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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 SEPTEMBER 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b04g1c6v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b04g19vy)
Omid Djalili - Hopeful: The Autobiography

Episode 5

Omid explores the vital role his vivacious mother plays in his life and art.

Conclusion of comedian and actor Omid Djalili's memoir

One of Britain's funniest men takes us through his unconventional childhood growing up in an Iranian household in London and chart his progression from serious acting into comedy.

It's a laugh-out-loud, intelligent and deeply touching journey through a fascinating life.

Abridger ..... Lu Kemp

Producer ..... Kirsty Williams

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in September 2014


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g1c6x)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g1c6z)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g1c71)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b04g1c73)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04g1cyy)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Martyn Atkins.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b04g1cz0)
'I could never look at that car park without a cold horrible feeling.' iPM speaks to a listener who wants better hospital car parks - and not just by lowering the cost of them. Your News is read by John Simpson. Presented by Jennifer Tracey and Eddie Mair. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b04g1c75)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b04g1c77)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b04g13rk)
The John Muir Way

A young boy - John Muir - spent his early years in Scotland, playing along Dunbar's coast and scrambling across rocks. This early fascination with nature and 'wild places' later saw him campaign to protect them. When his family emigrated to the USA it led him on a path that would see him appeal directly to the president and help create the National Parks. Today he's known by most American schoolchildren but he is not so widely known in the UK.

Helen Mark sets off on the new coast to coast John Muir Way from Dunbar to Helensburgh, named after the man but leading through his native country. She visits the town where he revelled in nature, hikes along some of the route with poets who've planted trees and created new writing inspired by his work and takes in Helix Park and the Kelpies - a dramatic modern designed landscape - far from the wilderness which Muir revelled in but which is bringing together thousands from the local community into the outdoors.

Presented by Helen Mark and produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b04g6k4q)
Farming Education

Charlotte Smith goes back to school to discuss how best to educate young people about farming. She meets students and staff at Brymore Academy, a state boarding school which specialises in agriculture. From next year farming and land based BTEC courses will no longer count towards school league tables and the future of land based GCSEs is also uncertain. The headteacher of Brymore, Mark Thomas, explains why he believes farming deserves a place on the curriculum.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sarah Swadling.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b04g1c79)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b04g6k4s)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b04g6k4v)
Alistair McGowan

Impressionist and actor Alistair McGowan joins Aasmah Mir and Suzy Klein to talk sporting passions, finding your roots and the joys of Noel Coward.

Also joining us is Katy U'ren, a PE teacher from Glasgow. She discusses what it was like to teach children in Bangladesh how to swim as part of UNICEF's SwimSafe campaign, and what she's doing back home to transform the lives of the children she teaches.

Listener Emma got in touch with Saturday Live after tracking down her birth mother on Facebook. She explains how the black hole of her past life has now been filled in â€" all the way back to 1647.

Jack Durand is 14 and has just become the first Briton ever to win the World Youth Scrabble Championship. He gives us his tips for winning words.

JP Devlin speaks to Jeanette Charles who has been impersonating The Queen for the last 42 years. As she prepares to take things a little easier, we hear what it's been like to live life as someone else.

Virtuoso pianist Lang Lang shares his Inheritance Tracks. He chooses Tristesse from Etudes Opus 10 No 3 by Chopin and Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No 3 played by Prokofiev.

'Sincerely Noel' - a cabaret evening featuring a medley of songs and poems by Noel Coward, devised by and starring Alistair McGowan and Charlotte Page - is on at The Crazy Coqs in central London from Tuesday 9th September for 5 nights.

Alistair's motto as shared on the programme: Good, better, best. May it never rest. Until the good is better and the better best.

Produced by Alex Lewis.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04g6k93)
Series 8

Canterbury

Jay Rayner and the team are in Canterbury. Taking questions from the audience on eating and drinking are Masterchef winner Tim Anderson, Scottish chef - hooked on the taste of all things Catalan - Rachel Mccormack, the food historian Annie Gray and former Head of Creative Development for Heston Blumenthal James "Jocky" Petrie.

The panel discuss the eating habits of Chaucer's famous characters, argue about the best use for horrible beer, indulge themselves in the sweet smell of hops and muse on the merits of the Kentish cobnut.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun
Producer: Victoria Shepherd
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b04g6k95)
Peter Oborne of The Daily Telegraph looks behind the scenes at Westminster.

