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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 OCTOBER 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04jhjnb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04jm9mx)
Fragments of Power

Neil MacGregor discovers how coins reveal the range and diversity of the Holy Roman Empire, with around 200 different currencies struck in the different territories of Germany.

It's an extraordinarily immediate and physical way of grasping the complexity and the confusion of the Holy Roman Empire, because every coin represents a kind of sovereignty. To be able to strike a coin you needed to be the ruler in your territory - and every coin speaks of a particular state, with its particular laws and a whole set of traditions.

Producer Paul Kobrak.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04jhjnd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04jhjng)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04jhjnj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04jhjnl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04jmdc9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Imam Monawar Hussain, Muslim Tutor at Eton College.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04jmdcc)
'I simply voted NO' - A listener tells iPM why his was a vote for the status quo. More powers for Scotland are coming, but he says that's not what they voted for. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04jhjnn)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04jhjns)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b04jm36f)
Series 28

The Dales Way, Part Three

Clare Balding continues her journey along The Dales Way, hiking from Grassington to Kettlewell in the company of two experienced long distance walkers, Aileen Strangham and Brenda Dodd. Clare enjoys their company so much and their tales of taking part in every Great North Run, that they wander off track and have to use all their combined map reading skills to get themselves back onto the right route.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b04k2ljw)
Farm animal welfare

Charlotte Smith meets agriculture students at Hartpury College in Gloucestershire, where animal welfare is embedded within its courses. From the European Union and the RSPCA to one of the industry standard bodies, Red Tractor, there are rules and regulations over the treatment of farm animals. We ask if these standards are stringent enough, and whether better food labelling, showing how livestock has lived and died, would encourage consumers to demand higher welfare values.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04jhjnv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b04k2lqq)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b04k2lqs)
Kanya King

Presented by Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir.

Kanya King MBE is the founder and CEO of the MOBO Awards, Europe's leading urban music brand, which has played a major role in bringing black music and culture to the mainstream. Now in its 19th year, it reaches in excess of 400 million viewers. Kanya reveals how she started it from a makeshift office in her bedroom, and by re-mortgaging her home.

George The Poet describes his dizzying itinerary from Uganda to the Albert Hall via Stonebridge Park, and King's College Cambridge and performs from his latest work about fatherlessness and premature parenthood.

Ben Collins is better known as "The Stig" from the BBC's internationally acclaimed Top Gear TV show. He discusses how he has coached hundreds of celebrities from Tom Cruise to Lionel Richie and his twenty year career as one of the best drivers in the world - from Le Mans Series racing to NASCAR, piloting the Batmobile and dodging bullets with James Bond.

JP Devlin goes to meet Mike Cobb. As a budding songwriter in the 1970s Mike found himself recording at a studio in Leatherhead. It was located above the local Co-Op dairy. His songs didn't go anywhere but he ended up staying on at the studio as a studio manager for the next 11 years. The Police recorded their album Outlandos D'Amour there and all the while the milk floats whirred in and out. They'd start at 5am when many bands like The Police were in the middle of recording. Milkmen would bump into bleary eyed rock stars. Did the early morning sound of the milk floats inspire some of the great tunes of the 70s and 80s?

Phil Worsley and pupils from The Joseph Whitaker School in Nottingham explain how they are preparing to smash the world speed record for a model car.

Bonnie Langford shares her Inheritance Tracks - Bring Me Sunshine by Morecambe and Wise, and The Overture of Gypsy by Stephen Sondheim and Jule Styne, performed by the National Symphony Orchestra.

And Len Biddlecombe has written 47 poems for his wife Barbara, to mark every year they have spent together. Barbara now has Alzheimer's and lives in a nursing home. Len shares his last poem to her.

The MOBO Awards 2014 - will take place on 22 October at The SSE Arena, Wembley.

George the Poet's new EP is Chicken and Egg. He will be performing at the Scala London on 13 October.

How to Drive - The Ultimate Guide - from the man who was The Stig, by Ben Collins, is published by Macmillan.

Bonnie Langford is appearing in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels at the Savoy Theatre in London.

Life of Love by Len Biddlecombe is published in paperback by Blackheath Dawn Ltd.


SAT 10:30 Seven Round a Cauldron (b04k2lqv)
The names might not mean much now, but they could be Olympic champions in years to come: Peter White meets the seven youngsters nominated by sporting legends to light the 2012 cauldron

The choice of the seven was a closely guarded secret and a revelation which surprised everyone, not least the bookmakers. In keeping with London's hope of "inspiring a generation," Sir Steve Redgrave handed the Olympic torch to the youngsters - with the world watching on. Little is known about them and in this programme Peter joins Katie, Callum, Jordan, Desiree, Cameron, Aidan and Adelle. Since the Olympics some have gone on to achieve in their given sports, even qualifying for the Commonwealth Games and other international meets. For others the period has been spent adjusting to new lives at University and coping with the practical and emotional pressures of living away from home.

Scottish sailing star Callum Airlie actually had his 17th birthday on the day of the 2012 opening ceremony. All seven youngsters had been nominated by previous British Olympic medal winners, and Callum had been selected by fellow Scot and sailor Shirley Robertson, a double Olympic gold medallist.
The teenager said: "We got a call from Shirley. A double gold medallist phoning my dad was quite a big thing. It set alarm bells ringing, and although she didn't say why I was invited to the opening, she was adamant I should not miss this.

"The whole thing was part of what they called 'Save the Surprise'. Only my mum knew.
"She couldn't tell Dad, though, and my brothers didn't have a clue. It was a huge secret to keep. In the end, I chose not to phone people. I didn't trust myself not to say anything.

"I just sent everybody a text telling them they should definitely watch it and that they probably wouldn't miss me."

Mystery had surrounded who would perform the ceremonial event and sports legends including Sir Steve Redgrave, Sir Roger Bannister and Daley Thompson had all been among the favourites for the prestigious role. Athlete Katie Kirk found her legs shaking uncontrollably as she waited for Sir Steve Redgrave to come into the stadium with the torch: "We were all just so excited. I could not wait to get out there - the crowd out there was massive," Katie was nominated by Northern Ireland gold medallist and Olympic ambassador, Dame Mary Peters and feels the experience has motivated others and helped inspire her - so much so that this summer she qualified for the Commonwealth Games.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b04k2lrs)
Challenges of Nanoscience

Bridget Kendall talks to leading nanoscientists gathered by the Royal Society of Chemistry at the University of California San Diego: biochemist Shana Kelley who makes medical diagnostic tools using tiny quantities of metals, biologist Yamuna Krishnan who creates nanomachines from synthetic DNA, design theorist Benjamin Bratton who wants to link up nanoinks with cloud computing, and journalist Josh Fischman who helps us separate nanofact from nanofiction.

(Photo: A nano gold/palladium crystal courtesy of Kelley Laboratory)


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04k2lrv)
Three Questions for Mr Leung

The questions arising from a week of protest in Hong Kong are asked by the BBC's China editor Carrie Gracie; the Yangon River in Burma, now Myanmar, doesn't have the mightiest of reputations. But on its banks lay one of the world's most cosmopolitan cities. Andrew Whitehead caught the ferry to see how Rangoon, as it used to be known, looks in today's era of political and economic change; Lyse Doucet is in Baghdad, the Iraqi capital where residents heard this week the militants from Islamic State were only a few miles away; the Turkish parliament has voted to take the fight to IS and Mark Lowen's been to the border between Turkey and Syria to consider the consequences; Wyre Davies is covering the Brazilian election and wonders if it can be won by the environmentalist daughter of a rubber tapper from the Amazon jungle.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04jhjnx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b04k2lrx)
New pension changes

On Moneybox with Paul Lewis.

Pensions - We talk to Steve Webb, Pensions Minister with news on the Single Tier State Pension.
Michelle Cracknell from The Pensions Advisory service will talk about the tax changes if you are a beneficiary of a pension.

With the demise of the Tax Disc this week, Hannah Moore reports on whether you can make cash out of your 'car'lectibles.

Continuing our investigation into Misdirected payments. Helen Grady reports on the Moneybox Listeners who are in danger of losing their property after a misdirected payment and we explain the Norwich Pharmacal Order.

Single Parent Charity, Gingerbread says as they predicted numbers are down on applications to the the Child Maintenance Service, which replaced the Child Support Agency since the introduction of a £20 fee.

We talk to Rebekah Barry of Gingerbread.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b04jmcrj)
Series 44

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guest John Finnemore for a comic romp through the week's news. With Pippa Evans and Mitch Benn.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Sarah Morgan,Jane Lamacraftl and Sarah Campbell. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04jhjnz)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04jhjp1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04jmd8b)
Baroness Williams, Michael Gove MP, Patrick O'Flynn MEP, Emily Thornberry MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Surbiton High School in Surrey with the Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Williams, Government Chief Whip Michael Gove MP, Shadow Attorney General Emily Thornberry MP, and Patrick O'Flynn MEP UKIP Economics spokesman.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b04k2lrz)
Human Rights Act, NHS, Tax Cuts

Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

Changes to the human rights act, funding the NHS, and tax cuts.

Call: 03700 100 444 (Calls will cost no more than calls to 01 and 02 geographic landlines. Lines open Sat 12:30-1430).
Text: 84844
Tweet: follow us at @BBCAnyQuestions using the hashtag #bbcaq
Email: anyanswers@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Beverley Purcell.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b04k4022)
Jonathan Myerson - Reykjavik

4 Extra Debut. 11th October 1986: the height of the Cold War, enough missiles to detonate the planet two thousand times over.

Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev meet at Gorbachev's request for a one-day, informal chat, at the (some say haunted) Hofdi House near Reykjavik. But in the small brown room where they meet, Gorbachev suddenly blindsides the Americans: out of the blue, he offers 50% cuts in all missiles - and he'll sign today. The White House team is catastrophically unprepared for this - no one predicted it.

But Reagan sees how he can really achieve something.... and within hours they are talking the most colossal cuts in nuclear warheads, aiming to reach zero missiles within ten years. How did this happen? How did it fail?

Drawing on both American and Russian transcripts of every word said between the two leaders, Jonathan Myerson's gripping drama explores the pressures on both sides, moment by moment, as the deal grows bigger and bigger, and the drama shifts from measured words at the negotiating table, to the panic, graft and invention of the two diplomatic teams outside the room.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting

Images courtesy of the Ronald Ronald Reagan Library.


SAT 15:30 Always the Bridesmaid (b04jk36b)
Classical soprano and broadcaster Catherine Bott is used to standing centre stage as a soloist, but has never sung backing vocals live.

She explores the world of the backing vocalist and asks is it a case of constantly being frustated - always the bridesmaid and never the bride? She talks to singer songwiter Eddi Reader about her move from backing singer with Gang of Four and the Eurythmics to lead singer of Fairground Attraction and then solo artist. Eddi invites her to sing live in concert as a backing vocalist - how will Catherine cope outside her comfort zone? Catherine speaks to Annie Skates who is a backing vocalist to major stars, and to singers from the Chorus of Opera North about another type of backing vocalist - being a member of an opera chorus. And with the help of arranger and producer Steve Pycroft she tries her hand at recording backing vocals to a song where she sings the main vocal line.

With contributions from Eddi Reader, Steve Pycroft, Annie Skates, Edward Thornton, Sarah Estill and Paul Rendall.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b04k4024)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Julia Gillard, Jessie Ware

Australia's first female leader Julia Gillard on the pressures of leading a nation, the now infamous misogyny speech directed at her opposition leader and her motivation in publicly dissecting such a turbulent period in her political life.

The invention of the contraceptive pill changed the world and women's place in it forever. We discuss whether the introduction of an equivalent contraceptive for men will have similarly far reaching consequences. We find out why it is being suggested that divorcing couples avoid new relationships until after their divorce settlement.

Has university life always been blighted by some form of misogyny? National Union of Student presidents from the nineties, noughties and current day give us their view.

How well do you really know your partner? That's the question at the heart of the much anticipated adaptation of Gillian Flynn's bestseller Gone Girl. So how much do we adapt our behaviour and edit our pasts in order to appeal to our lover? And Jessie Ware sings her new single Say You Love Me.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b04k4026)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b04jm36y)
The Saviour Returns

The best person for the job? Evan Davis hears from four bosses who took back control of the companies they had once founded. Why did they leave and what events made them return? From boardroom coups to corporate collapses, entrepreneurs explain how they took the helm - for the second time - of the businesses they knew so well. What had changed while they were away? And what were the very first decisions they made when they walked back through the doors?

Guests: Steve Morgan, founder, Redrow; Louise O'Sullivan, founder, Anam Technologies; Nick and Kath Whitworth, co-founders, Celtic & Co.

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04jhjp3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04jhjp5)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04jhjp7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b04k402y)
David Morrissey, Andy Hamilton, Benjamin Zephaniah, Salena Godden, Paul Heaton and Jacqui Abbott

Clive's Outnumbered with screenwriter, comedian and director Andy Hamilton, whose new film 'What We Did On Our Holiday' is a hilarious journey through an unforgettable family trip as Doug and Abi (David Tennant and Rosamund Pike) attempt to keep their impending divorce secret from their extended family.

Award-winning actor, director, producer and screenwriter, David Morrissey is best known for his sterling TV performances in The Deal', 'State of Play' and the 'Red Riding' trilogy. David talks to Clive about being both Executive Producer and lead actor in 'The Driver', a tense thriller in which a depressed cabbie takes a job as a driver for a crime gang.

Arthur Smith chats to performance poet Salena Godden, whose memoir 'Springfield Road' charts her early years; growing up mixed-race in England in the '70s and '80s. Along with the painful and the difficult episodes of her life, Salena also celebrates the ridiculous and the beautiful.

Clive talks Propa Propaganda with dub poet, author and screenwriter Benjamin Zephaniah, who gained a reputation speaking out on local and international issues. Benjamin's new children's book 'Terror Kid' is a novel about a teenage boy called Rico Federico, who is drawn into a terrible crime he never intended to commit.

With music from Paul Heaton & Jacqui Abbott, formerly of The Beautiful South. Paul and Jacqui perform 'When it Was Ours', from their album 'What Have We Become' and 'Rotterdam' from The Beautiful South's album, 'Blue is The Colour'.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b04k4030)
White Dee

In January 2014 Benefits Street aired for the first time on Channel 4. The reality TV series, which documented the lives of residents of James Turner Street in Birmingham, was controversial right from the start. Ofcom and Channel 4 received hundreds of complaints.

One straight-talking resident - Deirdre Kelly, also known as 'White Dee' - became the standout star of the show. Many of the headlines were negative and the mother-of-two found herself vilified, accused of being a scrounger and worse.

But she received a warmer welcome on Celebrity Big Brother this summer and more recently this week at the Conservative Party Conference where she spoke at a fringe event hosted by a think-tank.

So how did an ordinary woman from Birmingham, who has spent the last several years living off benefits, become so famous - and, potentially, influential? Mark Coles travels to Birmingham to find out.

Presenter Mark Coles
Producer Ben Crighton.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b04k4032)
Electra, Gone Girl, The Code, Howard Jacobson, Gothic Imagination

Kristin Scott Thomas plays the title role in Electra at The Old Vic. It's a millennia old play in a modern translation by Frank McGuinness and directed by Ian Rickson.

David Fincher's film version of Gillian Flynn's best seller Gone Girl stars Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike. Howard Jacobson's Booker-nominated novel J imagines a dystopian world where a Holocaust-type event might happen again.

Gothic Imagination at The British Library explores 250 years of a public predilection for horror and terror.

BBC4's new Australian drama The Code deals with a corrupt government dealing ruthlessly with cyber skulduggery.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Stephanie Merritt, Dea Birkett and Sarfraz Manzoor. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b04k4034)
From Inside: The Guildford Four

The inside story of the Guildford Four, based on the previously unheard letters home of Paul Hill, written during his fifteen-year wrongful incarceration for the Guildford Pub Bombings.

Paul Hill was one of the Guildford Four, who were subsequently found to have been wrongly convicted of IRA pub bombings in 1974. After a lengthy campaign, their convictions were quashed and they were released in 1989.

Martin McNamara presents this collection of passionate, evocative, angry and poignant letters written by Paul Hill to members of his family, especially his mother, sister and uncle. His words give a real sense of an ordinary young man caught in a terrible miscarriage of justice, trying to reassure his mother, growing up at a distance from the world and his loved ones. They eloquently chart the nightmare of being jailed for something he did not do.

After his release Paul Hill donated hundreds of the letters he sent to his family to the Archive of the Irish in Britain at the London Metropolitan University.

At the original trial, where the convictions were based solely on confessions, the judge regretted that he could not impose the death penalty. From his cell, Paul Hill watched the world change: the birth of his child, the Thatcher years, punk, the miners' strike, the death of John Lennon, Glasnost.

The programme includes interviews with Hill himself from his adopted home in the USA, and with Joshua Rozenberg, who was the BBC legal correspondent during the period of Hills incarceration and release.

Reader...Jonjo O'Neill
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b04jhp4d)
Ian Rankin - Rebus: Set in Darkness

Episode 1

Ian Rankin's crime thriller centres on the building of the new Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh in 1998. During the construction work a body is discovered in an old fireplace. The forensics suggest the victim was murdered 20 years before. Police are still attempting to identify the corpse when a second body is found on the site - and this time it's one of the prospective candidates for the new parliament. It's a high-profile case and the rising star of Lothian And Borders Police - 28-year-old Detective Inspector Linford - is assigned to investigate, assisted by a reluctant John Rebus.

Dramatised by Chris Dolan.

Other parts are played by the cast.

Producer/director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04jhjp9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 FutureProofing (b04jlry1)
The Descent of Man

Will men be needed in the future? Writer Michael Smith explores the uncertain future of masculinity.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b04jjz3s)
Series 28

Heat 2, 2014

Russell Davies is in the chair for the second heat in the 2014 series of Britain's most eclectic music quiz, from the Radio Theatre in London. Three more amateur music enthusiasts compete for a place in the series semi-finals, answering questions on music in all its variety.

As well as answering general questions on music, they'll also have to pick from a list of specialist musical topics on which to answer their own individual questions, with no prior knowledge of the choices.

There's something to suit every taste and plenty of musical extracts, both familiar and surprising, to identify.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b04jhpnz)
Remember

To coincide with National Poetry Day, Roger McGough presents listeners requests on the theme of 'Remember'. Including 'Aftermath', a moving poem of the First World War by Siegfried Sassoon, Brian Patten reading 'So Many Different Lengths of Time', and the Christina Rossetti classic 'Remember'.



