard Vadon and Keith Moore explain why it's not true.

Sixty bodies in 6 years - is a serial killer stalking the canals of Great Manchester? Hannah Moore investigates a theory first raised by the Star on Sunday's crime editor Scott Hesketh.

Plus the programme hears from Professor Carlos Vilalta from the University of California San Diego and Steven Dudley from Insight Crime about claims that "98% of homicides in Mexico are unsolved." A shocking statistic, but is it true?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04yk0jc)
Lord Brittan, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, Professor John Bayley, Anne Kirkbride

Matthew Bannister on

The former Tory Home Secretary Lord Brittan. As Leon Brittan, he also served as Secretary of State for Trade and Industry and as a European Commissioner.

Also: King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. He was the thirteenth of at least forty-five sons of the founder of modern Saudi Arabia and seen as a cautious reformer.

John Bayley, the eccentric Oxford don whose memoir of his life with the novelist Iris Murdoch was made into a film.

And Anne Kirkbride the actress who played Deirdre in Coronation Street for more than forty years.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0501jp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0505l33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b04ykk5q)
Ttip: The world's biggest trade deal

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or Ttip, is currently being negotiated between the US and the EU. It is the world's biggest trade deal and highly controversial. Peter Day asks how it may effect what we eat, how we work and the strength of our democracy. Will it provide a beneficial boost for business or allow big corporations to side-step important regulation?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0505t30)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b0505t32)
Olly Duff of the i paper analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 TED Radio Hour (b0505t34)
Series 1

Transformation

A journey through fascinating ideas based on talks by riveting speakers on the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) stage.

Guy Raz investigates if we are the sum of our experiences, or can we choose our own path? With Zak Ebrahim.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b04yk3w3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 26 JANUARY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b05053m3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b04ykd77)
Tribute to Ulrich Beck (1944 - 2015) - Dissident Irish Republicanism

Dissident Irish Republicanism - Laurie Taylor talks to John Morrison, Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of East London, about his in depth study into the recent intensification of rogue paramilitary activity, Can the upsurge in dissident Republican violence be explained by the history of splits within the Movement? He charts the rise of groups including the Real IRA, Continuity IRA and the newly emerging 'New IRA.' He's joined by Henry Mcdonald, Belfast correspondent at the Observer newspaper.

Ulrich Beck - Angela McRobbie, Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London, gives a tribute to the eminent German sociologist who died earlier this month. What do his ideas about the 'risk society' tell us about current concerns relating to global terrorism?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0505l2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05053m5)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05053m7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05053m9)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b05053mc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b051dr80)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0505zvn)
Fracking, Milk

Fracking should be put on hold in the UK - that's the conclusion of an all-party committee of MPs, which says fracking for shale gas has the potential to pose significant risks to water and air quality, and to public health. It adds that it won't help meet climate change emission targets, as although cleaner than coal it is still a fossil fuel.
The Environmental Audit Committee also wants fracking banned outright in National parks, areas of outstanding natural beauty, sites of special scientific interest and ancient woodland.
And we look at the dairy industry - how milk is priced, and what consumers can do if they want to support dairy farmers.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.


MON 05:56 Weather (b05053mf)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sxg)
Red-Eyed Vireo

Michael Palin presents the red-eyed vireo from North America. About the size of British great tits the red-eyed vireo is a common summer visitors to much of North America where they breed in woodlands. The adult vireos are mainly olive green with white bellies and grey heads and their red eyes are highlighted by a white eyestripe. Seeing the birds as they hunt insects among the leaves is much harder than hearing them, because red-vireos are tireless songsters. They used to be known locally as "preacher birds " and territorial males hold the record for the largest repertoire produced by a songbird in a single day.

Each vireo can have a repertoire of between a dozen and over a hundred different song-types. And while these marathon "question- and- answer" sessions are the soundtrack to many North American woods, they aren't universally appreciated. The nature writer Bradford Torrey wrote in 1889 that "whoever dubbed this vireo the preacher could have had no very exalted opinion of the clergy"

Producer Andrew Dawes.


MON 06:00 Today (b0505zvz)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0505zw1)
Organising the Mind

Tom Sutcliffe is joined in the studio by Daniel Levitin, author of New York Times bestseller 'The Organized Mind'. Levitin dismisses the idea of multi-tasking and explores how we can counter information overload. But the poet Frances Leviston with her latest collection, Disinformation, believes her best work is conceived in disorganisation. The cognitive scientist Maggie Boden puts forward the idea that computers can be highly creative, and the conductor Ian Page celebrates the genius of Mozart who wrote his first symphony in London at the age of eight.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b0505zw3)
Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible

Episode 1

In the early 2000s, Peter Pomerantsev (Kiev-born, raised in England; the son of Russian political exiles) came to Moscow to work in the fast-growing TV and film industry. The job gave him first hand access to every nook and corrupt cranny of the country. He was perfectly placed to witness the transformation of the New Russia on its journey from communist collapse to a new form of dictatorship.

In a series of character studies, the subjects of Pomerantsev's reality TV documentaries, we glimpse the ways in which the Russian people have responded to and acted upon the opportunities (as well as terrible injustices) of Putin's new world order.

Including, Oliona, professionally trained 'gold digger', escaping a bleak upbringing in Siberia; Vitaly, gangster-turned-filmmaker who studied his favourite American mafia movies and then made his auto theft crimes the subject of a hit six-part drama series; and, Mozhayev, an architectural and urban historian who fights in vain to save what remains of the buildings of the Moscow that existed before the Soviet experiment.

Written by Peter Pomerantsev.

Read by Justin Salinger.

Abridged by Robin Brooks.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.
.
First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0505zw5)
Knitting and coding; Women's rights in Saudi Arabia; Forced marriage

Jane Garvey asks whether there will be changes for Saudi women with a new ruler in place. We find out what knitting and computers have in common. Over 20% of UK adults in their forties will age without children; Adults without Children are holding their first conference to look at the implications for the future. Panorama this week follows the High Commission team in Pakistan as they help British citizens sent there to be married against their will; Jane speak to Aneeta Prem, founder of the charity Freedom; We hear about the suffragette Katie Gliddon who spent time in Holloway Prison.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 Tinsel Girl (b0505zw7)
Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip

Episode 1

Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip by Lou Ramsden

Episode One

Nicknamed Tinsel Girl by her best-friend Lisa because of her sparkly view of life, wheelchair user Maz is one of life's eternal optimists. But when Lisa asks Maz to be her maid of honour, the next month, in the Seychelles, even Maz is a little put out. She is broke, unemployed and has never travelled abroad with her wheelchair. Maz has to decide whether this is a challenge she is able to take on.

Maz .... Cherylee Houston
Rachel .... Kathryn Pemberton
Jim .... James Quinn
Lisa .... Rosina Carbone
Didier .... Quentin Surtel
Photographer .... Hamilton Berstock

Written by Lou Ramsden
Produced by Charlotte Riches

The drama is inspired by the adventures and experiences of Cherylee Houston.


MON 11:00 Out of the Ordinary (b0505zw9)
Series 3

Esperanto

Jolyon Jenkins explores Esperanto, the language designed to bring world peace and harmony.

Invented in the late 19th century, Esperanto is simple to learn, with a logical grammar, a vocabulary drawn from European languages, and no irregularities. Its creator, Ludovic Zamenhof, hoped that it would become a second language that everyone could speak, eliminating international misunderstandings. For a while, Esperanto flourished, and there was even a tiny Esperanto-speaking state in what is now Belgium, but both Stalin and Hitler saw it as subversive and tried to crush it.

Jolyon tries to learn the language and to discover what remains of those early ideals. He finds elderly Esperantists playing word games in a Cardiff pub, Brazilian spiritists who believe that Esperanto is the language in which the dead converse, and a small Esperanto-speaking enclave in Goma, in the war-torn eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (some of whom learned it under the misapprehension that Esperanto was an organisation that handed out money). Is Esperanto a blindingly obvious and sensible idea, or a ludicrously utopian one?

Presenter/producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 11:30 The Best Laid Plans (b0505zwc)
Caution: Angel At Work

Smallbone gets a job in a supermarket and tries his hand at customer service.

But when a fully automated, super-brain self-service checkout system threatens the workers' jobs, Smallbone finds himself leading the protest against the store.

Ardal O'Hanlon plays Smallbone - an idiot angel who's sent to earth to fix his mistakes - in Mark Daydy's sitcom.

In 1885, God (Geoff McGivern) nodded off. In 2015, he awoke to discover that his idiot servant, the angel Smallbone, had accidentally handed out God's plans for the next millennium when he was only meant to hand out plans for the next century. A thousand years of leisurely human progression has been crammed into the last 130. No wonder we're all so stressed. We weren't even meant to have pocket calculators until 2550.

Not only that, but God's blueprints should have run out in the mid-eighties – but we kept going. Humans are now inventing things God never even dreamed of - mobile phones, wireless internet and Made in Chelsea.

Smallbone is cast down to Earth in human form by God, tasked with the dauntingly vague mission of 'reversing the last thirteen decades of human progression'. The problem is that Smallbone is the world's biggest fan - he loves modern technology and his new human body, and he becomes distracted by everything that he's meant to destroy. Especially escalators.

Smallbone.......Ardal O'Hanlon
God.................Geoff McGivern
Tanya..............Esther Smith
Toby................Mike Wozniak
Susan..............Ruth Bratt
Supporting Roles: Duncan Wisbey and Ruth Bratt

Written by Mark Daydy

Produced by Ben Worsfield.
A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b05053mh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 A History of Ideas (b0505zwf)
How Has Technology Changed Us?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking how has technology changed us?

Helping him answer it are Archaeologist Matt Pope, the Surgeon Gabriel Weston, the technologist Tom Chatfield and the historian Justin Champion.

For the rest of the week Matt, Gabriel, Tom and Justin will take us further into the history of ideas about technology with programmes of their own. Between them they will tell us about Plato and the internet, medieval medicine, tool use in human evolution and the origins of Modern Science.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b0505zwh)
Pension Liberation, BHS, Demise of the Casserole?

Savers tempted to re-invest their pensions have found themselves penniless when they discover the great returns they've been offered on investments are nowhere to be seen - and their cash appears to be gone. The Head of the industry's efforts to combat this kind of fraud say they need legal powers to protect people from making life-changing mistakes.

And according to the body which markets English lamb and beef we've fallen out of love with the old-fashioned casserole. It's being cooked increasingly by the older generation but younger cooks are interested in quicker results - we talk about their research and chef Dean Edwards will give us some ideas to re-energise your slow cooking.

We've a report from Samantha Fenwick with the latest in our series on the cost of living, and she also takes a look at the future of BHS.

Radio 4 is taking a look at knitting today, and we visit one firm which rode the resurgence in crafts which stemmed from recession, with the founder of the Baa Ram Ewe wool shop in Leeds.

And - is mortgage porting the latest big problem for the banks? We speak to more customers who thought they could easily move their mortgage - but they're not quite as portable as they thought...


MON 12:57 Weather (b05053mk)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0505zwk)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


MON 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zlcpw)
Cinema

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill was a film fanatic and sought an active role in the movie business. He became friends with Charlie Chaplin and collaborated as a screenwriter in the 1930s with the great Hungarian-born director Alexander Korda. A scene set in the trenches of World War One from Churchill's screenplay - never made into a film - is dramatised here for the first time, as Sir David Cannadine explores Winston Churchill's love affair with cinema and his growing awareness of the power of the moving image. Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0505t2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0505zwn)
Series 2

Episode 6

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 6:
Jack gets paranoid as Brian and the firm plot against him over a robbery they have planned.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b0505zwq)
Heat 5, 2015

(5/17)
Which singer was fatally shot by his father on the first of April 1984? And in the name of the West African terror group, what do the words 'Boko haram' actually mean?

