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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 JANUARY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkg6s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b04xs49r)
Reaching down the Rabbit Hole

Episode 5

Emphasising the importance of neurology - Dr Allan H Ropper and his co-writer Brian D Burrell conclude their behind the scenes look at the Harvard Medical School's neurology unit.

"In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," says Ropper, "Alice jumps into a rabbit hole and finds herself in a bizarre realm where everything bears little relation to the outside world. It is a place where, as the Red Queen mentions to Alice, it helps to believe six impossible things before breakfast. I have no need to believe six impossible things before breakfast because I know that on any given day I will be confronted with six improbable things before lunch..."

Concluded by Colin Stinton.

Written by Dr Allan H Ropper and Brian D Burrell
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg6v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkg6x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg6z)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkg71)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04xs9m4)
With Andrew Graystone.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04xs9m6)
'If you have an opinion, you speak among your friends, the ones you trust, you do not say it out loud you do not know who you will offend or who will come after you'. A Muslim woman reacts to the attacks in Paris and describes her dual life living between the UK and the Middle East. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04xkg73)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04xkg75)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b04xrvbc)
The Purbeck Clay Mines

Helen Mark explores the clay mining history of Dorset's picturesque Isle of Purbeck.

Purbeck may look like an unspoilt rural holiday destination, but in reality it is an area steeped in industrial heritage - dictated by the clay mining industry which began as far back as Roman times and took flight when Sir Walter Raleigh bought tobacco to England and created a demand for clay pipes. The landscape is sculpted by traces of this industry and tales from the days of picking clay out by candle light are still shared by mining communities to this day but in the 21st century it's diggers and trucks that do the hard labour that ensures Purbeck's clay goes worldwide.

Featuring interviews with author Chris Legg, Purbeck Mineral and Mining Museum Chairman Peter Sills, Learning & Interpretation Officer at Purbeck Corfe Castle Pam White, former Mines Manager Norman Vye, retired Mines Forman Mickey White and Chris Cleaves, Safety Director UK Ceramics & UK Ball Clays GM.

Produced By Nicola Humphries.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b04y6drt)
Pesticides

Charlotte Smith is at the National Institute of Agricultural Botony (NIAB) in Cambridgeshire where scientists are breeding new strains of crops that are more disease and pest resistant but still produce higher yields. The programme is looking at pesticides, as a European consultation into endocrine disruptors comes to an end. Endocrine Disruptors are found within a wide range of substances, and can alter the hormones in humans and animals. The consultation could lead to more of them being banned from use.

We hear from those for and against chemical use in agriculture, and ask what is the way forward for farming in this atmosphere.

Produced by Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04xkg77)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b04y6drw)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b04y6kc7)
Sally Gunnell

Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles are joined by Olympic Gold medallist Sally Gunnell. Now an ambassador for Sport England, she discusses how she keeps fit, her role in her local community in Sussex and how her sons now outrun her!

Saturday Live listener Alice Munro contacted the programme to tell us about the community in Wirksworth, Derbyshire and why it's a special place to live. Matt Barlow accepted her invitation to visit.
Matthew Engel describes his three year journey exploring England afresh by visiting 39 counties and the capital, what he discovered about their individual natures and traditions, and why he's adopted the county of Herefordshire as his home.

Vlogger and creator of Vsauce, Michael Stevens, shares his passion for knowledge and how he makes videos relating to various scientific topics for an online community with 8 million subscribers.

We hear the wonderful story of Pamela Rose - who gave up acting in her twenties to work at Bletchley Park and returned to the stage in her 80s.

Crime writer Peter May explains how his real-life teenage experience of playing in a band and running away from Glasgow for London has inspired his latest book. He describes that journey, how life in the Outer Hebrides led to his Lewis Trilogy and why he is an honorary member of The Chinese Crime Writers Association.

And actor Julie Hesmondhalgh shares her Inheritance Tracks - The Joy of Living by Ewan MacColl and Reach by S Club.

Engel's England: Thirty-nine Counties, One Capital and One Man', is published by Profile Books.
Cucumber is on Channel 4 on Thursday at 9pm.
The Bletchley Girls: War, Secrecy, Love and Loss by Tessa Dunlop is published by Hodder and Stoughton.
Runway by Peter May is published by Quercus.

Producer: Louise Corley.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04y6kc9)
Series 9

Peterborough

Taking questions from a local audience in Peterborough are the cabinet of culinary experts chaired by Jay Rayner.

The team reminisce about railway dining and learn how the spoons we use affect the way we taste. They sample the local borsht and debate the merits of celery - a diet food or an essential member of a buttery trio?

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun
Producer: Victoria Shepherd
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b04y6kcc)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Are the Conservatives going back to the future by fighting the general election as if it were 1992? Can governments control energy prices? and Boris Johnson - does his appeal stretch to the northern regions of England?
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04xkg79)
Kate Adie introduces stories from correspondents around the world: Shaimaa Khalil in Pakistan meets relatives and survivors of the army school massacre in Peshawar, on the day the school reopens. Ruth Sherlock in Lebanon finds that while the Syrian refugees struggle in the snow, their Lebanese hosts struggle economically. Caroline Wyatt enjoys life as a VAMP (Vatican Accredited Media Personnel) as she flies on the Papal plane to Sri Lanka. Martin Fletcher joins a Vietnamese conservationist who is trying to save the world's only scaly mammal from extinction: the loveable but endangered pangolin. And Aidan O'Donnell meets the cash-strapped Burundian national cycling team as they prepare to cycle home - from Rwanda.

Presenter: Kate Adie
Producer: Ben Crighton.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04xkg7c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b04y6kcf)
New pension advice service, energy prices, savings bonds for those who are 65 plus

Alongside its pension reforms, the Government last year announced a Guidance Guarantee, promising free, impartial, face-to-face advice to those now having to make choice about what to do with their pension pots from April. It was rebranded this week as Pension Wise, with its own logo. But how just how "expert" will the face-to-face guidance be? The Economic Secretary, Andrea Leadsom MP, tells Money Box what to expect.

Wholesale gas prices are now a third lower than their peak, but domestic energy bills remain stubbornly high. Are the Big Six's hedging strategies the cause? Energy UK explain why their member companies are not (yet) passing on price reductions.

Thursday saw the launch of the much-anticipated National Savings & Investments Plus 65 Bonds, paying up to 4% interest. But within minutes the NS&I website had crashed and the telephone helpline was overwhelmed. Are there bonds any left? And if you haven't managed to get hold of any, are there any savings products with comparable rates?


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b04xs4bb)
Series 45

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches. Featuring Mitch Benn, Pippa Evans, Jon Holmes and Tez Ilyas.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04xkg7f)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04xkg7h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04xs4bl)
Norman Baker MP, Sadiq Khan MP, Dia Chakravarty and Francis Maude MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Barnham in West Sussex with the former Home Office Minister Norman Baker MP, Political Director of the Tax Payers Alliance Dia Chakravarty, Shadow Justice Secretary Sadiq Khan MP and Francis Maude MP Minister for the Cabinet Office.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b04y6kch)
Terror

Do you believe we can could face a Charlie Hebdo type attack in this country - what can we do to try and prevent it?

Email: anyanswers@bbc.co.uk

Presented: Anita Anand
Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Beverley Purcel.


SAT 14:30 Kneehigh's The Wild Bride (b03m3j76)
Down at the crossroads, the dust-bowl wind blows as the Devil sits in a rocking chair and begins to tell a story. It's a tale of love and war, good and evil; the tale of a young girl, whose father accidentally sells her soul to the Devil. The girl chooses to walk into the wilderness. She rejects not only the Devil, but also her home and must survive the ravages of nature and time. A dark blues infused musical fairy tale, from the critically acclaimed Kneehigh Theatre.

Kneehigh is celebrated as one of Britain's most innovative theatre companies. For 30 years they've created popular and challenging theatre for audiences throughout the UK and beyond. This epic and poetic wondertale is classic Kneehigh: Instinctive storytelling, devilish humour, a uniquely realised other-world and a fantastic blues music score. The show was first produced at the Kneehigh Asylum in Cornwall in 2011, directed by Emma Rice. Since then it has delighted audiences from the West End to Broadway.

Adapted for radio by Carl Grose and Emma Rice

Praise for the original stage show

"Witty, surprising, strange. I dreamt about it all night" The Times

"A feast of timeless story, irresistible music and wildly imaginative theatricality." San Francisco Chronicle

"Bewitching" New York Times

Original text and lyrics... Carl Grose
Adapted for radio by Carl Grose and Emma Rice

The Devil... Stuart McLoughlin
The Wild Bride... Audrey Brisson
Father/King... Stuart Goodwin
King's Mother... Emma Rice
Composer... Stu Barker
Musical Director... Ian Ross
Violinist... Patrycja Kujawska
Sound Design... Simon Baker and Nigel Lewis

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production


SAT 15:30 Kitch! (b04xp15m)
June 1948. The Empire Windrush docks at Tilbury carrying 492 West Indian "citizens of the British Empire". Newsreel footage captures forever the suited new arrivals waiting to alight. As the reporter introduces one young man as "their spokesman", a gently smiling Aldwyn Roberts sings a Calypso he wrote on the the voyage, 'London is the place for me, London, this lovely city...'

Aldwyn Roberts was 26 years old and already well known in Trinidad as Calypso star Lord Kitchener. He lived in England for almost 15 years, married a girl in Manchester, was celebrated by glamorous upper class English society and became the voice of a generation of Caribbean immigrants far from home.

Poet and musician Anthony Joseph also left Trinidad for London in his twenties and has always felt a powerful connection to Kitch. He spoke to him just once, when he saw Kitch standing alone for a moment at Carnival in Trinidad. Now, fifteen years after Kitchener's death Anthony Joseph tries to get to the heart of the man behind the famous footage.

Presenter: Anthony Joseph
Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b04y6kck)
Reese Witherspoon on her new film Wild

Oscar nominated Reese Witherspoon talks about her new film Wild based on the bestselling memoir of Cheryl Strayed.

We discuss the new advertising campaign This Girl Can and how its aims to get more of us to take part in sport.

Kate Gross died of colon cancer on Christmas morning. She was 36. Her mum Jean talks about the book Kate has written for her five year old sons Late Fragments: Everything I wanted To Tell You About This Magnificent Life.

The television and film composer Debbie Wiseman on her latest project composing the music for the new BBC drama Wolf Hall.

We discuss the lives of older lesbians and the hurdles they faced coming out. And find out if Denmark is really the happiest place to live in the world.

Plus music from one of 2015's hotly tipped musicians, Laura Doggett.

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b04y6kcm)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b04xs9m6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg7k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04xkg7m)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkg7p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b04y6kcp)
Emma Freud, Paul Whitehouse, Ross Kemp, Sharon Horgan, Rob Delaney, Anita Anand, Ephemerals, Tenterhook

Ross Kemp talks to Clive about his new series of 'Extreme World'; TV and Radio journalist Anita Anand tells the story of Sophia Duleep Singh, Queen Victoria's god-daughter, suffragette and revolutionary; Sharon Horgan (award-winning actress and star/co-writer of 'Pulling') and US comedian and best-selling author Rob Delaney discuss their brand new comedy series following an Irish woman and an American man who make a bloody mess as they struggle to fall in love in London. And co-host Emma Freud talks to Paul Whitehouse about his new TV sitcom. With music from Ephemerals and more music from Tenterhook

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b04y6kcr)
Series 17

The All-Clear

The All-Clear
by Amanda Whittington

After 'Je Suis Charlie', is it any easier to speak the truth? Two women fight their deepest fear in order to do so.

A story about how to live in the face of death.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b04y6kct)
Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Wild, Wolf Hall, Adam Thirlwell and Bull

Women on the verge of a nervous breakdown; Pedro Almodovar's film has been turned into a stage musical with Tamsin Greig as Pepa Marcos. It flopped on Broadway, now thoroughly rejigged, can it succeed in London?
Reese Witherspoon is in the running for an Oscar playing Cheryl in Wild, about a woman who sets off to discover herself on a 1100 mile walk in the wilderness.
Wolf Hall was first a best-selling book by Hilary Mantel, then an RSC play and now it comes to BBCTV, with Mark Rylance as Thomas Cromwell
Adam Thirlwell is a young British writer whose third novel Lurid and Cute focusses on an ordinary egotistical young man whose life spirals out of control
Bull at The Young Vic is a play about the consequences of ruthless office bullying. At only 55 minutes long it has to come out swinging, but does it land any punches?


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b04y6mw8)
Mustn't Grumble: The Noble British Art of Complaining

Complaining is a vital component of British life, whether it's formal letters to a utility company, bank or broadband provider, or it's an ice-breaker at a bus stop, bemoaning the dreary weather.

Writer and broadcaster Bidisha sets out to identify why complaining is so important to us, and also precisely how we go about it.

She visits an international language school to hear how students learning English react to lessons in 'hedging' (the art of introducing a complaint with apology - "I'm terribly sorry but..", "Forgive me for mentioning it but.."); she also meets literary professor Phil Davis to track complaint through the fictional pages of history, former comedian and classicist Natalie Haynes to found out how the Ancients did it, and journalist Lynne Truss to find out why we never complain to a hairdresser.

Along the way she also meets a professional complainer, Jasper Griegson, who's sent thousands of letters of complaint over the years, sometimes in verse, sometimes in medieval script, to find out the best methods of complaining.

Bidisha also wonders, finally, whether complaining is actually good for us - whether the occasional gains we may achieve are worth so much of our energy and spirit. The programme will make use of the ample archive of complaint, from Juvenal to 'Points of View', Samuel Pepys' diaries to Alf Garnett and Tom Wrigglesworth.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


SAT 21:00 War and Peace (b04w82wh)
Episode 3

Napoleon maps out his strategic plan against the Russians at Austerlitz. General Kutuzov and Andrei are both wounded in the battle and Andrei's family don't know if he is alive. Meanwhile, Pierre challenges Dolokhov to a duel over Helene - he suspects them of being lovers - and Pierre and Helene argue, but she refuses to separate. Denisov and Nikolai return to the Rostov home while at Bald Hills, Lise is in childbirth but will she and Andrei ever see each again?

A dynamic fresh dramatisation by Timberlake Wertenbaker of Leo Tolstoy's epic - from the translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokonsky - follows the fortunes of three Russian aristocratic families during the Napoleonic War. Starring Lesley Manville, John Hurt, Alun Armstrong and Harriet Walter.

The story moves between their past and present as Pierre, Natasha, Marya and Nikolai talk to their children about the events that shaped their lives and the lives of every Russian who lived through these troubled times.

War and Peace reflects the panorama of life at every level of Russian society in this period. The longest of 19th-century novels, it's an epic story in which historical, social, ethical and religious issues are explored on a scale never before attempted in fiction.

Alex Shiels … Sergei Rostov
Ben Crowe … Mikhail Mitrich
Charlotte Emmerson … Helene Kuragin
Daniel Flynn … Regimental Commander
David Calder … Prince Vassily Kuragin
David Collings … Shinshin
Ella Dale … Masha Bezukhov
Ferdinand Kingsley … Anatole Kuragin
Harriet Walter … Anna Mikhailovna Drubetskoy
Hazel Ellerby … Julia's mother
Jed Vine … Petya Rostov
Joanna David … Annette Scherer
Joel Maccormack … Boris Drubetskoy
John Hurt … Prince Bolkonsky
Jonathan Slinger … Captain Denisov
Kathleen Keaney … Liza Rostov
Nelly Harker … Lise Bolkonsky
Alun Armstrong … Count Rostov
Emerald O'Hanrahan … Julia Karagan
Lesley Manville … Countess Rostov
Natasha Little … Marya Bolkonsky
Paterson Joseph … Pierre Bezuhkov
Phoebe Fox … Natasha Rostov
Pip Donaghy … Colonel of the Hussars
Roger Allam … General Kutuzov
Roger May … Prince Bagration
Sam Blatchford … Andrusha Rostov
Sam Dale … Alpatych
Sam Reid … Nikolai Rostov
Sarah Badel … Maria Demitrievna
Serena Evans … Catiche
Stanley Toyne … Mitya Rostov
Stephen Campbell Moore … Andrei Bolkonsky
Tamzin Merchant … Sonya Rostov
Tom Glenister … Nikolenka Bolkonsky

Director: Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04xkg7r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b04xrl8r)
Good Samaritan Law

Clive Anderson and guests ask why Britain, unlike many other countries in the world, has no general law which requires people to behave like good Samaritans, punishing those who fail to help others in trouble.

