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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 NOVEMBER 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04n23vp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6tvd)
Reichstag

Neil MacGregor began his journey through 600 years of German history at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, and ends it at the Reichstag, seat of the German Parliament. These two extraordinary buildings, only a few hundred yards apart, carry in their very stones the political history of the country.

Neil talks to architect Norman Foster, who in 1992 won the commission to restore the Reichstag, when Germany's Parliament returned to Berlin in the wake of re-unification.

Producer Paul Kobrak.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04n23vr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04n23vw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04n23vy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04n23w0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04n69px)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Chaplain to The Royal British Legion, the Rt Revd Nigel McCulloch.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04n23w2)
Sara Tasker is an Instagram super-user. She has thousands of followers on her account @me_and_orla where she posts artful photographs of her and her daughter's life in Yorkshire. What started out as a hobby is becoming something else entirely. She tells Jennifer Tracey how it started and what's happened since.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04n23w4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04n23w6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b04n62n8)
Orchards in Herefordshire

Felicity Evans visits the autumnal orchards of Herefordshire and discovers how centuries of cider production have shaped this landscape. For at least 350 years there has been cider production in this area and there are over 800 orchards across the Wye Valley, which make a significant contribution to the beautiful countryside.

Norman Stanier's family have lived in this area for generations and are deeply rooted ('scuse the pun') in the apple industry here. He shares his passion for this landscape and explains how centuries ago these local enterprises caught the eye of Gladstone's government as they sought to do away with the 'Yankee Apples' and how today, this area has become 'The Big Apple' of the UK.

Featuring visits to a variety of cider and perry producers - from small scale ametuer production to award winning artisan ciders and global scale distribution from Europes largest cider factory.

Produced by Nicola Humphries.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b04nqpc7)
Farming Today This Week: Invasive Species

Farming Today this week goes Sunningdale in Berkshire to discover Himalayan Balsam and see what two scientists are doing to try and stop its spread. Dr Carol Ellison and her colleague Sonal Vari work for CABI, who are non profit science-based development and information organisation. They are releasing pathogens which are the Himalayan balsam's natural enemy, and attack the plant without damaging any other flora or fauna around it. Dr Niall Moore is head of the Non-Native Species Secretariat - a government body reporting to Defra he says foreign species are costly for the UK economy, treating their effects is estimated to cost £166 million a year. Many local groups try to pull up and destroy invasive weeds, Lucy Bickerton went out on the River Frome looking for Japanese Knotweed with Neil Green from the Avon Invasive Weeds Forum to find out more about their work. However, it isnt just plants which are a problem, animals such as the Grey squirrel and Signal Cray fish are too. In Scotland, American mink are having a significant impact on the local wildlife population. Nancy Nicholson talked to Anne Marie McMaster who is involved in a programme of culling the mink. Invasive species are an international problem, last week in Turkey, a high level conference took place about the issue, which brought together many European agencies who were concerned about the problem. Dr Helen Roy was in attendance and said that there needs to be a joined up approach in tackling Invasive species.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04n23w8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b04nqpc9)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b04nqpcc)
Radio 4 BBC Children in Need Auction; Katherine Jenkins

Mezzo-Soprano Katherine Jenkins joined Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir.

Saturday Live hosted a special auction, offering listeners the chance to bid for some amazing prize packages to raise money for BBC Children in Need. LINES ARE NOW CLOSED - PLEASE DO NOT CALL OR TRY TO BID.
Jonathan Agnew described the Test Match Special package; Felicity Finch aka Ruth Archer talked about the VIP Archers experience; Alan Smith described life behind the scenes at R4 presentation and Richard, Aasmah and JP Devlin talked about the Saturday Live experience. With Auctioneer, Will Farmer.

John Craven shared his Inheritance Tracks - You Are My Sunshine by Gene Autry and The Children in Need single Wake Me Up.

We also heard from Jack and Billie who have benefitted from projects supported by Children in Need and from children who say Thank You.

Katherine Jenkins has sold more than eight million records and received accolades including two Classical BRITS. She headlined the Queen's Coronation Festival at Buckingham Palace and was awarded an OBE at the 2014 New Year's Honours List. She joined Richard and Aasmah to discuss her music career and her return to her classical roots.
Home Sweet Home by Katherine Jenkins is released on 17 November.


SAT 10:30 The Frequency of Laughter: A History of Radio Comedy (b04nqpcf)
1980-1985

The Frequency of Laughter is a six-part history of radio comedy, covering 1975-2005, presented by journalist and radio fan Grace Dent. In each episode she brings together two figures who were making significant radio comedy at the same time, and asks them about their experiences. This is a conversational history that focuses on the people who were there and the atmosphere within the BBC and the wider comedy world that allowed them to make great radio - or not.

This second edition features Angus Deayton and Michael Knowles looking at radio comedy in the early 1980s. Angus had been given a writer's contract by the BBC Light Entertainment Radio (as it was then) in 1980, and used the time he was afforded by that to co-create the sketch show Radio Active, in which he wrote and performed. Michael however came to radio from television; having acted in It Ain't Half Hot Mum, he was asked to adapt Dad's Army for radio in the 1970s, which he did to great success, and in 1983 he and Harold Snoad wrote the sitcom It Stick Out Half A Mile, a sort of Dad's Army sequel. Grace asks them about the atmosphere within the Radio Comedy department and within the BBC, and how they might circumvent rules on taste and decency; they share their memories of former Heads of Light Entertainment Radio (as it was then called) Bobby Jaye and Martin Fisher; and they talk about how the alternative comedy movement bypassed radio and went straight to TV - and how it felt to be left behind.

The Frequency of Laughter is presented by Grace Dent, a journalist for The Independent, and is a BBC Radio Comedy production.

Presenter ... Grace Dent
Guest ... Angus Deayton
Guest ... Michael Knowles
Interviewee ... Martin Fisher
Interviewee ... Peter Richardson

Producers ... Ed Morrish & Alexandra Smith.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b04nqpcl)
Paul Waugh, editor of PoliticsHome.com, looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Questions over Ed Miliband's leadership, how to interpret the mid-term election gains for the Republicans in the United States, making paying for sex a criminal offence, and the problem of terrorists using social media networks.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04n23wb)
Jerusalem on Edge

Foreign correspondents. Today, Kevin Connolly on tension in Jerusalem:- a reminder, he says, that the very thing that makes the city one of the glories of human civilisation makes it difficult and dangerous too; a walk through the Menin Gate towards Flanders fields - Chris Haslam on the storm of commercialisation sweeping through the memorial sites of World War One; some of the Russian republics want independence but Mark Stratton, travelling through the Middle Volga lowlands, finds others happy to be part of Moscow's empire; students in India have been talking to Craig Jeffrey about their right to cheat in university exams and as Berlin marks the anniversary of the Wall coming down, Jenny Hill tells us the story of one young couple's 'forbidden journey'.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04n23wd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b04n23wg)
Security breach at the Booking.com hotel website

Paul Lewis presents the latest news from the world of personal finance.

CHECKING OUT!
Booking.com - the hotel booking firm that describes itself as Planet Earth's number one accommodation site admits that at least 10,000 customers have been targeted by scammers who have tried to get them to pay twice for their room. But it won't warn all its customers that the fraud is going on, leaving many of them to find out for themselves.

BAD EXPERIENCE!
Would the threat of a bad credit record encourage absent fathers (for it is mainly men) to pay the maintenance for their children which has been ordered by the courts? The Government thinks so. We talk to single parent organization Gingerbread.

FINANCIAL ADVISER ADVICE
New online directories promise to help with the search for a good financial adviser. We look at what they will offer and the differences between them. The boss of one of them will be live on the programme.

COUNCIL ENERGY
Plymouth council has done a deal with energy supplier Ovo which means it will provide electricity and gas for people who live lin the city. We ask Ovo how the scheme will actually work and how it differs from schemes which allows residents to club together and negotiate cheap energy deals.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Paul Waters.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b04nhytz)
Series 85

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, who is joined by Andrew Maxwell and Andy Hamilton, alongside regular panellist Jeremy Hardy.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04n23wj)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04n23wl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04n695h)
Diane Abbott MP, Douglas Carswell MP, Dominic Grieve MP, Simon Hughes MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Newton Abbot in Devon with Labour MP Diane Abbott, the UKIP MP Douglas Carswell, the former Attorney General Dominic Grieve MP, and Justice Minister Simon Hughes MP.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b04n23wn)
Immigration, Drinking whilst pregnant

Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

This week: Immigration and drinking whilst pregnant.

Email: any.answers@bbc.co.uk
Tweet: Follow us @BBCAnyQuestions or tweet using #bbcaq

Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b04nqpd0)
The Boy from Aleppo Who Painted the War

Farshid Rokey, Noof Ousellam and Jalleh Alizadeh lead an outstanding young cast in this heart-rending drama, based on the moving debut novel by Sumia Sukkar.

'The Boy from Aleppo who Painted the War' presents the Syrian conflict through the eyes of Adam, a teenage boy with Asperger's syndrome, who can only speak the truth.

As the war creeps ever closer to home, it devastates and disrupts the life of his family.

Struggling to make sense of the conflict, as he and his family try to survive in an impossibly brutal world, Adam paints as a way to record and cope with the horrors he witnesses.

His older brothers face the dilemma of whether to take sides - and the consequences of their choices have repercussions for the entire family. But can they make it to safety as the conflict in Aleppo rages all around them?

The immediacy and impact of this drama bear witness to the horrors of war, its effect upon the innocent, and the triumph of the human spirit over almost unbearable adversity.

Dramatised for radio by Richard Kurti and Bev Doyle.

Original Music: Imran Ahmad
Sound Design: Wilfredo Acosta

Executive Producer: Andrew Mark Sewell
Producer: Patrick Chapman
Director: Fiona McAlpine

A B7 Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 The Yes, No, Don't Know Show (b04nw3g8)
The brief was simple enough: five minute 'created by anyone for everyone' around the theme of independence.

But then came the logistics. And don't forget the politics. And the fun, nerves and unexpected sadness.

In its most ambitious production to date, over twenty four hours, the National Theatre of Scotland staged 'The Great Yes, No, Don't Know Show', a series of 5 minute theatre pieces on the theme of independence. It was watched online by more than 26000 people in thirty countries.

The production was curated by two Scottish playwrights from opposite sides of the referendum divide. David Greig who voted for independence in September and David MacLennan who wanted Scotland to stay part of the UK. Sadly he died ten days before the production.

Edi followed the making of this epic production, capturing its highs and lows and bitter sweet success.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b04nqpd6)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Blondie, Marian Keyes, Savile Abuse Survivor

Chris Stein and Debbie Harry talk about making music in Blondie, their relationship and Stein's new book celebrating the New York punk scene.

We hear from a woman suffering from the debilitating effects of osteoporosis. A call for better rights for au pairs working in the UK.

A survivor of Jimmy Savile's abuse tells about the effect the violent sex attack has had on the rest of her life. While Dan Davies who's written about Savile explains how he believes the DJ and television presenter got away with his abuse for so many years.

The Queen of Page Turners, Marian Keyes, talks all things sparkly, Strictly and her new book about losing your old life and finding a new one.

And at 82 years old the author Shirley Conran discusses sexual pleasure for older women.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed
Edited by Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b04n23wq)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b04n6438)
Live Long and Prosper

Very few companies survive for centuries. Evan Davis hears from a luxury jeweller, a removals firm and a diversified business that makes money from ships, finance and groceries. Between them they have nearly a thousand years of business experience. What strategies have they embarked on to ensure that they live long and prosper? Has their history become a burden or a motivator? And have they sacrificed growth for corporate longevity?

Guests:
Sir Michael Bibby, MD The Bibby Line
Michael Wainwright, CEO Boodles
Stuart Burnett, Partner Shore Porters Society

Producer:
Rosamund Jones.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04n23ws)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04n23wv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04n23wx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b04nqpdb)
Mick Fleetwood, Matt Berry, Imtiaz Dharker, Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford, GoGo Penguin

Clive talks to Mick Fleetwood about memoir 'Play On' - his life with Fleetwood Mac; Actor, comedian writer and musician, Matt Berry, best known for his role in The IT Crowd, talks to Clive about the new series of 'Toast': and Clive's co-host Nikki Bedi chats to poet Imtiaz Dharker - 'one feels that were there to be a World Laureate, Imtiaz Dharker would be the only candidate' - (Carol Ann Duffy). With music from Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford and GoGo Penguin.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b04n23wz)
Rand Paul

This week, with Republicans celebrating mid term election victories, Rand Paul - a Tea Party supporting ophthalmologist from Kentucky with only three years' experience in the Senate is fast emerging as one of the frontrunners to try to wrest the US Presidency back from the Democrats in 2016.
Rand is part of a political dynasty although hardly from the Republican Party establishment.
His father Ron - also a physician turned politician - ran as a Libertarian for the US Presidency twice on a platform championing free markets, small government and a ferocious determination to keep the state out of individuals lives. Rand shares many of his father's ideas but his challenge now is making them palatable to a majority of the Republican party and a majority of people in the country. Many ask if he could pose a serious threat to Hilary Clinton by greatly expanding the Republicans' appeal and reaching out to African Americans and young voters. Some praise Rand Paul for his unconventional yet pragmatic approach - TIME magazine recently called him "the most interesting man in US politics." But some see him as a wolf in sheep's clothing and a dangerous isolationist.
In this edition of Mark Coles asks who exactly is Rand Paul - the man who eschews small talk but embraces loud shirts and turtle neck sweaters?


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b04n23x1)
DV8: John, Interstellar, Peter Carey, Gold at Buckingham Palace, Puppy Love

Peter Carey's latest novel, Amnesia follows a disgraced Australian journalist hired to write the life story of a hacker activist who has raised the hackles of international governments because she wrote the code that unlocks prisons around the world. Carey is has twice won The Booker Prize, is this another winning work?
DV8 Physical Theatre Company's new show "John" tells the tale of a man who grows up in an extremely abusive family and who- as an adult - finds comfort and company in gay saunas. There's a lot of vivid descriptions of what goes on - how will the audience at London's Lyttleton respond to such explicit depiction of gay sex?
Christopher Nolan's new film Interstellar stars Matthew McConaughey as a former NASA astronaut whose job is to save the human race from extinction...not an simple subject, even for such an accomplished director.
The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace has an exhibition called Gold, which displays some of Her Majesty's astonishing artefacts around that theme. Is it a dazzling success?
Puppy Love is the latest project from Joanna Scanlan and Vicky Pepperdine (who made the award- winning Getting On comedy series set in a hospital geriatric ward). This deals with the world of canine training; is it a bit of dog's breakfast?
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Giles Fraser, Susie Boyt and Antonia Quirke. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b04nqpdd)
The Mersey Militants

Liverpool journalist Liam Fogarty tells the story of how the Militant Tendency dominated his city's politics in the 1980s. Liam asks how a small group of extreme leftists were able to lead Liverpool City Council into a high-profile confrontation with the government of Mrs. Thatcher. He speaks to former Militant leaders Derek Hatton and Tony Mulhearn and to former Westminster politicians who were drawn into the conflict, including Neil Kinnock and Michael Heseltine. And he explores the legacy today of one of the most dramatic eras in British politics, both for the country and for Liverpool.

Producer: Helen Grady.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b04n2k2f)
Alan Le May - The Searchers

Episode 2

By Alan Le May
Dramatised for radio by Adrian Bean

A new adaptation of the classic western novel, upon which the famous film was based. Episode two.

Texas, 1851. It's been three years since the Comanches attacked the Edwards family's settlement on the Texas plains, and kidnapped ten year-old Debbie. Now only Amos Edwards and his nephew Mart remain on the epic search. But Mart is concerned about what Amos might do if he finds Debbie.

Alan Le May's 1954 novel is a timeless work of western fiction and a no-holds-barred portrait of the real American frontier. It explores the fear and the hatred that underpinned the lives of both the white settlers and the Native Americans. And what emerges is a violent account of a creeping genocide, as one culture inevitably triumphs over the other.

John Ford's 1956 film, based on the novel, starred John Wayne as Ethan Edwards (called Amos in the book and radio adaptation). Ford's version of The Searchers was named the Greatest Western Movie of all time by the American Film Institute in 2008.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04n23x3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b04n6119)
The moral purpose of tax

Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the minister of finances for King Louis XIV of France said "The art of taxation consists in so plucking the goose as to obtain the largest amount of feathers with the least possible amount of hissing". You probably won't be surprised to learn that Colbert's central economic principle was that the wealth and the economy of France should serve the state. When it comes to this equation David Cameron has made it clear that he's firmly on the side of the goose. Our PM wasn't quite as colourful as Colbert when he recently set out his principles on taxation, but he did raise more than just an economic argument. It was, he said, his moral duty, to cut taxes. So this week on the Moral Maze we ask: what is the moral purpose of tax? Is tax a kind of moral mechanism to tackle injustice and inequality on our society? Or is the moral imperative of taxation to create as much wealth as possible in the first place, without which no-one benefits and let individuals decide how they send their cash? Can you just measure the morality of taxation through its utilitarian consequences - the greatest happiness for the greatest numbers? Of course that can be used to justify punishing taxes on the wealthy in the name of redistribution, just as it can to argue that the state should allow as many people as possible the freedom to keep as much of their own money as possible. Or is there some overriding moral virtue in raising and paying tax? When citizens allow the state to take some of their money it is a fundamental part of the democratic contract. If voters were equally willing to support high or low taxes which would be the more moral society? The one with high or low taxes? Is tax an issue of individual freedom versus collective altruism? Moral Maze - Presented by Michael Buerk

Panellists: Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Mehdi Hasan.

Witnesses: Professor David Myddelton, Canon Dr. Angus Ritchie, Frances Coppola and Danny Kruger.

Produced by Phil Pegum.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b04n31cm)
Series 28

Episode 7

(7/13)
The seventh heat in the 2014 series is chaired by Russell Davies, with three contestants from the North of England facing questions on music of all varieties. This week's contenders come from Alfreton, Preston and Wigan.

As always, they'll have to demonstrate the breadth of their musical knowledge, and choose a musical special subject on which to answer individual questions - from a list of which they've had no prior warning. There are plenty of musical extracts and clues to identify, including both familiar pieces and new surprises.

The winner will take another of the places in the series semi-finals in a few weeks' time.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Night Fishing (b04n2k2k)
Cumbrian poet Tom Rawling fished for sea trout at night. His poems about fishing were admired by Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes - but now, Tom is almost totally forgotten. Night fishing is a heightened experience captured in sound and with poems read by Tom, found on a cassette.

