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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 JANUARY 2015

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04wrqgk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b04wwtsj)
Different Every Time - Robert Wyatt

Episode 5

Wyatt curates a very successful Meltdown Festival in London. Plus an insight into 'le trac' – his particular form of stage fright - and meet some of his famous collaborators who continue to hold him in high esteem.

Marcus O'Dair's biography of Robert Wyatt, a musical cult cum national treasure,

Concluded by Julian Rhind-Tutt.

Abridged in five parts by Katrin Williams:

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04wrqgm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04wrqgp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04wrqgr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04wrqgt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04wwwkz)
A reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04wwwl1)
'I feel like I'm in line for execution.' We hear from a listener who has created an ethical dilemma for her medical team by asking for her pacemaker to be switched off. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04wrqgw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04wrqgy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b04wwmcc)
Wiltshire Wellbeing Group

Helen Mark meets the people who have found the courage to embrace outdoor life.

The Wiltshire Wildlife Trust has been running the Well Being Programme since 2008, in partnership with Wiltshire Council Public Health, providing support for people suffering from mental and emotional stress. The programme is available to anyone experiencing issues such as persistent low mood, depression, anxiety or long-term mental health conditions - this includes people who may be experiencing mental health issues on top of physical or mental disability too.

Joining them at one of their regular weekly sessions, Helen meets those whose lives have quite literally been transformed by this project - and by embracing the landscape on their doorstep have also found their way back to a happier life.

Produced by Nicola Humphries.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b04xjbjs)
Sustainability

Anna Hill visits a farm in Buckinghamshire where trials have been held to see if it's possible to farm profitably, while still protecting the environment and wildlife. A team at Home Farm in Hillesden have divided some traditionally unprofitable parts of the land - like field corners and edges - into three pockets: in the first the land has just been left alone. In the second low level environmental work has been carried out. And in the third intensive countryside stewardship work has been done.

The aim is to look at the science behind the government's environmental schemes for farmers:cross compliance, Entry Level stewardship and Higher Level Stewardship.

Experts from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology have monitored the trials and found that in certain areas where wildlife, and especially pollinators, have increased, yields have also improved. In all areas there was a benefit for wildlife.

We also meet Marek Nowakowski from the Wildlife Farming Company. He acts as a bridge between the scientists and the farmers in the field, to help them put the theories into practice.

The producer is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04wrqh0)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b04xjcmt)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b04xjcmw)
Viv Groskop and Paul Sinton-Hewitt

Artistic Director and acclaimed comedian, Viv Groskop joins Aasmah Mir and Suzy Klein to talk about the 'caw' of stand-up comedy and what it's like making tea for famous authors at the Bath Literature Festival.

Ten years ago Paul Sinton-Hewitt was fired and then had a bad fall when training for a half marathon which ruptured his stomach. Not knowing what to do with himself and determined not to give up running, he set up a club with the aim of running 5k at 9 o'clock on a Saturday morning. 13 people joined him on his first run. Today, more than 1 million people across the world are part of the phenomenon Paul created that day - it's called Parkrun and it's happening as we speak, in more than 500 parks across the world.

Seventy seven year-old Jill Stidever has been teaching children with disabilities to swim for over 50 years. Three of her swimmers have gone on to be paralympians - including her daughter Jane who won five gold medals. In December Jill won the 2014 BBC Get Inspired Unsung Hero award at the Sports Personality of the Year for her work in changing the perception of disabled sport.

Interaction designer & aspiring astronaut Nelly Ben Hayoun works to bring the wonder of outer space into the comfort of the living room & creates chaos out of order.

JP Devlin meets a group of pensioners in Gateshead who find that keeping hens helps stave off loneliness.

Novelist, essayist, lyricist, and screenwriter Nick Hornby picks his Inheritance Tracks

Producer: Maire Devine
Editor: Karen Dalziel

I Laughed, I Cried: How One Woman Took on Stand-Up and (Almost) Ruined Her Life Paperback - Jun 2013 by Viv Groskop. Published by Orion

Inheritance Tracks:
Ring of Fire written by June Carter Cash and Merle Kilgore sung by Johnny Cash, 1963 album, Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash.
(Do the) Mashed Potatoes recorded by James Brown with his band in 1959.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04xjcmy)
Series 9

Hastings

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel programme in Hastings.

Taking questions from a local audience are food historian Annie Gray, DIY food expert Tim Hayward, Israeli chef Itamar Srulovich and a Glaswegian chef with a taste for Catalonian cuisine, Rachel McCormack.

The team discusses the culinary legacy of the Normans - while enjoying fried fish and enduring pottage from the past and a taxidermy pie courtesy of Annie Gray.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

Produced by Robert Abel and Miranda Hinkley
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b04xjcn0)
Sue Cameron of The Daily Telegraph looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The general election campaign began this week 3 months before the official campaign is scheduled to start but will the parties be able engage the attention of voters for that length of time? and what are the odds on a hung parliament?
Plus Westminster reflects on the horror of the terrorist atrocities in Paris.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04wrqh2)
Charlie Hebdo

Looking beyond the headlines: correspondents with insight and analysis consider: Charlie Hebdo and how life used to be in France; the rallies in Germany for and against the influence of Islam in Europe and the arguments over free speech in Turkey. Also in this edition one correspondent, leaving Mexico, pays tribute to the country's brave mothers while another, visiting Antarctica, wonders if tourists should be allowed even to set foot in this, the earth's last great unspoiled wilderness.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04wrqh4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b04xjcn2)
Second-hand Annuity - One Careful Owner

In this week's programme.

Annuity sale
Freedom and Choice in Pensions begins in April. But five million existing pensioners who bought an annuity before it was announced are left out. They are stuck with an annual income which is an income guaranteed for life but probably at a level they always found disappointing. This week the Pensions Minister said he wants to include them too, though he has very little time before the election to pass the laws to do so.

Payday gap
Will payday loan customers who need money turn to the dark side when many payday lenders go out of business in response to regulation and a price cap? Or is the Church of England ready to come to their rescue as the Archbishop of Canterbury - former banker Justin Welby - sort of promised in July 2013?

RPI RIP
The Retail Prices Index was moved from intensive care towards the mortuary this week. The last rites were administered by Institute for Fiscal Studies Director Paul Johnson who recommended it should no longer be used as a measure of inflation. Already de-designated as a national statistic in March 2013, its life support is about to be turned off for most purposes. But Johnson is less clear about what will replace it - he doesn't much like the CPI either. He will tell us why.

Holiday cash
As the euro tumbles against the pound should we fill our boots with notes and coins ready for a trip to one of the 19 (now including Lithuania) Eurozone countries? Or is currency speculation only for the likes of Warren Buffet. And do we need actual cash at all?


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b04wwvnq)
Series 45

Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis return with a new series of The Now Show, looking at the week's events via topical stand-up and sketches with guests Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin, Rich Hall and Vikki Stone.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04wrqh6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04wrqh8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04wwwc6)
Victoria Ayling, Jillian Creasy, Maajid Nawaz, Sir Keir Starmer, Tom Tugendhat

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Harlow College in Essex with prospective parliamentary candidates hoping to win a seat in the May General Election. Victoria Ayling is standing for UKIP, Jillian Creasy for the Green Party, Maajid Nawaz for the Liberal Democrats , Sir Keir Starmer for Labour and Tom Tugendhat for the Conservative Party.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b04xjfxy)
Charlie Hebdo Attack; Fixing the NHS

Following events in Paris, how fundamental is our right to freedom of speech? And with current A+E waiting times the worst ever recorded, how can we fix the NHS?

Email: anyanswers@bbc.co.uk

Presented: Anita Anand
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b03kp47b)
Carine Adler - Angel Maker

Angel Maker by Carine Adler

When penniless Hungarian Lili arrives in London with her young daughter, she is determined to use whatever means available to make the arrangement with her rich boyfriend Sam more permanent. A passionate tale of money, sex and the power they bring, set in 1950s London.

Producer/Director Charlotte Riches

Angel Maker is set in mid 1950s, post war London, a time when women had few choices and would be lost without a man to protect them. This was especially true for immigrants like Lili Weiss, a penniless, Jewish Hungarian, who comes to London with her young daughter Rosie in the hope of securing a brighter future for herself and her daughter by marrying Sam, a man whom she had a passionate affair with just after the war. As a development entrepreneur, Sam is rich and powerful and is making a name for himself in the higher echelons of London society. As a Jewish immigrant with no family and no money Lili is at the opposite end of this spectrum. Lili must use her sexuality and charm to encourage Max to go against the prejudice of London society and his own family to take her as his wife.


SAT 15:30 Sasha's Song (b04wtzz5)
In a rapidly changing Russia, Sasha Tsaliuk continues to fight for the existence of his beloved Moscow Acapella Jewish Choir. Formed as the Soviet Union collapsed around him, Sasha came to the choir as conductor when it was a potent, exciting and hopeful symbol of the new Russia. Here was music both sacred and folk that had been arrested, buried and silence by Communism, anti-semitism and the hammer blow of war- it was the return of those voices long stifled.

Whilst many of Sasha's contemporaries left to begin new lives abroad Sasha stayed, believing the choir offered hope and progress for the best of modern Russian values. Tsaliuk had once performed in the legendary Big Soviet Children's Choir, beloved across all of the Soviet Union. Singing to the Party highups and travelling the length and breadth of the Union. Now Sasha lives to revive Jewish Russian music; the music of the vanished world of his grandparents. His choir has won international acclaim on its many tours and draws diverse audiences at home. Frequently it performs for the mega rich who find it charming and fashionable. But Sasha's perfect dinner jacket hides deep worries.

The choir perennially struggles for funding and the Russia he hoped would be home to the choir is perplexingly different and volatile. Every night, Sasha is up late on Skype scouring the world for sponsors. As the Moscow Jewish Acapella Choir marks its 25th anniversary Monica Whitlock hears its story and encounters Sasha's world.

Producer Mark Burman.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b04xjfy0)
Michaela DePrince; Gender Pay Gap

Michaela DePrince talks about being orphaned in Sierra Leone and adopted by American parents and how her dream to become a dancer was inspired by a picture in a magazine.

We hear from the Labour MP who introduced a bill in December calling for big companies to reveal their gender pay gap. Whilst the majority of MPs backed the proposed legislation, seven Conservative MPs didn't. We hear from Labour's Sarah Champion who proposed the bill and Adam Afriyie who voted against it.

What is the future of women's magazines in a digital world? The Tate Galleries in London, Liverpool, and St Ives have unveiled an unprecedented line up of female artists for 2015 - we discuss the highlights.
We hear from a listener calling for a Royal Commission on murder to take place after her friend was killed by her estranged husband.

Four women who lead Royal Colleges talk about medicine as a profession for women and whether barriers to leadership roles are finally breaking down. And we ask whether adult children still living at home should pay rent?

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b04xjfy2)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b04wwwl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04wrqhb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04wrqhd)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04wrqhg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b04xjfy4)
Arthur Smith, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Fred Wiseman, Chris Lynam, Shelina Janmohamed, J Mascis, Boxed In

Hugh Fearnley-whittingstall talks to Clive about Series 2 of 'River Cottage Australia' and also about his latest book: 'River Cottage, Light & Easy'. Writer Shelina Janmohamed explores what it means to be young, female and Muslim today. She meets the Mipsterz - or Muslim Hipsters - and other fashionable, educated, young Muslim women confronting cultural stereotypes and negotiating their futures. Co-host Arthur Smith talks to comedian Chris Lynam - in the words of the New York Times, 'a brilliantly bizarre antidote to today's truculent society', and American filmmaker Fred Wiseman, recipient of the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at last year's Venice International Film Festival, talks about his new film 'National Gallery' more than half a century after the he produced his first feature-length documentary 'The Cool World' in 1963. With music from J Mascis who performs ''Every Morning' from his album 'Tied To A Star' And from Boxed In who perform 'Foot Of The Hill' from their album 'Boxed In'.

Producer Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b04xjfy6)
Series 17

140 Characters with Nothing to Say

Playwright D.C. Jackson creates an imaginative response to a story from this week's news as the award-winning series continues.

On 30th December the news reported that Pauline Cafferkey, a Scottish nurse who contracted Ebola whilst volunteering for Save the Children in Sierra Leone, had been moved from a Glasgow hospital to the Royal Free Hospital in London.

Social commentator Katie Hopkins tweeted on the subject: "Not so independent when it matters most are we jocksville?" and followed up with a second tweet: "Little sweaty jocks, sending us Ebola bombs in the form of sweaty Glaswegians just isn't cricket."

It set off a twitter storm that culminated in more than 27 thousand signing an online petition calling, yet again, for her arrest.

In his searing drama DC Jackson explores the controversial and often abusive world of social media.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b04xjfzk)
Whiplash, Foxcatcher, Daniel Kitson's Tree, Cucumber Banana Tofu, Weathering

A review of the week's cultural highlights.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b03bpv42)
A Brief History of Irony

"What is irony ? Why do we need it ? Does it have any socially redeeming features whatsoever, or is it merely nasty ?"

Ian Hislop, John Sergeant, Kathy Lette, Barry Cryer and Madonna join the American satirist Joe Queenan in a search for the meaning and purpose of irony - or saying one thing to mean something else. Juvenal, Swift and John Lennon all find a place in the spotlight, as do the bible, Oliver Cromwell and World War One.

"Some might think it ironic that the BBC has hired an American presenter for this show," says the presenter, "but the latest chapter in irony's history was written in the United States." The reference is to the 2001 destruction of the Twin Towers, and the proclamation that the Age of Irony was dead. "Shattered Nation Yearns to Care About Stupid Bullshit Again," replied the Onion newspaper. We have an interview with the editor about the dangers of stepping into the irony-free zone.

The programme also features Armando Iannucci, Kurt Anderson, Brenda Maddox, Dean Martin, Bert Kaempfert and The Mike Flowers Pops.

The producer is Miles Warde.


SAT 21:00 War and Peace (b04w82wf)
Episode 2

Having inherited his father's fortune, Pierre becomes the new Count Bezukhov and the richest man in Russia. Prince Vassily's charming daughter, Helene, captures Pierre's attention and before long they are married. But will it be a happy match?

Meanwhile, Princess Marya is being wooed by Helen's wily brother, Anatole, while war dominates for others - Prince Andrei is building a respectful relationship with General Kutuzov and courageously speaks out to Prince Bagration in defence of Captain Tushin while Nikolai is wounded at Shoengraben. The Battle of Austerlitz is imminent.

A dynamic fresh dramatisation by Timberlake Wertenbaker of Leo Tolstoy's epic - from the translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokonsky - follows the fortunes of three Russian aristocratic families during the Napoleonic War. Starring Lesley Manville, John Hurt, Alun Armstrong and Harriet Walter.

The story moves between their past and present as Pierre, Natasha, Marya and Nikolai talk to their children about the events that shaped their lives and the lives of every Russian who lived through these troubled times.

War and Peace reflects the panorama of life at every level of Russian society in this period. The longest of 19th-century novels, it's an epic story in which historical, social, ethical and religious issues are explored on a scale never before attempted in fiction.

Alex Shiels … Sergei Rostov
Ben Crowe … Mikhail Mitrich
Charlotte Emmerson … Helen Kuragin
Daniel Flynn … Regimental Commander
David Calder … Prince Vassily Kuragin
David Collings … Shinshin
Ella Dale … Masha Bezukhov
Ferdinand Kingsley … Anatole Kuragin
Harriet Walter … Anna Mikhailovna Drubetskoy
Hazel Ellerby … Julia's mother
Jed Vine … Petya Rostov
Joanna David … Annette Scherer
Joel Msccormack … Boris Drubetskoy
John Hurt … Prince Bolkonsky
Jonathan Slinger … Captain Denisov
Kathleen Keaney … Liza Rostov
Miss Nelly Harker … Lise Bolkonsky
Alun Armstrong … Count Rostov
Emerald O'Hanrahan … Julia Karagan
Lesley Manville … Countess Rostov
Natasha Little … Marya Bolkonsky
Paterson Joseph … Pierre Bezuhkov
Phoebe Fox … Natasha Rostov
Pip Donaghy … Colonel of the House
Roger Allam … General Kutuzov
Roger May … Prince Bagration
Sam Blatchford … Andrusha Rostov
Sam Dale … Alpatych
Sam Reid … Nikolai Rostov
Sarah Badel … Maria Demitrievna
Serena Evans … Catiche
Stanley Toyne … Mitya Rostov
Stephen Campbell Moore … Andrei Bolkonsky
Tamzin Merchant … Sonya Rostov
Tom Glenister … Nikolenka Bolkonsky

Director: Celia de Wolff
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04wrqhj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b04wwgz9)
The Law and Artificial Intelligence

Clive Anderson ask how our legal system will cope in a fast-approaching world of autonomous cars, care-bots and other machines using artificial intelligence to make judgments normally made by humans.

What will be the legal implications of the use of robotics in healthcare - the introduction of care-bots that not only monitor patients' medical care, but carry meals, crack jokes and remind patients to take medication? Who will be sued for negligence if the care-bot malfunctions - the NHS, the doctor who delegated responsibility to the machine, the manufacturer of the machine or the software company?

The Government is currently changing laws to allow the testing of prototype autonomous self-driving vehicles on UK roads - how will these changes affect motorists? Who will be liable in the event of an accident? What happens if a car is hacked and taken over by a criminal third party? Who has access to data about the car's, and therefore the passenger's, movements?

The development in Japan of therapeutic robots looking like baby seals has raised questions about whether robots should be given human or animal form. What are the legal implications of having to separate a sick child from the malfunctioning robot with which he or she has bonded?

Can a super intelligent robot be legally accountable for the decisions it takes? Who has the intellectual property rights for the creative output of a robot? And can existing laws deal with all these issues or do we need major new legislation to deal with the robotic future?