Under French law, a person who endangers the life or health of another by failing to assist in some way faces imprisonment of up to five years or a fine of 75,000 euros. In the UK there would be no liability whatsoever. We can walk past a drowning baby with legal impunity.

Our common law system in the UK does not generally impose liability for pure omissions - failures to act. There is no general duty of care owed by one person to prevent harm occurring to another. However, a duty of care can arise, for example, once someone attempts to rescue a drowning child if they inadvertently make things worse.

So is British law both failing to make people behave as good Samaritans and punishing them if they do? What needs to change?

The panel includes former law lord, Lord Hoffmann, and distinguished academic lawyer Andrew Ashworth who have polarised views on the issue. Andrew Ashworth calls for the introduction of a general good Samaritan law, arguing that our current law is untidy and unprincipled. Lord Hoffmann suggests such a law would be unnecessary and inappropriate.

With leading barrister Peter Cooke and French law expert Catherine Elliott, the panel examines the arguments for and against a law imposing a duty of rescue.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b04xnd03)
3/17)
The collective noun a 'business' or 'busyness' is used for a group of which mammals? And Joanne Wheatley, John Whaite and Nancy Birtwistle have all had the distinction of winning which TV reality contest?

Russell Davies will be testing whether the contenders in this week's third heat of the general knowledge quiz are up to the challenge of these, and many other questions. They come from London, Norfolk, Essex and Kent - and each will be hoping their general knowledge may see them through to the semi-finals and perhaps even taking their place on the illustrious list of Brain of Britain champions.

As usual, there's a chance for a Brain of Britain listener to win a prize too, by coming up with questions that might stump the combined knowledge of the panel.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Fear and Loathing in Harrogate (b04xmwz6)
Do you remember when the Tour de France came to Yorkshire ? When thousands upon thousands lined those sun-kissed moors and hills ? Cycling virgins John Cooper Clarke, Phill Jupitus, Simon Day and Mike Garry all respond to the day's proceedings at an evening of bike inspired performance, recorded on the first day of the race - poems, prose and jokes in Harrogate about one of last summer's most memorable events.

The evening was the brainchild of Johnny Green, former road manager of the Clash. First though he has to introduce his team of reprobates to the intricacies of the race, which they follow throughout the day. It is the crowd that inspires them the most, and the language is suitably rock and roll.

Simon Day appears as 'acclaimed' Yorkshire poet Geoffrey Allerton; Mike Garry is himself; Phill Jupitus rediscovers Porky the Poet; and John Cooper Clarke performs a heartfelt 'Ode to Bicycles' by Pablo Neruda.

Compere Johnny Green is author of Backstage at the Tour de France - 'conveys the magnificent bonkerness of le Tour rather well'.

The producer is Miles Warde.



SUNDAY 18 JANUARY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6v77)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Showman's Parson: Tales from the Memoirs of the Rev Thomas Horne (b03xcxxm)
The Cumberland Crusher

Thomas Horne was born in 1849 in a caravan at Nottingham Goose Fair. He spent the first part of his life as a working showman - dressing up as a performing bear, running a Penny Bazaar around the Lancashire Wakes, working as a doorman in Mrs Williams' Waxwork, and finally becoming an actor in a Mumming Booth and a partner in an Illusion Show. Latterly, he joined a missionary brotherhood in Oxford, and was ordained as a priest in Leeds in 1885.

Until his death in 1918, Thomas Horne was a vigorous campaigner for the rights of travelling people. With his education, training as a priest, and family association with the fairground, he was their ideal representative. He travelled throughout the country, preaching to showfolk and, in one year alone, he travelled over 12,000 miles, visiting fairs as far apart as Penzance in Cornwall to Ayr in Scotland.

The stories in this series are taken from his memoirs held in the National Fairground Archive in Sheffield.

Today's story concerns the goings-on in Nimble Nicky's Boxing Booth at Newcastle Races. John Umberston, the notorious Cumberland Crusher is persuaded to take on all-comers as part of a wrestling display. He meets his match, with tragic consequences.

Read by Tony Lidington

Producer: David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6v7d)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6v7p)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6v7v)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6v82)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b04y9nkm)
The bells of St Matthew's Church, Stretford, Greater Manchester.


SUN 05:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b04xrl8t)
Series 1

Cryptic Crosswords

Continuing his new series where he tries to make sense of apparently puzzling matters, David Baddiel seeks to understand something which is meant to be puzzling: cryptic crosswords.

David gets help from a crossword champion and and also from a leading compiler who sets him a special crossword. Can he put his learning into practice and complete it?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b04y6v8w)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04y9nkq)
The Song Inside

Inspired by words attributed to Henry Thoreau, Melissa Viney reflects on the fear some people have of leading 'lives of quiet desperation' and going to their graves 'with their songs inside them'.

She draws on readings from Raymond Carver, Mary Oliver and Martha Graham, a comedy routine by Dylan Moran, music by Pink Floyd, Talking Heads and Brahms, and an interview with the poet Ruth Sharman.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b04y9nks)
Trout Farming

Brown, blue and rainbow. On Your Farm explores the colourful world of Trout farming at Bibury fish farm in Gloucestershire. Sport fishing is the most popular activity in the UK, farms like Bibury restock lakes and reservoirs throughout the country with trout to be caught by anglers. Ruth Sanderson meets owner Kate Marriott who explains the process from egg to full fish, and the bizarre intricacies of farmed fish reproduction, and finds out why breeding fish is an exercise in vanity. Produced and presented in Bristol by Ruth Sanderson.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b04y6v98)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b04y6v9h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b04y9nkv)
Pope in Manila, Parisian Jews, Church and Politics

Could it be the biggest Papal crowd ever when Pope Francis says Mass for millions of Catholics in Manila on Sunday at the end of his trip to Sri Lanka and the Philippines? Our Religious Affairs Correspondent Caroline Wyatt is there.

Last week's attacks in Paris have stoked fears amongst the Jewish community and the number of inquiries of people making "Aliyah" (returning to Israel) has risen from hundreds to 2,000 since the attacks. John Laurenson reports from Paris.

An All Parliamentary Report recommends mindfulness training in several key areas of public life as a means of improving health and wellbeing. Madeline Bunting, co-founder of the Mindfulness Initiative and Dr Miles Neale, Buddhist psychotherapist debate the report's claims.

Last week Raif Badawi was whipped 50 times for offences ranging from cybercrime to insulting Islam. Fawaz Gerges explains why Saudi authorities appear reluctant to listen to international pressure to stop the punishment.

As the Church of England release five key papers ahead of Synod on 'Reform and Renewal' John Spence, Finance Chair of the Archbishop's Council, explains the pressing issues that the C of E faces.

With the General Election less than four weeks away a book edited by the Archbishop of York, John Sentamu, has been criticised as 'straying too far into the political arena'.

Trevor Barnes reports on the tensions that have always existed between Bishops and elected officials while The Bishop of Manchester David Walker and the Spectator's Assistant Editor Isabel Hardman debate.

Contributors:
John Spence
Madeline Bunting
Dr Miles Neale
Fawaz Gerges
Rt Rev David Walker, Bishop of Manchester
Isabel Hardman

Producers:David Cook
Zaffar Iqbal

Editor:Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b04y9nkx)
Book Aid International

Jonathan Dimbleby presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Book Aid International
Registered Charity No 313869
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope ' Book Aid International'.
- Cheques should be made payable to Book Aid International.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b04y6v9t)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b04y6v9z)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b04y9nl0)
From St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral, Glasgow.
"If I take the wings of the morning even there your right hand shall hold me fast." An early morning service of communion, with prayers for peace and justice, focusing on the promise of Psalm 139 that wherever we go, God's caring presence is always with us.
Hymn: Today I awake (Slithers of Gold)
Hymn: Glory be to God the Father (Regent Square)
Psalm 139: O God you search me and you know (Farrell)
Hymn: Sing for God's Glory that colours the dawn of creation (Lobe den Herren)
Sanctus and Benedictus & Agnus Dei: Macmillan - St Anne's Mass
Anthem: Richard Shephard: Out of the stillness of dark before dawn
Hymn: You are before me Lord, you are behind (Sursum Corda)
With the Provost, the Very Revd Kelvin Holdsworth. Cathedral Choir directed by Frikki Walker. Organist: Steven McIntyre.
Producer: Mo McCullough.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04xs4bn)
Language and Listening

AL Kennedy reflects on the importance of learning languages and listening to one another. "More words give me more paths to and from the hearts of others, more points of view - I don't think that's a bad thing."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0ptz)
Adelie Penguin

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the adelie penguin on a windswept Antarctic shore. A huddle of braying shapes on a windswept shore in Antarctica reveals itself to be a rookery of Adelie Penguins. These medium sized penguins whose white eye-ring gives them an expression of permanent astonishment were discovered in 1840 and named after the land which French explorer Jules Dumont d'-Urville named in honour of his wife Adele. They make a rudimentary nest of pebbles (sometimes pinched from a neighbour) from which their eggs hatch on ice-free shores in December, Antarctica's warmest month, when temperatures reach a sizzling minus two degrees. In March the adult penguins follow the growing pack ice north as it forms, feeding at its edge on a rich diet of krill, small fish and crustaceans. But as climate change raises ocean temperatures, the ice edge forms further south nearer to some of the breeding colonies, reducing the distance penguins have to walk to and from open water. But, if ice fails to form in the north of the penguin's range it can affect their breeding success, and at one research station breeding numbers have dropped by nearly two thirds.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b04y9nl2)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b04y9nl4)
Rob has got a lot on his mind, and Lilian is horrified.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b04y9nl6)
Julia Cleverdon

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the campaigner, Dame Julia Cleverdon.

As head of the charity, Business in the Community, she fine-tuned to perfection the art of persuasion. A phone call from her and many of the big beasts of the business world - the "pinstripes" she calls them - stride from their boardrooms intent on giving something back to society. Her energies and endeavours have powered countless corporate social responsibility programmes.

In a life dedicated to public service, she has charmed not only chief executives but apparently royalty too - HRH the Prince of Wales is a long time supporter and collaborator.

She seems keenly aware that not everyone has her good fortune of a first class education and top drawer connections - when she's not harrying the blue chip brigade, she's inspiring young people from all sorts of backgrounds to follow her example and get involved in social action.

She says, "one of the most important leadership roles is to grow people. It is very much like gardening. You tend them and apply fertiliser. But sometimes you have to prune them to make them grow stronger."

Producer: Paula McGinley.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vbt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b04xnd0c)
Series 14

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Arthur Smith, Sarah Millican, Sandi Toksvig and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as death, balloons, farming and Jane Austen.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b04y9nl8)
The Future of Food Markets

Food markets have been the heart of our towns and cities for thousands of years. Now, with financial pressure on local authorities, and growing competition from a supermarkets price war, Sheila Dillon and guests discuss what a market needs to survive in 2015.

Sheila is joined by award winning markets organiser Malcolm Veigas, Carolyn Steel architect and author of 'Hungry City' and market trader and BBC Food and Farming Awards 2015 judge in the Best Market category, Peter Gott.

She also hears from a 'monstrously huge' and revolutionary new market development in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, from one of the UK's oldest established markets in Leicester and from the organiser of Iceland's first ever farmers market.

Produced in Bristol by Clare Salisbury.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b04y6vbw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04y9nlb)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Inflating Shopping Basket (b04y9npb)
Every year the nation's shopping habits are analysed as the CPI - the Consumer Prices Index - is calculated. Statisticians use an imaginary shopping basket of things we buy to check price changes and have done since 1947. How we shopped, what we bought, what we cooked and the fads that we still remember today are all revealed in this ultimate shopping list.

Food journalist Andrew Webb uses this list to chart the change from post-war austerity to the rise of frozen foods as he joins friends in their eighties for a lunch of that 1950s classic, corned beef and mashed potatoes. He examines the development of brands and food advertising in the 1970s and 80s with packaging historian Robert Opie, while food scientists explain what went into creating the modern chilled ready meal. And he finds out why 2015 sees us returning to small baskets and shopping to lists.

Along the way he remembers classics like Smash instant potato as well as lesser known food oddities like cheese on Weetabix.

Presenter: Andrew Webb
Producer: Lucy Proctor.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04xs4b4)
North Cumbria

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from North Cumbria. Pippa Greenwood, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson join him to answer questions from the audience.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Claire Crofton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04y9rj2)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces teenagers campaigning on the issue of anorexia, and fathers and daughters dealing with the loss of a family member and the loss of a career, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b04y9rj4)
The Last Days of Troy

Episode 2

The Last Days of Troy. Simon Armitage's dramatisation completes Homer's Iliad and Virgil's Aeneid
The Greeks are laying siege to Troy to win back their abducted queen, Helen. But as the conflict drags on, and despite battlefields scarlet with blood, opposing forces have reached a bitter stalemate. Desperate and exhausted, both Gods and mortals squabble amongst themselves for the spoils of war and the hand of victory.

The Last Days of Troy reveals a world locked in cycles of conflict and revenge, of east versus west, and a dangerous mix of pride, lies and self-deception.

Lily Cole gives her radio debut as Helen of Troy - the face that launched a thousand ships.

Original music composed by Alex Baranowski
Directed for Radio by Susan Roberts
First directed for The Royal Exchange Theatre by Nick Bagnall.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b04y9rj6)
Emma Hooper on Etta and Otto and Russell and James

Canadian writer Emma Hooper talks to Mariella about her first novel Etta and Otto and Russell and James, the story of octogenarian Etta who sets off from her home in the Canadian prairies to walk the two thousand miles to the coast. She leaves behind her husband Otto and as she walks she remembers their childhood, and wartime courtship. Emma tells Mariella about her grandparents, who inspired the characters and her love of the bleak, harsh Saskatchewan landscape where the novel is set.

Catherine Taylor profiles the Italian novelist Elena Ferrante who has ardent fans around the the world, but who remains resolutely private - refusing to give interviews or make public appearances.

Sandip Roy sends a postcard from India and Ben Okri, who won the Man Booker prize for his novel The Famished Road, reveals why his copy of Don Quixote is the book he'd never lend.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b04y9rj8)
Poems to Make You Laugh

Roger McGough presents poetry to make you laugh, with poets from Wendy Cope to Ivor Cutler, taking in Kit Wright, Clive James and Adrian Mitchell along the way.
There's Carol Ann Duffy's ode to the Kray Sisters, Michael Rosen's mickey-taking brother, and Roger throws a few of his own into the mix for good measure. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b04xp4x3)
Prison Violence

With serious assaults at a record high, File on 4 investigates the growing tension within Britain's prisons.

In the first of a new series, BBC Home Affairs correspondent Danny Shaw meets recently released prisoners and families of those inside to hear about their safety fears.

And he talks to the Prison Officers Association about their concerns for the frontline members who they say are facing unprecedented levels of pressure and danger in a "chaotic" system.