Tom Rawling was a driven man and his poems have a peculiar intensity, a strange slightly frightening quality that's vivid and almost obsessive. No one else has conveyed so piercingly the drama, the intensity and the sheer strangeness of fishing - above all, of night fishing for sea trout. This programme, with Grevel Lindop and Finlay Wilson, helps us to experience some of that.

Rawling was born in Ennerdale in the Lake District in 1916. His family had been farming on the shores of Ennerdale Water for at least three hundred years. He was the son of the village schoolmaster, attended his father's school, and was caned by him every day. Rawling eventually became a teacher himself - of children with special needs. He preferred that because it didn't tie him down to a syllabus.

He didn't begin writing poetry until he was sixty years old. Retired, the poems poured out of him. They were about Cumbria - about his family, his childhood memories of Ennerdale, and the hard labour entailed in making a living from the land. Also, they were about fishing. Above all, to fish for sea trout.

Produced by Matt Thompson
A Rockethouse production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 09 NOVEMBER 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b04nqpgp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Europe (b01mf7zf)
On the Road

Read by Mark Little.

The Hitch-hiker's Guide to Europe was the book most often stolen from British libraries in the 1970s. Mark Little reads from the young travellers' bible that nestled in every student rucksack forty years ago as they set off to explore Europe on £10 a week. Australian Ken Welsh was the hitcher who inspired thousands to follow "the infinite miles of tarmac and pot-holes which criss-cross the world, the magic ribbon which can lead to a thousand other worlds."

With a great deal of humour, some common sense and a spirit of recklessness lost to today's youngsters, Welsh's book covered everything from How To Hitch ("Providing a driver isn't obviously bombed out of his mind, my rule is to take any car that stops which has its bonnet pointed even vaguely in the direction I want to go...") to tips on How To Survive ("If you make the mistake of getting in with a fast driver who won't stop, make sounds which suggest you're about to throw up all over his upholstery...")

Re-reading it forty years on it's surprising what a different world it was then for the young traveller. There seemed to be more trust around (hitch-hikers are a rarity nowadays), and no real worries about roughing it far from home without the comfort of a mobile phone and by relying on the black markets, pawn shops or even blood banks when cash machines were simply not an option.

Produced by Neil Cargill
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpgr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04nqpgt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpgw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b04nqpgy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b04nqs3w)
The bells of St Lawrence, Towcester.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b04n23wz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b04nqph2)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04nqs3y)
Commemoration

On Remembrance Day, Mark Tully asks why we feel acts of commemoration are important and discusses their purpose with the campaigner and survivor of Ravensbruck Concentration Camp, Selma Van de Perre.

He also introduces readings and music written in commemoration of some of the major conflicts and acts of violence of the last 100 years - from accounts of the very first Armistice Day to commemorations of the Afghan conflict. There is music too, ranging from Shostakovich to Suzanne Vega.

The readers are Jane Whittenshaw, David Westhead and Francis Cadder.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b04nqs40)
Great Crested Newts

As the weather starts to chill, Chris Sperring travels to the Somerset Levels to seek out a last glimpse of the great crested newt as it prepares for hibernation. It's at this time of year we discover why ponds that dry up are important for their breeding and how far they are prepared to travel to find a good place to haul up for winter.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b04nqph4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b04nqph6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b04nqs42)
Religion in Remembrance Sunday, Gender-selective abortion, Berlin Wall 25th anniversary

Secular and humanist groups have called for Remembrance Sunday not to be dominated by religion. Edward Stourton examines what place religion should have in commemorative events.

This Sunday marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We hear about the role churches in East Germany played in the events of 1989.

South Yorkshire's new Police and Crime Commissioner is also a retired Anglican Priest. Canon Alan Billings explains how he will approach the job.

Following the overwhelming backing by MPs for a bill seeking clarification on the law banning gender-selective abortion, we discuss whether more needs to be done to tackle the issue among certain ethnic communities.

The Church of Scotland is arguing for further devolved powers over taxation and welfare, to address what it sees as the "scandal" of poverty and inequality. Kevin Bocquet reports from Glasgow on what greater devolution could mean for the country.

Producers:
Dan Tierney
Rosie Dawson

Series producer:
Amanda Hancox

Contributors:
Canon Alan Billings
Karsten Bannel
Rani Bilkhu
Andrew Copson
Ted Harrison.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b04nqs44)
Epilepsy Research UK

Martin Kemp presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Epilepsy Research UK, a national charity which supports and promotes basic and clinical scientific research into the causes, treatments and prevention of epilepsy, funding individual students and scientists based in university departments, medical schools and hospitals across the country.
Registered Charity No 1100394
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope ' Epilepsy Research UK'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b04nqph8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b04nqphb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b04nqs46)
Coming Home

To mark the anniversary of the start of World War I and drawing to the close of the campaign in Afghanistan, Sunday Worship, on Remembrance Sunday, will be a special edition recorded at Camp Bastion and also on the battlefields of northern France. Former army chaplain, the Reverend Andrew Martlew, meets the British forces there as they prepare to leave and attends a service for the re-interment of the remains of fifteen British soldiers 100 years after they were killed in action in Flanders.

Producer: Phil Pegum.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04n695k)
Capitalism and the Myth of Social Evolution

John Gray reflects on why the advance of capitalism is not - as is widely believed - inevitable. He argues that social evolution is often unpredictable and that the "seemingly unstoppable advance of market forces" could well be halted by political decisions and the "random flux of human events".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mj64k)
Red-breasted Goose

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the red-breasted goose in Siberia. Red-breasted geese are colourful birds with art-deco markings of brick-red, black and white. Despite their dainty and somewhat exotic appearance, these are hardy birds which breed in the remotest areas of arctic Siberia. They often set up home near the eyries of birds of prey, especially peregrine falcons. But there's method in the madness; These wildfowl nest on the ground where their eggs and chicks are vulnerable to predators such as Arctic foxes. But the ever vigilant peregrine falcons detecting a predator, will defend their eyries by calling and dive-bombing any intruders, and this also doubles as a warning system for the geese. In winter red-breasted geese migrate south where most of them graze on seeds and grasses at a few traditional sites in eastern Europe around the Black Sea.


SUN 09:00 News and Papers (b04nqs48)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 09:15 The Archers Omnibus (b04nqs4b)
There is no turning back for David, and Charlie has got something to say to Adam.


SUN 10:30 Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph (b04nqs4d)
Nicholas Witchell sets the scene in London's Whitehall for the solemn ceremony when the nation remembers the sacrifice made by so many in the two world wars and in other more recent conflicts. This year a particular focus of the thoughts of many at the ceremony will be the centenary of the start of World War I as well as the 70th anniversary of the D Day landings; this year veterans of D Day will march past the cenotaph as an entity for the last time.

The traditional music of remembrance is played by the massed bands. After the Last Post and Two Minutes Silence, Her Majesty the Queen lays the first wreath on behalf of nation and commonwealth, before The Bishop of London leads a short Service of Remembrance. During the March Past, both veterans and those involved in present conflicts throughout the world share their thoughts.

Producer: Katharine Longworth.


SUN 11:45 Singing with the Nightingales (b044m17b)
Late in the evening on 19th May, 1924, the BBC made its first live wildlife outside broadcast, from the cellist Beatrice Harrison's garden. A nightingale joined in, singing as she played. Listeners were so entranced by this duet that the cello and nightingale concerts were broadcast annually, eagerly awaited by listeners around the globe.

To celebrate the 90th anniversary of this remarkable musical event, the folk musician Sam Lee finds, somewhere in southern England, "some melodious plot/ Of beechen green, and shadows numberless", as Keats puts it in his 'Ode to a Nightingale', and himself sings "of summer with full throated ease". Sam, with the cellist Francesca Ter-Berg, violinist Flora Curzon and viola player Laurel Pardue, sings songs that feature nightingales, such as 'The Tan Yard Side', to the nightingales as they sing in the thickets.

Sam considers our relationship with this amazing songster, which itself appears in so many songs and poems, and we hear, too, Beatrice's reminiscence of that first nightingale broadcast, 90 years ago.

Producer: Julian May.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b04nqphg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b04n31cw)
Series 7

Episode 5

The Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd welcomes his latest curator Phill Jupitus.

Television and radio presenter, comedy writer and former barrister Clive Anderson, award-winning musician, composer, arranger, conductor and producer Anne Dudley and world famous animator Richard Williams.

The Museum's Steering Committee discusses:

* How the Old Bailey isn't very old
* How the Wool Sack was found to be a sack of horsehair
* How Disney provided the perfect workstation for animators

Researchers: James Harkin and Stevyn Colgan of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and Dan Schreiber

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b04n2hv2)
Mushrooms

From the king oyster to the not-so-humble button, Dan Saladino discovers a world of mushrooms, grown for food - and follows the spores to reveal the secrets of mycelium, hunts for the perfect mushroom sandwich, and finds that there is one species in particular that dominates the supermarkets and our kitchens.

With more types of cultivated mushroom available in the UK now than there has ever been, Dan hears about Korean mushrooms grown in jars, visits Europe's biggest mushroom farm, and tracks down the biggest global company in the ultra-specialised world of spawn production.
Dan also encounters a photographer whose street-food mushroom project inspired him to create a new type of imagery - the 'fungi luminogram', gets insights from Eugenia Bone - author of 'Mycophilia' - and Paul Stamets, legendary mycologist and advocate of mycelium. There will also be plenty of butter and garlic.

Presenter: Dan Saladino
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b04nqphj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04nqv6m)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 Hardeep's Sunday Lunch (b04nqv6p)
Series 3

Hardeep meets Joe Powell

In the first of the series, Hardeep Singh Kohli travels to Newport, South Wales, to meet Joe Powell. Joe has been on an extraordinary journey. Growing up during a time when his condition, Asperger's Syndrome, was not medically recognised or specifically provided for in the care system; he became non-verbal for ten years, speaking only in whispers for the most part or not at all. But today Joe has a voice and he uses it in the most remarkable way. As Hardeep cooks up Welsh Rarebit and roast chicken for Joe and his close friend Bernard, Joe talks about life with Asperger's in a rare and insightful way.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04n6951)
Leeds

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Leeds. Bob Flowerdew, Christine Walkden and Matthew Wilson take questions from local gardeners. Bob and Katie Rushworth visit a jungle garden which is thriving despite the chilly climate.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:

Q. I sowed my Leeks in June this year. Now they look like Spring Onions. Should I leave them to grow or throw them into a stir-fry now?

A. Bob says that next year, sow them earlier - April at the latest. They will grow through the winter, but they have a high chance of bolting. If this happens, cut the flower head off then a bulb will develop which you can leave for a couple of weeks before digging up and putting to one side. You can replant those bulbs at the end of August and have better sized Leeks by Christmas. Go for 'Musselburgh' seeds as they are reliable.
Eric advises you to give up!
Bunny says you should plant them at least nine inches apart. Transplant them now and you'll have a good chance of decent sized leeks soon.

Q. Can the panel recommend some plants that we could grow in containers in a shaded paved area? The area gets sun in the late afternoon. We want a good view, something that reminds us of the courtyards of Seville.

A. This is ambitious. Go for containers with a structure of climbers such as Trachelospermum Jasminoides - 'Star Jasmine'. Sow annuals for colour. Try Virginian Stock, Californian Poppies, Wallflowers and Night-scented stock. Plumbago 'crystal waters', Pelegonium 'Lord Beaufort' or 'Cézanne' would also work well as long as you can keep them frost-free over the winter.

Q. I make home brewed beer for Christmas. This year's brew had lots of Barley and Hops in it. I've heard that Hops can be used on the allotment to repel the slugs, can I use the brewed Barley in the garden, or will it start to re-germinate?

A. Use the grain in the compost, it will be good for the soil.

Q. How can I improve the soil in a massive raised bed? It's topsoil and there is a dressing of compost but it's very hard to dig. It's a metre high, a metre wide and two metres deep.

A. It's a myth that the deeper the topsoil the better. You need lots of sub soil too. The excessive amount of topsoil you have used has now turned bad. So dig out 400mm of the existing soil and then incorporate lots of organic matter and put some more topsoil above that and feed from above. Or, put the compost on top and let the worms do the work. Bob says put lime on first, and then a few weeks later, put on manure. Bunny recommends using green waste.

Q. Does the panel have any advice on how to save some large shrubs that I will have to move as part of a drastic garden makeover? A contorted Hazel, a Buddleia 'dark night', a huge Fuchsia 'Hawkshead' and a large 'mop-head' Hydrangea are among the shrubs. I've read that root pruning in advance can help.

A. Matthew says yes, do the root pruning now with a sharp spade. Prune back when the plant has been moved. Take cuttings from the shrubs as a backup. Bunny says that if you have a digger at hand, use that to dig up the shrubs.
Bob thinks you should buy new plants.

Q. What are the panel's views on using wood chip in the compost?

A. Bob says mix the chippings with urine, compost and lime so that it breaks down. Don't add too much to the compost heap but use it for paths. Bunny and Matt say you must be careful because it can really affect the PH of the soil.

Q. Any tips on growing Physalis alkekengi 'Chinese Lantern' plants?

A. Plant them in the spring as they have all summer to get their roots down. Choose the plants that look very healthy. They will skeletonise by late winter. You can grow it with Passiflora, 'Passion Flower' as the two look great together. Grow both against the wall to maximise the.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04nqv6r)
Sunday Omnibus - Children in Need 1

Fi Glover with three conversations from Walsall, Stoke and London, between people who have been helped by charities funded by Children in Need, about autism, fear and growing up. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Once and Future King (b04krxsk)
The Coming of Merlyn

T. H. White's classic retelling of the King Arthur story dramatised by Brian Sibley. England is in turmoil. On the night before a decisive battle, Merlyn and Arthur meet to talk about what has brought the King and country to this perilous state.

Original music by Elizabeth Purnell
Directors: Gemma Jenkins, Marc Beeby and David Hunter

The radio debut of all five books of The Once and Future King in an adaptation by the award-winning dramatist, Brian Sibley, whose credits include dramatisations of The Lord of The Rings trilogy, Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast novels and most recently, Ray Bradbury's The Illustrated Man.

White's imagining of Arthur's childhood in The Sword in The Stone, his use of myth to deliver a powerful anti-war message and the humanity of his depiction of doomed love marks this cycle of novels as one of the defining works of 20th century fantasy fiction.

White uses the Arthurian legends to explore epic themes of national identity, democracy and the virtues of right over might.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b04nqv6t)
Jane Smiley on Some Luck; Africa 39

The Pulitzer prize winning novelist Jane Smiley talks to Mariella Frostrup about her new novel, Some Luck, the first in a planned trilogy. It opens in 1920 and follows the fortunes of an Iowa farming family through the turbulent events of first half of the 20th century: the Great Depression, the Second World War and the McCarthy era.

Also on the programme, Mariella discusses the best new writing from sub-Saharan Africa with Ellah Allfrey, the editor of a new collection, Africa 39, Lynne Truss reveals the book she'd never part with and some ideas on the best German reading for an A Level student from Julia Franck.


SUN 16:30 Coming Home (b04nqv6w)
Earlier this year, Andrew Motion visited the British army camp at Bad Fallingbostel, 40 kilometres north of Hanover in Germany. It's where the 7th Armoured Brigade - the Desert Rats - are based and where they returned this Spring after Operation Herrick 19, their final tour of duty in Afghanistan.

Here he talked to a range of soldiers, and back in England he also talked to the mother of a soldier who had been killed on duty in Helmand. He has used these conversations as the basis for a series of new poems reflecting on what it is like for British soldiers to come home after their long and dangerous campaign in Afghanistan. The poems explore the particular nature of the Afghan conflict, while showing certain continuities that flow from wars through the generations.

In this programme, the interviews and poems are set side by side, creating a unique poetry event by Andrew Motion to mark Remembrance Day 2014.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b04n338g)
Private Equity: Winners and Losers

Recent high-profile collapses of high street names such as Comet, Phones4U and other companies have left thousands of people out of work and have cost the taxpayer millions in statutory redundancy payments and unpaid taxes. This week File on 4 goes behind the headlines to examine the role of the companies' private equity backers. Were these failed businesses which were bound to have to close? Or might they have survived for longer under different ownership? Fran Abrams investigates.
Producer: Emma Forde.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b04n23wz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04nqphl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b04nqphn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04nqphq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b04nqv6y)
Among John McCarthy's picks, there are profound stories of human resilience, from colonial ladies coping with mud-hut living and witch doctors, to the brutality experienced by prisoners of war. He explores the mentality of violent extremists, and celebrates the difference that comes with disability. There are revelations about the lure of standing in the dark up to your waist in water while holding a stick. We'll be grooving to some funky bass playing and laughing quite a bit too...


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b04nqv70)
Jennifer cries off from the Remembrance service with a terrible cold. Alan leads the service, which brings back memories for Peggy. Shula and Alan talk about Jill and her memories of Brookfield - she has spent 57 years in Ambridge. Shula thinks about Dan who's turning 20. Peggy twists her ankle and people are naturally worried, but she insists she's fine.

Jennifer's putting together a photo album for Peggy - to be ready by Thursday for her birthday. Adam cringes at an embarrassing photo of him as a child dressed in a Tigger costume.

Brian reports that Debbie has been unceremoniously sacked by email - after everything she's done for Borchester Land! She was furious, and Brian and Adam share her outrage. Adam feels that Justin Elliot wants Home Farm out of the picture - having lost contracting work to RB Farming. Adam may have to let his workers, Jeff and Andy, go.

But Adam has an idea - they could buy one or both Brookfield land parcels. Jennifer worries that they'd be seen to be taking advantage of David and Ruth. But inspired Adam wonders at the point of thinking small - let's buy the whole farm, he says.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b04nqv72)
Series 17

Virginia Woolf

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton. Recorded at the Hay Festival with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Russell Davies and Sue Limb.

This week's author is Virginia Woolf.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SUN 19:45 Grounded (b04nqv74)
The Silt Path, by Togara Muzanenhamo

A series of three specially commissioned stories taking our relationship with the land beneath our feet as a starting point.

The first story, The Silt Path by Togara Muzanenhamo, is set on a farm in Zimbabwe where the author grew up and is told from the perspective of an elderly farm labourer.

Read by Togara Muzanenhamo

Commissioned for radio by Ellah Allfrey

Directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b04nhytx)
Dramatic storylines and racy relationships are continuing to cause a stir among Archers fans. Now the actor who plays the sausage king Tom Archer has been deposed, some listeners are threatening to switch off altogether.

There were 103 episodes of Hancock's Half Hour recorded in the 1950s. However, 20 episodes are missing from the BBC archives. Now, five of them have been brought back to life in new recordings of the original scripts. Giving a voice to the many voices of Kenneth Williams is actor Robin Sebastian. But which of all Williams's classic characters is his favourite? And what is it about this comedy that makes audiences still laugh sixty years on?

