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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 DECEMBER 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04tcghk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b04tv0pj)
Elsa Schiaparelli: A Biography

Episode 5

During the glittering 1920s and 30s, Elsa Schiaparelli was the undisputed Queen of Fashion. Everyone who was anyone, from Vivien Leigh to the Duchess of Windsor, entered her doors on the Place Vendôme and obediently wore whatever she instructed.

Her clothes were beautifully made, but they were also designed in a manner no one had seen before - buttons that looked like butterflies, mermaids or carrots, trompe l'oeil pockets that looked like lips, gloves with red nails appliquéd on them. She was unique.

Born into a prominent Italian family, she moved to London and married a supposed Polish count who, it transpired, was really a French con-man. His deportation during the First World War saw them move to New York, where he abandoned Schiaparelli and their baby daughter. Undaunted, she picked herself up, moved to Paris and launched her meteoric career, surviving the Second World War despite being under suspicion of spying from both sides.

Her story is one of pluck and determination, talent and great imagination. Along with Coco Chanel, her greatest rival, she was one of the few female figures in the field at the time. And her collaborations with artists such as Man Ray, Salvador Dali, Jean Cocteau and Alberto Giacometti, elevated the field of women's clothing design into the realm of art.

Reader: Abigail Thaw

Written by Meryle Secrest
Abridged by Libby Spurrier

Produced by Joanna Green
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04tcghm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04tcghp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04tcghr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04tcght)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04tlrjj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Judy Merry.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04tlrjl)
'It's a shame Grand Theft Auto doesn't have a misogyny filter.' A listener and her son tell iPM about their stalemate: "I won't let him play Grand Theft Auto, because it demeans women; he now won't attend Mass, because the Catholic Church demeans women." And another listener tells us about his research into extreme right music. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04tcghw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04tcghy)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b04tljkj)
Nature Reserves in Cumbria

Caz Graham visits two Nature Reserves in Cumbria to find out what happens on wildlife reserves in winter and meets the people working away to maintain these conservation areas.

It's cold outside: many birds have flown south for the winter and the smaller mammals have gone into hibernation, but there is still life to be found on nature reserves, if only in the form of teams of conservationists maintaining the area for next year's visitors.

Caz heads first to Foulshaw Moss, an expanse of peat bog that has been restored over the past decades to ensure the peat continues to grow and squelches her way around the wet habitat.

She then heads to Roudsea Nature Reserve to find a team at work preparing the woodland for the tiny, hibernating dormice that make the area their home.

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b04v29gs)
Brassicas

Charlotte Smith goes to a farm near the Lincolnshire coast to talk about brassicas - the group of vegetables that includes sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and swede. We hear how they're grown, and some of the health benefits that they bring to us. We also hear about some of the research being carried out to make these staple crops more sustainable. The producer is Sally Challoner.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04tcgj0)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b04v29gv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b04v29gx)
Suzi Perry

The BBC's Formula 1 presenter, Suzi Perry, joins Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir to discuss life on the road, her passion for speed, her rock and roll childhood and time spent working backstage at her local theatre.

Ben Collins, ex-"The Stig" from the BBC's Top Gear, takes Richard on a circuit of Rockingham Racetrack.

With more than 30 years' experience Mark Thompson shares his passion for "amateur astronomy", gives simple steps on how you can get started without spending a fortune and explains what is happening with The Geminid meteor shower this weekend.

Hermen, an outreach worker for The Connection at St. Martin's, supported by the Radio 4 Christmas Appeal, recalls his time living on the street.

Robin Ollington describes how his suggestion led to Buckingham Palace displaying a welcoming Christmas Tree.

Katie Rogers shares her story of how, as a city executive, she followed her childhood passion to run away to become a circus ringmaster.

And actress Wendi Peters chooses her Inheritance Tracks - I Won't Last A Day Without You by Carpenters, and Hello Dolly by Barbra Streisand.

Stargazing - The Essential Guide to Astronomy, by Mark Thompson, is published by Philips.

Wendi Peters is appearing as Martha in White Christmas at London's Dominion Theatre.

The Radio 4 Christmas Appeal with St Martin in-the-Fields. This is the 88th Appeal for St. Martin's work to support homeless and vulnerable people across the UK. You can give to the Christmas Appeal online by going to the Radio 4 Christmas Appeal website.

Produced by Louise Corley.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04v29gz)
Series 9

Greenwich

Jay Rayner hosts the programme in Greenwich.

Taking questions from a local audience are food historian Annie Gray, Masterchef winner Tim Anderson, and former Head of Creative Development for Heston Blumenthal James "Jocky" Petrie.

The team talk cocktails to keep scurvy at bay, political pallets, jellied eels and timing in the Kitchen.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

Produced by Victoria Shepherd
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b04v29h1)
Ton Newton Dunn of the Sun looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

The Lib Dems struggle to keep a grip on government and keep their independence. MPs struggle with the obstinate age old problems of poverty and devolution, and the temptations of new technology prove too much for one MP.

The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04tcgj2)
A New Empire

'For God, Tsar and Nation.' That's the motto of some of those fighting with the pro-Russia separatists in eastern Ukraine. Tim Whewell's been to talk to them about their dreams of a new Orthodox autocratic state; Mary Harper, in Mogadishu, has been finding out why there's a love affair going on between Somalia and Turkey; South Koreans are big believers in plastic surgery but Steve Evans, in Seoul, says there are now negative headlines after a string of news reports about botched operations; Bangladesh is known as a prolific producer of clothes for the mass market but Caroline Eden's been discovering it also makes saris so fine they're highly coveted and hugely expensive. And after more than a quarter of a century Justin Marozzi has mixed feelings as he bids farewell to the Moroccan town regarded as being the hashish capital of the world.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04tcgj4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b04v29h3)
Pensioner bond rates, Bank of Scotland mortgage ruling, Annuities market, VAT helpline

As the Government announces the rates for the new NS&I 65 Plus Bonds that it promises will be a "market leader", Money Box looks how you can apply and whether there will be enough of them to satisfy demand.

The Financial Conduct Authority has found that there has not been widespread misselling of annuities, but says that it wants to "clean up" how firms present the options to customers. Independent pensions expert, Ros Altman, tells us why the FCA hasn't been nearly tough enough.

A judge in Northern Ireland has found that the Bank of Scotland has been "unconscionable" in "double-billing" some of its borrowers in arrears on their mortgages. Now, the Attorney General there has called on the police to investigate whether the bank has committed "criminal fraud". We'll look at what it could mean for those struggling with mortgage repayments across the UK.

Lloyds Banking Group, the parent company of Bank of Scotland, told us: "In the light of a criminal complaint being made we do not consider it appropriate for us to comment at this time. Our position remains that repossession is always a last resort. We work hard to ensure that we are providing customers facing financial difficulty with the right support for their individual circumstances and ultimately help to resolve the situation in what we appreciate is an extremely sensitive time."

The VAT Mini One Stop Shop is designed to allow those selling digital products to pay sales taxes across all 28 EU countries. But some of those engaging with the new system, coming in on 1st January, think it may be a lot more complicated than the "one stop" billing suggests.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b04tlr06)
Series 85

Episode 8

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, who is joined by Camilla Long, Romesh Ranganathan and John Robins, alongside regular panellist Jeremy Hardy.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04tcgj6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04tcgj8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04tlr0d)
Jeremy Browne MP, Ken Livingstone, Jacob Rees-Mogg MP, Polly Toynbee

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Gordano School in Portishead near Bristol with former Home Office Minister Jeremy Browne MP, Former Mayor of London and now Labour NEC member Ken Livingstone, Conservative back bench MP Jacob Rees-Mogg and Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee.

Producer Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b04tcgjb)
Torture, Hunger in the UK, State of education

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions? with Anita Anand.

What makes a successful school? Are people really hungry in the UK? Torture; can the ends ever justify the means?


SAT 14:30 The Penny Dreadfuls (b04v29h5)
Macbeth Rebothered

A brand new comedy play by The Penny Dreadfuls that tells an alternative tale of this noble King. Greg McHugh stars as Macbeth with Susan Calman as the narrator. Other roles played by Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Humphrey Ker, David Reed and Thom Tuck.

Written by David Reed with additional material by Humphrey Ker
Produced by Julia McKenzie.


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b04tjdls)
Series 19

La Boheme

"La Boheme is a work of genius, for me it's the perfect opera. There's not a bar or a word or anything you'd want to alter. It just gets to you" - Opera Director John Copley CBE.

For the final programme in this series of Soul Music, we venture back into the Parisian winter of Puccini's beloved 'La Boheme' where legendary Opera Director John Copley CBE reflects on his 40 years of bringing this tale of friendship, love and loss to the stage of the Royal Opera House. Alongside his memories of sharing pasta with a young Pavarotti we hear the stories from those whose lives have been touched by - and often reflect - the essence of this most popular of operas.

From the romantic gesture of a probationary constable serenading his soon to be bus conductress wife in 1950's Torquay to the moment that a devoted husband passed away - La Boheme has touched the lives of opera lovers around the world.

Featuring interviews with author Mavis Cheek and opera devotees Ray Tabb and Nancy Rossi.

Produced by Nicola Humphries.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b04v2b31)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Kiesza, Harriet Harman

The Canadian singer songwriter Kiesza talks about writing her hit, Hideaway, in 90 minutes and how the Canadian army wanted to train her as their first female sniper.

Harriet Harman on why Prime Ministers Questions is such a turn off for most men and women.

Zoe Williams discusses the madness of modern parenting. We hear how two charities are supporting young people in the business world from Neeta Patel of the New Entrepreneurs Foundation.

New ideas for Christmas dinner with Yottam Ottolenghi, Allegra McEvedy and Trine Hahnemann.

Why if you're a woman in part time work you're more than likely to become 'stuck' in a low paid job. Ginette Leach tells us how her life changed when she joined the peace camps at Greenham Common. We run through the four women shortlisted for the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award.

And the writer and former chief Woman reporter at the Daily Express M C Beaton talks about her vices and how she feels about being the most borrowed UK adult fiction author from the UK's libraries.

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b04tcgjd)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b04tlrjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04tcgjg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04tcgjj)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04tcgjl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b04v2b33)
Scottee, Stephen Fry, Jon Hamm, Chris Hadfield, Agyness Deyn, Bollywood Brass Band

Clive Anderson is joined by Stephen Fry, Jon Hamm, Chris Hadfield, Agyness Deyn and Scottee for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Bollywood Brass Band.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b04v2b35)
Frank Field

Chris Bowlby profiles the veteran Labour MP and co-author of this week's report on hunger, Frank Field, who is one of the most unusual politicians in Britain.

Variously described as "independent-minded" and a "free thinker" Field has been in Parliament for more than 30 years, representing Birkenhead, which contains some of the most deprived wards in the country.

He had to fight off a hard left challenge from Militant at the beginning of his career and he has long been a campaigner against poverty. His radical views on welfare haven't always endeared him to his Labour colleagues but he is famous for the friends he has made across the political divide.

Most remarkably, perhaps, he was one of those who told Margaret Thatcher, shortly before she resigned, that it was time for her to go. We'll hear from friends, both Labour and Conservative, who speak warmly of a man of dogged determination and great personal integrity. But we'll also hear from critics who say he's not a natural team player who was failed in his brief period as a member of Tony Blair's first government.

Producer: Tim Mansel.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b04tcgjn)
Treasure Island is The National Theatre's seasonal offering at The Olivier, full of pirates, parrots and seaspray. How does it play to the various audiences who come to the theatre at Christmas time?
Electricity is a film starring model turned actress Agyness Deyn whose character deals with her epilepsy as she tries to find a community to be a part of.
Charlie Brooker is back with a one-off feature-length Christmas special edition of Black Mirror on Channel 4. It's a worrying look at a future world that may be closer to our present world than we expect. It's guaranteed to inject some darkness into the joviality of Christmas
Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Robert Olen Butler's latest novel is The Hot Country; a historical thriller set in Mexico in 1914 with a hardbitten journalist as hero
The V+A has an exhibition of Dolls Houses - from 1670 to 2001. They're a world of wonder in miniature. How do they reflect the society of the children for whom they were made?

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Deborah Bull, Neil Brand and Misha Glenny. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b04v2b83)
Gone with the Wind: A Legacy

Author, journalist and academic Diane Roberts examines the impact of one of the most successful Hollywood movies of all time, 75 years after its release.
Using previously un-broadcast extracts from archive interviews with cast and crew, conducted by the veteran Hollywood correspondent Barbra Paskin, Diane looks at how the book and film came about, the reaction it received across America, and its lasting legacy.

It's been called racist, discriminatory, retrograde, and offensive - but, as we discover, the importance of Gone With The Wind lies in part in the conversation it provokes about an ugly and often overlooked chapter in American history.

We hear how issues around race dominated the film's premiere in Atlanta and even spilled over on Oscar night. Hattie McDaniel became the first African-American to win an Academy Award but she was racially segregated from her co-stars at the ceremony - made to sit at a separate table at the back of the room.

Gone with the Wind had a $3.7m budget - unheard of at the time. It grossed over $390m globally at the box office and it was filmed and presented on a scale not seen in modern productions. There were a massive 554 speaking roles and a supporting cast of 2,400 people.

This programme includes archive of Evelyn Keyes who played Scarlett's sister Suellen, Ann Rutherford who played Careen, the film's make up artist Frank Westmore, script clerk Lydia Schiller and Editor Hal Kern. We also hear from Barbra Paskin who conducted the original interviews, and from Professor Helen Taylor, author of the book Scarlett's Women: Gone with the Wind and Its Female Fans.

Produced by Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 The Once and Future King (b04tclg7)
The Lengthening Shadow

Brian Sibley's dramatisation of T. H. White's classic retelling of the King Arthur story continues. Murder and betrayal threaten to undermine all that Arthur holds dear.

Original music by Elizabeth Purnell
Directors: Gemma Jenkins, Marc Beeby and David Hunter.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04tcgjq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b04tjdlj)
Dr Atul Gawande: The Future of Medicine

The Problem of Hubris

Surgeon and writer Atul Gawande calls for a new approach to the two great unfixable problems in life and healthcare - ageing and death. He tells the story of how his daughter's piano teacher faced up to terminal cancer and the crucial choices she made about how to spend her final days. He says the teacher was only able to do this because of an essential honesty from her physicians and the people around her. Dr. Gawande argues that the common reluctance of society and medical institutions to recognise the limits of what professionals can do can end up increasing the suffering of patients towards the end of life. He proposes that both doctors and individuals ask a series of simple but penetrating questions to decide what kind of treatment is appropriate - or whether treatment is appropriate at all. And he praises the values of the hospice movement, in putting quality of life before prolonging life.

The programme was recorded at The Royal Society in Edinburgh in front of an audience.

The Reith Lectures are introduced and chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b04thfrp)
Series 28

Semi-Final 3, 2014

Which jazz musician's work is celebrated in the stage musical Five Guys Named Moe? And who was the architect of the grand opera house in Paris completed in 1875, which is sometimes known by his name?

Paul Gambaccini asks the questions in the eclectic music quiz. The one remaining place in the grand Final will be decided between semi-finalists from Staffordshire, London and West Yorkshire. All three scored impressive victories in the series heats, and the competition will be intense.

As well as answering general knowledge music questions, the competitors have to choose a special musical subject on which to answer their own questions - the choice of topics, as always, coming as a complete surprise.

The winner returns in the 28th annual Counterpoint Final next week.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b04tcxm6)
Series 4

The Knowledge

Paul Farley does the Knowledge, collecting taxi poems and sounds from all over London. Including poems by John Challis, Sean O'Brien and David Harsent and songs, prose texts and other performances from a recent series of art events held in the capital's surviving cabbies shelters. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 14 DECEMBER 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b04v2jjm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Border Crossings (b03w39ww)
Letting Go

Set at Neidpath Castle on the banks of the River Tweed, Lily reflects on her English roots and her Scottish home. Gerda Stevenson reads her new story about conflict and liberty, the personal and the political.

Letting Go concludes Border Crossings, a pair of specially commissioned pieces by writers living on either side of the Border. Each explores the unique qualities of the debatable lands and the centuries of interlinked history between England and Scotland, the amity and the animosity.

Gerda Stevenson is an award-winning actor, writer and director. Radio 4 listeners will probably know her best as Steve, Paul's wife in The Paul Temple Mysteries. Her stage play Federer versus Murray was shortlisted for London Fringe Theatre Writing Award, 2010, and was runner-up for the Best Scottish Contribution to Drama on Edinburgh Fringe, 2011. In 2013, her poetry collection If This Were Real was published by Smokestack Books, and she won the YES Arts Festival Poetry Challenge.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard and Di Speirs.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jjp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04v2jjv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jjz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b04v2jk2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b04v2ltq)
The bells of St Michael's Church in Kingsteignton, Devon.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b04v2b35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b04v2jk8)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04v2lts)
Weltschmerz

Is there too much bad news? As a journalist, Mark Tully worries that his profession sometimes exacerbates a growing sense of world weariness.

At times, the sheer volume of awful stories in the news can be utterly overwhelming - that there's a temptation to despair completely, is hardly surprising. How should we overcome world weariness, improve our lot and maintain a zest for life?

In many faiths despair is a sin, and it is commonly seen as a social ill. Yet in the nineteenth century, the Romantic movement coined the word 'Weltschmerz', which was seen as a spur to achievement and the natural ally of idealism. So is weariness with the world something we can harness and use to improve life?

Mark talks to the journalist and writer on ethics and international development, Paul Vallely, and presents readings by the poet Paul Birtill and the Vietnamese Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh.

There is music from Mahalia Jackson, Tracy Chapman and John Corigliano.