The Howard League for Penal Reform has used Ministry of Justice figures to calculate that around 40% of prison officer jobs have been cut - leaving inmates spending longer locked in their cells and less time preparing for their release.

Lawyers and campaigners tell File on 4 that overcrowding and gang activity are adding to a "toxic mix" of problems leading to instability and tension.

Twenty five years after the prison system was shaken by a series of riots centring on Strangeways in Manchester, is a new crisis starting to unfold?

Reporter: Danny Shaw Producer: Sally Chesworth.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b04y6kcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vby)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b04y6vc0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vc2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b04y9s7s)
Stewart Henderson

Arising from her fate, we have that Juliet with us this week. For Shakespeare's doomed damsel is currently advising the love struck from her Verona salon. Also with the impending television dramatisation of Wolf Hall, author Hilary Mantel takes us back to the book's first paragraphs where Thomas Cromwell suffers a parental battering. And, if you wish to complain about this programme there is a radio seminar just for you on the etiquette of successful moaning....shouldn't be allowed...

Join Stewart Henderson for this week's Pick of the Week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b04y9s7v)
Jolene gets a shock when she catches Harrison in the shower. He and Fallon have moved in while the heating in Fallon's flat is mended.

Down in the bar, lonely Lilian gets chatting to Adam, who's looking tanned from his holiday. She could do with some company but Adam's busy - only there to put up a poster about the cricket club meeting. Jolene cheers Lilian up by telling her about her embarrassing moment with Harrison.

Chatting with Jolene about the Valentine's Day 1940s dance, Jolene tells Lilian to write it down in Matt's calendar. This gives Lilian an idea. As she heads home, sheepish Harrison pops down. He gets a flirty tease from Jolene, who has clearly recovered from her embarrassment.

Rob and Helen enjoy some kite flying with Henry. They spot Adam, who's rather evasive with Helen. Helen goes home feeling a cold coming on. Rob senses there's something else going on and fumes about Jess. But Helen reveals it's not that. She tells Rob about seeing Adam and Charlie kissing at New Year. He must promise not to say anything to Ian.

Harrison drops round to check on Lilian, who points out that Matt has circled 14 February on their year planner. She's convinced that Matt must have something planned. She knows her Tiger - he's bound to come back.


SUN 19:15 The Rest is History (b04y9v20)
Series 1

Episode 6

Frank Skinner loves history, but just doesn't know much of it.

This comedy discussion show with celebrity guests promises to help him find out more about it.

With Josh Widdicombe, Roisin Conaty and historian in residence Dr Kate Williams.

Frank and company navigate their way through the annals of time, picking out and chewing over the funniest, oddest, and most interesting moments in history.

Producers: Dan Schreiber and Justin Pollard

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


SUN 19:45 Subway (b04y9w1g)
Out of the Depths

A multi-contributor series of specially-commissioned stories with subterranean settings.

Episode 2: Out Of The Depths by Tom Connolly
Hoping to take his new relationship to the next level, Mike takes Mary and her kids to Paris on the Eurostar. A visit to the Catacombs with Mary's son is supposed to be a bonding exercise...

Tom Connolly is the producer and director of award winning short films for the BBC and Channel 4, including the critically acclaimed Dogfight. His debut novel The Spider Truces was shortlisted for the Writers' Guild of Great Britain Award and the Desmond Elliott Prize. His play The Man In The Lift was broadcast on Radio 4 in 2013.

Read by Barnaby Kay

Produced by Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b04y53fk)
How big are the Conservatives' planned cuts?

The Conservatives' plans to achieve a budget surplus by 2019-20 have led to near universal acknowledgment that big reductions in spending would be required. However, David Cameron said government spending would only need to be reduced by 1% per year. So, how big are the cuts? Tim Harford asks Gemma Tetlow of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

In the wake of the Paris killings, an imam in Paris told the BBC that 95% of terrorism victims around the world are Muslim. Is that true? More or Less speaks to Erin Miller of the Global Terrorism Database.

The reported death toll of the Boko Haram attack in Baga, Nigeria, this month has ranged from 150 to more than 2000 people. More or Less speaks to Julian Rademeyer of Africa Check, who's been trying to get to the truth.

Which are the world's worst boardgames? Oliver Roeder, a senior writer for the website FiveThirtyEight, has done a statistical analysis of player reviews to answer this question. He's also been looking at which are considered to be the best. Tim Harford challenges Oliver to a transatlantic game of Snakes and Ladders.

And the coverage of the Living Planet Index and its claim that species populations have dropped 50% in the last 40 years aroused much suspicion among More or Less listeners. The team looks at what the figure means and how it was calculated.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04y53fh)
Ray McFall, Richard Meade, Joan Benesh, Frank Atkinson and Brian Clemens

Matthew Bannister on

Ray McFall, the former accountant who ran the Cavern Club in Liverpool and booked the Beatles more than 200 times.

Richard Meade who won both team and individual eventing Gold medals at the Olympics.

Joan Benesh, who perfected the system for noting down complex dance moves in ballet.

Frank Atkinson who founded and ran the Beamish open air museum in County Durham.

And Brian Clemens the screenwriter best known for creating the Avengers and the Professionals.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b04y6kcf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b04y9nkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b04xrwhr)
Money Making

Peter Day explores the future of money and asks how "cashless" we may become. With the arrival of internet based digital currencies such as bitcoin and payments via mobile phones, he looks at whether the banks will still have a role to play.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04y9w5b)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04y9w5d)
Leading journalists analyse how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b04xrvbf)
Nick Hornby on Wild; JK Simmons and Damien Chazelle on Whiplash

With Francine Stock.

Arsenal fan Nick Hornby reveals what appealed to him about Cheryl Strayed's memoir Wild, about her 1000 mile hike through mid America, and why he was never tempted to try the walk himself.

Jazz drumming is the unlikely subject for a movie, but Whiplash has won numerous awards in festivals across the world. Its director Damien Chazelle and star J.K. Simmons discuss the film's theme of how music teaching can turn into bullying.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04y9nkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 19 JANUARY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6vd0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b04xrl8f)
Living Apart Relationships - Grading Universities

Grading universities - The rights and wrongs of the Research Excellence Framework. The REF is the most recent in a series of national assessments of research in British universities. But how reliable and fair are these assessments? Do they give the taxpayer value for money, as is hoped by their advocates? And will they lead to the best and most innovative research in the future? Laurie Taylor asks the questions. He's joined by the former Minister for Higher Education and Conservative MP, David Willets, and by Derek Sayer, Professor of History at the University of Lancaster and author of a recent book which argues that the REF isn't fit for purpose.

Also, living apart together. Sasha Roseneil, co-author of a Europe wide study, examines why a growing number of couples choose to live separately.

Producer: Torquil Macleod.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b04y9nkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vd2)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6vd4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vd6)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6vd8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04y9y6m)
With Andrew Graystone.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04y9y6p)
Scottish agriculture, Bee diseases, Farm machinery

This is a key week for Scottish devolution, with publication expected of the draft version of clauses to be included in the Scotland Bill. After the no vote in last year's independence referendum, it was agreed that further powers would be devolved to Scotland - including income tax, VAT, and air passenger duty.
One of the less publicised areas is farming. Agriculture is already devolved, but when it comes to negotiations in the EU, the United Kingdom is still represented as one entity - in the form of Defra. New powers will mean that Scottish farmers' views must be taken into account when UK ministers go to Europe.

There are calls for stricter regulation on the use of bees, following new research at the University of Exeter which shows that viruses found on bees used to pollinate commercial crops can jump into wild populations, with potentially devastating results. Charlotte Smith talks to one of the researchers.

The LAMMA show, which is the UK's largest farm machinery and equipment show, takes place in Peterborough this week. Charlotte asks two specialist agricultural journalists what's hot in the world of combine harvesters.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04y6vdb)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0rtf)
Harpy Eagle

Michael Palin presents the Harpy Eagle flying over the Brazilian rainforest. This is one of the most powerful birds of prey and links mythological corpse-bearers, the coat of arms of Panama and the Harry Potter films.

In Greek mythology harpies were creatures with the bodies of eagles and the faces of women, who seized people in their claws. A human body is beyond the real-life harpy eagle, but with its massive 12 cm talons, it can carry a full-grown sloth or an adult howler monkey. Being versatile hunters, the eagles catch a range of birds and reptiles and can easily hoist porcupines and armadillos into the treetops to feed their young.

Harpy Eagles breed in the rainforests of central and South America. They're blackish- grey above and white below with a black collar and a divided crest which gives them an uncanny resemblance to Buckbeak the Hippogriff in 'Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban'.


MON 06:00 Today (b04y9y6r)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b04y9y86)
Surveillance and Self-censorship

Tom Sutcliffe's joined in the studio by Pulitzer Prize winning poet Paul Muldoon, Oxford professor of Russian Catriona Kelly, Philip Schofield who is a professor at UCL and director of The Bentham Project and by Canadian blogger and science fiction writer Cory Doctorow. How do we respond, creatively, when people or algorithms put our physical and virtual worlds under surveillance?

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b04yb0f5)
Epilogue: A Memoir

Prologue

Jamie Parker reads Will Boast's extraordinary family story. A moving account of loss, confronting long-held secrets and finding a way of facing the future.

Following the tragic deaths, in quick succession, of his mother, younger brother and father, American author, Will Boast, at the age of 24, finds himself absolutely alone. It's while he's putting his father's papers in order that he discovers a family secret which takes him back to England and compels him to question everything he thought he knew about his parents.

Read by Jamie Parker
Abridged by Miranda Emmerson
Producer: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04yb0f7)
Secret eating, Teacher-pupil relationships, Julie Hesmondhalgh

We look at teacher/pupil relationships and why there is still debate about whom the 'victim' is in cases where sex has occurred. Julie Hesmondhalgh is best known for playing Hayley Cropper, Coronation Street's first transgender character. Now she has a new part in Russell T Davies's latest drama, Cucumber, playing Cleo, sister of gay man Henry. Research at the University of Surrey has shown that potassium salts, found in fruit and veg, can help prevent osteoporosis. Dr Helen Lambert talks about the new research, and we ask GP Clare Gerada how we can best get health messages across to the public. Medieval princess Eleanor De Montfort is known as the 'Mother of the Parliament'. Louise Wilkinson, Professor of Medieval History talks about her significant role in the creation of the earliest Parliament in Britain. Eating in secret can range from the harmless but guilty pleasure of eating peanut butter straight from the jar to an indication or symptom of an eating disorder. We consider why some people eat in private and when it becomes a problem.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04yb2wy)
The Corrections

Chip in Vilnius

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 11: Chip in Vilnius - Chip Lambert's happy interlude in Vilnius, running a scam investment website for Gitanas Misevicius, comes to an abrupt end.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


MON 11:00 Out of the Ordinary (b04yb2x0)
Series 3

Desperately Seeking Sperm

Annie, 35, wants a baby, but she doesn't have a partner. If she could afford it, she could go down the official and regulated route to a fertility clinic and get pregnant using donor sperm. But that could cost thousands of pounds. So instead, she's gone online and entered the world of unregulated sperm donation.

Jolyon Jenkins investigates this shadowy world. It's illegal to sell sperm, but some men are making a living doing so. Others offer free sperm in return for "natural insemination", i.e. sex. Some women report that men who start by appearing to offer free sperm, gradually exert pressure on them to have sex.

But what of those who want neither money nor sex in return for their sperm? Jolyon discovers the world of the "super donor" - men who compete to inseminate as many women as possible, in an acknowledged bid to spread their genes as widely as they can. Their activity can border on the obsessive."It is a bit like stamp collecting really," says one. "I devote three hours per day to it, through travelling to donate or arranging my spreadsheets or doing my photo albums of the children".

The risks to women and their children are obvious - sexually transmitted infection, hereditary conditions unwittingly passed on, and accidental incest between half-siblings. If women could afford to use the official channels, they would be much safer. Instead, they are being driven into the hands of sexual adventurers, serial liars, and hobby eugenicists.

Presenter/producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 11:30 The Best Laid Plans (b04yb2x2)
Would Like To Meet

Smallbone and the gang hold a speed-dating event to raise money for the church roof. Will Smallbone find true love or, perhaps inevitably, make a complete hash of it?

Ardal O'Hanlon plays Smallbone - an idiot angel who's sent to earth to fix his mistakes - in Mark Daydy's sitcom.

In 1885, God (Geoff McGivern) nodded off. In 2015, he awoke to discover that his idiot servant, the angel Smallbone, had accidentally handed out God's plans for the next millennium when he was only meant to hand out plans for the next century. A thousand years of leisurely human progression has been crammed into the last 130. No wonder we're all so stressed. We weren't even meant to have pocket calculators until 2550.

Not only that, but God's blueprints should have run out in the mid-eighties – but we kept going. Humans are now inventing things God never even dreamed of - mobile phones, wireless internet and Made in Chelsea.

Smallbone is cast down to Earth in human form by God, tasked with the dauntingly vague mission of 'reversing the last thirteen decades of human progression'. The problem is that Smallbone is the world's biggest fan - he loves modern technology and his new human body, and he becomes distracted by everything that he's meant to destroy. Especially escalators.

Smallbone.......Ardal O'Hanlon
God.................Geoff McGivern
Tanya..............Esther Smith
Toby................Mike Wozniak
Susan..............Ruth Bratt
Supporting Roles: Duncan Wisbey and Ruth Bratt

Written by Mark Daydy.

Produced by Ben Worsfield.
A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vdd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04yb2x4)
What Makes Us Human?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking What makes us human?

Helping him answer it are philosopher Barry Smith, classicist Catharine Edwards, historian Simon Schaffer and theologian Giles Fraser.

For the rest of the week Barry, Catharine, Simon and Giles will take us further into the history of ideas about being human with programmes of their own. Between them they will examine the evolution of language, the Stoic philosopher Seneca, the classification of all living species, the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and the film Bladerunner.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b04yb2x6)
Portable Mortgages, Voucher Stacking, Church Music

Millions of people have a 'portable' mortgage, which in principle allows them to transfer the interest rate to a new home, but many are finding that they don't meet new eligibility criteria, even when they aren't looking to borrow any more money.

Voucher stacking is the habit of looking for deals that allow you to combine them with other offers, resulting in a large discount from the selling price. We hear how much it can save.

And a new gadget for guitarists claims to mimic the sound of church and cathedral organs. Could it be an alternative for churches that struggle to find an organist?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Joel Moors.


MON 12:57 Weather (b04y6vdg)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b04yb3s5)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00y6p63)
Bricklaying

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

The first programme explores how Winston Churchill was a committed bricklayer, and he even joined the bricklayers' union. But this didn't mean he had anything in common with the working man. He was surrounded by a retinue of servants, he never even set foot in a shop and he famously got stuck on the Circle Line the only time he used the tube.

Featuring Roger Allam as the voice of Winston Churchill. Other parts are played by Ewan Bailey, Jasmine Hyde, James Sobol Kelly and Simon Tchernaik.

The theme tune is composed by David Owen Norris.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b04y9s7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04yb5fn)
Series 2

Episode 1

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 1:
Joey finds a gun Brian has hidden at his house, panics and calls the police.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b04yb5g5)
(4/17)
Which is the largest landlocked country in the world? And which word is both an Imperial measurement of weight and the alternative name for the snow leopard?

Russell Davies puts these and many other questions to the four latest competitors in the evergreen general knowledge quiz. They'll each be hoping their general knowledge proves to be good enough to carry them through to the semi-finals, and perhaps even all the way to the 62nd Brain of Britain title.