And is the British coverage of German history too focused on conflict? One programme setting out to change this is Neil McGregor's 30 part series 'Germany: Memories of a Nation'. It's been well received by most listeners though some feel repeating it three times a day was a bit much. Commissioning Editor Jane Ellison and the programme's producer Paul Kobrak discuss how and why the series was made.

Produced by Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04nhytv)
Warren Anderson, Acker Bilk, Lord Barnett, Sonia Rolt

Matthew Bannister on

Warren Anderson who was chairman of the Union Carbide chemical company at the time of the Bhopal disaster, which killed more than 2,200 people and injured thousands more.

Acker Bilk, the jazz clarinettist from Somerset best known for his hit "Stranger On The Shore".

The Labour politician Lord Barnett, who came up with the "Barnett formula" to decide on public spending in the different nations of the UK.

And Sonia Rolt, who worked on the canals during the war and then devoted her life to preserving Britain's industrial heritage.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b04n23wg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b04nqs44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b04n31d2)
Just Culture

Margaret Heffernan explores why big organisations so often make big mistakes - and asks if the cure could be the aviation industry's model of a "just culture".

In the past ten years, there have been a string of organizational failures - from BP to the banks, from the Catholic Church to Rotherham. In each instance, hundreds, even thousands of people could see what was going on but acted as though they were blind. Silence ensured the problems continued and allowed them to grow.

The conditions that create the phenomenon called "wilful blindness" are pervasive across institutions, both public and private. Wherever there have been cases of organisational failure you typically find individuals who are over-stretched, distracted and exhausted. They cannot see because they cannot think.

Businesswoman and writer Margaret Heffernan argues that the solution is a "just culture"; which means organizations that encourage people to speak up early and often when things go adrift, without fear of being silenced.

Contributors:
Alexis Jay, author of the report into child sexual exploitation in Rotherham
Ben Alcott, Head of Safety at the Civil Aviation Authority
Helene Donnelly, Cultural Ambassador, Staffordshire and Stoke on Trent NHS Trust
Bill McAleer, a former safety auditor for General Motors
Philip Zimbardo, the psychologist behind the famous Stanford Prison experiment

Producer: Gemma Newby.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04nqphv)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04nqv76)
John Kampfner analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b04n642w)
Interstellar; The Killing Fields; Sound of Harry Potter

Francine Stock hears from director Christopher Nolan about the tension between eco-conservatism and interplanetary pioneer spirit in his new space Blockbuster INTERSTELLAR. There's also the second part of a series featuring the sound effects experts - this time Randy Thom who added more than a little of himself to the spells and wand-craft of the Harry Potter series, and on the 30th anniversary of its release, Lord Puttnam talks about the enduring impact of THE KILLING FIELDS, particularly in Cambodia.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04nqs3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04nqpjw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b04n601g)
'Lad culture' in higher education - Fugitives from the law in Philadelphia

Fugitives from the law: Laurie Taylor talks to Alice Goffman, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, about 'On the Run' her study of the lives of African American men caught up in webs of criminality in Philadelphia. She spent six years living in a neighbourhood marked by pervasive policing, violence and poverty. She argues that high tech surveillance and arrest quotas have done little to reduce crime or support young lives in the most disadvantaged parts of the US. They're joined by Professor Dick Hobbs, Criminologist at the University of Essex. Also, Alison Phipps, Director of the Centre for Gender Studies at the University of Sussex, explores the rise of 'lad culture' in Higher Education and its relationship to the 'marketisation' of learning.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b04nqs3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpjy)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04nqpk0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpk2)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04nqpk4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04pd26j)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Chaplain to The Royal British Legion, the Rt Revd Nigel McCulloch.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04nr36j)
Scottish Rural Parliament, Deer, Beef Recovery

The first meeting of the Scottish Rural Parliament took place in Oban on the country's west coast over the weekend. It has no legislative power, but follows in the footsteps of other European countries such as Sweden and Estonia which have established rural parliaments as a way of airing problems and finding solutions to some of the issues affecting remote areas.

It's been a rollercoaster year for beef producers in the UK. In 2013 prices were high in the wake of the horsemeat scandal, but during 2014 they've dropped significantly. By August this year, farmers were warning that they were losing money on each animal they produced. Charlotte Smith talks to Debbie Butcher from the English Beef and Lamb Executive, who describes a "slow and steady" recovery since then.

All this week Farming Today will be talking about deer, both the farmed and the wild varieties. Sales of venison in the UK have increased by over 400% in just over a year. Ben Jackson reports from Bradgate Park in Leicestershire - a medieval deer park where animals are culled every year and sold for meat.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04nqpk6)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlpgv)
Vegetarian Tree Finch

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the vegetarian tree finch on the Galapagos Islands. These streaky sparrow-like birds found on the Galapagos Islands may look rather plain, but belong to the evolutionary elite, having attracted the attention of Charles Darwin on his visit there in 1835. Darwin noticed that the fourteen or so species of finches, which he concluded were derived from a common ancestor on this isolate archipelago, had evolved bills adapted to the type of food available. The Vegetarian finch has a bill rather like a parrot's, with thick curved mandibles and a biting tip which also allows it to manipulate seeds, similar to a parrot or budgie. Vegetarian finches are especially fond of the sugar-rich twigs of certain shrubs and are use the biting tip of their bills to strip off the bark to reach the softer sweeter tissues beneath: a niche that other finches on Galapagos haven't exploited yet.


MON 06:00 Today (b04nrh0n)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b04nrh0q)
A Good Death

Do we value longevity more than quality of life, towards our final years? That's the discussion Andrew Marr's having with surgeon Atul Gawande, who's giving this year's Reith Lectures. Joining them in the studio are the legendary editor, novelist and memoirist Diana Athill, who has recently written about her attitude to death and the process of dying; Professor Deborah Bowman who advises on the ethics of medical care, including whether to prolong life when death is imminent; and Dr Carl Watkins, who has examined the idea of "a good death" from Medieval times until now.

Atul Gawande's Reith lectures start on Radio 4 on Tuesday 25th November at 9am and are also broadcast on BBC World Service.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b04nrh0s)
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

1. Secrets From The Dead

Bestselling crime author Val McDermid has long been fascinated with forensic science. Now she delves into the medical archives to discover the secrets of this incredible field.

The dead talk. To the right listener, they tell us all about themselves: where they came from, who they are, how they lived, how they died - and who killed them. Through forensic medicine, a corpse, the scene of a crime or a single hair can reveal the secrets that hold the truth and allow justice to be done. But how much do we really understand about forensics? What is it like to be a SCO (Scene of Crime Operative)? Attend an autopsy? Where did it come from? How reliable are its proofs?

Val McDermid - author of The Wire in the Blood and The Vanishing Point - delves into medical archives including interviews with scientists to answer these questions, exploring as far back as the murder of Julius Caesar and early recorded forensic science in thirteenth century China as well as famous modern cases.

Read by Val McDermid

Abridged by Sian Preece
Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04nrh0v)
Mary Roach; Neglected Children; Baby Girls in China

We discuss how life has changed for women and girls in china. Popular science writer Mary Roach talks about her book Gulp on the mysteries of our digestive system. We ask the significance of Ed Miliband appointing the former childcare minister Lucy Powell to a key role in Labour's general election campaign. With BBC Children in Need this Friday, we examine how widespread child neglect is and what more we could do to stop it? And, we hear about the involvement of Queen Caroline in the establishment of the first foundling hospital in the eighteenth century.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Ruth Watts.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nrh0x)
Children in Need: D for Dexter: Series 1

Episode 1

by Amanda Whittington.

Skye is eleven years old and she lives with her brother Dexter, who's two and a half. And Spider the cat, and their Mum. But they're both usually out.

Skye looks after Dexter and plays with him. He likes it best when she plays her guitar, an electric guitar she found under a heap of clothes in her mum's bedroom. The bailiffs didn't take it even when they came back for the telly.

Skye's never had any lessons: she doesn't need them. But the new neighbours don't agree.

A heart-breakingly brave, funny and beautiful story, exploring the issue of neglect, it's one of the highlights of programming for this week's BBC Children in Need appeal.

The serial was inspired by collaboration with Home-Start UK, a national charity offering support to families struggling to cope, who receive funding for specific projects from BBC Children in Need.

Guitar...Pip Moore
Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.


MON 11:00 Laura Barton's Tomboys (b03k29xt)
Drawing on her own experiences and those of a literary heroine (the figure of Mick, the female protagonist of Carson McCullers' novel The Heart is a Lonely Hunter), Laura Barton shares her fascination with a way of engaging with the world that's simultaneously challenging of social norms and curiously unthreatening.

Along the way, she talks to the writer Jacqueline Wilson, the fashion expert Cally Blackman and the psychologist Melissa Hines about adolescence, sexual identity and personal freedom of expression.

With music by Cat Power, Sufjan Stevens, Bjork and Antony and the Johnsons. Reading by Cecilia Fage.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Start/Stop (b04nrh2j)
Series 2

Wedding

Hit comedy about three marriages in various states of disrepair. Starring Jack Docherty, Kerry Godliman, John Thomson, Fiona Allen, Charlie Higson and Sally Bretton.

This week the prospect of attending a wedding pushes everyone to the limit. Alice and David wrestle with the dress code; Barney and Cathy struggle with the memories of their own wedding and Fiona and Evan aren't talking to each other after one of Evan's comments went a bit too far.

Producer ..... Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b04nqpk8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04bwyf8)
What Does It Mean to Be Free?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking what does it mean to be Free?

Helping him answer it are philosopher Angie Hobbs, criminal barrister Harry Potter, neuropsychologist Paul Broks and theologian Giles Fraser.

For the rest of the week Angie, Giles, Harry and Paul take us further into the history of ideas with programmes of their own.

Between them they'll talk about Isaiah Berlin's distinction between positive and negative freedom, JS Mill's thoughts on individual liberty and the state; what neuroscience has to say about the age old philosophical debate about Freewill and whether freedom is over-rated as a political, moral and psychological concept.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b04nrmgj)
Luring GPs to Rural Scotland; Cold Homes; Ethical Jewellery

You and Yours reports on the new NHS Highland campaign to attract English GPs to vacancies in rural Scotland. With a UK wide shortage of family doctors can urban England do without them?

When buying jewellery would you put the origin of the materials before the look of the item? Why is Fairtrade gold not as widespread as Fairtrade bananas or chocolate?

And the latest political plans to tackle cold and draughty homes.

Producer: Olive Clancy
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


MON 12:57 Weather (b04nqpkb)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b04nrmgl)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 World Agony (b04966ry)
Cheryl Strayed, USA

Irma Kurtz, Cosmopolitan magazine's Agony Aunt for over 40 years, talks to a different agony aunt from around the world for each programme in this series.

She speaks to Aunts from America, India, Australia, Egypt and South Africa, and reflects on the universal and contrasting problems that occur in their particular society. These Aunts, many of whom have dramatic personal lives themselves, offer advice in newspaper columns, on radio phone-ins and on-line.

Irma draws on her ample experience to offer a useful perspective on their approach to problem solving. Together they discuss the problems specific to their communities and listeners hear examples of some of the letters they receive and the advice given.

Programme 1: Cheryl Strayed, U.S.A.
Irma talks to Cheryl Strayed, an American agony aunt who has received thousands of queries to her 'Dear Sugar' online column. Cheryl has grappled with many problems herself, including sexual abuse, bereavement and divorce. It's no surprise then that her strap line reads, "From someone who has been there".
Irma and Cheryl compare notes. They consider American optimism compared with the perceived attitude of the British stiff upper lip and reflect on why so many men write to Dear Sugar.



Producer: Ronni Davis
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b04nqv70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b04nrmgn)
Death of a Soldier

Lt Mark Evison was killed by a Taliban sniper, aged just 26, as he led his men in Helmand Province in May 2009. His mother Margaret Evison, a clinical psychologist, began writing her book as she fought to come to terms with his death. 'In the beginning it was therapeutic. I would write with no particular aim other than making myself feel better.'

An adventurous, bright and charismatic soul, Mark Evison was a natural fit for the army, and his mother acknowledges her son's eagerness to join the Welsh Guards. But his death raised questions that she feels have never been properly answered.

Posted to Nad-e-Ali, one of the most dangerous places on Earth, Mark Evison's own diary - sent to his mother after his death - talks of the inadequate medical equipment. There had been reported issues with the men's Bowman radios, and it was in seeking a better radio signal that Mark Evison exposed himself to the sniper. Then there was, without apparent reason, a crucial wait of 39 minutes until the rescue helicopter was authorised to pick up her son.

In this radio adaptation, words adapted from interviews with soldiers from Lt Evison's platoon and interwoven with Margaret's story.

"Death Of A Soldier: A Mother's Story" is more than a mediation on grief. It's a scrutiny of 21st century warfare.

Original music and sound design by Lucinda Mason Brown.

"Death Of A Soldier: A Mother's Story" is published by Biteback publishing

Produced and Directed by Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b04nrmgq)
Series 28

Episode 8

(8/13)
Russell Davies is in the chair for the penultimate heat in the 2014 series of the wide-ranging music quiz. The competitors face questions on everything from early music and the classical era to 20th century musicals, jazz, film and TV themes, rock and pop. As always they'll be given a choice of topics on which to demonstrate their specialist knowledge - the catch being that they have no prior warning of the topics on the list.

This week's hopeful contenders are from Greater Manchester and Lancashire, and the programme comes from the University of Salford.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b04n2hv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 In a Nutshell (b04mgxt4)
Frances Glessner Lee revolutionised the study of crime investigation, founding the first centre for the study of forensic pathology at Harvard University . Glessner Lee built a series of Dolls Houses in the 1940's with a carpenter in which she constructed meticulous replica crime scenes to teach detectives their craft. These are still used in training new detectives today .

Poet Simon Armitage travels to the Medical Examiners office in Baltimore to investigate them , and their maker - regarded as the mother of modern CSI.

with Bruce Goldfarb, Corinne May Botz, Dr David Fowler, Detective Robert Ross and Jerry Dziecichowicz.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b04nrmgs)
Series 6

Maps

Aleks Krotoski examines what digital mapping has meant for our understanding of the world. Are we always aware of the decisions that make them look the way they do? Traditionally of course maps are as "authored" as anything else. As Simon Garfield writer of On the Map: Why the world looks the way it does , explains we should think of maps like the biography of a famous person; highly subjective and usually with some sort of angle.

We hear this authorship at work when we join Bob Egan of PopSpotsNYC; he maps out where famous album cover photos were taken in his native New York and puts them online for us all to visit. We join him on the hunt through Google maps and on the streets as tracks down his latest quarry. Bob is adding his own layer of information to the digital mapping of our world for Dr Mark Graham of the Oxford Internet Institute this is happening all around us.

And it's this phenomenon that makes the understanding of the choices that go into making our maps even more important. We hear about the experience of paleo-anthropologist Prof Lee Berger and how hidden choices in GPS data he was using nearly cost him the most important discovery of his career. Aleks then explores if the so called "open mapping" movement hold the answer to eliminating some of issues created by digital maps with the example of Christchurch recovery map -a crowd sourced map that was created within hours of the Christchurch earth quake of 2012.


MON 17:00 PM (b04nrmgv)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04nqpkg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b04nrmgx)
Series 7

Episode 6

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Phill Jupitus welcome

Neil Innes, either a musical comedian or a comedy musician or possibly both. He was the third member of the surreal psychedelic jazz pop fusion combo the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band; is acknowledged as the seventh member of the Monty Python team; and was, according to some authorities, the 33rd member of the Beatles.

Dr Bradley Garrett, a writer, photographer urban explorer and researcher at Oxford University. He is perhaps the only academic whose studies have resulted in hanging onto a crane at the top of the Shard, being arrested on the tarmac at Heathrow for criminal damage and trespassing on private property over 300 times in more than eight countries.

Isabel Berncke, a scientist who grew up in the wild mountains of Chile but moved to the UK to study in London, Cambridge and Oxford. She's a doctor of cognitive and evolutionary anthropology, but her research interests include neuroscience, music, primatology, poetry, ethnology, complexity theory, behavioural ecology and hobbits.

This week, the Museum's Steering Committee discusses wrapping the Angel of the North up warm, penis fencing, the lowest-rated prime-time show in American TV history, London's secret rivers, what makes a tree laugh and why we should stupidity should be put in an institution.

The show was researched by James Harkin and Molly Oldfield of QI.

The producers were Richard Turner and Dan Schreiber.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b04nrmgz)
Johnny's course tutor, Keith, comes to meet Pat and Tony and observe Johnny on the farm. Keith's friendly and full of questions. Johnny enjoys that his mum, Sharon, actually seems proud of him and everything he's doing. Noting that Johnny has been out on a quad bike, Keith suggests a course - as Tony assures Keith that he's adhering to all health and safety rules. Having bonded with Keith, Johnny talks poignantly about his dad John, as well as his own struggles at school.

With Emma's help, Fallon is doing an elaborate birthday cake design, which includes the village green, Bull pub and Pavilion rendered in icing. Jennifer's delighted with all her old photo discoveries - one shows Peggy's Jack digging spuds, with Peggy looking on. There's also one of 'Granny P'. Tony's working on songs for the party, including some old dance bands.
Pat wonders who'll take Brookfield on - Jennifer agrees but gives nothing away about Adam's plan.

Jennifer gets a photo of Johnny with Pat and Tony - and with his tutor, dressed in his work gear.
As Jennifer goes, she mentions to Pat that Peggy didn't get out of her chair at all when she visited earlier.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b04nrmh1)
Bryan Ferry; The Fall; Peder Balke; Revolutionary Theatre

Bryan Ferry talks to Kirsty Lang about his 14th solo album, Avonmore. Professor Chris Rapley, one of the UK's leading climate scientists, has written his first play, 2071, which focuses on climate change, and Molly Davies has drawn on her years working as a teaching assistant to write God Bless the Child in which a group of eight-year-olds rebel against the school system. They discuss how they turned their professional experiences into theatre. Crime writer Stella Duffy reviews BBC crime drama The Fall, which stars Gillian Anderson as a detective on the hunt for a killer in Belfast, and Richard Cork discusses a new exhibition of work by Peder Balke, a Norwegian artist who was one of the pioneers of modernist Scandinavian painting.