The readers are David Holt and Francis Cadder

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b04v2ltv)
FarmAbility

FarmAbility is a project in Oxfordshire which gives adults with learning disabilities such as autism the chance to try their hand at agriculture. It offers them work experience and new training opportunities, on what is very much a working farm. Emma Campbell visits the farm and meets some of the "co-farmers", as they're called, as they learn to pack eggs, grow vegetables, and care for livestock. She finds out what they get out of the time they spend on the farm, and how they interact with the rest of the commercial farm business. She also hears from the man behind the idea, Mike Gooding, whose farm at Wytham near Oxford is home to the FarmAbility scheme.

Produced and presented by Emma Campbell.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b04v2jkh)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b04v2jkp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b04v2ltx)
French Nativity row, Ethical investment, Brighton Royal Pavilion 100 years ago

As part of the BBC's "A life less lonely" project Kati Whittaker went to meet Stafford Whiteaker, a hermit monk now in his 80s.

100 years ago this month, the Brighton Royal Pavilion became the hospital ward for hundreds of Indian soldiers wounded in the war. Rosie Dawson reports.

As Christmas approaches, John Laurenson tells Edward Stourton why secularists have been appealing to the courts to ban the life-size nativity scenes that many local authorities display at this time of year.

Kevin Bocquet looks at the complexities of ethical investments as the Church of England comes under increasing pressure to stop investing in fossil fuels.

A new parliamentary report highlights the extent of religious persecution in North Korea and calls on the UK government to do more to address the issue. Baroness Elizabeth Berridge talks to Edward.

William Crawley tells Edward Stourton why an iced cake with a message supporting same sex marriage has sparked a row in Northern Ireland has led to First Minister Peter Robinson giving his backing to a draft amendment to equality legislation which would permit businesses to refuse goods and services if they go against the supplier's religious beliefs.

A hundred years ago Britain re-established formal diplomatic relations with the Holy See. Francis Campbell, former Ambassador to the Holy See, explains why it is a key diplomatic posting.
Celibacy could have contributed to the instances of child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, says a report by the church's Truth, Justice and Healing Council in Australia. Phil Mercer reports.

Producers
David Cook
Carmel Lonergan

Editor
Amanda Hancox

Contributors
Stafford Whiteaker
Baroness Elizabeth Berridge
Francis Campbell.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b04v2ltz)
Hearing Link

Sian Williams presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Hearing Link, a UK charity for people with hearing loss and their family and friends. It helps people to find information and support, and to connect with others who have similar experiences.
Registered Charity No 264809
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Hearing Link '.
- Cheques should be made payable to Hearing Link.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b04v2jkw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b04v2jl0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b04v2lv1)
The Spirit of the Lord Is Upon Me

The third in our Advent series live from St Martin-in-the-Fields, London, exploring the nature of Jesus's ministry and the social and economic climate in which he preached. Led by the Revd Dr Sam Wells and the Bishop of Stepney, the Rt Revd Adrian Newman, and the choir of St Martin's directed by Andrew Earis. Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04tlr0g)
Kitsch

Philosopher Roger Scruton looks at kitsch in the second of his three talks on art.

Kitsch, he says, creates the fantasy of an emotion without the real cost of feeling it. He argues that in the twentieth century artists became preoccupied by what they perceived as the need to avoid kitsch and sentimentality.

But it's not so easy. Some try being outrageously avant-garde, which can lead to a different kind of fake: cliche. So a new genre emerged: pre-emptive kitsch. Artists embraced kitsch and produce it deliberately to present it as a sophisticated parody. But is it art?

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04symph)
Northern Jacana

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the northern jacana at home in Central American wetlands. A cross between a coot and a plover, northern Jacanas are found in swamps in Central America and Mexico. They're long legged birds with a black head and neck, and a chestnut body with yellow highlights. And, northern jacanas are polyandrous; the females have more than one partner. Males build platforms of floating vegetation and attract females by calling or posturing. If a female mates with a male, he may use his platform as a nest for her eggs. The female doesn't care for the eggs, but goes in search of up to three other mates. The result is that a single female may have several males raising different clutches of eggs for her and each clutch may contain the eggs of more than one male!


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b04v2lv3)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b04v2lv5)
Writer ..... Caroline Harrington
Director ..... Rosemary Watts
Editor ..... Sean O'Connor

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer ..... Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy ..... Heather Bell
Will Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Carol Tregorran ..... Eleanor Bron.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b04v2lv7)
Sarah Millican

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the comedian, Sarah Millican.

Her every woman yet no-holds-barred style of comedy has brought her sell-out tours and several of her own highly successful TV series. Revelling in normality and drawing on the difficult, intimate and often excruciating moments of being human, she dares to say what most of us are thinking, only she's much funnier.

A Geordie, born in South Shields, her dad was an engineer down the mines and her mum was a hairdresser. They encouraged their daughter in her storytelling and performing even though her childhood shyness meant she'd recite her poetry from behind the living room curtains. Later it was pain that first propelled her onto the stage when a broken early marriage provided the catalyst she needed to find the courage to confront the glaring judgement of the audience's gaze. Her rise was then rapid. Within four years she was awarded the Best Newcomer prize at the Edinburgh Fringe.

She says, "People come along and think, 'oh she's being too rude'. They don't realise I'm just like this at home. People think I'm prim and proper at home but I'm not - I'm just me transplanted onto the stage".

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b04v2jl7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b04tj37y)
Series 62

Episode 4

The antidote to panel games pays a return visit to the Victoria Hall in Stoke-on-Trent. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Omid Djalili with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell attempts piano accompaniment.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b04v2lv9)
Feeding Britain

Feeding Britain - The story of one shop in South Yorkshire which is changing the way we think about food waste and food poverty. A year ago the Community Shop opened in Goldthorpe. It takes food which would otherwise have gone to landfill and sells it at a heavily discounted price.

Now the model is expanding. This Monday, 15th December, a new community shop is opening in Lambeth, South London. The aim is for dozens of these stores to be across the country.

This week's Food Poverty Inquiry 'Feeding Britain' recommended more of these social supermarkets. But some people do not believe that the problem of food waste should solve the problem of food poverty.

Presented by Dan Saladino and produced in Bristol by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b04v2jl9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04v2lyh)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 The Lipinski (b04v2lyk)
The startling 300-year journey of a 'golden period' Stradivarius violin - through the lives of geniuses, dictators, refugees, ordinary people and the thieves who stole it violently in 2014.

An art crime story is the beginning of a journey around the world - and through varied lives and cultures - tracing the history of the Lipinski Stradivarius violin which left the hands of the master Antonio Stradivari in 1715.

In February 2014, Milwaukee Symphony leader Frank Almond was beaten and tasered after a sell-out performance - and the $6 million violin was snatched from his hands. National US media overload followed, as the instrument had become the blue-collar city's emblem of accessible high culture. The programme explores its impact not on the musical elite, but on the life of the city and its regular people.

And from the crime scene, we get into the rich international cast and stories.

Memories are shared by Evi Liivak, an Estonian violinist whose father was murdered by the Gestapo and who played in Second World War refugee camps before marrying one of the main translators at the Nuremberg War Crime Trials and coming to America.

Plus Peter Voight the Sussex luthier whose family have been making and repairing violins across Europe since the 17th century, the lawyer of Universal Allah, the Milwaukee barber imprisoned for the 2014 theft, and the local Police Chief who led the investigation.

Producer: Peter Curran

A Foghorn Company production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04tlr02)
Glasgow

CLARIFICATION: In this programme, the team mentions the red Brussels sprout variety Rubine which they say is "taking the supermarkets by storm" but, when cooked, tends to lose its colour. However, although Rubine does tend to lose its colour when cooked, the variety Redarling, which is also widely available, does retain its colour after cooking.

Eric Robson chairs the horticultural panel programme from Glasgow. Bob Flowerdew, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Wilson join him to answer audience questions.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:

Q. I want to prune back my six-foot (1.8 meters) Arbutus Menziesii (Madrone) to form a small multi-stem tree to show off its red bark. Could the panel advise when would be the best time to do this and how?

A. This is a beautiful tree with red bark and distinctive ericaceous bell shaped flowers. In the wild it naturally sheds its lower branches. It's sometimes known as a 'Strawberry Tree'. It does take pruning well when it's a young plant. Prune it over the course of a few years. Work your way up from the bottom.

Q. Many years ago I planted some seed that turned into a beautiful Thistle like plants with silvery leaves. I'd like to grow them again, could you tell me what I might have been growing?

A. It sounds like Eryngium Giganteum or an Onopordum.

Q. I'll be taking some cuttings from a Holly bush for Christmas, can I propagate from these?

A. No, you need to take cuttings in the spring; seeds from the berries are a better bet. Put the berries in a bucket, give it a good slosh about and the seeds will sink while the pulp rises to the top. Take the seeds and sow them in trays with vermiculite over the top and put them outside.

Q. What would the panel suggest I start growing in my greenhouse over the winter?

A. Put Garlic sets in pots and grow winter salad plants such as Pac Choi, Mustards, Spring Onions, Radishes and leaf salads such as Claytonia that you can sow thickly and cut them when they are a couple of inches (five centimetres) tall. You could also use the greenhouse to over winter tender plants such as Pelargoniums or tomatoes.

Q. We are always being offered car tyres to grow edibles in, should we be worried about the chemicals leaching into the plants?

A. Bob says that he's been doing it for years and he's fine but you should cut out the middle of the tyre (so that it makes a cylinder shape) and line with polythene to prevent any possible leaching. Alternatively try growing in builder's bags.

Q. All our allotment neighbours grow amazing Brassicas but all of ours develop club root and die. Any suggestions?

A. Liming could rid the soil of Club root. Try planting them out in clean compost in containers or raised beds and lime well. Try disease resistant varieties such as the 'Kilaton' Cabbage.

Q. My Clematis Montana has run riot up a slender tree and I'm afraid it might cause some damage. Should I trim the ends, or try something more drastic?

A. You could cut it off at the ground. These are so resilient they will recover.

Q. On our allotments, there is great debate about whether to winter dig or spring dig. What do the panel reckon?

A. The panel say don't dig unless it's clay that has been trampled. If you want to put organic matter into the soil, lay it on the top and let the worms bring it down. Digging can harm the worms and micro-organisms in the soil.

Q. Can the panel recommend some colourful, low maintenance plants to be planted in railway stations?

A. Bob recommends a bed full of Mints, a bed full of Thymes, Rosemary, Lavender and Sages. Label them all and invite people to touch and smell the herbs. Bunny recommends putting edibles in there like the Ida Red Apples or fruit vines. Matt suggests Lambs Ear, Pennisetum 'Tall Tales' or Hair Grass for tactile planting. He also recommends lots of blubs as they're cheap and don't require looking after. Narcissus, Tulips and Alliums would all work.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04v2s0x)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with a moving, one-sided conversation between a mother and her stillborn son. Then a couple consider the finiteness of life, while friends debate disability from polio or sport, all in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Once and Future King (b04v2s0z)
The Candle in the Wind

Brian Sibley's dramatisation of T. H. White's classic retelling of the King Arthur story continues. Mordred uses Arthur's new laws against him and long-held secrets are forced out into the open.

Other parts are played by members of the cast.

Original music by Elizabeth Purnell
Directors: Gemma Jenkins, Marc Beeby and David Hunter.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b04v2s11)
William Fiennes on the Folio Prize; BJ Novak; Ben Elton on PG Wodehouse

Literary news hot of the press from the Folio Prize who have just announced the 80 books nominated. Chairman of the judges William Fiennes joins Mariella to say why he thinks this prize has a unique perspective.

The actor and comedian BJ Novak has written his first children's book. The Book With No Pictures is, as its title suggests, text-only. Despite this it must be doing something right because it's topped the New York Times bestseller list. BJ Novak talks to Mariella about why he chose to omit the illustrations - even on the cover.

Peter Walker from New Zealand and Australian writer Evie Wyld have each written about the legacy of the Vietnam war in their fiction. They talk to Mariella about the impact of that war on Antipodean fiction, a war some feel has been partly written out of their countries' history.

Ben Elton, novelist, stand-up, writer of musicals, co-creator of Blackadder, shares the Book He'd Never Lend, a comic masterpiece which he loves for its refreshing lack of cynicism.


SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b04v2s13)
Series 4

Michael Donaghy

Paul Farley remembers the poet Michael Donaghy with other poets ten years after his death. Greta Stoddart, Sean O'Brien and Don Paterson read his poems and read poems of their own that speak to their memory of the poet and teacher. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 23 Amazing Reasons This Radio Programme Will Change Your Life (b04tjfvy)
A new wave of digital upstarts is transforming the business of journalism in weird and unusual ways. Maybe you've seen headlines like '19 Things You Didn't Know Cats Could Do' and 'Which Fictional Company Should You Actually Work At?' on top of highly sharable stories, often in the form of lists, designed to be shared on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks.
Of all the news start-ups in recent years BuzzFeed has arguably received the most, well, buzz - but it's a crowded field with competitors including Vice, Mashable, Taboola and others.
As these outlets mature, grabby 'listacles' such as '32 Pictures You Need To See Before The World Ends' are increasingly being joined by hard news from the world's war zones and in-depth investigations and political features.
The trend towards sharing isn't just the domain of a few high-tech start-ups - as newspapers and the BBC get to grips with the digital era, they're increasingly looking at ways to get their stories to people through social media.
Mukul Devichand, presenter of BBC Trending, has been talking to some of the top names in the new news business, to find out what makes a story spread online, whether pictures of cats will always triumph over hard news, and what this all means for the future of journalism - established players and upstarts alike.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b04v2b35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jlc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b04v2jlf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04v2jlh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b04v2s5b)
From 14 century Italy to the modern day classrooms of Kabul; from the cotton mills of Manchester to the olive groves of the occupied territories - we certainly get around a bit this week.
There's the uplifting voice of Sam Cooke, and a different kind of soul music Puccini's La Boheme.
Arthur Smith tells us about his hero Emile Zatopek. And actor Richard Wilson on sharing the limelight - with a dog
Join Adrian Goldberg for Pick of the Week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b04v2s5d)
At the Ambridge Christmas Fair, Carol treats herself to new earrings from Fallon's stall. She also picks up a scented candle for Pat, who has been struggling to sleep. Tony's recovery is slow going, she tells PC Burns.

Harrison congratulates a slightly awkward Fallon on the success of her stall, before putting his foot in it by joking about the heavy Christmas puddings. In mock outrage, Fallon claims that Jolene made them. She later regrets making him feel so guilty that he bought one.

At the History of the Turkey pageant, Carol treats Eddie's punters to an extract from A Christmas Carol. Harrison will be spending Christmas helping at the homeless shelter. Carol will be in a hotel with a friend, so the free turkey Eddie gave her has gone to the Brookfield Archers - to Eddie's thinly veiled chagrin.

Ruth is frustrated to have lost another beef client, so distracts herself at the Christmas fair. It's great to be able to find things on her doorstep rather than go into town, she tells a delighted Fallon. David also gets an ear-bashing for 'selling out'. David cheers up a bit when Pip offers to cook for David and Ruth's anniversary. Reflecting on the news that Pip has had notice from her landlord, David admits that seeing her has really perked Jill up. When they're all back together everything's so much better.


SUN 19:15 The Rest is History (b04v2ssq)
Series 1

Episode 1

Frank Skinner loves history, but just doesn't know much of it.

This comedy discussion show with celebrity guests promises to help him find out more about it.

With Dave Gorman, Sara Pascoe and historian in residence Dr Kate Williams

Frank and company navigate their way through the annals of time, picking out and chewing over the funniest, oddest, and most interesting moments in history.

Producers: Dan Schreiber and Justin Pollard

An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in December 2014.


SUN 19:45 Shorts (b04v2sss)
Writing West

Underworld

SHORTS: New writing. New writers.

The third and final of our Midlands Odysseys series: short stories written by writers new to radio in response to The Odyssey - transplanting episodes from Homer's epic to contemporary West Midlands settings.

Buzz returns home to Birmingham, haunted by images of his time volunteering in a Laos hospital and by older, deeper loss.

By Richard House.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b04tlys1)
Roger Bolton talks to investigative journalist Tom Mangold about The Silent Conspiracy, a programme he first began working on 35 years ago. The programme concerned Jeremy Thorpe, the charismatic leader of the Liberal Party between 1967 and 1976. Thorpe's political career was overshadowed by scandal when he was accused of conspiring to murder Norman Scott - a man who claimed to have been his lover at a time when homosexuality was illegal. He was acquitted of conspiracy to murder but soon withdrew from public life.

The day after he died last week, Radio 4 broadcast The Silent Conspiracy, in which veteran BBC journalist Tom Mangold uncovered an alleged establishment conspiracy to protect Jeremy Thorpe's career and reputation. Many listeners questioned the tone and timing of the programme. Roger talks to Tom about the making of the programme and why he felt it was in the public interest.

Michael Buerk has survived life in the Australian outback and returned as chair of Radio 4's Moral Maze. To welcome him back, his programme team chose reality TV as the subject for the last episode in the series. Not letting him escape the spotlight, Buerk was declared a star witness. But after frequent updates of his jungle antics on the PM programme - was this an in-joke too far?

What does it take to find "extraordinary stories and remarkable guests"? Roger goes behind-the-scenes at Saturday Live to discover how they blend celebrity interviews and inheritance tracks with tales straight from listeners' mouths.

And more musical archives are restored following last week's revival of Radio 4's Singing Together.

Produced by Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04tlyrz)
Queen Fabiola, Stella Young, Bernard Stonehouse, Kent Haruf, Ralph Baer

Matthew Bannister on

The Australian disability campaigner and comedian Stella Young. She spoke out against what she called "inspiration porn."

Queen Fabiola of Belgium - the Spanish aristocrat who was picked out as a suitable bride for the King by an Irish nun.

Bernard Stonehouse, the polar scientist who spent three consecutive winters in the Antarctic and studied king penguins on South Georgia.

Kent Haruf whose novels of American life are all set in the fictional town of Holt, Colorado.