There's also a chance for a listener to win a prize by suggesting questions that will stump the contestants' collective knowledge, in 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b04y9nl8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Can You Spot the Hidden Message? (b0501kvj)
What is subliminal advertising? David Aaronovitch investigates the mysterious birth of this modern myth - and introduces a unique new BBC experiment, conducted in collaboration with The Infinite Monkey Cage, to try it out.

Subliminal advertising was first tried out on the public in a cinema in New Jersey in 1956 - but no information about this was formally released for over a year.

And when the man behind the experiment finally went public, the mystery just deepened. James Vicary, a well-known 'motivational researcher', claimed amazing results for his new technique - but refused to reveal details, pleading a patent application.

He thought people would be pleased as his method would mean fewer ad breaks - but instead, he faced an explosion of panic and outrage. Subliminal advertising was damned as "a technique for a Goebbels".

And then a cinema trade paper, Motion Picture Daily, actually investigated the story - and it turned out that the manager of the cinema said the experiment hadn't really had any impact on sales...

In this programme, David Aaronovitch clears away much of the myth and misinformation surrounding Vicary and his strange experiment - and explores what science has to tell us about subliminal influence.

He talks to Professor Wolfgang Stroebe of the University of Utrecht in Holland, who explains how, in strict lab conditions, he has repeatedly made subliminal advertisng work.

But can his laboratory findings be transferred to a public venue?

To test this, David presents a unique new BBC experiment, developed and run by producer Phil Tinline under the guidance of Professor Stroebe.

In our test, almost 100 volunteers from the Infinite Monkey Cage audience are divided into a test group and a control group. Each group is shown the same three-minute clip - but only one contains subliminal flashes of the name of a drink brand.

Then the volunteers are offered a choice of two drinks - the drink brand, and a mineral water. But will the test group pick the subliminally advertised brand significantly more often than the control group?

To find out, listeners will need to stay with Radio 4. The results will be announced during the edition of the Infinite Monkey Cage that follows straight on from this programme...

With: Professor Charles Acland, Kelly Crandall, Professor Timothy Moore, Professor Wolfgang Stroebe

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE

NOTE: Prof Stroebe's research shows that subliminal messages are ineffective if the participants know about them. Participants in our experiment confirmed in writing that they understood and accepted that we could not divulge the full nature of this experiment, or what we were testing, until afterwards.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b04yfsst)
Series 11

Deception

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by author and journalist David Aaronovitch, psychologist Professor Richard Wiseman and neuroscientist Professor Sophie Scott as they tackle the science of deception. They'll be asking why we seem to be so good at telling lies, but not very good at spotting them, and why being good liars could be the secret to our success as a social animal. They will also be carrying out their own act of deception on the monkey cage audience. They reveal the results of an experiment to test the idea of subliminal advertising, carried out by David Aaronovitch for the Radio 4 documentary, "Can You Spot the Hidden Message" . Will they manage to secretly persuade a section of the theatre audience to pick one type of soft drink over another by secretly flashing the name of a certain brand on a screen? All will be revealed.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.


MON 17:00 PM (b04yfssw)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vdj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b05061zg)
Series 14

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Ed Byrne, Holly Walsh, Richard Osman and Henning Wehn are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Ancient Egypt, ice, rubbish and British food.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b04yfst0)
Pip tells Jill the latest on the Brookfield sale and move to Hadley Haugh. They won't be leaving Brookfield quite as soon as they'd planned, as the building conversion and the robotic milker setup will take a few months. David will need to speak to Justin Elliott to see if they can stay on at Brookfield as tenants after the sale.

Pip helps Jill clearing and boxing up old things in the attic. They find Elizabeth's old dolls and the lettered baby bricks that Jill and Phil used to come up with Kenton and Shula's names. Snappy More interested in getting a meeting with Justin, David has no time to look through old stuff, such as the old model farm of his that Jill has dug out.

As Emma talks through dress ideas with Susan, Ed is preoccupied by a letter from the Estate. He plays it down as a little mix-up about the rent.

Ed interrupts Eddie from pheasant plucking to get some urgent advice. Ed's received a Notice of Forfeiture for the fifty acres of land he rents. It t looks like he's going to be turfed off it.

Ed tells Emma the truth, as Eddie assures him he'll be ok. Ed must call the Tenant Farmers Association tomorrow.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b04yfst2)
Mark Ronson and Michael Chabon, Helen Macdonald, Rubens at the RA

Musician and producer Mark Ronson talks to John Wilson about the influences behind his new album Uptown Special, and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon considers the trials involved in writing lyrics for the album.

In the first of a series of interviews with the Costa Book Award category winners, John Wilson talks to Helen Macdonald who has won the Biography award for H is for Hawk, a memoir of her grief at the sudden death of her father and how it led her to train a goshawk, Mabel - a notoriously difficult bird.

Rubens and his Legacy: Van Dyck to Cézanne is the new exhibition at the Royal Academy in London which assesses Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens's influence on art history. Art critic William Feaver assesses the 160 works on display.

Sotheby's has been cleared of negligence over the attribution of a painting claimed to be by Caravaggio, so John seeks advice from Karen Sanig, Head of Art Law at solicitors Mishcon de Reya about what you might do if a work by a certain artist that you have bought turns out not to be, and the complications arising.

Producer Julian May.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04yb2wy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Devil's Rope (b048l0s1)
Ian Marchant traces the story of how barbed wire privatised America. He drives from DeKalb, Illinois where 'the devil's rope' was invented, to the Barbed Wire Museum at La Crosse, Kansas, calling along the way at the birthplace of Buffalo Bill and the wildest cow-town of them all, Abilene, where Wild Bill Hickock was marshal. 'Uncle' Joe Glidden's simple invention was patented in 1874. Within 15 years it had put an end to the wild west and consigned its mythology to the dime novels and the movies. In the place of cowboys, indians and outlaws came civil society, modern capitalism and the idea that land is there to be owned and exploited.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b04xrv9x)
Greece: The Rubber Glove Rebellion

The cleaners whose protest has captured the imagination of those opposed to the harsh austerity programme in Greece. Mostly middle-aged or nearing retirement, they have refused to go quietly. The women have kept up a day and night vigil outside the Finance Ministry in Athens, taken the government to court and resisted attempts by the riot police to remove them by force. They've challenged representatives from the International Monetary Fund and raised their red rubber gloves in a clenched fist at the European Parliament. Some say they represent the plight of many women and the poorly paid, others that they are being manipulated by the left. Maria Margaronis hears the women's stories and asks what makes them so determined.

Producer: Mark Savage.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04xp15k)
Half and Half

The world has lost so much wildlife some conservationists think half the earth should be set aside for nature to ensure the world can continue to provide all the services we need such as clean water, unpolluted air and soils, healthy food and so on. But one recent study shows that 50% of wildlife has disappeared in the last 40 years. As human population grows and pressure on resources increases many feel there needs to be a bold plan to ensure we can share the planet with other forms of life so that they and us can continue. One proposition is called Half Earth - make half of the earth just for nature. The vision is for a meandering network of nature corridors that open out into huge parks set aside for wildlife. In a special programme from the Natural History Museum in London Monty Don and a panel of experts in subjects ranging from conservation science to urban planning and economics discuss whether this could work?


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b04y9y86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b04yfst4)
Pope says Catholics do not need to 'be like rabbits'.

Pontiff says Catholic teaching on birth control does not mean people should have no control over how many children to have. He was speaking to reporters on the plane as he flew home after a visit to Asia - where he defended ban on artificial contraception.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04yfst7)
Curtain Call

Episode 6

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b04xp4wn)
Philip Pullman and Michael Rosen talk about language and writing

Philip Pullman and Michael Rosen talk in depth about language, writing and imagination. They share examples from their own work, discuss the books that influenced them and share who they think they are writing for. Produced by Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04yfst9)
MPs approve the fast-tracking of women bishops to the House of Lords. The Northern Ireland Secretary answers more questions about letters sent to so-called "on-the-runs". And are fewer people eating meals on wheels? Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 20 JANUARY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6vfh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b04yb0f5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vfk)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6vfm)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vfp)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6vfr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04yrqnt)
With Andrew Graystone.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b04yfsy7)
Dairy, Agricultural Engineers, Lambing

A report out by the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, is calling on the government for more help to protect UK dairy farmers from volatile milk prices. Anna Hill speaks to the chair of the committee, MP Anne McIntosh.

Although thousands of farmers will gather at the UK's largest farm machinery and equipment show this week, there is a shortage of UK agricultural engineers in the industry. This is according to a survey carried out the Landbased Engineering Training and Education Committee. Farming Today asks why and whether the situation will improve in coming years.

And as the lambing season has started for some farmers, dog owners are being reminded to act responsibly. For outdoor flocks, the pregnant ewes are out in the fields and can be vulnerable victims.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sc8)
Kakapo

Michael Palin presents the New Zealand Kakapo, high on the ferny slopes of its island fortress off the coast of New Zealand. Kakapos are flightless and the heaviest parrots in the world. They're also called owl-parrots from their nocturnal habits and open owlish expressions. Like owls their plumage is richly mottled although no owl shares their beautiful moss-green tones.

Kakapos also have a curious mating strategy. The males gather at traditional "leks" or display areas to attract mates. At the top of a wooded ridge, the male digs one or more a bowl- like depressions in the ground which function as an amplifier. He then takes a deep breath, swells his throat-pouch like a balloon then releases the air with a soft booming call which can carry up to five kilometres.

This sound can now only be heard on a handful of offshore islands. The kakapo story is tragically familiar. Flightless and ground-nesting, it was helpless in the face of settlers who logged its forests and introduced cats and rats which slaughtered the birds. Between 1987 and 1992 the last surviving kakapos were relocated to predator-free islands. Now following intensive care and a national conservation strategy, there are about 130 kakapos in the wild.


TUE 06:00 Today (b04yftkh)
Including from 0830 a special Democracy Day edition of BBC Radio 4's Public Philosopher in which Professor Michael Sandel goes inside the Palace of Westminster to explore the nature and limits of democracy, challenging an audience of MPs, Peers and the public to apply some critical thinking to what democracy really means.


TUE 09:00 Can Democracy Work? (b0506ykz)
Episode 2

Is our democracy working? Today there's a real sense of our traditional democratic system fracturing - but is this because it's failing, or is it because it's doing exactly what we want it to?
In 'Can Democracy Work?' The BBC's Political Editor Nick Robinson questions top politicians, those seeking power around the UK and direct action campaigners, as well as testing public opinion, to find out what we really want from our democracy and whether it can deliver.
In episode two, Nick asks if vested interests dominate our democracy and explores why so many in Britain now feel ignored and alienated from politics.
Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b04yftkm)
Adrian Goldberg on Mixed Marriage

In the second of three editions of One to One, broadcaster Adrian Goldberg - who is married to a British Asian woman - explores the topic of mixed marriage. Today Adrian meets Rosalind Birtwistle, a Christian woman who married a Jewish man in the 1970s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b04yftkr)
Epilogue: A Memoir

Divorce

The death of author Will's father brings a long-held family secret out into the open.

Jamie Parker continues reading from Will Boast's moving account of loss and coming to terms with the past.

Abridged by Miranda Emmerson.

Producer: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04yftkt)
Democracy Day

A special Democracy Day edition. The Lord Speaker Baroness D'Souza discusses her role and the significance of the House of Lords. Archivist Mari Takayanagi looks at the history of women trying to get in to parliament. Helen Pankhurst, the great-granddaughter of Emmeline, and her daughter Laura discuss their family heritage and the political battles women are still facing. Kuwaiti artist and activist Shurooq Amin and Nan Sloane, Director of the Centre for Women & Democracy, explore what democracy means for women in the UK and internationally. Girl Guides explain why they were keen to pilot a new badge introduced to show girls how they can have a voice and be politically aware.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04yftkx)
The Corrections

The Large People of St Jude

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Richard Laing. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 12: Alfred and Enid have recovered from the traumatic events of their north Atlantic cruise, and now Enid's hopes for a Christmas family reunion in St Jude will not be dampened.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b04yftkz)
Natural Symbols

In the final programme of the series a panel of experts from different disciplines choose an object they feel represents our relationship with nature. Recorded in the Natural History Museum in London in front of an audience Monty Don explores how our connection to nature has changed through time and what we may need to do to ensure we live on a vibrant planet in the future. The four guests from different areas of expertise from archaeology to conservation science to oceanography choose one thing that tells a big story. Monty Don explores how each object shows how our view of nature has changed since our time as hunter gatherers. Over the thousands of years we have lived on earth we have become increasingly divorced from the nitty gritty of the natural world. Where are we heading and what do we need to do to enable all of life to share this one planet? As population increases and stress on resources gets more intense there has never been a more important time to assess our impact on planet earth.


TUE 11:30 The True Story of Abner Jay (b04yftl1)
Laura Barton pieces together the true story of Abner Jay, a most unusual musical talent.

Abner Jay was an itinerant musician - a modern-day minstrel. He was a one-man band, a songster, a storehouse of history and an off-colour raconteur; he was a direct line to a different era.

He said that his instruments were centuries old, passed down through his family. That his father and grandfather had been slaves. He claimed to have fathered 16 children, that daily doses of water from the Suwannee River kept him young and that he was 25 years younger than you think.

But you never know what to believe with Abner Jay.

What is certainly true is that he travelled the Southern states of the US with a converted mobile home which he opened out into a makeshift stage. And he was possibly the last performer of the 'bones' - a musical tradition that involved playing rhythms on cow and chicken bones dried in the sun.

The writer Laura Barton talks to those who knew him and those who love his music in an effort to dig beneath the myth and misdirection and reveal the true story of Abner Jay.

Featuring Sherry Sherrod Dupree, William Ferris, Jay Martin, Jack Teague and Brandie Watson.

Producer: Martin Williams.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vft)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04yftl3)
Simon Schaffer on humans, apes and Carl Linnaeus

Simon Schaffer is interested in the human species in general and one member of it in particular. Carl Linnaeus was a Swedish botanist and zoologist who set out the basic structure of how we name and understand life on earth. In doing so he broached the thorny question of where humans should sit among the species of the earth. A hundred years before Darwin he correctly placed us among the apes. Simon examines that relationship to see the things that mark our similarities and our differences. Simon comes face to face with 'Jock', an adult Gorilla at Bristol Zoo and talks to Prof. Robert Foley about human evolution. He also sees how Linnaeus' ideas were used to support racial science. After all if humans were more like apes perhaps some humans were more like apes than others.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b04yftl5)
Call You and Yours: Inequality

Call You & Yours is asking how comfortable are you with the level of inequality in Britain today?

Email the programme now: youandyours@bbc.co.uk

As world leaders meet in the Swiss resort of Davos for the World Economic Forum, Oxfam has called on governments to adopt a plan to tackle inequality. The charity says governments need to clampdown on tax evasion, and ensure a living wage is paid to all workers. The UK is the only G7 nation where levels of inequality have risen over the past four year, and according to The Equality Trust the top fifth of the UK population have 42% of the country's income, and 60% of the wealth, while the bottom fifth have 8% of the income, and 1% of the wealth.

So we are asking, has it gone too far? Or is some inequality inevitable and good for the economy?

Email the programme with your experiences - have you noticed the rich getting richer, and the poor getting poorer? Are you living closer to the bread line? What difference have the super-rich made to you?

The email address is youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b04y6vfw)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04yftl9)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zfsxy)
Appetite

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill is known to have drunk copious quantities of alcohol. But was he an alcoholic? He developed a taste for Havana cigars while visiting Cuba, but did he actually smoke all those cigars? Churchill was so keen on his food that, during the Second World War, the constraints of rationing were unknown to him. In the second programme of 'Churchill's Other Lives', Sir David Cannadine enjoys Winston Churchill's prodigious appetite for food, drink and cigars.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b04yfst0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04yk3d4)
Series 2

Episode 2

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 2:
Joey borrows a lot of money to invest in the Minister of Transport's road-building company.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04y6kc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b04yk7h2)
Series 5

Hindsight Bias

The Human Zoo is a place to learn about the one subject that never fails to fascinate - ourselves. Are people led by the head or by the heart? How rational are we? And how do we perceive the world?