SUNDAY 05 OCTOBER 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b04k404y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 The Time Being (b02119cs)
Series 6

The Dog Track

The latest season of The Time Being brings another showcase for new voices, none of whom have been previously broadcast. Previous series have brought new talent to a wider audience and provided a stepping stone for writers who have since gone on to enjoy further success both on radio and in print, such as Tania Hershman, Heidi Amsinck, Sally Hinchcliffe and Joe Dunthorne.

The Dog Track by Rebecca F. John

A young woman visits the dog track for the first time, and weighs up a matter of life and death.

Rebecca F. John was born in 1986 and grew up in Pwll, a small village on the Welsh coast. She has previously worked as a ski instructor and in the financial sector, and holds an MA in Creative Writing from Swansea University.

Reader: Rakie Ayola
Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04k4050)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04k4052)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04k4054)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b04k4056)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b04k7b6j)
The bells of St Stephen's church in Brannel, Cornwall.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b04k4030)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b04k4058)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04k7b6l)
Beating Time

Samira Ahmed drums her fingers and explores waiting, measuring and keeping time. She talks to the conductor Charles Hazlewood about why holding an orchestra to the beat is like persuading a pony round the paddock and considers the impatience of Henri Bergson who understood the nature of time as he mixed himself a drink.

The programme includes readings from works by Virginia Woolf, RS Thomas and Rosa Luxemburg, with music by Chopin, Messiaen and Brian Eno.

The readers are Emily Joyce and Hazel Holder.

Producer: Natalie Steed
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b04k7b6n)
Sally Stockings and Her Pig Empire

Following the death of her husband Andrew in 2010, Sally Stockings found herself at the helm of the family pig farming business. With four sons all wanting to follow in their father's footsteps, Sally vowed to not only continue Andrew's work - but also to expand and secure a profitable future for her boys.
She now rears and finishes pigs on farms across the south of England and Wales and sells 4,000 pigs a week, supplying supermarkets up and down the country. She is one of the biggest outdoor producers in the UK and a hugely respected figure in the industry, although Sally would argue she's just "hanging on in there".
Anna Jones travels to the Oxfordshire farm where the business began and talks to Sally, and her sons, about the driving force behind it all - family.
Produced and presented by Anna Jones.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b04k405b)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b04k405d)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b04k7b6q)
Lambeth Conference Future; Catholic Family Synod; Sixth-Century Christian Charm

William Crawley speaks exclusively to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, on the postponement of the 2018 Lambeth Conference and asks if this reflects growing divisions within the Anglican Communion.

In the first of three special reports on the Catholic Synod of Bishops on the Family, Andrew Fletcher speaks to two young families ahead of the gathering which opens in Rome this weekend. David Willey discusses how the Synod will operate and if the discussion on controversial teachings including contraception and divorce will upset traditionalists in the church.

As pro-democracy campaigners in Hong Kong continue to defy the authorities in Beijing by holding street protests, we speak to Catholic Cardinal Joseph Zen, who is calling for unity among the protesters.

While the search continues for the Bristol school girl who is thought to be heading to Syria, Jahan Mahmood, a former adviser to the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism talks to William about radicalisation on the internet. What content is out there and why is it so persuasive?

The Sunday programme enlisted the help of our listeners to find a suitable location in London for the statue 'Homeless Jesus'. Trevor Barnes visits some of the locations suggested and investigates the practicalities of erecting the artwork.

One of the world's earliest surviving Christian charms, dating back to the end of the 6th Century, has been discovered in a library vault in Manchester. William meets Dr Roberta Mazza, Research Fellow at the John Rylands Research Institute who made the remarkable discovery.

Producers:
David Cook
Peter Everett

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox

Contributors:
The Most Revd Justin Welby
Cardinal Joseph Zen
Dr Roberta Mazza
Jahan Mahmood.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b04k7b6s)
Shape

Will Self presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Shape, a disability-led arts organisation working to improve access to culture for disabled people.
Registered Charity No 279184
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Shape'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b04k405g)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b04k405j)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b04k7b6v)
A Harvest of Souls

In 1614 England was a dangerous place for Roman Catholics. Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ and Dr Damian Howard SJ look back on Heythrop College's 400 years of training priests and laity for ministry, as they reflect on the theme of harvest and celebrate the tradition of prayerfulness which is a hallmark of Jesuit spirituality. With 'Inner Voices', a highly acclaimed youth chamber choir made up of singers from inner London state schools, directed by Ralph Allwood. Producer: Rowan Morton Gledhill.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04jmd8d)
Short and Successful

Adam Gopnik thinks there's a simple reason for the recent findings that short men enjoy stable marriages. It's not that they are desperate to please, but are desperate to prevail. "In every area of life, we underrate the merits of desperation, and persistently overrate the advantages of free choice."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkwg9)
Brown Kiwi

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the New Zealand brown kiwi. A piercing wail can be heard in a forest at night. A brown kiwi is calling. Only found in New Zealand, kiwi are flightless birds and the brown kiwi, which is about the size of a domestic chicken, lays an egg weighing as much as a quarter of its own bodyweight – proportionally; the largest egg for its size of any bird. More mammal like than birds; their tiny eyes are of little use, but they have an excellent sense of smell, using their nostrils located unusually for birds near the end of the bill. Held in great affection, brown kiwi appear on coins, stamps and coats-of- arms as well as providing a nick-name for New Zealand's national rugby team.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b04k7b6z)
Sunday morning magazine with Paddy O'Connell. Reviewing the papers: Lib Dem Peer Lord Palumbo, FT columnist and superscrimper Heather McGregor and science journalist Ben Goldacre. A mother from Sussex tells us how her son came killed in Aleppo, Syria. Emma Jane Kirby takes to the skies with Frontex - the EU agency which protects Europe's borders.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b04k7b71)
Writer ..... Simon Frith
Director ..... Julie Beckett
Editor ..... Sean O'Connor.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b04k7b73)
Sally Wainwright

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the writer Sally Wainwright.

TV is her chosen medium and Last Tango In Halifax, Happy Valley or Scott & Bailey are watched by millions of viewers. Her ear for dialogue and talent for story-telling place her among the cream of small screen dramatists: she majors in whip-smart phrasing and plot lines that twist the innards with their tension, but never strain plausibility.

Her passion for every day drama was honed at her mother's knee: in the 60's and 70's as Mrs. Wainwright watched Coronation Street, young Sally tuned in too, developing an affinity with the power of the portrayal of language as it is spoken and life as it is lived. She would later go on to write for the show.

She says, "When I was seven I started writing down the things people said - it was something I just had to do. I think I was born with it - it's like being able to draw or paint."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b04k405l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b04jjz41)
Series 70

Episode 8

In the last of the current series; Nicholas Parsons challenges Sheila Hancock, Russell Kane, Holly Walsh and Paul Merton to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation?

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b04k7g5x)
Mouthwatering Mutton

Mutton tastier than lamb - why we should all demand to eat older meat. Dan Saladino uncovers the mystery of why we no longer eat mutton, despite it being a favoured meat of the Victorians. He hears about the efforts of Bob Kennard, author of a new book, Much Ado About Mutton, who's campaigning for good quality mutton to return to our menus.

Chefs Fergus Henderson and Cyrus Todiwala are both lyrical on the virtues of mutton and give tips on the best way to cook it. And Dan visits the Thomas family sheep farm deep in the Welsh hills to understand why our lack of interest in mutton has changed their way of life.

The programme also hears of a mutton story from America, the Moonlite BBQ in Kentucky, a destination restaurant that draws people from all over the US in search of their slow cooked mutton. It was also a destination for artisan mutton producer Tony Davies who travelled to the restaurant to see if you could provide an answer to mutton's woes in the UK. As he explains in the programme, he arrived at a dramatic conclusion.

Presented by Dan Saladino and produced in Bristol by Emma Weatherill.

Photo image copyright - Bob Kennard.
The audio of the Moonlite BBQ restaurant kindly provided by Mark Dolan of www.bbqpilgrim.com and the American Southern Foodways Alliance www.southernfoodways.org.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b04k405n)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04k7g5z)
Global news and analysis; presented by Mark Mardell.


SUN 13:30 With Humble Duty Reports... (b041yd48)
After Labour's election victory in 1997, the MP Janet Anderson was appointed a government whip and found herself in a role unique in the British constitution. As Vice-Chamberlain of the Royal Household, Janet was charged with writing a daily message to Her Majesty the Queen on the proceedings in Parliament. Janet's messages went beyond the usual humdrum, regaling the Queen with a daily soap opera of life in the House of Commons, from the disappearing transport minister to the secret deals done with the Opposition to prevent the viewing of a critical football match being interrupted by parliamentary votes. Her accounts make vivid the characters, rivalries and absurdities of the Palace of Westminster in the first year of Tony Blair's government.

Producer: Adam Bowen.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04jmcr3)
The Next Horticultural Generation

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme in front of an audience of 150 young gardeners during London's Landscape Show. James Wong, Pippa Greenwood and Matthew Wilson answer the questions.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:
Q. How can alpine plants be better incorporated in gardens with diverse planting?

A. Shallow troughs, dry-stone walls and living walls can be used to show off alpine plants.

Q. What is the best way to look after an Amaryllis plant so that it flowers again the following year?

A. Let it dry out in the winter to allow it to go into dormancy. Make sure it's in a cool, brightly lit place. Give it a high-potash feed when the flowers start to die.

Q. Why is it that you sometimes see pink Hydrangeas growing alongside blue ones when the colour is down to soil PH?

A. This might be due to mortar or chalk beneath the soil creating small patches of soil with different PH levels.

Q. Is it possible to micro-propagate ferns using the tissue from the fronds?

A. Technically yes, but it's not something that people usually do, perhaps because it's not financially viable. Have a go!

Q. What plants would you recommend for a north-facing steep slope with rich soil?

A. Hellebores, Camellias, Drimys winteri, Sarcococca (Christmas Box) and autumn-flowering Cyclamen.

Q. My Indian Bean tree is getting too big. When can I trim it and by how much?

A. You could pollard the tree. Prune it, but not too hard. Reduce the size over the period of two to three years as to keep its shape. Next time, why not plant Paulownia Tomentosa (Foxglove tree)?

Q. The Myrtle hedges I put in look like they're dying. Should I take them out?

A. This might be due to bad drainage. Lift one of the sickly plants and inspect the roots to check if they are soggy.

Q. Which herbs, veg and fruits would the panel recommend for growing in containers?

A. Strawberries, salads, Chives, edible flowers, Runner Beans, Sweet Peas, Radishes and Miracle Berries.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04k7g63)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the challenges of adoption, remembering grandad through his recipes, and facing terminal cancer, from Devon, Northern Ireland and Leeds, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b04k7j00)
Ian Rankin - Rebus: Set in Darkness

Episode 2

In the final part of Ian Rankin's crime thriller, Rebus is investigating two murders on the site where the new Scottish Parliament is being built in Edinburgh in 1998. But he makes the mistake of sleeping with the sister of one of the victims. DC Siobhan Clarke is looking into the death of a vagrant with over £400,000 in the bank. Rebus begins to suspect all three cases could be linked - but crime boss Ger Cafferty has his own ideas about where the police investigation should be going. Dramatised by Chris Dolan.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b04k7j02)
Tim Winton - Dirt Music

With James Naughtie. Celebrated Australian writer Tim Winton discusses his novel Dirt Music with a group of readers.

Tim reveals how after seven years of writing Dirt Music, he was unable to hand it in to his publisher on the agreed date. He felt ashamed of the novel and that it wasn't ready; if he found himself getting lost in it so would the reader. He spent the next fifty-five days redrafting and rewriting, and the novel went on to be short-listed for the Man Booker Prize 2002 and is considered one of his best.

Dirt Music is set on the coast of Western Australia and in its vast isolated deserts. Forty year old Georgie Jutland is a mess, with her career in ruins she's torn between two men who are both bereaved and grieving. These characters' lives are in stasis, they are incapable of articulating their emotions and instead resort to alcohol and petty crime. Tim Winton explains :

"I'm interested in people who have very few words to express feelings, it's not that they don't have feelings but they have no language, and I'm interested in finding ways to portray that ... and in this instance it's space, memory and music by which they express themselves or communicate."

November's Bookclub choice : And When Did You Last See Your Father? by Blake Morrison (1993)

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed Guest : Tim Winton
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b04k7j04)
The Brownings

Roger McGough is joined by Professor Daniel Karlin to talk about the power couple of British poetry, Robert and Elizabeth Browning. Poems include the classics 'How Do I Love Thee?' and 'Home Thoughts from Abroad'. With an appearance by Sir David Attenborough.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b04jk3qy)
Border Security: All at Sea?

How well are Britain's borders patrolled and defended at a time when the authorities are battling to stem the flow of illegal immigrants coming across the Channel and tightening national security because of fears of a terrorist attack by extremists returning from fighting in Syria and Iraq?

Allan Urry assesses the vulnerability of our ports, struggling with cuts to Border Force personnel and problems with a computer system that was supposed to have identified all those coming into and going out of the UK. The programme reveals how security checks on cargo are being compromised and hears concern about the gaps in surveillance of our coastline.

Producer: Emma Forde
Reporter: Allan Urry.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b04k4030)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04k405q)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b04k405s)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04k405v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b04k7kbf)
Steven Fry speaks frankly about his cocaine use.

Iggy Pop shares some sartorial secrets, how do you pull off silk pyjamas on a public highway?

We walk on the shingle of Derek Jarman's beach with poet Kate Tempest, then roam the New York City Streets of the 70s with a cab driver who worked the same shift as Philip Glass.

And there's music too - John Grant with the BBC Philharmonic and also John Taverner's swansong 'Flood of Beauty'.

Lauren Laverne (6Music, 3rd October)

Tom Ravenscroft: John Grant and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra (6Music, 3rd October)

Simon Mayo Drivetime (Radio 2, 29th September)

Out There (Radio 4, 28th September)

Woman's Hour (Radio 4, All Week)

The Forum: Aliens (World Service, 27th September)

The Essay: Trip Sheet (Radio 3, All Week)

Between the Ears (Radio 3, 4th October)

Shipping Forecast (Radio 4, All Week)

Radcliffe and Maconie (6Music, All Week)

Breakfast (Radio 3, All Week)

Radio 1 Stories: The Fear (Radio 1, 30th September)

Iggy Pop (6Music, 5th October)

Front Row (Radio 4, All Week)

Radio 3 Live in Concert: Celebrating John Tavener - Flood of Beauty (Radio 3, 28th September).


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b04k7kbj)
Having enjoyed the harvest festival service, Carol enthuses about village life and Fallon's small business, which Jill points out is better than BL's big business. Jill found BL's ostentatious hamper for harvest festival simply blatant.

They also discuss Roy's departure from Lower Loxley. Jill is surprised he left. After meeting a rather flat Hayley, Carol subtly mentions to Jill that Hayley doesn't seem quite the cheerful young woman she's been described as.

Carol offers to be a sous chef/helper to Jill for the harvest supper. They discuss Bert and his singing group - other members Joe and Eddie. Carol is finding Bert to be a treasure with all his old stories. She could talk vegetables with him all day.

David admits to Ruth that he'd consider moving to a new farm in Prudhoe only as a last resort - but it would have to be perfect. He and Ruth agree to go and have a look at one. David's worried about telling Jill.

Hayley reveals to Roy that Phoebe knows about his affair. Roy can't think what to say to Phoebe. Sorry is all he can say, says Hayley. Desperate to make things right with Phoebe, Roy suggests they all go to the harvest supper together - as a family.


SUN 19:15 The Write Stuff (b04k7kbn)
Series 17

John Osborne

4 Extra Debut. Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton, with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Mark Billingham and Lynne Truss. The week's author is playwright John Osborne, the creator of 1956's Look Back in Anger.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SUN 19:45 Out There (b04k92wb)
The Constant Heart

Stories from a new anthology celebrating the work of Scottish Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender writers.

Episode 2/ 3

The Constant Heart

A quirky tale about a down-trodden baker living on a Scottish island.

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b04jmcr9)
Has a summer of tough foreign news had you switching off the radio? The Editor of the Today programme, Jamie Angus, talks to Roger Bolton about his plans to bring a greater range of approaches to telling international stories. The aim is to give audiences a broader view of life in countries which are more often in the news for conflict or disaster - but is it sugar-coating the news for listeners?

Mud-slinging or mediation? What's the best way to debate? Many Feedback listeners tell us they want more measured, discursive debate - especially on important issues. Matthew Taylor, who's used to holding his own on the Moral Maze, has been presenting Agree to Differ in which he asks contributors to seek common ground in their argument. He debates the subject with the boss of Any Questions, Clare McGinn.

And why is You and Yours being cut short for a World War I drama? The 500-part, four-year-long serial Home Front is knocking twelve minutes off the consumer affairs programme each day. Will You and Yours ever gets its missing minutes back? Roger asks Radio 4's Head of Planning and Scheduling, Tony Pilgrim.

Produced by Will Yates.
A Whistledown production for Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04jmcr7)
Christopher Hogwood, Major General Yitzhak Hofi, Sheila Tracy, Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw, Lynsey de Paul

Matthew Bannister on

the conductor and musicologist Christopher Hogwood, who founded the Academy of Ancient Music to give authentic performances of baroque and classical works.

Major General Yitzhak Hofi. As head of the Israeli intelligence service Mossad, he presided over the rescue of hostages at Entebbe airport, the destruction of an Iraqi nuclear reactor and the hit squads who killed Black September militants.

The broadcaster Sheila Tracy who championed big band music on Radio 2 - and created a cult "Truckers Hour".

Dame Kathleen Ollerenshaw, the mathematician who played a leading role in building up educational institutions in her native Manchester

And the singer and songwriter Lynsey de Paul.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b04k2lrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b04k7b6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b04jjz49)
Michael Pollan on Food

What should we eat? Jo Fidgen talks to the influential American writer Michael Pollan about what food is - and what it isn't. In an interview before an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science he criticises the way the food industry has promoted highly-processed products delivering hefty doses of salt, sugar and fat. He believes that the plethora of accompanying health claims have left us more confused than ever about what food really is, where it has come from and its impact on our health and the environment. His solution? To cook at home. He argues that this simple change will guarantee a healthy diet and stop us relying on big food companies to feed us. It is also, he says, a profoundly political act. But is it a realistic proposition for busy working families or simply a middle-class ideology?

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04k94jq)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04k94js)
Hugh Muir of The Guardian analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b04jm36h)
David Fincher on Gone Girl; Clint Mansell; George Szirtes; London Film Festival

With Francine Stock.