Does the UK have a strategy to deal with the threat from IS? The imbroglio over the Speaker's handling of the appointment of a new House of Commons clerk, and the fall out from Douglas Carwell's defection to UKIP from the Conservative party.

Plus a violent assault on an MP in broad daylight raises little comment in the Palace of Westminster.

The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b04g6kqt)
Matters of Life and Death

Kate Adie introduces correspondents stories from around the world. This week Gabriel Gatehouse takes a nerve-wracking drive, trying to avoid IS forces in Iraq. Shahzeb Jillani explains what Pakistan's political turmoil is about; John Sweeney comes face to face with President Putin after 14 years of trying. Claudia Hammond discovers that many patients in Israel remain on life support for years; and Steve Evans has the story of how a German board game took off in the trenches of WW1.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b04g1c7c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b04g6kqw)
Putting you through it

On Money Box with Paul Lewis: People who use BT for their telephone calls could find that trying to economise costs them more. A new inclusive tariff will be cheaper than paying separately for daytime calls for many customers. David Hickson of the Fair Telecoms campaign joins the programme.

Complaints about mobile phone insurance are on the rise and according to the Financial Ombudsman Service, which is fielding them, the majority are justified complaints. Ruth Alexander reports and the programme also hears from David Cresswell at the Financial Ombudsman Service.

A man has been sentenced to two years in jail for not telling HM Revenue & Customs about his income from selling things on ebay. John Woolfenden from Bury failed to pay almost £300,000 of tax on his income from selling DVDs, music, and games over six years. This week he was convicted at Bolton Crown Court of cheating the public revenue and for transferring criminal property. It's an exceptional case but it does point out the dangers of buying and selling things on ebay - when do you become a trader that has to declare their income and fill in a tax return as self-employed? Elaine Clark of cheapaccounting.co.uk explains all.

Just what should be in the guidance that will be available to everyone who has a pension which they may want to cash in under the new pension freedoms from next April? When should the guidance be given and by whom? Should you cash your pension in at all? What will the tax position be? Independent pensions expert Dr Ros Altmann and the pensions minister, Steve Webb, join the programme.


SAT 12:30 The Brig Society (b04g1bsp)
Series 2

Banker

Uh-oh - Marcus Brigstocke has been put in charge of a thing!

Each week, Marcus finds he's volunteered to be in charge of a big old thing and each week he starts out by thinking "Well, it can't be that difficult, surely?" and ends up with "Oh - turns out it's utterly difficult and complicated. Who knew...?"

We would like to inform you that this week, Marcus Brigstocke has decided to open a bank. That'll be £25 please. If you would like to call our customer helpline... that will be another £25

Waiting to serve you are Rufus Jones ("W1A", "Holy Flying Circus"), William Andrews ("Sorry I've Got No Head") and Margaret Cabourn-Smith ("Miranda")

The show is a Pozzitive production, and is produced by Marcus's long-standing accomplice, David Tyler who also produces Marcus appearances as the inimitable as Giles Wemmbley Hogg. David's other radio credits include Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Cabin Pressure, Thanks A Lot, Milton Jones!, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, The Castle, The 3rd Degree, The 99p Challenge, My First Planet, Radio Active & Bigipedia. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul Calf Video Diary, Three Fights Two Weddings & A Funeral, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt & Dan Tetsell

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for the BBC.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b04g1c7f)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b04g1c7h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b04g1bsw)
Anna Soubry MP, Roger Helmer MEP, Caroline Lucas MP, Michael Dugher MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Westonbirt School in Gloucestershire with the UKIP MEP Roger Helmer, Green MP Caroline Lucas, Defence Minister Anna Soubry and Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office Michael Dugher MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b04g6kqy)
Spare room subsidy, ISIS, returning jihadists

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

The arguments for and against the spare room subsidy.

What can we do to reduce the power of ISIS?

Can radicalized Muslims returning from Iraq and Syria ever be rehabilitated ?

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Angie Nehring.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01mnxvj)
The Martin Beck Killings

The Man on the Balcony

by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö
translated by Alan Blair
Dramatised by Katie Hims

Someone is assaulting and killing young girls in the parks of Stockholm. With only a brutal mugger and a three year-old boy for witnesses, the investigation is stalling. It's only a tiny detail surfacing in Beck's mind that puts the murder squad on the trail of the killer, but will they get him before he strikes again?

Original Music composed by Elizabeth Purnell
Directed by Mary Peate.