And Ralph Baer, the electronic engineer who pioneered computer games played through a console plugged into TVs.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b04v29h3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b04v2ltz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b04tlk9z)
Cabin Fever

Cabin Fever
Finding your comfort zone can be difficult at 35,000 feet. As cash strapped carriers try to put more passengers on each plane, flyers are feeling the squeeze. But there are innovations and advancements being made in aircraft design and London is leading the way with a cluster of firms in this specialist market. Peter Day asks about the width and breadth of these changes and when they will start to make some difference to air travellers everywhere.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04v2jlk)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04v2ssv)
Dan Hodges of The Telegraph analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b04tljkl)
Best Films of the Year, Danny Elfman on Tim Burton, ET, Nick Hornby, The Curse of the British Museum

With Francine Stock

Composer Danny Elfman talks about his long collaboration with director Tim Burton that's included Batman and Alice In Wonderland.

Nick Hornby recites all of the lyrics to the ABC's Minors Song, the theme tune to a kids club that showed cartoons and the work of the Children's Film Foundation.

Sound designer Ben Burtt reveals just how many elements went into the making of E.T.'s voice, including a few animals, a professor, and his wife snoring in bed.

Three Film Programme experts buy each other the perfect Christmas present - a DVD of what they consider the best film of the year: Under The Skin, The Grand Budapest Hotel and 20,000 Days On Earth

The Night At The Museum trilogy, about an Egyptian curse that brings relics to life, concludes in the British museum. It's an appropriate location, because the British Museum is itself the subject of an ancient Egyptian curse, as Professor Roger Luckhurst explains.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04v2lts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 15 DECEMBER 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04v2jmq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b04tlfsk)
After Redundancy - Global Payday Lending

Global payday loans: Laurie Taylor talks to Carl Packman, a researcher and writer, who has analysed the growth of a worldwide industry. Today there are more payday lender shops in the US than McDonald's restaurants. They cater mainly to those without access to mainstream credit and with no other option. But how did they evolve and proliferate? And what is their impact on the most financially vulnerable consumers? He's joined by Johnna Montogomery, an economist from Goldsmiths, London.

Also, redundancy at a Welsh aluminium plant. Tony Dobbins, Reader in Employment Studies at Bangor Business School, asks why re-training has failed to provide jobless workers with a fresh future.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b04v2ltq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jms)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04v2jmv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jmx)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04v2jmz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04v2ynj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Judy Merry.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04v2ynl)
Fish Quotas, Freshwater Pearl Mussels, Sheep

Fisheries ministers from all over the EU are meeting in Brussels today to negotiate an agreement on quotas. Quotas are set to achieve what it calls Maximum Sustainable Yield, the number of fish scientists say can be aught in order to preserve future stocks. Farming Today speaks to Paul Trebilcock from the Cornish Fish Producers Organisation as they prepare for cuts to their quotas next year.

The population of freshwater pearl mussels has halved in just over a decade on the River Spey in Scotland. This decline has been put down to a number of issues, including water quality and wildlife crime. Scottish Natural Heritage is working alongside other organisation to tackle the problem.

A scheme in the South West helping would-be sheep farmers get a foot on the ladder is proving so successful, it can't keep up with demand. A farmer from Devon started the project last year by giving two young farmers a hundred sheep each and Anna Varle has been to meet him.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and Produced by Lucy Bickerton.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04v2jn1)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04syygh)
Hawaiian Goose (Nene)

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the Nene, or the endemic and rare Hawaiian goose. Visit a Wildfowl and Wetland Trust centre in the UK and it is likely you'll be mobbed by the nasal calls of one of the world's rarest birds, the Hawaiian Goose or "Ne-Ne". In the late 18th century there were around 25,000 of these neat attractive geese, with ochre cheeks and black-heads, on the Hawaiian Islands. But by the early 1950s, due to development and introduced predators, a mere 30 or so remained. A few of these remaining Nene's were taken to Slimbridge, home of Peter Scott's Wildfowl Trust as part of a captive breeding programme. They bred successfully and now many generations of geese produced there have been returned to their native islands. Their future is still precarious in the wild, but as the state bird of Hawaii the Nene's outlook is more secure today than for the last seventy years.


MON 06:00 Today (b04v2ynn)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b04v2ynq)
Reinventing Inventions

Tom Sutcliffe discusses invention and reinvention in science. He is joined in the studio by Danielle George of the University of Manchester, where she is Professor in the Microwave and Communications Systems research group; by John Barrow, Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Cambridge; by Professor Armand Marie Leroi of Imperial College London; and by Misbah Arif from UCL Institute of Education. Prof George is giving this year's Christmas Lectures at the Royal Institution, Prof Barrow's been looking at the link between maths and creativity; Prof Leroi has been reassessing Aristotle's role as inventor of science; and Misbah Arif's been inspiring children in the science classroom.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


MON 09:45 The Kingdom to Come (b04v2yns)
Robin Butler

In the first of a series of one-to-one conversations with senior figures in public life, Peter Hennessy, the historian, asks Robin Butler (Lord Butler of Brockwell), the former Cabinet Secretary, how the United Kingdom's constitution will change as a result of further devolution.

The hurried promises of further devolution made by political leaders during and immediately after the Scottish Referendum will fundamentally change how the United Kingdom is governed, with little opportunity for people to consider what this radical reform might mean or to discuss the constitutional implications.

This series explores the possible impact of further devolution on the United Kingdom's constitution. In each programme, Peter Hennessy invites his guests to draw on their different expertise in government, politics, the law and public ethics in considering questions of accountability, coherence and practicality. For example, would further devolution improve trust in politics? Is devolution practical unless it is accompanied by tax-raising powers? Is there a risk that varying degrees of devolution across the country could create an incoherent system? Would all citizens of the United Kingdom continue to enjoy equal rights? Would a federal constitution be viable? Are we heading towards the end of the United Kingdom?

Peter Hennessy's other guests in the series are William Hague MP, First Secretary of State and Leader of the House of Commons; Alistair Darling MP, former Chancellor of the Exchequer; Onora O'Neill (Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve), philosopher, chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission and former BBC Reith lecturer; and David Hope (Lord Hope of Craighead), former Deputy President of the United Kingdom's Supreme Court.

Producer: Rob Shepherd.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04v2ynv)
Transgender Children, Anna Krien, Sharia Wills

Anna Krien on her award-winning book Night Games, which explores the darker side of sporting culture. Families with transgender children. Why The Law Society has withdrawn guidelines on compiling Sharia-compliant wills. Just over a fifth of MPs are women - will it go up in 2015?


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v2ynx)
Just a Girl: Series 1

Episode 1

How would you cope if your child was born into the wrong body? Powerful new drama by Mark Davies Markham.

Amy and her parents meet the doctor who will help them work out if hormone blockers are the right choice.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy who was born as Ben. Adamant that she is a girl from an early age, Amy is growing up fast and nervous about starting senior school, with a boy's body. Her parents, Gary and Charlotte, have to help decide whether she should take significant steps to delay puberty until she can be fully assessed for transgender treatment. The right thing to do is not clear, and their different views on what is best for their child present some very difficult choices. Granddad Ted loves them all but struggles to grasp how serious the situation is. At the same time, everyday family life goes on, and re-decorating Amy's bedroom brings her and her Granddad closer. This honest, compassionate new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families, and the Tavistock Clinic.

Studio Pianist ..... Alfie Davies
Director ..... Polly Thomas
Writer ..... Mark Davies Markham.


MON 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b04v2ynz)
Series 18

Sails and Oars Only - Oyster Fishing on the Fal

In 1602 Sir Richard Carew saw fishermen catching oysters with 'a thick strong net fastened to three spills of iron, and drawn to the boat's stern, gathering whatsoever it meeteth lying in the bottom of the water, out of which... they cull the oyster'. When Les Angel and Timmy Heard show Alan Dein how they catch oysters in the Fal today he finds that, in four centuries, nothing's changed.

The last wild native oyster beds lie in this beautiful Cornish estuary. In 1876, in an early example of conservation legislation, Truro Corporation passed byelaws forbidding the mechanised harvesting of oysters. The Fal oystermen use gaff-rigged cutters, some over a century old, the last in Europe to fish commercially under sail. Upstream they dredge with punts; not what see boys in blazers and girls in muslin poling along the Cam in, but hefty rowing boats.

Twenty years ago mussel farming was introduced. Ropes are suspended from rafts, obliging molluscs attach themselves and grow, and grow.

The methods are simple, the times, complicated. Carol Thorogood and David Robertson of Cornwall Port Health Authority take Alan up the Fal, explaining how they have to test shellfish. This summer some readings showed E coli present in concentrations above the limit; sections of the fishery were closed for a time, threatening fishermen's livelihoods.

Out on the water Alan Dein meets Les Angel and Timmy Heard. The oysters have grown well; they're optimistic. But mussel-farmer Gary Rawle has abandoned the Fal, moving his rafts out to sea.

The Fal has always flowed through farmland and towns. Is the water quality deteriorating, or being tested more rigorously? Alan ponders the future of the oystermen's precarious, wonderful way of life.

Producer: Julian May.


MON 11:30 Start/Stop (b04v2z6p)
Series 2

Date Night

Hit comedy about three marriages in various states of disrepair.

This week the three couples end up on a 'date night' together and Evan is a surprise convert to French cinema. Meanwhile Barney tries to get his smartphone to answer some of life's big questions.

Barney ..... Jack Docherty
Cathy ..... Kerry Godliman
Fiona ..... Fiona Allen
Evan ..... John Thomson
David ..... Charlie Higson
Alice ..... Sally Bretton
Voice of Barney's smartphone...Jon Briggs
Producer ..... Claire Jones

Producer ..... Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b04v2jn3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b04v2z6r)
15 December 1914 - Hilary Pearce

A surprise visitor at Folkestone Town Hall shakes Hilary Pearce's easy confidence.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b04v30zl)
Selling Care Homes; Nuisance Calls; Free-from Foods

A government task force set up to deal with the problem of nuisance calls says company bosses should be held accountable for the 'distress' caused. But will that tackle the unregistered companies who make many of the estimated one billion nuisance calls and texts made every year? You and Yours investigates.

Some local authorities, charities and small businesses are selling care homes as budgets are squeezed. In Doncaster the longest running strike in social care ended only a few weeks ago. Workers had been protesting about wage cuts imposed in homes owned by a private equity group. Now the council is considering putting the running of seven homes that it owns out to tender. How are the families involved feeling?

And more than half of those who buy 'free-from' food do not suffer from allergies or intolerances to gluten, dairy or nuts. What are the 'lifestyle reasons' for buying such products and is free-from really as healthy as all that?


MON 12:57 Weather (b04v2jn5)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b04v30zn)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v30zq)
Series 3

Psyche

Bettany Hughes examines her psyche in her archaeology of philosophy.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double espresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award--winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programme Bettany investigates her psyche and those of philosopher Angie Hobbs, Byzantinist
Dr Dionysios Stathakopoulos, writer and broadcaster Lisa Appignanesi and neuroscientist Patrick Haggard. Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Other ideas examined in series include idea, desire, agony, fame, justice, wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace, hospitality, charisma, irony, nemesis and virtue.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b04v2s5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b04v30zs)
Atlas

By Bethan Roberts.

Charlie's got a secret. He longs to look like Elizabeth Taylor in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Sometimes he dresses up like her, pretends to be her. But that's until his Dad catches him in the act. Determined to get more manly, and inspired by the perfect specimen Charles Atlas, Charlie begins bodybuilding and undergoes a glorious transformation.

A unique, feel-good story about acceptance and pumping iron.

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b04v30zv)
Series 28

The Final 2014

(13/13)

Many of us are familiar with the song 'Istanbul, not Constantinople' - but who recorded the original version? And which European city (definitely not Istanbul) is the home of the Gulbenkian orchestra?

The 2014 season of the wide-ranging music quiz comes to its climax, with Paul Gambaccini hosting the Final from BBC Maida Vale.

The three Finalists are from Derbyshire, London and Cheshire. Only one of them can take the 2014 Counterpoint champion's trophy, but with formidable performances in their respective heats and semi-finals it would be a bold prediction as to which of the three will triumph.

As well as answering general knowledge questions on music, the Finalists will also have to choose a special musical subject on which to answer individual questions, with no prior hint of what the available topics are going to be.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b04v2lv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Beckett in Brooklyn (b04v30zx)
A disembodied mouth hovers 8 feet above the stage and appears to oscillate wildly around the pitch-black auditorium.

Blindfolded, her head strapped into a harness, Irish actor Lisa Dwan delivers the frenetic, roller-coaster stream of consciousness that is Samuel Beckett's 'Not I'. Alongside 'Footfalls' and 'Rockaby', the play forms one part of a trilogy of intensely demanding one-woman Beckett works which Lisa has been performing to packed houses across the UK & Ireland.

Now, as Lisa takes her Beckett trilogy across the Atlantic to the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Harvey Theatre, we find her immersed in a whirlwind of rave reviews, TV appearances and a US theatre-going public heavily preoccupied with Ebola, Isis and the uncertainty of our times.

As the curtain prepares to fall for the last time, we discover the true extent of Lisa's commitment to these dark and challenging roles, what the impact of performing them has been on her and if, 25 years after the Irish playwright's death, she may have shown us that Samuel Beckett's work matters more than ever.

Producer: Conor Garrett

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b04v30zz)
Race Relations in the USA

In recent months some major American cities have experienced racial tension which has erupted into violence. In August Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. Sections of the community reacted with violence, looting and protest and when, at the end of November, a Grand Jury decided not to indict the policeman there was further violence. Then in New York another Grand Jury decided against indicting a policeman who was caught on video in Staten Island putting a choke hold on a black man. Eric Garner was heard screaming "I can't breathe" and he subsequently died. The cases have raised questions about how much progress has been made in America towards creating a truly equal society. Joining Ernie Rea to discuss church and race relations in the United States of America is the Rev Cheryl Sanders, Professor of Christian Ethics at the Howard University School of Divinity and Pastor at the Third Street Church of God in Washington DC; Bishop Larry Jones, Founder and Pastor of Greater Grace Church in St Louis Missouri; and Alexander Smith, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Warwick University and at Kansas University.

Producer: Beatrice Pickup


MON 17:00 PM (b04v3101)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04v2jn7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b04v3103)
Series 62

Episode 5

The godfather of all panel shows pays a visit to The Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury. John Finnemore and Graeme Garden are joined on the panel by Susan Calman and Tony Hawks, with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell accompanies on the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b04v3287)
Lynda's desperate for someone to play Ruth in her Blithe Spirit production. Alice persuades Lilian but Lynda questions Lilian's discipline. Alice insists it's their last resort.

Lynda has drafted a letter for the SAVE campaign. Jim and Carol have a chance to quiz Justin Elliott at the party tomorrow.

David and Ruth enjoy their anniversary meal. It's madness that any customers could be put off their beef. Shula has been trying to decide which donkey to give Alan for the nativity. They realize they won't be around to see it next year. Pip looks ahead to living up north, and is looking to the future. Farming will be very different and whatever they do has to be right. Pip's clearly excited about the move, but wonders how Jill is feeling.

Josh bursts in, rather merry. He has passed his driving test.

Josh looks forward to seeing Dan when he's home from Sandhurst, as well as the New Year's Eve Young Farmers' bash. Pip's evasive about Spencer. She doesn't know what's happening as he'll be with his parents over Christmas. Josh would love a car as a present.

David ponders whether to attend Justin's shoot on Wednesday. He and Ruth agree they seem damned if they do and damned if they don't. At least it's a comfort to know that what they're doing is for the whole family's future.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b04v3289)
Willy Russell switches on the Front Row neon artwork, Kon-Tiki review, Dementia-friendly theatre

Forty years after his breakthrough play - John, Paul, George, Ringo...and Bert, the celebrated playwright, musician, and novelist Willy Russell reveals the word he has chosen for the new Front Row neon artwork. He joins Kirsty Lang on the roof of the BBC's Salford home to turn it on.

A review of Kon-Tiki, a new film about Thor Heyerdahl's famous journey across the Pacific ocean.

Tomorrow the West Yorkshire Playhouse will be the setting for the UK's first ever 'dementia friendly' theatre performance - a specially adapted theatre performance of a new production of Irving Berlin's Broadway musical White Christmas. Front Row visited the Playhouse to find out more about this performance from those involved with developing it.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v2ynx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Invisible Age (b04v328c)
The Age Bomb

Old age is an increasingly long stage of life. There are nearly 1.5 million people in the UK aged 85 and over. By 2050 there will be 5 million in the UK alone.

Matthew Sweet tries to understand why society is still so reluctant to talk about ageing when - for many - the experience is a good one. He asks whether historical anxieties about population growth still overshadow contemporary discussions about the so called 'fourth-age' and if ageism will soon be regarded in the same way as discrimination on the basis of race or colour.

Matthew's many friendships with people in their 80s and 90s have hugely enriched his social life and, in this programme, he considers why such cross-generational relationships are so rare. He also asks what those over the age of 85 think about his generation's denial of the ageing process.

We explore the new territory that the 'oldest-old' inhabit - to ask about the perspective that age brings, to reflect on experiences and memories of a long life, and to discover what the 'oldest-old' would like to report back to those who are following behind.

Produced by Catherine Carr
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b04tljk6)
Washington Redskins

Fans of the Washington Redskins, one of the most popular American football teams in the country, are fiercely proud of their dark crimson Indian head logo. They say it is a sign of respect and that the name 'Redskins' goes back 80 years. But to many Native Americans, the indigenous people who lived in the United States before the arrival of European settlers, the word Redskins is hateful. For them it's a painful reminder of how their people have been oppressed and neglected even to this very day.

Mike Wendling travels from North Dakota, to Minneapolis to Washington DC to explore the controversy which, thanks to social media and a growing number of Native American campaigners, has now become a burning national issue.