There's a curious blend of intriguing experiments to discover our biases and judgements, explorations and examples taken from what's in the news to what we do in the kitchen, and it's all driven by a large slice of curiosity.

Michael Blastland presents. Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick University, is the experimenter-in-chief, and Timandra Harkness the resident reporter.
In this programme hindsight bias - the "I knew it all along" effect - comes under the microscope.

Producer: Eve Streeter and Dom Byrne

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b04yk47x)
Are you really Somali? Using language to determine country of origin

Michael Rosen examines the use of language analysis to judge asylum seekers' country of origin, when they've arrived in the UK with no documentation. Linguists can then be used to try and verify which country the person comes from, as they apply for refugee status. With linguists Laura Wright and Peter Patrick, and Lars-Johan Lundberg of Verified, the Swedish company that the Government uses to carry out the analysis.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b04yk47g)
Series 35

Eve Pollard on Nora Ephron

Former newspaper editor and writer Eve Pollard tells Matthew Parris why Nora Ephron, the screenwriter of hit films such as 'When Harry Met Sally', 'Heartburn', and 'Sleepless in Seattle', is a Great Life.

They are joined by Dr Jennifer Smyth, an historian whose teaching includes women in Hollywood at the University of Warwick.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar


TUE 17:00 PM (b04yk47z)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vfy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b04yk55d)
Series 6

Gyles Brandreth

Marcus Brigstocke persuades his reluctant guest to try new experiences: things they really ought to have done by now. Some experiences are loved, some are loathed, in this show all about embracing the new.

This week, Gyles Brandreth is persuaded to spend a day doing absolutely nothing, and writes his first ever pop song.

Produced by Bill Dare.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04yk55g)
Ed has spoken to the TFA. He has to apply for a relief of forfeiture. Totting everything up, Ed reckons he owes £5k to get back on track. He'll never get hold of that sort of money. Eddie tells Ed he needs to sell four of his cows. Ed panics at the idea, but realizes it's his only option.

Kate is buzzing after her day at Uni. Phoebe reluctantly joins Kate for dinner in Borchester, enduring Kate going on about her favourite course module and the cool young friends she's made. She takes a call from one of them, Steph, inviting her for more drinks this evening.

Over a glass of wine, Lilian lies to Jennifer about Matt, saying he's on a business trip. She changes the subject to the Valentine's dance.

Phoebe arrives home alone - Kate has stayed out for drinks. Weary Phoebe goes up to her room, where Jennifer joins her to check what's wrong. Phoebe's had an awful day. She got a bad mark on an essay and her friend made her feel terrible. Kate didn't bother to ask about her day. Jennifer comforts Phoebe, who then gets a text from Kate with a 'selfie' of Kate with her new friends and wearing pussycat ears. It's all so sad and embarrassing.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04yk7h4)
Ex Machina, Jamie Lloyd, Max Brooks and Emma Healey

Ex Machina is the new film written and directed by Alex Garland, writer of The Beach and 28 Days Later, about the quest for the perfect AI robot. Briony Hanson, Director of Film at the British Council, reviews the film that stars Alicia Vikander, Domhnall Gleeson and Oscar Isaac.

Samira Ahmed talks to theatre director Jamie Lloyd, well-known for re-imagining great plays and finding in them contemporary relevance. His latest production is The Ruling Class, Peter Barnes's 1968 satire of those in power and how they get away with murder, starring James McAvoy as the 14th Earl of Gurney, who thinks he is the Messiah.

Max Brooks discusses his new book The Harlem Hellfighters, a graphic novel which focuses on the real-life 369th Infantry Regiment in the First World War, composed entirely of African American soldiers who despite achieving enormous success in war faced tremendous discrimination on their return from Europe in 1919.

And Costa First Novel winner Emma Healey discusses her book Elizabeth Is Missing.

Presenter Samira Ahmed

Producer Dixi Stewart.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04yftkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b04yk7h6)
Benefit Sanctions

Benefit sanctions are supposed to be part of a system helping people back to work. But critics say they penalise the vulnerable and are among the reasons for the growing use of food banks. So how fair is the Government's system of withholding state payments for those who don't comply with welfare rules? Allan Urry hears from whistleblowers who allege some JobCentrePlus staff are setting claimants up to fail in order to meet internal performance targets. Why did a recovering amputee lose his benefits because he didn't answer the phone?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Nicola Dowling.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b04yk7h8)
Voting campaigns - Young Author and Speaker Molly Watt

Coming up to the 2015 general election, a number of organisations and charities are launching campaigns and lobbying government to increase voter participation by visually impaired people. The Political and Constitutional Reform Parliamentary subcommittee have heard evidence from the Royal National Institute of Blind People and other organisations, about the experience of visually impaired people when voting. We hear some listeners' experiences, as well as find out what reforms might be possible.

Molly Watt is twenty years old, has written a children's book and has Usher Syndrome. Molly talks frankly about her experience of having two sensory impairments and describes how she deals with both hearing and vision loss.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat.

(Photgraph: Molly Watt and Peter White)


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b04yk7hb)
Mutant Flu, Weight-Loss Surgery, Young Men and Body Image, CVID, Dental Check-ups, Doctors' Example, Dry January Findings

Mark investigates reports that the UK faces an epidemic of "mutant flu".

Just a month after NICE calls for more weight loss operations to be done, there are proposals to slash the amount hospitals are paid to do the procedures - a move that could see many hospitals stop offering the operation.

Six packs and big guns - there is growing concern about steroid abuse by young men on a quest for the perfect body.

And Dry January - Mark looks at the science behind going on the wagon for a month.


TUE 21:30 Can Democracy Work? (b0506ykz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b04y6vg0)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04yk7hd)
The story of British jihadi, Imran Khawaja

British man who faked his own death fighting in Syria so he could secretly return to the UK has admitted terrorism offences.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04yk7hg)
Curtain Call

Episode 7

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Today in Parliament (b04yk7hj)
Today in Parliament: Democracy Day

Susan Hulme and Sean Curran mark the 750th anniversary of the first English parliament with reports from Westminster and assemblies and parliaments at home and around the world.
From arguments over Trident at Westminster to events at Holyrood, Cardiff Bay, and Stormont.
The programme also hears from BBC correspondents in Washington and Moscow and reports on the proceedings at the European Parliament.
And Mark D'Arcy investigates the hidden hearings and debates that go on all the time within the Palace of Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 21 JANUARY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6vgv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b04yftkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vgx)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6vgz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vh1)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6vh3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04ykbjc)
With Andrew Graystone.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b04ykbjf)
Rural Community Councils, Farmland Bird Count and Mangoes

There are fears for the future of services in rural communities, after ACRE (Action with Communities in Rural England) was warned that its government funding could be withdrawn. The ACRE network is made up of thirty-eight Rural Community Councils across England. They help provide services in rural areas, including transport, housing, and support for village halls. Anna Hill asks what cuts to funding would mean for rural communities.

Tens of thousands of people are expected at the East of England Showground in Peterborough today for LAMMA, the UK's largest farm machinery and equipment show. Continuing a week looking at developments in agricultural machinery, Farming Today hears from a farmer from Iowa who talks about a new kind of seed planter which uses the very latest in smart technology.

The Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust's "Big Farmland Bird Count" for 2015 gets underway in February. Anna Hill joins farmers in Norfolk as they learn how to identify different species of bird on their farms.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0skg)
Horned Screamer

Michael Palin presents the Venezuelan horned screamer. Soundling as if someone is using a giant plunger in the Venezuelan marshes, these are the mating calls of the Horned Screamer. They're sounds that only another Horned Screamer could love, but then screamers are very odd birds. Over the years ornithologists have struggled to classify them, modern thinking puts their closest living relatives as the primitive Australian Magpie Goose.

Protruding from its head is a long wiry horn made of cartilage, which could rightfully earn it the title of "unicorn of the bird world" Usually seen as pairs or, outside the breeding season in small groups in the marshes and savannas of the northern half of South America, as you'd expect from their name , they are very vocal and these primeval bellows which sound more cow like than bird like and can be heard up to 3 kilometers away.


WED 06:00 Today (b04ykbjh)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b04ykbjk)
Barbara Winton, Lord Alf Dubs, Anne Reid, Dr John C Taylor, Lottie Muir

Libby Purves meets Barbara Winton, daughter of Sir Nicholas Winton who orchestrated the Kindertransport rescue mission; Lord Alf Dubs who was one of the rescued children; actor Anne Reid; inventor Dr John C Taylor and horticulturalist and mixologist Lottie Muir.

Dr John C Taylor OBE is an inventor, businessman and collector. He recently designed a new chronophage clock featuring a dragon that waves its tail and swallows a single pearl at the top of every hour. He holds 400 patents and an estimated two billion appliances use his designs including the cordless kettle. The Dragon Chronophage will be showcased at Design Shanghai.

Barbara Winton is the daughter of Sir Nicholas Winton who orchestrated the Kindertransport, a rescue mission in which 669 children were evacuated from Czechoslovakia in 1938 and 1939. Barbara's biography tells the story of her father's daring plan to transport mainly Jewish children to be placed with foster parents in the UK. One of the children was six-year-old Alf Dubs, now Lord Alf Dubs. Sir Winton has received several honours including a knighthood and the Czech Republic's highest civilian honour - the Order of the White Lion. If it's not Impossible - The Life of Sir Nicholas Winton is published by Matador.

Anne Reid MBE is a film, television and theatre actor. She stars in the BBC One series Last Tango In Halifax, a one-off production of A Little Night Music and will soon reprise her role in the cabaret show Just in Time. After graduating from RADA, she played Valerie Barlow in Coronation Street for over a decade. She received a BAFTA nomination for her role in the film The Mother opposite Daniel Craig. A Little Night Music is at the Palace Theatre, London and Just in Time is at Crazy Coqs, London.

Lottie Muir is a horticulturalist and mixologist who is known as the Cocktail Gardener. She runs workshops demonstrating how to make botanical cocktails from foraged ingredients. She created a community garden on the rooftop of the Brunel Museum where she now runs the Midnight Apothecary cocktail bar. The next Wild Drinks Workshop with the Cocktail Gardener is at the Queen of Hoxton Rooftop Terrace in Shoreditch, London.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b04ykbjm)
Epilogue: A Memoir

Stranger

Will is apprehensive about meeting his half-brother for the first time.

Jamie Parker continues reading from Will Boast's moving account of loss and coming to terms with the past.

Abridged by Miranda Emmerson.

Producer: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04ykbjp)
Marine Le Pen, Sexism in the Restaurant Trade and Unexpectedly Pregnant

In the aftermath of the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, what will Marine Le Pen do now? Sally Peck and Heidi Hasbrouck discuss sexism in the restaurant trade. The 45th World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos starts today, why are only 17% of the representatives female? Unexpectedly pregnant and in a new relationship, two women share their experiences. And Philippa Helme, Principal Clerk of the Table Office in Parliament talks about 31 years working in the House of Commons.


WED 10:40 15 Minute Drama (b04ykbjr)
The Corrections

The Good Daughter

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Roslyn Hill. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 13: The Good Daughter - Denise's arrival for a St Jude family Christmas stirs some uncomfortable truths.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b04ykbjt)
Valerie and Brian - Never Too Late to Say Sorry

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about the serious head injury that meant Brian lost his career and his family. Although separated, he and his wife have re-built a relationship.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 A Gripping Yarn (b0418p75)
In A Gripping Yarn, Jane Garvey explores the world of knitting. It's a lot more exciting and dynamic than the simple 'knit one, purl one' sweater would have you believe!

Tracing its popularity from the American revolution through to modern "guerilla" knitters, Jane comes across composer such as Hafdís Bjarnadótti, who designs music to represent knitting patterns, and jailbirds who earn remission through knitting.

Utilised by therapists, developed by social media and discovered by Reality TV, its image is now a million miles away from the knitting granny.

Introducing Jane to this hitherto hidden world are fashion historian Dr Joanne Turney, Christine Kingdom of the UK Hand Knitting Association and Rachel Matthews, owner of an Aladdin's cave of different Yarns of all colours and textures in East London.

Producer: Joanne Watson
An Alfi production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


WED 11:30 The Rivals (b04ykbjw)
Series 3

The Moabite Cipher

Based on a short story by R. Austin Freeman
Dramatised by Chris Harrald

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he is writing his memoirs and has a chance to get his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. He continues with Dr James Thorndike as they try to protect Pastor Wayne Kaplan after he receives death threats, despite Lestrade's and James' aversions to Kaplan's charismatic preaching and healing.

Directed by Liz Webb

Episode by Chris Harrald inspired by the short story 'The Moabite Cipher' by R. Austin Freeman: http://www.online-literature.com/r-freeman/john-thorndykes-cases/6/.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vh5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04ykbjy)
Catharine Edwards on Seneca and facing death.

Catharine Edwards wants to introduce you to the Roman Philosopher Seneca. But he's dying. Towards the end of his life Seneca became interested in the idea that only human beings had foreknowledge of their own death. Animals didn't know and Gods didn't die. This singular piece of knowledge gives human life its meaning as well as its burden. Seneca argued that to liberate yourself from the fear of death was a vital part of life. But did his own famous death live up to his beliefs?


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b04ykbk0)
Social Care Crisis, Work Rotas and Celebrity Biographies

Care budgets for the elderly have declined by more than a billion pounds says Age UK who claim our care system is in swift and calamitous decline.

Living with unemployment and disability - the first report in our Cost of Living series.

Can a good rota really help companies and workers by delivering more money and more useful time off.

Is the shine coming off the celebrity biography?

Insurance companies warn motorists against using key safes in or on their vehicles.

Treatment of whistleblowers is 'a stain on the NHS', say MPs.

Producer: Kevin Mousley

Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b04y6vh7)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b04ykbk2)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zft2t)
Journalist

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

As a young man, Winston Churchill discovered his love for words and decided to make a living out of them, initially as a war correspondent. Indeed he became a writer so prolific and unstoppable that when he was hit by a car in a New York street, he dictated a thousand words about the experience from his hospital bed. Sir David Cannadine explores Winston Churchill's first career as a journalist. With extracts from Churchill's forgotten early dispatches.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04yk55g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04ykd72)
Series 2

Episode 3

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 3:
Jack goes to prison with a lot of help from Joey and Cath, who plant Brian's gun at his flat.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b04ykd74)
Insurance

Insurance Questions? Need help with premiums, policies or claims? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk

Motor insurance premiums are rising for the first time since 2011, according to the latest AA Insurance Premium Index. Average quotes rose by 4.2% to £891 in the third quarter of 2014 but there is better news for drivers aged 17-22 whose costs are falling due to 'pay how you drive' policies.

Home insurance premiums are falling, with average annual buildings cover costing £112.56 and contents cover dropping to £61.64. But don't fall into the trap of allowing your insurance to renew automatically or you won't benefit from the drop in prices.

If you want to ask about finding a cheaper policy, while making sure your valuables our covered, why not talk to our team on Wednesday?

Maybe you need help understanding the jargon?

If you're making a claim, is it going smoothly?

Perhaps you want the latest news on plans for flood insurance?

Or advice about a specialist policy?