Russell Davies puts these and many other questions to the participants in the fifth heat of the 2015 series, which comes from the University of Salford. The winner will go through to the semi-finals in April - and others may too, as there are places for the highest-scoring runners-up across the series.

As always there's a chance for a listener to 'Beat the Brains' by suggesting a devious pair of questions with which to try and defeat the combined brainpower of the contestants.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0505l3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b05061z8)
Sanjeev Bhaskar

Sanjeev Bhaskar, star of Goodness Gracious Me, presents his favourite pieces of writing and comedy to the audience at the Radio Theatre. His readers are Adrian Lester and Claire Benedict. Sanjeev's picks include Monty Python, Alan Alda, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and a stirring speech by Frederick Douglass, who after escaping from slavery became a leader of the abolitionist movement.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b05061zb)
Series 11

Fierce Creatures

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by naturalist Steve Backshall, zoologist Lucy Cooke and comedian Andy Hamilton as they battle it out to decide which creature wins the title of earth's most deadly. The panel reveal their own brave encounters with a host of venomous, toxic and just downright aggressive beasts, including the bullet ant, rated the most painful stinging insect on the planet, deadly tree frogs and snakes, sharks, scorpions and hippos. They ask whether our seemingly innate fear of snakes and spiders is justified, and whether the deadliest creature on the planet is in fact a human being.


MON 17:00 PM (b05061zd)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05053mm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b04yfssy)
Series 14

Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Lloyd Langford, Josh Widdicombe, Susan Calman and David O'Doherty are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as fakes, holes, cats and Marie Antoinette.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith.
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b050621v)
Emma tries to encourage Ed that he's made the right decision in selling four of his cows. He's worried about money for the wedding. Emma reminds Ed that they're a partnership and need to be open and honest with each other - any future plans need to be made together.

Jolene's horrified by Matt's heartless text telling Lilian he's in Costa Rica and not coming back. Lilian realizes she was deluding herself and breaks down in sobs. She thought he loved her.

Kenton twigs why poor Lilian was so keen to sell her share of the Bull quickly. He's determined to pin David down about the Brookfield sale date.

Helen tells Ian about the recent problems at the shop. Helen's still unsure about whether to go back to work. They make a pact to dance together at the Valentine's Day dance. Helen's keen to know that things are ok between Ian and Adam. She's delighted to learn that they have decided to get 'properly' married.

Emma updates Helen on wedding plans - Fallon has found some vintage dress material. They joke about Bert and Joe's rivalry over dancing with Carol. Helen admits she has been feeling down - she has so much to sort out.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b050674t)
Kingsman: The Secret Service; Puppeteer Basil Twist; Album Auctions

Samira Ahmed talks to director Matthew Vaughn and Kick Ass writer Mark Millar about Kingsman: The Secret Service, which stars Colin Firth as a spy mentoring a new recruit.

Puppeteer Basil Twist, who worked on Kate Bush's recent concerts, on reviving the Japanese tradition of moving screens, called Dogugaeshi.

As figures reveal the extent of BP's sponsorship of Tate Galleries, Samira discusses the relationship between arts organisations and big business.

And as two bands - Wu Tang Clan and Sexual Objects - auction their new album as a single copy, Samira talks to Sexual Objects front man Davy Henderson and Forbes Magazine editor Zack O'Malley Greenburg.


MON 19:45 Tinsel Girl (b0505zw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Inside the Unit - Treating Disorder (b050674w)
Writer Carole Hayman spends time locked in a secure unit for men detained under the Mental Health Act. She's in the company of avuncular Irish psychiatrist Dr. Ray Travers, whose job it is to see if the convicted patients under his care can be reintegrated into the community.

But it's not just the day-to-day workings of the unit she explores, Carole also tries to get under the skin of the man in charge. What drives him and how does he maintain his own mental wellbeing? How does he reconcile what he is aiming to achieve for his patients with what they did to their victims.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b050674y)
Maskirovka: Deception Russian-Style

'Maskirovka' is the Russian military strategy of deception, involving techniques to surprise and deceive the enemy. Lucy Ash looks back over its long history from repelling invading Mongols in the 14th Century, to its use to confound the Nazis in World War II, to the current conflict in Ukraine. Translated literally maskirovka means "a little masquerade", but it also points to strategic, operational, physical and tactical duplicity. When heavily-armed, mask-wearing gunmen - labelled the 'little green men' - took over government buildings in Crimea last year, was this a classic example of maskirovka in the 21st century? All nations use deception as a strategy in war, but Analysis asks whether any other nation has pursued guile as an instrument of policy so long and so ardently as Russia.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04yftkz)
Natural Symbols

In the final programme of the series a panel of experts from different disciplines choose an object they feel represents our relationship with nature. Recorded in the Natural History Museum in London in front of an audience Monty Don explores how our connection to nature has changed through time and what we may need to do to ensure we live on a vibrant planet in the future. The four guests from different areas of expertise from archaeology to conservation science to oceanography choose one thing that tells a big story. Monty Don explores how each object shows how our view of nature has changed since our time as hunter gatherers. Over the thousands of years we have lived on earth we have become increasingly divorced from the nitty gritty of the natural world. Where are we heading and what do we need to do to enable all of life to share this one planet? As population increases and stress on resources gets more intense there has never been a more important time to assess our impact on planet earth.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0505zw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0506750)
New Greek government sworn in

Germany rules out writing off some of Greece's debts - and warned Athens that it must honour its commitments to its international creditors


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0506752)
The Bottle Imp

Episode 1

"All my fortune, and this house itself and its garden, came out of a bottle not much bigger than a pint."

The promise of wealth beyond imagining and his every wish granted tempts a young Hawaiian sailor to purchase an enchanted bottle. There's just one catch; if the owner should die before selling it on, his soul will burn in hell forever. Keawe reasons that the bottle should be easy enough to pass on once he has gained his heart's desire - but it must be sold at a loss, and the price drops with every trade...

Robert Louis Stevenson travelled the Pacific from 1888, finally settling in Samoa in 1890 where he lived until his death in 1894. Inspired by his travels he took the Samoan name Tusitala - Teller of Tales. "The Bottle Imp" first appeared in the short story collection "Island Nights Entertainment" (1893) and is a hugely engaging tale of greed, consequences and the redeeming power of love.

Read by Ian McDiarmid

Written by Robert Louis Stevenson

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b04yk47x)
Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status. With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0506754)
A bid to suspend fracking until more research has been done into the environmental impact fails in the Commons.
But ministers agree to an outright ban on fracking in national parks and accepts Labour calls for tougher regulation.
A group of peers press for a change in the law to allow the storing of internet and phone data to help reduce the chances of a terrorist attack in Britain.
MPs hear from the lawyer for the troubled official inquiry into child sex abuse.
And the Government defends the introduction of Universal Credit.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 27 JANUARY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b05053nr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b0505zw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05053nt)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05053nw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05053ny)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b05053p0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b051j931)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0506855)
European Milk, Scottish land, rural Anglicans

The farming minister George Eustice talks to Anna Hill from the EU Council of ministers in Brussels as they meet to discuss plummeting dairy prices and the end of EU quotas in April. Meanwhile, Sally Challoner meets a dairy farmer who wants to relabel and rebrand his milk as free range, so as to raise the value of his product. 40% of Anglican Churches are in the countryside, and the Church of England's National rural officer, Canon Dr Jill Hopkinson says more needs to be done to preserve them as hubs of the community. As Scotland gears up for more political devolution, the debate about how, and why land should be used comes to the fore. The Scottish land reform bill is a hot topic as it wants to loosen up the tight hold that a few landowners had on a vast amount of Scotland's land as BBC Scotland reporter Andrew Black explains. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0syn)
Poorwill (American Nightjar)

Michael Palin presents the common poorwill from an Arizona desert. In the dead of night, loud calls pierce the stillness on a moonlit track, a small shape suddenly sprouts wings and flutters into the darkness ... a Common Poorwill is hunting.

Poorwills are small nightjars that breed mainly in western North America, often in deserts and dry grassland. By day the poorwill sits in the open or among rocks relying on its mottled plumage for camouflage. By night, it emerges to hawk after insects snapping them up with its large frog-like mouth.
This technique works if it's warm enough for insects to be active, but in some places where poorwills live there are sudden cold snaps. Instead of migrating, the poorwill slows down its metabolism and goes into torpor for days or even weeks . This hibernation-like state is very rare among birds and allows the poorwill to get through lean periods and was first scientifically described in 1948, although the phenomenon had been recorded more than 140 years earlier by the great explorer Meriwether Lewis, during the Lewis and Clark Expedition to discover western side of America in 1804.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0506857)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 Can Democracy Work? (b0506859)
Episode 3

As it celebrates its 750th birthday, BBC Political Editor Nick Robinson asks if Parliament itself might be the obstacle to improving our democracy. Now that the internet and social media are revolutionising the way that information is used, should our politics adopt new ways of engaging support in order to remain relevant?

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b05068jp)
Adrian Goldberg on Mixed Marriage

Broadcaster Adrian Goldberg, who is married to a British Asian woman, explores the topic of mixed marriage for One to One. Today, in the third and final of his interviews, he meets Mandy. Mandy is of Sikh/Hindu heritage and had to deal with the rejection by most of her family when she refused to contemplate the idea of an arranged marriage. She went on to meet and marry an Afro-Caribbean man; something which has brought her happiness, although it hasn't been the smoothest of journeys.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b05077k4)
Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible

Episode 2

In the early 2000s, Peter Pomerantsev (the son of Russian political exiles) came to Moscow to work in the fast-growing television industry. He was perfectly placed to witness the transformation of the New Russia on its journey from communist collapse to a new form of dictatorship.

In a series of character studies, the subjects of Pomerantsev's reality TV documentaries, we glimpse the ways in which the Russian people have responded to and acted upon the opportunities of Putin's new world order. In this episode we meet Vitaly, the gangster-turned-filmmaker, who studied his favourite American mafia movies and then turned his auto-theft crimes into the subject of a hit drama series.

Written by Peter Pomerantsev

Read by Justin Salinger

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b05077k6)
Menstruation, Mars and Mathematics

Tennis player Heather Watson recently blamed 'girl things' for her disappointing performance at the Australian Open. We examine the knock on effect of periods and ask how open we are able to be about menstruation.
Jane is joined in the studio by one of the women longlisted to start a colony on Mars, astrophysics student Maggie Lieu.
As her 1974 novel Fathers Come First is reissued, Rosita Sweetman joins Jane to talk about how much things have changed for girls and women in Ireland over the last fifty years. We also hear from girl's football clubs in Kenya and hear the story behind the play Taken At Midnight about the campaign by the mother of German lawyer Hans Litten who was incarcerated for challenging Hitler.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Corinna Jones.


TUE 10:45 Tinsel Girl (b05077k8)
Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip

Episode 2

Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip by Lou Ramsden

Episode 2

With the clock ticking down to Lisa's wedding, Maz begins her mission to try and raise the money for her flight to the Seychelles. It is no easy task, for while the job opportunities are out there, Maz's wheelchair quickly becomes a sticking point.

Written by Lou Ramsden
Produced by Charlotte Riches

The drama is inspired by the adventures and experiences of Cherylee Houston.


TUE 11:00 Anne Frank's Trees: Keeping the Memory Alive (b05077kb)
To commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day, Michael Rosen examines the ways in which Britain remembers the darkest period in modern history.

From Britain's only day-centre catering solely for Holocaust survivors to the narrow attic staircase of Anne Frank's House in Amsterdam, via an art installation in Huddersfield and a primary school in Potters Bar, Michael looks at the many different ways in which we've chosen to commemorate the unimaginable horror of the Holocaust, aided by schoolchildren, campaigners and a 93-year-old survivor of Auschwitz.