Produced by Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b04wtgjv)
(2/17)
Which South American country owns Robinson Crusoe Island? And which punctuation mark is used in maths to stand for the factorial of an integer?

Russell Davies puts these and many other questions to the contenders in the second heat of the 2015 series. This week they come from Leicestershire, Hampshire, East Sussex and the West Midlands. Each will be hoping he or she can win a place in the semi-finals and perhaps stand a chance of adding their name to the illustrious list of Brain of Britain champions.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 India's Beats: The Hungry Generation (b04ws24p)
Allen Ginsberg arrived in early 1960s Calcutta to discover a collective of angry young poets whose anti-establishment antics were uncannily reminiscent of his own past. This is the story of the so-called Hungry Generation.

Fifty years later, we follow in the footsteps of the Beat Generation to the literary centre of India and go in search of the Hungryalist poets. Who were they? Where did they fit with a rich Bengali literary tradition that includes the great Rabindranath Tagore? What eventually led to their arrests, imprisonment and disbandment?

The Hungry Generation were a special breed - born in the slums, but highly educated and primed for a revolution in both literature and society. Through their verse, they broke strict rules of Bengali poetry as well as social taboos. In their actions they rubbished 'bourgeois' Bengali polity - consciously acting without manners or etiquette, burping, farting and using bad language.

They also used clever stunts to attack local officials and politicians, and held readings in socially unacceptable venues such as brothels, opium dens and graveyards. Hungryalist poets, such as the Roychoudhary brothers, and Utpal Kumar Basu, stood for the outsiders of society.

Eventually the authorities had enough. Hungryalists were rounded up and arrested on charges of obscenity and conspiracy against the state. Ginsberg attempted to intervene, sending letters of support. US literary journals carried the story and printed Hungryalist poetry. The movement floundered.

But despite this, we discover that the Hungryalist anti-establishment spirit is very much still alive in modern-day Calcutta today.

Produced by Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 11 JANUARY 2015

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkfww)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Showman's Parson: Tales from the Memoirs of the Rev Thomas Horne (b03wh36q)
The Dwarf's Stratagem

Thomas Horne was born in 1849 in a caravan at Nottingham Goose Fair. He spent the first part of his life as a working showman - dressing up as a performing bear, running a Penny Bazaar around the Lancashire Wakes, working as a doorman in Mrs Williams' Waxwork, and finally becoming an actor in a Mumming Booth and a partner in an Illusion Show. Latterly, he joined a missionary brotherhood in Oxford, and was ordained as a priest in Leeds in 1885.

Until his death in 1918, Thomas Horne was a vigorous campaigner for the rights of travelling people. With his education, training as a priest, and family association with the fairground, he was their ideal representative. He travelled throughout the country, preaching to showfolk and, in one year alone, he travelled over 12,000 miles, visiting fairs as far apart as Penzance in Cornwall to Ayr in Scotland.

The stories in this series are taken from his memoirs held in the National Fairground Archive in Sheffield.

Today's story concerns the exploits of a cunning dwarf, Peter Piper, who is in charge of an amazing mechanical waxwork exhibition visiting Cardiff.

Read by Tony Lidington

Producer David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkfwy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkfx0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkfx2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkfx4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b050hhct)
The bells of All Saints Church, East Pennard in Somerset.


SUN 05:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b04wwgzc)
Series 1

Electricity

In a new series, David Baddiel sets out to make sense of some apparently puzzling topics.

In this first programme, and after hearing suggestions from his followers on social media, David seeks to understand electricity. He travels to Manchester to learn the basics from a professor of high voltage technology, and to Staffordshire to grasp the operations of a huge power station.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b04xkfx6)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04xkgsv)
Yoga: For Body, Mind and Spirit

The guru B.K.S. Iyengar died last year. He was credited by many with being instrumental in introducing the contemporary practice of yoga to Britain. Mark Tully knew him personally and, in a programme inspired by the teacher's life and work, he discusses the possible benefits of yoga and investigates its spiritual roots.

He talks to British yoga teacher Gerry Chambers, who trained with Iyengar, about different approaches to yoga in the East and in the West. He also plays archive of Iyengar himself and introduces readings by the poet Rose Flint and the novelist Hanif Kureishi.

There's music from yoga enthusiasts as varied as Yehudi Menuhin, Ravi Shankar, the Russian pianist GeNIA and Beethoven.

The readers are Lucy Briers and Arsher Ali.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b04xkyp6)
Pheasant Shoot as Conservation

Sybil Ruscoe meets Buckingham farmer George Eaton. He's recently won an award for Conservation for the work he's done improving habitats for birds and wildlife on his land. But the award is from a gun manufacturer: George also hosts pheasant shoots on his land two or three times a year - so how does that fit with his conservation work?

George says he's always been involved in shooting, hunting and fishing from a young age. He says the shoot provides the incentive and funding he needs to carry out extensive conservation work. He's involved in trials of bird food, including unusual crops sown specifically as year-round feed. He's also improved drainage and wildlife cover on the farm. We hear from the RSPB about which birds are being helped through his efforts.

Sybil also visits the classroom that George has built to host up to 100 school and other visits to the farm, to explain his conservation work in the context of a living, working farm.

Produced in Bristol by Sally Challoner.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b04xkfx8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b04xkfxb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b04xkyp8)
Islam and Europe, Pope in Sri Lanka, Wi-fi in church

Father Aidan Troy has been in Paris for seven years at Saint Joseph's Church near the offices of Charlie Hebdo. He is known for his time in Belfast where his ministry in Ardoyne had spanned the time of the Holy Cross Protest Walks. He talks to Edward about how the churches in France will mark the shootings in Paris this week.
Caroline Wyatt reports from Rome ahead of Pope Francis's trip to Sri Lanka and The Philippines.
John Laurenson reports from Paris on the reaction from French Muslims on this week's events whilst Edward Stourton discusses the wider implications of the shootings and the protests earlier this week against the 'Islamisation of Europe' in Germany and Sweden with Riem Spielhaus, Nabila Ramdani and Sara Silvestri.
Kevin Bocquet reports on calls for the Church of England to drop laws that forbid a full Christian funeral to people 'of sound mind' who have taken their own lives.
As Andrew Lloyd Webber calls for Wi-Fi in Churches, the Bishop of Worcester, John Inge, explains how it may work.

Contributors

Father Aidan Troy
Riem Spielhaus
Nabila Ramdani
Sara Silvestri
Bishop John Inge

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Dan Tierney

Editor
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b04xkypb)
Multiple System Atrophy Trust

David Hare presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Multiple System Atrophy Trust
Registered Charity No. 1137652 (England & Wales) and SC044535 (Scotland)
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope ' Multiple System Atrophy Trust '.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b04xkfxd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b04xkfxg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b04xkypd)
The Second Advent

From Croydon Seventh Day Adventist Church. Distinctives of Seventh Day Adventist beliefs celebrate traditional Christian teachings about the return of Jesus Christ to bring justice and restoration to the whole universe. The service also explores why Adventists take a weekly Sabbath rest, which, they believe, help Christians live healthy and Godly lives in their communities. The Croydon Seventh Day Adventist Gospel Choir is directed by Ken Burton. Preacher: Pastor Richard Daly. Producer: Philip Billson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04wwwc8)
Charlie Hebdo

Adam Gopnick reflects on the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

"The notion that what some have called France's 'stark secularism' - or its level of unemployment, or its history of exclusion, that imposed invisibility - is in any way to blame or even a root cause for this, depends on being ignorant of the actual history of France."

Producer: Sheila Cook
Editor: Richard Knight.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0nw9)
Blue Rock Thrush

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the blue rock thrush, perched high on a Spanish castle. The blue rock thrush has a slim silhouette, rather like that of a blackbird, but these largely sedentary, elusive and sun-loving birds are a rare sight in northern Europe. They are widespread in summer across southern Europe and also occur in the Arabian Peninsula and across most of south-east Asia. The male lives up to his name, as in sunlight his deep indigo body feathers contrast with his darker wings and tail. His mate is a more muted mid brown, and barred beneath. Blue rock thrushes often nest in old ruins, but can also be found in houses in villages and on the edge of towns. Here in sunny spots they feed on large insects like grasshoppers and will even take small reptiles in their long thrush-like bills.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b04xkypg)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b04xkyt1)
Emma soothes Ed's fears, and there is a shock for Rob and Helen.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b04xmqd6)
Jo Malone

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the business woman, Jo Malone.

If her name automatically conjures the citrusy scents of lime, basil and mandarin or spicy notes of amber and lavender then you're doubtless one of the customers who flock into the eponymous stores to buy the products that have made her a household name.

Aged nine, she would grind sandlewood and strain juniper at the kitchen table. 17 years later fashionable London flocked to her little salon in Chelsea to be massaged with oils and unguents. In the 1990s the brand went international and the fragrance made her fortune when she sold the business.

If this all sounds like a fragrant little fairy tale, crisply wrapped in a signature black grosgrain bow, it isn't. Severely dyslexic she left school at 14. Her dad was a talented painter but a chronic gambler too, and home life was sometimes hand-to-mouth. Later, and at a time in her life when she should have been enjoying her success and her toddler son, she was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer. Finally fully recovered she decided to start again from scratch.

She says, 'I love sharing my story, and I'm not frightened of people seeing the cracks as well as the strengths. I think the things that are sad and difficult are just as important.'

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b04xkfxj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b04wth58)
Series 14

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Ed Byrne, Henning Wehn, Holly Walsh and Richard Osman are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Ireland, rules, London and beavers.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith

A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b04xmqd8)
2015 Food and Farming Awards Launch

Sheila Dillon unveils a new team of judges for the 2015 BBC Food and Farming Awards, including Giorgio Locatelli, Diana Henry and Cyrus Todiwala.

Sheila catches up with previous nominees and winners, looks ahead to the big food stories of the coming year, and explains how you can send in your nominations.

Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b04xkfxl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04xmqdb)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Mindfulness: Panacea or Fad? (b04xmqdd)
In little more than a few decades mindfulness has gone from being a specialist element of Buddhist teaching to the front cover of Time magazine. It's the must have app for the stars, courses in it are advertised in the back of all the glossies, businesses use it to reduce staff stress and boost productivity. It's even prescribed on the NHS for anxiety and depression. This is the story of "mindfulness" - from its roots in the Buddhist practice of meditation to today's multi-billion dollar, worldwide industry. Devoted followers hail it as a cure-all for the ills of modern life. Or is this just another health fad, destined for disparagement, like homeopathy? And what do Buddhists feel about their heritage being westernised, secularised and commercialised?

Presenter: Emma Barnett. Producer: Phil Pegum.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04wwtsy)
West Yorkshire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from West Yorkshire. Bob Flowerdew, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson take questions from an audience of local gardeners.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:

Q. Can you grow fruit trees in containers and raised beds?

A. Yes, if they are on dwarfing stocks. Most modern Apple trees would be fine and the bigger the container the less watering they would need. Apricots and Peaches are surprisingly easy, so long as they are well sheltered. Try 'Tomcot', 'Flavourcot', 'Goldcot' Apricot varieties, and the 'Bonanza' Peach variety which likes being in a pot. Cherries wouldn't work so well though. Regular watering and a correct feeding pattern is the secret to growing fruit trees in containers.

Q. I live next to woodland, what is the most effortless way to prevent Brambles from invading my garden?

A. Dig out the plants as soon as they appear. Get a pair of Kevlar gloves so you can pull them up. Cut the roots with secateurs if you can't wrench them out. If the plants do take over, try making Blackberry vinegar - it's delicious. You could try training some across your fence to harvest the fruit. Put really thick mulch down (five or six inches) and this makes it easier to pull out the saplings.

Q. What plants would you recommend planting up against the red brick of Leeds' terraced housing?

A. Bob says avoid climbers because they can take over and are hard to keep under control. Try instead, Cotoneaster horizontalis or Pyracantha. Bunny disagrees with Bob and recommends a rambling Rose called 'Lady of the Lake' and an evergreen climbing Hydrangea, Hydrangea Seemannii. Grape vines would also work. Matthew recommends Itea Ilicifolia and Camsis radicans.

Q. How do you propagate Rosemary from an old plant?

A. Get the plant to put on new growth by giving it lots of water, feed it in the spring, cut it back a little and try to get more light on it. Take cuttings from the new growth. Use the layering technique - take a sprig through the hole of a plant pot, then fill with compost and this should take. The original plant should live for thirty of forty years if you cut it back every year to encourage fresh growth.

Q. What herbs or vegetables would the panel recommend growing in a hanging basket?

A. Mint would take well as would Marjoram. Avoid Tarragon, Parsley and Chervil as these tend to grow vertically. If you put two hanging baskets back to back you could grow Thyme in a kind of ball.

Q. I'm looking for low growing plants that would thrive in a very shady garden. What could you recommend?

A. Cyclamen, Lily of the Valley, Alchemilla Mollis, Pear Trees, Arbutus Unedo (Strawberry Tree), Ferns (Dryopteris Wallichiana, Erythrosora, Athyrium Niponicum), white Roses, white Foxgloves, Sweet Rocket, Japanese Anemones, Hydrangea Paniculata Unique and Daphnes. Keep it simple in a north-facing Garden with topiary pieces like Ilex Crenata (Japanese Holly) and Ferns such as Dryopteris wallichiana, Dryopteris erythrosora, Athrium japonicum (Japanese Painted Fern) and our own native version of Deschamsia Caespitosa 'Goldtau'.

Q. Two years ago I bought a Japanese Cherry Tree, Prunus Nipponica Brilliant and it flowers well each spring but then the new growth dies back - why is this happening?

A. This could be blossom end wilt which is passed by insects. The only thing you can do if this is the case is trim off the dead matter. This could also be happening because the plant is pot bound. Go and give it a good tug, if it comes out the ground then plant it again, properly!

Q. I'm struggling to grow Borage from seed. Any tips on how I can improve my chances of success?

A. Maybe the moisture levels are wrong. Buy a couple of plants and let it self-seed. Or, try getting seed from somewhere else - you might be sowing bad seed.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04xmqrg)
Sunday Omnibus: Alison and Shirley

Fi Glover presents three excerpts from a conversation between sisters about their childhood in Sedbergh and the difficulties they've both overcome in their lives since, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b04xmrnk)
The Last Days of Troy

Episode 1

The Last Days of Troy. Simon Armitage's dramatisation of Homer's Iliad . The Greeks are laying siege to Troy to win back their abducted queen, Helen. But as the conflict drags on, and despite battlefields scarlet with blood, opposing forces have reached a bitter stalemate. Desperate and exhausted, both Gods and mortals squabble amongst themselves for the spoils of war and the hand of victory.

The Last Days of Troy reveals a world locked in cycles of conflict and revenge, of east versus west, and a dangerous mix of pride, lies and self-deception.

Lily Cole gives her radio debut as Helen of Troy - the face that launched a thousand ships.

Original Music by Alex Baranowski
Directed for Radio by Susan Roberts
First directed for The Royal Exchange Theatre by Nick Bagnall.

'Beyond the battlefield, the original tale is a back-room story of wounded pride, and the push and pull of family ties and national loyalty - tense and intriguing, with moments of great tragedy and breath-taking humility. Everything we have come to expect of the great myths'
Simon Armitage.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b04xmwz2)
Ben Lerner on 10:04

The American writer Ben Lerner won huge praise for his first novel Leaving The Atocha Station. He talks to Mariella about the follow up, 10:04 - a playful and complex book about time, story telling and friendship.

Thriller writer Charles Cumming has set his latest book in Istanbul where his disgraced agent Thomas Kell has to find a traitor in the ranks of the secret service. Charles Cumming, and critic Jake Kerridge talk to Mariella about writing contemporary thrillers in a time of fast-changing global politics.

Our Reading Clinic offers advice to a listener in search of well written memoirs and Boualem Sansal sends a literary postcard from Algeria.


SUN 16:30 Fear and Loathing in Harrogate (b04xmwz6)
Do you remember when the Tour de France came to Yorkshire ? When thousands upon thousands lined those sun-kissed moors and hills ? Cycling virgins John Cooper Clarke, Phill Jupitus, Simon Day and Mike Garry all respond to the day's proceedings at an evening of bike inspired performance, recorded on the first day of the race - poems, prose and jokes in Harrogate about one of last summer's most memorable events.

The evening was the brainchild of Johnny Green, former road manager of the Clash. First though he has to introduce his team of reprobates to the intricacies of the race, which they follow throughout the day. It is the crowd that inspires them the most, and the language is suitably rock and roll.

Simon Day appears as 'acclaimed' Yorkshire poet Geoffrey Allerton; Mike Garry is himself; Phill Jupitus rediscovers Porky the Poet; and John Cooper Clarke performs a heartfelt 'Ode to Bicycles' by Pablo Neruda.

Compere Johnny Green is author of Backstage at the Tour de France - 'conveys the magnificent bonkerness of le Tour rather well'.

The producer is Miles Warde.


SUN 17:00 The City on the Couch (b04wth5g)
Psychoanalyst Mary Bradbury investigates why a growing number of big businesses in the financial sector are taking more care of their employees' mental health.

Contributors include Graham Thornicroft, Professor of Community Psychiatry at King's College London; Professor David Tuckett of University College London; Ian Gatt QC of Herbert Smith Freehills; and Sacha Romanovitch of Grant Thornton.

Presented by Mary Bradbury

Produced by David Morley
A Bite Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b04xjfy6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04xkfxn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b04xkfxq)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkfxs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b04xmwzb)
On Pick of the Week this week we walk in circles with Will Self around the large Hadron Collider, trying to make sense of particle physics in a storm; poet Mike Garry becomes a spokesperson as the Tour de France speeds through Yorkshire and we remember another poet, the great Thom Gunn who transported himself from Gravesend to California and notated his journey for us all.
The comedian Bridget Christie talks yogurt and we meet The Ferryhill Philosophers who attempt to understand the great questions about death and love and sex and brass music. There's more brass too as Frank Renton celebrates two decades at the driving wheel of Listen to The Band.
Where there's self, there's brass; where there's philosophy there's yogurt.