Producer Olivia Skinner.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nrh0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Syria Vote: One Day in August (b04nrqsk)
In August 2013 the Assad regime in Syria was accused of deploying chemical weapons against its own civilian population. The world looked on, horrified. President Obama - who had described the use of chemical weapons as a "red line" - was planning airstrikes against the Syrian government. David Cameron was determined Britain should stand with him. But first, he had to win Parliament's approval. And the clock was ticking. Shaun Ley tells the inside story of one extraordinary day in the House of Commons and a vote which changed history - for Syria, and for Britain.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Richard Knight.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b04nrqsm)
Conservative Muslims, Liberal Britain

The recent so called Trojan Horse dispute in some Birmingham schools shone a light on how separately from the liberal British mainstream a significant conservative bloc of British Muslims wants to live. Although some Muslim parents objected, most seemed happy to go along with rigorous gender segregation, the rejection of sex education and ban on music and arts lessons.
Why is it that so many British Muslims - especially from Pakistani and Bangladeshi backgrounds - seem to be converging much more slowly, if at all, on liberal British norms? Is this a problem in a liberal society and what are the future trends likely to be?
David Goodhart, of the think tank Demos, visits Leicester in search of some answers. He listens to many different Muslim voices from a mufti who advises Muslims on how to navigate everyday life in a non-Muslim society to a liberal reformer who is dismayed at seeing more women wearing the niqab.

East is East (extract with Jane Horrocks and Ayub Khan) is playing at the Trafalgar Studios, London until 3rd January, and then on tour.

Contributors:
Mustafa Malik, Director of the Pakistan Youth and Community Centre, Leicester
Saj Khan, Leicestershire businessman
Mufti Muhammed Ibn Adam, Islamic scholar, Leicester
Riaz Ravat, Deputy Director, St Philip's Centre, Leicester
Dilwar and Rabiha Hussain, New Horizons organisation, Leicester
Gina Khan, human rights campaigner
Myriam Francois-Cerrah, journalist and PhD researcher
Jytte Klausen, affiliate professor at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University
Producer Katy Hickman.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04n31w4)
Beavers in Business

The European beaver was hunted to extinction for its fur, meat and the aromatic secretions from sacs near its anal glands. Now it is coming back throughout Europe , either naturally or by being introduced, as here in the UK. Wherever they settle they transform the landscape by building dams and channels and create a landscape of pools and watercourses that hold back flood water, pollution and silt from entering the main rivers. In these times of severe weather events and flooding beavers are doing for free what landscape engineers would do at great cost. Viewing nature in terms of the services it provides, or evaluating nature in financial terms, is a growing movement in conservation. Nature can be seen on balance sheets and hopefully respected for all that it gives us for free. But there is concern that monetising nature leaves it open to the ruthless world of finance and trading and diverts attention away from the real aims of conservation. Monty Don grabs this thorny issue and chairs a debate between the writer and conservationist Tony Juniper and the economist Clive Spash. There are no easy answers but plenty of food for thought.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b04nrh0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b04nqpkj)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b04nrqsp)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04nrqsr)
Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear

Episode 1

The Valley of Fear, the last of the four Sherlock Holmes novels, ranks among Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's best work. The mystery begins with a coded warning of imminent danger, drawing the illustrious Sherlock Holmes and the faithful Dr. Watson to a secluded English country home. A trail of bewildering clues leads to sleuthing in the finest Holmesian tradition and the gripping backstory of a cult that terrorized a valley in the American West.

Reader ..... Sir Ian McKellen
Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b04nrqst)
Series 4

Rufus Wainwright (the A-Side)

John Wilson returns with a new series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Future programmes in the series include Manic Street Preachers discussing "The Holy Bible", Angelique Kidjo returning to "Aye" and Sinead O'Connor talking about "Theology"

Programme 1. "Want One" with singer-songwriter-composer Rufus Wainwright.

The son of folk singers Kate McGarrigle and Loudon Wainwright III, Rufus began playing the piano at the age of 6 and touring at 13. Before he had even reached voting age, he had been nominated for Best Original Song and Most Promising Male Vocalist awards. But it would be another fourteen years before he released the album that has been variously described as "obscenely lush"... a "gorgeous meditation on emotional displacement" and "a three-hankie weepie". The first part of what was intended to be a double album, Want One is full of songs about love, loss, family, addiction and popular culture, including 'I Don't Know What It Is', 'Go Or Go Ahead' and 'Dinner At Eight'.

Not only does he play exclusive versions of some of these songs, in a frank and no-punches-pulled interview, Rufus also reveals what part drugs, sex, near-death experiences and extended arguments with his father played in the making of this remarkable album

"Frankly, Wainwright could be singing lists of names out of the phone book and it would still be more exciting and inventive than 99% of the other albums out there"

THIS SESSION WAS ALSO FILMED AND A VERSION OF THIS PROGRAMME WILL BE AVAILABLE ON THE RED BUTTON AND BBC IPLAYER

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04nrqsw)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b04nqplg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b04nrh0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04nqplj)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04nqpll)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpln)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b04nqplq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04pg96m)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Chaplain to The Royal British Legion, the Rt Revd Nigel McCulloch.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b04nrqxk)
Affordable Housing, Deer Farming, Mussels

A letter signed by the ten people who chair England's National Park Authorities is urging ministers to think again about changing the rules on affordable housing. At the moment, local councils can insist property developers include a quota of affordable homes in any plans for a housing development. The government is now considering introducing a threshold, which would mean developments of fewer than ten houses would be exempt from this requirement. The chairman of National Parks England tells Anna Hill why he doesn't think that's a good idea.

A local delicacy in Norfolk is now off the menu and may be endangered for the future, after the harvest failed. Morston Mussels have been seeded and grown along the shoreline by local fishermen for generations, but silting up of the Morston coastline has meant the young stock is unable to grow. Anna Hill's been talking to local fishermen to try and find out why.

British deer farmers have been picking up tips from a New Zealander who's running a deer farm in Scotland. Sales of venison are increasing in the UK, which is fuelling a renewed interest in deer farming.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlphq)
Southern Cassowary

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the roaring southern cassowary of Australia's Queensland. The territorial roaring calls of the world's second heaviest bird, the cassowary are odd enough, but it still won't prepare you for your first sighting of these extraordinary birds. Reaching a height of over 1.5 metres, they have thick legs armed with ferocious claws, blue – skinned faces and scarlet dangling neck- wattles. These are striking enough but it is the large horn, or casque, looking like a blunt shark's fin on the bird's head that really stands out. It's earned this giant its common name - cassowary comes from the Papuan for "horned head". Such a primitive looking creature seems out of place in the modern world and although the southern cassowary occurs widely in New Guinea, it's still hunted for food there. Cassowaries can kill dogs and injure people with their stout claws, but the bird usually comes off worst in confrontations.


TUE 06:00 Today (b04nrrbp)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b04nrrbr)
Dave Goulson on bees

Professor Dave Goulson has been obsessed with animals since he was a child. He collected all kinds of creatures and went as far as doing home made taxidermy. He's now Professor of Biological Sciences at Sussex University where he specialises in bumblebees. Dave Goulson talks to Jim al-Khalili about how he took five years to work out how bees know which flowers to go to for the most nectar, and why he set up a charity to encourage the public and farmers to plant more flowers for bumblebees to feast upon.

Recently Dave has found himself in a media storm as he's been studying the effects of pesticides called neo-nicotinoids on bumblebees. After he and others published research showing that the neo-nicotinoids have a detrimental effect on the foraging of bumblebees, the EU has brought in a temporary ban on some of them. But some farmers say that their harvests will be poor if they can't use these pesticides. Dave and Jim discuss the balance between conserving nature and feeding people.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b04nrrbt)
Broadcaster Nihal owns a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, but doesn't want to be stereotyped by his dog. In this second of two programmes for the interview series One to One, he talks to Paul who is a first time owner of a Staffie. For Paul, his dog 'Bee Bee' has been a revelation and came into his life at just the right time.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b04p2gpg)
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

2. Entomology & Pathology

Entomology and Pathology – from a Chinese criminal investigation in 1247 to the case of Dr Crippen.

Bestselling crime author Val McDermid is fascinated by forensic science - the secrets it can reveal and the way it has altered the processes of justice. She delves into medical archives including interviews with scientists, exploring as far back as the murder of Julius Ceasar and early recorded forensic science in 13th century China as well as famous modern cases.

Read by Val McDermid

Abridged by Sian Preece
Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04nrrbw)
Children in Need Auction

Media coverage of murdered women:why does it feel so lurid and voyeuristic? Best-selling, Australian novelist Monica McInerney. Rebecca Gomperts, Dutch doctor and her organisation 'Women on Waves'. Stories of the cooker up for auction for Children in Need. And a named guardian for every child in Scotland by 2016 - a good idea or invasion of privacy?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nrw1x)
Children in Need: D for Dexter: Series 1

Episode 2

by Amanda Whittington.

Dexter's cough is worse and Skye can't find any clean clothes for him. Time to take him shopping!

A heart-breakingly brave, funny and beautiful story, one of the highlights of programming for this week's BBC Children in Need appeal.

The serial was inspired by collaboration with Home-Start UK, a national charity offering support to families struggling to cope, who receive funding for specific projects from BBC Children in Need.


TUE 11:00 Armistice Day Silence (b04nrw21)
The traditional two-minute silence to mark Armistice Day.


TUE 11:02 Shared Planet (b04nrw23)
Blue Whales - When Giants Collide

Blue whales are increasingly being hit by ships, especially off the coast of California. As whale numbers recover from hunting and the number of ships that ply the oceans increases this is a growing problem. What can be done? Monty Don explores this little known threat to whales, a threat that is found in all oceans all over the world and effects most species of whale. It seems that the welcome news that whale numbers are slowly rising is being countered by concern over ship strikes, most of which are fatal. A simple solution is to slow the speed of ships down to around 10 knots, but this has financial implications for the shipping industry, so a balance has to be struck. Technology could help, but it is expensive, not reliable in choppy seas and in the case of sonar could fill the ocean with more noise. How can we share the oceans with giants and still move 90% of traded goods by boat?


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b04nrw25)
Series 19

A Shropshire Lad

"Into my heart an air that kills
From yon far country blows:
What are those blue remembered hills,
What spires, what farms are those?
That is the land of lost content,
I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went
And cannot come again."

So wrote the poet AE Housman lamenting the loss of his brother in the Boer war in his epic poem A Shropshire Lad. It harks back to a simple idyllic rural way of life that is forever changed at the end of the nineteenth century as hundreds of country boys go off to fight and never return. George Butterworth adapted his words to music in 1913 just before the outbreak of the Great War. This edition of Soul Music hears from those whose lives continue to be touched by the loss of so many young men between 1914 and 1918. Broadcaster Sybil Ruscoe recalls visiting her Great Uncle's grave in a military cemetery in France with Butterworth's Rhapsody as the soundtrack to her journey. A concert at Bromsgrove School in Worcestershire where Housman was a pupil remembers the former schoolboys killed in action, and singer Steve Knightley discusses and performs his adaptation of The Lads In Their Hundreds as part of the centenary commemorations. The Bishop of Woolwich connects his love of the countryside and Butterworth's music with his father's battered copy of Housman's poems which comforted him while held captive in Singapore during the Second World War.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b04nqpls)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04p25s8)
Philosopher Angie Hobbs on Positive and Negative Freedom

Angie Hobbs wants to tell you about two kinds of freedom - Negative and Positive. This influential philosophical distinction was made in the 20th century by Isaiah Berlin but it's rooted in the ideas of the hugely influential Greek Philosopher Plato.

Negative freedom involves getting things out of your way - be it the state, the police or your parents. Positive freedom is the ability to take command of your own self and make decisions that are in your own interest.

Berlin used the metaphor of doors: Negative freedom concerns the number of doors open to you. Positive Freedom is about how you choose between them.

Angie talks to conservative MP and ex-banker Jessie Norman and to environmental activist and ex-Jain monk Satish Kumar to see how these two ideas of freedom can co-exist.

This programme is part of a week of programmes looking at the history of ideas around Freedom.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b04nrwny)
Call You and Yours: Weight loss surgery - Would you go under the knife?

Call You and Yours is asking if you would ever consider having weight loss surgery.

Experts from the National Bariatric Surgery Registry say a gastric band might not only help people to lose weight but in the long term - could also cut costs for the NHS.

We are keen to hear your experience. Have you tried all the diets under the sun and are now wondering if a gastric band could be the solution? More younger people are deciding to do it - so would you recommend it to your child? If you have had surgery, we are keen to hear how it went, and how it has affected your life.

Email us your stories - youandyours@bbc.co.uk.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Natalie Donovan.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b04nqplv)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04nrwp0)
Wanless review finds no evidence of Home Office cover-up of child abuse: we speak to the former Home Office minister David Mellor and to Peter Saunders of the National Association for People Abused in Childhood.

Peter Hunt reports from the Armistice Day ceremony amidst the field of ceramic poppies at the Tower of London - and we hear from the Constable of the Tower, General Lord Dannatt. Major General Patrick Cordingley, who led the Desert Rats during the First Gulf War, tells us about the value of military bands and music in raising morale.

The European Court of Justice rules jobless EU citizens who go to other countries solely to get benefits can be refused some state payments. We get reaction from a Conservative member of the Work and Pensions Select Committee, Nigel Mills.

We speak to the leader of the Western-backed Syrian opposition, Hadi al-Bahra, about air strikes on Islamic State and the conflict with President Assad.

And the former Home Secretary, David Blunkett, debates the state of The Archers with former radio critic Elisabeth Mahoney.

Presented by Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:45 World Agony (b049y3mc)
India

Irma Kurtz, Cosmopolitan magazine's Agony Aunt for over 40 years, talks to a different agony aunt from around the world for each programme in this series.

She speaks to Aunts from America, India, Australia, Egypt and South Africa, and reflects on the universal and contrasting problems that occur in their particular society. These Aunts, many of whom have dramatic personal lives themselves, offer advice in newspaper columns, on radio phone-ins and on-line.

Irma draws on her ample experience to offer a useful perspective on their approach to problem solving. Together they discuss the problems specific to their communities and listeners hear examples of some of the letters they receive and the advice given.

Programme 2: Bachi Kakaria, India.
Irma talks Bachi Kakaria, who writes her advice column Giving Gyan in two Indian newspapers, the Mumbai Mirror and the Bangalore Mirror.

Giving Gyan translates roughly as 'laying it on the line', and Bachi certainly does that. This is a very different style of agony aunting to the one we're used to. She is level headed and empathetic but doesn't wrap her advice in any sentiment, as her strap line intimates: 'There are agony aunts and then there's Bachi, she'll sort you out'.

Her qualifications, she says, are none - other than a close observation of life, personal and professional. Her post bag reflects the concerns particularly of young people who, after years of Indian socialism, have been plunged into consumerism. On the one hand there is liberalism and, on the other, conservatism - so there is confusion and conflict in the minds of India's young.

Produced by Ronni Davis
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b04nrmgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Tommies (b04nrwp2)
11 November 1914

By Nick Warburton.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

Through it all, we follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Indira Varma, Lee Ross and Sam Rix star in this story, as Mickey finds himself at Ypres with the exhausted British Expeditionary Force, and no one to defend a vital breach in line, at Nonne Bosschen copse.

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b04nrwp4)
Series 6

The Double

Josie Long hears stories of seeing double.

Tales of doppelgangers, identity theft and a woman who offered a living counterpart to dead composers. Featuring a new 'documentary song' from Gaggle.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b04p85ct)
Series 4

Rufus Wainwright (the B-Side)

John Wilson returns with a new series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Future programmes in the series include Manic Street Preachers discussing "The Holy Bible", Angelique Kidjo returning to "Aye" and Sinead O'Connor talking about "Theology"

Programme 2 (B-side): Having discussed the making of "Want One" (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 10th November and available online), Rufus Wainwright responds to questions from the audience and performs acoustic live versions of some to the tracks from the album.

The son of folk singers Kate McGarrigle and Loudon Wainwright III, Rufus began playing the piano at the age of 6 and touring at 13. Before he had even reached voting age, he had been nominated for Best Original Song and Most Promising Male Vocalist awards. But it would be another fourteen years before he released the album that has been variously described as "obscenely lush"... a "gorgeous meditation on emotional displacement" and "a three-hankie weepie".

The first part of what was intended to be a double album, Want One is full of songs about love, loss, family, addiction and popular culture, including 'I Don't Know What It Is', 'Go Or Go Ahead' and 'Dinner At Eight'.

'Frankly, Wainwright could be singing lists of names out of the phone book and it would still be more exciting and inventive than 99% of the other albums out there'

THIS SESSION WAS ALSO FILMED AND A VERSION OF THIS PROGRAMME WILL BE AVAILABLE ON THE RED BUTTON AND BBC IPLAYER.


TUE 16:00 Spin the Globe (b04nrwq8)
Series 2

1485

Michael Scott presents the series which takes a look at global events coinciding with famous dates from British history.

This week he explores events in the year 1485 - a famous turning point in British history, with the death of a King and the birth of the Tudor dynasty.

On 22 August 1485, the Battle of Bosworth Field was fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. Richard died in battle and Henry Tudor became King Henry VII.

Spin the globe to the West and in Mesoamerica at this time, it is said that more than 80,000 prisoners were sacrificed at the behest of Aztec ruler Ahuitzotl over four days. But to what extent is this story of mass ritual killing, circulated by the Spanish conquistadors, borne out by recent archaeological excavations at the site?

And in Russia, in 1485, Ivan the Great accepted the title Grand Prince of All Russia. Sometimes referred to as the "gatherer of the Russian lands", he tripled the territory of his state, and became one of the longest-reigning Russian rulers - but to what extent did he become a model for his successors?

In 1485 in Spain, the Inquisition was under way. Jews, then Muslims and Protestants were put through the Inquisitional Court and condemned to torture, imprisonment, exile and death - events which have left a legacy in modern Spain.

Meanwhile, in Italy Leonardo da Vinci turned his mind to flight, and designed a multitude of mechanical devices, including parachutes, and drew detailed plans for a human-powered flying machine.

Producer Mohini Patel.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b04ntvv5)
Roy Foster and Andrew Roberts

Harriett Gilbert discusses great books with historians Roy Foster and Andrew Roberts, including Harriett's choice The Buddha of Suburbia by Hanif Kureishi. Twenty years on, how does it read now? Andrew Roberts introduces them to Covenant with Death by John Harris, a little-known but powerful novel of WW1, and Roy Foster shares his passion for William Maxwell's The Chateau.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b04ntvv7)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04nqplx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b04ntvv9)
Series 2

Lost and Found

When Tom makes his weekly phone call to his parents in Sheffield he discovers they've been flooded.

As his parents manage the clear up operation, Tom reflects on what is important to keep and what isn't.

With Rita May, Paul Copley and Kate Anthony.

Written by Tom Wrigglesworth and James Kettle. With Miles Jupp.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04ntvvc)
Jim and Lynda re-stock shelves at the shop, discuss the poppy appeal and the latest developments with Blithe Spirit - Helen's playing Ruth, Fallon's Elvira, but Lynda's short of a Charles. They also note that Johnny's settling well into Bridge Farm - although he can't seem to resist giving Jazzer tips on feeding the sows.