On the Turtle Mountain reservation, Mike meets Jordan Brien, a young hip-hop artist with a troubled past who is determined to get the name of the team changed. He says his people shouldn't be reduced to mascots, and he urges young Native Americans to take a stand against racism. His cause has got the support of some in the US Congress and even President Obama has said that if the name is offensive to a sizeable group of people, the owners should "think about changing it". But for diehard fans like Chap Petersen, who has been going to Redskins games for four decades, such a change is unthinkable. And the club's owner Daniel Snyder has vowed never to discard the name whatever the press, pollsters and politicians say.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04tjdlq)
Orangutans and Drones

Orang-utans live in the peat rainforests of Malaysia and Indonesia. It can be tough terrain to travel through on foot so studying and surveying wild orang-utans is difficult and dangerous. Can drones help to answer questions about the number and distribution of the 'people of the forest' and monitor illegal logging of this endangered ape's habitat? This week Shared Planet explores the potential of drones to help us share the planet with orang-utans - but also explores the possible pitfalls of using this controversial technology.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b04v2ynq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b04v2jn9)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b04v328f)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective with Ritula Shah

The Sydney cafe siege ends; Turkey media arrests; German protests about immigration; and a discussion on the pros and cons of boarding schools.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04v328h)
Mary Costello - Academy Street

Episode 6

Mary Costello's acclaimed debut – shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award - traces the arc of a quiet woman's life: from Tess Lohan's childhood in 1940s rural Ireland through to her emigration to America and a career as a nurse in New York.

Flooded with feelings of confusion and shame, Tess is left reeling in the aftermath of her brief affair with David.

Read by Niamh Cusack

Written by Mary Costello

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b04v328k)
Series 4

Sinead O'Connor (the A-Side)

John Wilson continues with the latest series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 10: A-side 'Theology' by Sinéad O'Connor

Sinéad O'Connor became a household name after her 1990 hit 'Nothing Compares 2U', penned by Prince. Since then she has released 9 solo albums including this year's 'I'm Not Bossy, I'm the Boss'. No stranger to controversy and with an ambivalent relationship towards the Roman Catholicism of her upbringing, Sinéad is an artist who has always followed her own vision. She found notoriety when she tore up a picture of the Pope live on American television and later or was ordained as a priest.

Her interest in all faiths finds expression in her eighth record Theology, her most personal body of work to date and the one album she says she wants to take with her to the grave.

Sinéad had been studying Judaic Theology in Dublin before she wrote the album, drawing mainly on psalms and scriptures of the prophets for inspiration. It also includes a tense, intimate version of "I Don't Know How To Love Him" from Jesus Christ Superstar. As one critic wrote, Sinéad "re-invigorates the ancient genre of the hymn in her own inimitable way".

In the A-side of Mastertapes Sinéad talks about 'Theology' and her inspiration for writing it and also plays key tracks from the 2007 album in an exclusive acoustic set.

Producer Neil McCarthy.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04v328m)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 16 DECEMBER 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b04v2jp7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 The Kingdom to Come (b04v2yns)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jp9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04v2jpc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jpf)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b04v2jph)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04v380h)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Judy Merry.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b04v380n)
Fishing quotas, diversity, meat waste, wildcats

According to an investigation carried out by the conservation group Greenpeace, almost half England's fishing quota is caught by foreign owned vessels. They say that one Dutch-owned vessel holds up to 23% of the English quota. Its campaigning for small-scale fishermen to get a fairer deal. Sarah North is Head of Oceans campaign at Greenpeace, she says they are lobbying both DEFRA and European ministers in Brussels negotiating every Member State's quota for next year. The National Farmers Union wants more transparency from meat processors and abattoirs over the price they pay them for carcasses. Currently, an extra price is deducted after the animal is slaughtered, and this is at the mercy of world commodity prices, the NFU says this should be factored before animals are sent to slaughter. The endangered Scottish Wild Cat is receiving a financial boost of nearly £1million from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Jenny Bryce from Scottish Natural Heritage explained to Anna Hill how a group of more than 30 organisations including landowners and wildlife groups, are intending to help the wildcat. For many farmers what they branch out into has become more niche in order for the business to be a success. Charlotte Smith talked to Stuart Beare from Tulleys Farm in West Sussex which has gone from a 'pick your own' business, to farm shop, to haloween adventure. Presenter Anna Hill. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04syywl)
Blue Manakin

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the advancing, leaping and queuing male blue manakin of Brazil. Male blue manakins are small, blue and black birds with scarlet caps. They live in the forests of south-east Brazil and neighbouring areas of Argentina and Paraguay. Whilst their plumage is eye-catching, their mating display is one of the strangest of any bird. A dominant male Blue Manakin enlists the support of one or more subordinate males. Calling loudly, all the males sidle along a branch towards the female, taking turns to leap into the air and then fly back down and take their place at the back of the queue. This sequence of advancing, leaping and queuing occurs at a frenetic pace, until, without warning, the dominant male calls time on this avian dance-off, with a piercing screech.


TUE 06:00 Today (b04v380w)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b04v380z)
Dr Atul Gawande: The Future of Medicine

The Idea of Wellbeing

The surgeon and writer Atul Gawande calls for a new focus on medical systems to ensure doctors work more effectively, alongside far greater transparency about their performance.

Speaking to an audience at the India International Centre in Delhi, he describes the story of medicine over the last century through the prism of his own family. From a grandmother who died in rural India from malaria - a preventable disease - to the high-tech medicine of today. He argues that despite its scientific advances, medicine has failed to exploit its knowledge successfully. In both the developed and developing world doctors do not carry out basic procedures effectively and often do not act in the best interests of their patients. He calls for wide-ranging research into the systems by which medical care is delivered, alongside far greater transparency about performance.

The Reith Lectures are introduced and chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.


TUE 09:45 The Kingdom to Come (b04v3813)
David Hope

Peter Hennessy, the historian, continues his series of conversations on the future of the United Kingdom's constitution. His guest today is David Hope (Lord Hope of Craighead), former Scottish judge and former Deputy President of the United Kingdom's Supreme Court.
The hurried promises of further devolution made by political leaders during and immediately after the Scottish Referendum will fundamentally change how the United Kingdom is governed, with little opportunity for people to consider what this radical reform might mean or to discuss the constitutional implications.
This series explores the possible impact of further devolution on the United Kingdom's constitution. In each programme, Peter Hennessy invites his guests to draw on their different expertise in government, politics, the law and public ethics in considering questions of accountability, coherence and practicality. For example, would further devolution improve trust in politics? Is devolution practical unless it is accompanied by tax-raising powers? Is there a risk that varying degrees of devolution across the country could create an incoherent system? Would all citizens of the United Kingdom continue to enjoy equal rights? Would a federal constitution be viable? Are we heading towards the end of the United Kingdom?
Peter Hennessy's other guests during the series are William Hague MP, First Secretary of State and Leader of the House of Commons; Alistair Darling MP, former Chancellor of the Exchequer; Onora O'Neill (Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve), philosopher, chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission and former BBC Reith lecturer; and Robin Butler (Lord Butler of Brockwell), former Cabinet Secretary.
Producer: Rob Shepherd.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04v3817)
Bette Midler; Women offenders; Losing contact with grandchildren

The Divine Miss Bette Midler talks to Jane Garvey. Should there be a Justice Board for Women? What are the political parties doing to get more women MPs elected? Losing touch with grandchildren.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v381f)
Just a Girl: Series 1

Episode 2

Gary and Charlotte struggle with very different approaches to hormone blockers, whilst Amy embarks on some dramatic interior decoration.

How would you cope if your child was born into the wrong body? Powerful new drama by Mark Davies Markham.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy who was born as Ben. Adamant that she is a girl from an early age, Amy is growing up fast and nervous about starting senior school, with a boy's body. Her parents, Gary and Charlotte, have to help decide whether she should take significant steps to delay puberty until she can be fully assessed for transgender treatment. The right thing to do is not clear, and their different views on what is best for their child present some very difficult choices. Granddad Ted loves them all but struggles to grasp how serious the situation is. At the same time, everyday family life goes on, and re-decorating Amy's bedroom brings her and her Granddad closer. This honest, compassionate new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families, and the Tavistock Clinic.

Studio Pianist ..... Alfie Davies
Director ..... Polly Thomas
Writer ..... Mark Davies Markham.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b04v381l)
Sharing Our Lives with Wolves

Few creatures have infiltrated our psyche as much as wolves. They haunt our imagination and appear in our stories, myths and legends. They are at once the embodiment of the devil and of the wild, enough dog that we relate to them, but also rugged, unpredictable and wild. They roam vast, untamed landscapes and then appear in our midst, hunting sheep and spreading fear. Our relationship has been so conflicting that they were almost eradicated from the earth by the end of the 19th Century. But since being protected they are slowly coming back in both Europe and America. Are we now able to live with them? Do we want to? Monty Don explores the enigma that is the wolf and looks at how our attitudes have shaped their destiny.


TUE 11:30 Death of An Orchestra (b04v381r)
Alan Bennett recalls his regular boyhood visits to hear the Yorkshire Symphony Orchestra. With other keen supporters and former members, he tells the Orchestra's history from 1947 to its demise in 1955.

Amid the austerity of the post-war years, the YSO was founded in a spirit of great optimism to provide first class orchestral music for the citizens of Yorkshire. It was based in Leeds Town Hall, and funded entirely out of the Rates. The inaugural concert book expressed the hope that it would "find a permanent place in the musical life of Yorkshire and rank with the finest orchestras of this country".
The founder conductor was Maurice Miles, who appears in the only recording of the YSO to survive in the BBC Archive.

There were guest appearances by Sir Malcolm Sargent, Sir Thomas Beecham and Sir Adrian Boult, and visits from glittering soloists such as Joan Hammond and Tito Gobbi.

As a Leeds schoolboy, Alan Bennett found these figures from the outside world "tinged with great glamour". Violinist Rodney Friend, another supporter, was a winner of the YSO's competition for young soloists before becoming leader of the LPO, the New York Philharmonic and the BBC SO.

Eight former members of the orchestra, now scattered around the country, describe life in the YSO: cold rickety buses, romance, and the thrill of the great conductor Nikolai Malko arriving for the final season. They recall their shock on discovering that the Orchestra was to be disbanded and the sadness of the final concert.

Produced by Susan Kenyon
A Whistledown production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b04v2jpk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b04v381z)
16 December 1914 - Ralph Winwood

The day's events make Reverend Ralph Winwood question his own authority.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b04v3824)
Call You and Yours: Do people treat you differently when you're older?

Almost one in five people in the UK are aged 65 and older, but even expressing a figure in those terms involves grouping people whose lifestyles and experiences are very different, maybe even three generations apart.

Perhaps it's a shorthand that shows unsophisticated attitudes to anyone aged between 60 and 100+ years old.

A new series for Radio 4 - The Invisible Age - looks at how society views people aged 85 or over, and how this so-called 'fourth age' group sees younger generations who are in denial about the ageing process.

Maybe you have examples of being treated differently or presented with certain choices because someone perceived you as 'old'.

Do you think people treat you differently when you're older?

Tell us your experience - email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Phone lines open at 11am on Tuesday - 03700 100 444

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Joel Moors.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b04v2jpm)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04v3828)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v382b)
Series 3

Charisma

Bettany Hughes investigates charisma at The Acropolis, in a recording session with Live Aid founder Bob Geldof and on the pages of a best-selling novel with author Ben Okri.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double espresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award--winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programme Bettany investigates charisma with classicist Professor Paul Cartledge, Byzantinist Dr Dionysios Stathakopoulos, Live Aid founder Bob Geldof, sociologist Professor Linda Woodhead and writer Ben Okri.

Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Ideas examined in the first series, in September 2013, were idea, desire, agony, fame and justice. The second series, in January 2014, considered wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace and hospitality. Other ideas in this series are psyche, irony, nemesis and virtue.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b04v3287)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b04v382d)
The Giffnock Girls

Marcella Evaristi's play - both moving and comic - features three childhood friends who re-unite at a key moment in their lives. PJ returns to the family home in Giffnock outside Glasgow after many years in New York to find Gail and Bianca in mid-life turmoil. PJ would love to help but he has personal issues of his own. He left Giffnock as a man but has now returned as a woman. His initials - PJ - stand for Previously John.

Producer/director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04v29gz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b04v382g)
Series 4

Sinead O'Connor (the B-Side)

Programme 10: B-side 'Theology' by Sinéad O'Connor

John Wilson continues with his new series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 10, the B-side. Having discussed the making of "Theology", her 2007 album (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 15th December and available online), Sinéad O'Connor responds to questions from the audience and performs acoustic live versions of some of the tracks from the album which she considers her most personal body of work.

Producer Neil McCarthy.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b04v382j)
First Words: How do children develop language?

Michael Rosen finds out about the first sounds, words and phrases that babies recognise and learn to say. He talks to author Tom Chatfield and his 15-month-old son, and to linguists Laura Wright and Kriszta Szendroi.
Producer: Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b04v382p)
Series 35

Laura Bates on Louisa May Alcott

Laura Bates, journalist and curator of the Everyday Sexism Project, explains to Matthew Parris why the 19th century children's author Louisa May Alcott has her vote for a Great Life. They are joined by Sarah Churchwell, Professor of American Literature at the University of East Anglia.

Louisa May Alcott is best known as the writer of "Little Women", the story of four sisters growing up during the Civil War in America. Generations of girls have read the book, which at first sight seems to be an improving tract on growing up and becoming a good Christian wife.

Both Laura and Sarah have a very different reading of the book and believe Louisa May Alcott to have been a remarkable woman and a dedicated feminist.

Producer Christine Hall

First heard on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


TUE 17:00 PM (b04v382z)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04v2jpp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b04v3838)
Series 2

The Well of Loneliness

When Tom's father uncovers some potentially life-changing news through his research into the family tree, Tom is pressganged into helping him find a church which could be devastating for the Wrigglesworth name.

Meanwhile, Tom's mum and gran enter the cut-throat world of competitive well-dressing.

Tom ...... Tom Wrigglesworth
Granny ...... Judy Parfitt
Dad ...... Paul Copley
Mum ...... Kate Anthony

Written by Tom Wrigglesworth and James Kettle. With Miles Jupp.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04v383k)
Carol confides in Jim that she can't bear the idea of losing Jill because of this new road. Going undercover at Justin's drinks bash, Carol immediately finds Justin intriguing and rather charming. She resolves to find out what his interests are, aside from money.

Carol and Justin find they share a mutual love of wine. Carol talks of her vineyard back in the 1970s. Justin thinks Borsetshire is a perfect location. He lets slip that he has his eyes on a place nearby and is looking to build a house to his own design.

Lynda berates Lilian for her disruptive behaviour in rehearsals. She demands that she learn all her lines by the end of the week. Following a lecture to Lilian on the clichéd views of 'frothy' Noel Coward, Lynda introduces Douglas Herrington to his 'wife'.

Lynda cycles home to find Jim and Carol at her door, desperate to report back from their mission. Jim learned from a rather drunk Borchester construction manager that there are plans to construct a distribution hub that would stretch half way to Ambridge. Jim's keen to go straight to the press, but wise Lynda says no. They should sniff around a bit more and come up with some hard evidence, before breaking the story in the New Year.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04v383q)
Ridley Scott's Exodus, Serial, The Shoemaker's Holiday, Annie

Ridley Scott's Moses epic Exodus: Gods and Kings is reviewed by Adam Smith; investigative journalist John Sweeney and Baltimore-based crime novelist Laura Lippman discuss the phenomenon of the 'Serial' podcasts; The Shoemaker's Holiday director Phillip Breen tells Samira Ahmed about his RSC production of Thomas Dekker's Elizabethan comedy of class, conflict and cobblers in love; and Quvenzhané Wallis and director Will Gluck on their new film adaptation of Annie.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v381f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Suppose I Lose It (b04v383w)
Now in her 80s, one issue looms ahead for Joan Bakewell and others from her generation - the fear of dementia. She admits that she's becoming increasingly forgetful. Her home is decked with post-it note reminders to help her remember. But are the annoying lapses in memory, that characterise her daily life, just a normal part of ageing, or could they signal something more serious like dementia? As she herself says - 'suppose I lose it?'.

In this programme, Joan asks what she might expect and how she should prepare if she receives the diagnosis.

Joan's search is spurred on by the news that her friend of many years, the actress Prunella Scales, has dementia. Over cups of tea at their home, Joan talks to Prunella and her husband, the actor Timothy West, about how her memory loss is affecting their lives.

Dementia is a growing problem for the nation. Over 800,000 now suffer from it and there's no available cure. It's a problem that the government has been prioritising through the National Challenge on Dementia, but as Professor Sube Banerjee, a lead author on the National Dementia Strategy, says there's still an immense amount that needs to be done.

Even hospitals struggle to cope with people with dementia. Being mostly old and frail, they make up a quarter of inpatients, yet the experience can be traumatising. They tend to leave hospital less capable than when they went it, and are often more confused and anxious.

So how will hospitals cope as the numbers with dementia spiral? Professor Harwood is one of those making a start, adapting Ward B47 at Queens Medical Centre in Nottingham and training staff to meet the complex needs of patients with dementia, which are only now starting to be understood.

One of the challenges of caring for dementia patients is that often their disease is so advanced that they can no longer make decisions about their medical treatment. What's more, few make their wishes known in advance. So geriatrician Professor Rowan Harwood often has to make a best guess, which can mean keeping patients alive longer than they might have wanted. Joan asks what she should do to prepare should she be diagnosed with dementia.