The best of BBC Radio this week chosen by Ian McMillan.

Produced by Stephen Garner.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b04xmwzg)
Tomorrow is Plough Monday. Jill wonders whether Alan's heartfelt words about custodians of the land are a criticism of David and Ruth. Alan's grateful to the SAVE committee for sourcing the plough outside the church. SAVE will be using the plough for a photo opportunity.

Meanwhile, Jill has started on the task of clearing the Brookfield attic. Shula's pleased that Elizabeth is so optimistic. For the first time since Nigel died, Elizabeth has realized she is capable of caring about someone else and feels positive about the year ahead.

Rob can't relax and phones Jess, outraged at the letter he has received from the Child Maintenance Service. Rob's more shocked when Jess tells him he is named on her son's birth certificate. Rob vehemently denies the child is his, so Jess tells him to prove it by taking a paternity test. But Rob refuses to be blackmailed.

Elizabeth spots Helen and Henry and points out how wonderful Rob is with Henry. Rob apologises to Helen for missing her day out with Henry and messing up dinner. According to Jess, Rob's Mother believes she is the child's grandmother. Helen supports Rob, who resolves to call the CMS and explain what Jess is doing, and that there's no way he's the father.


SUN 19:15 The Rest is History (b04wrycv)
Series 1

Episode 5

Frank Skinner loves history, but just doesn't know much of it.

This comedy discussion show with celebrity guests promises to help him find out more about it.

With David Mitchell, Steve Hall and historian in residence Dr Kate Williams

Frank and company navigate their way through the annals of time, picking out and chewing over the funniest, oddest, and most interesting moments in history.

Producers: Dan Schreiber and Justin Pollard

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


SUN 19:45 Subway (b04xmwzl)
Redemption Song

A multi-contributor series of specially-commissioned stories with subterranean settings.

Episode 1 (of 3): Redemption Song by Jami Attenberg
Early one morning, a woman insists that her casual lover accompanies her on her walk to the New York subway.

Jami Attenberg is the author of a collection of short stories and three novels. Her last, The Middlesteins, was a Book At Bedtime on BBC Radio 4 in 2013. Her next, Saint Mazie, will be published in 2015. Jami lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Read by Laurel Lefkow

Produced by Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b04xf1d5)
A&E Waiting Times

It's been reported that the NHS in England has missed its four-hour A&E waiting time target with performance dropping to its lowest level for a decade. Tim Harford takes a closer look at the numbers with John Appleby, chief economist of the independent health think tank the King's Fund.

Do 85 people really own half the world's wealth? An advert for a BBC2 programme claims so, but More or Less listeners aren't so sure.

The media has also been full of stories about a new study, which reportedly shows that most cancers are caused by 'bad luck'. But, actually, it doesn't. Tim Harford finds out what the research really tells us about the causes of cancer, speaking to PZ Myers, a biologist and associate professor at the University of Minnesota, Morris, in the United States and Professor George Davey-Smith, clinical epidemiologist at Bristol University.

The Financial Times' Chris Giles joins Tim Harford to discuss statistical claims which are both true and unfair.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander
Programme credit: the song Bad Dream, featured in the item about cancer, was composed by Nick Thorburn.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04xf1d1)
Jean Cabut and Georges Wolinski, Luise Rainer, Edward Brooke and Chip Young

Matthew Bannister on

The French cartoonists Jean Cabut and Georges Wolinski who were among the twelve people who died when gunmen stormed the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

The German born actress Luise Rainer who won two Oscars, but ended her Hollywood career when she fell out with the movie mogul Louis B Mayer.

Edward Brooke who was the first African American to be elected to the US senate.

And Chip Young, the session guitarist and producer who played on hits for Elvis Presley, Dolly Parton and many more.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b04xjcn2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b04xkypb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b04wwqcr)
Meet the Vloggers

Vlogging may be the internet's new path to riches. Peter Day meets the Youtubers who start off making videos in their bedroom and end up being courted by big brands. Will these new relationships disrupt the advertising and broadcasting industries and, for those who make the big time, can their authentic appeal be maintained in the face of fame and money?


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04xmxjk)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04xmxrz)
Zoe Williams of The Guardian analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b04wwn6n)
James Corden and Emily Blunt, Bennett Miller on Foxcatcher, Richard Linklater on Eric Rohmer

With Francine Stock.

Into The Woods stars James Corden and Emily Blunt discusses what it was like to sing on screen for the first time.

Director Bennett Miller reveals the reasons he cast Steve Carrell against type as a multi-millionaire who sponsored an American Olympic wrestling team with tragic consequences.

As a retrospective of Eric Rohmer's career continues at the BFI Southbank, Boyhood director Richard Linklater and critic Antonia Quirke consider the quiet genius of films like The Green Ray and Claire's Knee.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04xkgsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 12 JANUARY 2015

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkfyr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b04wwdz1)
War Games - Riding the Subway

The militarisation of every day life. Joanna Bourke, Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London, talks to Laurie about the multiple ways in which military violence and war play invade our current lives, pervading language and entertainment. Are we irrevocably 'wounding the world'?

Also, Richard Ocejo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the City University of New York, takes us on a mystery ride with teenage New Yorkers, showing the diverse ways in which people experience being strangers in public space.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b050hhct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkfyt)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkfyw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkfyy)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkfz0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04y9cby)
A reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04xn7cj)
SEMEX dairy show; Pesticides - Endocrine Disruptors; BBC Food and Farming Awards

First Milk's announcement that it will not be paying its farmers this week, has sent shockwaves throughout the dairy industry. The dairy company is farmer-owned, and takes milk from about 15% of dairy farmers in the UK. Figures released by the NFU show about 60 farmers left dairying in December alone. The SEMEX dairy conference in Glasgow - which is celebrating its 25th year - is under way. Agricultural consultant John Allen is the conference organiser. After months of cuts in milk prices, he expects the mood to be rather angry and a bit glum.

All this week Farming Today focuses on the use of pesticides in British Farming. For many years, there have been concerns that people's health may be affected by the amount of chemicals in food and drinking water. Chemicals known as "endocrine disruptors" in water have been known to affect invertebrates, and even change the sex of some organisms. Now, the European Union is discussing how to define an "endocrine disruptor", and farmers here are worried that if the definition is wide enough it could mean many of the pesticides they use might be banned. Today we compare the views on this of the NFU and PAN, the Pesticide Action Network.

The BBC's Food and Farming Awards are on the horizon. Categories include Best Food Producer, Best Food Initiative, Cook of the Year, and - this year - the Countryfile Farming Hero Award. Nominations in all except the last category are now open.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04xkfz2)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0pjx)
Snow Petrel

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents an Antarctic specialist, the delicate looking snow petrel. On a wind blasted Antarctic iceberg, small white hummocks sprout beaks to bicker and flirt with each other. These are snow petrels, one of the hardiest bird species in the world. Few bird species breed in the Antarctic and fewer still are so intimately bound to the landscape of snow and ice. But the near pure white snow petrel makes its home in places where temperatures can plummet to -40 Celsius and below. Returning to their breeding areas from October, the nest is a skimpy affair nothing more than a pebble-lined scrape in a hollow or rocky crevice where the parents rear their single chick on a diet of waxy stomach oil and carrion. But for a bird of such purity the snow petrel has a ghoulish diet, foraging at whale and seal carcasses along the shore. Although it breeds on islands such as South Georgia which are north of the summer pack ice, the snow petrel's true home is among snow and ice of its Antarctic home.


MON 06:00 Today (b04xn7cl)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b04xn7cn)
The Tudors

Tom Sutcliffe discusses the connection between the Tudors and modern times with author Lady Antonia Fraser, composer Claire van Kampen, director Peter Kosminsky and historian Dan Jones.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b04xn7cq)
Reaching down the Rabbit Hole

Episode 1

Neurologist Dr Allan H Ropper and his co-writer Brian D Burrell take us behind the scenes at the Harvard Medical School's neurology unit.

Dr Ropper's case studies cover the unusual, sometimes bizarre, and often moving stories of life-changing injuries and illness - including the case of an epileptic.

"In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," says Ropper, "Alice jumps into a rabbit hole and finds herself in a bizarre realm where everything bears little relation to the outside world. It is a place where, as the Red Queen mentions to Alice, it helps to believe six impossible things before breakfast. I have no need to believe six impossible things before breakfast because I know that on any given day I will be confronted with six improbable things before lunch..."

Read by Colin Stinton

Written by Dr Allan H Ropper and Brian D Burrell.
Abridged by Pete Nichols.

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04xn99p)
This Girl Can, Nail Biting and Laura Doggett

This Girl Can', a new advertising campaign from Sport England to get more women playing sport. Domestic Violence perpetrator programmes stop abuse says new research. Nail biting is very common but why do we do it and does it matter? Laura Doggett, a hotly-tipped 2015 musician, plays live. Denmark is said to be the happiest place to live in the world. 'A Year of Living Danishly' looks at if it is.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xnczl)
The Corrections

The Dinner of Revenge

First ever dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's acclaimed 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 6: The Dinner of Revenge - Alfred and Enid Lambert, a Midwestern couple in their seventies, are on board a cruise ship in the North Atlantic. As Enid faces up to Alfred's worsening health, she thinks back to the conflicts of their early married life.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


MON 11:00 The Secretaries of Juliet (b04xnczn)
Every year, 10,000 lovelorn people write to Juliet, Shakespeare's great romantic heroine. Some leave their letters in a postbox at the "House of Juliet", a museum in Verona. Others simply address them to "Juliet, Verona, Italy". Someone has to answer those letters, and the task falls to a committee of a dozen local women who style themselves "The Secretaries of Juliet".

Some of the letters celebrate love, but most of them are sad. The Secretaries, all of them volunteers, try to answer all letters, even those that are not written in Italian or English. Sometimes there is a backlog while they hunt for a local speaker of, say Russian. Despite the unremitting sadness of the letters (and in some cases their own personal experiences), all the Secretaries are incurable romantics by disposition.

Jolyon Jenkins travels to Verona to meet the Secretaries, and finds himself unexpectedly co-opted as a temporary secretary. How to answer the American woman facing marriage and asking how to be a submissive wife? What about the 15 year old girl needing to choose between her dull but safe boyfriend and the "bad boy who offers rampant lust"? Are the correspondents really looking for advice or do they just want empathy and reassurance?

Producer/presenter: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 11:30 The Best Laid Plans (b04xnczq)
Peddle Power

Smallbone is set to lead the gang in staging a cycling protest against the building of a new multi-story car park. That is, if he doesn't get too distracted by the car showroom on the way to the protest.

Ardal O'Hanlon plays Smallbone - an idiot angel who's sent to earth to fix his mistakes - in Mark Daydy's sitcom.

In 1885, God (Geoff McGivern) nodded off. In 2015, he awoke to discover that his idiot servant, the angel Smallbone, had accidentally handed out God's plans for the next millennium when he was only meant to hand out plans for the next century. A thousand years of leisurely human progression has been crammed into the last 130. No wonder we're all so stressed. We weren't even meant to have pocket calculators until 2550.

Not only that, but God's blueprints should have run out in the mid-eighties – but we kept going. Humans are now inventing things God never even dreamed of - mobile phones, wireless internet and Made in Chelsea.

Smallbone is cast down to Earth in human form by God, tasked with the dauntingly vague mission of 'reversing the last thirteen decades of human progression'. The problem is that Smallbone is the world's biggest fan - he loves modern technology and his new human body, and he becomes distracted by everything that he's meant to destroy. Especially escalators.

Smallbone.......Ardal O'Hanlon
God.................Geoff McGivern
Tanya..............Esther Smith
Toby................Mike Wozniak
Susan..............Ruth Bratt

Supporting Roles: Duncan Wisbey and Ruth Bratt

Producer: Ben Worsfield
A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2015.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b04xkfz4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04xnczs)
How Did Everything Begin?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Each week Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking 'How did everything begin'?

Helping him answer it are Cosmologist Carole Mundell, Historian Justin Champion, Theologian Giles Fraser and Creation myth Expert, Jessica Frazier

For the rest of the week Carole, Giles, Justin and Jessica will take us further into the history of ideas about origins with programmes of their own. Between them they will examine early modern comet theory, Medieval Philosophy, The Big Bang and Hindu Creation myths.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b04xnczv)
Ticket Sales, Nissan Locks, Unisex Underwear

A change to the government's new Consumer Rights Bill could give people more information and protection when they buy tickets from a secondary re-seller. We look at why the Department of Culture, Media and Sport is against it.

Many new cars come with an automatic 'drive-away' feature that locks the doors as you set off. But Nissan have dropped it from their cars. A customer tries to find out why.

And some clothing brands think underwear is the final frontier of his and hers, since more women are buying and wearing men's pants. Can you really design a one-size-fits-all? And would partners really want to...um...share?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Joel Moors.


MON 12:57 Weather (b04xkfz6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b04xnczx)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 The Diaries of Brett Westwood (b04xnczz)
Farmland

1. Farmland. When Brett Westwood began a wildlife diary at the age of 15, little did he think that he'd still be writing notes, nearly 40 years later about the same local patch in North Worcestershire.
From those early days, when travel was by bicycle, Brett's wildlife diaries have developed into a record which is anything but parochial. They mirror the often undreamt of changes which have taken place across the UK over the last 40 years; Cuckoo and Water Vole reveal both have disappeared from Brett's local patch, whilst ravens, buzzards and otters have moved in.
In this series Brett returns, diaries in hand, to different 5 different habitats in his local patch and compares notes from the past with the landscape and wildlife of today. There are genuine shocks and revelations.
In the first programme Brett visits an area of arable and pasture land where corn buntings sang their crackly songs, grey partridges creaked in spring dusks and the pee-wit cries of lapwing were regular sounds. But intensive farming in this area has had a huge effect on how the land is managed; resulting in the loss of hedges, use of pesticides, loss of winter stubble; all these changes have impacted on the insects, shelter and nesting sites for wildlife. This is a scene which has been repeated across the UK. However, the old hedge banks are still home to rare bumblebees which feed on the flowers and a very scarce and spectacular black bee with smoky wings has turned up in the last two years, one of a handful of sites for it in the UK.
The series underlines the importance of keeping a diary like Brett's not just for personal notes but as a valuable document of change which is measurable from decade to decade.
Wildlife sound recordist: Chris Watson, Producer: Sarah Blunt.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b04xmwzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b04xnd01)
Series 6

Daventree Mansions

by Sebastian Baczkiewicz.

Having acquired copper silver and gold, Pilgrim returns to Jacksons Mill where his friend Morgan and the spirit Hartley have prepared a nasty surprise. Last in series.

4 of 4

CAST
Pilgrim ..... Paul Hilton
Morgan ..... Justin Salinger
Mattias ..... Nicholas Jones
Siri ..... Vineeta Rishi
Hartley ..... Matthew Tennyson
Liam ..... Shaun Mason
Karen ..... Bettrys Jones
Gaynor ..... Jane Slavin

Directed by Marc Beeby


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b04xnd03)
3/17)
The collective noun a 'business' or 'busyness' is used for a group of which mammals? And Joanne Wheatley, John Whaite and Nancy Birtwistle have all had the distinction of winning which TV reality contest?

Russell Davies will be testing whether the contenders in this week's third heat of the general knowledge quiz are up to the challenge of these, and many other questions. They come from London, Norfolk, Essex and Kent - and each will be hoping their general knowledge may see them through to the semi-finals and perhaps even taking their place on the illustrious list of Brain of Britain champions.

As usual, there's a chance for a Brain of Britain listener to win a prize too, by coming up with questions that might stump the combined knowledge of the panel.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b04xmqd8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Everyone a Rembrandt (b04xnd05)
Art critic Louisa Buck lifts the lid on Painting By Number kits, the 'How To Craze' that swept the world in the 1950's, and promised to turn 'Everyman into a Rembrandt'. The pretension was laughed at by the art establishment, but appreciated by the millions of amateur artists who loved them. The anodyne subject matter of seascapes, landscapes, clowns and kittens, were all given a flat treatment with a simple palette and in the process created an instantly recognisable aesthetic. This was plundered for ironic effect by Andy Warhol and Damien Hirst who saw in Painting By Number a way to critique the relationship between art and taste, and art and mechanical reproduction. Louisa speaks to Dan Robbins in America who did more than anybody else to create the PBN template, as well as collectors, museum curators, and artists inspired by the complex inter-relationships between it, and Pop and Conceptual Art. To some eyes PBN represented all that was crass about post-war American Culture, a pandering to the lowest common denominator, mechanistic, and devoid of artistic merit, to others it empowered generations of ordinary people to pick up a brush and dare to paint. In the process teaching them to look and opening the door onto an artistic world they would otherwise have been denied access to. Painting by Number might have had its heyday, but even in this digital age the attraction of a gentler pastime that doesn't require batteries continues to appeal to a new generation of adherents. Louisa Buck didn't get a PBN kit for Christmas, because her parents thought it wasn't the done thing, now forty years later she sets out to lay that ghost to rest, and prove that PBN is anything but child's play.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b04xnd07)
Fundamentalism

Is it correct to describe the killers of Charlie Hebdo staff in Paris as fundamentalists?
When this programme was recorded, the operation to detain the suspects is continuing. The initial murders were carried out in the name of Allah in retaliation for the publication of cartoons deemed to be lampooning the prophet Mohammed. How do you describe people who carry out such atrocities? A quick glance through the papers revealed a wide diversity of terms, from the simple "terrorists," to "Muslim hardliners and "Islamic fundamentalist." Which terms are appropriate? What does it mean to describe someone in religious terms as "A Fundamentalist? What problems do we cause problems when we don't consider carefully the meaning of terms before applying them to a particular situation?
The use of the term Fundamentalism has changed over the decades. Joining Ernie Rea to discuss its usage today are Haras Raffiq, Managing Director of the Quilliam Foundation, which exists to counter Islamic extremism, Julie Scott Jones, Associate Head of the Sociology Department at Manchester Metropolitan University; and Salman Sayyid, Reader in Islam and Politics at the University of Leeds.