Produced by Marc Haynes and Nick Minter
An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:30 Marc Riley's Musical Time Machine (b05077kd)
Series 1

David Bowie and Iggy Pop

The BBC's archive is justifiably and inarguably world-famous, but most of this attention and praise is showered on the riches contained within the Beeb's music archive - the life-changing Peel performances, seminal sessions from Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin and David Bowie.

But these musical marvels risk over-shadowing another archive that's just as diverse, rich and rewarding - the BBC's spoken word, music archive.

As long as there have been pop stars, the BBC has spoken to them. Marc Riley and his trusty Time Machine - a rickety rust-bucket, back-firing jalopy - travel back through the years to visit the great and the good, the famous and the infamous, safely ensconced within the treasure trove of the BBC archive. Marc replays candid snapshots at crucial points in the careers of some of the biggest names in music.

In each episode, Marc lines up the Time Machine to travel to two different points in time and revisit two interviews with something in common - a person or place, a shared influence or ideology, a discovery, a misunderstanding.

In this first episode, the interviews share a geographic connection - Berlin. David Bowie, in conversation with Radio 1's Stuart Grundy from 1977, explains why the city was so good for his creativity. The second interview comes from 1990 when Iggy Pop spoke to Nicky Campbell about how he hooked up with Bowie and offered another perspective on their time together in Germany.

Produced by Ian Callaghan
A Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b05053p2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 A History of Ideas (b05077kg)
Writer Tom Chatfield: Has technology rewired our brains?

Is technology making us less human? Writer, Tom Chatfield is an enthusiastic downloader of the latest apps, an early adopter of anything small and shiny that promises to smooth his path through life. But Tom can't help feeling a little anxious about the hold that new technology has on his life.

Plato felt much the same, concerned that the new- fangled concept of writing might destroy the ability of the Ancient Greeks to memorise vast swathes of human knowledge. Do car sat-navs destroy our innate sense of direction? Do search engines displace our store of general knowledge?

With the help of the Economist's Digital Editor, Tom Standage and cybernetics expert, Kevin Warwick, Tom looks toward a future when the communication and computing power of our smartphones is inserted directly into our nervous systems. With superfast thought processes and a battery of new senses will we feel upgraded or out of control, superhuman or inhuman?


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b05077kj)
Call You and Yours: CCTV

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b05053p4)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b05077kl)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


TUE 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zft89)
Women

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill never knew the names of his secretaries - calling 'get me a miss' when he needed to give dictation. Yet such was his charm that women fell in love with him over the dinner table. How much was he interested in women - or sex? Today, Sir David Cannadine explores Churchill's attitude to women, his relationship with his nanny Mrs. Everest and with the other central woman in his life, his wife Clementine.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b050621v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b05077kn)
Series 2

Episode 7

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 7:
Tory councillor, Margaret Courtney, helps Joey corrupt City officials, while continuing their affair.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0501jlz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b05077kq)
Series 5

Information

The Human Zoo is a place to learn about the one subject that never fails to fascinate - ourselves. Are people led by the head or by the heart? How rational are we? And how do we perceive the world?

There's a curious blend of intriguing experiments to discover our biases and judgements, explorations and examples taken from what's in the news to what we do in the kitchen, and it's all driven by a large slice of curiosity.

Michael Blastland presents. Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick University, is the experimenter-in-chief, and Timandra Harkness the resident reporter.
In this programme, we look at information avoidance and denial: when and how do we resist the facts?

Producer: Dom Byrne

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b05077ks)
Prof Tanya Byron on the language parents use to talk to their children

Psychologist Professor Tanya Byron and Michael Rosen discuss the language parents use to talk to their children. Do parents over-praise, and is it ok to say no? How is the way that parents talk to children changing and what effect might that have? With linguist Dr Laura Wright.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b05077kv)
Series 35

Mervyn King on Risto Ryti

Mervyn King, former Governor of the Bank of England tells Matthew Parris why the life of the Prime Minister of Finland Risto Ryti was so remarkable.
They are also joined by expert and biographer Martti Turtola.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 17:00 PM (b05077kx)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05053p6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b05077kz)
Series 6

Reece Shearsmith

Reece Shearsmith had never had a driving lesson - until now.

Marcus Brigstocke also persuades him to try wallpapering for the first time.

Series which persuades guests to try new experiences: things they really ought to have done by now.

Some experiences are loved, some are loathed, in this show all about embracing the new.

Producer: Bill Dare

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b05077l1)
Jennifer hints to Kate that Phoebe could do with some comforting. Some time with Hayley would help. Kate offers to drive Phoebe to Birmingham to see Hayley. Kate also plans to have Phoebe move into her cottage with her, so that they can really bond over the next year.

Jennifer confronts Kate over Lucas, wanting the truth. Kate insists that Lucas's interfering parents are to blame for Kate being estranged from her children. Brian warns Jennifer that the situation could be more complicated - there are two sides to every story.

Pat's worried that Helen isn't doing enough to sort out the problems at the shop. Tony can't wait to get better and back to work, which Tom and Pat know is unrealistic. They were shocked at Tony's idea to get another bull. Tom reassures Pat that they can rely on him as Tony recovers properly.

Pat feels that Rob has no right to interfere in the management of the shop, which is missing Helen's touch. Helen's so busy. They'll have to do something. How can they persuade Helen to come back?

Lilian finally reveals to Jennifer that Matt has left for good, and pretty much cleaned her out. Suspecting that Matt is with someone else, Lilian feels alone - and that she always will be, without her Tiger.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b05077l3)
Inherent Vice, Dara, Teen Film Tropes, Cotton to Gold

Paul Thomas Anderson's latest film is Inherent Vice, an adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's seventh novel, starring Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon. It describes itself as surf noir. The novelist Lawrence Norfolk joins Samira Ahmed to say whether it captures the style, humour and psychadelic content of the book.

Charlie Lyne, director of Beyond Clueless, a film about the teen films that defined his youth, and Naomi Alderman, critic, author and lover of teen films, discuss the tropes of the classic teen movie and the blend of nostalgia and unease we feel re-watching the films of our own adolescence.

Lead curator Dr Cynthia Johnston discusses Cotton to Gold: Extraordinary Collections of the Industrial North West, a new exhibition that showcases the treasures of several 19th Century Lancashire mill magnates.

Dara is a new play about a ferocious family fight for succession and conflicting visions of Islam. Set in India in 1659, it's the story of two brothers and a sister whose mother's death inspired the Taj Mahal. The writer Shahid Nadeem and adaptor Tanya Ronder talk to Samira.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Sarah Johnson.


TUE 19:45 Tinsel Girl (b05077k8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b05077l5)
Where Have All the Nurses Gone?

Where have all the nurses gone? File on 4 looks at the reasons for the nursing shortage in the NHS in England and the cost of plugging the gaps at a time of peak demand.
A decision four years ago to cut training places to save money is still haunting the health service. There's no shortage of people wanting to be nurses but the NHS is badly understaffed.
Recruitment in countries like Spain, Portugal and Italy has quadrupled in the last year as NHS trusts fail to find enough domestic nurses. But with thousands of European nurses encouraged to come here with incentives like relocation bonuses and free accommodation, why are hospitals still breaking guidelines on the level of acceptable vacancies? And how much has that contributed to the winter crisis in Accident and Emergency Units across the country?
Hospitals aren't the only area of concern. Professional bodies like the RCN say there has been a reduction in the number of experienced senior nurses working in the community. Has the recent focus on increasing nurses on hospital wards meant other areas have suffered? And what impact will that have on the Government's long term plan to solve our hospital crisis by caring for more patients at home?
Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Gemma Newby.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b05077l7)
Simulating Blindness, Blind Darts, 'Be My Eyes' App

A study by Colorado University has shown that simulating blindness may adversely affect sighted people's perception of the visually impaired. Peter White speaks to the study's lead author Arielle Silverman, who is blind, about her findings.

Tony Shearman visits a pub in Grampound, Cornwall, to meet a blind dart's team.

BeMyEyes is a new iPhone app that connects a blind person wanting a little bit of help, with a sighted volunteer. We hear from a user, and the app's inventor, Hans Wiberg.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b05077n8)
Drugs link to dementia, Gluten-free, Heart disease in women, Social jetlag, Boilers on prescription

With widespread reports of a link between dementia and commonly used medicines, Inside Health assesses the risks.

Why women are more likely to die from heart disease than men with cardiologist, Dr Laura Corr.

With more and more people choosing to adopt a gluten free diet, Mark explores the possible health benefits for people who don't have coeliac disease. Is the real problem wheat intolerance, irritable bowel syndrome, or too much hype?

Boilers on prescription: a new idea being investigated by one Clinical Commissioning Group.

And new research that links having a weekend lie-in with an increased risk of obesity-related diseases, like diabetes.


TUE 21:30 Can Democracy Work? (b0506859)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b05053p8)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b05078by)
Cameron drops hint of help for pensioners if re-elected

PM suggests winter fuel payments and free TV licences will still be protected from welfare cuts, if Conservatives win general election.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b05078c0)
The Bottle Imp

Episode 2

The promise of wealth beyond imagining and his every wish granted tempts a young Hawaiian sailor to purchase an enchanted bottle. There's just one catch; if the owner should die before selling it on, his soul will burn in hell forever. Keawe reasons that the bottle should be easy enough to pass on once he has gained his heart's desire - but it must be sold at a loss, and the price drops with every trade...

Witnessing the bottle's sinister power, Keawe is increasingly uneasy and determines to rid himself of it as quickly as possible. But once parted with it, can he avoid the curse of previous owners and remain content with his lot?

Read by Ian McDiarmid

Written by Robert Louis Stevenson

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b05061zb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b05078c2)
The Northern Ireland Secretary admits there could be further cases of people on the run wrongly sent so-called "comfort letters". At Home Affairs Committee, MPs speak to a survivor of Female Genital Mutilation. Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 28 JANUARY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b05053q3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b05077k4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05053q5)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05053q7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05053q9)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b05053qc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b051s5yn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0507lgt)
Scottish Tenant Rights, TB Testing, Welsh Hill Farmers, Vegan Views on the Milk Industry

Radical reform proposals aimed at revitalising tenant farming in Scotland have been announced. Scottish farming minister, Richard Lochhead, explains why.

Also the overhaul of TB testing system in England and Wales. We hear from Simon Hall, the Animal and Plant Health Agency's veterinary director.

And the creation of F4U, Farmers for the Upland, speaking up for upland farmers in Wales.

All this week on Farming Today we hear about the pressures dairy farmers are facing because of declining prices. But there are some groups, who disagree with milk production per se on animal welfare grounds. We hear from The Vegan Society, which supports food production which doesn't involved animals, saying the dairy industry is damaging and we'd be better off without it.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0t02)
Oilbird

Michael Palin presents the oilbird, from a Venezuelan cavern. Demonic screeching's and the rush of unseen wings mixed with a volley of strange clicks are the sound backdrop to oilbirds.

Oilbirds are known in Spanish as guacharos .."the wailing ones". These bizarre-looking brown birds with huge mouths, long broad wings and long tails were seen in 1799 by the explorer Alexander von Humboldt in 1817 who described their sounds as "ear-splitting". They're similar to nightjars, their closest relatives, but unlike them, oilbirds feed on fruit; ..... they're the world's only nocturnal flying fruit-eating bird.

In their dark breeding caves, they navigate using echolocation like bats. Young oilbirds grow fat on a diet of fruit brought in by their parents and can weigh half as much as again as the adults. These plump chicks were once harvested by local people and settlers for oil which was used in cooking and, ironically for a bird which spends its life in darkness, for lighting lamps.