Director David Fincher reveals how he adapted the best-selling thriller Gone Girl for the big screen and why he's not worried that seven million readers already know the plot's infamous twist.

Lux Aeterna composer Clint Mansell discusses the pleasure and pain of writing for Hollywood and what he really thinks about having his music replaced by somebody else's score.

Poet George Szirtes reviews the poetic realism of Le Jour Se Leve, written by Jacques Prevert and considered one of the masterpieces that inspired 40s film noir, with its heady mix of romanticism, cynicism and fatalism.

With 248 films in 12 days, the choice of movies in the BFI London Film Festival may seem slightly daunting, so its director Clare Stewart discusses the LFF programme.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04k7b6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 06 OCTOBER 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04k406w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 The Educators (b04hytg6)
Salman Khan

Sal Khan worked as a hedge-fund analyst before he set up the Khan Academy, almost by accident, when his cousin in another city needed help with her maths homework. Since then, his online video lessons have been watched half a billion times, and he's been described by Bill Gates as 'the world's favourite teacher'.

In this programme, Sal Khan talks about how and why he set up the not-for-profit organisation. He tells Sarah Montague why he believes lesson time in school could be spent more effectively if the explanation of new ideas is done at home, with students watching video lectures, in a process known as 'flipped learning'.

He argues that pupils should have the freedom to move at their own pace, only moving on when they have mastered a concept. He says this type of learning would be done best in larger classes made up of students from mixed age groups and abilities.

Presenter: Sarah Montague
Producer: Joel Moors.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b04k7b6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04k406y)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04k4070)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04k4072)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04k4074)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04kbghw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Imam Monawar Hussain, Muslim Tutor at Eton College.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04k971x)
Rural health, Lib Dem rural policy, Goat contraceptives

Rural healthcare is facing a major crisis, according to a GP with thirty years experience in a rural practice, who now chairs the rural health working party for the World Organisation of Family Doctors. At the start of a week looking at issues facing healthcare in rural areas, Charlotte Smith asks him what the problems are, and what can be done to try and tackle them.

As the Liberal Democrats meet in Glasgow for their Autumn conference, Charlotte talks to Dan Rogerson MP, the Defra minister responsible for water, forestry, rural affairs and resource management. She asks about Liberal Democrat rural policies.

And how to stop goats having more kids? Give them contraceptives, of course! We report from a project in Devon which is giving contraceptives to nanny goats, in order to control their numbers. Experts say the current goat population in the Valley of Rocks in North Devon is about twice the size that the landscape can support.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04k4076)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkwmk)
Hawaiian Crow

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the now extinct in the wild Hawaiian Crow. It's hard to imagine any crow becoming endangered, but only a hundred or so the formerly widespread Hawaiian crow survive and all of them in captivity. Also known by its Hawaiian name 'Alala' these sooty black brown crows produce a chorus of caws and screeches. Early settlers in the Hawaiian archipelago reduced their numbers, leaving the remaining populations vulnerable to introduced predators; feral pigs further reduced the fruit-laden understory plants favoured by the crow. The species was last seen in the wild in 2002. All may not be lost. A captive breeding programme overseen by San Diego Zoo is hoping to reintroduce the crows into the wild, so perhaps the Hawaiian forests will once again resound with their calls.


MON 06:00 Today (b04k971z)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b04k9gj0)
Naomi Klein on climate change and growth

Naomi Klein argues that the greatest contributor to global warming is not carbon and climate change, but capitalism. She tells Anne McElvoy that the market's addiction to growth and profit is killing the planet. But the economist Dieter Helm questions whether capitalism is really at war with the environment and looks to the world's innovators to invent our way out of crisis. Climate change is a global issue, but the author Tahmima Anam looks at what it means for her home country Bangladesh. Jeremy Oppenheim argues that economic growth and action on climate change can be achieved together, with global cooperation.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


MON 09:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rc8)
Luther and a Language for All Germans

Neil MacGregor continues his series with a week of programmes with a focus on the things which bind Germans together - ranging from the importance of the great German writer Goethe, and the significance of the Grimm brothers' fairy tales, to the long-standing history of German beer and sausages.

He begins with the story of how Martin Luther created the modern German language, through his translation of the Bible.

Luther is often, in German history, seen as the Great Divider. His attacks on his opponents were pitiless, not least his writings against the Jews. But he is also, unquestionably, a great Uniter - almost single-handedly he created the modern German language which, in the centuries that followed, proved a unifying force during times of destruction and disintegration.

Producer Paul Kobrak.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04k9gj2)
Chore wars; What will the Lib Dems offer women voters?

Woman's Hour has invented a chore calculator to for you to work out who does the majority of the chores in your home and who gets the most free time. Across the week we are looking at the division of labour in the home. Mumsnet join Jane to discuss why it matters to their users who does what at home. BBC reporter Geoff Bird and his wife Sarah provide a frank look at who does what in their home. Professor Jonathan Gershuny, co-director of the Centre for Time Use Research at the University of Oxford provides the historical context of the chore debate and journalist Tim Dowling and his wife Sophie de Brandt enter their details into the chore calculator to find out how equal the running of their house is.
Over the last few weeks Woman's Hour has been speaking to women who go the different party conferences - why do they do it, what do they get out of it and what difference does it make? On Monday we are at The Liberal Democrats conference in Glasgow. We hear about their record in the coalition government and what they're planning to offer women voters when they go to the polls next May. We talk to some of the young women who are active members of the Liberal Democrats about why they joined, how they're trying to engage female voters and why it matters to them - especially when so many young women don't vote.

Presenter: Jane Garvey.


MON 10:45 The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber (b04k9gj4)
Episode 1

Joe Armstrong, Hayley Atwell and Dougray Scott star in this adaptation of the powerful novel by Michel Faber (Under the Skin, Crimson Petal and the White).

Set in the near future, it tells the story of Peter, devoted husband and devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Beatrice.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Emmerson.

CAST
Narrator.....Dougray Scott
Peter.....Joe Armstrong
Beatrice.....Hayley Atwell
Grainger.....Kelly Burke
Oasan/ Tuska.....Mark Edel-Hunt
Jesus Lover Number One/ Severin.....Michael Bertenshaw
Jesus Lover Number Five/ BG.....Damian Lynch
Jesus Lover Number Four.....David Acton
USIC Psychologist.....Jane Slavin
USIC Doctor.....Elaine Claxton
Other parts played by members of the company

Directed by Emma Harding.


MON 11:00 The Year of the Drone (b04k9gj6)
Will Robson gets exclusive access to some of the British military's most secretive, sophisticated and controversial drones, and talks to the men and women who operate them. He gets an insider perspective on what it means to fight a war remotely, and finds out how long distant combat affects those at the controls.

In a remote corner of west Wales, in a matt green shipping container, a group of engineers and military officials crowd around a high-tech bank of screens and joysticks. A monitor feeds them live aerial footage of the Carmarthenshire coastline. The image is crisp, they can make out dolphins swimming in the wake of a fishing trawler. They're testing the limits of the British Army's Watchkeeper surveillance drone, one of a new fleet of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) which have an £850m pound price tag.

The British military is a global leader in UAS technology, and Watchkeeper is just one element. As drones become ever more important to the way Britain fights its wars, the Government's Select Defence Committee are demanding more transparency.

While the military have welcomed UAS as a way of reducing costs and casualties, not everyone is convinced. Critics say that drones could bring an age of airborne occupation and dispassionate warfare. They claim that when war can be fought without consequence to the aggressor, violence quickly becomes easier than diplomacy.

Will Robson explores the debate around one of this generation's most divisive military technologies.

Produced by Harry Graham
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:30 Kerry's List (b04k9gj8)
Series 2

Justice

Kerry Godliman has to become a juror. Through sitcom scenes, sketches, stand up and songs, we find out how her complicated life is helped by the all-important list.

With jury service weighing heavily on her mind, Kerry and husband Ben have problems with 5 year old daughter Elsie who's been mistreating their cat. Kerry also has to make a cushion, which confuses Elsie no end. In addition, Kerry has every parent's current technological problem - forgetting the computer password.

We hear from a very passionate dinner lady, discover a very unusual Tudor courtroom and witness a very different version of the TV hit series Masterchef.

Kerry gets a problematic visit from her Guilt alter ego - who's continually keen to show up her inadequacies - and she has another chaotic chat with her best friend Hazel (Bridget Christie).

The cast includes co-writer David Lane Pusey, Ben Abell, Rosie Cavaliero, Lucy Briers, Nicholas Le Prevost, Dominic Frisby and Melissa Bury.

Producer: Paul Russell
An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b04k4078)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 21st Century Mythologies (b04k9gjb)
Screw-Top Wine Bottle

In 1954, the French critic and semiotician Roland Barthes began a series of essays in which he analysed the popular culture of his day. He called his essays "Mythologies." In this series of witty talks the acclaimed writer and critic Peter Conrad delivers a series of 21st Century Mythologies in a French accent of the mind. Conrad ranges over the defining effluvia of our era, from the Cronut to the Shard, to the Kardashians. In this first programme Conrad turns his mind to an innovation Barthes would have abhorred: the screw top wine bottle.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b04k9gjd)
Could the living wage transform care in the UK?

Could paying the living Wage transform care in the UK?

The hydrogen cars that could make electric vehicles old hat.

Public urged to spy on relatives' receiving care

The radical solution to bare faced cheek.

New aromas in Scottish hospitals that are saving the NHS a packet.

We hear from a Mum about her Wonga woe.


MON 12:57 Weather (b04k407b)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b04k9gjg)
Business Secretary Vince Cable attacks Conservative "obsession with spending cuts" - and tells us the Liberal Democrats won't go along with Tory plans for a further £25bn of savings in the next parliament. While Martha Kearney gauges the mood of activists at the LibDem conference in Glasgow.

The besieged Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane appears to be in serious danger of falling to Islamic State fighters. Paul Adams has the latest from the Turkish side of the border. The former head of the armed forces, General Lord Richards, warns that air strikes alone won't be enough to defeat IS - and that hardline Taliban fighters from Afghanistan could link up with IS militants.

The trial has opened in South Africa of the British businessman, Shrien Dewani: he's pleaded not guilty to murdering his wife, Anni, on their honeymoon four years ago.

Jon Manel and Henry Dimbleby visit a school in Gloucestershire that's experienced difficulties implementing Nick Clegg's flagship policy of free lunches for 4 to 7-year-olds in England.

And the Sun's managing editor, Stig Abell, tells us why the police's use of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act poses a "really serious risk to the freedom of the press".

Presented by Martha Kearney.


MON 13:45 An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin (b04k9gjl)
Episode 1

The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), broadcast for the first time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964. Her letters, introduced by her biographer Georgina Ferry, reveal a passionate and gentle woman who juggled pioneering research in x-ray crystallography with bringing up three children, while her husband Thomas spent much of his time in Africa.

From an early age, Dorothy ran the family home, looking after her younger siblings while her parents travelled the world. In 1928, Dorothy's parents encouraged her to apply to Oxford University to read chemistry. They were confident in her intellectual ability but her father did worry that, without a good haircut, her appearance might let her down.

Dorothy's university friend, Betty Murray, described her as 'quite the most interesting woman in College'. She was passionate about chemistry, choosing to spend her 21st birthday in the lab and became interested in x ray crystallography, a new technique for revealing the internal structure of molecules. She also enjoyed archaeology and painstakingly completed intricate paintings of ancient mosaics. All the while, her distant but devoted mother repeatedly warned her not to work too hard.

Dorothy Hodgkin remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science. She really ought to be a household name.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b04k7kbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b04k9gjn)
De Wife of Bristol

by Edson Burton.

Lorna Gayle and Susan Wokoma star in this scurrilous contemporary riff on Chaucer's Wife of Bath.

Retiree Clarissa da Costa finds herself telling tall tales of marriage and disharmony to Shanti, a young Jamaican woman who has been brought to Bristol as housekeeper to a much older man. Shanti, however, turns out to have a story of her own.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b04k9gjq)
Series 28

Heat 3, 2014

(3/13)
The competitors joining Russell Davies for the latest heat of the wide-ranging music quiz this week come from London, Kent and Oxfordshire. As always, the quiz tests their knowledge of music in all its variety, from the classics to film music, jazz, stage musicals, rock and pop. The winner goes through to the semi-finals later in the autumn.

There are plenty of musical extracts of all kinds to identify, and the dreaded specialist round where the contestants have to pick one of five musical topics on which to answer individual questions, with no prior warning whatsoever.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b04k7g5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 In Praise of Limestone (b04k9mzl)
In W.H. Auden's famous poem, In Praise of Limestone, he wrote about a landscape that he was always homesick for - the remote Pennine Dales. It's a place he returned to in his imagination again and again.

Since reading it at school the poet Ian McMillan has always wanted to explore the limestone scenery that inspired the poem. Ian walks in Auden's footsteps, revisiting the places that so moved Auden when he was a boy and young man.

Ian leaves the train at Penrith, where he meets Tony Sharpe from Lancaster University who's looked at how the area impacted on Auden's development as a poet. Ian meets local writer and Auden enthusiast Robert Forsythe who's researched the links between the Pennine Dales and Auden's poetry. They visit Haggs Mine, near to Alston the highest town in Cumbria. Here they peer into the 375 ft deep mine shaft, the kind that fascinated the young Auden as he walked the land as a boy.

Robert takes Ian further East in search of the places described in a New Year Letter, which was written while Auden was living in America during WW2. Ian meets the mining historian Ian Tyler and local poet Josephine Dickinson, whose own work is rooted in the countryside.

As he travels the Pennine Dales Ian reflects on the unbreakable link between the landscape and the poet.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b04k9mzn)
Catholic Synod on the family

This week the extraordinary Synod on the family called by Pope Francis takes place in Rome. It is a crucial moment for the church because the notion of what constitutes family and attitudes towards things like contraception, marriage, abortion and divorce have changed, putting church teaching out of step with wider society and indeed many Catholics. The question is what should the Church do about it? Pope Francis has hinted he wants change, but of what kind? To what extent is current Church teaching based on scripture and indissoluble, or based on rules that can be reinterpreted and more openly applied?

Joining Ernie Rea to discuss the extraordinary Synod on the family are Madeline Teahan, Associate Editor at the Catholic Herald, Paul Vallely author of 'Pope Francis: Untying the Knots' and David Willey the BBC's Vatican Correspondent.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.


MON 17:00 PM (b04k9mzq)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04k407d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b04k9mzs)
Series 7

Episode 1

The Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd welcomes his latest curator Phill Jupitus.

With the space-obsessed star of Radio 4's It Is Rocket Science Helen Keen; the internet entrepreneur and founder of Wikipedia Jimmy Wales; and curator of the Natural History Museum of Rotterdam Kees Moeliker, who won an Ig Nobel Prize for his study of Homosexual Necrophilia in the Mallard Duck.

The Museum's Steering Committee discusses:

* A smuggling ring 27 kilometres in circumference
* Why the largest reference work in the history of civilisation has room for a list of sexually active popes
* How a sparrow became Holland's most famous martyr to TV Light Entertainment
* How invoking The Wand helped put Americans in space
* How Africa will be transformed by a £10 gadget.

Researchers: James Harkin and Stevyn Colgan of QI.

Producers: Richard Turner and Dan Schreiber

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2014.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b04k9mzv)
Roy wants the family to go to the harvest supper. Vicky, sensing problems, feels it would show a united front. She fishes to find out what's happened between Elizabeth and Roy. Vicky has heard rumours that Roy had his fingers in the till at Lower Loxley. Hayley finally tells Vicky about the affair. Shocked Vicky prompts Hayley to ask Elizabeth for the truth. How long has it been going on? Hayley admits she doesn't believe it was a one-off.

David explains to Jill that he and Ruth are going to look at a farm in Northumberland. It is a last resort, but also because Ruth is worried about Heather. David makes it clear to Jill that she is a big part of any decision that they make.

Helen considers delaying going back to work while Henry's sick. Rob encourages her to leave Tina to it at the shop. Finally Helen reveals to Rob she's thinking about quitting work altogether. Rob points out how much Henry looks forward to seeing her after nursery, although Rob insists he doesn't want to guilt trip her. But Helen is confident it's the right decision for her.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b04k9mzz)
Clive James, Effie Gray, Selfie, Niven Govinden

Clive James talks to Samira Ahmed about his new publication Poetry Notebook 2006-2014, in which he presents a distillation of all he's learned about the art form that matters to him most; Sarah Dunant reviews Emma Thompson and Dakota Fanning in new film Effie Gray about the life of the Victorian art critic and painter John Ruskin; playwright Brad Birch on his new production, Selfie, an update on Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray; and Niven Govinden on his novel All the Days and Nights

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


MON 19:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b04jjz47)
Series 4

Sex Equality

Pints and philosophical problems with Matthew Sweet. Each week the programme examines a knotty philosophical issue: this week, sex equality and pay. Should we expect women to make up 50% of senior positions and, if they do not, is that evidence of discrimination? In the pub for this episode is the philosopher Janet Radcliffe Richards.

Producer: David Edmonds.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b04k9n03)
Peston and the House of Debt

Robert Peston tests the arguments made by the authors of a new book who claim the financial crisis was caused by exploding household debt - not by the banks. But are they right?

Now the BBC's Economics Editor, he witnessed at first hand every twist and turn of the financial crisis of 2007 and 2008. He first exposed the crisis at Northern Rock as well as revealing the failure of Lehman Brothers. This makes him the ideal interviewer to probe the arguments and conclusions of "The House of Debt", a radical new study of the recession and the lessons to be learnt from it. In discussion with the book's authors, Atif Mian and Amir Sufi, he subjects their arguments to rigorous scrutiny.

They challenge the conventional wisdom that the banks were to blame for the recession in the US and UK. They argue that the real villain was the doubling between 2000 and 2007 in total American household debt to $14 trillion. Much of this was owed by borrowers with the poorest credit ratings. When the house price bubble burst and incomes also fell, these households suddenly stopped spending and plunged the US economy into deep recession.

By this argument, the banks weren't the real problem. And yet, thanks in large part to their lobbying power, they received help which would have been better directed at helping indebted households. If correct, this means governments and central banks should fundamentally reappraise how they tackle future downturns, focusing much more on households and much less on bankers. For many, this may sound highly attractive. But does the new analysis pass muster with Robert Peston?