Whatever your question, why not ask our panel for their view? Joining presenter Lesley Curwen will be:

Anne-Marie Flexman, Gocompare.
Stuart Reid, Executive Chairman, Insurance Broker, Bluefin.
Malcolm Tarling, Association of British Insurers.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b04yk7hb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b04ykd77)
Tribute to Ulrich Beck (1944 - 2015) - Dissident Irish Republicanism

Dissident Irish Republicanism - Laurie Taylor talks to John Morrison, Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of East London, about his in depth study into the recent intensification of rogue paramilitary activity, Can the upsurge in dissident Republican violence be explained by the history of splits within the Movement? He charts the rise of groups including the Real IRA, Continuity IRA and the newly emerging 'New IRA.' He's joined by Henry Mcdonald, Belfast correspondent at the Observer newspaper.

Ulrich Beck - Angela McRobbie, Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London, gives a tribute to the eminent German sociologist who died earlier this month. What do his ideas about the 'risk society' tell us about current concerns relating to global terrorism?

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b04ykd79)
End of Page 3, Josie Cunningham's Agent, Sir Alan Moses on Press Feedom

Britain's best-selling newspaper The Sun has stopped publishing photographs of topless Page 3 models after 44 years. The paper still hasn't confirmed the move but its sister publication, The Times, reported the change has been approved by owner Rupert Murdoch. It's been hailed a victory for campaigner groups like No More Page 3, who have long said the images are sexist. However, readers can now go online to see topless pictures, and it's understood the Sun's Page 3 website has enjoyed a surge in traffic. Steve Hewlett talks to academic and columnist Roy Greenslade about where this leaves the Sun's print edition, and whether Page 3 is indeed gone for good?

The Independent Press Standards Organisation, or IPSO, which regulates the press, wants to put a 'red pencil' through rules and regulation which allow publishers to 'resist' investigations. So says its Chair Sir Alan Moses, who, at the Lords Communication Committee yesterday, said the rules are opaque and difficult to understand. Steve Hewlett asks him about the independence of the organisation, rival regulators, and his vision for the future of press self-regulation.

Josie Cunningham appeared on the front page of the Sun after having a boob job on the NHS. In 2014, she made headlines again when she announced she was considering aborting her unborn baby for the chance to appear on Big Brother. This week, Channel 4 airs, 'Josie: the most hated women in Britain?', which looks at how she has occupied the media spotlight by promoting shocking stories, including a plan to sell tickets to the birth of her baby. Steve Hewlett talks to the man behind this coverage - her agent Rob Cooper - about his controversial media strategy and how he goes about securing column inches.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b04ykd7c)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vh9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b04ykd7f)
Series 2

The BFF

Best Friends Forever.

Stephen K Amos's sitcom about growing up black, gay and funny in 1980s south London.

Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.

Stephen K Amos … Stephen K Amos
Young Stephen … Shaquille Ali-Yebuah
Stephanie Amos … Fatou Sohna
Virginia Amos … Ellen Thomas
Vincent Amos … Don Gilet
Miss Bliss … Michelle Butterly
Jayson Jackson … Frankie Wilson
Roy ... Ryan Watson

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b04ykd7h)
Tony's triumphant on his crutches, but Pat worries when he tells her he's thinking about buying another bull. Tony understands why Pat had to send Otto to be destroyed. He remembers why he bought Otto. It's not too late to start again, surely?

Susan believes Justin Elliott's rumoured development scheme might help young people. Ed is really struggling to keep going. Carol sympathizes.

Carol asks Jill if perhaps an Archer might want to take on Mike's milk round

Susan asks Neil to pick up the children. Neil can't. He has to move some pigs at Bridge Farm. Susan's not happy

Meanwhile, Johnny helps Tom to move the pigs. As they finish, Neil arrives. Bemused Neil points out that he was on his way to do the job himself. Tom is sorry but it couldn't wait. And they're running out of pasture. Interrupting as Neil starts to suggest a plan, Tom announces his own suggestion along similar lines. Great minds think alike, trumpets Tom.

Neil grumbles to Susan that Tom seems to have forgotten who's manager. Not for the first time, Susan urges him to stand up for his rights and not be a doormat. All right, says Neil. He won't let Tom or anyone else push him around.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b04ykd7k)
Bjork's New Album, Samantha Shannon and the Head of Disney Animation

Bjork has been forced to release her new album earlier than expected due to an online leak. Musicologist Nicola Dibben, who has worked with Bjork, reviews Vulnicura, the first album from Bjork since Biophilia in 2011.

Andrew Millstein, head of the Walt Disney Animation Studios in California with its 800-strong workforce, reflects on the company's performance over the last few years, in particular the unexpected success of the animated hit Frozen, and looks ahead to its Tokyo-inspired new release Big Hero 6.

Author Samantha Shannon was touted as the next JK Rowling when she secured a six figure deal for her series of fantasy novels about a clairvoyant living in a dark dystopian future. Shannon wrote the first novel, The Bone Season, when she was still at university. She discusses whether she felt pressure to produce a thrilling sequel.

Costa Poetry Prize winner Jonathan Edwards discusses his collection, My Family and Other Superheroes, which he wrote while working as an English teacher.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Olivia Skinner.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04ykbjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:40 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b04ykd7m)
Human Rights at the Crossroads?

Clive Anderson and guests get behind the political rhetoric to debate the potential impact on the rights of British citizens if the Government carries out a proposal to scrap the Human Rights Act and replace it with a "more British" Bill of Rights.

Barrister Martin Howe QC, who was a member of the Coalition Government's recent commission on human rights, defends the proposals and argues that British citizens and Parliament should not be subject to decisions made by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.

But the proposals are challenged by the other guests - barrister Tom de la Mare QC, legal academic Dr Alison Young and retired Appeal Court judge Sir Stanley Burnton. Sir Stanley totally rejects the suggestion that he and his fellow judges are being dictated to by a foreign court.

The panel also discusses the Government's threat to withdraw from the European Convention of Human Rights unless Parliament is allowed to veto judgments from the European Court. Would it be possible for one member country to have special status, or would such a move threaten British membership of the EU itself?

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b04ykd7p)
Series 1

Derivatives

Continuing his quest for understanding, David Baddiel explores derivatives. What are they and how do they work?

David begins by meeting journalist Janice Turner, who initially suggested the subject, and she explains why she believes we should all try to understand derivatives.

Then David visits the London Metals Exchange, the last place with open outcry trading in London, where he discusses the history of derivatives with financial historian D'Maris Coffman. And on a trading floor at Canary Wharf he hears how the market works today.

At the end, he returns to try to explain to Janice what he's learned, with D'Maris ready to pass judgement on his understanding.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Becoming Myself: Gender Identity (b04v5pg6)
Trans Women

A revealing series which goes inside the Charing Cross Gender Identity Clinic in Hammersmith, London - the largest and oldest in the world - to explore the condition of gender dysphoria - a sense of distress caused by a disjunction between biological sex and gender identity.

With growing mainstream discussion prompted by high-profile transgender people like boxing promoter Frank Maloney, WikiLeaks source Chelsea Manning and model Andrej Pejic, gender dysphoria is fast becoming more visible. Indeed there has been a steady rise in the numbers of referrals to Gender Identity Clinics across the country and patient numbers at Charing Cross have doubled in the last five years.

This series follows a group of transgender patients pursuing treatment for gender dysphoria in order to 'become themselves'. In the first programme we meet Freddie, Mitchell and Blade, who were raised female and are seeking treatment as trans men. The second programme centres on trans women Bethany, Emma and Tanya, who are making the opposite journey.

We also hear from the psychiatrists, endocrinologists and surgeons as they meet and assess the patients on a day-to-day basis. Their treatment decisions have the potential to transform the lives of their patients, but these irrevocable changes are not made lightly.

Narrator: Adjoa Andoh

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b04ykbjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b04ykdyd)
Ukraine and Russia try to negotiate a ceasefire to end the fighting in eastern Ukraine

Violence has flared between Ukrainian troops and separatist rebels in past week


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04ykdyg)
Curtain Call

Episode 8

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Roger McGough's Other Half (b04ykdyj)
Kids, eh?

Roger McGough is joined by Helen Atkinson-Wood, Philip Jackson and Richie Webb in a hilarious and surreal new sketch show for BBC Radio 4. With sketches about Fandom, Fatherhood and 17th Century France, you'll hear his familiar voice in a whole new light. Expect merriment and melancholy in equal measures, and a whisker of witty wordplay too. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


WED 23:15 Love in Recovery (b04ykdyl)
Series 1

Simon

The lives of five very different recovering alcoholics.

Set entirely at their weekly meetings, we hear them get to know each other, learn to hate each other, argue, moan, laugh, fall apart, fall in love and, most importantly, tell their stories.

Comedy drama by Pete Jackson, set in Alcoholics Anonymous. Starring Sue Johnston, John Hannah, Eddie Marsan, Rebecca Front, Paul Kaye and Julia Deakin.

In this episode, Simon surprises everyone when he tells his story of being a war correspondent in the line of fire.

Julie ...... Sue Johnston
Marion ...... Julia Deakin
Fiona ...... Rebecca Front
Simon ...... John Hannah
Danno ...... Paul Kaye
Andy ...... Eddie Marsan

There are funny stories, sad stories, stories of small victories and milestones, stories of loss, stories of hope, and stories that you really shouldn't laugh at - but still do. Along with the storyteller.

Writer Pete Jackson is a recovering alcoholic and has spent time with Alcoholics Anonymous. It was there he found, as many people do, support from the unlikeliest group of disparate souls, all banded together due to one common bond. As well as offering the support he needed throughout a difficult time, AA also offered a weekly, sometimes daily, dose of hilarity, upset, heartbreak and friendship.

Director: Ben Worsfield

A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04ykdyn)
David Cameron is challenged over the long delays to publication of the Chilcot Inquiry report into the war in Iraq. Sean Curran covers the exchanges at Prime Minister's Questions.
Also on the programme:
* Reaction to the Oxfam report that concludes 1 per cent of the world's population now owns all the globe's wealth.
* The latest arguments in the Commons over the state of the Health Service in England..
* Peers focus on the arguments over televised election debates between the party leaders.
* And MPs react to the uncertain future for Yemen, scene of a recent violent coup.



THURSDAY 22 JANUARY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6vj1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b04ykbjm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vj3)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6vj5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vj7)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6vj9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04yyw9s)
With Andrew Graystone.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b04ykk4h)
Toxic silt, Milk update, Abattoir on Skye, Lamma

Environmentalists are celebrating a victory which halts the dumping of poisonous silt off the south Cornish coast. For twenty years they have been trying to stop contaminated silt dredged from the naval dockyard at Devonport from smothering environmentally sensitive reefs near the mouth of the river Tamar.

The Isle of Skye could get an abattoir of its own. It would make a big difference to livestock producers on the island, who currently have to drive 150 miles each way to a slaughterhouse near Inverness.

And there may finally be a hint of good news on the horizon for dairy farmers.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sqd)
Greater Roadrunner

Michael Palin presents the greater roadrunner of south western North America. A cuckoo that can run at 20 miles per hour and snap up venomous reptiles might not seem destined for cartoon fame, but that's exactly what happened to the Greater Roadrunner.

The loud "beep-beep" call of the Warner Brothers cartoon creation, always out-foxing his arch-enemy Wile-E. Coyote brought this very odd member of the cuckoo family racing into the living rooms of the western world from 1949 onwards . Greater roadrunners live in dry sunny places in the south western states of North America, where their long-tailed, bushy--crested, streaky forms are a common sight. They will eat almost anything from scorpions to rats, outrunning small rodents and lizards and even leaping into the air to catch flying insects.

As it runs across the desert, the roadrunner's footprints show two toes pointing forward and two backwards. The "X" shape this forms was considered a sacred symbol by Pueblo tribes and believed to confound evil spirits because it gives no clues as to which way the bird went.


THU 06:00 Today (b04ykk4k)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b04ykk4m)
Phenomenology

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss phenomenology, a style of philosophy developed by the German thinker Edmund Husserl in the first decades of the 20th century. Husserl's initial insights underwent a radical transformation in the work of his student Martin Heidegger, and played a key role in the development of French philosophy at the hands of writers like Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Phenomenology has been a remarkably adaptable approach to philosophy. It has given its proponents a platform to expose and critique the basic assumptions of past philosophy, and to talk about everything from the foundations of geometry to the difference between fear and anxiety. It has also been instrumental in getting philosophy out of the seminar room and making it relevant to the lives people actually lead.

GUESTS

Simon Glendinning, Professor of European Philosophy in the European Institute at the London School of Economics

Joanna Hodge, Professor of Philosophy at Manchester Metropolitan University

Stephen Mulhall, Professor of Philosophy and Tutor at New College at the University of Oxford

Producer: Luke Mulhall.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b04ykk4p)
Epilogue: A Memoir

A Balancing Act

Will struggles to adapt to his new family circumstances and starts to question his understanding of events.

Jamie Parker continues reading from Will Boast's moving account of loss and coming to terms with the past.

Abridged by Miranda Emmerson

Producer: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04ykk4r)
Beyond Clueless; How Influential Are Our Teenage Film Heroines?

Coming-of-age movies like Clueless and The Breakfast Club show the transition from childhood to adulthood and what it's like to fit in - or not. But what do we learn from our teenage film heroines? Which female characters have - or will - stand the test of time?

At the moment, just over a fifth of MPs are women - but what are the chances women will be better represented after the General Election? Last month we looked at the efforts of the main political parties at Westminster to get more women to stand. Today we turn to those parties hoping to make big gains on May 7th - the Green Party

Around 7,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with Ovarian Cancer every year. What impact will the discovery of six new genes associated with the disease have on how it's treated .

This week marks the 750th anniversary of the first parliament of elected representatives at Westminster. The role the suffragettes played in getting women the vote is well documented. But they also owe something to the rise of the English tea room.

Plus the writer Diana Nneka Atuona on the inspiration behind her award-winning debut play
about a child soldier in Liberia's civil war

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04ykk4t)
The Corrections

A Wonderland of Wealth

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 14: A Wonderland of Wealth - The prodigal Chip returns home.
Cast:

Narrator.....Richard Schiff
Enid Lambert.....Maggie Steed
Alfred Lambert.....Colin Stinton
Gary Lambert.....Richard Laing
Chip Lambert.....Julian Rhind-Tutt
Denise Lambert.....Roslyn Hill

Don Armour.....Shaun Mason
Brian Callahan.....Ian Conningham
Robin Passafaro.....Kelly Burke
Mrs Nygren.....Hannah Genesius
Sylvia Roth.....Elaine Claxton
Ted Roth.....David Acton
Gitanas Misevicius.....Sam Dale
Caroline Lambert.....Jane Slavin
Caleb Lambert.....Adam Thomas Wright
Jonah Lambert.....Sean McCrystal

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).
Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 14: A Wonderland of Wealth - The prodigal Chip returns home.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b04ykk4w)
The Knot Reaches the Comb

Correspondents' stories: in this edition Maria Margaronis on the keenly-awaited Greek election; Will Ross meets soldiers who've been dismissed from the Nigerian army and asks them for their views on the battle against Boko Haram; Susie Emmett's in South Africa talking to farmers about controversial government plans for land reform; Richard Fleming's in Haiti where he's been meeting a photographer who found himself caught up in the devastating earthquake five years ago and Lucy Daltroff is on one of the many thousands of islands sprinkled along Chile's skinny coastline hearing magical legends and fears about what the modern world might bring once that community is joined to the mainland by a new bridge.


THU 11:30 The Real MacColl (b04ykk4y)
John Cooper Clarke looks back at the life of Ewan MacColl, a working class boy from Salford, who became renowned as a dramatist, broadcaster, songwriter and folk singer.