WED 06:00 Today (b0507lgw)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b0507lgy)
Cathy Tyson, Sir Tim Smit, Adam Cohen, Rupert Harry Miller

Libby Purves meets actor Cathy Tyson; Sir Tim Smit, co-founder of the Eden Project; singer and songwriter Adam Cohen and designer Rupert Harry Miller.

Cathy Tyson is a television, film and theatre actor. She plays the title role of Marie Curie in Radiance: The Passion of Marie Curie by Alan Alda. She starred opposite the late Bob Hoskins in the 1986 film Mona Lisa for which she was nominated for a BAFTA and a Golden Globe award. She appeared on television in Band of Gold and Grange Hill and on stage in The Taming of the Shrew and The Merchant of Venice. Radiance: The Passion of Marie Curie is at the Tabard Theatre, London.

Rupert Harry Miller is a designer and author. His autobiography, Life of a Salesman, tells how he honed his salesmanship skills in Eastern Europe in the 1990s. The story of his colourful antics is clouded by the death of Rupert's brother, Julian, who suffered from haemophilia and died after developing Aids from the contaminated blood he received as part of his treatment. Life of a Salesman is published by Spiffing Covers.

Adam Cohen is a Canadian singer and songwriter. His fifth album, We Go Home, was recorded in several locations including the Greek Island of Hydra, where he spent most of his childhood, and Montreal, the city of his birth. Adam is the son of Leonard Cohen, celebrated for songs such as Hallelujah, Bird on the Wire and Suzanne. We Go Home is released on Cooking Vinyl. Adam is touring Europe.

Sir Tim Smit is a Dutch-born British businessman who, with John Nelson, rediscovered and then restored the Lost Gardens of Heligan in Cornwall. The gardens had slipped into decline after the estate's workers had left to fight in the First World War. Sir Tim is also co-founder of the Eden Project, an environmental tourist attraction. The Lost Gardens of Heligan celebrates the 25th anniversary of its rediscovery with a photographic exhibition of The Lost Images and a walk through the garden.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0507lh0)
Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible

Episode 3

In the early 2000s, Peter Pomerantsev (the son of Russian political exiles) came to Moscow to work in the fast-growing television industry. He was perfectly placed to witness the transformation of the New Russia on its journey from communist collapse to a new form of dictatorship.

"Black is white and white is black." Like the subject of an absurdist short story by Gogol, businesswoman Yana Yakovleva finds herself accused of drug trafficking and is falsely imprisoned: an innocent victim of political wrangling near the top of the Kremlin.

Written by Peter Pomerantsev

Read by Justin Salinger

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0507lh2)
Should we brief juries involved in sex cases?

Jill Saward, co-founder of Jurors Understanding Rape Is Essential Standard (JURIES) campaign and Helen Reece, Professor in Law at the LSE, speak to Jenni Murray about whether mandatory briefings of juries on myths about rape and sexual violence at the beginning of trials for sexual offences should be introduced.

Award winning poet and playwright Sabrina Mafhouz performs live and reveals what made her move into the arts away from the more formal world of the civil service, her expanding repertoire of written work and why inspiring others to write and perform their poetry is so important to her.

One in ten of the world's adult population is illiterate - nearly two-thirds are women. One charity attempting to tackle the problem is Room to Read. Their Co Founder Erin Ganju talks about the work they're doing to support and educate girls and help them out of poverty.

Are you a die-hard shredder? For the uninitiated, it's a 20 minute workout, which combines cardio and strength training. The woman behind it is Jillian Michaels an American health and wellness expert - she explains why it's so popular and the principle behind it.


WED 10:40 Tinsel Girl (b0507lh4)
Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip

Episode 3

Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip by Lou Ramsden

Episode 3

Still furiously trying to raise the money to get herself to Lisa's wedding, Maz decides to take handsome temp Ollie up on his offer of a date. It is perhaps not quite the romantic outing he had imagined - 5.30am on a Sunday morning, driving Maz, her wheelchair and a mountain of her household tat to a local car boot sale.

Written by Lou Ramsden
Directed by Charlotte Riches

The drama is inspired by the adventures and experiences of Cherylee Houston.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b0507lh8)
Margaret and Geraldine - A Talk with Mum

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a mother who now speaks through an electronic device and her daughter, about just how precious a chat can be.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Tales from the Ring Road (b0507lhb)
Coventry

Anne-Marie Duff narrates a new documentary series for BBC Radio 4, telling stories of survival and resilience on the UK's ring roads - in towns & cities often overlooked.

The ring road is the circulatory system of the city - a perilous place where life can seem fragile, but one which also bears witness to tales of great resilience and kindness.

In this first episode, Coventry is in the spotlight. Among the stories, the murder of Eritrea-born Genet Kidane who was pushed to her death from a bridge over the ring road. Also, one man's miraculous survival after a head-on collision with a car going the wrong way round the ring road.

As drivers jostle for space in the busy lanes of traffic, the ring road is contested in other ways too. In Coventry a massive development planned just adjacent to the ring road has provoked a fierce debate about the future of the city.

Also in the series, stories from the roads of Wolverhampton and Bedford.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


WED 11:30 Alun Cochrane's Fun House (b01rlnhp)
The Kitchen

Comedian Alun Cochrane has a 25 year mortgage which he can only pay off by being funny. In this series he takes us on a room by room, stand up tour of his house.

He has a fridge that beeps at him when he doesn't move quickly enough and a fire alarm he can't reach. His relationship with his house is a complicated one.

A hoarder of funny and original observations on everyday life, Alun invites us to help him de-clutter his mind and tidy his ideas into one of those bags that you hoover all the air out of and keep under your bed. This show will help Alun and his house work through their relationship issues and prevent a separation that Alun can ill afford; at least not until the market picks up anyway.

Performers: Alun Cochrane and Gavin Osborn

Writers: Alun Cochrane and Andy Wolton

Producer: Carl Cooper.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b05053qf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 A History of Ideas (b0507lhd)
Historian Justin Champion on Francis Bacon

Historian Justin Champion on Francis Bacon's anxieties about the fallibility of technological innovators. The 17th century polymath Francis Bacon blew a fanfare for the new scientific age: where man would dominate, understand and improve the world and use technology to achieve this. Optimistic about man's ingenuity and the potential perfectibility of human society he saw also that men were weak. Nature might have been laid out by God as a kind of book for man to read but individual humans were as likely to be motivated by greed, folly and pride as good intentions. He explored this idea in his book of 1609, The Wisdom of the Ancients, where he used the example of Daedalus, the most ingenious of inventors from Greek Myth to consider the ambiguities of technical progress. Daedalus inventions were truly marvellous but his pride and lack of forethought led to disaster for all around him, not least his son Icarus who perished testing out one his father's extraordinary inventions.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b0507lhg)
Green Deal, Computer Games, Tax Fraud

Tax man issues beware warnings as fraud threat rises ahead of the tax self-assessment deadline this weekend

What's it like to be held in an NHS assessment centre because of the logjam of people waiting to be placed in independent living facilities

The Green Deal is two years old but businesses hoping to benefit say they have lost out.

Computer Games sold over $100 billion worth of product last year: how the industry is developing away from blood and gore.

Campaign group say the promises made to reduce sugar by the food industry have made no difference to cereals- some of which have more.

EDF became the last of the big six energy firms to lower prices but only by 1.3%- so who's got the best deal on the market now?


WED 12:57 Weather (b05053qh)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0507lhl)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


WED 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zlk0h)
Money

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill's finances were never comfortable. Despite being born in a palace, he had to work as a writer to fund his lavish lifestyle and lack of money was a constant source of anxiety. He spent more than he earned for most of his life, gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and was prevented from selling Chartwell by the generous intervention of supporters. Today, Sir David Cannadine explores Churchill's vexed relationship with money.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b05077l1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b0507lhn)
Series 2

Episode 8

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 8:
Brian gets scared of Jack's madness and asks his dad, Joey, to help him escape his influence.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b0507lsb)
The State Pension

State Pension question? To talk to Paul Lewis and guests, call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk

When will you reach state pension age?

Will you fall under the current or the new state pension rules?

What will your state pension be worth?

How many qualifying years will you need to receive a full state pension?

Will your payment be affected by contracting out?

Where do you stand if you don't work while looking after children or have a caring role?

Can you increase the payments by deferring your State Pension?

Whatever your question, our guests will be ready to explain how it works. Joining presenter Paul Lewis will be:

Chris Curry, Director, Pensions Policy Institute.
Malcolm McLean OBE, Senior Consultant, Barnett Waddingham.
Sally West, Policy Manager, Age UK.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b05077n8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0507lsd)
Social Stigma and Negative Labels - Migraine

Migraine: a cultural history. How did a painful and disabling disorder come to be seen as a symptom of femininity? Laurie Taylor talks to Joanna Kempner, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University, about her research into the gendered values which feed into our understanding of pain. Also, 'chavs' and 'pramfaces': Anoop Nayak, Professor in Social and Cultural Geography at Newcastle University, discusses a study into how marginalised young men and women resist the social stigma attached to negative labels. He's joined by Helen Wood, Professor of Media and Communication at the University of Leicester.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0507lsg)
The future of news; Entertainment shows; Page 3 and The Sun

The job of public service journalism is to provide news, not noise according to a new report by the BBC into The Future of News. The report makes the case that in an internet age, the BBC is more necessary and valuable than ever. It says the internet is magnifying problems of information inequality, misinformation, polarisation and disengagement. So how is BBC News going to deliver on its mission to inform in an age beyond broadcasting? Steve hears from the BBC's Director of News, James Harding. He also hears from Emily Bell, Director of The Tow Centre for Digital Journalism, at Columbia University's School of Journalism about the increasing tabloidisation of journalism on the web.

A week ago, the media, reported that The Sun had dropped topless models from Page 3. The paper itself neither confirmed nor denied the claims. Just 2 days after the story first appeared in The Times, Page 3 reappeared in sister paper The Sun. Media commentator Roy Greenslade, and publicist, Mark Borkowski discuss the possible PR strategy of the paper.

TV shows Strictly, X Factor and I'm a Celebrity have been entertaining the nation for over a decade. Why are durable entertainment formats proving so hard to find? Steve hears from Mark Wells, former ITV Controller of Entertainment and now Creative Director of Rain Media Entertainment and Jane Lush, former BBC Controller, Entertainment Commissioning who now runs Kalooki Pictures.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.


WED 17:00 PM (b0507lsj)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05053qk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b0507mbg)
Series 2

A Royal Visit

Mad about the monarchy.

Stephen K Amos's sitcom about growing up black, gay and funny in 1980s south London.

Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.

Stephen K Amos … Stephen K Amos
Young Stephen … Shaquille Ali-Yebuah
Stephanie Amos … Fatou Sohna
Virginia Amos … Ellen Thomas
Vincent Amos … Don Gilet
Miss Bliss … Michelle Butterly
Jayson Jackson … Frankie Wilson
Margaret Cabourn-Smith … Fergie

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0507mbj)
Johnny's dreading getting the results of his Maths and English retakes this week. Even after Tom's help, Johnny doubts he has passed. Tom distracts him with some ploughing work. Tom teaches confident Johnny, who gets to measures a furrow.

Neil arrives and questions Tom's choice of field to move the pigs to. Accepting Tom's reasoning, Neil is still put out that he wasn't consulted.

Neil complains to Susan, who tells him he should have stood his ground. He needs to stop complaining and do something about it.

Ed, Emma and Keira watch as the four cows are taken to be sold at Felpersham Market. They're glad that George (who's with Will) isn't there to witness.

Emma confides In Susan that she's worried about Ed's mood. He keeps calling himself a failure. But Susan knows how hard he works. Like Neil, Ed just needs a bit of a push from Emma, who could learn from her mother.