SAT 15:30 The Poet Librettists (b04fz4vq)
Michael Symmons Roberts is one of our most accomplished poets, and has for some years also built a reputation as a first rate librettist, in collaboration with James Macmillan. In the course of his alternative operatic career he's had much time to consider why so many poets have decided to have a go at writing for the opera stage - even though the collaborative experience is often so alien to poets most comfortable writing alone. He meets some of the modern era opera's most illustrious practitioners, including Harrison Birtwistle, David Harsent, Alice Goodman as well as James Macmillan - and more skeptical voices such as Don Paterson, a prize-winning poet who has been highly reluctant in the past to have his own words set to music as he regards them to have their own internal music already. Michael also presents archive audio from perhaps the greatest poet-librettist of all, W.H. Auden, to try to establish precisely what it is that poets bring to the operatic table that other writers - such as novelists and playwrights - do not; he also investigates how writing for the voice rather than the page affects the writing style of poets.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b04g6lbh)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Han-Na Chang; Tom Kerridge; Jeanette Winterson

The cellist and conductor Han-Na Chang will take up the baton on Sunday at the BBC Proms to conduct the Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra. Why she's putting her accomplished career as a world class cellist aside and rebranding herself as a conductor

The sexual abuse and exploitation of 1400 mainly white girls in Rotherham by men predominantly of Pakistani origin has caused shock and outrage. What can be done to give British-Pakistani women in these communities a louder voice?

Almost thirty years after its publication .Jeanette Winterson talks about, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit, her ground breaking novel and examines its place in women's writing after all these years.

Groping in public places. After a woman was punched in the face by a man she challenged for sexually assaulting her, we discuss the problem of groping. And as celebrities are held at fault for intimate photos published online, is there a problem of victim-blaming when it comes to women's bodies?

The creator of 'Charlie and Lola', has written a new book about introducing a new sibling to the family. What's the best way to introduce a new baby and manage sibling rivalry.

Plus can you be friends with an ex's new partner? And the Michelin starred chef Tom Kerridge Cooks the Perfect Barnsley Chop.

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Presented by Jane Garvey.
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b04g6lbk)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news with Simon Jack.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b04g1cz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04g1c7k)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b04g1c7m)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g1c7p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b04g6lbm)
Ross Noble, Alan Johnson, Sarah Solemani, Jón Gnarr, Arthur Smith, Gregory Porter, Bunty

Postie turned politician Alan Johnson talks to Clive about the sequel to his bestselling childhood memoir, 'This Boy'. 'Please, Mr Postman' paints a vivid picture of England in the 1970s, where smoking was the norm rather than the exception, and Sunday lunchtime was about beer, bingo and cribbage. But as Alan's career in the Union of Postal Workers begins to take off, his close-knit family is struck by tragedy.

Clive gets a Bad Education with actress and writer Sarah Solemani, who writes and stars in an episode of BBC One drama 'The Secrets'; a series of 5 short films - each one an explosive story with a secret at its heart. In episode two; 'The Conversation', we join a bride (played by Sarah) on the eve of her wedding, who discovers her fiancé was once accused of a shocking crime.

Meet Jon Gnarr: he's a mayor like no other. A successful stand-up comedian, Gnarr founded Iceland's "Best Party" in reaction to his country's economic collapse. His campaign offered voters a more honest approach to power, a polar bear for Reykjavik zoo and a drug-free Parliament. Jon tells Arthur Smith about his book 'GNARR: How I Became the Mayor of a Large City in Iceland and Changed the World'.

Clive's Freewheeling with the king of improvisational comedy Ross Noble, who's back with another mind-blowing UK tour. Famed for his inspired nonsense, 'The wizard haired Geordie' talks to Clive about his new tour 'Tangentleman', in which he talks nonsense of the highest order.

With music from Grammy Award winning Gregory Porter who performs 'Musical Genocide' from his album 'Liquid Spirit'. More music from Bunty who performs 'Congatron' from her upcoming album 'Multimos'.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b04g6lbp)
Rona Fairhead

Edward Stourton profiles Rona Fairhead, the woman nominated to replace Lord Patten as chair of the BBC Trust. She's a high achiever who excelled at school and in the world of business, but her nomination caught many by surprise. So who is she, and how will she fare in one of the BBC's toughest jobs?


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b04g6mmz)
The Children Act, Little Revolution, Watermark, Secrets, Bernd and Hilla Becher

Ian McEwan's new novel The Children Act deals with a young man who is suffering from leukaemia and the conflict between his parent's wishes and the authority of the State in the form of a high court judge.