Producer: Rosie Dawson.


MON 17:00 PM (b04xnd09)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkfz8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b04xnd0c)
Series 14

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Arthur Smith, Sarah Millican, Sandi Toksvig and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as death, balloons, farming and Jane Austen.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b04xnd0f)
David and Ruth are visiting a milking parlour - David joking that it's too conventional for Pip to bother coming to see. Pip's also helping Jill retrieve boxes from the attic. David has bad news- Steve and Ros at Hadley Haugh aren't prepared to knock £140K off the asking price to help with the cost of the new slurry system.

At the parlour, David and Ruth are impressed by the setup, including a fifty-degree parlour - it's self-cleaning and labour-saving.

Tom talks to defensive Helen about the worrying state of the shop. Helen wonders whether Johnny could be dyslexic and fears antagonizing Johnny so asks Tom to speak to him.

Tom pops round to see Roy and offer support. Roy's hurt that Phoebe isn't giving him the time of day - and has seemingly forgotten about all of Kate's past behaviour. He prays that Hayley will forgive him and regrets not being completely honest with her about the affair. Tom reflects on his own bad judgement in not being upfront with Kirsty before their wedding. Tom tells Roy not to give up - things can only get better.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b04xnd0h)
Wild, TS Eliot poetry prize, Oppenheimer at the RSC and Barbara Hannigan

We review Reese Witherspoon's new film, Wild. Adapted from Cheryl Strayed's memoir by Nick Hornby, it's the story of Cheryl's 1,100 mile solo trek on the Pacific Crest Trail, to recover from recent catastrophic events in her life.

Director Angus Jackson and playwright Tom Morton-Smith discuss their new play, Oppenheimer, about 'the father of the atom bomb', J. Robert Oppenheimer. The play is set against the backdrop of hedonistic 1930s America, and explores the tension at the heart of the Manhattan Project.

Canadian soprano Barbara Hannigan talks about the extraordinary leaps she is able to make with her voice and how she is taking on more and more conducting (often while singing).

Plus, we talk to judge Fiona Sampson about the David Harsent's collection Fire Songs which has won the TS Eliot Prize for Poetry 2014.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xnczl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Olive Wars (b04tcl5w)
The olive harvest in the West Bank is all about tradition. The first rains of the winter signal the start of gathering the olives on which so many Palestinian farmers depend.

The BBC's Middle East Editor, Jeremy Bowen, has been travelling during the harvest through the West Bank, occupied by Israel since 1967, and wanted by the Palestinians for a state. He spoke to Palestinian farmers, Jewish settlers, oil exporters, and Israeli soldiers, and found that the harvest is about a lot more than olives, or oil, or the soap they make from it.

In a land where everything is politicised, so is the olive harvest. It's the politics of the struggle for land between the Palestinians and the Israelis who want it, and in that struggle the olive tree has become a potent symbol. And the olive harvest has at times become a serious flashpoint.

'Olive Wars' shows how every year the harvest is at the heart of the conflict between Palestinians and Israelis for control of the land.

Jeremy Bowen, who has been reporting on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict since 1991, finds that the status quo in the West Bank guarantees more bloodshed. He concludes that is not just disastrous for Palestinians and Israelis. At a time when the whole world can feel the impact of the tumult in the Middle East, it's not good for the rest of us either.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b04wwkhl)
Should Comics Be Crimes?

In Japan, manga and anime are huge cultural industries. These comics and cartoons are read and watched by young and old, men and women, geeks and office workers. Their fans stretch around the world and their cultural appeal has been used by the government to market 'Cool Japan'.

Manga and anime can be about almost anything, and some can be confronting - especially those featuring young children in sexually explicit scenarios. The UK, Canada and Australia have all banned these sorts of virtual images, placing them in the same legal category as real images of child abuse.

Last year, Japan became the last OECD country to outlaw the possession of real child abuse images, but they decided not to ban manga and anime. To many outsiders and some Japanese, this seems baffling - another example of 'weird Japan', and a sign the country still has a long way to go to taking child protection seriously.

James Fletcher travels to Tokyo to find out why the Japanese decided not to ban. Is this manga just fodder for paedophiles, and is Japan dragging its feet on protecting children? Or is Japan resisting moral panic and standing up for freedom of thought and expression?


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04wtzz3)
The Future of Corals

Coral reefs are renowned for their beauty and diversity, and they provide us with a wondrous spectacle. Full of colourful fish, patrolled by sharks and visited by a host of exotic creatures from manta rays to turtles, they bring breath-taking colour to our seas. But what is their future? As our climate warms, so too do the oceans and corals are highly sensitive to changes in temperature. The increasing level of CO2 in our atmosphere means more is dissolved in seawater, making our oceans ever more acidic and hindering their ability to build their structures. Mass coral bleaching, when large areas of corals die and turn white, was unknown before the 1980s, now they are increasingly common in many areas of the ocean. The lack of build-up of new coral due to acidification is now measurable and many scientists are wondering how long coral reefs will survive. Monty Dom explores the future of coral in our stressed oceans and explores what can be done.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b04xn7cn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b04xndg0)
France deploys 10,000 troops onto the streets.

Deployment aimed at protecting potential targets after last week's attack in Paris.
An additional 5000 police officers are being deployed to Jewish schools.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04xndg2)
Curtain Call

Episode 1

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.
Episode 1:Stephen Wyley first spotted Nina Land at a private view, mutual attraction and curiosity have propelled them towards an afternoon rendez-vous in a hotel.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b04wtzzk)
How Is English Going to Change in the future?

How's English going to change in the future? Michael Rosen looks ahead, with the help of linguists Bas Aarts and Laura Wright, and biologist Mark Pagel. It's not looking good for "shall" and "must"...
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04xnfv4)
The Defence Secretary says security options are "under continuous review" following the attacks in Paris. Peers consider how to make young drivers safer behind the wheel. And a 9-year-old explains to MPs why he's against HS2. Alicia McCarthy reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 13 JANUARY 2015

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkg06)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b04xn7cq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg08)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkg0b)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg0d)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkg0g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04y9dqx)
A reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b04xp153)
Dairy Crisis

Farming Today reports from the Semex Dairy Conference in Glasgow, where discussion among farmers centred on a decision by First Milk to defer milk payment for two weeks. It comes during difficult times for the dairy industry, which is facing global overproduction coinciding with a fall in demand.
The leader of the farmers' campaign group Farmers for Action, David Handley, says he'll give up dairy unless the industry rallies in the next six months.

Later today MEPs will vote on new rules which will give member states the power to ban or permit the cultivation of genetically modified crops in their own countries. GM crops can currently only be grown in the EU under strict regulations. And only one crop - an insect-resistant maize - is actually grown. The compromise means individual countries will have the final say, taking some power away from Europe. It comes after several years of discussions over how to solve the GM question.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0pm9)
Black-footed Albatross

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the black-footed albatross of Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. Two dusky-brown birds point their bills skywards to cement their lifelong relationship, these are black-footed albatrosses are plighting their troth in a former theatre of war. At only a few square kilometres in size, the island of Midway is roughly half way between North America and Japan. Once it was at the heart of the Battle of Midway during World War Two, but today it forms part of a Wildlife Refuge run by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and is home to white laysan albatross and the darker Black footed Albatross. Around 25,000 pairs of Black-foots breed here. Each pair's single chick is fed on regurgitated offal for six months, after which it learns to fly and then can be vulnerable to human activity on the airbase. But careful management of both species of albatrosses near the airstrip has reduced the number of casualties to a minimum.


TUE 06:00 Today (b04xp155)
Including from 0830 a special Democracy Day edition of BBC Radio 4's Public Philosopher in which Professor Michael Sandel goes inside the Palace of Westminster to explore the nature and limits of democracy, challenging an audience of MPs, Peers and the public to apply some critical thinking to what democracy really means.


TUE 09:00 Can Democracy Work? (b04xp157)
Episode 1

Is our democracy working? Today there's a real sense of our traditional democratic system fracturing - but is this because it's failing, or is it because it's doing exactly what we want it to?
In 'Can Democracy Work?', the BBC's Political Editor Nick Robinson questions top politicians, those seeking power around the UK and direct action campaigners, as well as testing public opinion, to find out what we really want from our democracy and whether it can deliver.
In episode one, Nick examines whether we actually want as much democracy as we have.
Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b04xp159)
Adrian Goldberg on Mixed Marriage

In two (repeated) interviews for One to One, broadcaster Adrian Goldberg - who is married to a British Asian woman - explores the topic of mixed marriage.

The dry facts, from the Office of National Statistics, state that "Nearly 1 in 10 people living in as a couple were in an inter-ethnic relationship in 2011".*

Now Adrian brings this statistic to life as he meets two people who married outside their own faith or cultural background, across different decades.

In this first programme he meets Tara Bariana. Tara arrived in England from India in the 1960s and was, in his words, an illiterate 13 year old who couldn't speak English. He was expected to marry a Punjabi girl, but went against his family's wishes when he met and fell in love with Beryl, the daughter of a Baptist minister. Adrian hears Tara's story, and finds out what happened next.

*figures from the 2011 census.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b04xp15c)
Reaching down the Rabbit Hole

Episode 2

With a case of Wernicke’s aphasia - neurologist Dr Allan H Ropper and his co-writer Brian D Burrell take us behind the scenes at the Harvard Medical School's neurology unit.

"In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," says Ropper, "Alice jumps into a rabbit hole and finds herself in a bizarre realm where everything bears little relation to the outside world. It is a place where, as the Red Queen mentions to Alice, it helps to believe six impossible things before breakfast. I have no need to believe six impossible things before breakfast because I know that on any given day I will be confronted with six improbable things before lunch..."

Read by Colin Stinton

Written by Dr Allan H Ropper and Brian D Burrell
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04xp15f)
Freedom of Expression and the Ban on the Burqa in France; Debbie Wiseman and the Score for Wolf Hall

Jane Garvey explores freedom of expression and the ban on the burqa in France with Myriam Francois-Cerrah and Tehmina Kazi; Kate Gross died of cancer on Christmas morning, leaving five-year-old twin boys. Her mother, Jean, joins Jane to talk about Kate and her book, Late Fragments; Composer Debbie Wiseman talks about the score she has written for the highly anticipated adaptation of Wolf Hall, based on Hilary Mantel's novels. A new EU ruling means that parents in Britain will be able to request up to 18 weeks of unpaid leave until their child's 18th birthday (it was previously until their child's fifth birthday).
So are teen years a time when parental support is needed more? And how understanding are workplaces of requests for leave or flexible working from parents of older children?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xp15h)
The Corrections

The Axon Road Show

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's sparkling 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Richard Laing and Roslyn Hill. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 7: The Axon Road Show - Gary Lambert is determined to buy significant shares in the biotech company that has bought his father's patent for a measly sum. He takes his sister, Denise, along for moral support. But all does not go according to plan...

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b04xp15k)
Half and Half

The world has lost so much wildlife some conservationists think half the earth should be set aside for nature to ensure the world can continue to provide all the services we need such as clean water, unpolluted air and soils, healthy food and so on. But one recent study shows that 50% of wildlife has disappeared in the last 40 years. As human population grows and pressure on resources increases many feel there needs to be a bold plan to ensure we can share the planet with other forms of life so that they and us can continue. One proposition is called Half Earth - make half of the earth just for nature. The vision is for a meandering network of nature corridors that open out into huge parks set aside for wildlife. In a special programme from the Natural History Museum in London Monty Don and a panel of experts in subjects ranging from conservation science to urban planning and economics discuss whether this could work?


TUE 11:30 Kitch! (b04xp15m)
June 1948. The Empire Windrush docks at Tilbury carrying 492 West Indian "citizens of the British Empire". Newsreel footage captures forever the suited new arrivals waiting to alight. As the reporter introduces one young man as "their spokesman", a gently smiling Aldwyn Roberts sings a Calypso he wrote on the the voyage, 'London is the place for me, London, this lovely city...'

Aldwyn Roberts was 26 years old and already well known in Trinidad as Calypso star Lord Kitchener. He lived in England for almost 15 years, married a girl in Manchester, was celebrated by glamorous upper class English society and became the voice of a generation of Caribbean immigrants far from home.

Poet and musician Anthony Joseph also left Trinidad for London in his twenties and has always felt a powerful connection to Kitch. He spoke to him just once, when he saw Kitch standing alone for a moment at Carnival in Trinidad. Now, fifteen years after Kitchener's death Anthony Joseph tries to get to the heart of the man behind the famous footage.

Presenter: Anthony Joseph
Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b04xkg0j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04xp4w8)
Jessica Frazier on Creation Myths

How did the world begin? In the Old Testament it all starts with an act of God, but where did God come from?

Dr Jessica Frazier, lecturer in Religious Studies at the University of Kent and fellow of the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies wants to know how different cultures deal with this most fundamental of questions.

Hindus can choose from a menu of options, followers of Chinese Taoism are comfortable with the idea that we come from chaos, a potent force of creativity that continues to pulse through the life of the Universe.

With the help of Ram Aithal from Birmingham's Shri Venkateswara Hindu Temple and the renowned science fiction writer Ursula K Le Guin, Jessica asks if the wonder of the great Creation myths can increase our understanding. Can they help us make sense of the data that modern science is gathering from the beginning of time?

This is part of a week of programmes exploring the beginnings of the Universe.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b04xp4wb)
Call You and Yours: Cancer

Was your cancer diagnosed at the first possible opportunity? Currently, around 25% of cancer diagnoses are made too late. NHS England is to trial a scheme where people who are worried that they might have cancer will be be allowed to bypass the GP - and refer themselves on for tests. It's hoped it will speed up diagnosis and lead to better survival rates. You & Yours wants to know whether it would have helped you? Please email your experiences to YouandYours@bbc.co.uk.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Natalie Donovan

Macmillan
0808 808 0000
For answers, support or just a chat, call the Macmillan Support Line free (Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm)

Cancer Research UK
Nurse Helpline: 0808 800 4040
Questions about cancer? Call Freephone or email us.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b04xkg0m)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04xp4wd)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Shaun Ley.


TUE 13:45 The Diaries of Brett Westwood (b04xp4wg)
Valley

2. Valley. When Brett Westwood began a wildlife diary at the age of 15, little did he think that he'd still be writing notes, nearly 40 years later about the same local patch in North Worcestershire.
In this series Brett returns, diaries in hand, to different areas of his local patch and compares notes from the past with the landscape and wildlife of today. There are genuine shocks and revelations.
In this programme, Brett visits the valley. Since Brett started visiting his local patch, the landscape here has been changed more radically than any other area in the patch, not as a result of management, but of nature taking its course. The valley is a sandstone dip between two horse pastures and its steep sides have deterred any cropping or grazing. As a teenager, this is where Brett soaked in the scents of basil and thyme which carpeted the banks. Young hawthorn saplings attracted whinchats and tree pipits. Turtle doves nested here in summer. Knowing that if the hawthorns became too vigorous they would shade out the ground cover and become too dense for the whinchats, Brett did a little judicial pruning from time to time - but it was a battle he lost. Today the hawthorn cover is complete and many rare flowers have been shaded out. Ash and birch trees have grown up and the whinchats, tree pipits and cuckoos have gone. Instead fieldfares and redwings roost in the thorns in winter and in summer chiffchaffs and blackcaps are commoner than ever. Ravens and Buzzards are often heard overhead. And on one winter's eve he had an unforgettable close-encounter with a sparrowhawk.
The series underlines the importance of keeping a diary as a valuable document of change which is measurable from decade to decade. Wildlife sound recordist: Chris Watson, Producer: Sarah Blunt.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b04xnd0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b04xp4wj)
Can't Live without You

By Kellie Smith

Starring Sarah Smart and Bryan Dick

A psychological thriller about a man's craving for control in his marriage.

When Greg's partner Anna becomes ill and needs constant care Greg flourishes as her carer and becomes intoxicated by her dependency. Greg's apparent overwhelming love for his partner, his deepening desire to feel needed takes him to the limit in their relationship.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04xjcmy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b04xp4wl)
Series 5

Declinism

The Human Zoo is a place to learn about the one subject that never fails to fascinate - ourselves. Are people led by the head or by the heart? How rational are we? And how do we perceive the world?

There's a curious blend of intriguing experiments to discover our biases and judgements, explorations and examples taken from what's in the news to what we do in the kitchen, and it's all driven by a large slice of curiosity.

Michael Blastland presents. Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick University, is the experimenter-in-chief, and Timandra Harkness the resident reporter.
In the first programme of the new series, the team will be exploring declinism: what's the psychology of thinking that things get worse?

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b04xp4wn)
Philip Pullman and Michael Rosen talk about language and writing

Philip Pullman and Michael Rosen talk in depth about language, writing and imagination. They share examples from their own work, discuss the books that influenced them and share who they think they are writing for. Produced by Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b04xp4wq)
Series 35

Michael Dobbs on Guy Burgess

Michael Dobbs champions the life of Guy Burgess - journalist, diplomat and spy. Between 1935 and 1951, Guy Burgess worked for a Conservative MP, the BBC, MI6 and the Foreign Office. Brilliant, flamboyant and apparently shambolic, he also shot like an arrow to the heart of the Establishment and secretly and systematically betrayed its secrets to the KGB. Matthew Parris chairs as Michael explains why he believes that Guy Burgess was a Great Life. Burgess’s biographer Stewart Purvis, who uncovered the only known audio recording of Guy Burgess, is the expert witness.
Producer: Julia Johnson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2015.