Ed's pleased to get the expected price for the cows. The hard part now is deciding what to do next. Ed has made an appointment to see a solicitor about dealing with the Estate. Emma offers to postpone the wedding, if it will help things. No way, says Ed. If there's one thing he's sure of, it's that he wants to marry Emma.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0507pmm)
David Oyelowo; Helen Macdonald; Bob Dylan Album; Joanna Marsh

British actor David Oyelowo discusses taking on the role of Martin Luther King Jr in new film Selma and why it took Hollywood so long to make a film about such an important figure; Mark Ellen reviews Bob Dylan's new album of Sinatra covers; Helen Macdonald reflects on winning the Costa Book of the Year Award for H is for Hawk; and Dubai-based composer Joanna Marsh reveals how she looks to the Arabic landscape for inspiration in her compositions.


WED 19:45 Tinsel Girl (b0507lh4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:40 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b0507pmp)
The Law and Rape

Convictions for rape in the UK are described as "shockingly low". Why does the law appear to be failing to protect women? Clive Anderson discusses what needs to be done to improve the situation with the Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders, Assistant Metropolitan Police Commissioner Martin Hewitt and two leading lawyers working in the area.

Solicitor Harriet Wistrich, founder of the campaign group Justice For Women, welcomes moves by the Police and the Crown Prosecution Service to improve the way they deal with rape cases. But she says her experience suggests the message is not always reaching individual prosecutors and police officers.

Barrister and law lecturer Catarina Sjolin worries that the police and the CPS don't have the resources to deal with a huge increase in rape cases, pointing out that it can take two years between a rape being reported and a verdict.

How effective is the new Crown Prosecution Service and Police action plan on rape, which is aimed at increasing convictions? How should the CPS approach 'difficult' cases? And to what extent should the Police and CPS pursue women who falsely claim to have been raped?

Producer name: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b050bk90)
Series 1

Sunni and Shia Islam

In the final episode in the series, David Baddiel tries to understand the difference between Sunni and Shia Islam.

David speaks to senior theologians from both traditions, but can he navigate his way through the complicated theological, political and social distinctions?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Gone to Earth (b048n3fb)
The Fan Dance

Infantry soldiers are trained, challenged and shaped by the Brecon Beacons. Horatio Clare walks with former soldiers to see the Welsh mountains through their eyes.

For decades the Brecon Beacons in South Wales have played an important part in British Army infantry training. Soldiers have walked, crawled, run, taken cover, got cold and wet, cursed and been shaped by the terrain of the Brecon Beacons. Writer Horatio Clare, who grew up in the Beacons, meets former infantry soldiers to explore their unique and lasting relationship with this landscape.

1. The Fan Dance: Horatio sets out to walk the infantry training route known as The Fan Dance, so called because it takes you over Pen y Fan, the highest peak in southern Britain. He's joined in the hills by former Parachute Regiment officers Adam Dawson and Evan Fuery and by Ed Butler who commanded British Forces in Afghanistan in 2006. The three soldiers talk about their deep physical and psychological connection with these upland border landscapes and the fact that, wherever they have served, wherever they're from originally, the Brecon Beacons become 'home'.

Horatio also gets first-hand experience of infantry endurance training and skills from Steve Rees, a former Royal Marine physical training and outdoor pursuits instructor. As he shoulders a 55 pound bergen - the military term for a rucksack - and Steve puts him through his paces, Horatio experiences first-hand a soldier's focused, exhausting, exhilarating intimacy with the landscape. He discovers how to turn it to your advantage and use it as cover; and what you see and know if it as you move invisibly through it, gone to earth.

Producer: Jeremy Grange.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b0507lgy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b050bk93)
New Greek prime minister promises to press ahead with anti-austerity policies

Alexis Tsipras tells first cabinet meeting his priority is to address "humanitarian disaster" in his country.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b050bk95)
The Bottle Imp

Episode 3

Keawe, a young Hawaiian sailor, buys an enchanted bottle that grants its owner's every wish. There's just one catch; if the owner dies before selling it on, his soul will burn in hell forever. Keawe reasons that the bottle should be easy enough to pass on once he has gained his heart's desire - but it must be sold at a loss, and the price drops with every trade...

Witnessing the bottle's sinister power, Keawe is glad to get rid of it and when he becomes engaged to a beautiful and clever woman his happiness is unbounded. But a shocking discovery forces him to reconsider his decision to sell the bottle.

Read by Ian McDiarmid

Written by Robert Louis Stevenson

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 23:00 Roger McGough's Other Half (b050bmfk)
Episode 4

Roger McGough is joined by Helen Atkinson-Wood, Philip Jackson and Richie Webb in a hilarious and surreal new sketch show for BBC Radio 4. With sketches about Fandom, Fatherhood and 17th Century France, you'll hear his familiar voice in a whole new light. Expect merriment and melancholy in equal measures, and a whisker of witty wordplay too. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


WED 23:15 Love in Recovery (b050bmfm)
Series 1

Andy

The lives of five very different recovering alcoholics.

Set entirely at their weekly meetings, we hear them get to know each other, learn to hate each other, argue, moan, laugh, fall apart, fall in love and, most importantly, tell their stories.

Comedy drama by Pete Jackson, set in Alcoholics Anonymous. Starring Sue Johnston, John Hannah, Eddie Marsan, Rebecca Front, Paul Kaye and Julia Deakin.

In this episode, Andy has a date for the first time in....well....longer than he'd like to admit. It's up to the rest of the group to rally round and get him match fit.

Julie ...... Sue Johnston
Marion ...... Julia Deakin
Fiona ...... Rebecca Front
Simon ...... John Hannah
Danno ...... Paul Kaye
Andy ...... Eddie Marsan

There are funny stories, sad stories, stories of small victories and milestones, stories of loss, stories of hope, and stories that you really shouldn't laugh at - but still do. Along with the storyteller.

Writer Pete Jackson is a recovering alcoholic and has spent time with Alcoholics Anonymous. It was there he found, as many people do, support from the unlikeliest group of disparate souls, all banded together due to one common bond. As well as offering the support he needed throughout a difficult time, AA also offered a weekly, sometimes daily, dose of hilarity, upset, heartbreak and friendship.

Director: Ben Worsfield

A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b050bmfp)
The Health Service dominates a busy day in the Commons. Susan Hulme follows the latest robust exchanges between the party leaders at Prime Minister's Questions in the Commons.
Also on the programme:
* An MP speaks out about living conditions in some parts of the privately rented housing sector.
* The Chief Inspector of England's Schools tells MPs standards in state schools are 'mediocre'.
* Frustration over the delays in the reporting of the Chilcot inquiry into the Iraq War spreads to the Lords.



THURSDAY 29 JANUARY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b05053r9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0507lh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05053rc)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05053rf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05053rh)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b05053rk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b051s60x)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b050bcdx)
Fracking, Dairy

The Scottish energy minister Fergus Ewing has announced a moratorium on fracking north of the border. It comes after a move for a UK wide freeze on fracking consents was heavily defeated at Westminster earlier in the week. Mr Ewing said that there would have to be an assessment of environmental regulation, the possible impact of fracking on public health and a full public consultation on 'unconventional oil and gas extraction' before the Scottish government would go ahead with any new licences.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0vb1)
Black Sicklebill

Michael Palin presents the black sicklebill of New Guinea. The black sicklebill is a breath-taking creature. It's a bird of paradise, and the male sicklebill's black feathers gleam with metallic blue, green and purple highlights. But his most striking features are a slender scythe-like bill, and an extremely long sabre-shaped tail whose central plumes can reach 50cm in length.

During courtship, he transforms his pectoral and wing feathers into a huge ruff which almost conceals his head and exposes an iridescent blue patch. Perching on a dead branch, he displays horizontally, looking less like a bird than a small black comet, all the while producing strange rattling cries.

It is thought that the Black sicklebill and its relative the Brown Sickle bill may have spooked the Japanese in the Second World War. Japanese forces had occupied the North coast of (Papua) New Guinea and during their push south to the capital, Port Moresby, had to cross the mountain territories of the sicklebills. It's said that on hearing the birds' courtship displays; they flung themselves to the ground, thinking that they were under fire from the Allies.


THU 06:00 Today (b050bcdz)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b050bcf1)
Thucydides

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. In the fifth century BC Thucydides wrote The History of the Peloponnesian War, an account of a conflict in which he had himself taken part. This work is now seen as one of the first great masterpieces of history writing, a book which influenced writers for centuries afterwards. Thucydides was arguably the first historian to make a conscious attempt to be objective, bringing a rational and impartial approach to his scholarship. Today his work is still widely studied at military colleges and in the field of international relations for the insight it brings to bear on complex political situations.

With:

Paul Cartledge
Emeritus Professor of Greek Culture and AG Leventis Senior Research Fellow at Clare College, Cambridge

Katherine Harloe
Associate Professor in Classics and Intellectual History at the University of Reading

Neville Morley
Professor of Ancient History at the University of Bristol

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b050bcf3)
Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible

Episode 4

In the early 2000s, Peter Pomerantsev came to Moscow to work in the fast-growing television industry. He was perfectly placed to witness the transformation of the New Russia on its journey from communist collapse to a new form of dictatorship.

"Old walls and doors know something we can't understand... the true nature of time." Peter tours the city's hidden courtyards and side streets with Mozayev, a 'guardian spirit' of Old Moscow and self-proclaimed defender of its fast-disappearing historic architecture.

Written by Peter Pomerantsev

Read by Justin Salinger

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b050bcf5)
Sophie Grabol - Sarah Lund in The Killing; Grey Pound Marketing

Jenni Murray speaks to Sofie Grabol, star of Danish detective drama The Killing. Sophie talks about appearing in brand new television crime thriller Fortitude where she plays the governor of a small Arctic town. She talks to Jenni about filming in Iceland, taking on a marathon work load after surviving breast cancer, and whether we might see the return of that famous jumper any time soon.

Joan Didion, Jessica Lange and Yasmina Rossi have all recently signed deals to become the faces of bigs brands. As we are seeing more over 50s faces in advertising, is this a cynical marketing ploy or symptomatic of a change in attitude to age and beauty? Tiff Stevenson, a comedian whose work draws on her fear of ageing and attitudes to older women in society; Tim Pethick, CEO of Saga Publishing and Sandra Howard, former model and fashion journalist discuss.

Academic Lisa McKenzie talks about her new book Getting By about the people who live on St Ann's estate in Nottingham, and being a working class woman with a PhD.

Forgotten Women of Science: Elsie Widdowson. The Science Museum in London is commemorating this with a special exhibition focusing on Churchill's interest in science. Rachel Boon is a curator of the exhibition and has inside knowledge on the women who made their mark in science during World War Two. Elsie Widdowson may not be a household name, but she was a nutritionist who made a huge impact on life at home during the war.

The Women's Justice Minister Simon Hughes says that the number of women being sent to prison needs to be reduced. But how can this be achieved in practice? BBC presenter Rachel Burden spent a day with women at Styal prison in Cheshire.


THU 10:45 Tinsel Girl (b050bcf7)
Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip

Episode 4

Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip by Lou Ramsden

Episode 4

A very nervous Maz arrives at the airport for her first trip abroad as a wheelchair user. Her first stop, however, is the security gate, where she has to smuggle through the cannabis which she relies so heavily upon for pain relief.

Written by Lou Ramsden
Directed by Charlotte Riches

The drama is inspired by the adventures and experiences of Cherylee Houston.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b050bfv7)
A Cosy Dinner in Leipzig

What are they talking about? In Germany there's emotional debate about Pegida; Libyans try to lead normal lives amid violence and instability; left-wingers from around Europe descend on Greece hoping a revolution's underway; surprise, subterfuge and misinformation swirl around the fighting in eastern Ukraine while Brazilians explain why they are proud to be the only nation in the region speaking Portuguese.