Lynda notes that Peggy's looking terrible. It's a shame Pat can't make the committee meeting tomorrow - she expected more fight from David & Ruth too. SAVE needs to go back to basics and re-question the need for a new road at all. Jim agrees with the idea to look into Borchester Local Enterprise partnership - they can challenge Borchester CC's transport figures.
Brian tells David he'd like to buy Brookfield - he's keen to check that David and Ruth aren't against it in principle. But David and Ruth are keen. They warn that it will come down to price in the end though - let's hope we can do a deal, says David. Ruth and David are left wondering whether Brian, in waxed jacket, cravat and brogues, could be an unusual fairy godmother.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04ntvvf)
Chadwick Boseman on James Brown; Allen Jones

John Wilson talks to Chadwick Boseman, who plays soul singer James Brown in the Hollywood biopic Get on Up.

Sculptor Allen Jones on his retrospective at the Royal Academy.

Artist Jonathan Yeo on portraits in the age of the selfie.

And Hannah Price from Theatre Uncut on generating dozens of productions of the same 5 new plays in different places around the world this month.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nrw1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b04ntvvh)
Dirty Secrets

The UK generates nearly 300 million tonnes of waste every year. That's rich pickings for criminals who illegally dump what we don't want, damaging the environment and threatening our health. The black market in rubbish is said to be worth a billion pounds. With such huge sums at stake there's concern that organised crime is increasing its grip on the sector. Allan Urry examines the efforts of Britain's Environment Agencies to try to hold the line. But it's tough going at a time when cuts have led to a reduction in staffing.
Reporter: Allan Urry
Producer: Carl Johnston.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b04ntvvk)
Self-driving cars; Cities Unlocked trial

Three test areas in which self-drive cars will be trialled are due to be announced in the next couple of months. Reporter Jane Taylor talks to Steve Mahan, who has only 5% vision, and has experienced one for himself. Transport activist Kirsten Hearn is asked whether these are the answer for independent travel for visually impaired people, or should we be trying to fix what we already have?

Reporter Tom Walker has been out to trial a new navigation initiative called Cities Unlocked - a collaboration between Microsoft and The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association UK. It utilises binoral technology, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth beacons to give visually impaired people, what they say, is a 3D soundscape of information around them. Mike May, founder of The Sendero Group which develops personal navigation or wayfinding systems for visually impaired people, tells Peter White about the likelihood of such an initiative being adopted in public places.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


TUE 21:02 All in the Mind (b04ntvvm)
1:4 and Stigma; Emotional Brain Training; Clio Barnard

"One in Four" has been a prominent slogan in campaigns to reduce stigma and discrimination against people with mental health problems. But Clinical Psychologist Martin Seager tells Claudia Hammond why he believes saying 'one in four' people will experience mental illness in any one year actually increases prejudice, artificially separating our mental health from our physical health. The Director of Time to Change, Sue Baker, disagrees, and argues that this statistical campaign tool has helped to normalise mental illness and played an important part in changing public attitudes.

Humans vary in their ability to "keep a cool head" in emotionally charged situations, and difficulty to regulating emotions is linked to many psychiatric disorders. Dr Tim Dalgliesh from the Medical Research Council's Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge tells Claudia about new research which suggests our brains could, with practice, be trained to focus on the goal at hand, and not get diverted by overwhelming emotions.

TV dramas, plays and films can be ruined when scriptwriters get the science wrong. The Wellcome Trust's first ever screenwriting fellowship is an attempt to give film makers the chance to immerse themselves in science and explore their interests with the country's top scientific brains. Award winning film maker Clio Barnard (The Arbor and The Selfish Giant) has spent a year trawling the Wellcome archives and meeting psychologists, psychiatrists and neuroscientists investigating memory, perception, hallucination and the impact of trauma: all themes which recur in her movies.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b04nrrbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b04nqplz)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04ntvvp)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04ntysx)
Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear

Episode 2

The Valley of Fear, the last of the four Sherlock Holmes novels, ranks among Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's best work. The mystery begins with a coded warning of imminent danger, drawing the illustrious Sherlock Holmes and the faithful Dr. Watson to a secluded English country home. A trail of bewildering clues leads to sleuthing in the finest Holmesian tradition and the gripping backstory of a cult that terrorized a valley in the American West.

Reader ..... Sir Ian McKellen
Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


TUE 23:00 What The Future? (b04nv4hs)
Series 1

Bees

All the bees are dead. And we love it! Britons revel in sting-less, insect-free summers.

But soon all the honey vanishes and instantly becomes the must-have accoutrement for rappers and grime artists. With no pollination, all fruits and vegetables vanish and a panicked government tries to find bees in North Korea and, confusingly, space.

Can Brian Cox and Brian May, the country's leading science people, find a solution? Probably not.

Kirsty Wark presents a documentary from the future...

Starring:

Nadia Kamil
Geoffrey McGivern
Kieran Hogson
Alistair McGowan
Alice Scott-Gemmill
Elaine Caxton
Sam Dale
Paul Heath
Bettrys Jones

Recorded 30 years from now, What the Future plunges into the world of tomorrow and investigates how decisions and actions from today’s headlining issues could have massive repercussions on our later lives.

Written by Madeleine Brettingham, Steve Burge and Dale Shaw.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04nv4hv)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b04nqpmz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b04p2gpg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpn1)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04nqpn3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpn5)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b04nqpn7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04pg9b4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Chaplain to The Royal British Legion, the Rt Revd Nigel McCulloch.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b04nv6lq)
Deer Cull in Scotland; Yorkshire Potash Mine; Soil Compaction

Anna Hill explores the pros and cons of culling Scotland's ever increasing deer numbers. It's a controversial issue. On the one hand the deer stalking industry is worth £105 million per year to the country, and it's thought to support about two and a half thousand jobs - but set against that is the substantial growth of deer herds, and the significant damage they cause to woodland, moorland and wildlife habitats. All this week Farming Today is looking at the deer industry. David Frew manages the National Trust for Scotland's largest estate, Mar Loge, and explains how they manage the 1,600 deer on their land.

All farmers know that cattle and machinery can damage wet grassland, especially in the winter, but for the first time, scientists have worked out exactly how much impact compaction of the soil can make on growing grass. A three year field study by researchers at Scotland's Rural College showed compaction by tractors will reduce the next spring's grass growth by up to 22 percent.

And we hear the latest on a controversial billion-pound potash mine in North Yorkshire. The mineral is key to the production of fertiliser. As we've reported before on Farming Today, what could become the world's largest potash mine, is planned for a site within the North York Moors National Park. A public meeting was held this week as part of the consultation on the proposals by York Potash.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlphz)
Common Indian Cuckoo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the Indian cuckoo found across much of South East Asia. A bird singing "crossword puzzle" - "crossword puzzle" over the woods is an Indian Cuckoo, a shy and slender bird, grey above and barred black and white below. These features are similar to those of a small hawk and when a cuckoo flies across a woodland glade, it's often mobbed by other birds. They're right to sense danger. Indian cuckoos are brood parasites and the females lay their eggs in the nests of other species including drongos, magpies and shrikes. The Indian cuckoo's song is well-known in the Indian sub-Continent and has been interpreted in different ways. As well as "crossword puzzle " some think it's saying "one more bottle" or "orange pekoe". And in the Kangra valley in northern India, the call is said to be the soul of a dead shepherd asking "... where is my sheep? Where is my sheep?".


WED 06:00 Today (b04nv6ls)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b04nv6lv)
Roger Law; Sophie Bevan; Mary Bevan; Sondra Lee; Douglas Ward

Libby Purves meets ceramicist Roger Law; sopranos Sophie and Mary Bevan; actor and director Sondra Lee and cruise ship guide Douglas Ward.

Sopranos and sisters, Sophie and Mary Bevan, come from a family steeped in musical tradition. Sophie is currently playing Ilia in Mozart's Idomeneo at the Royal Opera House and Mary is performing Susanna in The Marriage of Figaro with the English National Opera at the Coliseum.

Roger Law is the satirist and ceramicist who co-created Spitting Image, the television puppet show which aired for over 18 series. Following the end of Spitting Image Roger travelled to Australia, becoming artist-in-residence at National Art School in Sydney. The ceramics he makes today incorporate his own ideas with ancient Chinese tradition. His solo exhibition features pots influenced by his love of Australian marine life. Roger is also presenting a talk at the British Museum alongside its exhibition Ming: 50 years that changed China. His solo exhibition, Roger Law, is at Sladmore Contemporary Gallery.

Sondra Lee is an actor, dancer, director and teacher. She is directing Go See by Norris Church Mailer at The King's Head Theatre, London. In 1954 she was heralded on Broadway for her creation of Tiger Lily in Peter Pan and during her long career she collaborated with Jerome Robbins; Federico Fellini and Marlon Brando. She also appeared in Broadway productions of Hello Dolly and Hotel Paradiso. Her book I've Slept With Everybody: A Memoir, written in 2009, is published by BearManor Fiction. Go See by Norris Church Mailer is at The King's Head Theatre, London.

Douglas Ward, a former band leader, is the author of The Berlitz Guide to Cruising and Cruise Ships. He's completed over 6,000 days at sea, participated in more than 1,000 cruises, 158 transatlantic crossings and countless ship-naming ceremonies. The Berlitz Guide to Cruising and Cruise Ships is published by Insight Guides.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b04p2gqk)
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

3. Crime Scene Investigation

Val explores the astonishing developments in Crime Scene Investigation through fingerprinting and DNA evidence.

Bestselling crime author Val McDermid is fascinated by forensic science - the secrets it can reveal and the way it has altered the processes of justice. She delves into medical archives including interviews with scientists, exploring as far back as the murder of Julius Ceasar and early recorded forensic science in 13th century China as well as famous modern cases.

Read by Val McDermid

Abridged by Sian Preece
Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04nv6lz)
Joan of Arc; Keir Starmer; Heroism; PUAs

Keir Starmer, Director of Public Prosecutions when the Savile abuse scandal broke, talks about changing the culture around cases of historical abuse. Kate Smurthwaite on the culture of Pick Up Artists and the online petition to stop the American PUA Julien Blanc being allowed to enter the UK. Helen Castor on the woman behind the myth of Joan of Arc. Professor Mary Beard and Professor Alison Fell on the online course 'World War 1 - Changing Faces of Heroism'.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b04nv6m1)
Children in Need: D for Dexter: Series 1

Episode 3

by Amanda Whittington.

Skye has made friends with Evan next door, who likes Nirvana. But now Dexter's medicine has gone missing and her mum needs to get up for her interview.

A heart-breakingly brave, funny and beautiful story, one of the highlights of programming for this week's BBC Children in Need appeal.

The serial was inspired by collaboration with Home-Start UK, a national charity offering support to families struggling to cope, who receive funding for specific projects from BBC Children in Need.

Guitar...Pip Moore
Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b04nv6m3)
Kizzy and Emma - Friendship on Four Wheels

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between two young wheelchair users who have forged a friendship through their common experience and positive attitude.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Move (b04nv6m6)
Episode 3

On average we move eight times during our lives and end up quite close to where we are born.

But this week Rosie meets Tina, an American artist and serial mover. Tina gets itchy feet within months and is now drawn by the light and coastline of the North East. Fascinated by Scarborough where she knows no one but one on-line friend, Tina is trying to raise the money to make the 250 mile move through crowdfunding.

Jim and Sheila are leaving behind their beloved converted barn to move from Derby to Northern Ireland. Sheila has never lived outside Derby but now in her 70s, Jim is taking her across the North Sea with her Labradors and his home-made aeroplane to be nearer the grandchildren and, with cheaper house prices, a dream of living like kings. But sadly before they go, they have a secret they must bid farewell to.

Producers: Simon Elmes and Sarah Bowen.


WED 11:30 Welcome to Our Village, Please Invade Carefully (b04nv6m8)
Series 2

Testing Times

It's the day after Lucy's 18th birthday, and her parents aren't happy, and not only because she took that bottle of rum from their drinks cabinet. They think she is wasting her life being part of the resistance, so unless she can pass her A Levels they're going to stop her coming to the meetings.

Does it really take a village to raise a child? Or will they make things worse?

Series two of Eddie Robson's sitcom about an alien race that have noticed that those all-at-once invasions of Earth never work out that well. So they've locked the small Buckinghamshire village of Cresdon Green behind an impenetrable force field in order to study human behaviour and decide if Earth is worth invading.

The only inhabitant who seems to be bothered by their new alien overlord is Katrina Lyons, who was only home for the weekend to borrow the money for a deposit for a flat when the force field went up.

So along with Lucy Alexander (the only teenager in the village, willing to rebel against whatever you've got) she forms The Resistance - slightly to the annoyance of her parents Margaret and Richard who wish she wouldn't make so much of a fuss, and much to the annoyance of Field Commander Uljabaan who, alongside his unintelligible minions and The Computer (his hyperintelligent supercomputer), is trying to actually run the invasion.

Katrina Lyons ...... Hattie Morahan
Richard Lyons ...... Peter Davison
Margaret Lyons ...... Jan Francis
Lucy Alexander ...... Hannah Murray
Field Commander Uljabaan ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Computer ...... John-Luke Roberts
Carl ...... Don Gilet
Colin ...... Don Gilet

Script-edited by Arthur Mathews
Producer: Ed Morrish.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b04nqpn9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04p270w)
Lawyer Harry Potter on Individual Freedom and the State

Harry Potter is a criminal barrister and watches people being let off and locked up for a living. He is interested in the ways the state can curtail our liberty. His key thinker is John Stuart Mill, the 19th century British philosopher who argued that the state should take a minimal role in the lives of its citizens.

Harry talks to Mark Dempster, ex-drug addict, dealer and now counsellor about the limits of individual liberty and to Prof. Philip Schofield of University College London about JS Mill and his ideas.

This programme is part of a week of programmes looking at the history of ideas around Freedom.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b04nv6mb)
Bus Ticketing; Welsh Care Watchdog; Sainsbury's and the challenge of change

Sainsbury's plan for meeting the challenge of change, Christmas is coming earlier and earlier each year - and it's our fault. Queue jumping dilemma for EE customers, bus companies move to make ticketing easier- what took them so long? Giving up data when you give, how working for nothing is getting more expensive for job hunting graduates and the Welsh care watchdog orders more kindness in care homes.


WED 12:57 Weather (b04nqpnc)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b04nv6md)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Shaun Ley.


WED 13:45 World Agony (b04bmz8s)
Australia

Irma Kurtz, Cosmopolitan magazine's Agony Aunt for over 40 years, talks to a different agony aunt from around the world for each programme in this series.

She speaks to Aunts from America, India, Australia, Egypt and South Africa, and reflects on the universal and contrasting problems that occur in their particular society. These Aunts, many of whom have dramatic personal lives themselves, offer advice in newspaper columns, on radio phone-ins and on-line.

Irma draws on her ample experience to offer a useful perspective on their approach to problem solving. Together they discuss the problems specific to their communities and listeners hear examples of some of the letters they receive and the advice given.

Programme 3: Kate de Brito, Australia

Kate de Brito writes her advice blog 'Ask Bossy' for the news.com.australia website. Her strap line reads 'Got a question? Ask Bossy. It's the advice your friends and relatives are probably too polite to give.' And Kate, who is one of the few agony aunts with qualifications in counselling and psychotherapy, does indeed give practical and clear-sighted advice. The two agony aunts discuss attitudes to gender differences in Australia, problems concerning the aboriginal community, and the importance of referring serious issues on for specialised counselling.

Produced by Ronni Davis
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04ntvvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01h75cx)
Ink Deep

Ink Deep by Vivienne Franzmann

Annie has rebuilt her life following a nervous breakdown. She lives in a beautiful isolated cottage on the Isle of Mull. She is in a new relationship with a local artist, Ed. Her children are healthy and attend a secondary school on the mainland. So why isn't she happy?

Producer/Director Gary Brown

Vivienne Franzmann won the Bruntwood Playwriting Competition in 2008 for her play 'Mogadishu', which was produced in 2011 by the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester to huge critical acclaim. She went on to win the George Devine Award for 'The most promising playwright of 2010'. She has a new play premiering at the Royal Court in June 2012. This is her first original drama for radio.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b04nv6mj)
Employment Rights, Pay and Conditions

Need advice about employment rights, pay, conditions or changing employment law? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

If you are required to work regular overtime, a recent judgement means that these regular hours should be included by your employer when calculating your holiday pay. Are you affected?

A new system of shared parental leave begins next month, for parents whose children are born or matched for adoption on or after 5 April next year. What do employees and employers have to do?

Changes to adoption leave and pay also take place next April.

New rights to time off for antenatal appointments for husbands, civil partners and partners are in place now.

If you want to find out how you're affected by changing employment law or to ask about any other employment issue, why not call on Wednesday.

Whatever your question, our employment panel with be ready to offer their help and guidance. Presenter Ruth Alexander will be joined by:

Howard Beckett, Director of Legal Services at Unite.
Stewart Gee, Head of Information and Guidance, ACAS.
Lucy McLynn, Partner, Bates Wells Braithwaite.

Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographical charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b04ntvvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:02 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b04nv6ml)
Meritocracy; Desert Island Doctors

Meritocracy, then and now. Laurie Taylor talks to Peter Hennessy, Attlee professor of contemporary British history at Queen Mary, University of London. How did meritocracy arise as a concept and has it ever been realised in practice given the persistence of notions of a British Establishment with control over access to the centres of power? They are joined by Danny Dorling, professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. Also, doctors' choice of desert island discs - what do they tell us about the possession of cultural capital? Ruth McDonald, professor of health science research at Manchester University, discusses the meaning of elite musical tastes.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b04nv775)
Charlotte Moore, BBC One Controller; Patrick Collins and sports journalism; Serial podcast

BBC One is the UK's most watched channel, with more than 40 million viewers tuning in each week. A BBC Trust review published earlier this year found the channel consistently produced high quality programmes but many viewers felt that the channel appeared to play it safe in programming and scheduling - particularly during peak time. In her first radio interview, since taking up the position, Charlotte Moore, Controller BBC One talks to Steve about her strategy for the channel, taking more risks in programming, balancing populism with public service as well as engaging the hard to reach audiences.

Serial, the new podcast from the creators of 'This American Life' is using a combination of innovative storytelling and investigative journalism to top the podcast charts in both the US and the UK. Steve is joined by Observer radio critic Miranda Sawyer, who has founded her own Facebook Serial 'addicts' group, to explore what makes it such a compelling use of the audio medium and what example it sets for traditional radio networks, 10 years after the birth of the podcast.