Little Revolution is a play by Alecky Blythe concerning the London riots of 2011 using a script drawn from verbatim interviews

Watermark is a film by photographer Edward Burtynsky about the world's most precious resource: H2O. There's a finite amount and it's getting more and more difficult to protect and access.

Secrets, a new mini drama series on BBC1 begins with a play starring Olivia Colman and Alison Steadman about a mother who discovers she's dying of cancer and her relationship with her daughter.

Bernd and Hilla Becher were a German husband and wife photographic duo who specialised in impartial pictures of industrial structures - conventionally unpretty but given a formalist beauty

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Mark Ravenhill, Liz Jensen and Kamila Shamsie. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b04g6mn1)
No More Heroes

The concept of the hero is an incredibly powerful one. But what are heroes, and why are we so drawn to them? Angie Hobbs examines the hero, and asks if we are in danger of devaluing the term.

Stories of heroes resound through the ages, from Achilles in The Iliad, to Lawrence of Arabia. Tales of heroic exploits can be inspiring, but the reality of being a hero can be a lonely one, and many find it difficult to adjust to normal life. Is a hero someone who displays physical or moral courage? What is the relationship between heroism and recklessness? Have we confused heroism and celebrity? And how is the term used and misused by politicians, charities and the media?

To find out what the hero means to us today, Angie speaks to Germaine Greer, Sir Max Hastings, Canon Vernon White, Rory Stewart MP, Colonel Tim Collins and Dame Ellen MacArthur

Presenter: Angie Hobbs
Producer: Jessica Treen.


SAT 21:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b04fy3z7)
Anthony Trollope's Framley Parsonage

Two Different Sets of People

by Anthony Trollope, dramatised by Nick Warburton

For young Mark Robarts, life as the Vicar of Framley can sometimes feel a little too quiet. So, risking the wrath of Lady Lufton and leaving his wife and children, he heads off for the allure of country house parties, little knowing the repercussions which are in store.

Music composed by David Robin, Jeff Meegan and Julian Gallant

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

Framley Parsonage is the fourth book in the Barchester Chronicles and the focus moves to Framley and its young vicar, Mark Robarts. Friend of the local landowner's son, the dashing Lord Lufton, Mark cannot resist the lure of celebrity beyond his own village. But he's to risk everything in his ambitious pursuits, including his devoted wife and children and his sister's happiness.

The Barchester Chronicles is Anthony Trollope's much-loved series of witty, gently satirical stories of provincial life set within the fictional cathedral town of Barchester and the surrounding county of Barsetshire. With a focus on the lives, loves and tribulations of the local clergy and rural gentry, the canvas is broad and colourful, with a wonderful set of iconic characters whose lives we become intimately involved in as they grow up, grow old and fall in or out of love and friendship across the years.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b04g1c7r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Agree to Differ (b04fzfxz)
Series 1

Jerusalem

Agree to Differ is Radio 4's new discussion programme where the aim is to give listeners a completely new way to understand a controversial issue and to decide where they stand. Presented by Matthew Taylor.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b04fyz5d)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, continues its 50th series.

In almost forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of celebrity guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the famous panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 4
Writer, actor, director and comedian - Chris Addison
Scientist, author and broadcaster - Professor Jim Al-Khalili
Actress, writer and comedian - Katy Brand
Political Biographer - John Campbell

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Producer ... Carl Cooper.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b04fyf2q)
Yeats

Roger McGough presents a special programme marking 75 years since the death of WB Yeats. With Yeats' biographer Professor Roy Foster, voices from the archive including Seamus Heaney, Sinead Cusack and Steven Rea, and of course some of Yeats' best loved poetry. Poems requested by listeners and featured on the programme include He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven, The Lake Isle of Innisfree and The Second Coming.



SUNDAY 07 SEPTEMBER 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b04g6mvp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Nadine Gordimer - A Flash of Fireflies (b03gtxv7)
City Lovers

Marking Nobel Laureate Nadine Gordimer's death in July, the second of three stories from her remarkable career as a writer and political activist.

In this story of forbidden love, set during apartheid in South Africa and first published in 1975, an Austrian geologist falls foul of the country's Immorality Act.