THU 11:30 Ansel Adams on Tape (b04dk88v)
Miles Warde explores the life of the great American photographer Ansel Adams on tape.

Using extensive archive, the programme builds a compelling picture of the man responsible for some of the most expensive photographic prints in history. He is probably most famous for dramatic black and white images of Yosemite, while a 1948 print of Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico sold for $609,000 in 2006.

With contributions from Ansel Adams, the photographer Greg Bartley, and Hiag Akmakjian, whose recordings of Adams speaking in Carmel, California in the 1980s have never previously been heard.

Producer: Miles Warde

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in August 2014.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b05053rm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 A History of Ideas (b050bfv9)
Surgeon Gabriel Weston on medical technology

Surgeons of the distant past were little more than skilled butchers, trying to minimise the agony of their bone-sawing craft. Surgery itself was a last-resort and one you might not survive, and if you did, one of many brutal contagious diseases might wipe you out instead.

But spool forward through history, past the growth in sanitation, inventions of anaesthesia, antibiotics, radiation therapy and the discovery of germ theory, and look at the world of the present-day medic. Safe, effective drug treatments are par for the course, and surgeons, operating in controlled, clinical environments, can count light-rays and robots-assistants alongside scalpels in their quiver of surgical instruments.

Clearly medical technology has come a long way. But along with changing how we look, how we think and how we live, have these developments changed who we are as a species? And are we heading in a positive direction?

The meteoric rise of elective, 'cosmetic' surgery is testament to the changing expectations we place on our bodies, but the idea of either drugging or cutting ourselves in pursuit of perfection leaves many feeling uneasy.

Not everyone feels this way however; 'transhumanists' believe that it's not just possible, but philosophically noble, to try to break through our biological limitations through drugs, genetic modification, or enhancement therapies. They believe the future of our species relies on actively pursuing the dream of 'Superintelligence, Superlongevity and Superhappiness'. But at what cost?

Surgeon Gabriel Weston looks at the past, present, and the weird and wonderful future of medicine to find the answer.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b050bfvc)
Green Energy Costs, The Real Cost of Living, Nuisance Calls

Consumer news.


THU 13:00 World at One (b050bfvf)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zllkb)
Painting

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Despite not taking up painting until he was 40, Winston Churchill produced more than 500 canvasses in his lifetime and became an honorary member of the Royal Academy. His show there in 1959 outsold every previous exhibition except one dedicated to Leonardo da Vinci. So why was painting such an important part of Churchill's life? Sir David Cannadine explores the hobby that meant most to Churchill and how it helped to keep what he called the 'black dog' of depression at bay.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0507mbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b050bfvh)
Series 2

Episode 9

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 9:
The police are trying to arrest Jack and put pressure on Brian to turn Queen's Evidence.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b050bfvk)
The Ring of Gullion

Helen Mark visits the Ring Of Gullion in Northern Ireland to discover it's ancient geographical features that are now attracting visitors from all over the world.

The Ring Of Gullion is in South Armagh, near the border with Ireland.

For years the area was an area that was dangerous during the troubles and so overlooked by tourists, but the locals have aware of it's beauty, wildlife and ancient history, packed with myths and legends for centuries. Now the area is trying to attract visitors and put itself firmly on the map as an area with plenty to attract visitors from all over the world.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0505l33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0505t2p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b050bfvm)
Paul Thomas Anderson on Inherent Vice; Stephen Daldry on Trash; Kids Clubs; Why we cry in films

With Francine Stock.

Director Paul Thomas Anderson discusses the challenges of writing Inherent Vice, the first ever movie adaptation of a novel by reclusive writer Thomas Pynchon.

Billy Elliot director Stephen Daldry talks about the dangers of filming in the favelas of Rio for his caper movie Trash. And reveals why he ripped up the script and let his child actors improvise and decide their own ending.

Listeners sing word-perfect renditions of the Odeon Film Club song and ABC Minors anthem, five decades since they last sang them. They recall a paradise free from parental control, where you could to go to the toilet as often as you liked.

Francine consults neuroscientist professor Jeffrey Zacks about the reasons she cries helplessly when she watches the final moments of Louis Malle's war memoir Au Revoir Les Enfants.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b050bhnl)
Climate change belief; Anthropocene era; Eyes on the sea; Origins of multicellular life

We all remember the floods across much of central and southern England this time last year, and the devastating effect they had on people's lives and livelihoods. Today, a group of researchers at Cardiff University published a report on how people's perception of climate change has evolved in the wake of the floods. To what extent has our belief in man-made climate change altered? Do we now regard last year's events as a sign of things to come? Adam Rutherford talks to Nick Pidgeon from Cardiff University's School of Psychology who led this UK wide study

Earlier this week an international group of climate scientists, geographers and ecologists met at the Stockholm Resilience Centre in Sweden to wrangle how we can practically make the best of the Anthropocene - the new geological epoch that many consider that we now find ourselves in. Gaia Vince author of Adventures in the Anthropocene, reports from the Stockholm meeting

At the UK's Satellite Application Catapult in Harwell, a project has been unveiled that seeks to offer real time data on the world's fishing fleet to help governments police illegal fishing.
Pulling together data from shipping registers, satellite images, radar and ships' own transponders, Eyes on the Sea automatically scans for suspicious activity and can alert human users and allow them to see what ships are up to. The Pew Charitable Trusts hope that vessels carrying illegal cargoes can then be tracked across the ocean, and any port receiving them would know where they had been and what they had been up to.

How complex cells evolved is a mystery. Current theories on the evolutionary jump, between 1 and 2 billion years ago, from life forms based on a simple prokaryote cell to the complex multiple eukaryote cells with a cell nucleus and a host of complex internal machinery, fails to explain much of what we see within animal, plant and fungi cells today. Adam talks to Buzz Baum a cell biologist at University College London who has devised a new testable model which appears to explain one of biology's most basic questions.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.


THU 17:00 PM (b050bhnn)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05053rp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap (b050bhnq)
Series 2

Episode 4

Bridget Christie talks about why she's not grateful Russell Brand has stopped being a sexist.

She reveals what happens when you wear an end FGM badge on a popular TV show?

And discover why politics has a women problem.

Multi-award winning series about modern feminism.

Bridget thought that she'd be able to put her feet up after her last series, she expected it to bomb. Sadly it was a huge success. But it's OK, because actually she's solved the feminist struggle all by herself.

She's assisted by token man, Fred MacAulay.

Written by Bridget Christie.

Producers: Alison Vernon-Smith and Alexandra Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b050bhns)
David's grateful to Justin Elliott for granting him a chat. Justin's impressed that David's moving into robotic milking. He agrees to let the Archers stay on at Brookfield as tenants for a few months while the work is completed at Hadley Haugh. Justin's architect will be pleased. But will three months be long enough, asks Justin?
David updates Kenton on the move.
Joe fascinates David by showing him an old milk bottle from Brookfield Dairy, which he found in the pole barn. Joe still can't fathom the idea of there being no cows at Brookfield in the summer. Joe remembers the heartache of leaving Grange Farm. Ed's there now and Joe hopes he'll get a break one day.
Jennifer and Kate sit Phoebe down for a chat. Phoebe admits she finds it difficult to talk since Kate returned. Kate explains that she'd like Phoebe to live with her in her cottage. But Phoebe has little time for Kate. She blurts out the truth - Lucas threw Kate out because she had another affair. Kate tries to explain herself. Phoebe becomes angry and storms away, wishing Kate wasn't her mother. Jennifer is hurt for being kept in the dark.
Phoebe returns, but only to say that she's going to stay with Hayley tomorrow - and Kate can drive her.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b050bhnv)
Trash, Tom Stoppard's The Hard Problem, Andrew O'Hagan, Chilly Gonzales

Stephen Daldry's new film Trash, about three kids who make a discovery on a Brazilian rubbish dump, is reviewed by Larushka Ivan-Zadeh; The Hard Problem, Tom Stoppard's first play for the stage since Rock 'n' Roll in 2006, is reviewed by Matt Wolf; Andrew O'Hagan discusses his new novel The Illuminations; and Grammy-winning pianist and composer Chilly Gonzales on the influence of classical music on pop, and how he solved a tricky musical issue for Daft Punk.

Presenter John Wilson
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 Tinsel Girl (b050bcf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b050bhnx)
French, Republican and Muslim, Insha'Allah?

Ahmed Merabet was one of three police officers killed in the recent terrorist attacks in France. All were honoured as heroes, but it was Ahmed's story which captured France, and the world's attention. As a Muslim who died responding to an attack on a publication which satirised the prophet Muhammed, many saw him as the perfect embodiment of the values of the French Republic and its hopes for the integration of its substantial Muslim population. As France now struggles to figure out how to combat radicalism and promote integration, politicians have called for France's muslims to "choose the Republic", in essence to be more like Ahmed Merabet. At his memorial service, Helen Grady meets Muslims who have come to pay their respects, and follows their lives in the aftermath of the attacks to find out whether they need to do more to be French, or whether the Republic's strong insistence on secularism leaves little place for French Muslims.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b050bhvc)
The Price of Time

How should we price services? By the hour? By results? Or by the difficulty of the task? And what impact does each model have on how businesses are run? In the first of a new series Evan Davis and guests look at the history of how we've priced our time and expertise and why this may be about to change.

Guests :
Christopher Saul, senior partner, Slaughter & May
Debbie Klein, UK CEO, The Engine Group
Russell Quirk, Founder, EMoov.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b050bhnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b050bcf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b050bjhg)
Fate of two hostages held by Islamic State militants remains unclear

IS threat to kill Jordanian pilot and Japanese journalist if Iraqi prisoner not released


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b050bjhj)
The Bottle Imp

Episode 4

Keawe, a young Hawaiian sailor, is tempted into buying an enchanted bottle that will grant his every wish. There's a catch; if the owner dies before selling it on, his soul will burn in hell forever. Keawe reasons that the bottle should be easy enough to pass on once he has gained his heart's desire - but it must be sold at a loss, and the price drops with every trade...

Read by Ian McDiarmid

Written by Robert Louis Stevenson

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 23:00 Colin Hoult's Carnival of Monsters (b050bjhl)
Series 2

Episode 4

Enter the Carnival of Monsters, a bizarre and hilarious world of sketches, stories and characters, presented by the sinister Ringmaster.

A host of characters are the exhibits at the Carnival - all played by Colin himself.

Meet such monstrous yet strangely familiar oddities as: Wannabe Hollywood screenwriter Andy Parker; Anna Mann - outrageous star of such forgotten silver screen hits such as 'Rogue Baker', 'Who's For Turkish Delight' and 'A Bowl For My Bottom'; and a host of other characters from acid jazz obsessives, to mask workshop coordinators.

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b050bjhn)
MPs criticise delays in the publication of the report into the invasion of Iraq in 2003.
The inquiry led by Sir John Chilcot will not release the report until after the General Election. Several members of the Commons give a warning against any attempts to push publication further back.
The Education Secretary, Nicky Morgan, moves to expand the role of "counter-extremism" in schools following the Trojan Horse scandal in Birmingham.
The growing use of food banks prompts angry exchanges in the Commons.
And peers call for changes in their own procedures amid complaints about question time in the House of Lords.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



FRIDAY 30 JANUARY 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b05053t5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b050bcf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b05053t7)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b05053t9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b05053tc)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b05053tf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b051s6jx)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b050bwp7)
GM fish food, First Milk boss, fines for unfair supermarkets?

The Government has confirmed that supermarkets could be fined millions of pounds by the Groceries Code Adjudicator, if they're found to have treated suppliers unfairly. The measure will be put through Parliament in the next few weeks.