And what's more terrifying - living with dementia, or living in a society that fails to support those suffering with it. Several towns around the country are now addressing the ignorance and fear that can leave sufferers and their carers feeling isolated. The Crawley Dementia Alliance is bringing together schools, GPs, local businesses and transport services to make Crawley more 'dementia friendly'. And it is dementia suffers themselves whose opinions lie at the heart of what happens here.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b04v3840)
TV Host Richard Osman

TV presenter Richard Osman, co-host of BBC One's Pointless quiz show, is Peter White's guest. Richard talks about the impact his eye condition Nystagmus has on his life and career.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b04v3844)
Perinatal obsessive compulsive disorder, Mirror neurons, Baby anxiety

Claudia Hammond investigates an often hidden condition: perinatal obsessive compulsive disorder which can affect pregnant women or new mothers. Women with perinatal OCD can have obsessive thoughts about contamination and cleanliness or a less well known aspect of the condition which is compulsive thoughts and intense fear of seriously harming their children. They go to extreme measures to prevent themselves doing any harm, although they never would. Women can be treated successfully with cognitive behavioural therapy. Claudia talks to Fiona Challacombe, clinical psychologist at the Institute of Psychiatry about the condition and its treatment. Also in the programme, the brains cells that have been described by one neuroscientist as underpinning civilisation - have they been overhyped? Claudia talks to mirror neurons expert, Cecelia Heyes from Oxford University. And does a baby pick up anxiety more from its mother or father? Claudia talks to researcher, Eline Moller from Amsterdam University.


TUE 21:30 Document (b01r9c9r)
Votes for Victorian Women

Popular history tells us that women did not get the vote until 1918.

Though they could technically vote in local elections before that, many historians have argued that in practice they had no vote until the 1860s at the earliest. And evidence that they ever did vote has proved almost impossible to find.

But now a poll book, discovered in a box of papers in a local record office, clearly shows 25 women voting in elections for important local posts in Lichfield in 1843.

In this week's Document, the historian Sarah Richardson follows the trail of these women, to reveal a picture of Victorian women's involvement in politics which challenges many of our assumptions.

She discovers that they represented a surprising cross-section of society - old and young, poor and prosperous - and attempts to trace their descendants today.

She finds out how, when even universal manhood suffrage was seen as a radical, dangerous idea, these women may have been just a few of many more who could vote at a local level.

And she explores how, decades later, campaigners for Votes for Women at the Westminster level had to contend with this complex legacy.

Producer: Phil Tinline.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b04v2jpr)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04v38s4)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04v38s6)
Mary Costello - Academy Street

Episode 7

Mary Costello's acclaimed debut – shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award - traces the arc of a quiet woman's life: from Tess Lohan's childhood in 1940s rural Ireland through to her emigration to America and a career as a nurse in New York.

Resolute in her decision to raise her son alone, Tess vows never to explain herself to anyone again.

Read by Niamh Cusack

Written by Mary Costello

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron


TUE 23:00 Andrew O'Neill: Pharmacist Baffler (b04v3950)
Episode 1

Comedian Andrew O'Neill is a transvestite or as he prefers to call himself, a "pharmacist baffler", or "correct toilet double-check instigator" or "patriarchal birthright rejecter". Andrew is also heterosexual, married and in a steam punk band. He confounds expectations and preconceptions.

In the first of two audience, stand-up shows using his own personal experience, he examines sexual and gender identity, what they are and how we get them.

From a transvestite's point of view, Andrew discusses gender identity and his own experiences growing up. His humorous take on these difficult and thought provoking issues delights the audience whilst occasionally shocking them.

Andrew is one of the most interesting and articulate voices on the circuit. He came out as a transvestite when he was 19, and now cross-dresses about half the time (the British Union Of Transvestites requires you to cross-dress at least 3 days out of the 7). He wears make-up and jewellery and has long hair. He's usually dressed in black, has lots of tattoos, plays in a steam punk band and has always been heterosexual. He's married and only ever fancies women. This makes him and Eddie Izzard the only out cross-dressing comics in the country.

This series brings his (almost) unique perspective to ideas about gender and sexual identity, He looks at where you get your ideas about what your gender is, and what it should look like, how your sexuality is defined and how other people's sexuality continues to fascinate us and not necessarily in a good way.

Written and performed by Andrew O' Neill with Stephen Carlin.

Producer; Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04v3952)
The Prime Minister condemns the week's acts of terrorism-- the massacre of children in Northern Pakistan and the hostage-taking in Sydney, Australia. Meanwhile there's a lively reaction in the Commons as the Leader of the House William Hague unveils a radical plan for only English MPs to vote on English laws at Westminster. Joanna Shinn reports on a busy day at Parliament.
Also on the programme:
* Members of the House of Lords respond to the U.S.Senate report on the use of torture by the CIA.
* A committee studies the complexity of the process when major defence decisions are made.
* Good news for the nation's Post Offices as a Minister announces that the Post Office Card Account is to be extended.



WEDNESDAY 17 DECEMBER 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b04v2jqp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 The Kingdom to Come (b04v3813)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jqr)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04v2jqt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jqw)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b04v2jqy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04v3b97)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Judy Merry.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b04v3b99)
Fish discard ban, Women in dairy, Winter wildlife

As the EU's Fisheries Ministers hammer out the 2015 fishing quota in Brussels, Farming Today focuses on the 'discard ban', which comes into force for some fish species from January 1st.

We hear how the aim is to stop fishermen throwing back unwanted catches - fish which might not meet the quota, or if they are too small. Instead they'll have to land all the fish they catch. From 2015 this new rule covers pelagic fish - like mackerel, whiting and herring - and then will gradually include all species by 2019.

However, fishermen are concerned that the new discard ban has to run alongside existing legislation, which makes landing everything you catch, illegal. Bertie Armstrong, chief executive of the Scottish Fishermen's Federation, is concerned that fishermen keeping to the new discard ban could actually be breaking the law at the same time.

While the campaign group Farmers for Action is reporting making inroads, forcing the retailer Iceland to give them a better deal on milk, a new organisation's been launched for women in the industry to share their expertise. We find out why 'Women in Dairy' groups have been set up in the South West and in Cheshire - a new scheme supported by the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers.

As of this week, members of the public in Cumbria and North Yorkshire will be able to protect their common land by putting it on a register - which means they'd regain the rights to walk and perhaps ride on them. These regions have been added to seven others in England which can also be put back on the Common Land Register. Nicola Hodgson of the Open Spaces Society explains what difference winning back rights to common land can mean for local people.

Presented by Anna Hill and Produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0gsc)
Saddleback

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the formerly widespread saddleback of New Zealand. It's loud, piping and whistling calls once resounded throughout New Zealand's forests, but now the saddleback is heard only on smaller offshore islands. This is a bird in exile. About the size of a European blackbird, saddlebacks are predominantly black with a rust-coloured saddle-shaped patch on their backs. In Maori culture this mark came from the demi-God Maui who, after trying to catch the sun, asked the saddleback to fetch water. The bird refused, so hot-handed Maui grabbed it and left a scorch mark on the bird's back. As well as this chestnut saddle, the bird has two bright red wattles at the base of its beak which it can dilate when it displays. It also has an extensive vocabulary and one of its calls has earned it the Maori name –"Ti-e-ke".


WED 06:00 Today (b04v3b9c)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b04v3b9f)
Barry and Bob Cryer, Florian Leonhard, Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent, Andrew Gant

Libby Purves meets Barry and Bob Cryer; violin maker Florian Leonhard; adventurer Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent and choirmaster Andrew Gant.

Father and son Barry and Bob Cryer have co-written a new show, Mrs Hudson's Christmas Corker. Set in the kitchen of 221b Baker Street, the Christmas special reveals what really happens below stairs at the home of Sherlock Holmes. Veteran comedy writer and performer, Barry is a regular on Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue. Bob is a writer and actor who has appeared in TV shows such as The Bill and Outnumbered. Mrs Hudson's Christmas Corker is at Wilton's Music Hall, East London.

Florian Leonhard is a violin maker, restorer and dealer. He matches soloists with violins, mentors young talent and advises artists such as Julian Lloyd Webber. He trained at the prestigious Mittenwald violin school in Germany and has been making and restoring fine violins since he was 18.

Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent is a travel writer and adventurer. She is presenting a talk at the Adventure Travel Show about her two month motorcycle trip along the Ho Chi Minh trail. Her other exploits include riding from Thailand to Brighton in a pink tuk-tuk; organising the world's longest horse race in Mongolia and surviving an attempt to reach the Arctic Circle on an old Russian Ural motorcycle with sidecar. Antonia is at The Adventure Travel Show, Olympia.

Andrew Gant is a musician, writer, choirmaster and composer. His book, Christmas Carols: From Village Green to Church Choir, reveals the stories behind 22 Christmas carols. He lectures music at the University of Oxford and led Her Majesty's Chapel Royal choir at the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. Christmas Carols: From Village Green to Church Choir is published by Profile Books.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 The Kingdom to Come (b04v3b9h)
Onora O'Neill

Peter Hennessy, the historian, continues his series of conversations on the future of the United Kingdom's constitution. His guest today is Onora O'Neill (Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve), philosopher, chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission and former BBC Reith lecturer.
The hurried promises of further devolution made by political leaders during and immediately after the Scottish Referendum will fundamentally change how the United Kingdom is governed, with little opportunity for people to consider what this radical reform might mean or to discuss the constitutional implications.
This series explores the possible impact of further devolution on the United Kingdom's constitution. In each programme, Peter Hennessy invites his guests to draw on their different expertise in government, politics, the law and public ethics in considering questions of accountability, coherence and practicality. For example, would further devolution improve trust in politics? Is devolution practical unless it is accompanied by tax-raising powers? Is there a risk that varying degrees of devolution across the country could create an incoherent system? Would all citizens of the United Kingdom continue to enjoy equal rights? Would a federal constitution be viable? Are we heading towards the end of the United Kingdom?
Peter Hennessy's other guests during the series are William Hague MP, First Secretary of State and Leader of the House of Commons; Alistair Darling MP, former Chancellor of the Exchequer; David Hope (Lord Hope of Craighead), former Deputy President of the United Kingdom's Supreme Court; and Robin Butler (Lord Butler of Brockwell), former Cabinet Secretary.
Producer: Rob Shepherd.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04v3b9k)
Backstage before a performance

We join the folk musician Kate Rusby backstage, as she prepares for her Christmas tour of the UK.

At the moment, just over a fifth of MPs are women. How might that that change in 2015? We've been looking at how the main political parties at Westminster are trying to get more women to stand - and what help they offer them in getting selected and elected. Today, it's the Conservatives.

As a part of our series on domestic abuse, Jenni Murray visits staff and users of the Gaia Centre in London. Funded by Lambeth Council and run by Refuge, it is referred to as a gendered violence centre and seen as a potential model for future centres.

And Child psychologist Lavern Antrobus will be talking about some of the issues raised by you following yesterday's discussion on grandparents, seeing and maintaining contact with their grandchildren.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b04v3b9m)
Just a Girl: Series 1

Episode 3

Amy's desperation to get on the hormone blockers begins to worry her family, and her granddad Ted finally understands her predicament.

How would you cope if your child was born into the wrong body? Powerful new drama by Mark Davies Markham.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy who was born as Ben. Adamant that she is a girl from an early age, Amy is growing up fast and nervous about starting senior school, with a boy's body. Her parents, Gary and Charlotte, have to help decide whether she should take significant steps to delay puberty until she can be fully assessed for transgender treatment. The right thing to do is not clear, and their different views on what is best for their child present some very difficult choices. Granddad Ted loves them all but struggles to grasp how serious the situation is. At the same time, everyday family life goes on, and re-decorating Amy's bedroom brings her and her Granddad closer. This honest, compassionate new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families and the Tavistock Clinic.

Studio Pianist ..... Alfie Davies
Director ..... Polly Thomas
Writer ..... Mark Davies Markham.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b04v3b9p)
Marvina and Renee - Being Gay in Nigeria

Fi Glover with a conversation between friends of Nigerian origin, reflecting on their culture's intolerance of homosexuality and its effect on their lives and their friendship.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 What's Funny about Money? (b04vxv1c)
The Kilkenomics Festival of economics and comedy was launched in the depths of Ireland's financial crisis in 2010. Five years on it has earned a reputation for being 'Davos with laughs'. Economists and comedians share platforms over a weekend in the Irish city of Kilkenny, demystifying the language and theories of economics. Comedian Colm O'Regan has been performing at Kilkenomics since it was launched and explores how the festival works.

Speaking to the co-founders of the festival, economist David McWilliams and festival organiser Richard Cook, Colm discovers what motivated them to start a comedy festival at such a difficult time for the Irish economy, and how the mood is different today.

He meets John Lanchester, author of How to Speak Money, who explains how those appearing at Kilkenomics are able to find ways to explain difficult economic concepts. He finds out what comedians appearing for the first time, like Ardal O'Hanlan, make of the event. He also hears from Irish economists and asks whether there is a 'Kilkenomics' school of economic thought. Finally, Colm meets a group of protestors against Ireland's debt who are marching at Kilkenomics to make their point.

Colm considers whether it is the Irish experience that makes Kilkenomics so appealing, or if the festival could also work in other countries.

Produced by Philip Reevell
A City Broadcasting production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


WED 11:30 Hobby Bobbies (b04v3cx5)
Series 2

Burglaries

Sitcom where Britain's longest serving PCSO -and Britain's laziest - make quite a pairing.

Written by Dave Lamb (the voice of Come Dine With Me) and starring Richie Webb (Horrible Histories), Nick Walker, Chris Emmett and Noddy Holder.

This week, Nigel has taken up free running in the hope that physical fitness can improve his performance at work. But what, if anything, will identify the mysterious hand cream thief?

Cast:
Geoff...............Richie Webb
Nigel...............Nick Walker
The Guv..........Sinead Keenan
Nina................Pooja Shah
Bernie.............Chris Emmett
Geoff's Dad.....Noddy Holder

Written by Dave Lamb

Produced by Steve Doherty
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4


WED 12:00 News Summary (b04v2jr0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b04v3cx7)
17 December 1914 - Archie Tulliver

The recruitment drive takes a new and charming turn on the streets of Folkestone.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b04v3cx9)
Calderstones, Christmas Dinners and Family Department Stores

The CQC reports today into the Calderstones NHS Trust. The last report was highly critical. The Trust runs one of the controversial Assessment and Treatment Centres meant for short term use only, but some residents have been in the centre for very long periods.

We spend around £40 million each year in ethical cleaning products & another £500 million on ethical cosmetics - all to protect ourselves from chemicals known as Endocrine Disrupter Compounds. But what are these compounds and just how dangerous are they?

Writer Shirley Conran once said "Life is too short to stuff a mushroom". Now it seems Christmas Day is too short to stuff a turkey. Supermarkets have an answer, but is the time it saves worth the extra cost?

Interview with Dermot Nolan the new head of the energy regulator, Ofgem

It used to be the handset of choice for the busy executive. Then Blackberry's fortunes took a tumble due to low sales and increased competition in the mobile phone market. But now the brand is hoping for a return to form with the launch of a new handset - the Classic - which is released today. It's already sold out on pre-order in the United States.

Randall's department store is closing down after 120 years of trading in Uxbridge. Our reporter Henrietta Harrison went to the store as it prepares for the closing down sale.


WED 12:57 Weather (b04v2jr4)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b04v3cxc)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v3cxf)
Series 3

Irony

Bettany Hughes examines irony in her archaeology of philosophy in a club where it's banned and in the studios of Radio 4's Today programme.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double expresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award-winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programme Bettany considers irony with philosopher Angie Hobbs, comedian Robert Newman, and grand inquisitor John Humphrys. Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Ideas examined in the first series, in September 2013, were idea, desire, agony, fame and justice. The second series, in January 2014, considered wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace and hospitality. Other ideas in this series are psyche, charisma, nemesis and virtue.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04v383k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b013gd2b)
Pink Boy Blue Girl

by Mateusz Dymek

When a Swedish PHD student interviews a couple about raising their child gender neutrally she begins to wonder if their choices are as politically correct as they first seem.

Directed by Sally Avens.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b04v3cxh)
Fraud

Have you been a victim of fraud? How do you report the crime, get your money back and stop it happening again? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk .

Around £450 million was lost to debit and credit card fraud in 2013 say Financial Fraud Action and the City of London Police have just launched 'The 12 online frauds of Christmas' campaign, to warn consumers about the latest dangers.

If you've got a question about dealing with or preventing fraud, Paul Lewis and guests will be ready to help on Wednesday.

Who is liable if you are the victim of fraud or identity theft?

What happens if your credit or debit card is lost or stolen and then used to buy something?

Where do you report fraud and how is it investigated?

How can you stay safe when shopping online?

Do you really need to pay for an identity protection service?

Whatever you need help with, you can speak directly to:

DCI Perry Stokes, Head, Dedicated Cheque and Plastic Crime Unit.
DCI Matt Bradford, National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB)
James Daley, Managing Director, Fairer Finance

Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b04v3844)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b04v3cxk)
Butchers; Fat Gay Men

Fat gay men: Laurie Taylor examines a world in which men are doubly stigmatised - for their weight as well as their sexuality. Jason Whitesel, an Assistant Professor in Women's and Gender Studies at Pace University in the US, discusses a study which illuminates how such men negotiate and fight back against a gay culture which places them in an inferior and stigmatised position in the 'attractiveness' hierarchy.They're joined by Paul Simpson, a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Manchester, who has researched the marginality of older gay men on the gay 'scene'.

Also, the masculine world of the butchers. Dr Natasha Slutskaya, lecturer of Organization Studies at Brunel Business School, discusses a study into the values and meanings butchers ascribe to the 'dirty work' of meat production and sale.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b04v3cxm)
BT's EE Talks, Journalism and PR, Ofcom's Review into C4, London Weeklies Launch

Telecoms group BT has entered exclusive talks over a £12.5 billion deal to buy Britain's biggest mobile phone operator EE. It signals BT''s ambitions to dominate the UK's mobile market, twelve years since it left the sector. BT will be hoping to persuade a growing number of homes to purchase all four of its services - home phone, mobile, broadband and pay TV. Steve Hewlett talks to analyst Claire Enders about how the move would affect consumer choice, and how the deal could impact on the forthcoming bidding for Premier League football rights.