Read by Alice Krige
Abridged and produced by Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mvr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g6mvt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mvw)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b04g6mvy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b04g6z5c)
St Nicholas Church, Newbury

The Bells of St. Nicholas Church, Newbury.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b04g6lbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b04g6mw0)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04g6z5f)
Seeing Mary

Something Understood: Seeing Mary

John McCarthy explores the role of the Virgin Mary in binding together different faiths in shared ceremony and respect.

To mark Christian celebrations of the birth of the Virgin Mary on September the 8th John McCarthy looks at her personal significance to people of different faiths. This includes the Palestinian Ambassador to the UK Professor Manuel Hassassian who says for him, "Mary symbolises hope, spirituality and love".

Mary, who was a Jew and the mother of the Christian Son of God, is also one of the most revered women in the Muslim tradition. Known in Arabic as Maryam, a chapter of the Qur'an is named after her. Verses from the Quran relating to Mary are frequently inscribed on the mihrab, or niche within a wall of a mosque, denoting the direction of Mecca. But alongside this she is deeply human.

In Colm Tóibín's novel The Testament of Mary he examines the complexity of motherhood. Mary supposes herself to have intimacy with her son; she knows him better than he knows himself (she told him raising Lazarus was dangerous, he wouldn't listen). And yet, as she also acknowledges, he is destined to be at an impossible remove from her.

In 1968 the image of the Virgin Mary was seen above the dome of a Coptic Christian church in the Cairo suburb of Zeitun. The apparitions recurred for five months, for hours on end, and more than a million and a half people claim to have seen Mary during this time. In conversation with Danish scholar Andreas Bandak, John considers how precariousness and ambiguity is embedded in saint worship in the contemporary Middle East.

Producer: Emily Williams
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b04g6z5h)
Dai the Bank

Over the last quarter century, Colonel David Davies MBE has become something of a legend in west Wales. Known locally as 'Dai the Bank', he's the founder of the Future Farmers of Wales Club, which seeks to recruit the brightest young minds in agriculture, and a former senior manager of Agricultural Services at NatWest bank. As if that didn't take up enough time, he's also a Territorial Army Colonel.

Now 76-years-old and retired, Dai reflects on his contributions to Welsh agriculture by taking Anna Jones on a tour of some of the businesses he's supported in Pembrokeshire.

Produced and presented by Anna Jones.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b04g6mw2)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b04g6mw4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b04g6z5k)
Justin Welby; Medical Innovation Bill; Homeless Jesus

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is looking for a Prior to lead a new 'monastic community' in Lambeth Palace. He discusses the project with Edward Stourton and reflects on his vigil for Iraq held earlier this week.

The first British person to contract Ebola in West Africa has been discharged from hospital after he was given the experimental drug ZMapp. It comes as the Medical Innovation Bill is laid before Parliament. It's designed to allow drugs to be used for untested treatments. Charles Carroll asks if this bill could be beneficial for the seriously ill and Edward debates the moral and ethical dilemmas it presents.

The Australian government has extended a Royal Commission into institutional child sex abuse. Joanne McCarthy's reporting played a large part in the creation of the Commission. She talks about her role in uncovering the stories of abuse within the Australian Catholic church there.

Should the tomb of the Prophet Mohamed be moved? It's a controversial, yet unlikely proposal, that raises questions about the preservation of historic landmarks in Saudi Arabia and the commercial development taking place around holy sites.

The Church in Wales wants to make sure that ancient yews in churchyards are preserved for future generations. Sarah Swadling reports from under the branches of the 5000 year oldfDefynnog Yew in Powys, said to be the oldest tree in Europe.

Can SUNDAY find a home for Jesus? Canadian sculptor Tim Schmalz is looking for a place in London for his latest work. We launch a search for a suitable location.

Producers
David Cook
Zaffar Iqbal

Editor
Amanda Hancox

Contributors
Archbishop Justin Welby
Sir Professor Michael Rawlins
Iain Brassington
Joanne McCarthy
Dr Irfan Al-alawi
Tim Schmalz.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b04g6z5m)
SafeHands for Mothers

Baroness Helena Kennedy QC presents The Radio 4 Appeal for SafeHands for Mothers which produces health education films to try to reduce the number of women worldwide who die in pregnancy and childbirth. The charity uses innovative solar powered video technology to ensure their films reach the most remote regions, where communities particularly need their help.