Producer Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04jk368)
Ocean Plastic and Seabirds

Plastic litter has the knack of finding its way into the ocean. Unfortunately this means that seabirds that have, until relatively recently, been safe to assume that the objects floating on the surface are food are getting a stomach full of trash. Shared Planet finds out how bad the situation is for seabirds like the fulmar and the simple things we can do to reduce the problem.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b04k9gj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b04k407g)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b04k9n05)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04k9n07)
The Bone Clocks

Episode 11

By David Mitchell. Part eleven. Novelist Crispin Hershey is in Iceland for a book festival. He nurses his recently broken heart while spending time with his friend and fellow writer Holly Sykes. Crispin must finally face the consequences of past mistakes. Read by Robert Glenister

This ambitious, much-anticipated new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas is one to lose yourself in. The Bone Clocks is an intricate feat of storytelling revealing one woman's life through those who encounter her. The journey has a global and historical sweep, it takes us from 1980s Kent via 19th Century Australia to a near future New York with a playfully genre-bending subplot.

Our Book at Bedtime will be read by a stellar cast of five actors over three weeks. We open with Hannah Arterton as Holly Sykes, 15 years old in 1980s Gravesend. Then Luke Treadaway is Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, likeable, good looking, and extremely dangerous. Joe Armstrong is Ed Brubeck, a foreign correspondent in the current decade, struggling to overcome the gaps between his life at home and the loss he experiences daily at work. Robert Glenister is Crispin Hershey, once the wild child of British letters, a novelist now past his best-selling peak. And Laurel Lefkow is Dr Marinus, a psychiatrist from the seventh century who meets Holly Sykes in a near-future America.

Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.


MON 23:00 Fresh From the Fringe (b04k9n09)
Fresh from the Fringe: 2014

Long Showcase of new comedy talent from the 2014 Edinburgh Fringe, hosted by Jason Cook and featuring Fosters award-winners Alex Edelman (newcomer) and Funz and Gamez (panel prize), along with Suzi Ruffell, Gein's Family Giftshop, Lolly Adefope, Tamar Broadbent, Rhys James, Massive Dad, Natasia Demetriou and Dane Baptiste.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.



TUESDAY 07 OCTOBER 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b04k408d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04k408g)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04k408j)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04k408l)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b04k408n)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04kbgck)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Imam Monawar Hussain, Muslim Tutor at Eton College.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b04kbgcp)
Dairy protests, rural health, Spanish slugs

Dairy farmers have held their first protest meeting outside a milk processing company in response to falling milk prices. The campaign group Farmers for Action says that the money they are being paid is less than the cost of production, which is around 30 pence per litre. We hear from one dairy farmer who has decided to give up the business and sell all 90 cows.

A charity in Scotland is providing emergency equipment to health workers in rural areas. The Sandpiper Trust says the kits can save lives, as it can take emergency services some time to reach patients in the most remote areas.

And farmers are being urged to report sightings of the invasive Spanish slug which is causing problems in some Eastern areas of the country. A new website, Slugwatch, has been launched to help people identify the pest, which was first identified a year ago.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkwnn)
Andean Cock-of-the-Rock

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Andean Cock-of-the-rock from Peru. Deep in a cloud forest a female awaits the display of her displaying males. Gathered in front of her several head-bobbing wing-waving males, these males are spectacularly dazzling; a vibrant orange head and body, with black wings and tails, yellow staring eyes, and ostentatious fan-shaped crests which can almost obscure their beaks. Male cock-of-the rocks gather at communal leks, and their performances include jumping between branches and bowing at each other whilst all the time calling loudly. Yet, for all the males' prancing and posturing, it is the female who's in control. Aware that the most dominant and fittest males will be nearest the centre of the lekking arena, it's here that she focuses her attention.


TUE 06:00 Today (b04ltddy)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b04kbjhg)
Elspeth Garman on crystallography

Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Elspeth Garman about a technique that's led to 28 Nobel Prizes in the last century.

X- ray crystallography, now celebrating its 100th anniversary, is used to study the internal structure of matter. It may sound rather arcane but it's the reason we now know the structure of hugely important molecules, like penicillin, insulin and DNA. But while other scientists scoop up prizes for cracking chemical structures, Elspeth works away behind the scenes, (more cameraman than Hollywood star), improving the methods and techniques used by everybody working in the field.

If only it was as simple as putting a crystal in the machine and printing off the results. Growing a single crystal of an enzyme that gives TB its longevity took Elspeth's team no less than fifteen years. No pressure there then when harvesting that precious commodity.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b04kbjhj)
Victoria Derbyshire meets Alastair Campbell

The broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire has kept a diary since she was a child. She talks to Alastair Campbell about the habit of diary writing, and why he keeps a diary. She finds out why he started writing them, and whether, now he is so well known for them, the decision to publish affected the people close to him.

Alastair Campbell talks frankly about the two occasions when his diary was read by others in circumstances beyond his control - one when he had a nervous breakdown and a police psychiatrist used his diary entries to help him see the part drink played in his problems; and the other when Lord Hutton asked to see his diaries as part of the inquiry into the death of David Kelly.

Producer: Isobel Eaton.


TUE 09:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcb)
Fairy Tales and Forests: The Grimms and Caspar David Friedrich

Continuing a week of programmes with a focus on the things which bind Germans together, Neil MacGregor reveals how the fairy tales collected by the Grimms and the landscape art of Caspar David Friedrich played a vital role in re-establishing an identity for German-speaking people who had been defeated by Napoleon.

While the Grimms were studying the German language and the inner German-ness present in the folk-tales they collected, Friedrich used landscape as the external vision of being German.

Producer Paul Kobrak.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04kbjhl)
Jo Swinson; Childcare and chores; Afghan girls living as boys

Jo Swinson M.P. on how the Liberal Democrats plan to win back women voters. Chore wars - continuing our investigation into who does what at home: should childcare be considered a chore? With Beccy Asher, author of Shattered: Modern Motherhood and the Illusion of Equality and Imogen Thompson from Mothers at Home Matter. Tim Samuels on men and domesticity. Happy birthday, Woman's Hour - 68 today. We celebrate with a classic archive interview from Olive Shapley, one of the first presenters of the programme. Journalist Jenny Nordberg on the Afghan girls who are dressed and treated as boys by their families.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


TUE 10:45 The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber (b04kbjhn)
Episode 2

Joe Armstrong, Hayley Atwell and Dougray Scott star in this adaptation of the powerful novel by Michel Faber (Under the Skin, Crimson Petal and the White).

Set in the near future, it tells the story of Peter, devoted husband and devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Beatrice.

In today's episode, Peter starts to explore the USIC base on Oasis, but is eager to meet his new flock - the planet's enigmatic native inhabitants. Back on Earth, the weather is doing strange things.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Emmerson

CAST
Narrator.....Dougray Scott
Peter.....Joe Armstrong
Beatrice.....Hayley Atwell
Grainger.....Kelly Burke
Oasan/ Tuska.....Mark Edel-Hunt
Jesus Lover Number One/ Severin.....Michael Bertenshaw
Jesus Lover Number Five/ BG.....Damian Lynch
Jesus Lover Number Four.....David Acton
USIC Psychologist.....Jane Slavin
USIC Doctor.....Elaine Claxton
Other parts played by members of the company

Directed by Emma Harding


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b04kbjhq)
Mahogany

Beautiful and durable, mahogany has been highly prized and traded internationally for centuries. Reaching the impressive height of 60 meters or more they are true giants of the forest. Selective logging of mahogany was unchecked across much of its range until international agreements restricted its trade. But has this been enough? Monty Don finds out more about the big-leaf mahogany and whether we can continue to use its beautiful wood without forfeiting its future.


TUE 11:30 A Mix-Tape for Gus (b04kbjhs)
When she was growing up in Oxford, young composer and musician Emily Levy learned much about music from her adored older brother, Gus.

He’d make her compilation tapes which brought together his passionate and eclectic taste. When he went off to university, the tape-making continued and soon they were also attending gigs and festivals together.

Then Gus died in an accident.

Five years after this sad event, Emily began to listen back to the mix-tapes.

She speaks with some of Gus's closest friends about his passion for music and his particular talent at bringing together surprising genres and artists - not to mention his love of juggling to music.

She finds solace in the discovery that sharing Gus's music tastes with others bestows on him a kind of immortality.

And she reflects on how, in our era of musical choices made by computer algorithm, the death of someone dear to us represents the loss of a unique, human algorithm.

Finally, Emily composes a short piece of music to contribute to a programme which is, in itself, her own Mix-Tape for Gus.

Producer: Beaty Rubens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2014.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b04k408q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 21st Century Mythologies (b04kf61b)
The Apple Icon

In 1954, the French critic and semiotician Roland Barthes began a series of essays in which he analysed the popular culture of his day. He called his essays "Mythologies." In this series of witty talks, the acclaimed writer and critic Peter Conrad delivers a series of 21st Century Mythologies in a French accent of the mind. Conrad ranges over the defining effluvia of our era, from the Cronut, to the Shard, to the Kardashians. In this second programme Conrad turns his attention to one of the most powerful images of our era: Steve Jobs' Apple Icon.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b04kbjhx)
Call You and Yours: How easy is it to get good quality care for your parents or relatives?

How easy did you find it to get good quality care for your elderly parents or relatives? The Care Quality Commission says it is one of the most stressful things we'll face in life.

We'll ask why is it so difficult and what can be done to make it better.

Guests will include the Care Quality Commission and Carers UK.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b04k408s)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04kbjhz)
News and current affairs presented by Martha Kearney.

Fighting between IS militants and Syrian Kurds is reported to have spread to a southern district of the town of Kobane on the Turkish border. We'll hear the latest.

After the brother of murdered hostage Alan Henning complained the family felt 'gagged' by the foreign office during his detention, we'll hear from the sister of Margaret Hassan, who was murdered by kidnappers in Baghdad ten years ago.

The British Army is about to head out to Sierra Leone to tackle the Ebola outbreak. Brigadier Kevin Beaton tells us what they'll be doing.

Liberal Democrat minister David Laws gives us his reaction to the party leadership's defeat over airport policy at their annual conference. Plus the difficulty of tackling cold school dinners.
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TUE 13:45 An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin (b04lc3kj)
Episode 2

The correspondence of the Nobel Prize winning scientist, Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), introduced by her biographer, Georgina Ferry.

In the early 1930s, Dorothy embraced x-ray crystallography, working with her phD supervisor and lover, J.D. Bernal. Letters that were both scientific and highly personal flew back and forth between them, as they tried to determine the internal structure of complex molecules.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b04k9mzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Tommies (b03thbp3)
7 October 1914

by Michael Chaplin.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

And through it all, we'll follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Indira Varma, Lee Ross and Alex Wyndham star in this story, based on events in the valley of the Aisne, on October 7th, 1914. The German advance is just being held 60 miles north-east of Paris, on the day Mickey Bliss arrives at war.

Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: David Hunter.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b04kbjj1)
Series 6

Rabbit Holes

Josie Long dives down a rabbit hole in this sequence of short documentaries, true stories and radio adventures.

We hear tales of a spam email that alters the course of two people's lives and a mysterious monument made out of shoes at a deserted intersection in rural Indiana - and Miranda July leads listeners into another world with her story of swim coaching an elderly team in a town near no large bodies of water.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b04kbjt2)
Saving the Caribbean

The small islands of the Caribbean are acutely vulnerable to rising sea levels and a potential increase in the frequency and severity of hurricanes. Tom Heap travels to the Turks and Caicos Islands to ask if they're prepared for the worst nature can offer.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 16:00 Out of the Ordinary (b03xd3hl)
Series 2

The Power of Prayer

Jolyon Jenkins meets those who think the sick can be cured through the power of prayer. Could there possibly be anything in it? For over a century, people have been trying to prove it - or disprove it - through science, but firm results are elusive, and some scientists get cross at the whole idea. One study suggests that sick people might actually get worse if they discover they are being prayed for. But over the last 20 years, belief in the miraculous has been growing in Pentecostal circles, not least because miracles seem to be an effective way to gain new recruits. And the claims go far beyond any possible placebo effect: people are claiming to have received new gold teeth through prayer, to have had internal organs grow back after they have been surgically removed, and even to have raised people from the dead through prayer.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b04kbl8c)
Jeremy Paxman and Mary Beard

Jeremy Paxman and Mary Beard argue heatedly and entertainingly about the books they love, with presenter Harriett Gilbert acting as referee.

Jeremy's choice is Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain: a rollercoaster of a novel that's been called the Catch-22 of the Iraq War.

The Return of Martin Guerre by Natalie Zemon Davis is classicist Mary Beard's recommendation. It's a depiction of French peasant life that's been described as even greater than the film of the same story.

Travels with my Aunt, a genuinely funny novel by Graham Greene, is Harriett Gilbert's contribution.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b04kbl8f)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04k408v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Lewis Macleod Is Not Himself (b04kbl8h)
Episode 4

The impression and sketch show that looks behind the scenes at the life and work of star impressionist Lewis Macleod

Lewis has performed on 4 Extra's Newsjack, plus Postman Pat, The Phantom Menace and Dead Ringers.

With Kate O'Sullivan, Duncan Wisbey and Julian Dutton.

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2014.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04lwp50)
Lynda offers Fallon the lead in her production of the Christmas show: Rumplestiltskin. She could cast PC Burns too. Alice points out they're not an item. Sensitive but undeterred, Lynda then asks Alice if she's interested. Can Chris sing?
At a club, Fallon's determined to forget about Harrison Burns. She and Alice discuss Roy and the horrible rumours about him stealing from Lower Loxley. They also lament the absence of 'homebird' Helen as a drinking buddy. Fallon is miffed to spot Burns out with another woman. Harrison comes over and Alice makes small talk. Fallon realises he's with his ex, Justine.
Helen's happy that Henry is feeling better. She tells Pat that she'll have more time to mother him now, as she's giving up work. Pat is astonished and unhappy. She rants to Tony about all the work feminists did and wonders at her own effectiveness as a mother. Tony points out that part of that goal was to give women a right to choose - and this is Helen's choice. But Pat suspects it's Rob's doing, aware that he's too clever to make it obvious. Pat feels heartbroken that Helen genuinely believes this is her own idea.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04kbl8m)
John Cleese, Ed Sheeran, Tracey Emin

In tonight's Front Row, John Cleese talks to John Wilson about his memoir, So, Anyway - an account of the influences that shaped his comedy - and singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran considers song-writing as revenge and explains why so many of his lyrics are about drinking.

Also in the programme, Tracey Emin makes it clear why she feels motherhood and a career as an artist are incompatible.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Rebecca Nicholson.


TUE 19:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


TUE 20:00 BBC Music Performance (b04l054g)
The whole BBC unites for an extraordinary star-studded performance and the launch of BBC Music: 27 artists, 1 song.


TUE 20:04 File on 4 (b04kbl8p)
Fraud: The Thin Blue Line

The nature of crime is changing, with much of it now happening online, sparking growing concern that official figures fail to account for potentially millions of fraud offences. Experts say frauds involving plastic debit and credit cards are among the crimes left out of the data. So just how reliable - and useful - are the statistics?

At the same time, police economic crime units, which investigate fraud, have become increasingly stretched, partly as a result of government budget cuts. BBC Home Affairs correspondent, Danny Shaw, asks whether law enforcement has kept pace with the changing face of fraud and if there are enough resources to tackle financial crime and bring fraudsters to justice.

Reporter: Danny Shaw
Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


TUE 20:42 In Touch (b04kbl8t)
Finding a Way into the Arts

Amie Slavin - a sound artist, Aly Woodhouse - an Assistant Director and Corie Brown - a continuity announcer for Channel 4 tell their tales of finding a way into the Arts and staying afloat in their respective fields.
Presenter: Peter White.
Producer: Lee Kumutat.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b04kbl8w)
Ebola, Painkillers, Immunity (CVID), Integrated Health, Thyroid and Pregnancy

Ebola - how do they predict how it's going to spread, and why estimates have risen so rapidly.

In the UK there are 22 million prescriptions a year for morphine type painkillers, costing over 300 million pounds - but do they actually work in non-cancer pain?

And a simple blood test that can tell if your recurrent chest infections might be due to an immune problem.

Plus thyroid problems and pregnancy.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b04kbjhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b04k408x)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04kbl8y)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04kbl90)
The Bone Clocks

Episode 12

By David Mitchell. Part twelve. Our story alights on Marinus in a near future Canada. A 1980s Walkman arrives with a message from the past, and we begin to learn about Horology. Read by Laurel Lefkow

This ambitious, much-anticipated new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas is one to lose yourself in. The Bone Clocks is an intricate feat of storytelling revealing one woman's life through those who encounter her. The journey has a global and historical sweep, it takes us from 1980s Kent via 19th Century Australia to a near future New York with a playfully genre-bending subplot.

Our Book at Bedtime will be read by a stellar cast of five actors over three weeks. We open with Hannah Arterton as Holly Sykes, 15 years old in 1980s Gravesend. Then Luke Treadaway is Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, likeable, good looking, and extremely dangerous. Joe Armstrong is Ed Brubeck, a foreign correspondent in the current decade, struggling to overcome the gaps between his life at home and the loss he experiences daily at work. Robert Glenister is Crispin Hershey, once the wild child of British letters, a novelist now past his best-selling peak. And Laurel Lefkow is Dr Marinus, a psychiatrist from the seventh century who meets Holly Sykes in a near-future America.

Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.


TUE 23:00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now (b04kbl92)
Series 2

The Troublesome Gobstopper

Comedy's best kept secret ingredient returns with another episode of his own sketch show. Sketches, characters, sound effects, bit of music, some messin' about, you know...

Carpentry, subatomic physics, Winston Churchill and how to deal with troublesome slugs all come under the microscope. Not really the best instrument for examining any of these things, one would've thought, but there you go.

Kevin Eldon is a comedy phenomenon. He's been in virtually every major comedy show in the last fifteen years, but not content with working with the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan, Armando Iannucci, Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Stewart Lee, Julia Davis and Graham Linehan, he's finally decided to put together another run of his own comedy series for BBC Radio 4.

After all the waiting - Kevin Eldon Will See You Now...

Appearing across the series are Amelia Bullmore (I'm Alan Partridge, Scott and Bailey), Julia Davis (Nighty Night), Paul Putner (Little Britain), Justin Edwards (The Consultants), David Reed (The Penny Dreadfuls) and Catherine Shepherd (Cardinal Burns, Harry and Paul).

Written by Kevin Eldon, with additional material by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris (A Touch Of Cloth, That Mitchell and Webb Sound).

Original music by Martin Bird.

Produced and Directed by David Tyler.
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Punt PI (b0144pvl)
Series 4

Episode 1

Steve Punt returns for a fourth series as Radio 4's very own gumshoe, re-opening a case of murder by poisoned partridge in 1931.