The media regulator OFCOM has raised concerns about the decline of Channel 4's audience. In a review of the broadcaster, which said that broadly it was performing well, it found limited provision of content made for older children and highlighted the continued decline in reach and share for Channel 4 News. It also published initial findings into its third Public Service Broadcasters review. Media commentator Maggie Brown and analyst Claire Enders join Steve Hewlett to discuss the details.

Sir Ray Tindle has launched 4 new weekly London papers, at a time when others are closing down. Steve talks to editor Philip Evans about why the group is bucking the trend.

A new book from the Reuters Institute claims PR no longer needs journalism as much as journalism needs PR. It considers the changing relationship between what it calls 'two trades at once antagonistic and mutually dependent.' Steve hears from journalist and co-author John Lloyd, and Robert Phillips, former UK CEO of Edelman, the world's biggest PR firm.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b04v3cxp)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04v2jr6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Paul Sinha's History Revision (b04v3cxr)
Series 1

Communication

Paul Sinha looks through all of human history and examines how we came to be where we are.

In this edition, he looks at the modern's youth's obsession with a device that can be used to email, text, surf the web, play games and, very occasionally, make telephone calls - the telephone.

The story of how it came, legally, into being obviously involves electro-shock therapy and an exploding boat.

Paul also looks at a more positive aspect of young people, and tells a story of how the introduction of gin to the United Kingdom inspired the 17th-century equivalent of the Ice Bucket Challenge.

Written and performed by Paul Sinha.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b04v3cxt)
At Justin's shoot, Charlie tells him who's who and David finally gets to meet the big man himself. The men get into the spirit of things and enjoy a sumptuous lunch from Jennifer. Brian's not quite as upbeat as Justin. When they raise their glasses, he decides to pace himself. David has a successful morning shooting and Justin toasts the gathered farmers, wishing good sport to "good friends and neighbours".

Jennifer's looking forward to having Kate home. She hopes Kate can build bridges between Roy and Phoebe. Jennifer asks David about Ruth's mother - and schools - up north.

Justin is keen to visit Brookfield with his architect. David reluctantly agrees to a visit after Christmas.

Charlie is keen to know more about Tom and Bridge Farm's organic operation, which he sees as niche farming. Charlie asks Brian about Home Farm's plans. Brian hints that he could decide to move into a new direction. Charlie is disappointed that Adam isn't around today.

At Grey Gables, Roy isn't in the party mood. Roy phones Hayley, desperate to sort out when he can have Abbie over at Christmas. Hayley awkwardly says he'll have to come to Birmingham. They discuss presents. Roy will get Abbie and Phoebe whatever they want. Roy rings off and trudges back to work.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b04v4sx6)
Christoph Waltz, Treasure Island, Mozart in the Jungle, Unread e-Books

Double Oscar-winner Christoph Waltz on working with Tim Burton in Big Eyes, and responds to rumours surrounding his role in the new James Bond film.

Kirsty goes backstage at the National Theatre on the set that really is the star of Treasure Island - it's a ship, a pub, a cave and a strange, pulsating island. And a pirate's corpse.

Radio 3's Petroc Trelawney reviews Mozart in the Jungle, a new 'webseries' about a wild young conductor who tries to rejuvenate the New York Symphony.

And, novelists Lawrence Norfolk and Kate Pullinger discuss the implications of the recent data released by e-reader Kobo about which books are most often left unfinished.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v3b9m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 At Home Abroad (b04v4sx8)
The world is on the move. More than 200 million people live today in a different country to their birthplace.

Britain is a major crossroads of this seething human migration. Among developed nations, there are more Britons living abroad than from any other country. Inward migration to Britain has also been massive - more than 13 percent of the UK population is foreign born.

A panel of New Britons, immigrants from all points of the compass, debate questions raised by making a new home abroad. How far do you assimilate? What is the process of leaving one culture behind when the new one doesn't always accept you with open arms? How do you raise your children, born in Britain, if you do not fully feel a member of British society yourself? Can an immigrant believe there too many immigrants coming to this country now?

Presented by Michael Goldfarb

Produced by Anthony Denselow
A Certain Height production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b04v4sxb)
Series 4

The Shadow of the Cold War

Jeffrey Sachs argues that many of today's global problems are hangovers from bad, ungenerous decisions at the end of previous conflicts.

Professor Sachs is one of the world's leading economists, and amongst the many governments he has advised over 30 years were Poland and Russia at the end of the Cold War.

In this very personal talk, recorded at McNally Jackson books in New York City, Professor Sachs describes how a stunned Russian Prime Minister, facing economic calamity and desperate for western support, was told instead by western governments that there would be no help forthcoming. And he argues that decisions like this - similar to those taken by the Entente powers at the end of the First World War which sowed the seeds of today's conflicts in the Middle East - are a large part of the explanation of Russian attitudes today, including in Ukraine.

The presenter is Amanda Stern.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b04v4sxd)
Can Maths Combat Terrorism?

Dr Hannah Fry investigates the hidden patterns behind terrorism and asks whether mathematics could be used to predict the next 9/11.

When computer scientists decided to study the severity and frequency of 30,000 terrorist attacks worldwide, they found an distinctive pattern hiding in the data.

Even though the events spanned 5,000 cities in 187 countries over 40 years, every single attack fitted neatly onto a curve, described by an equation known as a 'power law'.

Now this pattern is helping mathematicians and social scientists understand the mechanisms underlying global terrorism.

Could these modelling techniques be used to predict if, and when, another attack the size of 9/11 will occur?

Producer: Michelle Martin.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b04v3b9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b04v2jr8)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b04v4sxg)
President Barack Obama announces the re-establishment of diplomatic relations with Cuba.

Greek MPs fail to agree on a new President - as the prospect of new elections looms.

Pakistan's Nawaz Sharif vows to rid his country of terrorism after yesterday's Taliban attack

plus - how the discount supermarkets have changed the way we shop

and the intern who made a stunning discovery of polyphonic music

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective. With Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04v4sxj)
Mary Costello - Academy Street

Episode 8

Shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award, Mary Costello's acclaimed debut traces the arc of a quiet woman's life: from Tess Lohan's childhood in 1940s rural Ireland through to her emigration to America and a career as a nurse in New York.

Tess has never again heard from David and has raised their son, Theo, alone. Now aged 14, Theo is old enough to ask some tough questions.

Read by Niamh Cusack

Written by Mary Costello

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron


WED 23:00 The Lach Chronicles (b04v4sxl)
Series 2

Teenage Alcoholic

Lach was the King of Manhattan's East Village and host of the longest running open mic night in New York. He now lives in Scotland and finds himself back at square one, playing in a dive bar on the wrong side of Edinburgh.

His acclaimed night, held in various venues around New York, was called the Antihoot. Never quite fitting in and lost somewhere lonely between folk and punk music, Lach started the Antifolk movement. He played host to Suzanne Vega, Jeff Buckley and many others. He discovered and nurtured lots of talent including Beck, Regina Spektor and the Moldy Peaches - but nobody discovered him.

In 1982, the "Village" was the centre of all worldly excitement. Iggy Pop played small venues to those in the know, style was everybody's own, your heroes drank in the local bars, and anointment was just a few chords away.

Producer: Richard Melvin
A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in December 2014.


WED 23:15 Mission Improbable (b01p0s15)
Series 1

Jungle!

A series of fast-paced mini-adventures written by and starring Anna Emerson, Lizzie Bates and Catriona Knox, known collectively as The Boom Jennies.

Prompted by the pine-fresh fragrance of zoo keeper Amelia's new perfume, adventure journalist Jane is reminded of a story her uncle Norman once told her about a rare midnight orchid found only in the Guatemalan jungle. This is no ordinary flower, but one that gives off a scent with such aphrodisiac properties it makes the person wielding it utterly irresistible.

That's more than enough to convince perennial singleton Lucy that it is high time they all headed to South America. There follows a roller coaster ride of an adventure taking in waterfalls, crocodiles and a gang of ruthless drug smugglers. But our heroes remain unbowed.

Each and every challenge thrown at them is met head-on with courage, determination and deeply inappropriate footwear.

Jane.................Catriona Knox
Lucy.................Lizzie Bates
Amelia..............Anna Emerson
Norman.............Paul Ryan

Written by Anna Emerson, Lizzie Bates and Catriona Knox

Audio production by Matt Katz

Produced by Dave Lamb and Richie Webb

A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in November 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04v4sxn)
MPs welcome a report that dismisses as "deliberate lies" allegations that British troops tortured and murdered detainees in Iraq ten years ago.

The Defence Secretary told the Commons that Iraqi witnesses and their lawyers must bear the blame for traducing troops' reputations, and costing taxpayers more than £31 million.

In the final Prime Minister's Question time of the year, there was little seasonal goodwill on display, as Ed Miliband accuses the Conservatives of planning to take Britain back to the 1930s. David Cameron calls the Labour leader a "waste of space".

And the Chancellor warns that anyone expecting "unaffordable pre-election giveaways" in his budget next March, just seven weeks ahead of the May 7 poll, would be "disappointed".

Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 18 DECEMBER 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04v2jsc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 The Kingdom to Come (b04v3b9h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jsf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04v2jsh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jsk)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04v2jsm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04v59gb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Judy Merry.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b04v59gk)
Forage Aid, Fish quotas, Weetabix

Whether its been floods or snow, in recent years a scheme called Forage Aid has helped farmers feed their animals during the crisis. It now hopes to gain charitable status early next year. The organisation, which was founded by Lincolnshire farmer Andrew Ward, helps organise and co-ordinate donations of animal food when weather destroys farmers stocks.

Conservationists say the deal on fish quotas negotiated this week in Brussels is a missed opportunity and accuse the British Government of ignoring the science. With fishermen there is a mixed reaction, while there are cuts in some quotas many are not as big as they had feared. Farming Today speaks to the Fisheries Minister George Eustice and the Marine Conservation Society.

And the company Weetabix, which was bought out by a Chinese company two years ago, hopes to tap into the Chinese breakfast market, by tweaking some of their recipes. All of the wheat grown for thier UK produced cereals is grown within 50 miles of the Northamptonshire factory.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and Produced by Lucy Bickerton.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0gzx)
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the greater racket-tailed drongo of South-East Asia. Across a clearing in a Malaysian forest flies a dark bird, seemingly chased by two equally dark butterflies. Those butterflies in hot pursuit aren't insects at all; they are the webbed tips of the greater racket-tailed drongo's excessively long wiry outer-tail feathers, which from a distance look like separate creatures as it flies. Glossy blue-black birds which live in wooded country and are great insect catchers, hawking after them in mid-air before returning to a perch. They're bold too and won't hesitate to harry and chase much larger birds than themselves, including, birds of prey. Like other drongos the greater racquet-tailed drongo has an extensive but not very musical repertoire which includes the sounds of other birds it meets, when it joins mixed feeding flocks, and can imitate the call of a hawk to alarm the hawk's victims and so steal food from them while they are distracted by the call: an ingenious tactic, which few other birds have learned.


THU 06:00 Today (b04v59gv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b04v59gz)
Truth

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the philosophy of truth. Pontius Pilate famously asked: what is truth? In the twentieth century, the nature of truth became a subject of particular interest to philosophers, but they preferred to ask a slightly different question: what does it mean to say of any particular statement that it is true? What is the difference between these two questions, and how useful is the second of them?

With:

Simon Blackburn
Fellow of Trinity College, University of Cambridge, and Professor of Philosophy at the New College of the Humanities

Jennifer Hornsby
Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London

Crispin Wright
Regius Professor of Logic at the University of Aberdeen, and Professor of Philosophy at New York University

Producer: Victoria Brignell and Luke Mulhall.


THU 09:45 The Kingdom to Come (b04v59h1)
Alistair Darling MP

Peter Hennessy, the historian, continues his series of conversations on the future of the United Kingdom's constitution. His guest today is Alistair Darling MP, the former Chancellor of the Exchequer and Secretary of State for Scotland, Trade and Industry, Transport and Work and Pensions.
The hurried promises of further devolution made by political leaders during and immediately after the Scottish Referendum will fundamentally change how the United Kingdom is governed, with little opportunity for people to consider what this radical reform might mean or to discuss the constitutional implications.
This series explores the possible impact of further devolution on the United Kingdom's constitution. In each programme, Peter Hennessy invites his guests to draw on their different expertise in government, politics, the law and public ethics in considering questions of accountability, coherence and practicality. For example, would further devolution improve trust in politics? Is devolution practical unless it is accompanied by tax-raising powers? Is there a risk that varying degrees of devolution across the country could create an incoherent system? Would all citizens of the United Kingdom continue to enjoy equal rights? Would a federal constitution be viable? Are we heading towards the end of the United Kingdom?
Peter Hennessy's other guests in the series are William Hague MP, First Secretary of State and Leader of the House of Commons; Onora O'Neill (Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve), philosopher, chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission and former BBC Reith lecturer; David Hope (Lord Hope of Craighead), former Deputy President of the United Kingdom's Supreme Court; and Robin Butler (Lord Butler of Brockwell), former Cabinet Secretary.
Producer: Rob Shepherd.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04v59h3)
June Mottershead; Maddy Prior

June Mottershead whose father started Chester Zoo - their story inspired the TV series Our Zoo. As we head into the 2015 General Election just under 23% of MPs are women. What are the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats doing to get more women elected? Maddy Prior on a 45 year career in folk music and upcoming tour with reformed Steeleye Span. We discuss the history and future of the sale of commercial beauty products with Hadley Freeman and Gail Parminter.

Presented by Emma Barnett
Produced by Laura Northedge.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v59h5)
Just a Girl: Series 1

Episode 4

A sleep over for Amy with new friends brings things to a head between her parents.

How would you cope if your child was born into the wrong body? Powerful new drama by Mark Davies Markham.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy who was born as Ben. Adamant that she is a girl from an early age, Amy is growing up fast and nervous about starting senior school, with a boy's body. Her parents, Gary and Charlotte, have to help decide whether she should take significant steps to delay puberty until she can be fully assessed for transgender treatment. The right thing to do is not clear, and their different views on what is best for their child present some very difficult choices. Granddad Ted loves them all but struggles to grasp how serious the situation is. At the same time, everyday family life goes on, and re-decorating Amy's bedroom brings her and her Granddad closer. This honest, compassionate new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families and the Tavistock Clinic.

Studio Pianist ..... Alfie Davies
Director ..... Polly Thomas
Writer ..... Mark Davies Markham.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b04v59h7)
The Knights of New Russia

Russian support for the separatists in eastern Ukraine doesn't all come directly from the Kremlin. The rebellion there may be stoked, and armed, by Vladimir Putin - but it's also become a personal cause for young Russian volunteers recruited by a variety of nationalist and far-right groups. Many say they're motivated by their Orthodox faith - and their dream to restore Novorossiya, or New Russia, the territory which encompassed eastern Ukraine under the Tsarist Empire. Passionate members of re-enactment societies, they've spent their weekends reliving Russia's historic battles. But now they're fighting - and sometimes dying - for real, in what they see as a test of their own, and Russia's, "manhood". Tim Whewell has gained rare access to the weird, shadowy world of Russia's radical nationalists. He travels with volunteers from the grand old imperial capital, St Petersburg, to the chaotic, muddy battlefields of eastern Ukraine - and reveals a movement whose leaders have become increasingly influential in Putin's Russia - but is now in danger of becoming an embarrassment to the Kremlin.
Producer: Dina Newman.


THU 11:30 James Bond (b04v59h9)
The Soviet James Bond

In the depths of the Cold War, the Soviets had their own version of James Bond, a superspy whose adventures thrilled readers from Minsk to the Urals.

But whereas Bond enjoyed champagne, gambling and beautiful women, the spy codenamed Stierlitz was a Russian patriot of austere tastes (though he does enjoy vodka and singing Russian songs). In novels like “Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat,” Stierlitz carved a parallel path to that being followed by the great 007.

Spy fan Miles Jupp explores the extraordinary legacy of the Soviet James Bond and his creator Julian Semyonov.

Producer: David Stenhouse

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2014


THU 12:00 News Summary (b04v2jsp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b04v5fjh)
18 December 1914 - Mervyn Harris

Maisie Plackett takes very seriously the question 'Is Your Best Boy in Khaki?'

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha Littlehailes


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b04v5fjk)
Delivery delays; Audi problem; 'Gripe sites' censored

The online shopping delivery woes. We find out what the companies are doing to make sure parcels arrive in time for Christmas.

Facebook has removed a 'gripe site' set up to warn people against having laser eye surgery. Are fears of defamation closing Facebook down as a viable forum for complaint about companies?

Plus, why are so many Audi owners finding their car uses a lot of oil? Audi has told us that any customers who think their car may be burning too much can contact their UK customer helpline on 0800 699 888.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Natalie Donovan.


THU 12:57 Weather (b04v2jsr)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b04v5fjm)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v5fjp)
Series 3

Nemesis

Bettany Hughes pursues nemesis in her archaeology of philosophy on the streets of ancient Athens, in the gym and with experts on counterterrorism and climate change.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double expresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award--winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programmes Bettany pursues nemesis with classicist Professor Paul Cartledge, Buddhist scholar Dr Sarah Shaw, Colonel Tim Collins who in March 2003 led British troops into Iraq, and climate change scientist Dr Simon Lewis. Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Ideas examined in the first series, in September 2013, were idea, desire, agony, fame and justice. The second series, in January 2014, considered wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace and hospitality. Other ideas in this series are psyche, charisma, irony and virtue.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b04v3cxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b04v5fjr)
Ebola

The true story of the 1976 discovery of the deadly Ebola virus, in the jungle of Zaire. The arrival in Antwerp of a thermos flask containing the blood of a dead Belgian nun was the first step on a path that led a small group of virologists to discover the deadly disease Ebola.

This drama tells the story of the risks taken by a young team of people, flown deep into the rainforest of Zaire, to study and fight the virus with only the most rudimentary of equipment.