Chairman of the troubled dairy processor First Milk, Sir Jim Paice, tells Charlotte Smith that he's confident the farmer-owned business has a future.

Vegetable oil from GM Camelina plants has been successfully trialled as a feed for farmed salmon. The scientists developing the crop say the oil provides essential long chain Omega 3s which are currently supplied by fishmeal, which many say is unsustainable.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sarah Swadling.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0t44)
Kea

Michael Palin presents the kea from a windswept mountain in New Zealand. A a snow-capped mountain in New Zealand's South Island are not a place where you'd expect to find a parrot, least of all a carnivorous one (and with a penchant for rubber). But this is the home of the kea.

Keas are curious birds in every sense of the word. Drab greenish brown, they're the world's only Alpine parrot. When they can find them, keas eat fruits and berries, but also, especially in winter they descend from the higher slopes and scavenge on animal carcasses at rubbish dumps, cracking bones with their sharp beaks to reach the marrow. They will even attack live sheep, stripping the fat from their backs and damaging vital organs. Although this habit is rare and is now understood to be largely restricted to injured sheep, it led to widespread persecution of the birds and a bounty was paid on the head of each bird killed which led to widespread declines so that keas became endangered.

Today Keas are legally protected. In their mountain homes, the parrots survive to entertain and exasperate tourists as they clamber over cars, strip rubber seals from windscreens and remove wiper-blades ... curious birds indeed.


FRI 06:00 Today (b050bwpb)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0505l3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b050bwpf)
Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible

Episode 5

In the early 2000s, Peter Pomerantsev (the son of Russian political exiles) came to Moscow to work in the fast-growing television industry. He was perfectly placed to witness the transformation of the New Russia on its journey from communist collapse to a new form of dictatorship.

In this episode, he reflects upon the fractured nature of a country (and its people) that has moved so quickly from communism to capitalism, where the difference between 'public' and 'private' selves can, by necessity, be extreme. Realising that he can't maintain such psychological divisions, he decides to return to London.

Written by Peter Pomerantsev

Read by Justin Salinger

Abridged by Robin Brooks

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b050bwpk)
Abortion law; Women and art; Giving up booze; Colleen McCullough; Success stories

Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission is taking the devolved government in Belfast to the high court over its refusal to reform the abortion law. The Commission wants a change in the law so that women and girls in Northern Ireland have the choice of accessing a termination of pregnancy in circumstances of serious foetal abnormality, rape or incest. What is the basis for their legal challenge?

Are you among the thousands of women who resolved to cut down or stop drinking for January? Or perhaps you're among those who're hoping to give up the booze for good? A new wave of clubs and websites is springing up to support the growing numbers of women who are worried about their alcohol intake, but how do they differ from Alcoholics Anonymous and can they really help?

This weekend a new exhibition exploring the legacy of one of the most important and controversial artists of modern times opens at the Norwich Castle art gallery. The French artist, Edouard Manet's provocative paintings of women scandalised the Paris art world, but they challenged traditional depictions of women, and paved the way for professional female artists of the early 20th century. We discuss the impact of his work.

Australian Author, Colleen McCullough, has died at the age of 77. Her most famous novel, The Thorn Birds, a story of an unlikely affair between a young woman and a priest, sold more than 30 million copies and became a successful mini-series. But how did she come to give up a promising career in neurophysiology to become one of Australia most famous and loved authors?

Success stories: Judy Merry visits Feversham College in Bradford to see how a writing project is helping encourage academic ambition in Muslim girls.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Cecile Wright.


FRI 10:45 Tinsel Girl (b050bwpm)
Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip

Episode 5

Tinsel Girl and the Tropical Trip by Lou Ramsden

Episode 5

Maz finally arrives in the Seychelles, with the chiselled cheek-boned best man for Lisa's wedding in tow. Yet, with her pain levels riding high, it soon becomes clear to Maz that not everything is as sunny on this island paradise as she had imagined. Maz realises that she needs to work some of her Tinsel Girl magic.

Written by Lou Ramsden
Directed by Charlotte Riches

The drama is inspired by the adventures and experiences of Cherylee Houston.


FRI 11:00 The Sound of Space (b050bwpp)
The previously silent world of outer space is changing. In this audio tour around the Universe, Dr Lucie Green explores the sounds of space.

Some sounds have been recorded by microphones on-board interplanetary spacecraft. Others have been detected by telescopes and sped up until their frequency is tuned to our ears. The rest are sonified X-rays, space plasma or radio waves that reveal tantalising secrets about the universe that our eyes cannot see.

Everyone can recall the sound of the singing comet - a symphony created using measurements from the Rosetta mission. But many other sounds have been created from space data, from lightning on Jupiter to vibrations inside the Sun. From spinning pulsars to black holes and gamma ray bursts, outside our Solar System space becomes even stranger.

Joining Lucie Green on this sonic journey through space are:
- Prof Tim O'Brien (Associate Director of Jodrell Bank Observatory),
- Honor Harger (Executive Director of the ArtScience museum in Singapore) and
- Dr Andrew Pontzen (Cosmology Research Group, University College London)
with archive from Dame Jocelyn Bell-Burnell.

Producer: Michelle Martin.


FRI 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b03sztxc)
Series 5

Birkenhead

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a fifth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and does a bespoke evening of comedy in each one.

As every high street slowly morphs into a replica of the next, Mark Steel's in Town celebrates the parochial, the local and the unusual. From Corby's rivalry with Kettering to the word you can't say in Portland, the show has taken in the idiosyncrasies of towns up and down the country, from Kirkwall to Penzance, from Holyhead to Bungay.

This edition comes from Birkenhead, Wirral, where the landscape may be dominated by the shipyard but the local life has also included monks, a "Bantam Army", one of the quirkiest bands in the country, and a pub inside a barbershop. You will also find out why this edition of Mark Steel's In Town was probably the inspiration for Woody Allen's Manhattan. From February 2014.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Trudi Stevens
Producer ... Ed Morrish.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b05053th)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 A History of Ideas (b050bwpr)
Archaeologist Matt Pope on tools and human evolution

There's a tiny bone needle at Creswell Crags in Derbyshire. For archaeologist Matt Pope it's hugely significant. 13,000 years ago local people used it to construct tailored clothing which allowed them to survive and thrive at the very limits of Ice Age civilisation.

Skip forward millennia and the first human visitor to Mars will be protected by a thin skin of man-made fabric, a suit containing the only biological processes for millions of miles. Our ability to create tools that take us into new and hostile environments is, for Matt Pope, the key to man's evolutionary journey.

It's a view he shares with the first philosopher of technology, Ernst Kapp. Living through Germany's rapid industrial revolution Kapp came to believe that we could extend all the functions of the human mind and body through technology. Together, man and his tools would know no limits.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b050bwpt)
Heated Clothes; Hidden Debt; Blue Badge Refusal

It's cold. Would you consider turning off the heating and relying on battery-warmed clothes? We challenge two You & Yours listeners to do that. Find out how they got on and how much money they saved.

Personal debt is spiralling out of control, with the amount we owe up by 41 per cent on last year. And recent research shows we're keeping that debt hidden. Why are we so reluctant to talk about money?

And we hear from the partially-sighted eighty-eight-year old man with reduced mobility and Alzheimer's who's been refused a blue badge for parking. Have attempts to clamp down on misuse of the badges meant people with genuine disabilites are being refused this assistance?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b05053tk)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b050bwpx)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b050bwpz)
Science

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

Celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Sir David ends the series by examining Winston Churchill's lifelong fascination with gadgets and technology, and by a scientific future - as evidenced by his early delight in the novels of H.G. Wells. During the First World War, Churchill was awe-struck by the potential of the tank and, in the inter-war years, his friendship with H.G. Wells gave him the vision to predict the creation of a super-bomb that would kill millions of people. He later became friends with Professor Lindeman, who would become his scientific advisor during the Second World War.

Featuring Roger Allam as the voice of Winston Churchill. Other parts are played by Ewan Bailey, Jasmine Hyde, James Sobol Kelly and Simon Tchernaik.

The theme tune was composed by David Owen Norris, and performed by David Owen Norris on piano, Andrew Lyle on clarinet and Bastwin Terraz on bass.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b050bhns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b050bxkb)
Series 2

Episode 10

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 10:
Corrupt Tony Wednesday manoeuvres Jack and Brian into court, then gets a big surprise from Joey.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b050c1rt)
Correspondence Edition

Peter Gibbs is at The University of Reading for a Correspondence Edition of the programme, where Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew, Pippa Greenwood and James Wong answer questions sent in by post, email and via social media.

While Pippa and Bunny reminisce about their time studying at the University, James and Peter visit a corner of the campus that plays a vital role in the world's ability to grow cocoa.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Shorts (b050c4sd)
Scottish Shorts

No Numbers, by Pippa Goldschmidt

SHORTS: Scottish Shorts is one of a returning series of short readings featuring new writing from first time or emerging writers.

A woman considers the role of numbers in her life as she sits by the bed of her dying grandmother. Francesca Dymond reads a lyrical exploration of death, permanence and mathematics, written by Pippa Goldschmidt.
Produced by Eilidh McCreadie.

Pippa Goldschmidt is based in Edinburgh and came to creative writing from a previous career as an astronomer. She is the author of Dundee International Book Prize finalist, 'The Falling Sky'.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b050c4sg)
Sir Jack Hayward, Elena Obraztsova, Robert Stone, Jean Stogdon OBE and Demis Roussos

Matthew Bannister on

The businessman Sir Jack Hayward. He made his fortune in the Bahamas, but was obssesed with all things British and bought Wolverhampton Wanderers football club.

The acclaimed Russian mezzo soprano Elena Obraztsova who was a staunch supporter of the Soviet regime.

The novelist Robert Stone who emerged from the counter culture of the 1960s to write novels about the American psyche.

The social worker Jean Stogdon who founded the charity Grandparents Plus.

And the Greek singer Demis Roussos, whose high warbling voice and kaftans made him an unlikely sex symbol.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b050c4sj)
Cameron's 1000 Jobs

David Cameron says that the Conservatives have created 1000 jobs for every day they've been in office. Is this true?

Do dairy farmers make a loss on each litre of milk that they produce, as is often claimed? Charlotte Smith from Farming Today talks us through the numbers.

England cricketer Stuart Broad has prompted anger after tweeting: "I've heard if you earn minimum wage in England you're in the top 10% earners in the world. #stay #humble." More or Less considers whether this is true or not.

The UK's unhappiest workers are retail staff and teachers, reported the Guardian this week. Really?

How to use maths to find your life partner, with Matt Parker, author of "Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension".

And, what are the chances that two friends, given the same due date for their babies' birth, actually do give birth on the same day? Tim discusses the reliability - or otherwise- of pregnancy due dates with Professor Jason Gardosi of the Perinatal Institute.