TUE 17:00 PM (b04xp4ws)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkg0s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b04xp4wx)
Series 6

Rebecca Front

Marcus Brigstocke persuades his guests to try new experiences: things they really ought to have done by now. Some experiences are loved, some are loathed, in this show all about embracing the new.

This week, Rebecca Front, a self-confessed scaredy cat, is persuaded to take her first ride on a motorbike and read her first book about science. But how much of it did she understand?

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04xp4wz)
Emma wants a no-frills, second hand dress for her wedding. Susan shares with Clarrie her horror at the idea of Emma wearing 'cast offs'. They offer to make the dress for Emma - she can design it herself and choose the fabric. Emma's delighted.

Johnny's keen to get outside and keep busy, asking Pat to give Tony his love. Meanwhile, Tom shares with Pat that Roy isn't coping well at all. Tom feels guilty for not being there sooner, especially as Roy was so supportive after Kirsty. Pat tells Tom not to give up on Roy. Tom also tells Pat about his concern over the state of the shop. Pat offers to have a word with Helen.

Tom goes out to join Johnny, who says he's not letting Tony's accident get to him. Tom carefully brings up the subject of dyslexia - Johnny seems to struggle with his writing. Pat reports back from the hospital - Tony's simply bored waiting for a bed to become free in Felpersham. Tom comes back to Jonny with some coloured paper, which he gets Johnny to read from - and he seems to do ok. Johnny's resistant when Tom mentions seeking help from the college's Learning Support Team, but Tom persists, saying that asking for help is not a sign of weakness - he knows himself.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04xp4x1)
Wolf Hall on TV, Whiplash, Michael Boyd, Belle and Sebastian

Hilary Mantel's Tudor novel-turned-stage-play Wolf Hall makes its transition to TV starring Mark Rylance and Damian Lewis. Sarah Crompton reviews the six-part adaptation.

Michael Boyd, former artistic director of the RSC, discusses directing opera for the first time, with his production of Monteverdi's Orfeo at the Roundhouse in London.

Matt Thorne reviews new film Whiplash, about a big band drummer and his difficult relationship with his controlling instructor Fletcher, played by J K Simmons who won a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor this week.

Stuart Murdoch of Glaswegian band Belle and Sebastian, former winners of the Best Newcomer Brit Award, discusses the literary influences on new album Girls in Peacetime Want to Dance.

New Government figures show the UK's creative industries add £8.8 million pounds an hour to the economy - something to celebrate or a cause for concern? Jan Dalley of the Financial Times assesses the data.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xp15h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b04xp4x3)
Prison Violence

With serious assaults at a record high, File on 4 investigates the growing tension within Britain's prisons.

In the first of a new series, BBC Home Affairs correspondent Danny Shaw meets recently released prisoners and families of those inside to hear about their safety fears.

And he talks to the Prison Officers Association about their concerns for the frontline members who they say are facing unprecedented levels of pressure and danger in a "chaotic" system.

The Howard League for Penal Reform has used Ministry of Justice figures to calculate that around 40% of prison officer jobs have been cut - leaving inmates spending longer locked in their cells and less time preparing for their release.

Lawyers and campaigners tell File on 4 that overcrowding and gang activity are adding to a "toxic mix" of problems leading to instability and tension.

Twenty five years after the prison system was shaken by a series of riots centring on Strangeways in Manchester, is a new crisis starting to unfold?

Reporter: Danny Shaw Producer: Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b04xp4x5)
Blind Acoustic Target Shooting, Ted Ellerton

Peter White meets Ted Ellerton. He lost his sight overnight, whilst still working as a driver. Ted is now nearly 90 and lives alone in a small village near Sheffield. He's highly organised and we hear how he carries out everyday tasks like him cooking and sorting his washing.

Tony Shearman travels to Cornwall to find out about acoustic target shooting, one of the most popular sports for blind and partially-sighted people.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b04xp4x7)
Dry January and Nalmefene, PLAC Blood Test for Inflammation, Dental Check-ups

Dr Mark Porter talks to leading experts about treating alcohol dependence with a pill and whether the required counselling services are available to make it work.

And Mark finds out the state of his arteries when he has a new blood test to predict his risk of heart attack. Plus what does the evidence tell us about how often to visit the dentist?


TUE 21:30 Can Democracy Work? (b04xp157)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b04xkg0v)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04xp4x9)
The UK inflation rate falls to it's lowest for 15 years.

What does that mean for Labour's General Election strategy ?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04xp4xc)
Curtain Call

Episode 2

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Episode 2:
A young woman is found strangled near Russell Square. Nina needs to meet Stephen urgently.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Cabin Pressure (b04vf959)
Series 5

Zurich, Part 2

One of the most popular radio sitcoms of the past ten years bows out with a special double episode. In this second and concluding part, as the crew embark on a race against time, just what is Gerti's secret? And will it be happy ever after for Carolyn and Herc?

With the show titles running alphabetically from the first ever episode - "Abu Dhabi" through to this double finale "Zurich" - the cast and crew of MJN Air discover that whether it's choosing an ice-cream flavour, putting a princess in a van or remembering your grandmother's name, no job is too small, but many, many jobs are too difficult.

Starring Stephanie Cole as Carolyn Knapp-Shappey, Roger Allam as 1st Officer Douglas Richardson, Benedict Cumberbatch as Captain Martin Crieff and John Finnemore as Arthur Shappey.

With special guests including Anthony Head and Timothy West.

Written by John Finnemore
Produced and Directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04xp4xf)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 14 JANUARY 2015

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkg1r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b04xp15c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg1t)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkg1w)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg1y)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkg20)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04y9g6f)
A reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b04xp63s)
GM Crops, Pesticides, UK Dairy Crisis

In a historic debate at the European Parliament, MEPs voted in favour of legislation which will allow individual EU Member States to ban, or allow, the cultivation of GM crops in their country. However as Farming Today hears it is still unclear what opportunities this vote will bring for UK farmers.

And as crops develop resistance to certain chemicals, an alternative to pesticides is being offered in Africa, by using natural predators and pathogens. Anna Hill speaks to Louise Labuschagne, who farms in Kenya, about the use of biological control agents.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0ptz)
Adelie Penguin

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the adelie penguin on a windswept Antarctic shore. A huddle of braying shapes on a windswept shore in Antarctica reveals itself to be a rookery of Adelie Penguins. These medium sized penguins whose white eye-ring gives them an expression of permanent astonishment were discovered in 1840 and named after the land which French explorer Jules Dumont d'-Urville named in honour of his wife Adele. They make a rudimentary nest of pebbles (sometimes pinched from a neighbour) from which their eggs hatch on ice-free shores in December, Antarctica's warmest month, when temperatures reach a sizzling minus two degrees. In March the adult penguins follow the growing pack ice north as it forms, feeding at its edge on a rich diet of krill, small fish and crustaceans. But as climate change raises ocean temperatures, the ice edge forms further south nearer to some of the breeding colonies, reducing the distance penguins have to walk to and from open water. But, if ice fails to form in the north of the penguin's range it can affect their breeding success, and at one research station breeding numbers have dropped by nearly two thirds.


WED 06:00 Today (b04xp63v)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b04xp63x)
Paul McKenna, Jonathan Church, Judy Joo, Rear Admiral Kit Layman

Libby Purves meets hypnotist and self-help writer Paul McKenna; theatre director Jonathan Church; chef Judy Joo and Rear Admiral Kit Layman.

Judy Joo is a Korean-American chef. Her new TV series, Korean Food Made Simple, explores South Korea's food markets, culinary traditions and street food. Judy graduated in engineering and worked in New York's financial district before enrolling at the French Culinary Institute. Based in London, she has worked at Claridges, Restaurant Gordon Ramsay and Heston Blumenthal's The Fat Duck. Korean Food Made Simple is broadcast on Food Network UK.

Rear Admiral Kit Layman's new book, The Wager Disaster, pieces together the shipwreck of HMS Wager in 1741. Using eyewitness accounts and diary entries, he tells the story of this little-known nautical tragedy involving murder, starvation, mutiny and an epic open boat voyage of 2500 miles through hostile seas. During his 35-year career, Rear Admiral Layman commanded a variety of ships including HMS Argonaut during the Falklands conflict and the aircraft carrier HMS Invincible. The Wager Disaster - Mayhem, Mutiny and Murder in the South Seas is published by Uniform Press.

Jonathan Church is artistic director of the Chichester Festival Theatre. He is currently directing Penelope Wilton in Taken at Midnight which tells the story of young Jewish lawyer, Hans Litten, who subpoenaed Adolf Hitler in 1931. Jonathan, who learnt his trade backstage as an assistant electrician and stage manager, recently directed Singin' in the Rain; The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui and The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby. Taken at Midnight is at Theatre Royal Haymarket, London.

Paul McKenna is a hypnotist and self-help author. His new book, The 3 Things that will Change Your Destiny Today, aims to enable readers to take control of their lives and make decisions. A former radio presenter, Paul has hosted self-improvement television shows and seminars about hypnosis, weight loss and motivation. The 3 Things that will Change Your Destiny Today is published by Bantam Press.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b04xrj7r)
Reaching down the Rabbit Hole

Episode 3

A look at transient global amnesia - as neurologist Dr Allan H Ropper and his co-writer Brian D Burrell take us behind the scenes at the Harvard Medical School's neurology unit.

"In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," says Ropper, "Alice jumps into a rabbit hole and finds herself in a bizarre realm where everything bears little relation to the outside world. It is a place where, as the Red Queen mentions to Alice, it helps to believe six impossible things before breakfast. I have no need to believe six impossible things before breakfast because I know that on any given day I will be confronted with six improbable things before lunch..."

Read by Colin Stinton

Written by Dr Allan H Ropper and Brian D Burrell
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04xrj7w)
The Saudi women held for driving; Gender and careers after university

Two women's rights campaigners tried to drive into Saudi Arabia last year and we get the latest on their situation from Rothna Begum, Woman's Rights Researcher at Human Rights Watch for the Middle East and North Africa. Research shows that more men than women leave University for a graduate level job, we ask why? And, the end of a relationship is difficult, but is it worse when the partner you thought was heterosexual leaves you for a same sex relationship? And, after getting advice from Indian self reliant groups, we hear about the Scottish women who have started a business.


WED 10:40 15 Minute Drama (b04xrj82)
The Corrections

At Sea

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Julian Rhind-Tutt. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 8: At Sea - Alfred and Enid Lambert, a Midwestern couple in their seventies, are on board a cruise ship in the North Atlantic. Enid is determined to enjoy this long-awaited holiday, but Alfred's behaviour is increasingly unpredictable.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b04xrj8b)
Eilidh and Alisdair - He'll Always Be Older

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a father and daughter remembering the tragic accidental death of their son/brother and how they have dealt with it.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Mein Kampf: Publish or Burn? (b04xrj8j)
Everyone's heard of it. Few may have read it, or have any idea of its remarkable publishing history. For all its bizarre style and bombast, Mein Kampf was Hitler's broadest statement of his aims and beliefs. Had the world understood its meaning, it's been claimed, the Nazi catastrophe might have been averted.

It's a book that made Hitler rich and its ability to make money after his death has continued to pose sensitive problems. For the last 70 years the Bavarian authorities have effectively banned its republication in German through their control of the copyright. But this year, 2015, Mein Kampf's copyright expires. So what happens next?

Chris Bowlby has been investigating Mein Kampf's strange history and future, both in Germany and beyond. He hears of its strange popularity in India and the intriguing story of its translation into English.

Producer: John Murphy.


WED 11:30 The Rivals (b04xrj8n)
Series 3

Seven, Seven, Seven - City

Based on a short story by Julius Chambers
Dramatised by Chris Harrald

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he is writing his memoirs and has a chance to get his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. He starts with gifted amateur sleuth Mrs Edith Marchmont, trying to stop a murder plot overheard on a crossed telephone line.

Directed by Liz Webb

Episode by Chris Harrald inspired by the short story 'Seven Seven Seven City' by Julius Chambers: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0600421.txt.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b04xkg22)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04xrj8s)
Astronomer Carole Mundell on the Big Bang

What put the Bang in the Big Bang?

On the 7th of November 1919 an announcement was made to the great and good of the Royal Society. Photographs from the observations of a solar eclipse had just arrived in London. The images provided the proof of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.

The astronomer, Carole Mundell explains the significance of that moment and charts the steps that led from there to the generally accepted idea of the origin of our Universe in the energetic burst of the Big Bang.

But what caused the Big Bang and what came before it? Answering one fundamental question immediately threw up the next. With the help of the mathematician, physicist and philosopher of science, Sir Roger Penrose, Carole aims to find out if those are questions mankind can ever answer.

This is part of a week of programmes examining the origins of the Universe.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b04xrj8x)
Legal Aid for Inquests, New Car Fraud, Eon Price Drop

Should families whose relatives die in care or custody get legal aid for Inquests

The gym for people who don't like gyms

Why the difference between theft and fraud could matter for people who buy a car from someone they don't know

How insulation can be bad for your house and your health

Will other energy suppliers follow EoN's price drop?

Addison Lee fail in bus line bid

Ministry of Justice on Legal aid and inquests.


WED 12:57 Weather (b04xkg24)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b04xrj91)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 The Diaries of Brett Westwood (b04xrj95)
Sewage

3. Sewage. When Brett Westwood began a wildlife diary at the age of 15, little did he think that he'd still be writing notes, nearly 40 years later about the same local patch in North Worcestershire.
In this series Brett returns, diaries in hand, to different areas of his local patch and compares notes from the past with the landscape and wildlife of today. There are genuine shocks and revelations.
In this programme, Brett visits a farm at Whittington. When he was a teenager, sewage was pumped out onto an area of about a square mile where cattle were grazed. In icy winters the fields did not freeze owing to the warmth provided by the sewage and the life breeding in it! Unusual for the West Midlands in winter, a regular flock of up to 200 curlews were joined by a pink-footed goose, pintails, wigeon, and in winter 1976 two spotted redshanks. These waders are very rare inland in winter and Brett, as a novice bird watcher at the time wasn't believed by the traditional and older birders. However once the record was accepted by the West Midlands Bird Club, the record spurred Brett on and his passion for wildlife and bird watching continues to this day. The old methods of spreading sewage stopped in the 1980s and the curlew flocks have gone but Brett still visits the area, and in recent years has been rewarded with sightings of barn owls and buzzards.

The series underlines the importance of keeping a diary like Brett's not just for personal notes but as a valuable document of change which is measurable from decade to decade.

Wildlife sound recordist: Chris Watson, Producer: Sarah Blunt.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04xp4wz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b04xrjsg)
Take Me To...

Take Me to Hope Street

by Lizzie Nunnery.

The first in a series of geographically inspired dramas is a wintry ghost story set along Hope Street in Liverpool.

Nina is a university researcher and tour guide who lives and works on Liverpool's iconic Hope Street. She loves the layers of history all around her. However, after a personal tragedy, Nina starts to find herself haunted by the city she loves in a dark and unsettling way.

Directed by Abigail le Fleming

With thanks to the staff and pupils at Our Lady's Bishop Eton Primary School, Liverpool.

The Writer

Lizzie Nunnery is an award-winning playwright.

The Swallowing Dark, produced by the Liverpool Everyman and Theatre 503, was a finalist for The Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and past work includes the critically acclaimed Intemperance, produced by the Everyman, and Unprotected, which was awarded the Amnesty International Award for Freedom of Expression.

She is currently working on an adaptation for the Liverpool Everyman and collaborating with the Royal Exchange as part of their new 'Exchange Hub' initiative and writing an original commission with Box of Tricks theatre company.

Lizzie also writes extensively for radio. She has penned numerous original dramas for Radio 4 including Anna's War, a 5-parter based on true events in the life of Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, and her latest family drama The Sum, aired in July 2014.

She is also a successful singer-songwriter.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b04xrl8c)
Credit Cards, Loans and Debt

Looking for a cheaper credit card, personal loan, help with borrowing costs or your credit report? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Editors note: During the programme it was said that an Individual Voluntary Arrangements (IVA) remains on your Credit File for 6 years from the settlement date, when in fact it remains for 6 years from the date the IVA began, providing that the individual meets all of their payments for the full duration of the IVA.

Demand for credit cards, loans and other unsecured lending in December was the highest it's been since 2007, according to the latest Bank of England survey.

While lenders say the rise is driven by a greater consumer appetite for risk and looser credit scoring, debt charities report that many households are borrowing to pay monthly bills. In December StepChange Scotland raised concerns about people struggling with council tax arrears and payday loans.

If you want to pay less interest on your credit card you might want to consider switching to one with 0% interest. How long do these deals last for and what are the fees?

Maybe you're considering a loan? Where are the cheapest interest rates and how can you make sure you pay your loan off on time?

Are there any fees and restrictions lurking in the small print? Do you understand the jargon?

If you feel that your borrowing is too expensive who can help to reduce costs or negotiate with your creditors?

How do you repair a damaged credit report or make sure that the information held about you is right?

Whatever your question about borrowing Paul Lewis and guests will be waiting for your call. Joining Paul will be:

Kevin Mountford, Moneysupermarket.
Liz McVey, Debt Advisor, StepChange Scotland.
Terry Donohoe, Debt Advisor, Step Change.
Laura Barrett, Equifax.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b04xp4x7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b04xrl8f)
Living Apart Relationships - Grading Universities

Grading universities - The rights and wrongs of the Research Excellence Framework. The REF is the most recent in a series of national assessments of research in British universities. But how reliable and fair are these assessments? Do they give the taxpayer value for money, as is hoped by their advocates? And will they lead to the best and most innovative research in the future? Laurie Taylor asks the questions. He's joined by the former Minister for Higher Education and Conservative MP, David Willets, and by Derek Sayer, Professor of History at the University of Lancaster and author of a recent book which argues that the REF isn't fit for purpose.

Also, living apart together. Sasha Roseneil, co-author of a Europe wide study, examines why a growing number of couples choose to live separately.