Ewan MacColl immortalised his city, Salford, in the song Dirty Old Town. To many, he's best known as the creator of that song and The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face, but it's perhaps the lesser known things about him that are the most fascinating - his struggles as a young boy growing up in the Salford slums, his involvement with radical street theatre, and his re-appearance after the Second World War with a new name.

A century on from his birth, John Cooper Clarke looks back at MacColl's early years and formative influences and discovers how his upbringing went on to inform the important work he would go on to do in theatre, radio and in the British folk revival. With contributions from biographer Ben Harker, legendary folk artist Martin Carthy and American folk singer and musician Peggy Seeger, MacColl's partner from 1956 until the day he died.

Produced by Kellie While
A Smooth Operation production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vjc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04ykk50)
Barry Smith on Noam Chomsky and Human Language

Barry Smith argues that language is our most important uniquely human attribute. It doesn't just help us communicate, it helps us to think. He makes the case for the distinctiveness of human language against the limited signalling systems of other animals. He looks at Noam Chomsky's idea of a universal grammar – that there is something in the human brain that gives us an innate ability to produce language from very early in our lives. And he talks to experts on other intelligent animals - Prof. Nicola Clayton and Prof. Robin Dunbar - to ask how human language and imagination compares with that of birds and primates.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b04ykk52)
Carrier Bags, Ex-Council Flats, the Cost of Living

Consumer news.


THU 13:00 World at One (b04ykk54)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b00zft85)
Son and Father

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

Winston Churchill had an unhappy childhood. His father was distant, drunken and cold. His mother was a spendthrift who had numerous affairs. So how was he able to rise above his difficult upbringing and become the success he did? Sir David Cannadine looks at Winston Churchill's family life, exploring the legacy left by Churchill's childhood when he himself became a father.

Featuring Roger Allam as Winston Churchill.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b04ykd7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04ykk56)
Series 2

Episode 4

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 4:
Joey is approached by the police to fence a lot of money from the Great Train Robbery.


Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b04ykk58)
Churchill's Chartwell in Kent

To mark the 50th anniversary of the death of Sir Winston Churchill, Helen Mark heads to Chartwell in Kent to explore the family home and gardens.

Churchill bought the home in 1922 to live in with his wife Clementine and their children and remained here until his death in 1965. As well as making structural changes to the grounds he used it as an inspiration for writing and painting and it's been maintained to reflect how he kept it. Helen asks what Chartwell tells us about the man - to so many a great leader - but also a father, husband and nature lover.

Producer: Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b04y9nkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b04y9rj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b04ykk5b)
Alex Garland on Ex Machina, Liz Fraser on I'm All Right Jack, JC Chandor on A Most Violent Year

With Francine Stock.

Novelist Alex Garland discusses his directorial debut Ex Machina and tells Francine why he thinks Professor Stephen Hawking is wrong to worry that the development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.

Liz Fraser is known as one of the Carry On girls, even though she only appeared in four of the series. As her film debut, I'm All Right Jack, is released on DVD, she spills the beans on stereotyping, Peter Sellers, and the unions.

Director J.C. Chandor reveals why he set his crime drama A Most Violent Year in 1981, statistically the most violent 12 months in the history of New York city.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b04ykk5d)
GMOs; International Year of Light; Coral health

It is likely that scientists will soon engineer strains of "friendly" bacteria which are genetically recoded to be better than the ones we currently use in food production. The sorts of bacteria we use in cheese or yoghurt could soon be made to be resistant to all viruses, for example.
But what if the GM bacteria were to escape into the wild?

Researchers writing in the Journal Nature propose this week a mechanism by which GMO's could be made to be dependent on substances that do not occur in nature. That way, if they escaped, they would perish and die.

George Church, of Harvard Medical School, tells Adam Rutherford about the way bacteria - and possibly eventually plant and animal cells - could be engineered to have such a "failsafe" included, thus allowing us to deploy GM in a range of applications outside of high security laboratories.

Adam reports from this week's launch in Paris of the International Year of Light marking 100 years since Einstein's Theory of General Relativity. Amongst the cultural and scientific events at UNESCO in Paris, Nobel Prize winner Bill Philips explains how using lasers can achieve the most accurate atomic clocks imaginable and we hear how Google X is embracing new ways to manipulate light to ignite some of the team's futuristic technologies

And as the global decline in coral reefs continues as a result of human activity, Adam talks to Hawaii based biologist Mary Hagedorn who is using unusual techniques normally adopted for fertility clinics, to store and regrow coral species that are in danger

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.


THU 17:00 PM (b04ykk5g)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vjf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap (b04ykk5j)
Series 2

Episode 3

Bridget Christie tries to find a feminist icon who doesn't want to replace the word 'feminism' with 'bootylicious'.

She also discusses how adverts have ruined her sex life, and why Twitter is a sexist's natural habitat.

Multi-award winning series about modern feminism.

Bridget thought that she'd be able to put her feet up after her last series, she expected it to bomb. Sadly it was a huge success. But it's OK, because actually she's solved the feminist struggle all by herself.

She's assisted by token man, Fred MacAulay.

Written by Bridget Christie.

Producers: Alison Vernon-Smith and Alexandra Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b04yjz69)
Jill has suggested to Bert that he partners Carol for the Valentine's Dance. David raises an eyebrow, but Jill assures him Bert's a perfect gentleman. Jill is exasperated when she asks David to sort out some of his stuff from the attic so it can be given to the jumble sale. He makes a hasty exit.

When Lynda raises the same topic, David is curt. Lynda supposes she shouldn't be surprised; David will soon be taking his money and running. An argument ensues. When Jill walks in, David snaps that she can get rid of all his old stuff. He doesn't want it.

Kate cajoles Phoebe into going to the pub.

Lynda is shocked at the squalor when she calls at Roy's. He insists he's fine. He's going out with Tom tonight.

At the Bull, Tom desperately tries to cheer Roy up. He is making some headway when Kate walks in. Kate is loud and embarrassing. Phoebe feels even worse when she sees her dad there too.

Roy can't believe it. He stops listening to Tom. All he can hear is Kate making a fool of herself. Caught between her two difficult parents, Phoebe squirms.

Tom reassures Roy, pointing out that Phoebe is unimpressed with her mum too. He persuades Roy to turn the other cheek. But Roy can't stay. He thanks Tom for the drink and makes his excuses.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b04ykk5l)
Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany, Imogen Cooper, Kate Saunders, Fortitude

Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany discuss their new film Mortdecai, a slapstick art heist caper set amongst the British aristocracy.

Sofie Gråbøl, star of The Killing, returns to the small screen in Fortitude. Gråbøl's first British drama series focuses on a small community in the Arctic Circle where a murder has been committed. Novelist Tom Harper reviews.

Pianist Imogen Cooper discusses her new album on which she performs works by the husband-and-wife team of Robert and Clara Shumann, based on the letters they exchanged during their courtship.

Costa Children's Book Award winner Kate Saunders discusses Five Children on the Western Front, her update of E Nesbit's Five Children and It stories, which transports the children to 1914 and imagines their fortunes at war.

Presenter Kirsty Lang
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04ykk4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b04ykk5n)
Germany, Islam and the New Right

Germany's new anti-Islamisation movement, Pegida, is attracting a middle-aged, middle class following to its weekly marches around the country. The founder, Lutz Bachmann, has criminal convictions for burglary and assault. He rarely gives interviews to the media. However in this edition of The Report he talks to our reporter Catrin Nye.

Producer: Smita Patel
Researcher: James Melley.


THU 20:30 In Business (b04ykk5q)
Ttip: The world's biggest trade deal

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or Ttip, is currently being negotiated between the US and the EU. It is the world's biggest trade deal and highly controversial. Peter Day asks how it may effect what we eat, how we work and the strength of our democracy. Will it provide a beneficial boost for business or allow big corporations to side-step important regulation?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b04ykk5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b04ykk4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b04ykk5s)
Duke of York speaks publicly for first time about sex allegations

Prince says he wanted to "reiterate" statements issued by Palace rejecting the claim.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04ykk5v)
Curtain Call

Episode 9

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Colin Hoult's Carnival of Monsters (b04ykk5x)
Series 2

Episode 3

Enter the Carnival of Monsters, a bizarre and hilarious world of sketches, stories and characters, presented by the sinister Ringmaster.

A host of characters are the exhibits at the Carnival - all played by Colin himself.

Meet such monstrous yet strangely familiar oddities as: Wannabe Hollywood screenwriter Andy Parker; Anna Mann - outrageous star of such forgotten silver screen hits such as 'Rogue Baker', 'Who's For Turkish Delight' and 'A Bowl For My Bottom'; and a host of other characters from acid jazz obsessives, to mask workshop coordinators.

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04ykk5z)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 23 JANUARY 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04y6vkf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b04ykk4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vkh)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04y6vkk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04y6vkm)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04y6vkp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04yywcl)
With Andrew Graystone.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b04ykkts)
Campylobacter trials

We go to a farm that's trialing ways of reducing the incidence of campylobacter in live chickens. This bacterium is the biggest cause of food poisoning in the UK. Several farms are stopping the process of 'thinning' - where half the birds are taken out of the sheds to sell, while the rest are left to fatten. Thinning is thought to increase the spread of infection.
And we hear from a researcher speaking at a conference on rural affairs, who says governments should get involved in increasing the amount of food we grow in urban areas.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0sry)
Snail Kite

Michael Palin presents the snail kite from the Florida Everglades. Unlike many birds of prey which are known for their speed and agility, the snail kite hunts at a leisurely pace, one which matches its prey; and here in Florida's swamps, it is on the lookout for the apple snail.

To pick them out of floating vegetation the kite has evolved long needle-like claws, and its slender, viciously - hooked bill is perfect for snipping the snails' muscles and winkling them out of their shells. Snail kites are common across wetlands in South and Central America, but rare in Florida where there are around one thousand birds. Drainage of these marshes has made them scarce, but popular with bird watchers.

It's easy to see why, because snail kites are striking birds with their orange feet and black and red bill. The males are ash-grey apart from a white band at the base of their tails. Females and young birds are browner and more mottled. In times of drought, they will eat turtles, crabs or rodents, but these avian gourmets always return to their favourite dish of, escargots.


FRI 06:00 Today (b04yjtjg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b04y9nl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b04yjtjj)
Epilogue: A Memoir

Ambrosia

A thoughtful gesture breaks down barriers between Will and his new-found family.

Jamie Parker concludes Will Boast's moving account of loss and coming to terms with the past.

Abridged by Miranda Emmerson.

Producer: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04yjts5)
Plus-Size Fashion; Lesbians on TV; the Real Tennis Sisters; Sarah Jane Morris

The UK's first plus-size fashion magazine was recently launched. Slink, is hoping to tap into a growing demand for publications that, in the words of its editor, realise "beauty and style doesn't stop at a size 8". Editor of Slink, Rivkie Baum, and weight management expert, Dr Orla Flannery from the University of Chester join Jenni to discuss whether there's been a growth in the acceptability of obesity, and whether it's any good for women? Should women be encouraged to lose weight not justify their obesity?

It's 16 years since Queer as Folk came to our screens, as a new drama focusing on gay life starts on Channel 4 tonight, we'll be asking where are the lesbians in British TV drama?

Real Tennis was played during age of Henry VIII, it's a combination of tennis as we know it now and squash. British sisters, Claire Fahey and Sarah Vigrass are regularly beating some of the top male players in the sport, they join Jenni.

Sarah Jane Morris makes music in many guises, she was the female voice in the communards in the 1980's, but she's also a jazz crooner and a blues singer. Her new album is dedicated to Africa and some of the songs address some uncomfortable social issues, from homophobia in Africa and child soldiers, to honour killings, but the music maintains a sense of vitality and energy. Sarah Jane came into the studio to perform a track from her new album.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04yjv7g)
The Corrections

Corrections

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 15: Corrections - When Alfred's condition worsens, Enid is forced to move him into the Deep Mire Residential Home - an event that coincides with life changes for all members of the Lambert family.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


FRI 11:00 Churchill's Grave (b04yjv7j)
Marking the 50th anniversary of Winston Churchill's death on 24th January, 1965, William Crawley travels to the wartime leader's final resting place in the Oxfordshire village of Bladon.

Tucked discreetly around the side of the small parish church of St Martin's, Churchill's understated grave contrasts utterly with the pomp and ceremony of the State Funeral at St Paul's Cathedral and procession through the capital held in his honour on the 30th of January 1965, six days after he'd died at the age of ninety.

Following the same journey taken by Churchill's coffin from London to this small village six miles north west of Oxford, William meets members of St Martin's Parish, Bladon residents, and the visitors who continue to make their own 'pilgrimage' to the graveside to pay their respects.

Along the way, he asks why Churchill chose Bladon, what impact this decision has had on the village, and explores the nature of commemoration as we mark 50 years since the passing of the Prime Minister still considered by many to be our greatest Briton.

Producer: Stan Ferguson.


FRI 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b03s76dh)
Series 5

Southall

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a fifth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and does a bespoke evening of comedy in each one.

As every high street slowly morphs into a replica of the next, Mark Steel's in Town celebrates the parochial, the local and the unusual. From Corby's rivalry with Kettering to the word you can't say in Portland, the show has taken in the idiosyncrasies of towns up and down the country, from Kirkwall to Penzance, from Holyhead to Bungay.

This edition comes from Southall in Middlesex, which is also known as "little India" due to the large Asian community there. Mark tried the local food - Jalebi, Paan, Pakora - that can seem alien to someone who grew up in 1960s Kent. The twin landmarks of Heathrow Airport and the Sikh temple dominate the area, with the latter proving more popular as Mark also discusses football, astrology and bank openings. From January 2014.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Trudi Stevens
Producer ... Ed Morrish.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b04y6vkt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04ykktv)
Giles Fraser on Wittgenstein and Blade Runner

Giles Fraser thinks being human isn't a matter of biology or some unique attribute like language. It's not to do with what we are but about how we treat each other. Taking the work of the philosopher Wittgenstein he argues that to be human is to be considered worthy of certain kinds of respect and moral compassion. For Giles, human is a moral category and it is an instruction to treat each other well.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b04yjvbw)
Rural Fuel Prices, Student Debt, Nursery Funding

Consumer news.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04y6vkw)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b04yjvby)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 Churchill's Other Lives (b0505wjd)
Education

Winston Churchill was revered by millions as the saviour of Britain in the Second World War, but he wasn't just a great war leader - he wrote millions of words of journalism, he painted, he built brick walls, he owned racehorses, he gambled in Monte Carlo casinos and even wrote screenplays. Yet his personality was mercurial; bouts of hyper-activity were interspersed with black days of depression. While he had a loving marriage, he spent long periods apart from his wife and children, some of whom caused him deep anxiety and distress.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of his death, celebrated historian Sir David Cannadine, author of In Churchill's Shadow, examines the life and career of Winston Churchill by looking at ten different themes that are less well known, but which are crucial to a fuller understanding of one of the most extraordinary individuals ever to occupy No. 10 Downing Street.

He may have been one of the most visionary and impressive people who lived, but Churchill had a difficult time at school and a limited education. Today, Sir David Cannadine explores how Churchill's school days were rebellious and underachieving and how, after leaving Harrow, he applied three times to Sandhurst before passing the entrance exam. Being denied the benefit of an Oxbridge education left Churchill with complicated feelings of regret so, while serving as a young officer in India, he resolved to educate himself. The autodidact who never went to University later became the Chancellor of Bristol University and even had a Cambridge College named after him.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b04yjz69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b04ykktx)
Series 2

Episode 5

Crime drama based on the characters from the best selling novel by the multi-award winning writer, GF Newman. This second series runs from 1961 to 1970.