"About one-third of American girls become pregnant as teenagers" a New York Times article claimed. More or Less asks if this is true and looks at the long-term pregnancy trends in developed countries.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b050c4sl)
Moira and Stephanie – Seeing Hope

Fi Glover introduces a mother who hadn't seen her daughter since she was eleven years old, but whose vision has now been partially restored.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


FRI 17:00 PM (b050c4sn)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b05053tm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b050c4sq)
Series 45

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a comic take on the week's news.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b050c4ss)
Kenton feels a bit of a hypocrite, as he and Jolene help Jennifer spread the fundraising message for SAVE by offering to update their posters. Kenton is impressed by a blog post by Jennifer. It challenges Justin Elliott. Jennifer feels he should come clean about his evil development plans.
Brookfield will be sold in March but things could take longer. Kenton promises to do what he can to speed things up, for Lilian's sake as much as his own.
Jolene invites Lilian to stay at the Bull as she recovers from Matt's betrayal. Lilian has asked Jennifer to tell the family about Matt. She knows she has to start facing life without him.
Phoebe is brisk with Kate, who drives her to Hayley's in Birmingham. When asked about her boyfriend Alex, Phoebe makes a pointed remark about sex and relationships. She has no time for explanations from Kate.
Phoebe complains to Hayley about Kate, who seems obsessed with talking about her affair now that it's out in the open. Hayley is non-judgemental. They hug as Phoebe tells Hayley how much she misses her. Phoebe feels caught in the middle between desperate Roy and Kate. She has a birthday card for her dad. Why not drop it round, suggests Hayley.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b050c4sv)
Leviathan, Amelia Bullmore, Waterloo at Windsor, Son of a Gun

In Front Row: a new exhibition Waterloo at Windsor 1815-2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Kirsty Lang visits Windsor Castle to see the exhibits which include Napoleon's red cloak which was seized at the scene on the day of battle.

The Oscar-nominated Russian film Leviathan won a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, but it has caused controversy in the country, where it has been censored and the film-makers accused of 'blackening Russia's image to gain Western praise'. The film's producer Alexander Rodnyansky responds to criticism of the film on the line from Moscow.

Australian crime thriller Son of a Gun stars Ewan McGregor as Brendan Lynch, a notorious armed robber who takes troubled teenaged boy JR under his wing while in prison. Once he is released, JR quickly realises that Brendon's protection comes at a heavy price. Hannah McGill reviews.

The actress Amelia Bullmore is a familiar face from her roles in Scott & Bailey and Twenty Twelve but she's also a writer - responsible for half of the last series of Scott & Bailey and a successful play about female friendship, Di and Viv and Rose. It's now transferred to the West End. She talks to Kirsty Lang.


FRI 19:45 Tinsel Girl (b050bwpm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b050c5kg)
Tom Crotty, Lord Deben, Margaret Hodge MP and Julian Huppert MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Dereham Memorial Hall in Dereham, Norfolk with Director of the Energy firm INEOS, Tom Crotty, Chairman of the Committee on Climate Change, Lord Deben, Chair of the Public Accounts Committee, the Labour MP Margaret Hodge and the Liberal Democrat backbench MP Julian Huppert.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b050c5kj)
Losing Touch

Will Self regrets our growing lack of physical contact with one another and with the natural world as a result of the rise of technology. "What the touch screen, the automatic door,online shopping and even the Bagladeshi sweatshop piece-worker who made our trousers are depriving us of is the exercise of our very sense of touch itself, and in particular they are relieving us of the need to touch other people."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 A History of Ideas (b050c5p9)
Omnibus

How Has Technology Changed Us?

Omnibus edition of Melvyn Bragg's History of ideas series. Five programmes examining how technology has changed us from flint axe to sat nav.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b05053tp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b050c5wf)
South African apartheid-era assassin granted parole.

Former death squad commander Eugene de Kock given parole after 20 years in jail.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b050c5wh)
The Bottle Imp

Episode 5

Set in 1880s Hawaii, Robert Louis Stevenson's story about an enchanted bottle - its glass tempered in the flames of hell - that grants its owner's every wish. The catch? If the owner dies before selling it on, his soul will burn in hell forever. But it must be sold at a loss, and the price drops with every trade...

Read by Ian McDiarmid

Written by Robert Louis Stevenson

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b05077kv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b050c5wk)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b050c5wm)
Catherine and Bea - The Art of Inspiration

Fi Glover introduces a mother and daughter who are both artists, debating who inspires whom, and discussing living with art and learning from it too.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A History of Ideas 12:04 MON (b0505zwf)

A History of Ideas 12:04 TUE (b05077kg)

A History of Ideas 12:04 WED (b0507lhd)

A History of Ideas 12:04 THU (b050bfv9)

A History of Ideas 12:04 FRI (b050bwpr)

A History of Ideas 21:00 FRI (b050c5p9)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04yk3w3)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b04yk3w3)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b050c5kj)

Alun Cochrane's Fun House 11:30 WED (b01rlnhp)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b050674y)

Anne Frank's Trees: Keeping the Memory Alive 11:00 TUE (b05077kb)

Ansel Adams on Tape 11:30 THU (b04dk88v)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0501k2c)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04yk3w1)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b050c5kg)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b050bhnl)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b050bhnl)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0505l2v)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0505l2v)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0506752)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b05078c0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b050bk95)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b050bjhj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b050c5wh)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b04yjtjj)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b0505zw3)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b0505zw3)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b05077k4)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b05077k4)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0507lh0)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0507lh0)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b050bcf3)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b050bcf3)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b050bwpf)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b04yb5g5)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b0505zwq)

Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 18:30 THU (b050bhnq)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0505l37)

Can Democracy Work? 09:00 TUE (b0506859)

Can Democracy Work? 21:30 TUE (b0506859)

Can You Spot the Hidden Message? 20:00 SAT (b0501kvj)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 MON (b00zlcpw)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 TUE (b00zft89)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 WED (b00zlk0h)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 THU (b00zllkb)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 FRI (b050bwpz)

Colin Hoult's Carnival of Monsters 23:00 THU (b050bjhl)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 05:45 SUN (b04ykd7p)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 20:45 WED (b050bk90)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0505l3c)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0505l3c)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b0501k2f)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b0505l3m)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0501jls)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0505zvn)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0506855)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0507lgt)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b050bcdx)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b050bwp7)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b04yk7h6)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b05077l5)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b0501kvd)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b0501kvd)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04y6vn7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b050bfv7)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b050674t)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b05077l3)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0507pmm)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b050bhnv)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b050c4sv)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 MON (b0505zwn)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 TUE (b05077kn)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 WED (b0507lhn)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 THU (b050bfvh)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 FRI (b050bxkb)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04yjzvy)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b050c1rt)

Gloomsbury 19:15 SUN (b01mx2sp)

Gone to Earth 21:00 WED (b048n3fb)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b05077kv)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b05077kv)

I've Never Seen Star Wars 18:30 TUE (b05077kz)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b04ykk5q)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b050bcf1)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b050bcf1)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b05077l7)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b05077n8)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b05077n8)

Inside the Unit - Treating Disorder 20:00 MON (b050674w)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04yk0jc)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b050c4sg)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0501kvb)

Love in Recovery 23:15 WED (b050bmfm)

Marc Riley's Musical Time Machine 11:30 TUE (b05077kd)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 FRI (b03sztxc)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04y6vmq)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b05053k8)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b05053m3)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b05053nr)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b05053q3)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b05053r9)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b05053t5)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0507lgy)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0507lgy)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b0507lsb)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0501jp9)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0501jp9)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b04yk0jf)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b050c4sj)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04y6vmz)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b05053kj)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b05053mc)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b05053p0)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b05053qc)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b05053rk)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b05053tf)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b05053kl)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04y6vn9)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b05053kx)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b05053mh)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b05053p2)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b05053qf)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b05053rm)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b05053th)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04y6vn1)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b05053kq)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b05053kv)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04y6vnp)

News 13:00 SAT (b04y6vnf)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0505l2z)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b05068jp)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0505t2p)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0505t2p)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b04ykk58)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b050bfvk)

Out of the Ordinary 11:00 MON (b0505zw9)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0501k2k)

PM 17:00 MON (b05061zd)

PM 17:00 TUE (b05077kx)

PM 17:00 WED (b0507lsj)

PM 17:00 THU (b050bhnn)

PM 17:00 FRI (b050c4sn)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0505t2t)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b04y9rj8)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0505t2r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04yk50k)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b051dr80)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b051j931)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b051s5yn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b051s60x)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b051s6jx)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b0505l33)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0505l33)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0505l33)

Roger McGough's Other Half 23:00 WED (b050bmfk)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0501jlx)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0501kvg)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04y6vmv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b05053kd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b05053m7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b05053nw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b05053q7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b05053rf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b05053t9)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04yftkz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04y6vms)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04y6vmx)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b04y6vnh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b05053kb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b05053kg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b05053l1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b05053m5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b05053m9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b05053nt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b05053ny)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b05053q5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b05053q9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b05053rc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b05053rh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b05053t7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b05053tc)

Shorts 15:45 FRI (b050c4sd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04y6vnm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b05053l5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b05053mm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b05053p6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b05053qk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b05053rp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b05053tm)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0505zw1)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0505zw1)

Subway 19:45 SUN (b0505t2y)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0505l35)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0505l31)

TED Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b0505t34)

Tales from the Ring Road 11:00 WED (b0507lhb)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0505l39)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0505t2w)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0505t2w)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b050621v)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b050621v)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b05077l1)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b05077l1)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0507mbj)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0507mbj)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b050bhns)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b050bhns)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b050c4ss)

The Best Laid Plans 11:30 MON (b0505zwc)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b050bhvc)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b050bfvm)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0505l3f)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0505l3f)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b05077kq)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 20:30 SAT (b04yfsst)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b05061zb)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b05061zb)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b0501jlz)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b0501jlz)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0505l3k)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b0507lh8)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b050c4sl)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b050c5wm)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0507lsg)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b04yk373)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b050c4sq)

The Report 20:00 THU (b050bhnx)

The Secretaries of Juliet 13:30 SUN (b04xnczn)

The Showman's Parson: Tales from the Memoirs of the Rev Thomas Horne 00:30 SUN (b03y00qy)

The Sound of Space 11:00 FRI (b050bwpp)

The True Story of Abner Jay 15:30 SAT (b04yftl1)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b05061zg)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b04yfssy)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0501jp7)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0505l3h)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0506750)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b05078by)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b050bk93)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b050bjhg)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b050c5wf)

The Wrath of God 06:05 SUN (b0505l2x)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b04ykd77)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0507lsd)

Tinsel Girl 10:45 MON (b0505zw7)

Tinsel Girl 19:45 MON (b0505zw7)

Tinsel Girl 10:45 TUE (b05077k8)

Tinsel Girl 19:45 TUE (b05077k8)

Tinsel Girl 10:40 WED (b0507lh4)

Tinsel Girl 19:45 WED (b0507lh4)

Tinsel Girl 10:45 THU (b050bcf7)

Tinsel Girl 19:45 THU (b050bcf7)

Tinsel Girl 10:45 FRI (b050bwpm)

Tinsel Girl 19:45 FRI (b050bwpm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0506754)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b05078c2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b050bmfp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b050bjhn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b050c5wk)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0501jlv)

Today 06:00 MON (b0505zvz)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0506857)

Today 06:00 WED (b0507lgw)

Today 06:00 THU (b050bcdz)

Today 06:00 FRI (b050bwpb)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0skg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0sxg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04t0syn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04t0t02)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04t0vb1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04t0t44)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b04ykd7m)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b0507pmp)

War and Peace 21:00 SAT (b04w82wl)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b04y6vn3)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b04y6vn5)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b04y6vnc)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b04y6vnk)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b05053kn)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b05053ks)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b05053kz)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b05053l3)

Weather 05:56 MON (b05053mf)

Weather 12:57 MON (b05053mk)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b05053p4)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b05053p8)

Weather 12:57 WED (b05053qh)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b05053tk)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b05053tp)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0505t30)

What Does the K Stand For? 18:30 WED (b0507mbg)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b0505t32)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b05061z8)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0501k2h)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0505zw5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b05077k6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0507lh2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b050bcf5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b050bwpk)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b04yk47x)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b05077ks)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0505zwk)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b05077kl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0507lhl)

World at One 13:00 THU (b050bfvf)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b050bwpx)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b0505zwh)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b05077kj)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b0507lhg)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b050bfvc)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b050bwpt)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b04yk50m)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b04yk50m)