Narrated by one of that 1976 team, Professor Peter Piot was a young trainee virologist based in Antwerp. He went on to run the UN AIDS programme and is now the head of the London School of Hygiene And Tropical Medicine.

Written by Mike Walker
Directed by Dirk Maggs

Produced by David Morley
A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b04v5fjt)
Christmas Trees at Castle Howard

This week Caz Graham visits Castle Howard in Yorkshire.

Famous as the setting for 'Brideshead Revisited' the country estate has been gearing up for the festive period for months.

In the heart of the Howardian Hills, the estate has around 6,100 acres of farmland.

Much of the produce ends up in the farm shop on the estate.

There is also 2000 acres of woodland and at this time of year there is only one tree that people are after: Christmas Trees. Caz meets Nick Cooke, the man in charge of making sure that the trees reach the customers in good condition and also responsible for supplying some of Yorkshire's largest towns with their towering Christmas trees. Caz discovers why the Howardian Hills are perfect from growing Christmas trees and gets an insight into what happens in the winter on a large country estate.

Presenter: Caz Graham
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b04v2ltz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b04v2s11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b04v5fjw)
Angelina Jolie, Danny Elfman, Kevin Macdonald, Kon-Tiki

With Francine Stock.

Angelina Jolie reveals why she's planning to give up acting to concentrate on directing, and describes the moment she discovered that her neighbour Louis Zamperini was an Olympic athlete and ex-prisoner of war, and what it was like showing him her film about his life, Unbroken, just before he died.

Actor Pal Sverre Hagen, known as Norwegian's Ryan Gosling, reveals what it was like to recreate Thor Heyerdahl's epic voyage across the Pacific for the film Kon-Tiki, while Thor Heyerdahl Jr reveals what he thinks is wrong with the account of his father's famous adventure.

Composer Danny Elfman and director Kevin Macdonald share their memories of their first visit to the cinema.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b04v5fjy)
Microplastics; Holey Ice; Vesalius; Overeating

Microplastics
For the first time, scientists have studied the abundance of microplastics in deep sea sediments They have found that tiny fibres of plastic are everywhere and that levels found in the ocean sediments are 4 times higher than in contaminated sea-surface waters.

Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, there was a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that was unaccounted for. But now scientists have found that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics.

Holey Ice
You'd have thought, given how much water and ice there is around, that we'd know pretty much all there is to know about them. Among the notable facts is that ice is less dense than water - which is why it floats on your pond rather than sinking to the bottom. But like carbon - which exists in two distinct forms, diamond and graphite - the molecules in solid H2O can be packed in many different ways. And this week, scientists have found another completely different form of ice, which is perhaps stranger than all the others.

Overeating
Why do some people overeat? In order to find out, brave scientists tucked into 9000 calorie meals.

Vesalius
Andreas Vesalius, the founder of the modern science of anatomy was born 500 years ago, on the 31st December 1514. He was a proponent of, and yet, a strong critic of the ancient Greek physician Galen, who implied human anatomy from animal dissections. Vesalius challenged physicians and medical scholars to get their hands dirty and carry out dissections themselves.

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b04v5fk0)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04v2jst)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b04v5fk2)
Series 6

Robert Newman

Rufus Hound is joined by the comedian and author Robert Newman, who reads from his 1981 teenage diaries. The young Newman goes on a CND rally, meets Tony Benn and Joe Strummer, and falls in love on the bus... twice.

Produced by Harriet Jaine
A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b04v5fk4)
Helen and Pat feel for miserable Roy, who's getting nowhere in trying to rebuild his relationship with Phoebe. Jennifer and Helen offer to help Pat out, who's back and forth to Birmingham visiting Tony. Tony is slowly getting some strength back in his legs.

Jennifer offers to have them all over for Christmas Day, but Pat says she'll be at the hospital with Tony, and Helen will be having a quiet one with Rob and Henry. Tom would be grateful though.

Jennifer gives Pat a gift from Prague. Adam tells Jennifer he and Ian are going away somewhere hot in the New Year - Adam can be spontaneous after all.

Pat and Helen enjoy the Christmas market in Birmingham. Helen's being careful with money, but Pat treats her to a wooden train set for Henry, plus some extra cash. She thanks Helen for all her support.

Charlie begs Adam for help - and his digger - to deal with a landslip at the Estate. Adam can't resist telling Charlie he should ask his mates at RB Farming, before finally agreeing to help. Charlie brings Adam coffee and sandwiches. He missed Adam at the shoot.

Charlie encourages Adam to find a niche operation. Arable farming is for the big players now. Before going, Charlie asks Adam if he'll be coming to the Christmas party at Grey Gables. Adam's not sure he'll have the time.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b04v5gh5)
Esio Trot, Robert Olen Butler, The Thompson Family, The Interview controversy

Two well-loved children's books have been adapted for television - Roald Dahl's Esio Trot and The Boy in the Dress by comedian and author David Walliams. Children's book editor Julia Eccleshare discusses whether the characters in the novels come to life on the small screen.

Razia Iqbal talks to Pulitzer prize-winning author Robert Olen Butler who has turned his hand from literary fiction to writing espionage thrillers. He discusses The Hot Country, his new historical novel about an American journalist reporting on the Mexican Revolution.

Sony has cancelled the release of The Interview, a comedy starring James Franco and Seth Rogan that pokes fun at North Korea, after threats from hackers. US film critic Matt Prigge has seen The Interview and discusses its merits as a film.

Years ago Richard and Linda Thompson were a great musical partnership but then they got divorced. Now their son Teddy has brought them together with their daughter, Kami Thompson and her husband James Walbourne, another son, Jack Thompson, and grandson Zak. The Thompson Family have made an album together called - inevitably - 'Family'. Razia meets Richard, Teddy and Kami as they prepare to perform it live.

Presenter: Razia Iqbal
Producer: Olivia Skinner.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v59h5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b04v5gh7)
Rape: Prosecuting Accusers

A feminist campaign group has criticised the Crown Prosecution Service for prosecuting women suspected of making false accusations of rape. Do cases like this deter women from reporting rape, or is it the best way to get justice for men who go through the ordeal of clearing their name?

In this week's edition we hear the story of Paul Fensome, who was investigated and jailed after a false rape claim. After he cleared his name, his accuser was convicted of perverting the course of justice. Reporter Melanie Abbott asks whether the police are properly investigating accusations and whether the Crown Prosecution Service has got the balance right.

Producer: India Rakusen
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight.


THU 20:30 In Business (b04v5gh9)
For Ever and Ever

FOR EVER AND EVER
Britain's cathedrals have defined the landscape for more than 1000 years
as places of worship, tourist attractions, and unrivalled architectural
achievements. But what's their role in the 21st century? Peter Day hears
about the business of running some of the country's most famous places.
Producer : Sandra Kanthal.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b04v5fjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b04v59gz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b04v2jsw)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b04v5ghc)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04v5ghf)
Mary Costello - Academy Street

Episode 9

Mary Costello's acclaimed debut – which has been shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award - traces the arc of a quiet woman's life: from Tess Lohan's childhood in 1940s rural Ireland through to her emigration to America and a career as a nurse in New York.

Close to retirement, Tess's life has settled into a contented rhythm; enjoying her family and taking great pleasure in reading. But fate intervenes and she must cope with a terrible loss.

Read by Niamh Cusack

Written by Mary Costello

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron


THU 23:00 Another Case of Milton Jones (b013fm6m)
Series 5

Undercover Journalist

Milton Jones becomes Britain's best-known undercover journalist. Which means that Milton Jones also becomes Britain's most least-effective undercover journalist...

He's joined in his endeavours by his co-stars Tom Goodman-Hill ("Camelot"), Dave Lamb ("Come Dine With Me") and Margaret Cabourn-Smith ("Miranda").

Milton Jones returns to BBC Radio Four for an amazing 9th series - which means he's been running for longer than Gardeners' Question Time and answered more questions on gardening as well.

Britain's funniest Milton and the king of the one-liner returns with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes for a series of daffy comedy adventures

Each week, Milton is a complete and utter expert at something - brilliant Mathematician, World-Class Cyclist, Aviator, Championship Jockey...

... and each week, with absolutely no ability or competence, he plunges into a big adventure with utterly funny results...

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian.

"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times

"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary ("Think The Unthinkable", "Miranda")

David Tyler's radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, Another Case Of Milton Jones, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, The Castle, The 3rd Degree and even, going back a bit, Radio Active. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul & Pauline Calf Video Diaries, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04v5ghh)
Peter Mulligan reports as MPs clash on the NHS. There's new cuts for town halls. And what's it like to demonstrate for democracy in Hong Kong?

Editor: Alicia McCarthy.


THU 23:55 The Listening Project (b04sy4v3)
Nancie and Neil - Tears Not Allowed

Fi Glover introduces a 90 year old and her son, who were both sent to boarding school and who now reflect on the pain of being separated from your parents at the age of six.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



FRIDAY 19 DECEMBER 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04v2jv8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 The Kingdom to Come (b04v59h1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jvb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04v2jvd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04v2jvg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04v2jvj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04v66n6)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Judy Merry.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b04v5pfy)
Badger Cull Figures, Convicted Gangmasters

With DEFRA having released the badger cull figures, we ask how successful was it? We hear that while in Somerset the cull was deemed effective, in Gloucestershire it fell well short.

The government's chief vet concluded that the Somerset figures show 'industry-led culling can, in the right circumstances' be effective and help control disease.

Charlotte Smith speaks to NFU President, Meirig Raymond, Dominic Dyer of the Badger Trust, and
Andrew Guest, who's spokesman for Gloscon, the farmer-led company that's carried out badger culling in west Gloucestershire.

As two Latvian men have been found guilty of taking part in an illegal gangmastering operation, we hear about the lives of migrants working in the fields around Wisbech in Cambridgeshire.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0hgk)
Eastern Orphean Warbler

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Liz Bonnin presents the eastern orphean warbler in an olive grove near Athens. Until recently there used to be just a single species of Orphean Warbler; a summer visitor to southern Europe, North Africa and western Asia: a handsome bird much like a large blackcap with a white throat and greyish-brown back. But across the wide breeding range which stretches from Portugal to Pakistan some orphean warblers look and sound different. Those east of Italy tend to be subtly greyer above and paler beneath. And the songs of birds from Greece eastwards are longer and richer, often including the richness of nightingale like notes. These slight differences have persuaded many ornithologists that the Eastern Orphean warbler is a different species to the Western Orphean Warbler. Biologists call this "splitting "although exactly where these new species boundaries lie is a moot point.


FRI 06:00 Today (b04v5pg0)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b04v2lv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Kingdom to Come (b04v5pg2)
William Hague MP

In the last programme in this series of one-to-one conversations, Peter Hennessy, the historian, asks William Hague MP, First Secretary of State and Leader of the House of Commons, how the United Kingdom's constitution will change as a result of further devolution.
The hurried promises of further devolution made by political leaders during and immediately after the Scottish Referendum will fundamentally change how the United Kingdom is governed, with little opportunity for people to consider what this radical reform might mean or to discuss the constitutional implications.
This series explores the possible impact of further devolution on the United Kingdom's constitution. In each programme, Peter Hennessy invites his guests to draw on their different expertise in government, politics, the law and public ethics in considering questions of accountability, coherence and practicality. For example, would further devolution improve trust in politics? Is devolution practical unless it is accompanied by tax-raising powers? Is there a risk that varying degrees of devolution across the country could create an incoherent system? Would all citizens of the United Kingdom continue to enjoy equal rights? Would a federal constitution be viable? Are we heading towards the end of the United Kingdom?
Peter Hennessy's other guests in this series are Alistair Darling MP, former Chancellor of the Exchequer; Onora O'Neill (Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve), philosopher, chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission and former BBC Reith lecturer; David Hope (Lord Hope of Craighead), former Deputy President of the United Kingdom's Supreme Court; and Robin Butler (Lord Butler of Brockwell), former Cabinet Secretary.
Producer: Rob Shepherd.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04v66n8)
Domestic Abuse, American Nuns, Special Guardianship

A new law has been announced to protect victims of psychological domestic abuse, but will it actually work? Research into special guardianship has raised concerns about support for family members who take on responsibility for relatives' children. Is the Vatican softening its stance on the activities of American nuns, previously criticised as being too secular and feminist. And a special report from West Africa on the impact of Ebola on pregnant women.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v5pg4)
Just a Girl: Series 1

Episode 5

Gary finally comes to terms with the hormone blockers, but Charlotte has shocking news for him.

How would you cope if your child was born into the wrong body? Powerful new drama by Mark Davies Markham.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy who was born as Ben. Adamant that she is a girl from an early age, Amy is growing up fast and nervous about starting senior school, with a boy's body. Her parents, Gary and Charlotte, have to help decide whether she should take significant steps to delay puberty until she can be fully assessed for transgender treatment. The right thing to do is not clear, and their different views on what is best for their child present some very difficult choices. Granddad Ted loves them all but struggles to grasp how serious the situation is. At the same time, everyday family life goes on, and re-decorating Amy's bedroom brings her and her Granddad closer. This honest, compassionate new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families, and the Tavistock Clinic.

Studio Pianist ..... Alfie Davies
Director ..... Polly Thomas
Writer ..... Mark Davies Markham.


FRI 11:00 Becoming Myself: Gender Identity (b04v5pg6)
Trans Women

A revealing series which goes inside the Charing Cross Gender Identity Clinic in Hammersmith, London - the largest and oldest in the world - to explore the condition of gender dysphoria - a sense of distress caused by a disjunction between biological sex and gender identity.

With growing mainstream discussion prompted by high-profile transgender people like boxing promoter Frank Maloney, WikiLeaks source Chelsea Manning and model Andrej Pejic, gender dysphoria is fast becoming more visible. Indeed there has been a steady rise in the numbers of referrals to Gender Identity Clinics across the country and patient numbers at Charing Cross have doubled in the last five years.

This series follows a group of transgender patients pursuing treatment for gender dysphoria in order to 'become themselves'. In the first programme we meet Freddie, Mitchell and Blade, who were raised female and are seeking treatment as trans men. The second programme centres on trans women Bethany, Emma and Tanya, who are making the opposite journey.

We also hear from the psychiatrists, endocrinologists and surgeons as they meet and assess the patients on a day-to-day basis. Their treatment decisions have the potential to transform the lives of their patients, but these irrevocable changes are not made lightly.

Narrator: Adjoa Andoh

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Just William - Live! (b03z3lhv)
Series 4

The New Neighbour

As a highlight of the Cheltenham Festival of Literature in October, Martin Jarvis performed the second of two of Richmal Crompton's comic classics, live on-stage.

In The New Neighbour, William Brown is at his lateral-thinking best. How to rid the village of a horrific newcomer who torments his neighbours? William, master of human psychology, devises a brilliant plan. But, when the local policeman intervenes, will it work?

Dazzling stand-up from Jarvis - as William, and every other character. A comic tour de force.

Performed by Martin Jarvis
Director: Rosalind Ayres.

A Jarvis & Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b04v2jvl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b04v5pg8)
19 December 1914 - Alice Macknade

A surprise turn of events in the Macknade household heralds a change in their fortunes.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole
Sound: Martha LIttlehailes


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b04v66nb)
Broadband Adverts, Smart Meters, Christmas Markets

Why the Advertising Standards authority is being asked to look into adverts for broadband deals.

Do smart meters help you save?

Are German markets a good addition to our Christmas traditions?

Why cookies could, in theory, make you pay more when you shop online.

Confusion over local planning could see self-builders still paying a bill they were told they would never face again.

And why checking your credit history could be more important than you realise.

PRESENTER PETER WHITE
PRODUCER PETE WILSON.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04v2jvn)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b04v5pgc)
Iraqi army struggling against Islamic State in Anbar - Quentin Sommerville reports from front line. Kurds lift siege of Mount Sinjar - we hear from chairman of Defence Select Committee Rory Stewart, a former diplomat in Iraq.

Record number of emergency admissions at hospitals in England.

Labour writes to Cabinet Secretary over concerns that government special advisers have come under pressure to get involved in campaigning in by-elections. We hear from shadow minister Lucy Powell and former Conservative MP Paul Goodman.

Rory Cellan-Jones on a test version of Skype's Translator tool; Lithuania prepares to join the euro; and we remember Mandy Rice-Davies who's died at 70.

Presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 The Ideas That Make Us (b04v5pgf)
Series 3

Virtue

Bettany Hughes considers virtue at a club for the English aristocracy, with a former Greek Minister of Finance, and with an aid worker just back from an ebola zone in Sierra Leone.

The surprising and invigorating history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, described as 'a double espresso shot of philosophy, history, science and the arts'. Award--winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history, and how they've shaped us.

In this programme Bettany explores virtue with experts from the humanities and sciences, people who see these big philosophical ideas playing out in their own lives including philosopher Angie Hobbs, writer and historian Stella Tillyard, former Greek Finance Minister Petros Doukas, and Oxfam's Head of Water and Sanitation Andy Bastaple. Bettany travels to Athens to see where these ideas were born and then explores the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives.

Ideas examined in the first series, in September 2013, were idea, desire, agony, fame and justice. The second series, in January 2014, considered wisdom, comedy, liberty, peace and hospitality. Other ideas in this series are psyche, charisma, irony and nemesis.

Series Producer: Dixi Stewart.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b04v5fk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b04v5pgh)
Dogfood Diary

by Laura Bridgeman and Charles Lambert.

A heartbreaking and heartwarming seasonal drama.
Twelve year old Dean has been left home alone. It seems great at first but Christmas is coming and there's no sign of Mum. Where is she?

Choir ..... Jordanhill School Senior Choir

Producer/director ..... Gaynor Macfarlane.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04v5pgk)
Dalston

Eric Robson is in the chair for this week's programme from Dalston. Pippa Greenwood, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson join him to answer the audience questions.