Steve embarks on a historical whodunit, examining the bizarre death in Deepcut, Surrey of an army lieutenant, Hubert Chevis, who died after eating a partridge laced with strychnine. 80 years on, the Chevis case remains unsolved and nobody was ever been charged with his murder.

To add to the mystery, Chevis' father received a sinister telegram which read "Hooray, hooray, hooray" and a follow-up postcard from the same unknown sender which stated "it is a mystery they will never solve".

Steve marshals the facts, reopens the coroner's file and locates a relative with important evidence to share. Was it the wife, her ex-husband, the batman or the cook?

Producer: Laurence Grissell.



WEDNESDAY 08 OCTOBER 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b04k409v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04k409x)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04k409z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04k40b1)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b04k40b3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04kf5zb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Imam Monawar Hussain, Muslim Tutor at Eton College.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b04kf5zd)
As Farmers for Action protest against falling milk prices, the milk processing companies claim that they are reacting to global events. We ask how the rest of Europe's Dairy farmers - who are they facing similar pressures, how they are dealing with plummeting prices? Kevin Belamy, a senior analyst with the Dutch bank Rabobank gives us the picture. Then Farming Minister George Eustice responds to the hardships that many British dairy farmers are experiencing. Anna Hill puts asks him whether now is the time for the Voluntary Dairy Code to be made mandatory.

On Monday's edition of Farming Today we reported on the pressures faced by rural GP practices. Today we hear from Rob Gee of Coniston in the Lake District who is Chair of the 'SOS Group, Friends of Coniston Surgery'. We hear how villagers are campaigning to keep their surgery open.

What happens to older men from rural communities who no longer work on farms, and who face the challenges of rural isolation and ageing? That's what's being addressed by The Countrymen's Club who're hosted by Rylands Care Farm in north Dorset. Twice a week the men come and help muck out the livestock. As part of our Rural Health theme we meet them on the farm.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkxg2)
Variable Pitohui

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the poisonous variable pitohui from New Guinea. This jay sized, black-and-tan bird hides a dark secret. Named for their voice, pitohui is a representation of their song and 'variable' refers to their plumage colour which varies across their range. What is striking about this bird is that it is poisonous: its skin and feathers contain powerful neurotoxic alkaloids similar to those of South American poison-dart frogs. For the pitohui, this chemical defence is unlikely to be fatal to predators which prey on them; rather it discourages further attacks. People who've handled have suffered burning sensations in the mouth, numbness in fingers and bouts of sneezing. It is not recommended.


WED 06:00 Today (b04kf5zg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b04kf5zj)
Ray Winstone; Sir Ranulph Fiennes; Dr John Bradshaw; Martha D Lewis

Libby Purves meets actor Ray Winstone; adventurer Sir Ranulph Fiennes; singer and songwriter Martha D Lewis and animal behaviourist Dr John Bradshaw.

Dr John Bradshaw is an animal behaviourist and the founder and director of the Anthrozoology Institute at the University of Bristol. Anthrozoology is the study of interactions between humans and animals. He is one of the presenters of the BBC Two series Cat Watch which uses GPS tracking technology and cat-cams to follow a range of felines from city centre cats to farm cats. Cat Watch 2014: The New Horizon Experiment is broadcast on BBC Two. Cat Sense by Dr John Bradshaw is published by Penguin.

Ray Winstone is an actor best known for playing often brutal characters in films such as Sexy Beast, Scum and Nil by Mouth. In his autobiography he writes about growing up in East London where he was a schoolboy boxing champion. His breakthrough came in 1997 when he starred as an abusive husband in Nil By Mouth. He has since worked with directors including Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and Anthony Minghella. Young Winstone is published by Canongate.

Sir Ranulph Fiennes OBE was the first man to reach both poles by surface travel and the first to cross the Antarctic unsupported. In 2009 he became the oldest Briton to reach the summit of Everest. His new book explores how his own ancestors were key players through the centuries of turbulent Anglo-French history that led up to the Battle of Agincourt. Agincourt - My Family, The Battle and The Fight for France is published by Hodder & Stoughton.

Martha D Lewis is a singer and songwriter. She is performing at The Trilogy of the Greek Blues festival, inspired by rembetiko singer Roza Eskenazi. Rembetiko music is derived from Greek urban folk music and in her day Roza was feted as the Greek Billie Holiday. Martha, who has just produced an album called Homage to Roza, features in a documentary, My Sweet Canary, about the life of Roza. Rembetika & Beyond: A Journey Into the Greek Blues tour begins at the Millfield Theatre, London and later at the London Jazz Festival.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcd)
One Nation Under Goethe

Continuing his focus on the things which bind Germans together, Neil MacGregor examines the life and work of Goethe, the greatest of all German poets: "There is a case for arguing that if Americans are one nation under God, the Germans are one nation under Goethe. And there is no doubt that it was Goethe, more than anyone else, who made German a language read - and spoken - by educated Europe."

Producer Paul Kobrak.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04kf5zl)
Jane Horrocks

Jane Horrocks on her return to the London stage as Ella Khan in East is East after a 5 year gap.

Over the last few weeks we've been hearing about the concerns that women of different ages want to see the main political parties address. Today, it's the turn of young women. As Nick Clegg prepares to address the Liberal Party Conference, we hear from some members of the Girl Guides who've been in Glasgow this week. They've held fringe meetings at Party Conferences this autumn, speaking to leading politicians from the three main parties about exactly what they want them to do.

Chore Wars is trying to find out how the household chores are divided up in your home today. But how did they do it in the past - and are we better off now? How have social changes influenced the division of labour.

Plus how are chores are split in non-traditional households? We look at how it works in house shares and same-sex relationships.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


WED 10:41 The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber (b04kf5zn)
Episode 3

Joe Armstrong, Hayley Atwell and Dougray Scott star in this adaptation of the powerful novel by Michel Faber (Under the Skin, Crimson Petal and the White).

Set in the near future, it tells the story of Peter, devoted husband and devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Beatrice.

In today's episode, USIC pharmacist Grainger drives Peter out to the nearest settlement for his first encounter with his new flock - the planet's enigmatic native inhabitants. But the letters from his wife Beatrice back on Earth tell of food shortages and natural disaster.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Emmerson

CAST
Narrator.....Dougray Scott
Peter.....Joe Armstrong
Beatrice.....Hayley Atwell
Grainger.....Kelly Burke
Oasan/ Tuska.....Mark Edel-Hunt
Jesus Lover Number One/ Severin.....Michael Bertenshaw
Jesus Lover Number Five/ BG.....Damian Lynch
Jesus Lover Number Four.....David Acton
USIC Psychologist.....Jane Slavin
USIC Doctor.....Elaine Claxton
Other parts played by members of the company

Directed by Emma Harding


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b04kf5zq)
Rachel and Mandy - Diary Keepers

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who record their activities and their likes and dislikes with considerable dedication.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 How to Dig a Grave (b04kf5zs)
Gravediggers exist in the popular imagination as a creepy, ghoulish breed. We keep them safely at a distance where they can carry the weight of our fantasies and fears about death. But what's the reality? And what lessons are there to learn six feet under the ground?

Scottish gravediggers Stevie and Bobby teach Cathy FitzGerald how to hand-dig a grave.

Presented and produced by Cathy FitzGerald.
A Rockethouse production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Wordaholics (b04kf5zv)
Series 3

Episode 6

Irish comic Ed Byrne, Tasmanian stand up and art expert Hannah Gadsby, punmaster general Milton Jones and classics boffin Natalie Haynes vie for word supremacy.

Gyles Brandreth is in the chair.

The letter of the week is 'Z'.

The panellists must coin their own topynyms and they also have to guess which foreign words are edible.

There's a chance to add their own new word to the dictionary, before they delve into 'A Dictionary of Americanisms' from 1848.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2014.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b04k40b5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 21st Century Mythologies (b04kf5zx)
Nando's

In 1954, the French critic and semiotician Roland Barthes began a series of essays in which he analysed the popular culture of his day. He called his essays "Mythologies." In this series of witty talks, the acclaimed writer and critic Peter Conrad delivers a series of 21st Century Mythologies in a French accent of the mind. Conrad ranges over the defining effluvia of our era, from the Cronut, to the Shard, to the Kardashians. Today he looks at the ubiquitous home of piri piri chicken, Nandos.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b04kf5zz)
Care Homes Fire; Green Energy Fraud; Packed Lunches; Botton; Hospital Appointments

An elderly woman with dementia died in a fire in her care home caused by a burning cigarette while staff were supposed to be supervising her smoking. The fire service says it is seeing too many cases like this because care workers aren't reacting to the warning signs.

The Green Deal is a government scheme where people can get a loan to pay for energy efficiency work on their home. The loan is attached the house and paid back through the savings made on energy bills. In the early days of the scheme, Trading Standards and Citizens Advice warned that the scheme was vulnerable to scammers. Over 4,000 Green Deal plans have now been processed, so were these fears justified?

Packed lunches are taking a kicking at the moment. The nation's 4 to 7 year olds are currently enjoying free school meals thanks to Nick Clegg's dim view of what they used to get in their lunchboxes. And now it seems adults too are ditching the Tupperware. There's been a more than ten percent decline in packed lunch consumption this year - that's 76 million fewer tuna sandwiches and pasta salads year on year.

A pioneering community for learning disabled residents in North Yorkshire is facing the threat of a breakaway by some able-bodied co-workers over plans to change the way it's run. Botton, near Whitby, is the largest and oldest Camphill village. About a hundred people with learning disabilities share work and accommodation with volunteers, who aren't paid but receive living costs and expenses. Reporter Andrew Fletcher went to find out more on a tour of the workshops and farms that make up of the estate.

A report by the disability campaign group Transport for All claims that poor transport systems for patients and missed hospital appointments could be costing the NHS £357million a year - that works out at £126 per patient. In some areas awareness of the scheme is very low with some patients not realising they have access to transport for their appointments

In May 2013, permitted development rights policy was introduced to allow offices to be turned into houses without planning permission, changes the Government wants to make permanent. The policy was designed to bring empty and underused buildings back into use but in some areas businesses have been served eviction notices so landlords can cash in on higher residential rents and sales prices. Samantha Fenwick reports.


WED 12:57 Weather (b04k40b7)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b04kf601)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Martha Kearney.


WED 13:45 An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin (b04lc3pz)
Episode 3

The correspondence of Nobel Prize winning scientist, Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), introduced by her biographer, Georgina Ferry.

In the 1940s, Dorothy worked on the structure of a new medicine with a miraculous reputation, penicillin: making her first big breakthrough while breastfeeding her daughter Liz and with her peripatetic husband, Thomas, living and working away from home. Somerville College invented maternity pay for her, a benefit which Dorothy accepted rather reluctantly. As ever, her mother urged her to go gently but, inspired by her discoveries, Dorothy worked harder than ever.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04lwp50)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b04kf603)
The Golden Record

The Golden Record was one of two phonograph records on the Voyager spacecraft, containing sounds and images of Earth's life and culture - a cosmic message in a bottle to outer space. It was created by a team lead by Carl Sagan, and there is a real love story behind the science.

Carl Sagan was an author, astronomer and sceptic who popularised science. In 1977 he was tasked, with his colleague Ann Druyan, writer, activist and academic, with creating a 'golden record', a compilation of sounds and images to be launched into space. This disc would represent life on Earth, a greeting to worlds light-years away.

Sagan and Druyan raced against time to perfect 'the ultimate mix-tape', and fell in love. It was not straightforward – Sagan was already married. However, in one phone call, they agreed that whatever lay ahead, they needed to be together.

They were together until Sagan's death in 1996. In 2012, the Voyager spacecraft left our solar system forever.

Written by Duncan MacMillan and Effie Woods.

Carl Sagan ..... Kerry Shale
Ann Druyan ..... Nancy Crane
Linda Sagan ..... Clare Cage
John Casani ..... Mathew Gravelle
Tim ..... Chris Jack

Director ..... Polly Thomas
Sound designer ..... Cathy Robinson

A BBC Cymru/Wales production or BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in October 2014.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b04kf605)
Saving for Retirement

Need advice about your pension? Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Paul Lewis and guests answer your questions.

How are you going to fund your retirement? A company, personal or stakeholder scheme?

A new state pension will be available for those retiring from April 2016 and the age at which you can claim is rising for both men and women. When will you get yours and what might it be worth?

How many years national insurance contributions must you make to receive a full state pension ?

Should you defer claiming your state pension or make extra payments to boost your entitlement?

If you want to make your own plans you may want to ask about auto-enrolment or the different types of workplace scheme.

How do you build up a personal pension, what should you contribute and when can you access the money?

Joining presenter Paul Lewis to help you make sense of pensions will be:
Michelle Cracknell, Chief Executive, TPAS.
Tom McPhail, Head of Pensions Research, Hargreaves Lansdown.
Sally West, Strategy Adviser, Income and Poverty, Age UK.

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b04kbl8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b04kf607)
Dementia Handbags; Place Hacking

Place hacking the hidden city. Laurie Taylor talks to Bradley Garrett, Lecturer in Geography and Environment at the University of Southampton, about his research into the world of urban exploration. Bridges, sewerage and underground rail systems are just a few of the sites penetrated by crews of place hackers who want to journey beyond the boundaries of everyday metropolitan life. They are joined by writer and film maker Iain Sinclair whose work also involves uncovering unseen layers of the city. Also, Julia Twigg, Professor of Social Policy and Sociology at the University of Kent, discusses the role of handbags in the lives of women with dementia. How do they function as memory objects and sources of identity, particularly in the transition to care homes?

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b04kf609)
Facebook's apology to drag queens; Anonymity online; Inquiry into the use of RIPA

Facebook has apologised to drag queens, and those with transgender status, after it closed some accounts following reports they were fake because they weren't using their legal names. However, a coalition met with Facebook at its headquarters in San Francisco, and they can now use their pseudonyms. Steve Hewlett talks to Lil Miss Hot Mess, who organised a rally in San Francisco against the policy, and to Misty Chance a drag queen in Manchester, who changed his name legally, rather than having his online profile removed. Also joining Steve is Emma Carr from Big Brother Watch, and tech journalist Rupert Goodwins about some of the wider issues the story has uncovered.

Another story this week which has raised questions about our online identity is that of Brenda Leyland, who
was found dead after being challenged by Sky News over accusations of 'trolling' the McCanns. Steve is joined by Emily Bell, Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University in the US, to discuss whether anonymity should be allowed on social websites, or are the benefits of remaining anonymous outweighed by the costs?

And a parliamentary committee is to ask every police force in the UK how many times they have obtained the telephone and email records of journalists without their consent. Keith Vaz has called for a detailed breakdown of police use of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA), which forces telephone companies to hand over phone records. It was recently revealed how police investigating 'Plebgate' obtained the telephone records of Tom Newton Dunn, the Political Editor of the Sun, in this way. Steve Hewlett talks to Keith Vaz, chairman of the home affairs select committee about the scope of the inquiry.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b04kf60c)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04k40b9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Jeremy Hardy Speaks to the Nation (b04kf60f)
Series 10

How to Be Better

Stand by your radios! Jeremy Hardy returns to the airwaves with a broadcast of national comic import!

Using just the Bible, the Monarchy and Audrey Hepburn, Jeremy Hardy promises to build a whole new you.

Welcome to "Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation", a series of debates in which Jeremy Hardy engages in a free and frank exchange of his entrenched views. Passionate, polemical, erudite and unable to sing,

Few can forget where they were when they first heard "Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation". The show was an immediate smash-hit success, causing pubs to empty on a Saturday night, which was particularly astonishing since the show went out on Thursdays. The Light Entertainment department was besieged, questions were asked in the House and Jeremy Hardy himself became known as the man responsible for the funniest show on radio since Money Box Live with Paul Lewis.

Since that fateful first series, Jeremy went on to win Sony Awards, Writers Guild nominations and a Nobel Prize for Chemistry p - and was a much-loved regular on both The News Quiz and I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Written by Jeremy Hardy

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b04kf60h)
Bert Fry is busy working on Carol's new vegetable garden, respectfully calling her Mrs Tregorran. Jill points out it's just the way he is. Bert (the self-titled village laureate) looks forward to reading his poem at the harvest supper. Jill asks how music preparations with Joe and Eddie are going. Jill jokes to Carol that Bert is no great poet.

Eddie is keen to make some money from turkeys this Christmas. He asks Jim whether Romans used turkeys as part of any festivals. Jim does some research and turns up that Romans used chickens as oracles. Inspired, Eddie hatches a plan.

Bert is miffed with Eddie and Joe for giving him the runaround over the music for the harvest supper. Are they going to let him sing his song or not?

Jill admits to sympathetic Carol that Ambridge is changing. She's not sure she wants to stick around if Route B goes ahead. Jill is worried about the idea of David and Ruth moving to Prudhoe. They are looking at farms today.

Ruth is smitten by one farm in a nice community. David was shocked to see how frail Heather looked. However, Heather is adamant that they shouldn't move up north for her. Never mind my Mum, says Ruth - what about Jill?


WED 19:15 Front Row (b04kf60k)
Phyllida Lloyd, The Sensory War, Robert Wilson, Super Thursday

Phyllida Lloyd talks to Samira Ahmed about her all-female Henry IV and the importance of casting women in plays about political power. Professor Griselda Pollock reviews The Sensory War, a new exhibition in Manchester which reflects on how artists have tried to capture the impact of military conflict between 1914 and 2014. Photographer and official war artist Robert Wilson discusses Helmand Return, a new series of 59 billboards across the UK of his photos which capture the daily life of British troops in Afghanistan in their final tour of duty. And tomorrow is Super Thursday, the day when more than 300 books will be published on the same day. We ask why this has evolved, and what it means for the books market.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


WED 19:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b04kf6lk)
No End of Pleasure

How will humans experience pleasure in the near future? What is the shape of things to come?

The novelist AL Kennedy conjures a vision of the future where plugging in for pleasure is as easy as logging on, where your mood can be managed for recreation and productivity, and where technology allows you to interact sexually with your lovers at a distance and possibly from the perspective of a tiger.

People with an active stake in the future test out and investigate the potential of this virtual world.

We meet Anders Sandberg, a man with an extraordinary capacity to experience pleasure and perhaps the best example of what the human of the future might be like if the trans-humanist David Pearce has his way. David believes genetic-hacking and bio-engineering are an essential component of a future he imagines without suffering.

David Levy is an international chess master whose experience of playing games with computers means he anticipates a world where the relationship humans have with machines might develop away from the chess board in ways that bring physical and emotional satisfactions.