Spanning six decades, the saga plots the course of one family against the back-drop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

At the start of the 1960s, Joey Oldman acquires crafty Arnold Goodman as his solicitor, and buys shares in the civil engineering firm owned by the corrupt Minister of Transport, Ernest Marples.

Prospering with the help of venal bankers, and growing more devious, he and his wife Cath join Macmillan's Conservative Party. They strive without success to keep their son Brian free of the influence of Jack Braden (Cath's brother) as he takes their 'firm' from running illicit clubs, where they entertain politicians and judges, to armed robbery. All the while, Jack and Brian struggle to keep free of the police and further entanglements with the law, the Kray twins and the Richardsons.

Episode 5:
An elite band of policemen is formed to tackle the criminal 'firms' and corrupt police officers.

Written by GF Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04yjzvy)
Arundel Castle

Eric Robson chairs the programme from Arundel Castle, West Sussex. Taking questions in the Barons' Hall are Matt Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank.

Anne takes a tour of The Collector Earl's Garden with Arundel's Head Gardener Martin Duncan while Eric has a look around the castle built to last for a thousand years...

Produced by Howard Shannon.

Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Irish International (b04yk00p)
An Irishman's Guide to Paris by Robert McLiam Wilson

Three original stories from current, cutting edge Irish writers, Nick Laird, Philip Ó Ceallaigh and Robert McLiam Wilson, who have chosen to leave Ireland and make their homes in New York, Bucharest and Paris who each give their own unique take on being an Irishman living and writing abroad.

Writer ... Robert McLiam Wilson
Reader ..... Michael Smiley
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b04yk0jc)
Lord Brittan, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, Professor John Bayley, Anne Kirkbride

Matthew Bannister on

The former Tory Home Secretary Lord Brittan. As Leon Brittan, he also served as Secretary of State for Trade and Industry and as a European Commissioner.

Also: King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. He was the thirteenth of at least forty-five sons of the founder of modern Saudi Arabia and seen as a cautious reformer.

John Bayley, the eccentric Oxford don whose memoir of his life with the novelist Iris Murdoch was made into a film.

And Anne Kirkbride the actress who played Deirdre in Coronation Street for more than forty years.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b04yk0jf)
Is Anti-Semitism Widespread in the UK?

Are 95% of hate crimes in the UK directed against Jewish people? Tim Harford and Ruth Alexander fact-check an unlikely statistic. Meanwhile the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism (CAA) says surveys show that almost half of adults believe at least one anti-Semitic statement shown them to be true and that half of British Jews believe Jews may have no long-term future in the UK. But how robust are these findings? More or Less speaks to Gideon Falter, chairman of the CAA and Jonathan Boyd, executive director of the Institute for Jewish Policy Research.

Who is in the global 1% of wealthiest people, and where do they live?

More than 200 of the MPS voting on the 2012 NHS reform have recent or current financial connections to private healthcare, a recent editorial in the British Medical Journal claimed. Richard Vadon and Keith Moore explain why it's not true.

Sixty bodies in 6 years - is a serial killer stalking the canals of Great Manchester? Hannah Moore investigates a theory first raised by the Star on Sunday's crime editor Scott Hesketh.

Plus the programme hears from Professor Carlos Vilalta from the University of California San Diego and Steven Dudley from Insight Crime about claims that "98% of homicides in Mexico are unsolved." A shocking statistic, but is it true?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b04yk0jh)
Rab and Margaret - Clearing My Name

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a husband and wife about the six year fight to clear Rab's name after the psychiatric nurse was wrongly blamed for an incident at work.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b04yk0l7)
PM at 5pm- Carolyn Quinn with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04y6vky)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b04yk373)
Series 45

Episode 3

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week's news via topical stand-up and sketches featuring guests Marcus Brigstocke and Nish Kumar.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b04yk375)
Jill has suggested to Bert that he partners Carol for the Valentine's Dance. David raises an eyebrow, but Jill assures him Bert's a perfect gentleman. Jill is exasperated when she asks David to sort out some of his stuff from the attic so it can be given to the jumble sale. He makes a hasty exit.

When Lynda raises the same topic, David is curt. Lynda supposes she shouldn't be surprised; David will soon be taking his money and running. An argument ensues. When Jill walks in, David snaps that she can get rid of all his old stuff. He doesn't want it.

Kate cajoles Phoebe into going to the pub.

Lynda is shocked at the squalor when she calls at Roy's. He insists he's fine. He's going out with Tom tonight.

At the Bull, Tom desperately tries to cheer Roy up. He is making some headway when Kate walks in. Kate is loud and embarrassing. Phoebe feels even worse when she sees her dad there too.

Roy can't believe it. He stops listening to Tom. All he can hear is Kate making a fool of herself. Caught between her two difficult parents, Phoebe squirms.

Tom reassures Roy, pointing out that Phoebe is unimpressed with her mum too. He persuades Roy to turn the other cheek. But Roy can't stay. He thanks Tom for the drink and makes his excuses.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b04yk377)
Jessica Chastain, Ali Smith, Bob Copper at 100, the Art of the Self-Portrait

Jessica Chastain on her new film A Most Violent Year, the lack of diversity in Hollywood, and how she feels about missing out on an Oscar nomination this time.

Ahead of his centenary celebrations this weekend, the late British folk legend Bob Copper is remembered by singer Shirley Collins, Bob's grandson Ben Copper, and Jon Boden, singer and fiddle player with multi-award-winning innovative folk big band Bellowhead.

Art critic Richard Cork reviews Self: Image and Identity - Self-portraiture from Van Dyck to Louise Bourgeois at Turner Contemporary in Margate.

Ali Smith won this year's Costa Novel Award for How to be Both, a novel in two parts which can be read in either order. She tells John about the real painting that inspired the book.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Ellie Bury.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04yjv7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b04yk3w1)
Bea Campbell, Peter Hain MP, Owen Paterson MP, Steve Webb MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Keynsham in Somerset with the writer Bea Campbell, former Welsh Secretary, Peter Hain MP, former Secretary of State for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs Owen Paterson MP, and Pensions Minister Steve Webb MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b04yk3w3)
The Power of Art

AL Kennedy reflects on the importance of the beauty and creativity of art to sustain the human spirit.

"Art is a power and most of its true power is invisible, private, memorised and held even in prison cells and on forced marches, so you can see why totalitarians of all kinds dislike it."

Producer: Sheila Cook
Editor: Richard Knight.


FRI 21:00 A History of Ideas (b04yk3w5)
Omnibus

What Makes Us Human?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking What makes us human?

Helping him answer it are Philosopher Barry Smith, Classicist Catherine Edwards, historian Simon Schaffer and theologian Giles Fraser.

For the rest of the week Barry, Catharine, Simon and Giles will take us further into the history of ideas about what makes us human. With programmes of their own they will examine the evolution of language, the Stoic philosopher Seneca, the classification of all living species and the film Bladerunner.

This omnibus edition has all five programmes together.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04y6vl0)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b04yk3z5)
Greece - the world gathers.

Paul Moss is in Greece ahead of Sunday's General Election, as radical socialists and anti-austerity activists from around the globe gather, hoping for a Syriza win.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04yk3z7)
Curtain Call

Episode 10

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b04yk47g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04yk4b0)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b04yk4b2)
Alex and Rolf - Sing Our Own Song

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about musical roots, getting used to success, and the allure of writing your own songs rather than covering someone else's.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b04yb2wy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b04yb2wy)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b04yftkx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b04yftkx)

15 Minute Drama 10:40 WED (b04ykbjr)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b04ykbjr)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b04ykk4t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b04ykk4t)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b04yjv7g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b04yjv7g)

A Gripping Yarn 11:00 WED (b0418p75)

A History of Ideas 12:04 MON (b04yb2x4)

A History of Ideas 12:04 TUE (b04yftl3)

A History of Ideas 12:04 WED (b04ykbjy)

A History of Ideas 12:04 THU (b04ykk50)

A History of Ideas 12:04 FRI (b04ykktv)

A History of Ideas 21:00 FRI (b04yk3w5)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04xs4bn)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b04yk3w3)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b04y6kch)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04xs4bl)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b04yk3w1)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b04y6mw8)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b04ykk5d)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b04ykk5d)

Becoming Myself: Gender Identity 21:00 WED (b04v5pg6)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b04y9nkm)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b04y9nkm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b04yfst7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b04yk7hg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b04ykdyg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b04ykk5v)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b04yk3z7)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b04xs49r)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b04yb0f5)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b04yb0f5)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b04yftkr)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b04yftkr)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b04ykbjm)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b04ykbjm)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b04ykk4p)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b04ykk4p)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b04yjtjj)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b04xnd03)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b04yb5g5)

Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 18:30 THU (b04ykk5j)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b04y9nl2)

Can Democracy Work? 09:00 TUE (b0506ykz)

Can Democracy Work? 21:30 TUE (b0506ykz)

Can You Spot the Hidden Message? 16:00 MON (b0501kvj)

Churchill's Grave 11:00 FRI (b04yjv7j)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 MON (b00y6p63)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 TUE (b00zfsxy)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 WED (b00zft2t)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 THU (b00zft85)

Churchill's Other Lives 13:45 FRI (b0505wjd)

Colin Hoult's Carnival of Monsters 23:00 THU (b04ykk5x)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b04xrv9x)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 05:45 SUN (b04xrl8t)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 20:45 WED (b04ykd7p)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b04y9nl6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b04y9nl6)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b04y9rj4)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b04y6drt)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04y9y6p)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b04yfsy7)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b04ykbjf)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b04ykk4h)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b04ykkts)

Fear and Loathing in Harrogate 23:30 SAT (b04xmwz6)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b04xp4x3)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b04yk7h6)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b04y6kcr)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b04y6kcr)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04xkg79)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b04ykk4w)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b04yfst2)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04yk7h4)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b04ykd7k)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b04ykk5l)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b04yk377)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 MON (b04yb5fn)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 TUE (b04yk3d4)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 WED (b04ykd72)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 THU (b04ykk56)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 FRI (b04ykktx)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04xs4b4)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b04yjzvy)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b04yk47g)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b04yk47g)

I've Never Seen Star Wars 18:30 TUE (b04yk55d)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b04xrwhr)

In Business 20:30 THU (b04ykk5q)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b04ykk4m)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b04ykk4m)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b04yk7h8)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b04yk7hb)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b04yk7hb)

Irish International 15:45 FRI (b04yk00p)

Kitch! 15:30 SAT (b04xp15m)

Kneehigh's The Wild Bride 14:30 SAT (b03m3j76)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04y53fh)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b04yk0jc)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b04y6kcp)

Love in Recovery 23:15 WED (b04ykdyl)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 FRI (b03s76dh)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04xkg6s)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b04y6v77)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04y6vd0)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b04y6vfh)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b04y6vgv)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04y6vj1)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04y6vkf)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b04ykbjk)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b04ykbjk)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b04ykd74)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b04y6kcf)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b04y6kcf)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b04y53fk)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b04yk0jf)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04xkg71)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b04y6v82)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04y6vd8)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b04y6vfr)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b04y6vh3)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04y6vj9)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04y6vkp)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b04y6v8w)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04xkg7c)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b04y6vbt)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b04y6vdd)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b04y6vft)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b04y6vh5)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b04y6vjc)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b04y6vkt)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04xkg73)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b04y6v9h)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b04y6v9z)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04xkg7r)

News 13:00 SAT (b04xkg7h)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b04y9nks)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b04yftkm)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b04y9rj6)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b04y9rj6)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b04xrvbc)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b04ykk58)

Out of the Ordinary 11:00 MON (b04yb2x0)

PM 17:00 SAT (b04y6kcm)

PM 17:00 MON (b04yfssw)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04yk47z)

PM 17:00 WED (b04ykd7c)

PM 17:00 THU (b04ykk5g)

PM 17:00 FRI (b04yk0l7)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b04y9s7s)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b04y9rj8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04xs9m4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04y9y6m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b04yrqnt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b04ykbjc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b04yyw9s)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b04yywcl)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b04y9nkx)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b04y9nkx)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b04y9nkx)

Roger McGough's Other Half 23:00 WED (b04ykdyj)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b04y6kc7)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b04y6kct)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04xkg6x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b04y6v7p)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04y6vd4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b04y6vfm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b04y6vgz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04y6vj5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04y6vkk)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04xp15k)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b04yftkz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04xkg6v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04xkg6z)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b04xkg7k)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b04y6v7d)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b04y6v7v)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b04y6vby)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b04y6vd2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b04y6vd6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b04y6vfk)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b04y6vfp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b04y6vgx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b04y6vh1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b04y6vj3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04y6vj7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b04y6vkh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b04y6vkm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04xkg7p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b04y6vc2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04y6vdj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b04y6vfy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b04y6vh9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04y6vjf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04y6vky)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04y9nkq)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04y9nkq)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b04y9y86)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b04y9y86)

Subway 19:45 SUN (b04y9w1g)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b04y9nl0)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b04y9nkv)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b04y9nl4)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b04y9s7v)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b04y9s7v)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b04yfst0)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b04yfst0)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04yk55g)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04yk55g)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b04ykd7h)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b04ykd7h)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b04yjz69)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b04yjz69)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b04yk375)

The Best Laid Plans 11:30 MON (b04yb2x2)

The Devil's Rope 20:00 MON (b048l0s1)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b04xrvbf)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b04ykk5b)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b04y9nl8)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b04y9nl8)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b04yk7h2)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b04yfsst)

The Inflating Shopping Basket 13:30 SUN (b04y9npb)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b04y6kc9)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b04y6kc9)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04y9rj2)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b04ykbjt)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b04yk0jh)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b04yk4b2)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b04ykd79)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b04xs4bb)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b04yk373)

The Real MacColl 11:30 THU (b04ykk4y)

The Report 20:00 THU (b04ykk5n)

The Rest is History 19:15 SUN (b04y9v20)

The Rivals 11:30 WED (b04ykbjw)

The Showman's Parson: Tales from the Memoirs of the Rev Thomas Horne 00:30 SUN (b03xcxxm)

The True Story of Abner Jay 11:30 TUE (b04yftl1)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b04xnd0c)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b05061zg)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b04y6kcc)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04y9nlb)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b04yfst4)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04yk7hd)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b04ykdyd)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b04ykk5s)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b04yk3z5)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b04xrl8f)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b04ykd77)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b04yfst9)

Today in Parliament 23:00 TUE (b04yk7hj)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b04ykdyn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b04ykk5z)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b04yk4b0)

Today 07:00 SAT (b04y6drw)

Today 06:00 MON (b04y9y6r)

Today 06:00 TUE (b04yftkh)

Today 06:00 WED (b04ykbjh)

Today 06:00 THU (b04ykk4k)

Today 06:00 FRI (b04yjtjg)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0ptz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0rtf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04t0sc8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04t0skg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04t0sqd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04t0sry)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b04xrl8r)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b04ykd7m)

War and Peace 21:00 SAT (b04w82wh)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b04xkg75)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b04xkg77)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b04xkg7f)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b04xkg7m)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b04y6v98)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b04y6v9t)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b04y6vbw)

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Weather 21:58 FRI (b04y6vl0)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04y9w5b)

What Does the K Stand For? 18:30 WED (b04ykd7f)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04y9w5d)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b04y6kck)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b04yb0f7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b04yftkt)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b04ykbjp)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b04ykk4r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b04yjts5)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b04xp4wn)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b04yk47x)

World at One 13:00 MON (b04yb3s5)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b04yftl9)

World at One 13:00 WED (b04ykbk2)

World at One 13:00 THU (b04ykk54)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b04yjvby)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b04yb2x6)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b04yftl5)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b04ykbk0)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b04ykk52)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b04yjvbw)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b04xs9m6)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b04xs9m6)