Produced by Darby Dorras.
Assistant Producer: Claire Crofton.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:

Q. I've got a five-year-old dwarf apple tree which is now leaning over and I'm wondering what kind of strap I can use to support it? We've tried rubber straps, but they've snapped.

A. Matthew suggests staking the tree quite low down so that it can flex and strengthen. Try a dead-anchor - this is four stakes driven into the ground around the root ball. Fix stout timbre boards to the top of those stakes so that they hold the root plate in the ground. Or you can use an underground anchor system of wires and a ratchet. To start, you could just use a couple of stakes and make sure they are facing into the wind and then double up with a good quality rubber tie. Christine suggests using tights. Pippa suggests using really good quality rope threaded through a garden hose.

Q. How can you grow and keep Celeriac reliably.

A. Start it off in January, under heat, in as long a container as possible to minimise root disturbance, use a soil based material - a John Innes number two with 15% grit added. Make sure the plants are kept moist. Really good weed control is also important.

Q. Does the panel think it's an old gardeners' tale that putting soot on onion beds makes them grow better?

A. The panel think that it is a bit of a myth but if your soil is light, it can be useful to help the soil absorb more warmth.

Q. I have a Hydrangea Petiolaris on an east-facing wall and I'd like to grow something through it when it's passed its best. What would the panel recommend?

A. Matthew says make sure its well established before you grow something up it as anything vigorous would strangle it. Give it some love before planting through it. Annual mulching in spring or even a slow releasing fertiliser would help it. Pippa suggests foliar feeding as this stimulates extra root growth. Christine suggests planting a Clematis Alpina a couple of metres away and growing it horizontally into the Hydrangea so that you're not disturbing the roots.

Q. Last year I read about a Daphne that has a wonderful smell and flowers all year long. I bought six, gave four to friends and kept two for myself. The ones I gave away have flourished, but mine have died. I planted them in clay pots and watered well, but not too much. I put them against a west-facing wall. The leaves yellowed and dropped off. They died within a few weeks. What did I do wrong?

A. Daphnes like a humus rich woodland soil, so if you had light compost with high levels of coir they wouldn't have been happy. Daphnes also like neutral to acidic soil. They also like a degree of shade, so perhaps they got too warm. Daphnes are also prone to attack by spider mite.

Q. I've grown Aubergines in the greenhouse for many years with success. This year the plants grew well in the house before I put them in the greenhouse at the end of May. Then they stopped growing despite no inclement weather or late frosts. The Tomatoes, Peppers and Cucumbers just grew normally but the Aubergine's roots just didn't develop properly. I gave a friend some of the plants to put in his greenhouse and he had the same problem.

A. Perhaps they got too damp or they had root rot or some kind of virus. Next year use a fresh packet of seeds and watch out for aphids and whitefly.

Q. How long does it take for grass turfs to break down? What can they be used for once broken down?

A. They take anything between six and twelve months to break down depending on the soil type and composition of the turf. Stack it turf to turf. If it's warm and moist break down will be faster. It can be used as potting compost or seed compost.

Q. I planted a weeping ash about eight years ago. One section is great and is six feet tall and weeping while the other half has gone straight up and is fourteen foot high. When can I cut the vertical part?

A. The trick is to get it out as soon as possible but it's never too late, it might just look a little odd and there will be a sizable wound. Wait until it's in leaf in the spring.


FRI 15:45 King Albert's Book (b04v5r6m)
Episode 1

King Albert's Book was a tribute to the Belgian King and people, published by subscription in December 1914.

The book was the idea of Hall Caine, a novelist and playwright of the late Victorian and Edwardian eras, to raise money for the Daily Telegraph Belgium fund. He invited princes, statesman, churchmen, authors, political activists, artists and composers to present their view of the tragedy that had befallen Belgium in the preceding months of war.

Contributors include Winston Churchill, Thomas Hardy, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Sarah Bernhardt, Emmeline Pankhurst and Rudyard Kipling. The result is an extraordinary snapshot of a moment in time and the passions aroused by the conquest of Belgium and the resistance led by King Albert.

As the book was being prepared in the Autumn of 1914, no one knew how the tragedy of the First World War would unfold - there was still hope that it would all be over fairly swiftly. What seemed to be a heroic defence of a sovereign state was the primary concern of the book's contributors, little knowing how long the conflict would continue and how the greater tragedy of the war would supersede this event.

In this first episode, narrated by the writer and producer Paul Dodgson, there are little known poems by Rudyard Kipling and Edith Wharton, and spirited rhetoric in praise of King Albert from the pen of former Prime Minister, The Earl of Rosebury.

Readers: Kenneth Cranham, Tim McMullan and Harriet Walter.
Pianist: Kevin Matthews

Narrated and Produced by Paul Dodgson
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b04v66nd)
Mandy Rice-Davies, Dr Tim Black, Michel du Cille, Ian Player, Christopher Morris

Matthew Bannister on

Mandy Rice-Davies, the former showgirl who was involved in the Profumo Affair.

Dr Tim Black who built Marie Stopes International into one of the world's largest family planning organisations.

Michel du Cille - the award winning photographer who covered conflicts in Africa and Afghanistan.

Ian Player, the South African conservationist who built up the population of the white rhino

And Christopher Morris, the organist and publisher who launched the book Carols For Choirs.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b04v66ng)
Gwyneth Williams is in her fifth year as the controller of Radio 4 and has made her mark with various radical changes - including bringing a former Eastenders' producer to The Archers, cutting 12 minutes from You and Yours and bringing visualisation to a variety of Radio 4 programming.

For the final episode of this series, Feedback listeners speak directly to the Controller and give their views on the network. Loyal Archers Addicts ask how much free rein the editor should have when many listeners are unhappy with the programme's current direction.

Gwyneth is also asked whether there is a theme to the daily '12 o clock slot' that has divided listeners, and whether 15 minute programmes are long enough to over complex topics.

Radio 4's leap towards a dazzling digital future is also put under scrutiny as a listener asks whether radio programmes truly benefit from visual elements.

And how tight is her Radio 4 budget for programmes, given that even more cuts are coming soon?

Producer Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b04v5r6p)
Claire and Monica – Taking Things at Face Value

Fi Glover introduces a mother who remembers how her daughter’s birthmark affected her early life, and her daughter who confirms that her parents were right not to have it removed.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


FRI 17:00 PM (b04v5xys)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04v2jvq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b04v5r6r)
Series 85

Episode 9

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, who is joined by Rebecca Front, Bob Mills and Mark Steel, alongside regular panellist Jeremy Hardy.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b04v5r6t)
George is excited to be playing a Wise Man in the nativity. Keira is a snowflake. Alan's traditional nativity includes the wooden crib made years ago by Tom Forrest, which the children will build up piece by piece. George says his lines and then a star appears over the crib, to Clarrie's amazement

Emma stuns and delights Clarrie by offering to have everyone over to 1, The Green for Christmas dinner - her first in her new home.

Carol treats her guests to mulled wine and canapés at Glebe Cottage. Felpersham Light Opera's production of Season's Greetings has a rave review in the Echo, setting an unspoken challenge for Lynda. Lilian feels that Lynda has been too strict in her approach to Blithe Spirit. Just another week and it'll all be over, says Carol.

Commenting on how good it is for Carol to be part of the village, Jennifer can't help fishing for more details about John. Lilian reprimands Jennifer for this and later catches her snooping around upstairs for clues about Carol and whatever secrets Jennifer is convinced she has.

Jill and Carol reflect on the terrible fallout from Elizabeth and Roy's affair. Jennifer shocks Jill by revealing the extent of Justin Elliott's development plans. He is seeking planning permission to build a country house at Brookfield. Jill confronts David and Ruth. David admits that once the sale goes through, Justin can do whatever he likes.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b04v66nj)
Miranda Hart, John Rutter, Seamus Heaney

Miranda Hart tells Razia Iqbal about the emotional filming of the final episodes of her sitcom Miranda.

The latest instalment of the Night of the Museum franchise, starring Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson, is set in the British Museum. But how do you film riotous action sequences in one of the busiest museums in the world, full of priceless artefacts? Razia tours the museum with the film's location manager, Michael Harm.

Before his death last August Seamus Heaney was working on a selection of poems from the second half of his career. His 'New Selected Poems 1988 - 2013' has now been published. It ends with 'In Time', a poem written for his granddaughter just a fortnight before he died. Maurice Riordan, editor of 'Poetry Review', reviews the selection.

And composer John Rutter tells Razia what makes the perfect Christmas carol.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04v5pg4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b04v5r6w)
Giles Fraser, Tessa Jowell MP, Norman Lamb MP, John Redwood MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Hampton on Thames Community Centre in Middlesex with Dr Giles Fraser priest-in-charge at St Mary's Newington in South London, former Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sport, Tessa Jowell MP, the Liberal Democrat MP Norman Lamb who serves as Minister for Care and Support in the coalition government and the back bench Conservative MP John Redwood.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b04v66nl)
Art: The Real Thing

In the last of his three talks on art Roger Scruton asks what constitutes real art, as opposed to cliche or kitsch.

He says we must ignore the vast quantities of art produced as commodities to be sold, in contrast to symphonies or novels that cannot be owned in the same way as a painting or a sculpture.

Real art has to have lasting appeal, he argues, and for that it needs three things: beauty, form and redemption. The production of such art, he says, takes immense hard work and attention to detail, but it can give meaning to our modern lives and show love in the midst of doubt and desolation.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b04v5r6y)
15-19 December 1914

As Christmas approaches, a spirit of generosity and recklessness fills the air, as all Folkestone is encouraged to give themselves to the war.

Written by: Shaun McKenna
Story led by: Katie Hims
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04v2jvs)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b04v66nn)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04v5r70)
Mary Costello - Academy Street

Episode 10

Mary Costello's acclaimed debut – which has been shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award - traces the arc of a quiet woman's life: from Tess Lohan's childhood in 1940s rural Ireland through to her emigration to America and a career as a nurse in New York.

Carrying the sorrow for her loss deep within her, Tess returns to visit her family in Ireland – her first trip back since she left in 1962.

Read by Niamh Cusack

Written by Mary Costello

Abridged by Kirsteen Cameron

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b04v382p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04v66nq)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b04v5r72)
Rhian and Meirion – A Farming Family

Fi Glover introduces a couple who have been married for half a century and have passed their love of their mountainous land on to their children.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b04v2ynx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b04v2ynx)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b04v381f)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b04v381f)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b04v3b9m)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b04v3b9m)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b04v59h5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b04v59h5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b04v5pg4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b04v5pg4)

23 Amazing Reasons This Radio Programme Will Change Your Life 17:00 SUN (b04tjfvy)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04tlr0g)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b04v66nl)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b04v3844)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b04v3844)

Andrew O'Neill: Pharmacist Baffler 23:00 TUE (b04v3950)

Another Case of Milton Jones 23:00 THU (b013fm6m)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b04tcgjb)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04tlr0d)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b04v5r6w)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b04v2b83)

At Home Abroad 20:00 WED (b04v4sx8)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b04v5fjy)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b04v5fjy)

Beckett in Brooklyn 16:00 MON (b04v30zx)

Becoming Myself: Gender Identity 11:00 FRI (b04v5pg6)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b04v2ltq)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b04v2ltq)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b04v30zz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b04v328h)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b04v38s6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b04v4sxj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b04v5ghf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b04v5r70)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b04tv0pj)

Border Crossings 00:30 SUN (b03w39ww)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b04v2lv3)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b04thfrp)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b04v30zv)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b04tljk6)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b04v59h7)

Death of An Orchestra 11:30 TUE (b04v381r)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b04v2lv7)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b04v2lv7)

Document 21:30 TUE (b01r9c9r)

Drama 14:15 MON (b04v30zs)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b04v382d)

Drama 14:15 WED (b013gd2b)

Drama 14:15 THU (b04v5fjr)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b04v5pgh)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b04v29gs)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04v2ynl)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b04v380n)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b04v3b99)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b04v59gk)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b04v5pfy)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b04tlys1)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b04v66ng)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b04v4sxb)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04tcgj2)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b04v3289)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04v383q)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b04v4sx6)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b04v5gh5)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b04v66nj)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b04v4sxd)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04tlr02)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b04v5pgk)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b04v382p)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b04v382p)

Hobby Bobbies 11:30 WED (b04v3cx5)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b04v5r6y)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b04v2z6r)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b04v381z)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b04v3cx7)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b04v5fjh)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b04v5pg8)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (b04tj37y)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b04v3103)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b04tlk9z)

In Business 20:30 THU (b04v5gh9)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b04v59gz)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b04v59gz)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b04v3840)

James Bond 11:30 THU (b04v59h9)

Just William - Live! 11:30 FRI (b03z3lhv)

King Albert's Book 15:45 FRI (b04v5r6m)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04tlyrz)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b04v66nd)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 MON (b04v2ynz)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b04v2b33)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b04v328k)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b04v382g)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04tcghk)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b04v2jjm)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04v2jmq)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b04v2jp7)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b04v2jqp)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04v2jsc)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04v2jv8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b04v3b9f)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b04v3b9f)

Mission Improbable 23:15 WED (b01p0s15)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b04v3cxh)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b04v29h3)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b04v29h3)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 THU (b04v5fk2)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04tcght)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b04v2jk2)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04v2jmz)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b04v2jph)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b04v2jqy)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04v2jsm)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04v2jvj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b04v2jk8)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04tcgj4)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b04v2jl7)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b04v2jn3)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b04v2jpk)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b04v2jr0)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b04v2jsp)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b04v2jvl)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04tcghw)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b04v2jkp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b04v2jl0)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04tcgjq)

News 13:00 SAT (b04tcgj8)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b04v2ltv)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b04v2s11)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b04v2s11)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b04tljkj)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b04v5fjt)

PM 17:00 SAT (b04tcgjd)

PM 17:00 MON (b04v3101)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04v382z)

PM 17:00 WED (b04v3cxp)

PM 17:00 THU (b04v5fk0)

PM 17:00 FRI (b04v5xys)

Paul Sinha's History Revision 18:30 WED (b04v3cxr)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b04v2s5b)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04tlrjj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04v2ynj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b04v380h)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b04v3b97)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b04v59gb)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b04v2b35)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b04v2b35)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b04v2b35)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b04v2ltz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b04v2ltz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b04v2ltz)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b04v29gx)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b04tcgjn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04tcghp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b04v2jjv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04v2jmv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b04v2jpc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b04v2jqt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04v2jsh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04v2jvd)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04tjdlq)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b04v381l)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04tcghm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04tcghr)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b04v2jjp)

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Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b04v2jlc)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b04v2jqw)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04v2jsk)

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Shorts 19:45 SUN (b04v2sss)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04tcgjl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b04v2jlh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04v2jn7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b04v2jpp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b04v2jr6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04v2jst)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04v2jvq)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04v2lts)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04v2lts)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b04tjdls)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b04v2ynq)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b04v2ynq)

Start/Stop 11:30 MON (b04v2z6p)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b04v2lv1)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b04v2ltx)

Suppose I Lose It 20:00 TUE (b04v383w)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b04v2lv5)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b04v2s5d)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b04v2s5d)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b04v3287)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b04v3287)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04v383k)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04v383k)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b04v3cxt)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b04v3cxt)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b04v5fk4)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b04v5fk4)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b04v5r6t)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b04tcxm6)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b04v2s13)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b04tljkl)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b04v5fjw)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b04v2lv9)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b04v2lv9)

The Ideas That Make Us 13:45 MON (b04v30zq)

The Ideas That Make Us 13:45 TUE (b04v382b)

The Ideas That Make Us 13:45 WED (b04v3cxf)

The Ideas That Make Us 13:45 THU (b04v5fjp)

The Ideas That Make Us 13:45 FRI (b04v5pgf)

The Invisible Age 20:00 MON (b04v328c)

The Kingdom to Come 09:45 MON (b04v2yns)

The Kingdom to Come 00:30 TUE (b04v2yns)

The Kingdom to Come 09:45 TUE (b04v3813)

The Kingdom to Come 00:30 WED (b04v3813)

The Kingdom to Come 09:45 WED (b04v3b9h)

The Kingdom to Come 00:30 THU (b04v3b9h)

The Kingdom to Come 09:45 THU (b04v59h1)

The Kingdom to Come 00:30 FRI (b04v59h1)

The Kingdom to Come 09:45 FRI (b04v5pg2)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b04v29gz)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b04v29gz)

The Lach Chronicles 23:00 WED (b04v4sxl)

The Lipinski 13:30 SUN (b04v2lyk)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04v2s0x)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b04v3b9p)

The Listening Project 23:55 THU (b04sy4v3)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b04v5r6p)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b04v5r72)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b04v3cxm)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b04tlr06)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b04v5r6r)

The Once and Future King 21:00 SAT (b04tclg7)

The Once and Future King 15:00 SUN (b04v2s0z)

The Penny Dreadfuls 14:30 SAT (b04v29h5)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b04tjdlj)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b04v380z)

The Report 20:00 THU (b04v5gh7)

The Rest is History 19:15 SUN (b04v2ssq)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b04v29h1)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04v2lyh)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b04v328f)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04v38s4)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b04v4sxg)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b04v5ghc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b04v66nn)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b04tlfsk)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b04v3cxk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b04v328m)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b04v3952)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b04v4sxn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b04v5ghh)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b04v66nq)

Today 07:00 SAT (b04v29gv)

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Today 06:00 TUE (b04v380w)

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Today 06:00 THU (b04v59gv)

Today 06:00 FRI (b04v5pg0)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 18:30 TUE (b04v3838)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04symph)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04syygh)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04v2jlk)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04v2ssv)

What's Funny about Money? 11:00 WED (b04vxv1c)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b04v2b31)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b04v2ynv)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b04v3817)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b04v3b9k)

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Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b04v382j)

World at One 13:00 MON (b04v30zn)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b04v30zl)

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