Anil Seth shows Eliane Glaser around his substitutional reality machine and proffers a vision of the future where we can all take a trip to the North Pole, or the heart of an orchestra pit, without leaving our rooms.

And how does the future look to a greedy pleasure seeker and a recovering sex-addict? Tim Fountain and Erica Garza consider their future in a world bristling with new kinds of sex tech.

Also, Will Self is on hand to probe the ethical and moral dimensions of a new hedonic playground.

Produced by Colin McNulty and Natalie Steed

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b04kf711)
Series 4

High Street Revival

We are trying to revive our high streets the wrong way, argues Clare Richmond.

Clare has many years' experience in helping to revive the fortunes of high street shops. But she has grown disenchanted with the current expectation that councils, town managers and government hit squads can improve things.

Her own experience has taught her that real and lasting change for the better can only happen when businesses get fully involved and believe they hold their futures in their own hands.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b04kbjt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b04kf5zj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b04k40bc)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b04kf713)
Caroline Wyatt presents the programme: including an interview with the Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond. We analyse the speech of Liberal Democrat leader, Nick Clegg and ask about the state of British politics. It's the final of the Great British Bake Off - but what is the history of baking in the UK.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04kf715)
The Bone Clocks

Episode 13

By David Mitchell. Part thirteen. Holly Sykes must decide who to trust. She's suspicious of Marinus and the Horologists, but finds herself believing their seemingly outlandish story. Read by Laurel Lefkow

This ambitious, much-anticipated new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas is one to lose yourself in. The Bone Clocks is an intricate feat of storytelling revealing one woman's life through those who encounter her. The journey has a global and historical sweep, it takes us from 1980s Kent via 19th Century Australia to a near future New York with a playfully genre-bending subplot.

Our Book at Bedtime will be read by a stellar cast of five actors over three weeks. We open with Hannah Arterton as Holly Sykes, 15 years old in 1980s Gravesend. Then Luke Treadaway is Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, likeable, good looking, and extremely dangerous. Joe Armstrong is Ed Brubeck, a foreign correspondent in the current decade, struggling to overcome the gaps between his life at home and the loss he experiences daily at work. Robert Glenister is Crispin Hershey, once the wild child of British letters, a novelist now past his best-selling peak. And Laurel Lefkow is Dr Marinus, a psychiatrist from the seventh century who meets Holly Sykes in a near-future America.

Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.


WED 23:00 The Music Teacher (b01drtfn)
Series 2

Episode 3

Richie Webb returns as multi-instrumentalist music teacher Nigel Penny.

Nigel is offered a reconciliation meeting with local youths after they have run riot in the Arts Centre. And asked to teach them three part harmony into the bargain.

Directed by Nick Walker
Audio production by Matt Katz

Written and produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Terry Pratchett (b01r0zb9)
Eric

Episode 1

When precocious young Eric Thursley summons a demon from the loathsome pit to fulfil his every wish, he certainly gets what he asked for.

Just... not exactly what he asked for. That's the problem with wishes.

Terry Pratchett's many Discworld novels combine a Technicolor imagination with a razor sharp wit, especially when he rewrites Faust as spotty teenage demonologist Eric.

Rincewind ..... Mark Heap
Eric ..... Will Howard
Death ..... Geoffrey Whitehead
Archchancellor ..... Robert Blythe
Parrot ..... Ben Crowe
Demon King Astfgl ..... Nicholas Murchie
Screwpate ..... Michael Shelford
Mother ..... Christine Absalom
Narrator ..... Rick Warden

Adapted in four parts by Robin Brooks.

Director: Jonquil Panting

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


WED 23:30 Punt PI (b038wtj2)
Series 6

The Hollinwell Incident

Steve Punt turns private investigator to reopen a mysterious case of collapsing children.

One summer's day in 1980, at a junior jazz band festival in Nottinghamshire, hundreds of children were suddenly taken ill and fainted. They fell like dominoes; the showground was littered with bodies, the arena like a battlefield.

Many of the children feel they never got answers as to what really happened that morning.

Steve investigates, to find out if it was food poisoning or something a little more sinister.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.



THURSDAY 09 OCTOBER 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04k40c9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04k40cc)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04k40cf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04k40ch)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04k40ck)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04kf7f9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Imam Monawar Hussain, Muslim Tutor at Eton College.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b04kf7fc)
Dairy Crisis, Community Defibrillators, Scottish Tea

The NFU says it's vital consumers support British dairy farmers, as global milk prices continue to fall. NFU president Meurig Raymond tells Anna Hill the union is working with retailers and processors to make sure farmers get a fair price.
We talk to a charity helping rural communities to buy and fit defibrillators, which could save vital seconds in the case of cardiac arrest in remote areas.
And the Scottish tea growers off to an international conference in Quatar tell us they need more farmers to take up tea growing.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkwtg)
Black Drongo

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the black drongo of Southern Asia. What looks a like a small crow crossed with a flycatcher is riding a cow's back in an Indian village. Black drongos are slightly smaller than European starlings, but with a much longer tail. They feed mainly on large insects: dragonflies, bees, moths and grasshoppers which they will pluck from the ground as well pursuing them in aerial sallies. Although small, these birds are famous for being fearless and will attack and dive-bomb almost any other bird, even birds of prey, which enter their territories. This aggressive behaviour has earned them the name "King Crow" and in Hindi their name is Kotwal - the policeman.


THU 06:00 Today (b04kf7ff)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b04kf8ps)
The Battle of Talas

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Battle of Talas, a significant encounter between Arab and Chinese forces which took place in central Asia in 751 AD. It brought together two mighty empires, the Abbasid Caliphate and the Tang Dynasty, and although not well known today the battle had profound consequences for the future of both civilisations. The Arabs won the confrontation, but the battle marks the point where the Islamic Empire halted its march eastwards, and the Chinese stopped their expansion to the west. It was also a point of cultural exchange: some historians believe that it was also the moment when the technology of paper manufacture found its way from China to the Western world.

GUESTS

Hilde de Weerdt, Professor of Chinese History at Leiden University

Michael Höckelmann, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at King's College London

Hugh Kennedy, Professor of Arabic at SOAS, University of London

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcg)
The Walhalla: Hall of Heroes

Neil MacGregor visits the Walhalla, one of the most idiosyncratic expressions of national identity in 19th century Europe - a temple to German-ness, modelled on the Parthenon, built high above the Danube in Bavaria. It honours almost 200 people, from early rulers and kings to composers, poets and scientists.

Producer Paul Kobrak.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04kf8pv)
Lynda Bellingham; Could the CPS do more to prosecute historic sexual assault?

Lynda Bellingham joins Jenni to discuss her new autobiography 'There's Something I've Been Dying to Tell You', the decision she has made to stop her cancer treatment and her life as the Nation's "Oxo Mum". In the next part of series into historic sexual abuse and assault, Jenni speaks to Alison Saunders, Director of Public Prosecutions, about the role of the Crown Prosecution Service in bringing these crimes to court. What are the CPS doing to ensure that victims receive justice? And how are they responding to the increase in historic cases of rape and sexual assault? As part of Woman's Hour "Chore Wars", we explore what happens when people can no longer take on household work because of disability and illness, and we ask how the chore gender gap impacts on our finances, careers and relationships.
Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Laura Northedge.


THU 10:45 The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber (b04kf8px)
Episode 4

Joe Armstrong, Hayley Atwell and Dougray Scott star in this adaptation of the extraordinary novel by Michel Faber (Under the Skin, Crimson Petal and the White).

Set in the near future, it tells the story of Peter, devoted husband and devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Beatrice.

In today's episode, Peter shows his Oasan congregation some photos of life on Earth. But as life on Earth becomes increasingly difficult, the distance between him and Beatrice grows ever vaster.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Emmerson

CAST
Narrator.....Dougray Scott
Peter.....Joe Armstrong
Beatrice.....Hayley Atwell
Grainger.....Kelly Burke
Oasan/ Tuska.....Mark Edel-Hunt
Jesus Lover Number One/ Severin.....Michael Bertenshaw
Jesus Lover Number Five/ BG.....Damian Lynch
Jesus Lover Number Four.....David Acton
USIC Psychologist.....Jane Slavin
USIC Doctor.....Elaine Claxton
Other parts played by members of the company

Directed by Emma Harding.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b04kf8pz)
A Tap You Can't Turn Off

The European Union's announced plans to support, but not replace, efforts being made by Italy to save lives at sea. Emma Jane Kirby's been to the port town of Syracusa to see the difficulties the Italians have been facing. Will Ross has been meeting children in Nigeria who've been separated from their parents by the war against the militants of Boko Haram. What's it like when a family discovers that a loved one's gone to fight with extremists in the Middle East? Linda Pressly's been finding out in Kosovo. Jamie Coomarasamy's been to the west of Ukraine, hundreds of miles from the fighting in the east of the country, to find out what they think there of the struggle between government forces and the pro-Russia rebels. And the hair industry is big business in China and most of the customers, as Sam Piranty has been finding out, are Africans. But is that human hair they're buying or something else?


THU 11:30 August Shines (b04kf8q1)
Lenny Henry travels to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to tell the story of August Wilson, contemporary America's greatest black playwright.

When Lenny Henry last year won the London Critics' Circle award for his best-actor performance as Troy Maxson in August Wilson's 'Fences', many admitted they knew little about this great black playwright, whose work brought the lives of working-class Pittsburgh African Americans to Broadway and across the United States.

Although at his untimely death in 2005, Wilson had been living for many years on the west coast in Seattle, his plays and his soul had long remained in the east, in the venerable old steel town of Pittsburgh where he was born and grew up. This summer Lenny Henry travelled to the city of three rivers and many bridges, now slowly recovering from post-industrial gloom, to visit the old, multiracial Hill District, where August Wilson lived as a child, and whose geography and characters run through his plays like the Allegheny River through the city.

In a sequence of ten plays, known as the 'Pittsburgh Cycle', Wilson charts the stories of black Americans across ten decades of the twentieth century. Vibrant, real, yet filled with the original African rhythms and spirit that the playwright believed should underpin and shape his works, these plays are a magisterial account of the African American twentieth century.

At the now semi-derelict childhood home, Lenny Henry meets surviving members of Wilson's family, and encounters those who knew and loved him, like Sala Udin, who helped Wilson in the 1970s set up a powerful black theatre group to tell the stories of the Hill's residents.

Producer Simon Elmes.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b04k40cm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 21st Century Mythologies (b04kf8q3)
The Shard

In 1954, the French critic and semiotician Roland Barthes began a series of essays in which he analysed the popular culture of his day. He called his essays "Mythologies." In this series of witty talks, the acclaimed writer and critic Peter Conrad delivers a series of 21st Century Mythologies in a French accent of the mind. Conrad ranges over the defining effluvia of our era, from the Cronut to the Kardashians. Today Conrad looks at that defining landmark of the London skyline The Shard.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b04kf8q5)
Revisiting the Floods Nine Months On; Why Chilli Sauce Is So Popular

Eight months after they were flooded out of their homes, we speak to the people who still can't get their insurance companies to pay out. Best-selling novelist Rachel Joyce and Chris White, the Head of Fiction at Waterstones discuss why author appearances are important to beat the e-book. We investigate the lack of protection for elderly people who have money stolen by their own family members, and the growing success of chilli sauce- why do we want our food to get hotter?


THU 12:57 Weather (b04k40cp)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b04kf8q7)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


THU 13:45 An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin (b04lc564)
Episode 4

The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994) introduced by her biographer, Georgina Ferry.

After the war, Dorothy juggled pioneering research with bringing up three children. Having cracked the structure of penicillin in 1945, she embarked on an even more complicated molecule, vitamin B12, while her husband Thomas spent long periods living and working in Africa. Elected as one of the first female fellows of The Royal Society aged just 36, Dorothy's reputation as a world class researcher was growing, rapidly.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b04kf60h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01dgh87)
Marty Ross - Rough Magick

A comedic drama by Marty Ross set in 1605 in the Scottish Highlands in which the Royal playwright Shaxberd saves King James from assassination and attempts to save an innocent girl from being burnt as a witch.

1605. Fearing further terrorist activity following the gunpowder plot, King James transports his court to the Scottish Highlands, complete with The King's Men, his favoured theatre company. This includes middle-aged, careworn, neurotic and pox-troubled playwright William Shaxberd (although he prefers being called 'Shakespeare'). When the Royal wagons get bogged down on the moors and a seemingly supernatural attempt is made on the life of the paranoid, superstitious James, a local woman, Shona, is accused of witchcraft. Shaxberd owes Shona a debt and shaking off his customary deference to authority he employs all his ingenuity and gift for theatre to help her escape the gallows. But who was the real attacker? And does the innocent Shona have some genuine magic up her sleeve?

The play takes its prompt from historical facts: James's obsession with witchcraft and the political paranoia post-Gunpowder Plot; Shakespeare's being sometimes credited as 'Shaxberd' (might it have been his actual name?), his awkward position at court as a Catholic glove-maker's son, his rewriting of Scottish history in 'Macbeth' to flatter King James (Banquo's descendant); as well as the probably apocryphal story that The King's Men may have toured Scotland prior to the writing of 'Macbeth'.

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b04kf9m6)
Series 28

The Dales Way, Part Four

Clare Balding reaches one of the most beautiful stretches of the Dales Way, setting out from Buckden to Beckermonds, in the company of the Chairman of the Long Distance Walking Association, John Sparshatt and his Californian born friend, Randal Metzger. Despite being very familiar with this part of the route, both men infect Clare with their passion for this landscape and their commitment to ensuring as many people as possible can enjoy walking the path.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b04k7b6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b04k7j02)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b04kf9m8)
Illustrating Bjork; Gregory Burke on '71; Neil Brand on the Look of Love.

With Francine Stock.

Olivier Award winning playwright Gregory Burke discusses his feature film debut '71, about a young soldier who finds himself lost in Belfast during the height of the Troubles.

Peter Strickland, the acclaimed director of revenge drama Katalin Varga, reveals what happened when Bjork asked him to film a concert on her Biophilia tour, and what it all has to do with crystals, microbes and BBC Inside Science presenter Adam Rutherford.

Pianist Neil Brand demonstrates the seduction techniques of Hollywood composers and reveals why it never pays to be too obvious.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b04kf9mb)
Nobel Prizes 2014; Gauge; Genetics and Diabetes; UK Fungus Day

Nobel Prizes 2014
The annual Nobel Prizes for Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry were announced this week.

The Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to UK-based researcher Prof John O'Keefe as well as May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser who discovered the brain's "GPS system". They discovered how the brain knows where we are and is able to navigate from one place to another. Their findings may help to explain why Alzheimer's disease patients cannot recognise their surroundings.

The 2014 Nobel Prize for physics has been awarded to Professors Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura in Japan and the US, for the invention of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs). This enabled a new generation of bright, energy-efficient white lamps, as well as colour LED screens.

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell and William Moerner for improving the resolution of optical microscopes. This type of microscope had previously been held back by the presumed limitation that obtaining a better resolution than half the wavelength of light would be impossible. But the laureates used fluorescence to extend the limits of the light microscope, allowing scientists to see things at much higher levels of resolution.

GAUGE
The UK has a database for the amount of greenhouse gases we emit each year - usually measured in Gigatonnes of carbon. It's compiled by adding up emissions from various individual sources - be it a coal-fired power station or a wetland bog. This amount is used worldwide, but it is an estimate. A project called Greenhouse gas UK and Global Emissions, or GAUGE, is - for the first time - verifying these estimates by measuring what's in the atmosphere on a much larger scale.

Genetics and Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is globally the fastest growing chronic disease. The World Health Organisation estimates more than 300 million people are currently afflicted, rising to more than half a billion by 2030. It might seem on the surface to be a disease with a simple cause - eat too much & exercise too little - and the basic foundation is a relative lack of the hormone insulin. But as with most illnesses, it's much more complicated, not least because a large number of disease processes are happening all at once. In 2010, a particular gene variant was associated with around 40% of Type 2 diabetics - not directly causal, but this so-called 'risk variant' increases the chance of developing the condition if you have the wrong lifestyle. Research published in the journal Science Translational Medicine this week identifies a drug called yohimbine as a potential treatment to help Type 2 diabetics, one that targets this specific genetic make-up.

UK Fungus Day
October 12th is UK Fungus Day, a chance for us to celebrate these cryptic, often microscopic, but essential organisms. Usually hidden away inside plants or in soil (or if you're unlucky, in between your toes), fungi have largely been growing below scientists' radars for centuries. Mycologists still don't know anything close to the true number of fungi that exist on the planet. About a hundred thousand have been formally identified, but it's estimated that anywhere from half a million to ten million species may exist. This dwarfs, by several orders of magnitude, how many mammals there are on Earth. And, increasingly, we're realising quite how crucial fungi are to the functioning of our ecosystems. Head of Mycology at The Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Bryn Dentinger, explains how valuable fungi really are.

Producer: Fiona Roberts
Assistant Producer: Jen Whyntie.


THU 17:00 PM (b04kf9md)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04k40cr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing (b04kf9mg)
Series 3

About Maturity

Nathan decides to prove how mature he is in order to win back the girl that rejected him.

A mix of stand-up and re-enacted family life written by Nathan Caton and James Kettle

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing is a series about young, up-and-coming comedian Nathan Caton, who after becoming the first in his family to graduate from University, opted not to use his architecture degree but instead to try his hand at being a full-time stand-up comedian, much to his family's horror and disgust. They desperately want him to get a 'proper job.'

Each episode illustrates the criticism, interference and rollercoaster ride that Nathan endures from his disapproving family as he tries to prove himself.

Janet a.k.a. Mum is probably the kindest and most lenient of the disappointed family members. At the end of the day she just wants the best for her son. However, she'd also love to brag and show her son off to her friends, but with Nathan only telling jokes for a living that's kind of hard to do.

Martin a.k.a. Dad works in the construction industry and was looking forward to his son getting a degree so the two of them could work together in the same field. But now Nathan has blown that dream out of the window. Martin is clumsy and hard-headed and leaves running the house to his wife (she wouldn't allow it to be any other way).

Shirley a.k.a. Grandma cannot believe Nathan turned down architecture for comedy. She can't believe she left the paradise in the West Indies and came to the freezing United Kingdom for a better life so that years later her grandson could 'tell jokes!' How can her grandson go on stage and use foul language and filthy material... it's not the good Christian way!

So with all this going on in the household what will Nathan do? Will he persevere and follow his dreams? Or will he give in to his family's interference? Or will he finally leave home?!