Registered Charity No 1097928
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'SafeHands for Mothers'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b04g6mw6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b04g6mw8)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b04g6z5p)
The Harmony of the Trinity

A service recorded in the chapel of Worcester College, Oxford, exploring the doctrine of the Trinity, the ultimate mystery of the Godhead, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Led by the Chaplain, the Revd Dr Jonathan Arnold with Dr Susan Gillingham and the College Choir directed by Nicholas Freestone. Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b04g1dw8)
When fiction comes to the historian's rescue

Lisa Jardine explores how fiction can be more useful than fact in helping us understand the past.

She examines two works of fiction (a recent radio play "The Chemistry Between Them" and Michael Frayn's celebrated stage work, Copenhagen) to show how they often cast far more light on their respective subjects - and particularly the emotions and personal convictions involved - than that found in the history books.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvrcj)
Australian Magpie

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the Australian magpie. These large pibald birds with pickaxe bills reminded early settlers of the more familiar European magpie, but in fact they are not crows at all. Australian magpies have melodious voices which can range over four octaves in a chorus of squeaks, yodels and whistles. Pairs or larger groups of magpies take part in a behaviour known as carolling, a harmony of rich fluting calls which marks their territories and helps to cement relationships between the birds.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b04g6zg4)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b04g6zg6)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b04g6zg8)
James Bond

Great stunts, gorgeous girls, car chases, gadgets and exotic settings have helped maintain James Bond as the longest running series in film history.

Sir Roger Moore's Bond 1973 debut in Live and Let Die saw 007 reinvented for a more progressive era. Bond is less concerned with international Cold War super-villains and instead spears drug cartels infesting the streets of Harlem. 1977's The Spy Who Loved Me was nominated for three Academy Awards. And Moonraker delivered a Bond for the Star Wars generation.

With his matinee idol looks and martini dry wit Moore brought tremendous naughtiness to the part. Sue MacGregor reunites him with the team who helped make him the most popular Bond ever according to two polls from the last decade.

Fresh from writing his new memoir 'Last Man Standing', Sir Roger is in the studio with co-producer and screenwriter (and step-son of 007 mastermind Cubby Broccoli) Michael G Wilson. His half-sister and co-producer Barbara Broccoli who has fond memories from the Roger Moore era. She officially started in the publicity unit for The Spy Who Loved me and became assistant director on Octopussy.

John Glen - the most prolific director of the Bond franchise - impressed the team with his handling of action scenes including the scene when Bond shot off the edge of a cliff appearing again when his Union Jack parachute opened up. The world cheered!

Richard Kiel who played the terrifying Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me, recalls how making his character more "human" made him so popular with fans that he was brought back for a second appearance in Moonraker. And Britt Ekland says today's Bond girls are victim to the era of political correctness. "They are beautiful businesswomen instead of sex kittens like we were."

Producer: Karen Pirie
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b04g6mwb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b04fz0wz)
Series 70

Episode 4

Just how hard can it be to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation? Hosted by the legendary Nicholas Parsons with panellists Gyles Brandreth, Stephen Mangan, Tony Hawks and newbie Kerry Godliman.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b04g703w)
A Taste of Britain Revisited - Yorkshire

Dan Saladino revisits Yorkshire food traditions which were captured on film in 1974 by Derek Cooper, previous presenter of The Food Programme. From Yorkshire puddings to tripe, Dan discovers how the food from this region was formed by the Industrial Revolution, hard labour and fuel.

Dan re-watches the original 1970s A Taste of Britain tv programme with historian Peter Brears, writer Christopher Hirst, and those who remember the people and places in the original film.

Presented by Dan Saladino and produced in Bristol by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b04g6mwd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04g79ns)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Music of the Forest (b04f9r4m)
Horatio Clare tells the story of the complex and unconventional anthropologist Colin Turnbull.

Arguably the most influential field recordings of all time were made in 1954 by a British anthropologist called Colin Turnbull. These recordings of the finely wrought music of Mbuti pygmies, in the Ituri forest of what was then the Belgian Congo, inspired legions of ethnomusicologists and have gone on to be used as influence and source material for a raft of artists, including Madonna, John Coltrane, Brian Eno and Herbie Hancock to name a few. Alongside Bach, Mozart and Louis Armstrong, Turnbull's recordings of the Mbuti were sent into space as part of the Voyager Golden Record.

Colin Turnbull's fascination with the Mbuti pygmies made him one of the most famous intellectuals of the 1960s and '70s. He appeared on chat shows and collaborated with filmmakers and theatre directors. His bestselling book, The Forest People, showed how these hunter-gatherers, roaming the forest in search of honey, fruit, and game, lived lives of compassion for one another in an environment they adored. This idealistic vision, and Turnbull's corresponding unease with the excesses of western life, became the lens through which he would fashion his own existence - the rest of his life became a search to find those same values outside the forest.