Producer: Torquil Macleod.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b04xrl8h)
Publishing Charlie Hebdo Images, Newsbeat's Editor, Channel 4's Diversity Plan.

Whether to publish pictures of Charlie Hebdo's latest cover has raised questions for broadcasters and newspaper titles. This week's edition of the French satirical magazine shows a cartoon depicting the Prophet Mohammed holding a "Je suis Charlie" sign. Decision makers have had to make a call about whether the image warrants publication because of its news value, or decide not to publish because of the offence it may cause. Steve Hewlett talks to Emma Tucker, deputy editor of The Times, which published a series of Charlie Hebdo images on the day following the attack last week, and Kevin Maguire, Associate Editor of the Mirror, which hasn't printed the cover, about the dilemmas editors face.

As Radio 1 and Radio 1Xtra's news service, Newsbeat is specifically targeted at younger audiences. However, like much of radio, it's facing a decline in listening hours, and with the rising success of the likes of Vice and Buzzfeed attracting the youth market, the competition is getting fiercer. Steve Hewlett talks to Editor Louisa Compton about the digital methods she's implementing to get young people engaged with news coverage, and whether the BBC, constrained by defined editorial guidelines, can offer the content young people are now wanting.

Channel 4 has just published its plan for boosting diversity. 20 per cent of all its staff will be black, Asian or minority ethnic by 2020, up from 15 percent currently. In addition, 6 percent of the workforce will be disabled and 6 percent lesbian, gay bisexual or transgender. And there are new commissioning guidelines for programme makers. Steve hears from Ralph Lee Deputy Chief Creative Officer at Channel 4 about the impact their charter will actually have on and off screen.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b04yjx6g)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkg26)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b04xrl8k)
Series 2

Balham's Got Talent

Who’s got talent?

Stephen K Amos's sitcom about growing up black, gay and funny in 1980s south London.

Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.

Stephen K Amos … Stephen K Amos
Young Stephen … Shaquille Ali-Yebuah
Stephanie Amos … Fatou Sohna
Virginia Amos … Ellen Thomas
Vincent Amos … Don Gilet
Miss Bliss … Michelle Butterly
Jayson Jackson … Frankie Wilson
Mary ... Nadia Kamil

Producer: Colin Anderson

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b04xrl8m)
Kate's delighted to be accepted by Felpersham University onto the International Development course. She hopes Phoebe will join her to celebrate, raving about a new juice bar and pointing out the shoddy state of Ambridge Organics.

Jennifer's busy working on the SAVE campaign and planning the jumble sale. Kate scornfully says social media is a far more effective fundraising tool. Jennifer's pleased that the photo with the Plough turned out so well and now features on the village website - she just hopes the Echo will print it.

Jennifer wonders why neither she nor Kate have been able to speak to Nolly on Skype recently. Kate evades the issue, saying that Sipho sends his love

Pip and David visit a robotic milking parlour. Ruth's worry has been how to combine robotic milking with their paddock system. Pip suggests that the set up they're viewing today does that, and also tries to reassure Ruth about her other worry - that cows should be out on grass for as long as possible. To go with this approach, rather than the herringbone parlour they saw earlier, would cost extra money - that's fine, surely, says Pip.

With good news about the slurry tank - Steve and Ros at Hadley Haugh can meet half the cost - David eventually agrees to invest in robotic milkers. Pip's thrilled.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b04xrl8p)
Bradley Cooper, Adventures of the Black Square, Islamic art, Paula Hawkins

Bradley Cooper talks to Samira Ahmed about playing US Navy SEAL Chris Kyle in Clint Eastwood's new film American Sniper.

Iwona Blazwick, curator of a new exhibition Adventures of the Black Square, explains how abstraction has reflected politics and society across the globe from Malevich's painting of a single black square in 1915 to the present.

Novelist Paula Hawkins discusses her new thriller The Girl on the Train, about a commuter who puts herself in danger when she gets involved in something she sees out of the window of the carriage.

With the controversy surrounding the cover of this week's French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Dr Sussan Babaie from the Courtauld Institute of Art considers the history of images of the Prophet Muhammad in the tradition of Islamic art.

Producer Rebecca Armstrong.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xrj82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:40 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b04xrl8r)
Good Samaritan Law

Clive Anderson and guests ask why Britain, unlike many other countries in the world, has no general law which requires people to behave like good Samaritans, punishing those who fail to help others in trouble.

Under French law, a person who endangers the life or health of another by failing to assist in some way faces imprisonment of up to five years or a fine of 75,000 euros. In the UK there would be no liability whatsoever. We can walk past a drowning baby with legal impunity.

Our common law system in the UK does not generally impose liability for pure omissions - failures to act. There is no general duty of care owed by one person to prevent harm occurring to another. However, a duty of care can arise, for example, once someone attempts to rescue a drowning child if they inadvertently make things worse.

So is British law both failing to make people behave as good Samaritans and punishing them if they do? What needs to change?

The panel includes former law lord, Lord Hoffmann, and distinguished academic lawyer Andrew Ashworth who have polarised views on the issue. Andrew Ashworth calls for the introduction of a general good Samaritan law, arguing that our current law is untidy and unprincipled. Lord Hoffmann suggests such a law would be unnecessary and inappropriate.

With leading barrister Peter Cooke and French law expert Catherine Elliott, the panel examines the arguments for and against a law imposing a duty of rescue.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b04xrl8t)
Series 1

Cryptic Crosswords

Continuing his new series where he tries to make sense of apparently puzzling matters, David Baddiel seeks to understand something which is meant to be puzzling: cryptic crosswords.

David gets help from a crossword champion and and also from a leading compiler who sets him a special crossword. Can he put his learning into practice and complete it?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Becoming Myself: Gender Identity (b04tlqzt)
Trans Men

A revealing series which goes inside the Charing Cross Gender Identity Clinic in Hammersmith, London - the largest and oldest in the world - to explore the condition of gender dysphoria - a sense of distress caused by a disjunction between biological sex and gender identity.

With growing mainstream discussion prompted by high-profile transgender people like boxing promoter Frank Maloney, WikiLeaks source Chelsea Manning and model Andrej Pejic, gender dysphoria is fast becoming more visible. Indeed there has been a steady rise in the numbers of referrals to Gender Identity Clinics across the country and patient numbers at Charing Cross have doubled in the last five years.

This series follows a group of transgender patients pursuing treatment for gender dysphoria in order to 'become themselves'. In the first programme we meet Freddie, Mitchell and Blade, who were raised female and are seeking treatment as trans men. The second programme centres on trans women Bethany, Emma and Tanya, who are making the opposite journey.

We also hear from the psychiatrists, endocrinologists and surgeons as they meet and assess the patients on a day-to-day basis. Their treatment decisions have the potential to transform the lives of their patients, but these irrevocable changes are not made lightly.

Narrator: Adjoa Andoh

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b04xp63x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b04xrnlv)
Yemen-based branch of al-Qaeda says it ordered last week's attack on Charlie Hebdo.

Extremists said the killings were "vengeance" for insults against the prophet Muhammad.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04xrnlx)
Curtain Call

Episode 3

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Episode 3:
We meet a renowned theatre critic, and learn more of the life of failed shopgirl, Madeleine Farewell.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Roger McGough's Other Half (b04xrnlz)
Episode 2

Roger McGough is joined by Helen Atkinson-Wood, Philip Jackson and Richie Webb in a hilarious and surreal new sketch show for BBC Radio 4. With sketches about Fandom, Fatherhood and 17th Century France, you'll hear his familiar voice in a whole new light. Expect merriment and melancholy in equal measures, and a whisker of witty wordplay too. Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


WED 23:15 Love in Recovery (b04xrnm1)
Series 1

Julie

The lives of five very different recovering alcoholics.

Set entirely at their weekly meetings, we hear them get to know each other, learn to hate each other, argue, moan, laugh, fall apart, fall in love and, most importantly, tell their stories.

Comedy drama by Pete Jackson, set in Alcoholics Anonymous. Starring Sue Johnston, John Hannah, Eddie Marsan, Rebecca Front, Paul Kaye and Julia Deakin.

In this episode, Julie's husband comes back to her after six years and it's up to the rest of the group to pick up the pieces.

Julie ...... Sue Johnston
Marion ...... Julia Deakin
Fiona ...... Rebecca Front
Simon ...... John Hannah
Danno ...... Paul Kaye
Andy ...... Eddie Marsan

There are funny stories, sad stories, stories of small victories and milestones, stories of loss, stories of hope, and stories that you really shouldn't laugh at - but still do. Along with the storyteller.

Writer Pete Jackson is a recovering alcoholic and has spent time with Alcoholics Anonymous. It was there he found, as many people do, support from the unlikeliest group of disparate souls, all banded together due to one common bond. As well as offering the support he needed throughout a difficult time, AA also offered a weekly, sometimes daily, dose of hilarity, upset, heartbreak and friendship.

Director: Ben Worsfield

A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04xrnm3)
David Cameron and Ed Miliband accuse each other of "running scared" over election TV debates, as they clash at Prime Minister's Questions.
Mr Miliband calls the Prime Minister's refusal to take part unless the Green Party was involved a "pathetic excuse". Mr Cameron says the Labour leader was "chickening" out of facing the Greens and all "national parties" must be represented.
In the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris, the Home Secretary, Theresa May, says "innocent lives will be put at risk" unless the authorities are better able to track the online communications of suspected terrorists.
Labour calls for fast-track legislation to give the energy regulator, Ofgem, the power to cut energy bills .
And MPs hear that the number of A&E visits in England soared by more than 400,000 in 2014.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 15 JANUARY 2015

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkg2y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b04xrj7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg32)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkg34)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg36)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkg38)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04y9gdg)
A reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b04xrv9j)
Badger Research, Pesticides, Scottish Salmon

New research on tackling bovine TB: whether it's better to cull badgers or to increase the testing of cows. Charlotte Smith hears from Professor Matthew Evans of Queen Mary University of London whose computer modelling of the variables suggests that increased TB testing of cows could substantially reduce incidents of TB.

All this week Farming Today is looking into the use of pesticides. Today, Anna Hill hears about new developments in the manufacture of crop sprayers, that deliver the pesticides in the field.

As the salmon fishing season on the River Tay gets underway, Andrew Anderson of BBC Scotland tells Charlotte why anglers will be forced to return any they catch to the river following the introduction of a new statutory conservation policy.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0qpk)
Trumpeter Swan

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the sonorous trumpeter swan of North America. Across an Alaskan wilderness powerful sounds and calls emanate from the largest and heaviest of all wildfowl, the pure white trumpeter swan. With a wingspan of up to 250 cm, the biggest male trumpeter swan on record weighed over 17 kilogrammes, heavier than mute swans. They breed on shallow ponds and lakes in the wilder parts of north west and central North America. Hunted for feathers and skins, they were once one of the most threatened birds on the continent, with only 69 birds known in the United States, although populations hung on in Alaska and Canada. Since then trumpeters have been protected by law and populations have recovered in many areas. Alaska and Canada remain strongholds and today reintroductions are returning this musical bird to their former range in the USA.


THU 06:00 Today (b04xrv9l)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b04xrv9n)
Bruegel's The Fight Between Carnival and Lent

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Pieter Bruegel the Elder's painting of 1559, 'The Fight Between Carnival And Lent'. Created in Antwerp at a time of religious tension between Catholics and Protestants, the painting is rich in detail and seems ripe for interpretation. But Bruegel is notoriously difficult to interpret. His art seems to reject the preoccupations of the Italian Renaissance, drawing instead on techniques associated with the new technology of the 16th century, print. Was Bruegel using his art to comment on the controversies of his day? If so, what comment was he making?

CONTRIBUTORS

Louise Milne, Lecturer in Visual Culture in the School of Art at the University of Edinburgh and Edinburgh Napier University

Jeanne Nuechterlein, Senior Lecturer in the Department of History of Art, University of York

Miri Rubin, Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History and Head of the School of History at Queen Mary, University of London

Producer: Luke Mulhall.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b04xrv9q)
Reaching down the Rabbit Hole

Episode 4

Looking at signs versus symptoms, neurologist Dr Allan H Ropper and his co-writer Brian D Burrell take us behind the scenes at the Harvard Medical School's neurology unit.

"In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," says Ropper, "Alice jumps into a rabbit hole and finds herself in a bizarre realm where everything bears little relation to the outside world. It is a place where, as the Red Queen mentions to Alice, it helps to believe six impossible things before breakfast. I have no need to believe six impossible things before breakfast because I know that on any given day I will be confronted with six improbable things before lunch..."

Read by Colin Stinton

Written by Dr Allan H Ropper and Brian D Burrell
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04xrv9s)
Reese Witherspoon and Cheryl Strayed

Hollywood star Reese Witherspoon and novelist Cheryl Strayed on working together on the film Wild.
Comedian Josie Long talks to Jenni Murray about her UK tour, Cara Josephine, which steers away from Josie's long-standing political comedy, and is instead an introspective piece based on her family and romantic relationships. Dr Laura King from Leeds University discusses her book Family Men, Fatherhood and Masculinity in Britain, 1914-1960, which investigates the role of the father in the 20th century and charts the evolution of the 'family man.' The latest trends in online dating according to Charly Lester, global head of dating for Time Out and the founder of the UK Dating Awards, and Robyn Exton, founder of Dattch.com, a dating app for lesbians. Female potential US Republican presidential candidates according to Stacy Hilliard, Republican party commentator.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xrv9v)
The Corrections

The Married Man

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Roslyn Hill. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 9: The Married Man: The teenage Denise Lambert forms a relationship with a married man.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b04xrv9x)
Greece: The Rubber Glove Rebellion

The cleaners whose protest has captured the imagination of those opposed to the harsh austerity programme in Greece. Mostly middle-aged or nearing retirement, they have refused to go quietly. The women have kept up a day and night vigil outside the Finance Ministry in Athens, taken the government to court and resisted attempts by the riot police to remove them by force. They've challenged representatives from the International Monetary Fund and raised their red rubber gloves in a clenched fist at the European Parliament. Some say they represent the plight of many women and the poorly paid, others that they are being manipulated by the left. Maria Margaronis hears the women's stories and asks what makes them so determined.

Producer: Mark Savage.


THU 11:30 The Single Life (b04xrv9z)
Second-hand shops are littered with tatty old 7 inch records that were self-made by bands. Mark Hodkinson, who was in one of those bands, buys a handful of the singles and tracks down the people involved. What happened to the dreams and ideals of people who created a lasting plastic monument to their youth? And how is the experience of making and packaging a 7 inch single different from the modern practice of up-loading a file to a website.

The DIY single took commitment and ingenuity. Hopeful bands would scrape together money to record, press, package and distribute their music in the hope of fame, fortune or at least an appearance on the radio. Now, the bargain bins of second-hand shops are full of these records and each one marks a significant milestone in someone's career. But a stepping-stone to where?

Mark Hodkinson, now a journalist, learns how people coped with the disappointment of failure and how they continue to try and satisfy their creative desires. He meets a saxophonist who once supported Adam Ant and now is a designer for a computer gaming company; a bassist who went on to marry a Bond villain; a guitarist who still hopes to make it big; and a singer who did make it big, and id still selling records 30 years later.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b04xkg3b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04xscq0)
Theologian Giles Fraser on Thomas Aquinas

If the universe exists what caused it to be? Theologian Giles Fraser examines the brilliant medieval scholar St. Thomas Aquinas' and his argument for God as the first cause of everything.
It's part of a powerful body of ideas arguing for the logical necessity of the existence of God. But Giles also wonders how valuable these kinds of 'cosmological arguments' are for us today.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b04xrvb3)
Care Homes, Ex-Council Flats, Consumer Champions

How councils and companies broker care deals for people with disabilities.

Why the new pensions bonds caused the official website to crash

Mr Small goes into battle with nPower - the saga continues.

Why people are struggling to get a mortgage deal on an ex-council flat.

Could domestic heating oil be the cheapest way to heat your house at the moment?

And Kelvin MacKenzie tells us why he's becoming a consumer champion.

PRESENTER WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER PETE WILSON.


THU 13:00 World at One (b04xrvb5)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 The Diaries of Brett Westwood (b04xrvb7)
Woodland

4. Woodland. When Brett Westwood began a wildlife diary at the age of 15, little did he think that he'd still be writing notes, nearly 40 years later about the same local patch in North Worcestershire.
The diaries mirror the often undreamt of changes which have taken place across the UK over the last 40 years. In this series Brett returns, diaries in hand, to different areas of his local patch and compares notes from the past with the landscape and wildlife of today. There are genuine shocks and revelations.
Fairy Glen is a small natural woodland in Brett's patch carpeted with bluebells in spring. This was once oak has become a sycamore wood. However it's now a great place to spot warblers; chaffinches and bramblings feeding on aphids in spring, and during his visit Brett watches a pair of Nuthatches bringing back food for their young to their nest hole in the trunk of a tree. A second area of woodland which Brett visits - is a relatively new small plantation - but the species have been well chosen and Brett scans the skies above for buzzards. These he finds flying high above a third area of woodland in his local patch which was bought by the Woodland Trust and is much frequented by walkers and dogs. But for Brett - the attraction is the buzzards soaring over the canopy, which have returned and bred in the area since the 1990s. There are ravens too - another bird which Brett would never have dreamed of seeing when he was a teenager on his local patch.
The series underlines the importance of keeping a diary like Brett's not just for personal notes but as a valuable document of change which is measurable from decade to decade.

Wildlife sound recordist: Chris Watson, Producer: Sarah Blunt.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b04xrl8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b04xrvb9)
Take Me To...

Take Me to Victoria Park

By Alan Harris

The second in a series of geographically inspired dramas is a crime thriller set around Cardiff's Victoria Park.