Patrick Collins, one of the most widely read of British sports journalists, has just announced his retirement. His career began in newspapers fifty years ago, and includes over thirty years at the Mail on Sunday. He's covered 10 football World Cups and every summer Olympic Games since 1972, bar one. Steve speaks to him about his career and the changing nature of sports journalism.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.


WED 17:00 PM (b04nv777)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04nqpnf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 In and Out of the Kitchen (b01qlhjh)
Series 2

The Literary Festival

Damien and Anthony arrive at a literary festival to promote Damien's book about the culinary habits of the Great Poets. Despite the charming hotel and the peaceful surroundings, the cookery writer can barely disguise his chagrin at his talk being in a tent smaller to other writers he considers lesser than him.

But he soon has the opportunity to get the audience he feels he deserves when a fellow author is knocked unconscious and Damien is asked to fill in. But can he rise to the occasion?

Written by Miles Jupp.

Damien Trench ...... Miles Jupp
Anthony MacIlveny ...... Justin Edwards
Gary McDade ...... Ben Crowe
Sound Man ...... Ben Crowe
Bill Trumpetz ...... Toby Longworth
The Lady ...... Sarah Thom
Marion Duffett ...... Lesley Vickerage

Producer: Sam Michell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2013.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b04nv7nq)
Johnny's had positive feedback from tutor Keith, but he's still not sure what Peggy makes of him. Pat remarks that Peggy should be softened by the cat calendar Johnny has got her for her birthday. Tony's pleased when Eddie agrees to do a couple of hours work for him tomorrow.

Adam and Brian discuss Peggy's party at Grey Gables - Roy seemed happier helping, definitely not at home as a receptionist. Pat and Tony are busy organising the party and Matt and Lilian have supplied plenty of drink.

Carol has agreed to read from A Christmas Carol at Joe and Eddie's 'History of the turkey' pageants. Eddie will reward Carol with a turkey. Eddie also has an idea of how to use Jill's fancy recipes for Elizabethan bread and rabbit pie. They'll give Emma cash to cover her cookery costs, plus a bit extra. Joe poignantly tells David to bring the family - to see it before they head off up North.

The Aldridges are agreed in their plan to buy Brookfield. Brian feels they're back in the game.
Meanwhile, David agrees to set up a telephone auction, as they've had a lot of interest. They have no obligation to Brian - if he's genuinely interested, he'll have to bid against the rest.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b04nv97b)
Aaron Sorkin; Leighton House; Goldsmiths Prize; Dreda Say Mitchell

The Oscar-winning writer and producer Aaron Sorkin, acclaimed for The Social Network and The West Wing, talks to Kirsty Lang as the final season of The Newsroom airs.

Kirsty visits Leighton House in London as paintings from The Pérez Simón Collection, the largest private collection of Victorian art outside the UK, go on display there, including some significant works by Lord Frederick Leighton now returning to the house where they were painted.

We speak to Ali Smith, author of How to be Both, the winner of the Goldsmiths Prize 2014.

And crime writer Dreda Say Mitchell joins Kirsty to talk about her new thriller, Vendetta - which features an undercover cop who falls in love with one of the members of the criminal gang that he has infiltrated.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nv6m1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b04nv97d)
Loyalty

The rumours swirling around Ed Miliband's future have an unmistakeably Shakespearian character about them. The lean and hungry look on the faces of some back benchers may be ambition or just simple fear. Miliband supporters have been taking to the air to defend their leader and everyone is consulting the oracle to try and divine who might play the part of Brutus. This is the stuff of politics of course, but as Shakespeare knew, at its heart is a profound moral question about the nature and limits of loyalty. When is loyalty a virtue and when does it become a vice? Friendships are among the most profound expressions of our humanity and it's hard to imagine them flourishing without loyalty. Many of us, not just the politicians, will know the pain of betrayal. But loyalty is a powerful strand in many other relationships: families expect it and, mostly, we're happy with that. Organizations often demand it, but the regular rows over whistle-blowers in institutions like the NHS demonstrate the moral lines between standing up for your principles and being disloyal to your colleagues aren't clearly drawn. Countries do what they can to foster it, but how many of us would today claim to have the same loyalty to Queen and country that lead so many to volunteer in the First World War? Are we a less loyal society today? Does the collapse in membership of political parties, trades unions and organised religion indicate a society that's less willing to pledge loyalty to an idea or a belief? In an age of zero hours contracts, diminishing pensions and portfolio working does the idea of being loyal to your employer sound hopelessly outdated? Or have our loyalties just shifted and we now have a more nuanced, informed and healthy perspective and what and who deserves our loyalty? Moral Maze - Presented by David Aaronovitch.

Panellists: Michael Portillo, Giles Fraser, Anne McElvoy and Mehdi Hasan.

Witnesses: Dr. David Whetham, Corinne Sweet, Professor Matthew Flinders and Jonathan Hartley.

Produced by Phil Pegum.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b04nv97g)
Series 4

Andy Kirkpatrick

Andy Kirkpatrick - acclaimed mountaineer, author and stand-up - challenges us to let our children be exposed to greater risk. He argues that we shouldn't be wrapping up children in cotton wool, that children will naturally seek out risky, challenging, scary experiences and that by over protecting them we might just be encouraging them to seek out much more dangerous situations. Using a terrifying mountain climb he did with his young daughter as an example, Andy argues that if we're brave enough to allow our children to experienced managed risk they'll enter adulthood better prepared for life's challenges.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b04nv97j)
The Rosetta Mission

The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission to 67P/Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko reached its most dramatic moment on 12th November. BBC News correspondent Jonathan Amos has covered the event for a special edition of Radio 4's 'Frontiers' programme.

In August, the Rosetta spacecraft was the first to go into orbit around a comet; its images of the extraordinarily rugged landscape of this 4 kilometre space mountain of ice and space dust have already left everyone awestruck. Previous missions have been fleeting fly-bys.

On the day of the landing the orbiting mothercraft released a small robotic probe, named Philae, to fall and land on the cometary surface. It will be the first to sample and analyse directly the make-up of a comet, and photograph a comet's landscape from an explorer's eyeview.

Jonathan Amos presents 'Frontiers' from mission control at the European Space Operations Centre in Germany on the day of the landing.

The probe's deployment is not the final stage of the Rosetta mission. The mothercraft will accompany Comet C-G for the next year as both approach the Sun and then turn back out into deep space. Rosetta will be making measurements all the way as the comet's icy nucleus heats up and produces its great tail of gas and dust. Flying Rosetta as the comet becomes florid will also be a tricky business.

Comets are widely believed to be made of material unchanged since the planets came into existence, 4.5 billion years ago. They represent the original stuff of which planets were built. The Rosetta orbiter's and lander's findings may well tell us whether comets brought water and life's chemical ingredients to get life started on Earth. Jonathan talks to mission scientists and other comet experts about why they want to study comets in such detail and what Rosetta should tell us about comets in their own right as the most spectacular and most enigmatic objects in the solar system.


Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b04nv6lv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b04nqpnh)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b04nv97l)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04nv97n)
Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear

Episode 3

The Valley of Fear, the last of the four Sherlock Holmes novels, ranks among Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's best work. The mystery begins with a coded warning of imminent danger, drawing the illustrious Sherlock Holmes and the faithful Dr. Watson to a secluded English country home. A trail of bewildering clues leads to sleuthing in the finest Holmesian tradition and the gripping backstory of a cult that terrorized a valley in the American West.

Reader ..... Sir Ian McKellen
Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


WED 23:00 James Acaster's Findings (b04nv97q)
Series 1

2. Fruit

Triple Foster's nominated comedian James Acaster presents the results of his research.

This week, he's been investigating 'Fruit'. With Nathaniel Metcalfe ('Fresh from the Fringe') and Bryony Hannah ('Call the Midwife').

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


WED 23:15 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b01ckgh2)
Series 1

Death

Tim Key takes on the biggest imponderable of them all - death - via his narrative poem: The Boy Who Faked His Own Death.

Musical accompaniment is provided by Tom Basden.

Written and presented by Tim Key

Producer: James Robinson.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2012.


WED 23:30 The Art of the Nation (b049y9pg)
Discovery

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz investigates the art-works in our homes, and considers the stories they tell about our national identity.

Most of the nation's greatest works of art are in our museums and galleries, but there are also thousands of significant works - some valuable, some not - in homes across the country.

Will Gompertz discovers extraordinary stories behind the art-works on our domestic walls, and the tales they tell about our nation - an unwritten biography charting up and downs, highs and lows.

In the first programme of the series, he reveals the importance of discovery, hearing about the joy of uncovering apparently lost masterpieces, and acquiring works by chance.

Will meets an unemployed couple from Lincoln who believe they have tracked down - via the internet - works by Van Gogh, Manet and Cézanne. Will also finds out about the businessman who happened to become a good friend of Picasso, who gave him one of his prized plates. The plate sat in a drawer for 40 years, because its new owner thought it looked horrible. Now his son has re-discovered it. And there's the tale of home owner who happened to find a work by Francis Bacon on a wall - long hidden behind fitted furniture.

Producer Neil George.



THURSDAY 13 NOVEMBER 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04nqppj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b04p2gqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04nqppl)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04nqppn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04nqppq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04nqpps)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04pg9k8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Chaplain to The Royal British Legion, the Rt Revd Nigel McCulloch.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b04nv99z)
Coastal farmer, Deer antlers, Flood tax

A farmer in Devon says he could be forced to give up a third of his land so the local council can create a new coastal park. Richard Weeks farms 150 acres in Dawlish near the cliffs. The council wants to buy fifty acres from him, to create an open space as part of a new housing development, and it says it might resort to compulsory purchase. Farming Today hears from both the farmer and the council.

After the floods which devastated acres of farmland on the Somerset Levels, there are now plans to create a new Rivers Authority, which would have the power to raise money to pay for river maintenance. It could mean an extra £25 on the council tax bill of everyone in Somerset. With river levels once again rising, we hear from the leader of Somerset County Council.

A conference will explore ways of increasing the viability of rural businesses, and increasing the contribution they make to the UK economy. Anna Hill hears from the director of ACRE (Action with Communities in Rural England).

And we meet the man who makes everything from walking sticks to dog chews, using deer antlers!

Presented by Anna Hill and produced Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlpj8)
Plumbeous Antbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the Plumbeous antbird in a Bolivian rainforest. When army ants go on the march in the Bolivian rainforest, they attract a huge retinue of followers; often heard but rarely seen. These include Antbirds. The Plumbeous Antbird is a lead-coloured bird; the males have a patch of blue skin around their eyes, whilst the females are bright russet below. Like other antbirds they are supreme skulkers, hiding under curtains of dense foliage and only betraying themselves by their calls and song, a particularly fluty call. But you'd think that with a name like antbirds, their diet is easily diagnosed, but surprisingly antbirds rarely eat ants. Instead, most species shadow the columns of army ants which often change nest-sites or raid other ant colonies. As the ants march across the forest floor, they flush insects and other invertebrates which are quickly snapped by the attendant antbirds.


THU 06:00 Today (b04nv9b1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b04nvbp1)
Brunel

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the Victorian engineer responsible for bridges, tunnels and railways still in use today more than 150 years after they were built. Brunel represented the cutting edge of technological innovation in Victorian Britain, and his life gives us a window onto the social changes that accompanied the Industrial Revolution. Yet his work was not always successful, and his innovative approach to engineering projects was often greeted with suspicion from investors.

Guests:

Julia Elton, former President of the Newcomen Society for the History of Engineering and Technology

Ben Marsden, Senior Lecturer in the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen

Crosbie Smith, Professor of the History of Science at the University of Kent

Producer: Luke Mulhall.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b04p2gsf)
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

4. Digital Forensics

Val hears about the use of Anthropology, Facial Reconstruction and Digital Forensics in Crime Scene Investigations – from ‘The Sausage King of Chicago’ in 1897 to the investigation of contemporary war crimes.

Bestselling crime author Val McDermid is fascinated by forensic science - the secrets it can reveal and the way it has altered the processes of justice. She delves into medical archives including interviews with scientists, exploring as far back as the murder of Julius Ceasar and early recorded forensic science in 13th century China as well as famous modern cases.

Read by Val McDermid

Abridged by Sian Preece
Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04nvbp3)
Sophia Loren on her fairy tale life

Sophia Loren is an Academy Award-winning film star and Italy's most renowned and honoured
actress. She joins Jenni to recount stories from her colourful career, her 56 year marriage to producer Carlo Ponti and her brief incarceration in an Italian prison.

Why the maternal mortality rate across Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea has the potential to rocket by more than 20 times to one in seven women because of Ebola.

The creators of the BAFTA and RTS award-winning 'Getting On', Joanna Scanlan and Vicki Pepperdine discuss their new series 'Puppy Love'.

How the Woman's Hour cooker - used by and complained about by some of the biggest names in world cuisine: Delia, Nigella, Jack Monroe, Jamie, Heston to name a few - could be yours if you make the winning bid in this year's Children In Need Auction.

Plus Erin Pizzey and Jenni Smith recall the very first Refuge set up for the victims of domestic violence. Why was it needed then, what has changed now.

Presenter Jenni Murray.
Producer Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nvbp5)
Children in Need: D for Dexter: Series 1

Episode 4

by Amanda Whittington.

Evan from next door has taught Skye to play a D on her guitar. But now he's stuck in her room late at night and her mum has come home drunk.

A heart-breakingly brave, funny and beautiful story, one of the highlights of programming for this week's BBC Children in Need appeal.

The serial was inspired by collaboration with Home-Start UK, a national charity offering support to families struggling to cope, who receive funding for specific projects from BBC Children in Need.

See Monday's episode for cast details.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b04nqppv)
The Missing Students

Despatches from around the world. In this edition: Will Grant on the protests in Mexico City as families try to find out what happened to a group of students seized by the police; the Indian prime minister may have called for more protection for the country's women but Razia Iqbal, in Western Haryana, says many still suffer appalling violence; what's Qatar really up to in Syria? Frank Gardner sets out over a flat featureless desert in his attempt to find out; Hamilton Wende visits the Casbah in Algiers and explains why he finds it filled 'with half-remembered pockets of history and of war' and where in these islands is the very best place to take a look at Venus and Mars? Christine Finn boarded a ferry and went to find out.


THU 11:30 A Mortal Work of Art (b039pdtg)
As tattoos become ever more visible on the bodies of the British public, Mary Anne Hobbs explores the meeting point between the world of fine art and the world of tattoos.

She talks to Spider Webb, the tattoo artist credited with creating the first conceptual art tattoo and the artist Sandra Ann Vita Minchin who is in the process of getting a 17th century Dutch masterpiece tattooed on her back. She visits art historian Dr Matt Lodder who is writing what will be the first art history text on tattooing. She meets Alex Binnie, proprietor of Into You Tattoo - one of the first tattoo parlours in the UK to openly fuse fine art and tattooing.

Writer Shelley Jackson caught public attention worldwide when she launched her Skin project in 2003. Skin was to be a short story which would exist as over two thousand words individually tattooed on volunteers. These participants would become the words in Shelley's story. Mary Anne talks to Shelley about the inspiration behind Skin and she meets one of Shelley's words - the novelist and short story connosseiur Nicholas Royle.

Mary Anne discusses how fine art is influencing and being influenced by tattooing with Sion Smith, editor of Skin Deep, the UK's best-selling Tattoo Magazine and Trent Aitken-Smith editor of Tattoo Master. She talks to one of the new generation of tatto artists, Amanda Wachob, who sees skin as the ultimate canvas.

A Mortal Work of Art explores a practice often portrayed as a marginal pursuit, but that is most definitely mainstream today, and asks why the art establishment has taken such a long time to embrace it.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2013.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b04nqppx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04p2871)
Theologian Giles Fraser on Religious Freedom

Theologian Giles Fraser thinks freedom is overrated. It has become a kind of tyranny or obsession. He is interested in the tradition of religious thinking that understands true liberation sometimes comes from accepting boundaries on life. His key thinker is the medieval philosopher and Franciscan monk William of Ockham whom he blames for this turn of events. Giles talks to Brother Sam, a contemporary Franciscan Monk, about the way his life of constraint has led him to feel free. Giles also talks to Phillip Blond, theologian and political adviser.

This programme is part of a week of programmes looking at the history of ideas around Freedom.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b04nvbp7)
Tesco Kitchens; Missed Appointments; Indian Sweets

Tesco closes its kitchen business - what now for the thousand customers affected, especially those who've paid up front and had their old kitchens ripped out?

Why are we left waiting in for telecoms engineers who were never going to arrive?

And how British tastes are changing the flavours in the UK's Indian sweet shops.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b04nqppz)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b04nvbp9)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 World Agony (b04cb5sk)
Egypt

Irma Kurtz, Cosmopolitan magazine's Agony Aunt for over 40 years, talks to a different agony aunt from around the world for each programme in this series.

She speaks to Aunts from America, India, Australia, Egypt and South Africa, and reflects on the universal and contrasting problems that occur in their particular society. These Aunts, many of whom have dramatic personal lives themselves, offer advice in newspaper columns, on radio phone-ins and on-line.

Irma draws on her ample experience to offer a useful perspective on their approach to problem solving. Together they discuss the problems specific to their communities and listeners hear examples of some of the letters they receive and the advice given.

Programme 5: Youssra el-Sharkawy, Egypt.

Youssra el-Sharkawy had an advice column in The Egyptian Gazette, an English speaking newspaper. Agony Aunts are usually older than the people who write to them, but Youssra is young - only 27 years old. Her career as an agony aunt began when she joined an all-women theatre troupe and became drawn into helping her fellow actors with their problems. Her correspondents tend to be young and idealistic and Youssra deals with their concerns with a rational and mature approach. The revolutionary events in Egypt mean that some of the women who write to her are alone and depressed. She talks to Irma about the position of women in her country and her frustration at being a free-thinking woman in a country where many women are far from liberation.

Produced by Ronni Davis
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b04nv7nq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Sarah Wooley - Planning Permission (b04nvbpc)
In the 1930s, the Brutalist architect Erno Goldfinger bought a row of Georgian terrace houses in Hampstead.

His plan was to knock down the houses and build a modernist dream home for his family to live in. The only problem was - the neighbours.

Justin Salinger stars as Erno Goldfinger in Sarah Wooley's comedy about neighbours, architecture, tradition versus modernism - and James Bond.

Director: Gaynor Macfarlane

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2016.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b04nvbpf)
Lee Valley

Where can you find a hill that looks like an Inca monument but which is in fact an old nitroglycerin factory? The answer can be found in the Lee Valley, a green and watery wedge that grows and flows from Hertfordshire and Essex through northeast London to The River Thames. Occupying a liminal space between rural countryside and the industrial, the Lee Valley presents a surprising landscape - where nature has come back reclaim the monuments of an industrial past.