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b04kf9mj)
House-proud Helen enjoys quality time with Henry, making dinner and getting things ready for Rob to return from hunting. Henry has even drawn him a picture. Henry is keen to come hunting with him next time. When you're older, says Rob, who promised to buy Henry a pony.

Jill and Lynda are surprised that Helen has given up work, leaving Tina with more responsibility. Lynda shares her woes with Jill about her Christmas show. She had only two auditionees - Derek Fletcher and Molly Button. Jill suggests that perhaps Lynda should give the show a miss this year. It would enable the community to come back refreshed next year, and could even do Lynda the power of good as well. Lynda accepts that it's time to move on and find a new challenge.

Ruth and David tell Jill about the farm and surrounding area in Prudhoe that they're considering. They are worried how Jill will take it. David opens up to Jill about how strange and awful it would be to leave Brookfield behind. He can only do it if Jill comes with them. But can she ever see herself leaving Brookfield?


THU 19:15 Front Row (b04kf9ml)
Sheila Hancock, Gerhard Richter, '71, Nobel Prize Winner, Tony Allen

The actress Sheila Hancock talks to John Wilson about her debut novel, Miss Carter's War, which explores the repercussions of the Second World War on 20th Century Britain. The German artist Gerhard Richter gives a rare interview about his long career. Jenny McCartney reviews the film '71 starring Jack O'Connell, which follows a unit of inexperienced soldiers posted to Belfast during the Troubles. We hear from the Nigerian drummer and songwriter Tony Allen, one of the pioneers of Afrobeat. And as the French author Patrick Mondiano wins the Noble Prize for Literature, Dr Dervila Cooke explains the importance of his work.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Olivia Skinner.


THU 19:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b04kf9mn)
Paramedics Under Pressure

Medical emergency 999 calls are at an all-time high, with around 9 million calls a year, creating an unprecedented workload for ambulance paramedics around the UK. As a result, many are quitting their job in increasing numbers, burnt out and unable to keep up with the pace of work now demanded of them.

Adrian Goldberg investigates what's behind this growing demand for emergency medical assistance, and asks why the recruitment of emergency paramedics has not kept pace with pressure on the service. Serving staff as well as those who have quit their job reveal a target-driven culture which sees them sent from job to job to job, where a lunch break is seen as a luxury. The finger is also pointed at some members of the public, who dial 999 to demand an ambulance for trivial injuries and illnesses.

Senior managers working for ambulance service trusts around the country say there is no quick fix for this rising exodus of staff - especially now paramedic training requires a university degree course. This has led some trusts to look as far afield as Australia and New Zealand for new recruits to plug the gap.

The NHS is planning an enhanced role for paramedics where they will be required to treat more patients in the field, to ease the pressure on over-stretched A&E departments. But with staff retention and recruitment an on-going issue for several ambulance services around the country, will they be able to meet these new expectations and will new recruits burn out too?

Researcher: James Melley
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b04kf9mq)
Celebrities and Fans

Social advertising: Evan Davis and guests discuss the growing power of celebrities, the rise of the money-making super-fans who "like" their products and the vloggers with consumer clout. How effective are these new social campaigns and how will they change the advertising industry?

Guests: Edwina Dunn, CEO Starcount; Dominic Burch, senior director marketing innovation and new revenue Asda; Robin Grant, co-founder We Are Social.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b04kf9mb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b04kf8ps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b04k40ct)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b04kznbc)
The UK says it will screen people for Ebola at Heathrow and Gatwick. How will it work? And we ask the World Bank's chief economist about the impact of the disease on the region.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04kf9ms)
The Bone Clocks

Episode 14

By David Mitchell. Part fourteen. Holly Sykes becomes more deeply involved in the world of Horology. The strange incidents of her childhood begin to make sense, and she agrees to risk everything. Read by Laurel Lefkow

This ambitious, much-anticipated new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas is one to lose yourself in. The Bone Clocks is an intricate feat of storytelling revealing one woman's life through those who encounter her. The journey has a global and historical sweep, it takes us from 1980s Kent via 19th Century Australia to a near future New York with a playfully genre-bending subplot.

Our Book at Bedtime will be read by a stellar cast of five actors over three weeks. We open with Hannah Arterton as Holly Sykes, 15 years old in 1980s Gravesend. Then Luke Treadaway is Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, likeable, good looking, and extremely dangerous. Joe Armstrong is Ed Brubeck, a foreign correspondent in the current decade, struggling to overcome the gaps between his life at home and the loss he experiences daily at work. Robert Glenister is Crispin Hershey, once the wild child of British letters, a novelist now past his best-selling peak. And Laurel Lefkow is Dr Marinus, a psychiatrist from the seventh century who meets Holly Sykes in a near-future America.

Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.


THU 23:00 Ayres on the Air (b01n6yj5)
Series 4

Winter

Popular poet Pam Ayres concludes her series of poetry and sketch shows about the seasons with a look at winter.
.
Subjects include that magic combination of cold weather and broken boilers; the art of comparing ailments with an update of the Yuletide song The 12 Days of Christmas and, as we reach the end of the Winter season ,Pam tells how to fan the dying flame of passion, come Valentine's Day.

Poems include: Who's Had My Scissors, Ever Since I Had Me Op and Insomnia.

With Felicity Montagu and Geoffrey Whitehead

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in October 2012.


THU 23:30 Punt PI (b00v117n)
Series 3

Episode 3

Steve Punt turns super sleuth and goes in search of a most unusual royal relic: Queen Victoria's voice. He embarks on a journey to the dawn of recorded sound as he tracks down a wax cylinder which may contain the voice, the only suspected recording of Victoria in existence. Via sound archives, strong rooms, forensic audiologists, royal voice coaches, the Queen's apartments and Palace letters he pieces together the story of the lost recording of Queen Victoria and tries to get to the bottom of any message she left for her subjects.



FRIDAY 10 OCTOBER 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04k40dr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04k40dt)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04k40dw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04k40dy)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04k40f0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04krls1)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Imam Monawar Hussain, Muslim Tutor at Eton College.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b04kfgck)
Milk Protests, Mental Health Helpline, Rural Business, German Crop Spraying

This week has seen the return of dairy protests. On Monday night farmers were in Shropshire demonstrating at Muller Wiseman in Market Drayton. We hear from those who were picketing Morrisons at Bridgwater in Somerset on Wednesday night. It's starting to look like a re-run of the situation in 2012, when protests by farmers led to the introduction of a voluntary dairy code.

All this week we've been reporting on health services in rural areas. Today is World Mental Health Day - we hear about YANA which provides support for anyone in agriculture struggling with mental health problems like stress and depression. YANA stands for You Are Not Alone.

Are rural businesses being penalised by planning, potholes, poor transport and painfully slow broadband?
Later today in Exeter, the South West Federation of Small Businesses is holding its first rural businesses conference in its 40 year history. The Environment Secretary Liz Truss will be there; and delegates will be trying to find solutions to the problems hindering rural commerce. Richard Haddock, who's rural spokesman for the South West Federation explains what they're hoping to achieve in order to support rural businesses.

And world record crop spraying in Germany. The machinery giant Amazone claims one of their trailer sprayers covered a staggering 2,550 acres in 24 hours - that's 106 acres an hour. They sprayed 15 fields of oilseed rape with the herbicide glyphosate.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Mark Smalley.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkx14)
Arctic Warbler

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the long distant migrant Arctic warbler. These classic olive-grey warblers, slightly smaller than the European robin, with a pale eye-stripe, winter in south-east Asia, but each spring fly to northern forests to breed. This can be as far as Finland, up to 13,000 kilometres away as well as Arctic and sub-Arctic Russia, Japan and even Alaska. They do this to feed on the bountiful supply of insects which proliferate during the 24-hour daylight of an Arctic summer. A few make it to Britain, the Northern Isles, but whether they finally return to Asia is not known.


FRI 06:00 Today (b04kfgcm)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b04k7b73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcj)
One People, Many Sausages

Neil MacGregor focuses on two great emblems of Germany's national diet: beer and sausages. He visits Munich to find out how regional specialities represent centuries of regional history and diversity.

Producer Paul Kobrak.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04kfgcp)
It's one of the most enduring and celebrated dance partnerships of recent time. Now, to mark their fortieth year of working together, ice dance champions Torvill and Dean have co-written a second autobiography 'Our Life On Ice'. Jenni talks to Jayne Torvill about what it's like to have more than one 'other half'.

Ten years ago Woman's Hour reported on the house in Manchester where Elizabeth Gaskell lived and where she wrote most of her novels. Now as renovations are completed we return to hear how the building has changed.

Chores for children, as part of Woman's Hour Chore Wars series Woman's Hour hears from one family as they implement 'cleaning hour'. Jenni also speaks to Jayne Stokes of Family Action, a charity who have offered advice to parents to use domestic tasks as a basis for their children's education and to Telegraph columnist Beverley Turner about what jobs her son and two daughters are willing to do.

The UK government is investing £35 million into a new Africa-led movement to end Female Genital Mutilation in one generation. The funding will run until 2019 and represents the largest investment by any government ever into tackling FGM. The campaign called, 'The Girl Generation; Together to End FGM' is launched in Nairobi in Kenya today. Its focus is on ten African countries where it aims to instigate advocacy initiatives which will drive social and behavioural change. Thirty million girls across Africa are estimated to be at risk of FGM over the next decade. Lynne Featherstone, Minister for International Development, and Nimco Ali join Jenni to explain how the money will be used and why they believe it will make a difference.


FRI 10:45 The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber (b04kfgcr)
Episode 5

Joe Armstrong, Hayley Atwell and Dougray Scott star in this adaptation of the astonishing novel by Michel Faber (Under the Skin, Crimson Petal and the White).

Set in the near future, it tells the story of Peter, devoted husband and devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Beatrice. Peter has travelled to a far distant planet, called Oasis, where an enigmatic corporation called USIC have a base. He has been employed as Christian missionary to the native inhabitants - a gentle, peaceable community, who have welcomed Peter to their settlement and are eager to hear the teachings of the Bible, a book they call 'The Book of Strange New Things'.

In today's episode, Peter is called to preside over a funeral service of one of his colleagues on the USIC base. And for Bea, back on Earth, life grows increasingly complicated.

Adapted for radio by Miranda Emmerson.

CAST
Narrator.....Dougray Scott
Peter.....Joe Armstrong
Beatrice.....Hayley Atwell
Grainger.....Kelly Burke
Oasan/ Tuska.....Mark Edel-Hunt
Jesus Lover Number One/ Severin.....Michael Bertenshaw
Jesus Lover Number Five/ BG.....Damian Lynch
Jesus Lover Number Four.....David Acton
USIC Psychologist.....Jane Slavin
USIC Doctor.....Elaine Claxton
Other parts played by members of the company

Directed by Emma Harding.


FRI 11:00 Care, Work, Sleep, Repeat (b04kfgct)
For twenty-one year old David Matthews, life is a never-ending cycle. He cares for his mum who suffers from back problems and chronic depression. He cooks, he cleans, he does the shopping and provides emotional support. He does all this while holding down a job and thinking about his own life. Like hundreds and thousands of other young adult carers, the support he received before turning 18 largely disappeared and he found he just had to get on with it. The support available to him as an adult did not meet his needs.

Dave Howard finds out what it's like to be a young adult carer and asks if there's enough support for this group who are balancing their caring responsibilities with work or further education, and their own hopes and ambitions.

Producer: Toby Field.


FRI 11:30 My First Planet (b04fc5pq)
Series 2

Day Trip to Terror!

What better time for Social Media to kick in than on a dangerous search-and-rescue mission on the planet's surface? And just why is Lillian replacing her nose?

The return of the hit sitcom starring Nicholas Lyndhurst and Vicki Pepperdine (Getting On) set on a shiny new planet.

Welcome to the colony. We're aware that, having been in deep cryosleep for 73 years, you may be in need of some supplementary information.

Unfortunately, Burrows the leader of the colony has died on the voyage so his Number 2, Brian (Nicholas Lyndhurst), is now in charge. He's a nice enough chap, but no alpha male, and his desire to sort things out with a nice friendly meeting infuriates the colony's Chief Physician Lillian (Vicki Pepperdine), who'd really rather everyone was walking round in tight colour-coded tunics and saluting each other. She's also in charge of Project Adam, the plan to conceive and give birth to the first colony-born baby. Unfortunately, the two people hand-picked for this purpose - Carol and Richard - were rather fibbing about being a couple, just to get on the trip.

Add in an entirely unscrupulous Chief Scientist, Mason and also Archer, an idiot maintenance man who believes he's an "empath" rather than a plumber, and you're all set to answer the question - if humankind were to colonise space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Written by Phil Whelans

Produced and Directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b04k40f2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 21st Century Mythologies (b04l3bqs)
Oscar Pistorius

In 1954, the French critic and semiotician Roland Barthes began a series of essays in which he analysed the popular culture of his day. He called his essays "Mythologies." In this series of witty talks, the acclaimed writer and critic Peter Conrad delivers a series of 21st Century Mythologies in a French accent of the mind. Conrad ranges over the defining pop culture icons of our era, from the Shard, to the Kardashians to today, Oscar Pistorius.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b04krnsy)
Scam Jobs; Industrial Deafness; Boilers; Kindle Unlimited

The latest in You and Yours' investigation into scam jobs. A student faces repaying £3500 after taking on a work-from-home role selling goods on eBay. Louise Minchin finds out why the adverts keep appearing, and what can be done to stop them.

The insurance industry says industrial deafness is the "new whiplash". It has been getting record numbers of claims. How easy is deafness to prove? And are all the claims legitimate? We find out.

Plus a look at Amazon's new service Kindle Unlimited. We find out why subscribers will not be able to read the current bestsellers.

Presenter: Louise Minchin
Producer: Natalie Donovan.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04k40f4)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b04kfk1t)
Analysis of current affairs reports, presented by Mark Mardell.


FRI 13:45 An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin (b04lc6h3)
Episode 5

The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994) introduced by her biographer, Georgina Ferry.

Later in life, Dorothy combined scientific research with actively campaigning for peace, travelling to China and Russia during the Cold War and later writing to her former student, Margaret Thatcher.

On receiving the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964, she said she hoped that, in future, a woman winning such a prize would not require any special comment as 'more use is made of the talents that women share equally with men'. Fifty years later her hope has still not been fulfilled. Dorothy Hodgkin remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b04kf9mj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b04kfk1w)
Beyond Contempt

by Peter Jukes.

Peter Jukes' nail-biting account of how, as a playwright turned court reporter, he came to live-tweet the entire 8 1/2 month hacking trial.

The director was Mary Peate.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04kfk1y)
Kent

Peter Gibbs hosts the programme from Kent. Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Wilson take questions from local gardeners.

Produced by Darby Dorras.
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions and answers:
Q. What is a good plant to climb up a north-facing wall?

A. Ivy would be good for a fence, Akebia quinata would work as a climber and Camellias would work brilliantly grown in front of the wall. Espalier Pear trees or Morello Chrerries would also work well.

Q. What kind of tulips should I plant in a pot for a colourful display? What other plants could I plant with them?

A. Apricot-beauty, Fontainbleau, Triumphator, Queen of Night, Apple Dawn and Angelique are lovely varieties of tulips. Forget-Me-Nots look great planted under tulips. Plant the bulbs deep in the pot. Get some well-draining compost in the base, perhaps some John Innes mixed with something else over some crocks. Then add more compost and put the Mysotis plants (Forget-Me-Nots) on top of those and the Tulips will push their way through. You could also underplant with Scilla, White Jonquil Narcissus or Narcissus Thalia. Alternatively you could overplant them with Lilies. Plant the tulips at the end of October or early November.

Q. How should I prepare my shady east-facing vegetable plots?

A. Use raise beds to maximize the light getting to the plants. Paint any surrounding walls white. If there is turf there now, you don't need to prepare the soil too much. Plant Garlic, Broad Beans, Shallots, Onions now but wait for spring to plant other things.

Q. What is this invasive plant and how can I deal with it? It's a perennial plant which is 30cm tall with average leaves and reddish stems. It has bunches of pink scented flowers. It's in the same plant family as Carnations (Caryophyllus) so it has a similar look.

A. It's Saponaria (Soapwort) and you just need to keep digging it up.

Q. Is it recommended to leave the roots of Runner Beans in the ground with a chance of them shooting up the following year?

A. Yes, if you have a mild winter there is a chance this would work. You could use mulch to insulate them over the colder months. Be careful, the roots are poisonous.

Q. My beautiful ornamental Cherry tree took three years to die and now my other fruit trees are looking poorly. What should I do?

A. It looks like sclerosis due to mineral deficiency. You could try using some seaweed solution or manure to help give them the nutrition they need to survive.

Q. Will Eremurus (Foxtailed Lilies) do better in raised beds in full sunshine?

A. Yes, these plants like full, hot sunshine. Try the Pinocchio, Isabelina and Cleopatra varieties.

Q. My white climbing Hydrangeas are turning pink, what is happening?

A. Heat and light and water types can change the colour of the plants. The flower colour also depends on the acidity of the soil.


FRI 15:45 Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities (b04kfk20)
Hong Kong

4 Extra Debut. In 1959, Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, was commissioned by the Sunday Times to explore some of the world's most exotic cities. Travelling to the Far East and then to America, he left the bright main streets for the back alleys, abandoning tourist sites in favour of underground haunts, and mingling with celebrities, gangsters and geishas. The result is a series of vivid snapshots of a mysterious, vanished world.

Fleming wote, 'On November 2nd, armed with a sheaf of visas...one suitcase...and my typewriter, I left humdrum London for the thrilling cities of the world. All my life I have been interested in adventure and abroad. I have enjoyed the frisson of leaving the wide, well-lit streets and venturing up back alleys in search of the hidden, authentic pulse of towns. It was perhaps this habit that turned me into a writer of thrillers.'

In today's episode, Fleming flies to Hong Kong - the most vivid and exciting city he had ever experienced. He enjoys a massage at the hands of an expert, and his senses are enchanted by the smells of the streets at night - from the 'exciting dash of sandalwood' in a joss-stick factory to the scent of frying onions and 'sweet perspiration'.

Read by Simon Williams.
Abridged by Mark Burgess.

Copyright Ian Fleming Publications Ltd 1963

Produced by David Blount.
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b04kfk22)
Andrew Kerr, Jean-Claude Duvalier, Dorothy Tyler MBE, Prof Karl Miller, Cosimo Matassa

Matthew Bannister on

Andrew Kerr who co-founded the Glastonbury music festival. Thomas Crimble of Hawkwind recalls playing at the first one in 1971.