When Jen and Gail break out of prison, they head for South Wales. But life in the Welsh capital has its challenges. As Gail drags Jen further into a murky world of crime, Jen finds she's more of a prisoner than ever before. Her only sanctuary is the park.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

The Writer

Welsh writer Alan Harris has extensive experience in theatre and opera. With National Theatre Wales his work includes A Good Night Out in the Valleys (2010) and The Opportunity of Efficiency (2013). With the Welsh National Opera - The Journey (2010) and The Hidden Valley (under commission). On radio, his plays include Radio 3's The Goldfarmer (2010), and for Radio 4 The Lighthouse (2011) and Wolf (2012).

Alan lives in Victoria Park, Cardiff.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b04xrvbc)
The Purbeck Clay Mines

Helen Mark explores the clay mining history of Dorset's picturesque Isle of Purbeck.

Purbeck may look like an unspoilt rural holiday destination, but in reality it is an area steeped in industrial heritage - dictated by the clay mining industry which began as far back as Roman times and took flight when Sir Walter Raleigh bought tobacco to England and created a demand for clay pipes. The landscape is sculpted by traces of this industry and tales from the days of picking clay out by candle light are still shared by mining communities to this day but in the 21st century it's diggers and trucks that do the hard labour that ensures Purbeck's clay goes worldwide.

Featuring interviews with author Chris Legg, Purbeck Mineral and Mining Museum Chairman Peter Sills, Learning & Interpretation Officer at Purbeck Corfe Castle Pam White, former Mines Manager Norman Vye, retired Mines Forman Mickey White and Chris Cleaves, Safety Director UK Ceramics & UK Ball Clays GM.

Produced By Nicola Humphries.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b04xkypb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b04xmwz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b04xrvbf)
Nick Hornby on Wild; JK Simmons and Damien Chazelle on Whiplash

With Francine Stock.

Arsenal fan Nick Hornby reveals what appealed to him about Cheryl Strayed's memoir Wild, about her 1000 mile hike through mid America, and why he was never tempted to try the walk himself.

Jazz drumming is the unlikely subject for a movie, but Whiplash has won numerous awards in festivals across the world. Its director Damien Chazelle and star J.K. Simmons discuss the film's theme of how music teaching can turn into bullying.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b04xrwhc)
International Year of Soils

This year is the Food and Agriculture Organisation's International Year of Soils.

Adam Rutherford, ably assisted by Manchester University's Richard Bardgett, takes a look at new research seeking to further our understanding of soil behaviour that determines much of our existence.

A handful of soil contains many tens of thousands of different species of microbial life, all competing to the death with each other for nutrients and resources. Yet most of those species are very poorly understood, because hitherto scientists have only been able to grow a small percentage of them in the lab.

Last week's announcement of a new class of antibiotic - teixobactin - owes a lot to soil; Two buckets of it from the back garden of one of the researchers.

Kim Lewis of Northeastern University in the US describes the new technique that could open up the whole biodiversity of a clump of soil to future medicines.

Meanwhile, Monsanto, Novozyme and Morrone Bio in the US are just some of the big agricultural corporations exploring what useful microbes could be spread on seeds and crops to increase yields and reduce the needs for fertilizers.

Soils, apart from feeding us and helping us fight disease, also have a crucial regulatory role in our climate.

Sue Nelson reports on a new soil moisture monitoring network being set up in the UK that uses cosmic rays to measure the water content. The Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System, COSMOS-UK, is being set up by the CEH, based out of Edinburgh.

On a global scale, soils are a hugely important reservoir of carbon. Iain Hartley of the University of Exeter talks about the vast amounts of carbon - more than all the carbon in all the trees and air - held in frozen soils in the far northern reaches of the earth. If these vast plains of permafrost were to melt in a warming world, the positive feedback loop caused by the resulting methane and CO2 released could be a bigger problem than many of our climate models allow for.

But could we manage the soils beneath our feet better?

David Manning of Newcastle University suggests that minerals could be added to brownfield (urban) soils to help them capture and sequester staggering amounts of CO2 from the air to help us offset anthropogenic emissions.

Producer Adrian Washbourne.


THU 17:00 PM (b04xrwhf)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkg3g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap (b04xrwhh)
Series 2

Ethical Filing

Bridget Christie's taken her activism to a whole new level. Well, sort of.

Multi-award winning series about modern feminism.

Bridget thought that she'd be able to put her feet up after her last series, she expected it to bomb. Sadly it was a huge success. But it's OK, because actually she's solved the feminist struggle all by herself.

She's assisted by token man, Fred MacAulay.

Written by Bridget Christie.

Producers: Alison Vernon-Smith and Alexandra Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b04xrwhk)
Jennifer's outraged by a blatant propaganda piece on Justin Elliot in the Echo. There's no mention of SAVE or what Lynda and Jim uncovered at the LEP event. Kenton wonders why Shula's still pursuing the SAVE campaign - she and Kenton are benefitting from Justin, so isn't she a hypocrite?

Jolene and Kenton are promoting their Burns Night supper. Fallon will be managing the Valentines Day events this year, to avoid a repeat of last year's rival events. As Kenton and Jolene plan to help Fallon with her business, Jolene prompts Kenton to speak to Lilian about selling her shares of the Bull.

Home from holiday, Lilian makes a shock discovery and calls PC Burns. The safe is wide open and valuable paintings have been taken. There's no sign of Matt, just a very short note that PC Burns finds, which reads "Sorry, Pusscat". Lilian's sure there's an explanation and just needs to contact Matt. She asks Burns not to mention this to anyone. Jennifer arrives and Lilian covers for the fact that PC Burns is there, making up a story about the burglar alarm, and saying she forget that Matt was taking the paintings for valuation. Lilian declines Jennifer's offer to stay for a cup of tea - she needs to lie down.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b04xrwhm)
Oscar Nominations Special

John Wilson reports on the nominations for this year's Oscars which were announced today.

Including interviews with British nominees Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones and Rosamund Pike as well as analysis from critic Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and predictions for which films and actors will triumph on the night.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xrv9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b04xrwhp)
CIA Torture: What Did Britain Know?

Shortly before Christmas the Intelligence Committee of the United States Senate published an extraordinary and explosive document, universally referred to as the Torture Report, accusing the CIA of brutality in its treatment of prisoners detained in what George W. Bush had called the "War on Terror".

The report debunks the CIA's claims that its "enhanced interrogation techniques" produced important intelligence. These techniques include practices such as waterboarding, sleep deprivation, and sexual humiliation. The simple message for many who've read the report: torture doesn't work.

What was published represents a fraction of the Senate's findings after an investigation lasting more than five years. The 600 or so pages now available online are merely a summary of the full 6,700 page report that remains classified. And much of the 600 pages is illegible, because of redactions in the form of thick, black lines, some of which were demanded by Britain's intelligence services.

In The Report this week Simon Cox asks to what extent Britain's intelligence services were complicit in the mistreatment of prisoners; and why Britain has been dragging its heels in carrying out its own investigation into allegations of mistreatment.

He traces the history of British investigations: a discredited investigation by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament (ISC) in 2007 on extraordinary rendition from which it was later discovered that the intelligence services withheld information; the promise by David Cameron of a judge-led inquiry in 2010, which was subsequently scrapped; and handing back of the torture enquiry to the ISC, which Mr Cameron himself had said was not the appropriate body to carry out this investigation.

Simon will also look what appears to be a consistent tactic of successive British governments to avoid embarrassing details coming to light by claiming that publication would damage relations with the United States, or damage national security. It's a claim rejected by human rights agencies who defend alleged victims of torture, as well as by senior politicians. "National security often just means national embarrassment," says one.

Contributors to the programme include a man who claims he was illegally rendered with British complicity; a member of the judge-led inquiry into torture that was subsequently scrapped; and members of the ISC, now charged with carrying out an investigation.
The alleged abuse is historical. But it acquired contemporary resonance last week when it was reported that one of the alleged perpetrators of the Paris murders had been radicalised by the images of detainees being tortured by US operatives at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

Producer: Tim Mansell.


THU 20:30 In Business (b04xrwhr)
Money Making

Peter Day explores the future of money and asks how "cashless" we may become. With the arrival of internet based digital currencies such as bitcoin and payments via mobile phones, he looks at whether the banks will still have a role to play.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.


THU 21:02 BBC Inside Science (b04xrwhc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b04xrv9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b04xrzdc)
Two suspected Islamists killed in a police raid in the Belgian town of Verviers.

Authorities say men were on the verge of committing a major terrorist attack after returning from Syria.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04xrzdf)
Curtain Call

Episode 4

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Episode 4:
Paths cross and feelings deepen.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Colin Hoult's Carnival of Monsters (b04xrzdh)
Series 2

Episode 2

Enter the Carnival of Monsters, a bizarre and hilarious world of sketches, stories and characters, presented by the sinister Ringmaster.

A host of characters are the exhibits at the Carnival - all played by Colin himself.

Meet such monstrous yet strangely familiar oddities as: Wannabe Hollywood screenwriter Andy Parker; Anna Mann - outrageous star of such forgotten silver screen hits such as 'Rogue Baker', 'Who's For Turkish Delight' and 'A Bowl For My Bottom'; and a host of other characters from acid jazz obsessives, to mask workshop coordinators.

Writers Guild Award-winner Colin Hoult is best known for his highly acclaimed starring roles in Paul Whitehouse's 'Nurse', 'Being Human', Rickey Gervais' 'Life's Too Short' and 'Derek', and 'Russell Howard's Good News', as well as his many hit shows at the Edinburgh Festival. He has also appeared and written for a number of Radio 4 series including 'The Headset Set' and 'Colin and Fergus' Digi-Radio'.

Producer: Sam Bryant.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2015.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04xrzdk)
Sean Curran reports on a row over mobile phone reception. There's a plea for people infected with contaminated blood. And why the United States doesn't care for haggis.

Editor; Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 16 JANUARY 2015

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04xkg4g)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b04xrv9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg4j)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04xkg4m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04xkg4q)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04xkg4s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04y9kc8)
A reflection and prayer with Richard Hill.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b04xs49p)
First Milk, Rural fuel, Pesticides

The future of the dairy co-operative First Milk has been in question since the business announced a delay to its payment to farmers, and an increase in farmer contributions, in order to avoid increased borrowing. When First Milk's chairman, Sir Jim Paice, met farmers in Pembrokeshire, he assured them that the business is still solvent and does have a long-term future. We hear why.

A European consultation on 'endocrine disruptors' ends today. They are chemicals which have an effect on the functioning of the hormonal system of humans or animals, and include some pesticides. Depending on the conclusions of the consultation, farmers say up to forty products could be taken off the market. Charlotte Smith talks to a campaigner who believes the current system doesn't offer rural residents adequate protection from harmful chemicals.

And some of the UK's most rural communities could be entitled to tax break on fuel, under a government scheme. The idea, which got European Commission approval yesterday, could mean a reduction of up to five pence a litre for people living in selected areas of Cumbria, Devon, Northumberland, North Yorkshire, and the Highlands of Scotland. Charlotte asks Defra minister Dan Rogerson how it would work.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0rd4)
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the raucous calling sulphur-crested cockatoo from Australia. It is with somewhat heavy irony that with its loud, jarring calls, the sulphur crested cockatoo is also known as the "Australian nightingale". These large white parrots with their formidable curved beaks and long yellow crests which they fan out when excited are familiar aviary birds. One of the reasons that they're popular as cage birds is that they can mimic the human voice and can live to a great age. A bird known as Cocky Bennett from Sydney lived until he was a hundred years old, although by the time he died in the early 1900s he was completely bald, and was then stuffed for posterity. In its native forests of Australia and New Guinea, those far-carrying calls are perfect for keeping cockatoo flocks together. They're highly intelligent birds and when they feed, at least one will act as a sentinel ready to sound the alarm in case of danger. So well-known is this behaviour that in Australia, someone asked to keep a lookout during illegal gambling sessions is sometimes known as a "cockatoo" or "cocky".


FRI 06:00 Today (b04y55r6)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b04xmqd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b04xs49r)
Reaching down the Rabbit Hole

Episode 5

Emphasising the importance of neurology - Dr Allan H Ropper and his co-writer Brian D Burrell conclude their behind the scenes look at the Harvard Medical School's neurology unit.

"In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," says Ropper, "Alice jumps into a rabbit hole and finds herself in a bizarre realm where everything bears little relation to the outside world. It is a place where, as the Red Queen mentions to Alice, it helps to believe six impossible things before breakfast. I have no need to believe six impossible things before breakfast because I know that on any given day I will be confronted with six improbable things before lunch..."

Concluded by Colin Stinton.

Written by Dr Allan H Ropper and Brian D Burrell
Abridged by Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2015.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04y539w)
Woman in Broadcasting, Illegal Sperm Donors, Anti-Semitism in the UK

Radio 4's Out of the Ordinary has found online groups where women are looking for cheap or 'free' donors, and 'super donors', men fiercely proud of their apparent fertility, who are in competition to see who can father the most children. Jenni speaks to Juliet Tizzard, Director of Strategy at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority about the current regulations governing sperm donation, and Erika Tranfield who runs an online sperm donor site.

Why are there still not enough women in News and Current Affairs broadcasting? Jenni speaks to the chair of the Lords Communications Committee, Lord Best.

The biggest study into the lives of older lesbians in Britain has been carried out by Dr Jane Traies from Brighton. She carried out the research for a PhD she undertook after retiring from her job as a head teacher. Jane contacted nearly 400 women from all over Britain. They ranged in age from sixty to ninety and the interviews were carried out over a two year period. Some of the women interviewed by Jane were recorded, she shares some of the recordings with Woman's Hour and tells Jenni about her research.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xs49t)
The Corrections

The Generator

Dramatisation of Jonathan Franzen's darkly comic 2001 novel about the tribulations of a dysfunctional Midwestern family, starring Richard Schiff (The West Wing), Maggie Steed, Colin Stinton and Roslyn Hill. Dramatised by Marcy Kahan.

Episode 10: The Generator - When acclaimed chef, Denise Lambert, is head-hunted by a multi-millionaire entrepreneur, her romantic life becomes increasingly complicated.

Directed by Emma Harding

The Corrections was awarded the National Book Award in 2001, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 2002. It was included in TIME magazine's list of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.

Jonathan Franzen is the author of four novels (Freedom, The Corrections, Strong Motion, and The Twenty-Seventh City), two collections of essays (Farther Away, How to Be Alone), a personal history (The Discomfort Zone).

Marcy Kahan is a playwright and radio dramatist. Recent radio work includes two series of Lunch for BBC Radio 4 (starring Claire Skinner and Stephen Mangan) and Mr Bridger's Orphan. Theatre work includes 20 Cigarettes (Soho Theatre) and the stage version of When Harry Met Sally (Theatre Royal Haymarket).


FRI 11:00 MCAT: The Scourge of the Valleys (b04xs49w)
Five years since the stimulant MCAT crossed from legal high to Class B substance, award-winning writer Rachel Trezise visits the South Wales Valleys to witness the trail of distruction left by this drug, and finds out what's next for the teens who took it looking for a good time.

Producer: Claire Hill.


FRI 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b03q9w0n)
Series 5

St Davids

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a fifth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and does a bespoke evening of comedy in each one.

As every high street slowly morphs into a replica of the next, Mark Steel's in Town celebrates the parochial, the local and the unusual. From Corby's rivalry with Kettering to the word you can't say in Portland, the show has taken in the idiosyncrasies of towns up and down the country, from Kirkwall to Penzance, from Holyhead to Bungay.

This edition comes from St Davids, Pembrokeshire, which is technically a city - with the emphasis on the technically. He discusses lifeboats, art and wildlife, and discovers that in this sleepy coastal community, they are sometimes very rude but sometimes very, very friendly. Almost too friendly. But only if you're into that sort of thing. From January 2014.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Trudi Stevens
Producer ... Ed Morrish.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b04xkg4v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04xrvb1)
Historian Justin Champion on William Whiston's Comet Theory

Historian Justin Champion on Early Modern Comet Theory

Those who watched in awe as the space craft Philae bounced its way onto a comet last November should hold a candle for William Whiston. Back in 1696 this British theologian, mathematician and acolyte of Isaac Newton published a book called 'A new theory of the earth'. In it he argued that comets were responsible for the origins of the earth and life upon it. This was what Philae was tasked to help us find out when it dotted down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Not only does this feel like a coup for early modern farsightedness it also reminds us that much of early science was not built in opposition to Christianity but in order to justify it. Whiston's investigation of the natural world (like those of his peers) was designed to show how the biblical account of creation was true.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b04y539y)
GoodGym, Bank Fraud, Air Pollution

How some criminals set up online banking in the name a 94-year-old woman who doesn't even have a computer. Should the bank return the hundred thousand pounds she lost? You and Yours investigates.

As police incidents involving legal highs soar, Peter White find outs about the city of Lincoln's plan to be the first to ban them.

Is your New Year fitness flagging? Would altruism give you a boost? We try out goodgym, a not for profit company that organises workouts with a good deed on the side. Does it work?
www.goodgym.org

And as air pollution levels in London have already breached limits set for the entire year, we ask what it will take to get some action and how we got to be so dependent on diesel in the first place?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04xkg4x)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b04y53b0)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Diaries of Brett Westwood (b04xs4b0)
Canal

5. Canal .
When Brett Westwood began a wildlife diary at the age of 15, little did he think that he'd still be writing notes, nearly 40 years later about the same local patch in North Worcestershire.
From those early days, when birding was done by bicycle, Brett's wildlife diaries have developed into a record which is anything but parochial. They mirror the often undreamt of changes which have taken place across the UK over the last 40 years. In this series Brett returns, diaries in hand, to different areas of his local patch and compares notes from the past with the landscape and wildlife of today. There are genuine shocks and revelations.
The River Stour has its source in the industrial Black Country and flows through Brett's local patch on its way to the Severn, about 9 miles away. Today, although it is polluted, the river is far clearer than in years gone by, thanks to rigorous controls on pollutants. With their absence, fish have returned and damselflies such as the white-legged damsel which is sensitive to pollution, skim across the surface. During his visit for the programme, Brett is thrilled to see a Beautiful Demoiselle for the first time here; a species which signifies that the water is less polluted than in the past. Last year Brett heard the what he's convinced was the 'plop' of a water vole and saw footprints in the riverside mud for the first time in fifteen years. With mink now well-established, could these water voles survive?
The series underlines the importance of keeping a diary like Brett's not just for personal notes but as a valuable document of change which is measurable from decade to decade.
Wildlife sound recordist: Chris Watson, Producer: Sarah Blunt.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b04xrwhk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b04xs4b2)
Take Me To...