Helen Mark travels down the Lee Valley and its waterways to explore how for centuries it was a crucial thriving hub of industry before falling into decline until more recently experiencing regeneration of its natural spaces. She visits the Royal Gunpowder Mills, Kings Weir Cottage, Glasshouses, The Waterworks and the Lee Navigation to meet people who work on and live by the Lee Valley's historical waterways; people like Barbara the wife of one of the navigation's last weir-keepers.

Presenter: Helen Mark
Producer: Melanie Brown.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b04nqs44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b04nqv6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b04nvbph)
Tommy Lee Jones in The Homesman, The Imitation Game and Roger Ebert remembered

Francine Stock talks to Tommy Lee Jones about his new film The Homesman, a gritty take on the Western in which the harshness of frontier life and the impact it had on women are central to the story. She also discovers why set designer Maria Djurkovic is such a valued member of the teams in the many projects she undertakes, including this week's release The Imitation Game.
There's the latest in the series of Sci-Fi Sound FX secrets, in this programme the heavy breathing that has made Darth Vader one of the most memorable villains in cinema history and Steve James, director of the Documentary Life Itself, explains why his subject, the film critic Roger Ebert was worth the cinematic treatment.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b04nvf5g)
Rosetta; Thought-controlled genes; Biophonic Life; Arecibo message 40 years on

Rosetta
After a nail-biting, bumpy, bouncy landing, European Space Agency's Rosetta probe - 'Philae' -lands on the comet 67P. It's already collecting data and beaming back some very impressive images of this dusty, icy space projectile. BBC Space correspondent Jonathan Amos fills us in on the latest news.

Thought-controlled genes
Brainwaves from human participants activated a light, which in turn switches on specific genes in mice. In this proof of concept study, Professor Martin Fussenegger hopes that one day this technology could be used to control pain, pre-empt epileptic seizures, or in fact communicate with people who have locked in syndrome. It's another example of two very exciting techniques - brain machine interfacing and optogenetics.

Arecibo Message Anniversary
40 years ago, on 16 Nov 1974, a message designed to inform intelligent alien civilisations about human existence was beamed into space. Whilst Frank Drake's binary picture message was primarily put together to show the capabilities of the upgraded Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, it has inspired interest and enthusiasm around the world. Veteran of subsequent space message projects Dr Carolyn Porco joins Adam to talk about how space science has progressed in the interim decades, and what these ventures mean to humankind.

Biophonic Life
Sound installation "The Sounds of Others: A Biophonic Line", by artist Marcus Coates is currently delighting visitors to Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry. It explores the sounds of animals, from field crickets to humpback whales. By speeding and slowing each sound, his work reveals unimagined connections between species, and unearths common patterns and forms that would normally be beyond the reach of the human ear. The Sounds of Others looks for commonality between the human and non-human worlds, through sound. Marcus Coates, and collaborator wildlife sound-recordist Geoff Sample talk Adam through some of the surprising sounds of nature. Can you tell a pack of children from red deer? Or Marcus from a Lion? And is there a reason for these connections?

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b04nvf5j)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04nqpq1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b04nvf5n)
Series 4

Episode 5

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, records a fourth series of his hit sketch show.

5/6: This penultimate edition of the series presents the only detectives who've not had their own TV show yet; a well-disguised sketch about the residents of the savannah; and a revolutionary email exchange..

The first series of John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Radio Academy award. The third series actually won a Radio Academy award.

In this fourth series, John has written more sketches, like the sketches from the other series. Not so much like them that they feel stale and repetitious; but on the other hand not so different that it feels like a misguided attempt to completely change the show. Quite like the old sketches, in other words, but about different things and with different jokes. (Although it's a pretty safe bet some of them will involve talking animals.)

Written by and starring ... John Finnemore

Also featuring ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

Producer ... Ed Morrish.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b04nvf5q)
Pat was outraged at the newspaper - not just the letters from pro-Route B people in Penny Hassett, but also the positive coverage of BL at the fireworks display. Tony jokes to Johnny that he must have had a good time on bonfire night, surrounded by girls. Ed steps in for Eddie at Bridge Farm to help fix guttering and bring the herd down, and there's gossip about David and Ruth leaving Brookfield.

Helen leaves Henry with Tony for an hour. Peggy's using a stick to help her walk, but insists to Helen she doesn't need to see a doctor. Helen takes Peggy back to the farm to get her a support bandage.

Johnny's disappointed that Tony doesn't let him get the cows in with Ed. Tony and Ed discuss Emma's catering for the turkey pardon. George did a poster with drawings of turkeys with their heads chopped off - with just one happy one alive in the middle holding an axe.

As the cows come into the yard, Johnny takes Henry out to see them. Just as Peggy and Helen pull up there's a shout and a cry of pain - Johnny is knocked to the ground. Henry's also on the ground, with Ed behind Otto the bull. Tony is being trampled. Helen cries out to Henry to stay completely still.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b04nvf5s)
Richard Ford; William Orbit; Kate Hewitt; Dylan Thomas's notebook

Celebrated American writer Richard Ford discusses his new novel Let Me Be Frank With You - which continues the story of his much loved character Frank Bascombe.

A notebook of Dylan Thomas's poetry has been rediscovered after 70 years. It offers a unique insight into the creative workings of Dylan during one of his most creative periods. Sotheby's manuscript expert Gabriel Heaton brings the book into the Front Row studio and discusses its importance.

Queen Forever is a new album out this week. It's produced by William Orbit who describes creating a track using previously unheard vocals by Michael Jackson as well as a new mix of an unreleased Queen song.

Theatre director Kate Hewitt discusses her new production of Caryl Churchill's Far Away, funded by her receipt of the James Menzies-Kitchin award for young directors of thrilling promise.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nvbp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b04nvf5v)
Tesco: Trouble at the Top

Tesco is under investigation by the Serious Fraud Office over an alleged black hole in its accounts. Simon Cox tells the story of Tesco's biggest crisis to date.

Reporter: Simon Cox
Producer: Mark Turner
Researcher: James Melley.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b04nvf5z)
Family Rivals

Taittinger champagne, Clarks shoes, Theakstons beer - three famous and successful family businesses that have passed down through the generations. So what prompted members of those families to leave the original firms and set up rival brands of their own? Producing champagne, making shoes and brewing beer. What's it like to compete with the companies they've known all their lives? And how easy is it to make their mark?
Guests:

Paul Theakston, Founder and Chairman, Black Sheep Brewery

Virginie Taittinger, Founder, Virginie T

Galahad Clark, Founder and Managing Director, Vivobarefoot

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b04nvf5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b04nvbp1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b04nqpq5)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b04nvf63)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04nvf66)
Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear

Episode 4

The Valley of Fear, the last of the four Sherlock Holmes novels, ranks among Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's best work. The mystery begins with a coded warning of imminent danger, drawing the illustrious Sherlock Holmes and the faithful Dr. Watson to a secluded English country home. A trail of bewildering clues leads to sleuthing in the finest Holmesian tradition and the gripping backstory of a cult that terrorized a valley in the American West.

Reader ..... Sir Ian McKellen
Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


THU 23:00 Another Case of Milton Jones (b012lkzf)
Series 5

Astronomer

Move over Brian Cox - Milton Jones is now a world-famous astronomer and seeker after scientific truth and accuracy. Typical Sagittarian. He's joined in his endeavours by his co-stars Tom Goodman-Hill ("Camelot"), Ben Willbond ("Horrible Histories") and Lucy Montgomery ("Down The Line").

Milton Jones returns to BBC Radio Four for an amazing 9th series - which means he's been running for longer than Gardeners' Question Time and answered more questions on gardening as well.

Britain's funniest Milton and the king of the one-liner returns with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes for a series of daffy comedy adventures

Each week, Milton is a complete and utter expert at something - brilliant Mathematician, World-Class Cyclist, Aviator, Championship Jockey...

... and each week, with absolutely no ability or competence, he plunges into a big adventure with utterly funny results...

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners" - The Guardian.
"King of the surreal one-liners" - The Times
"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary ("Think The Unthinkable", "Miranda"), the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton," returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill ( "Spamalot"), Lucy Montgomery ("Down The Line"), Dave Lamb ("Come Dine With Me") and Ben Willbond ("Horrible Histories")

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 The Art of the Nation (b04bn0gm)
War

Most of the nation's greatest works of art are in our museums and galleries, but there are also thousands of significant works - some valuable, some not - in homes across the country.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz discovers extraordinary stories behind the art-works on our domestic walls, and the tales they tell about our nation - an unwritten biography charting up and downs, highs and lows.

In this edition, Will focuses on art and war. There's the tale of the shipwrecked sailor, who turned to painting. Trude remembers her father, who perished in Auschwitz, through the only item left from her former home in Czechoslovakia - a large 19th century oil painting, an allegory of Jewish oppression.

Or there is the small stone with tiny carvings on it, owned by Nazrin who spent eight years in an Iranian jail. The stone was carved by a fellow inmate, who gave it to her as a token of affection, even though she could have been put to death for doing so. And there are paintings of Charles II and Lord Montagu, once arch enemies who ended up as allies, and an image of World War One battle-field, painted on the day that war ended. All are kept in domestic settings, and all have a story to tell.

Producer Neil George.



FRIDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04nqpr3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b04p2gsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpr5)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04nqpr7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04nqpr9)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04nqprc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04pg9lf)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Chaplain to The Royal British Legion, the Rt Revd Nigel McCulloch.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b04nvg0h)
Sycamore Poisoning; Beef South West; Deer Welfare

Horse owners are being warned to look out for and remove sycamore seeds from paddocks, after an increase in the number of horses being poisoned. Vets also say owners should make sure horses are well fed, especially over winter, so they're not tempted to eat the seeds.

A new initiative has been launched this week to enable better communication between farmers, scientists, engineers, food processors and retailers. Agri-tech East aims to provide a forum for everyone involved in food production in East Anglia, to exchange ideas and innovation. And we've been to Beef South West in Devon where farmers are reaping the benefits of the new protected status of West Country Beef.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Sally Challoner.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlpll)
Bell Miner

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the bell miner of eastern Australia. The sound of a tiny hammer striking a musical anvil in a grove of gum trees signifies that bell miners are in search of sugar. More often heard than seen the bell miner is a smallish olive-green bird with a short yellow bill, with a small orange patch behind the eye. It belongs to a large family of birds known as honeyeaters because many have a sweet tooth and use their long bills to probe flowers for nectar. But the bell miner gets its sugar hit in other ways. Roving in sociable flocks, bell miners scour eucalyptus leaves for tiny bugs called psyllids who produce a protective waxy dome. Bell miners feed on these sweet tasting shelters. Some scientists suggest that Bell Miners actively farm these insects by avoiding over-exploiting of the psyllid colonies, allowing the insects numbers to recover before the birds' next visit. So dependent are they on these psyllids bugs that Bell Miners numbers can often fluctuate in association with any boom-and-bust changes in psyllid population.


FRI 06:00 Today (b04nvgpz)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b04nvgq1)
Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown

Kirsty Young's guest is former Royal Navy test pilot Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown - the programme's 3000th edition.

The Fleet Air Arm's most decorated pilot, his life reads like a handbook in beating the odds.

Landing on a flight deck is acknowledged as one of the most difficult things a pilot can do. Eric Brown has held the world record for the most flight deck landings - 2,407 - for over 65 years. He was one of only two men on his ship, HMS Audacity, to survive a German U-boat bombing.

In a long and remarkable life he has witnessed first-hand momentous events in world history, from the Berlin Olympics in 1936 to the liberation of the Belsen concentration camp.

Flying, he believes, is in his blood. He originally climbed into the open cockpit of a Gloster Gauntlet as a child to sit on his father's knee. Thirty years later he would pilot Britain's first ever supersonic flight.

He says: "It's an exhilarating world to live in. There's always that aura of risk - you come to value life in a slightly different way."

Producer: Paula McGinley.


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b04p2gvb)
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

5. Fiction Connection

Val reveals her personal interest in forensic science and how her research connects with her fiction.

Bestselling crime author Val McDermid is fascinated by forensic science - the secrets it can reveal and the way it has altered the processes of justice. She delves into medical archives including interviews with scientists, exploring as far back as the murder of Julius Ceasar and early recorded forensic science in 13th century China as well as famous modern cases.

Read by Val McDermid

Abridged by Sian Preece
Producer: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2014.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04nvgq3)
Cara Dillon; Policewomen 100 Years Ago; First Aid Training for Nursery Staff

Traditional Irish folk singer Cara Dillon performs live in studio. Britain's first policewoman Edith Smith has just been honoured with a blue plaque. Historian Dr Louise Jackson and former Detective Chief Superintendent Jane Antrobus talk about the work of the first female police officers and how the job has changed over the last century. Joanne Thompson started the charity Millie's Trust after the death of her two year old daughter at nursery. She has just obtained the necessary 100,000 signatures on a petition to force a debate in Parliament to make it compulsory for all nursery staff to have paediatric first aid training.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nvgq5)
Children in Need: D for Dexter: Series 1

Episode 5

by Amanda Whittington.

Skye has run away after she discovered her Mum had stolen Dexter's cough medicine. But now she's worried about her baby brother and is coming back for him.

A heart-breakingly brave, funny and beautiful story, one of the highlights of programming for this week's BBC Children in Need appeal.

The serial was inspired by collaboration with Home-Start UK, a national charity offering support to families struggling to cope, who receive funding for specific projects from BBC Children in Need.

For cast details see Monday.


FRI 11:00 The Baby Mothers' Tale (b04nvgq7)
The wifey, the side-chick and the baby-mother, we might know the terms, but the real voices of these women are almost never heard. Rebecca Lloyd Evans heads into the Jamaican community in Birmingham to discover their moving stories.

These are the women whose men live the inner city life, usually caught up in crime, chaos and gang-culture. On the one hand, there's glamour - fast cars, nice presents and the respect that comes from being on the arm of someone everyone knows in the gang world. But Rebecca learns there is also a lot of pain. She hears candid accounts from those women who's men have been sent to jail, those who had to flee their lives in the Caribbean and start from scratch in Birmingham because of crimes their men committed, and those who lost their man forever to a bullet.

And what about having families? Rebecca listens to the poignant tales of when women had to hide their pregnancies and even give birth alone. She learns that 2.4 kids with one Mum and Dad is certainly not the norm in this culture, where it is standard for men to have multiple children with a number of different baby mothers. She hears about the drama this causes between the women and the complications of children with brothers and sisters they may not even know about.

Producer: Rebecca Lloyd-Evans/Kevin Dawson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 The Missing Hancocks (b04nvkjn)
Series 1

The Hancock Festival

Between 1954 and 1959, BBC Radio recorded 102 episodes of Ray Galton and Alan Simpson's comedy classic Hancock's Half Hour. The first modern sitcom, it made stars of Tony Hancock, Sid James and Kenneth Williams, and launched Galton and Simpson on one of the most successful comedy-writing partnerships in history. But 20 episodes of the show are missing from the BBC archives, and have not been heard since their original transmission nearly sixty years ago. Now, five of those episodes have been lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio Theatre, featuring a stellar cast led by Kevin McNally as The Lad Himself.

Tonight's episode: The Hancock Festival. Inspired by Somerset Maugham's pay packet, Tony becomes a writer. His friends are recruited to bring his dramatic offerings to life.

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, and with the classic score newly recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, the show stars Kevin McNally, Kevin Eldon, Simon Greenall, Robin Sebastian and Margaret Cabourn-Smith. The Hancock Festival was only ever broadcast once, in November 1954.

Produced by Ed Morrish and Neil Pearson.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b04nqprf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 A History of Ideas (b04p2bcz)
Neuroscientist Paul Broks on Free Will and the Brain

Paul Broks tackles an age-old philosophical argument over whether humans have free will or whether all events are pre-determined. As a neuroscientist he is interested in the latest info on how our brains work. He also goes back to the 18th century French thinker Henry Poincare who argued that the universe was entirely mechanistic and that therefore all events in it are pre-ordained. Paul talks to researchers in the field including Professor Patrick Haggard of University College London to establish whether there is any place for human free will in a determined universe.

This programme is part of a week of programmes looking at the history of ideas around Freedom.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b04nvkjq)
Romance Fraud; Illegal Puppy Trading; Bargain Wines

We reveal new ways in which criminals extract money from people looking for love on the internet

How puppy breeders are bypassing the rules to smuggle dogs into the UK

Why some wine producers fear their reputations could be damaged by supermarkets selling their wine too cheaply

The older people who are too embarrassed to tell their families that they can't afford to turn the heating on.

Presenter: Peter White

Producer: Pete Wilson.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04nqprh)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b04nvkjs)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 World Agony (b04d1bjr)
South Africa

Irma Kurtz, Cosmopolitan magazine's Agony Aunt for over 40 years, talks to a different agony aunt from around the world for each programme in this series.

She speaks to Aunts from America, India, Australia, Egypt and South Africa, and reflects on the universal and contrasting problems that occur in their particular society. These Aunts, many of whom have dramatic personal lives themselves, offer advice in newspaper columns, on radio phone-ins and on-line.

Irma draws on her ample experience to offer a useful perspective on their approach to problem solving. Together they discuss the problems specific to their communities and listeners hear examples of some of the letters they receive and the advice given.

Programme 5: Criselda Kananda, South Africa.

In the final programme of this series, Irma Kurtz talks to Criselda Kananda - an agony aunt in South Africa, where more than six million people are living with HIV. She tells Irma that the practical and optimistic responses she gives to the many letters she receives from people who are coping with the condition comes from first hand experience. Criselda was diagnosed HIV positive 15 years ago and knows only too well the ignorance and confusion that such a diagnosis can cause. Criselda talks about her own relationships, the letters that lift her spirits and her mission to remove the stigma of HIV.

Produced by Ronni Davis
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b04nvf5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b04nvkjv)
Double Down

"If he goes to the press I want him to use that picture of me at the Miller's barbecue last Summer"
When Fiona and Steve kidnap her boss's wife to get money to pay off Steve's gambling debts it never occurs to them that she may enjoy being kidnapped or that he won't want to pay the ransom.
A black comedy about not being able to control the universe.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04nvkjx)
Postbag from Sparsholt

Eric Robson is in the Potting Shed at Sparsholt College for a correspondence edition of the horticultural panel programme.

Chris Beardshaw, Pippa Greenwood, Christine Walkden and Rosie Yeomans answer questions sent in by post, online and via social media.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions and answers:

Q. Following past suggestions from the panel not to walk on garden beds when the ground is wet so as to avoid compacting the earth, I've put planks down. However, I find these provide cover for moles and slugs. Can the panel suggest a better way of accessing an entire plot?