Haiti's fallen dictator Jean Claude Duvalier. He was nicknamed "Baby Doc" because he took over from his father "Papa Doc" as president for life at the age of nineteen.

Dorothy Tyler, the British high jumper who won silver medals at both the Berlin Olympics of 1936 and the London games of 1948.

Professor Karl Miller who co-founded the London Review of Books and promoted the careers of many leading novelists and poets.

And Cosimo Matassa whose New Orleans recording studio created some of the best known early rock n roll records, including Little Richard's Tutti Frutti and Fats Domino's Blueberry Hill.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b04kfk24)
Good news. You now have 30 day to catch up on radio programmes using iPlayer. Andrew Scott, the General Manager of radio and music for BBC Future Media joins Roger Bolton to discuss the changes.

Musician, writer, broadcaster - Jarvis Cocker can seemingly turn his hand to anything. But can he combine his intimate late-night delivery of Radio 4 programme Wireless Nights with the full force of the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra? Kate Taylor takes us behind the scenes at the rehearsal to meet Jarvis along with the Wireless Nights producer Laurence Grissell and the General Manager of the BBC Philharmonic, Simon Webb.

The battle for the 12 o'clock slot on Radio 4 continues. You and Yours listeners are still reeling from losing a quarter of the consumer affairs programme each day to make space for Home Front, Radio 4's landmark 500-part drama about the First World War. But while Home Front is taking a break there's a new series called '21st Century Mythologies' in its place. Every day Peter Conrad focuses on a different example of popular culture - including Nando's, Apple computers and the Kardashians - echoing the French semiotician Roland Barthes' Mythologies 60 years earlier. Clever cultural commentary? Some listeners are not convinced.

And listeners react to an item on Today in which Sarah Montagu interviewed a woman who had married herself.

Produced by Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b04kfk26)
Rachel and Mandy - Losing a Child

After Rachel lost her 19 year old daughter to septicaemia, her friendship with Mandy became even closer.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b04kfk28)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04k40f6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b04kfk2b)
Series 44

Episode 5

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guest Nathan Caton for a comic romp through the week's news. With Pippa Evans, Mitch Benn and Jon Holmes.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Gareth Gwynn, Jane Lamacraft and Tom Crowley. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b04kfk2d)
Bert and Joe argue over whose version of John Barleycorn to sing at the Harvest Supper. Joe argues that his is the original Borsetshire version - and besides, he's the oldest. Carol solves the problem by suggesting they do Joe's first and then Bert can sing his version as an encore.
Hayley confronts Elizabeth. She admits that the affair with Roy was not a one-off. They also got together at Loxfest.
Hayley makes clear to Roy that she knows it was Elizabeth who called the affair off, for the sake of her children. As Hayley packs a bag, Roy pleads with her not to go. But she says she needs to decide what to do, now that their marriage is over. Hayley loads the car to leave, telling a desperate Roy that he left her when he fell in love with Elizabeth.
Jill is disappointed that Elizabeth will miss the harvest supper because of a terrible headache. She worries about how awful Elizabeth sounded on the phone. Caught up in the festivities and reminded of Doris's favourite hymn, Jill has a funny turn and escapes for some air.
Outside, Jill confides in Carol that she had been prepared to leave Brookfield to support David. But now, particularly after tonight, she just can't. Jill feels too old to start again.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b04kfk2g)
Iggy Pop; The Lion King; Marcel Duchamp

John Wilson talks to the godfather of punk, Iggy Pop, ahead of this year's BBC Music John Peel Lecture.

Disney chief Thomas Schumacher on creating The Lion King and a stage version of Frozen.

Artists Cornelia Parker and Keith Tyson in praise of surrealist Marcel Duchamp.


FRI 19:45 Germany: Memories of a Nation (b04k6rcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b04kfk2j)
Paul Nuttall MEP, Ed Davey MP, Caroline Flint MP, Sarah Wollaston MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Calne Music Festival in Wiltshire with the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change Ed Davey MP, Caroline Flint MP who holds the shadow Energy brief for Labour, Paul Nuttall MEP the Deputy Leader of UKIP and Dr Sarah Wollaston, Conservative MP and Chair of the Health Select Committee.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b04kfk2l)
Dying with Dignity

Adam Gopnik thinks we fail too often to let people die with dignity at the end of their lives and believes the answer lies in showing deference.
"Dignity, I think is an exceptional demand, one that depends on at least an illusion or masquerade of an anti-egalitarian, indeed pre-modern - indeed an essentially feudal sense - of deference."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Plants: From Roots to Riches (b04kfybz)
Omnibus

Episode 1

The first of five omnibus editions of Prof Kathy Willis' timely new history of our changing relationship with plants

From the birth of modern plant classification, harnessing botany and imperial progress in furthering Britain's destiny as the major civilising power in the world , to establishing the laws of what grows where and why, Professor Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, examines new attitudes to plants during the 18th and early 19th century.

From plants as tools to exploit to flowers as objects of beauty, Kathy Willis draws upon Kew's archives and its herbarium collection of pressed plants that was to play a pivotal role in establishing insights into plant relationships and their distribution around the world. It was to help establish the first accurate maps of the world's flora by the mid 19th century.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne

Presenter: KATHY WILLIS is director of science at Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. She is also professor of long-term ecology and a fellow of Merton College, both at Oxford University. Winner of several awards, she has spent over 20 years researching and teaching biodiversity and conservation at Oxford and Cambridge.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04k40f8)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b04kfk2n)
Can UKIP repeat their success in Clacton ? Andy Hosken reports from Rochester. Can UKIP learn from the mistakes of the SDP ? Lord Owen gives us his verdict. And we discuss whether British politics is really about to enter a new dimension.

Also tonight - Ankara finds itself facing 3 enemies: IS, the Kurds and Assad. Paul Moss in Ankara asks how that's affecting the Turkish state of mind.

A potentially game changing moment for people with diabetes. One of the Harvard team tells us about their research.

Mia Farrow speaks to us about Malala Yousafzai's Nobel Peace Prize win.

We'll hear how the OTHER Nobel Peace Prize winner - Indian children's rights activist, Kailash Satyarthi
- reacted to his victory.

And - why the Australian version of Carmen has gone up in smoke.

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective - with Philippa Thomas.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04kfk2q)
The Bone Clocks

Episode 15

By David Mitchell. Part fifteen. Holly Sykes witnesses the twilight sea between life and death, and finds herself at the centre of a battle between good and evil. Read by Laurel Lefkow

This ambitious, much-anticipated new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas is one to lose yourself in. The Bone Clocks is an intricate feat of storytelling revealing one woman's life through those who encounter her. The journey has a global and historical sweep, it takes us from 1980s Kent via 19th Century Australia to a near future New York with a playfully genre-bending subplot.

Our Book at Bedtime will be read by a stellar cast of five actors over three weeks. We open with Hannah Arterton as Holly Sykes, 15 years old in 1980s Gravesend. Then Luke Treadaway is Cambridge student Hugo Lamb, likeable, good looking, and extremely dangerous. Joe Armstrong is Ed Brubeck, a foreign correspondent in the current decade, struggling to overcome the gaps between his life at home and the loss he experiences daily at work. Robert Glenister is Crispin Hershey, once the wild child of British letters, a novelist now past his best-selling peak. And Laurel Lefkow is Dr Marinus, a psychiatrist from the seventh century who meets Holly Sykes in a near-future America.

Abridged by Robin Brooks
Produced by Allegra McIlroy.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b04kbl8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Punt PI (b03892r4)
Series 6

The Case of the Vanishing Machine Gun Maker

Another perplexing case for our best loved, though slightly unusual PI, Steve Punt.

His methods may be unconventional but this time Steve is hot on the trail of two gun makers, William Cantelo and Hirum Maxim, and the story begins in Southampton.

Late in the 19th century strange noises could be heard from a cellar beneath a pub near the Southampton docks. It was rumoured that gun maker William Cantelo was inventing a rapid firing gun, capable of destroying the enemy and certain to make its inventor very rich.

Eventually William Cantelo emerged from his cellar with the news that his invention was complete and that he was going to take a much needed holiday, which he did, taking his new invention with him. But that was the last his family saw of him, "he simply vanished into the void."

Eventually his two sons began a search to find out what had happened to their father. When they saw a picture of the American inventor Hirum Maxim in a national paper with his new invention, a rapid firing machine gun, they were shocked; he was the spitting image of their own father William Cantelo. The sons both tried in vain to talk to Maxim, on one occasion at Victoria station as Maxim was catching a train, but to no avail. They were convinced that this Maxim was their father and that gun was the same gun that Cantelo had invented but they were never able to prove it.

Maxim died a very rich man having made millions from the invention which slaughtered millions in the Great War. Cantelo's last movements were traced to America, how and where he died is a mystery.
Clearly this story throws up more questions than answers: What happened to William Cantelo? Was Cantelo impersonating Maxim, if so why? Did Maxim steal Cantelo's invention and pay Cantelo to go away? Did one man murder the other, if so who murdered who?

Producer Neil George.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b04kfk5n)
Rachel and Mandy – Keep On Running

After Rachel's daughter Rosie died, the friends wanted to do something positive, but their route to the finish of the charity run wasn’t quite the same as that of the other runners. Fi Glover introduces another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

21st Century Mythologies 12:04 MON (b04k9gjb)

21st Century Mythologies 12:04 TUE (b04kf61b)

21st Century Mythologies 12:04 WED (b04kf5zx)

21st Century Mythologies 12:04 THU (b04kf8q3)

21st Century Mythologies 12:04 FRI (b04l3bqs)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b04kbl8c)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b04kbl8c)

A Mix-Tape for Gus 11:30 TUE (b04kbjhs)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04jmd8d)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b04kfk2l)

Always the Bridesmaid 15:30 SAT (b04jk36b)

An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin 13:45 MON (b04k9gjl)

An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin 13:45 TUE (b04lc3kj)

An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin 13:45 WED (b04lc3pz)

An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin 13:45 THU (b04lc564)

An Eye for Pattern: The Letters of Dorothy Hodgkin 13:45 FRI (b04lc6h3)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b04jjz49)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b04k9n03)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b04k2lrz)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04jmd8b)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b04kfk2j)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b04k4034)

August Shines 11:30 THU (b04kf8q1)

Ayres on the Air 23:00 THU (b01n6yj5)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b04kf9mb)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b04kf9mb)

BBC Music Performance 20:00 TUE (b04l054g)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b04k7b6j)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b04k7b6j)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b04k9mzn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b04k9n07)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b04kbl90)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b04kf715)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b04kf9ms)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b04kfk2q)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b04k7j02)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b04k7j02)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b04k7b6z)

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing 18:30 THU (b04kf9mg)

Care, Work, Sleep, Repeat 11:00 FRI (b04kfgct)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b04jhp4d)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b04k7j00)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b04kbjt2)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b04kbjt2)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b04jjz3s)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b04k9gjq)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b04k7b73)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b04k7b73)

Drama 14:15 MON (b04k9gjn)

Drama 14:15 WED (b04kf603)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01dgh87)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b04kfk1w)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b04k2ljw)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04k971x)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b04kbgcp)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b04kf5zd)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b04kf7fc)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b04kfgck)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b04jmcr9)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b04kfk24)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b04jk3qy)

File on 4 20:04 TUE (b04kbl8p)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b04kf711)

Fresh From the Fringe 23:00 MON (b04k9n09)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04k2lrv)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b04kf8pz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b04k9mzz)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04kbl8m)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b04kf60k)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b04kf9ml)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b04kfk2g)

FutureProofing 22:15 SAT (b04jlry1)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b04kf6lk)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04jmcr3)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b04kfk1y)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 00:30 SAT (b04jm9mx)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 09:45 MON (b04k6rc8)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 19:45 MON (b04k6rc8)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 00:30 TUE (b04k6rc8)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 09:45 TUE (b04k6rcb)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 19:45 TUE (b04k6rcb)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 00:30 WED (b04k6rcb)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 09:45 WED (b04k6rcd)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 19:45 WED (b04k6rcd)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 00:30 THU (b04k6rcd)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 09:45 THU (b04k6rcg)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 19:45 THU (b04k6rcg)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 00:30 FRI (b04k6rcg)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 09:45 FRI (b04k6rcj)

Germany: Memories of a Nation 19:45 FRI (b04k6rcj)

How to Dig a Grave 11:00 WED (b04kf5zs)

Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities 15:45 FRI (b04kfk20)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b04kf8ps)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b04kf8ps)

In Praise of Limestone 16:00 MON (b04k9mzl)

In Touch 20:42 TUE (b04kbl8t)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b04kbl8w)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b04kbl8w)

Jeremy Hardy Speaks to the Nation 18:30 WED (b04kf60f)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b04jjz41)

Kerry's List 11:30 MON (b04k9gj8)

Kevin Eldon Will See You Now 23:00 TUE (b04kbl92)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04jmcr7)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b04kfk22)

Lewis Macleod Is Not Himself 18:30 TUE (b04kbl8h)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b04k402y)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04jhjnb)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b04k404y)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04k406w)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b04k408d)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b04k409v)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04k40c9)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04k40dr)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b04kf5zj)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b04kf5zj)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b04kf605)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b04k2lrx)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b04k2lrx)

My First Planet 11:30 FRI (b04fc5pq)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04jhjnl)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b04k4056)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04k4074)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b04k408n)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b04k40b3)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04k40ck)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04k40f0)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b04k4058)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04jhjnx)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b04k405l)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b04k4078)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b04k408q)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b04k40b5)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b04k40cm)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b04k40f2)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04jhjnn)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b04k405d)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b04k405j)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04jhjp9)

News 13:00 SAT (b04jhjp1)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b04k7b6n)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b04kbjhj)

Out There 19:45 SUN (b04k92wb)

Out of the Ordinary 16:00 TUE (b03xd3hl)

PM 17:00 SAT (b04k4026)

PM 17:00 MON (b04k9mzq)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04kbl8f)

PM 17:00 WED (b04kf60c)

PM 17:00 THU (b04kf9md)

PM 17:00 FRI (b04kfk28)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b04k7kbf)

Plants: From Roots to Riches 21:00 FRI (b04kfybz)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b04jhpnz)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b04k7j04)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04jmdc9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04kbghw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b04kbgck)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b04kf5zb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b04kf7f9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b04krls1)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b04k4030)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b04k4030)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b04k4030)

Punt PI 23:30 TUE (b0144pvl)

Punt PI 23:30 WED (b038wtj2)

Punt PI 23:30 THU (b00v117n)

Punt PI 23:27 FRI (b03892r4)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b04k7b6s)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b04k7b6s)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b04k7b6s)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b04jm36f)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b04kf9m6)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b04k4022)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b04k2lqs)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b04k4032)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04jhjng)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b04k4052)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04k4070)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b04k408j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b04k409z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04k40cf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04k40dw)

Seven Round a Cauldron 10:30 SAT (b04k2lqv)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04jk368)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b04kbjhq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04jhjnd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04jhjnj)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b04jhjp3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b04k4050)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b04k4054)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b04k405q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b04k406y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b04k4072)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b04k408g)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b04k408l)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b04k409x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b04k40b1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b04k40cc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04k40ch)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b04k40dt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b04k40dy)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b04kbjj1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04jhjp7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b04k405v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04k407d)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b04k408v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b04k40b9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04k40cr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04k40f6)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04k7b6l)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04k7b6l)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b04k9gj0)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b04k9gj0)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b04k7b6v)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b04k7b6q)

Terry Pratchett 23:15 WED (b01r0zb9)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b04k7b71)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b04k7kbj)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b04k7kbj)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b04k9mzv)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b04k9mzv)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04lwp50)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04lwp50)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b04kf60h)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b04kf60h)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b04kf9mj)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b04kf9mj)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b04kfk2d)

The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber 10:45 MON (b04k9gj4)

The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber 10:45 TUE (b04kbjhn)

The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber 10:41 WED (b04kf5zn)

The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber 10:45 THU (b04kf8px)

The Book of Strange New Things, by Michel Faber 10:45 FRI (b04kfgcr)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b04jm36y)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b04kf9mq)

The Educators 00:15 MON (b04hytg6)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b04jm36h)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b04kf9m8)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b04k7g5x)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b04k7g5x)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b04k2lrs)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b04kbjhg)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b04kbjhg)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04k7g63)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b04kf5zq)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b04kfk26)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b04kfk5n)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b04kf609)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b04k9mzs)

The Music Teacher 23:00 WED (b01drtfn)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b04jmcrj)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b04kfk2b)

The Philosopher's Arms 20:00 MON (b04jjz47)

The Report 20:00 THU (b04kf9mn)

The Time Being 00:30 SUN (b02119cs)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04k7g5z)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b04k9n05)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04kbl8y)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b04kf713)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b04kznbc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b04kfk2n)

The Write Stuff 19:15 SUN (b04k7kbn)

The Year of the Drone 11:00 MON (b04k9gj6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b04kf607)

Today 07:00 SAT (b04k2lqq)

Today 06:00 MON (b04k971z)

Today 06:00 TUE (b04ltddy)

Today 06:00 WED (b04kf5zg)

Today 06:00 THU (b04kf7ff)

Today 06:00 FRI (b04kfgcm)

Tommies 14:15 TUE (b03thbp3)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04hkwg9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04hkwmk)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b04hkwnn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b04hkxg2)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b04hkwtg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b04hkx14)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b04jhjns)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b04jhjnv)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b04jhjnz)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b04jhjp5)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b04k405b)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b04k405g)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b04k405n)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b04k405s)

Weather 05:56 MON (b04k4076)

Weather 12:57 MON (b04k407b)

Weather 21:58 MON (b04k407g)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b04k408s)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b04k408x)

Weather 12:57 WED (b04k40b7)

Weather 21:58 WED (b04k40bc)

Weather 12:57 THU (b04k40cp)

Weather 21:58 THU (b04k40ct)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b04k40f4)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b04k40f8)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04k94jq)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04k94js)

With Humble Duty Reports... 13:30 SUN (b041yd48)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b04k4024)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b04k9gj2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b04kbjhl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b04kf5zl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b04kf8pv)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b04kfgcp)

Wordaholics 11:30 WED (b04kf5zv)

World at One 13:00 MON (b04k9gjg)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b04kbjhz)

World at One 13:00 WED (b04kf601)

World at One 13:00 THU (b04kf8q7)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b04kfk1t)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b04k9gjd)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b04kbjhx)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b04kf5zz)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b04kf8q5)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b04krnsy)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b04jmdcc)