Take Me to the Necropolis

By Oliver Emanuel.

The third in a series of geographically inspired dramas takes us on a darkly comic journey through Glasgow's infamous Necropolis.

Alice and Sasha are celebrating their graduation when Alice takes Sasha on a secret trip to a graveyard. Sasha is not impressed. But, after they've downed a bottle of bubbly and smoked a joint, they find themselves in the middle of a surreal space where imaginary boys and dead people talk to them and something even more sinister can penetrate their mind...

Also featuring the voices of Pearl Appleby, Amy Conachan, Sara Short, Michael Collins, Phillip Laing, Lorn MacDonald, Lorne McFadyen and Hamish Riddle from the Scottish Royal Conservatoire

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04xs4b4)
North Cumbria

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from North Cumbria. Pippa Greenwood, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson join him to answer questions from the audience.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Claire Crofton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Irish International (b04xs4b6)
More Credible Than the Truth by Philip Ó Ceallaigh

Three original stories from current, cutting edge Irish writers, Nick Laird, Philip Ó Ceallaigh and Robert McLaim Wilson, who have chosen to leave Ireland and make their homes in New York, Bucharest and Paris who each give their own unique take on being an Irishman living and writing abroad.

Writer ..... Philip Ó Ceallaigh
Reader ..... Declan Conlon
Producer ..... Jenny Thompson.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b04y53fh)
Ray McFall, Richard Meade, Joan Benesh, Frank Atkinson and Brian Clemens

Matthew Bannister on

Ray McFall, the former accountant who ran the Cavern Club in Liverpool and booked the Beatles more than 200 times.

Richard Meade who won both team and individual eventing Gold medals at the Olympics.

Joan Benesh, who perfected the system for noting down complex dance moves in ballet.

Frank Atkinson who founded and ran the Beamish open air museum in County Durham.

And Brian Clemens the screenwriter best known for creating the Avengers and the Professionals.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b04y53fk)
How big are the Conservatives' planned cuts?

The Conservatives' plans to achieve a budget surplus by 2019-20 have led to near universal acknowledgment that big reductions in spending would be required. However, David Cameron said government spending would only need to be reduced by 1% per year. So, how big are the cuts? Tim Harford asks Gemma Tetlow of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

In the wake of the Paris killings, an imam in Paris told the BBC that 95% of terrorism victims around the world are Muslim. Is that true? More or Less speaks to Erin Miller of the Global Terrorism Database.

The reported death toll of the Boko Haram attack in Baga, Nigeria, this month has ranged from 150 to more than 2000 people. More or Less speaks to Julian Rademeyer of Africa Check, who's been trying to get to the truth.

Which are the world's worst boardgames? Oliver Roeder, a senior writer for the website FiveThirtyEight, has done a statistical analysis of player reviews to answer this question. He's also been looking at which are considered to be the best. Tim Harford challenges Oliver to a transatlantic game of Snakes and Ladders.

And the coverage of the Living Planet Index and its claim that species populations have dropped 50% in the last 40 years aroused much suspicion among More or Less listeners. The team looks at what the figure means and how it was calculated.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b04xs4b8)
Sophia and Amber - Eating and Not Eating

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who are dedicated to promoting understanding of anorexia, after one of them got through it with the help of the other.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b04y53b2)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04xkg4z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b04xs4bb)
Series 45

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches. Featuring Mitch Benn, Pippa Evans, Jon Holmes and Tez Ilyas.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b04xs4bd)
Fallon and Harrison blissfully wake up together and stay warm in bed as it seems the heating's broken. Harrison impresses Fallon with an idea for a 1940s themed Valentines Night celebration. Mike and Vicky could run some dance classes.

Tony's happy to finally be moving from Birmingham to the Orthopaedic ward at Felpersham. Pat hopes to be back at work next week, which will free Helen up a bit. Helen opens up about problems at the shop. She also tells Pat about Rob's letter from the CMS. Helen worries about asking Rob to take the paternity test - he'll think she doesn't trust him. But Pat feels that it's the only way to be free of Jess.

Rob's outraged by another letter from the CMS. To prove that he's not the father, he will have to take the test. Helen carefully suggests that he should, to finally get Jess off their backs. But Rob refuses to dance to Jess's tune.

Pat calls round to to drop off a veg box and tell distracted Lilian about Tony. Lilian tells her that Matt's on a business trip. PC Burns checks on Lilian. She knows that Matt has done a runner and cleaned out their accounts. He must have planned it months ago. She's not giving up on Matt, though - she'll find him and they'll sort this out together.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b04xs4bj)
Russell T Davies, PJ Harvey, The Eichmann Show

Russell T Davies, acclaimed television writer with successes including Queer as Folk and Dr Who, talks about his upcoming gay multi-platform drama Cucumber, Banana and Tofu.

John visits London's Somerset House where P J Harvey is recording her new album in a glass box and inviting the public to watch. Commissioned by Artangel, 'Recording in Progress' aims to give visitors a glimpse of the labour that goes into making a studio album. Writer and critic Kate Mossman gives her verdict on the results.

Walking the Tightrope at Theatre Delicatessen in London is a new set of 5 minute plays and debates on the theme of censorship in the arts. Cressida Brown, the director, and playwright Ryan Craig talk to John Wilson about controversial content.

BBC 2 drama The Eichmann Show recreates the true story of the televised trial of Adolf Eichmann, one of the architects of the Holocaust, in 1961. Martin Freeman plays Milton Fruchtman, as TV producer who hired blacklisted director Leo Hurwitz, played by Anthony LaPaglia, to capture Eichmann's trial in the first global television event. Ryan Gilbey reviews.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Sarah Johnson.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04xs49t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b04xs4bl)
Norman Baker MP, Sadiq Khan MP, Dia Chakravarty and Francis Maude MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Barnham in West Sussex with the former Home Office Minister Norman Baker MP, Political Director of the Tax Payers Alliance Dia Chakravarty, Shadow Justice Secretary Sadiq Khan MP and Francis Maude MP Minister for the Cabinet Office.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b04xs4bn)
Language and Listening

AL Kennedy reflects on the importance of learning languages and listening to one another. "More words give me more paths to and from the hearts of others, more points of view - I don't think that's a bad thing."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 A History of Ideas (b04xs4bq)
Omnibus

How Did Everything Begin?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking How did everything begin?

Helping him answer it are Cosmologist Carole Mundell, Historian Justin Champion, theologian Giles Fraser and Creation myth Expert, Jessica Frazier.

For the rest of the week Carole, Giles, Justin and Jessica will take us further into the history of ideas about origins with programmes of their own. Between them they will examine early modern comet theory, Thomas Aquinas, The big Bang and Hindu Creation myths.

In this omnibus edition all five programmes from the week are presented together.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04xkg51)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b04y53b4)
Swiss central bank scraps exchange rate controls.

Several brokerage firms around the world have made large losses


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04xs4bs)
Curtain Call

Episode 5

On a sultry afternoon in the summer of 1936, a woman accidentally interrupts an attempted murder in a London hotel room. Nina Land, a West End actress, faces a dilemma. She's not supposed to be at the hotel in the first place, and certainly not with a married man - the celebrated portrait artist, Stephen Wyley - but once it becomes apparent that she may have seen the face of the man dubbed 'the Tie-Pin Killer' she realises that another woman's life could be at stake.

Jimmy Erskine is the raffish doyen of theatre critics who fears that his star is fading. Age and drink are catching up with him and, in his late-night escapades with young men, he walks a tightrope that may snap at any moment. He has depended for years on his loyal and longsuffering secretary Tom, who has a secret of his own to protect. Tom's chance encounter with Madeleine Farewell, a lonely young woman haunted by premonitions of catastrophe, closes the circle - it was Madeleine who narrowly escaped the killer's stranglehold that afternoon and now she walks the streets in terror of him finding her again.

Curtain Call is a poignant comedy of manners, and a tragedy of mistaken intentions. From the glittering murk of Soho's demi-monde to the grease paint and ghost-lights of theatreland, the story plunges on through smoky clubrooms, street corners where thuggish Blackshirts linger and tawdry rooming houses.

Read by Nancy Carroll

Abridged, directed and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b04xp4wq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04xs4bv)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b04xs4bx)
John and Fiona - A Second Chance

Fi Glover with a conversation between a father and daughter, both musicians, reflecting on the turn of events that led her to exchange her career as a dancer for one as a singer.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b04xnczl)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b04xnczl)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b04xp15h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b04xp15h)

15 Minute Drama 10:40 WED (b04xrj82)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b04xrj82)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b04xrv9v)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b04xrv9v)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b04xs49t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b04xs49t)

A History of Ideas 12:04 MON (b04xnczs)

A History of Ideas 12:04 TUE (b04xp4w8)

A History of Ideas 12:04 WED (b04xrj8s)

A History of Ideas 12:04 THU (b04xscq0)

A History of Ideas 12:04 FRI (b04xrvb1)

A History of Ideas 21:00 FRI (b04xs4bq)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04wwwc8)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b04xs4bn)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b04xjfxy)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04wwwc6)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b04xs4bl)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b03bpv42)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b04xrwhc)

BBC Inside Science 21:02 THU (b04xrwhc)

Becoming Myself: Gender Identity 21:00 WED (b04tlqzt)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b050hhct)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b050hhct)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b04xnd07)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b04xndg2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b04xp4xc)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b04xrnlx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b04xrzdf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b04xs4bs)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b04wwtsj)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b04xn7cq)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b04xn7cq)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b04xp15c)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b04xp15c)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b04xrj7r)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b04xrj7r)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b04xrv9q)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b04xrv9q)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b04xs49r)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b04wtgjv)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b04xnd03)

Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 18:30 THU (b04xrwhh)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b04xkypg)

Cabin Pressure 23:00 TUE (b04vf959)

Can Democracy Work? 09:00 TUE (b04xp157)

Can Democracy Work? 21:30 TUE (b04xp157)

Colin Hoult's Carnival of Monsters 23:00 THU (b04xrzdh)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b04wwkhl)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b04xrv9x)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 05:45 SUN (b04wwgzc)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 20:45 WED (b04xrl8t)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b04xmqd6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b04xmqd6)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b04xmrnk)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b04xp4wj)

Drama 14:15 WED (b04xrjsg)

Drama 14:15 THU (b04xrvb9)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b04xs4b2)

Everyone a Rembrandt 16:00 MON (b04xnd05)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b04xjbjs)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04xn7cj)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b04xp153)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b04xp63s)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b04xrv9j)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b04xs49p)

Fear and Loathing in Harrogate 16:30 SUN (b04xmwz6)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b04xp4x3)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b04xjfy6)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b04xjfy6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04wrqh2)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b04xnd0h)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04xp4x1)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b04xrl8p)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b04xrwhm)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b04xs4bj)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04wwtsy)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b04xs4b4)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b04xp4wq)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b04xp4wq)

I've Never Seen Star Wars 18:30 TUE (b04xp4wx)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b04wwqcr)

In Business 20:30 THU (b04xrwhr)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b04xrv9n)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b04xrv9n)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b04xp4x5)

India's Beats: The Hungry Generation 23:30 SAT (b04ws24p)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b04xp4x7)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b04xp4x7)

Irish International 15:45 FRI (b04xs4b6)

Kitch! 11:30 TUE (b04xp15m)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04xf1d1)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b04y53fh)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b04xjfy4)

Love in Recovery 23:15 WED (b04xrnm1)

MCAT: The Scourge of the Valleys 11:00 FRI (b04xs49w)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 FRI (b03q9w0n)

Mein Kampf: Publish or Burn? 11:00 WED (b04xrj8j)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04wrqgk)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b04xkfww)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04xkfyr)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b04xkg06)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b04xkg1r)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04xkg2y)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04xkg4g)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b04xp63x)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b04xp63x)

Mindfulness: Panacea or Fad? 13:30 SUN (b04xmqdd)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b04xrl8c)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b04xjcn2)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b04xjcn2)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b04xf1d5)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b04y53fk)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04wrqgt)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b04xkfx4)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04xkfz0)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b04xkg0g)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b04xkg20)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04xkg38)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04xkg4s)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b04xkfx6)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04wrqh4)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b04xkfxj)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b04xkfz4)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b04xkg0j)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b04xkg22)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b04xkg3b)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b04xkg4v)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04wrqgw)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b04xkfxb)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b04xkfxg)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04wrqhj)

News 13:00 SAT (b04wrqh8)

Olive Wars 20:00 MON (b04tcl5w)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b04xkyp6)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b04xp159)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b04xmwz2)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b04xmwz2)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b04wwmcc)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b04xrvbc)

PM 17:00 SAT (b04xjfy2)

PM 17:00 MON (b04xnd09)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04xp4ws)

PM 17:00 WED (b04yjx6g)

PM 17:00 THU (b04xrwhf)

PM 17:00 FRI (b04y53b2)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b04xmwzb)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 MON (b04xnd01)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04wwwkz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04y9cby)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b04y9dqx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b04y9g6f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b04y9gdg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b04y9kc8)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b04xkypb)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b04xkypb)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b04xkypb)

Roger McGough's Other Half 23:00 WED (b04xrnlz)

Sasha's Song 15:30 SAT (b04wtzz5)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b03kp47b)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b04xjcmw)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b04xjfzk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04wrqgp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b04xkfx0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04xkfyw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b04xkg0b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b04xkg1w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04xkg34)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04xkg4m)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04wtzz3)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b04xp15k)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04wrqgm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04wrqgr)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b04wrqhb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b04xkfwy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b04xkfx2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b04xkfxn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b04xkfyt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b04xkfyy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b04xkg08)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b04xkg0d)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b04xkg1t)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b04xkg1y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b04xkg32)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04xkg36)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b04xkg4j)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b04xkg4q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04wrqhg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b04xkfxs)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04xkfz8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b04xkg0s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b04xkg26)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04xkg3g)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04xkg4z)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04xkgsv)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04xkgsv)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b04xn7cn)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b04xn7cn)

Subway 19:45 SUN (b04xmwzl)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b04xkypd)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b04xkyp8)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b04xkyt1)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b04xmwzg)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b04xmwzg)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b04xnd0f)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b04xnd0f)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04xp4wz)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04xp4wz)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b04xrl8m)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b04xrl8m)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b04xrwhk)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b04xrwhk)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b04xs4bd)

The Best Laid Plans 11:30 MON (b04xnczq)

The City on the Couch 17:00 SUN (b04wth5g)

The Diaries of Brett Westwood 13:45 MON (b04xnczz)

The Diaries of Brett Westwood 13:45 TUE (b04xp4wg)

The Diaries of Brett Westwood 13:45 WED (b04xrj95)

The Diaries of Brett Westwood 13:45 THU (b04xrvb7)

The Diaries of Brett Westwood 13:45 FRI (b04xs4b0)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b04wwn6n)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b04xrvbf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b04xmqd8)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b04xmqd8)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b04xp4wl)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b04xjcmy)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b04xjcmy)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04xmqrg)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b04xrj8b)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b04xs4b8)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b04xs4bx)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b04xrl8h)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b04wwvnq)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b04xs4bb)

The Report 20:00 THU (b04xrwhp)

The Rest is History 19:15 SUN (b04wrycv)

The Rivals 11:30 WED (b04xrj8n)

The Secretaries of Juliet 11:00 MON (b04xnczn)

The Showman's Parson: Tales from the Memoirs of the Rev Thomas Horne 00:30 SUN (b03wh36q)

The Single Life 11:30 THU (b04xrv9z)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b04wth58)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b04xnd0c)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b04xjcn0)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04xmqdb)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b04xndg0)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04xp4x9)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b04xrnlv)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b04xrzdc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b04y53b4)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b04wwdz1)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b04xrl8f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b04xnfv4)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b04xp4xf)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b04xrnm3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b04xrzdk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b04xs4bv)

Today 07:00 SAT (b04xjcmt)

Today 06:00 MON (b04xn7cl)

Today 06:00 TUE (b04xp155)

Today 06:00 WED (b04xp63v)

Today 06:00 THU (b04xrv9l)

Today 06:00 FRI (b04y55r6)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04t0nw9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04t0pjx)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04t0pm9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04t0ptz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04t0qpk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04t0rd4)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b04wwgz9)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b04xrl8r)

War and Peace 21:00 SAT (b04w82wf)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b04wrqgy)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b04wrqh0)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b04wrqh6)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b04wrqhd)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b04xkfx8)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b04xkfxd)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b04xkfxl)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b04xkfxq)

Weather 05:56 MON (b04xkfz2)

Weather 12:57 MON (b04xkfz6)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b04xkg0m)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b04xkg0v)

Weather 12:57 WED (b04xkg24)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b04xkg4x)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b04xkg51)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04xmxjk)

What Does the K Stand For? 18:30 WED (b04xrl8k)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04xmxrz)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b04xjfy0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b04xn99p)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b04xp15f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b04xrj7w)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b04xrv9s)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b04y539w)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b04wtzzk)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b04xp4wn)

World at One 13:00 MON (b04xnczx)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b04xp4wd)

World at One 13:00 WED (b04xrj91)

World at One 13:00 THU (b04xrvb5)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b04y53b0)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b04xnczv)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b04xp4wb)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b04xrj8x)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b04xrvb3)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b04y539y)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b04wwwl1)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b04wwwl1)