A. Only put the planks down when you're using them. Lift them up when you're not using them. Or you could put a bark path down. Even stepping-stones could work.

Q. I've been growing a grafted, hybrid Wisteria - Lavender Lace, in a concrete container planted in John Innes number 3 and training it up the south-east facing front of my house for about 18 months. Midway through the summer, the leaves started turning brown and new shoots died. I've increased watering and feeding which helped, but some of the old leaves are looking bad again. The garden is cemented over so planting it in the ground is not an option. What would the panel recommend?

A. Wisteria likes a good root run, so it won't be happy in a container. Try to curtail the growth by pruning it hard. This will keep it to a size proportional to the container. Limit the total upward growth to a single stem and then train horizontally to about two meters of length. Put in a timed irrigation system.

Q. I work in an office six meters square with no windows and air conditioning. What potted plants could I grow to put a bit of colour into my life?

A. Install some lighting that mimics natural light. LED lights are an option. Start with Spider Plants, Kalanchoes, Fatshederas and the Monstera Deliciosa (Swiss Cheese plant).

Q. I'd like to grow a show-stopper of a climbing rose up a south-facing wall in a large pot. What would the panel recommend?

A. Go for a handful of roses. Try 'May Gold', 'Madame Alfred Caraway', 'Paul's Scarlet', 'Paul's Himalayan Musk'. The bigger the container the better. Look through catalogues now, as you want to get the roses in while they are dormant.

Q. Vine weevils are plaguing my Heucheras and the roots are disappearing. What's going on?

A. The vine weevils are eating them. Use nematodes to get rid of them. Make a moat around the plants to prevent the weevils getting to them.

Q. I'd like to plant a bed of red flowers to celebrate a ruby wedding anniversary. The bed gets a fair amount of sun and has good soil.

A. Try early-flowering Chrysanthemums - Schizanthus or Hesperantha. Try Roses, 'Ingrid Bergan' and 'Ruby Wedding'. Hebes would be good, try 'Ruby Mound'. Try Gladioli. Get a Clematis, 'Rebecca' is a lovely one.

Q. We have a bamboo planted within a black plastic water tank in the ground. We want thicker stems, how can we get them?

A. Water and feed it more, but the bamboo won't grow much more because of the way you've restricted its growth.

Q. I've planted some Sunflower Seeds and Sweet Peas in my greenhouse, they've started growing already. How can I protect them from the winter cold?

A. Get them outside into a cold frame or a greenhouse, or put them in a bright windowsill. They need to be kept cool but make sure they get plenty of light.

Q. When I had raised beds built eighteen months ago, they were filled with spent mushroom compost. The level has dropped and I want to add something. Should I go for more of the same or good quality topsoil?

A. Go for good-quality topsoil or loam. Mix mineral bulk with organic matter to avoid this kind of reduction.

Q. How can we restrict the growth of our Corylus Avellana (Hazel Nut) tree?

A. Coppice the tree. Raise the crown to prevent the tree from hindering the growth of the surrounding plants.

Q. Can the panel suggest any plants that can be spun into a yarn?

A. Nettles can be used. Sisal and Phormium could also be used to make rope. Cabbage Palms are also a possibility.


FRI 15:45 Man About the House (b04nvkjz)
The Middle Of, by James Meek

Three specially commissioned stories that explore men's relationships with their homes:

3. The Middle Of by James Meek.
A man returns to his former marital home and discovers subtle changes
have taken place. In every room, it seems.

Reader Ben Miles

Producer Duncan Minshull.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b04nvkk1)
Vivienne Price; Dr Dick Laws; Warren Clarke; Geoffrey Clarke; Prince David Chavchavadze

Matthew Bannister on

Vivienne Price who founded the National Children's Orchestra, which started the careers of many well known musicians.

Dr. Dick Laws, the zoologist who headed the British Antarctic Survey and alerted the government to the Argentine invasion of the Falkland Islands.

The actor Warren Clarke, best known for playing the cantankerous detective Andy Dalziel in Dalziel and Pascoe.

The sculptor Geoffrey Clarke who produced the crown of thorns at Coventry Cathedral and many other religious works.

And Prince David Chavchavadze who was descended from the Russian Imperial family and became a CIA agent during the Cold War.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b04p204g)
BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat has been found in breach of both Ofcom and BBC Editorial Guidelines for its broadcast of an interview with a member of ISIS. The item was considered inappropriate under BBC standards for Impartiality and Harm and Offence. Richard Ayre, the Chairman of the BBC Trust's Editorial Standards Committee, explains the ruling.

Radio 1's iPlayer video channel launched this week. It's the station's latest effort to engage with the smartphone generation. The BBC's Head of Visual Radio gives his vision for the future of Radio 1.
Radio 4 is also trying a bit of radio visualisation with a number of short-form animations to complement its History of Ideas series. A Feedback listeners' panel gives its verdict.

The former Home Secretary David Blunkett was on World at One this week - not to discuss any great affairs of state, but to give his thoughts on The Archers. Though many Feedback listeners share his concerns at the soap's current direction, others said that a serious news programme was not the place to cover such trivialities.

And Feedback listener Tony Harwood, gives a behind the scenes account of his time as a BBC page boy in the 1950s when one of many perks was the chance to watch live recordings of Hancock's Half Hour.

Produced by Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b04nvkk3)
Leif and Raphie - Memories of Mummy

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a father and daughter about her memories of her mother, who died suddenly when she was just 4, and the memories she wishes she had.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b04p204j)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04nqprk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b04nvkk5)
Series 85

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, who is joined by Mark Steel, Angela Barnes and Andy Hamilton, alongside regular panellist Jeremy Hardy.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b04nvkk7)
Tony lies on ground as Helen takes hold of Henry. Ed tells Johnny to throw him a brush, with which Ed hits the bull. Ed instructs Johnny to get the gate and they steer the bull in.

Helen gets frantic Peggy to talk Henry into the house. Ed calls an ambulance. Paramedics arrive and treat Tony - he can only just speak. Tony says he had to get Johnny and Henry out of the way. Ed gives a blow by blow account to the paramedics. Johnny feels guilty for letting go of Henry's hand (and causing the accident) - he's desperate to go and see Tony.

Helen calls Pat who rushes to the hospital. Tony has suffered major injuries - they may have to make a decision about operating. Helen feels it's her fault for leaving Henry at the farm. Pat says we've got to stay strong for Tony's sake. The Doctor talks to Pat about Tony's spinal injury. They need to do an MRI to work out whether to operate - if they do nothing Tony could be wheelchair-dependent for the rest of his life. Pat checks with Tony and says let's operate - but it's not without risk. He could be paralyzed from the waist down. At Tony's side, tearful Pat tells him to keep fighting, and don't dare leave her now.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b04nvkk9)
The Drop; Jan Garbarek; Quentin Blake; Assaf Gavron

Tom Hardy and the late James Gandolfini star in the thriller The Drop, reviewed by Jenny McCartney. Saxophonist Jan Garbarek and David James discuss the Hilliard Ensemble. Quentin Blake on Paula Rego and Honoré Daumier: Scandal, Gossip and Other Stories at the House of Illustration. And Assaf Gavron on the reality of life in Israel in the 21st century in his new novel, The Hilltop.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04nvgq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b04nvkkc)
Margaret Curran MP, Lord Forsyth, Alex Massie, Shona Robison MSP

Glenn Campbell presents political debate and discussion from Abertay University in Dundee with Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland Margaret Curran MP, Former Secretary of State for Scotland Lord Forsyth Spectator, the writer Alex Massie and Shona Robison MSP the Cabinet Secretary for Commonwealth Games, Sport, Equalities and Pensioners' Rights.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b04nvkkf)
Soylent and the Charm of the Fast Lane

The new food substitute Soylent allows you to give up eating meals in order to have more free time. But John Gray argues that human beings crave busy lives. We want to be distracted, he says, so we don't have to think too much.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 A History of Ideas (b04nvkkh)
Omnibus

What Does It Mean to Be Free?

A new history of ideas presented by Melvyn Bragg but told in many voices.

Melvyn is joined by four guests with different backgrounds to discuss a really big question. This week he's asking what does it mean to be Free.

Helping him answer it are philosopher Angie Hobbs, criminal barrister Harry Potter, neuropsychologist Paul Broks and theologian Giles Fraser.

For the rest of the week Angie, Giles, Harry and Paul take us further into the history of ideas with programmes of their own. Between them they examine Plato and the philosophy of freedom, JS Mill on the individual and the state, Piere Simon Laplace on freewill and determinism and William of Ockham on Freedom and Constraint.

In this omnibus edition all five programmes from the week are presented together.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04nqprm)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b04nvkkk)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04nvkkm)
Sherlock Holmes: The Valley of Fear

Episode 5

The Valley of Fear, the last of the four Sherlock Holmes novels, ranks among Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's best work. The mystery begins with a coded warning of imminent danger, drawing the illustrious Sherlock Holmes and the faithful Dr. Watson to a secluded English country home. A trail of bewildering clues leads to sleuthing in the finest Holmesian tradition and the gripping backstory of a cult that terrorized a valley in the American West.

Reader ..... Sir Ian McKellen
Abridger ..... Neville Teller
Producer ..... Gemma McMullan.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b04ntvv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 The Art of the Nation (b04cb9h2)
Fathers and Sons

Most of the nation's greatest works of art are in our museums and galleries, but there are also thousands of significant works - some valuable, some not - in homes across the country.

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz discovers extraordinary stories behind the art-works on our domestic walls or shelves, and the tales they tell about our nation - an unwritten biography charting ups and downs, highs and lows.

In this edition, Will looks at art passed from fathers to sons. Many art-works - and the tales behind them - are handed down in this way, and the programme includes the story of how Luke, son of celebrated artist Mark Gertler, began to understand his father's life through the art he now owns.

Producer Neil George.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b04nvkkp)
Emma and Emma – Making a Difference

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about how a poor start in life can inhibit the skills needed for family life, and how they can still be learned, with help, proving yet again that it's surprising what you hear, when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b04nrh0x)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b04nrh0x)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b04nrw1x)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b04nrw1x)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b04nv6m1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b04nv6m1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b04nvbp5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b04nvbp5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b04nvgq5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b04nvgq5)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b04ntvv5)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b04ntvv5)

A History of Ideas 12:04 MON (b04bwyf8)

A History of Ideas 12:04 TUE (b04p25s8)

A History of Ideas 12:04 WED (b04p270w)

A History of Ideas 12:04 THU (b04p2871)

A History of Ideas 12:04 FRI (b04p2bcz)

A History of Ideas 21:00 FRI (b04nvkkh)

A Mortal Work of Art 11:30 THU (b039pdtg)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04n695k)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b04nvkkf)

All in the Mind 21:02 TUE (b04ntvvm)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b04ntvvm)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b04n31d2)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b04nrqsm)

Another Case of Milton Jones 23:00 THU (b012lkzf)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b04n23wn)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04n695h)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b04nvkkc)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b04nqpdd)

Armistice Day Silence 11:00 TUE (b04nrw21)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b04nvf5g)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b04nvf5g)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b04nqs3w)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b04nqs3w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b04nrqsr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b04ntysx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b04nv97n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b04nvf66)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b04nvkkm)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b04nrh0s)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b04nrh0s)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b04p2gpg)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b04p2gpg)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b04p2gqk)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b04p2gqk)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b04p2gsf)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b04p2gsf)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b04p2gvb)

Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph 10:30 SUN (b04nqs4d)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b04n2k2f)

Coming Home 16:30 SUN (b04nqv6w)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b04n31cm)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b04nrmgq)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b04nvgq1)

Drama 14:15 MON (b04nrmgn)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01h75cx)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b04nvkjv)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b04nqpc7)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04nr36j)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b04nrqxk)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b04nv6lq)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b04nv99z)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b04nvg0h)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b04nhytx)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b04p204g)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b04n338g)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b04ntvvh)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b04nv97g)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04n23wb)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b04nqppv)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b04nrmh1)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04ntvvf)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b04nv97b)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b04nvf5s)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b04nvkk9)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b04nv97j)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04n6951)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b04nvkjx)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 00:30 SAT (b04k6tvd)

Grounded 19:45 SUN (b04nqv74)

Hardeep's Sunday Lunch 13:30 SUN (b04nqv6p)

Hitch-Hiker's Guide to Europe 00:30 SUN (b01mf7zf)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b04nvbp1)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b04nvbp1)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b04ntvvk)

In a Nutshell 16:00 MON (b04mgxt4)

In and Out of the Kitchen 18:30 WED (b01qlhjh)

James Acaster's Findings 23:00 WED (b04nv97q)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 THU (b04nvf5n)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04nhytv)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b04nvkk1)

Laura Barton's Tomboys 11:00 MON (b03k29xt)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b04nqs40)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b04nqpdb)

Man About the House 15:45 FRI (b04nvkjz)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b04nrqst)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b04p85ct)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04n23vp)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b04nqpgp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04nqpjw)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b04nqplg)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b04nqpmz)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04nqppj)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04nqpr3)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b04nv6lv)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b04nv6lv)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b04nv6mj)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b04n23wg)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b04n23wg)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b04n6119)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b04nv97d)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04n23w0)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b04nqpgy)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04nqpk4)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b04nqplq)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b04nqpn7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04nqpps)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04nqprc)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b04nqph2)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04n23wd)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b04nqphg)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b04nqpk8)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b04nqpls)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b04nqpn9)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b04nqppx)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b04nqprf)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04n23w4)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b04nqph6)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b04nqphb)

News and Papers 09:00 SUN (b04nqs48)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04n23x3)

News 13:00 SAT (b04n23wl)

Night Fishing 23:30 SAT (b04n2k2k)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b04nrrbt)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b04nqv6t)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b04nqv6t)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b04n62n8)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b04nvbpf)

PM 17:00 SAT (b04n23wq)

PM 17:00 MON (b04nrmgv)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04ntvv7)

PM 17:00 WED (b04nv777)

PM 17:00 THU (b04nvf5j)

PM 17:00 FRI (b04p204j)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b04nqv6y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04n69px)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04pd26j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b04pg96m)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b04pg9b4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b04pg9k8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b04pg9lf)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b04n23wz)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b04n23wz)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b04n23wz)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b04nqs44)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b04nqs44)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b04nqs44)

Sarah Wooley - Planning Permission 14:15 THU (b04nvbpc)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b04nqpd0)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b04nqpcc)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b04n23x1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04n23vw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b04nqpgt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04nqpk0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b04nqpll)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b04nqpn3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04nqppn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04nqpr7)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04n31w4)

Shared Planet 11:02 TUE (b04nrw23)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04n23vr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04n23vy)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b04n23ws)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b04nqpgr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b04nqpgw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b04nqphl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b04nqpjy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b04nqpk2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b04nqplj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b04nqpln)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b04nqpn1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b04nqpn5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b04nqppl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04nqppq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b04nqpr5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b04nqpr9)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b04nrwp4)

Singing with the Nightingales 11:45 SUN (b044m17b)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04n23wx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b04nqphq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04nqpkg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b04nqplx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b04nqpnf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04nqpq1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04nqprk)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04nqs3y)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04nqs3y)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b04nrw25)

Spin the Globe 16:00 TUE (b04nrwq8)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b04nrh0q)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b04nrh0q)

Start/Stop 11:30 MON (b04nrh2j)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b04nqs46)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b04nqs42)

The Archers Omnibus 09:15 SUN (b04nqs4b)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b04nqv70)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b04nqv70)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b04nrmgz)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b04nrmgz)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04ntvvc)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04ntvvc)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b04nv7nq)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b04nv7nq)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b04nvf5q)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b04nvf5q)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b04nvkk7)

The Art of the Nation 23:30 WED (b049y9pg)

The Art of the Nation 23:30 THU (b04bn0gm)

The Art of the Nation 23:27 FRI (b04cb9h2)

The Baby Mothers' Tale 11:00 FRI (b04nvgq7)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b04n6438)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b04nvf5z)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b04nrmgs)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b04n642w)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b04nvbph)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b04n2hv2)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b04n2hv2)

The Frequency of Laughter: A History of Radio Comedy 10:30 SAT (b04nqpcf)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b04nrrbr)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b04nrrbr)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04nqv6r)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b04nv6m3)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b04nvkk3)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b04nvkkp)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b04nv775)

The Missing Hancocks 11:30 FRI (b04nvkjn)

The Move 11:00 WED (b04nv6m6)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b04n31cw)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b04nrmgx)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b04nhytz)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b04nvkk5)

The Once and Future King 15:00 SUN (b04krxsk)

The Report 20:00 THU (b04nvf5v)

The Syria Vote: One Day in August 20:00 MON (b04nrqsk)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b04nqpcl)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04nqv6m)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b04nrqsp)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04ntvvp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b04nv97l)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b04nvf63)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b04nvkkk)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b04nqv72)

The Yes, No, Don't Know Show 15:30 SAT (b04nw3g8)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b04n601g)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b04nv6ml)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:15 WED (b01ckgh2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b04nrqsw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b04nv4hv)

Today 07:00 SAT (b04nqpc9)

Today 06:00 MON (b04nrh0n)

Today 06:00 TUE (b04nrrbp)

Today 06:00 WED (b04nv6ls)

Today 06:00 THU (b04nv9b1)

Today 06:00 FRI (b04nvgpz)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 18:30 TUE (b04ntvv9)

Tommies 14:15 TUE (b04nrwp2)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04mj64k)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04mlpgv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04mlphq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04mlphz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04mlpj8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04mlpll)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b04n23w6)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b04n23w8)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b04n23wj)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b04n23wv)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b04nqph4)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b04nqph8)

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Weather 17:57 SUN (b04nqphn)

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Weather 21:58 MON (b04nqpkj)

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Weather 21:58 FRI (b04nqprm)

Welcome to Our Village, Please Invade Carefully 11:30 WED (b04nv6m8)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04nqphv)

What The Future? 23:00 TUE (b04nv4hs)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04nqv76)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b04nqpd6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b04nrh0v)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b04nrrbw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b04nv6lz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b04nvbp3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b04nvgq3)

World Agony 13:45 MON (b04966ry)

World Agony 13:45 TUE (b049y3mc)

World Agony 13:45 WED (b04bmz8s)

World Agony 13:45 THU (b04cb5sk)

World Agony 13:45 FRI (b04d1bjr)

World at One 13:00 MON (b04nrmgl)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b04nrwp0)

World at One 13:00 WED (b04nv6md)

World at One 13:00 THU (b04nvbp9)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b04nvkjs)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b04nrmgj)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b04nrwny)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b04nv6mb)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b04nvbp7)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b04nvkjq)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b04n23w2)