Featuring Kwame Anthony Appiah; Steven Feld; Roy Richard Grinker and Terese Hart.

Producer: Martin Williams.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04g1bsk)
Whitstable

Peter Gibbs chairs the horticultural panel programme from Whitstable. Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Wilson answer the audience's questions.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:

Q. When is the best time to plant Daffodils?
A. Around now (from September onwards) to encourage a better root system.

Q. Can the panel recommend a variety of Pear tree that is resistant to pear rust?
A. Don't plant Conference Pears, plant Beth or Doyenne du Comice and a Beurre Hardy. Pear trees should not be grown through grass.

Q. How can I create a microclimate to protect my plants from the sea, the salt and the north-easterly winds?
A. You could plant a shelterbelt but it would be a shame to block the sea view. You could plant things that would do well by the sea instead such as the Sea Kale, Crambe Maritima, species of Orchid, Yellow Horn Poppy certain species of grass such as Pampas grass. You could try a sunken garden to protect your plants or a polytunnel.

Q. Why isn't my potted Hibiscus flowering?
A. Perhaps you didn't tease the roots out enough? Try adding some high potash and be patient.

Q. What plants would the panel recommend for making the most of the garden in the evening?
A. Hesperis Matronalis (Sweet Rocket), Night Scented Stocks and Zaluzianskya.

Q. Do the panel have any tips for growing Gladiolus Muriellae (Abyssinian Gladiolis) in the ground?
A. Don't bother trying them in the soil, they grow better and look better in pots.

Q. What is wrong with my Quince Tree? It has curly leaves, lots of flowers but no fruits.
A. There is a touch of mildew and damage from sea breeze. Quinces really like a lot of water. Ideally plant them by a pond in a warm spot. Give them a good thick mulch and keep them watered regularly. Fruit trees tend not to grow so well by the sea so if want to grow edibles try Sea Kale and Asparagus. Alternatively you could try hardy fruit trees such as Sea Buckthorn or a Eriobotrya Japonica (Loquat).

Q. My potted Olive tree is not doing so well, should I plant it in the ground?
A. Keep it in the pot. That way you could bring the plant undercover if it gets very cold. Prune it back a bit. Keep it in a greenhouse over winter (or wrap it in fleece) and repot it in the spring with fresh compost. Give it a bit of a root prune too. Put it in full sun and make sure it is well watered but well drained.

Q. What can the panel recommend planting on the back of clay dragon in a community garden that would be environmentally friendly and resilient?
A. You could turf it over or put Bergenias in or Kniphofia (Red Hot Poker). You could always put logs in the back for the children to run up and down.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b04g79nv)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with conversations from Walsall, Pontardawe and Fermanagh, between UKIP councillors, members of the Spinners, Weavers and Dyers Guild, and a man whose life was changed by literacy with the mentor who taught him, proving once again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b04g79nx)
Anthony Trollope's Framley Parsonage

A Word of Warning

by Anthony Trollope, dramatised by Nick Warburton

Mark Robarts, Vicar of Framley, worries that Lady Lufton may find out about the Bill he has put his name to, but she's more interested in plotting with Susan Grantly to marry their respective children. Which would scupper Mark's sister's potential happiness forever.

Music composed by David Robin, Jeff Meegan and Julian Gallant

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b04g79nz)
Allan Massie - A Question of Loyalties

With James Naughtie. Recorded at the BBC at the Edinburgh Festivals, Allan Massie discusses his novel A Question of Loyalties. First published in 1989, the book is widely acclaimed as his finest.

The novel engages with all the complexities and ambiguities of loyalty and nationality as it follows a family through the divisions in France during World War II, and the repercussions which last for decades.

In the early 1950s Etienne de Balafré strives to find out what happened to his father when the German invasion of 1940 divided the country between collaboration and resistance. Where some might see an accomplice, the author Allan Massie seeks to understand a human being making difficult choices.

As always on Bookclub, a group of especially invited readers join in the discussion.

October's Bookclub choice : Dirt Music by Tim Winton (2002)

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed Guest : Allan Massie
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b04g79p1)
Roger McGough presents a mixed bag as requested by listeners, including poems by Allan Ahlberg and DH Lawrence for teachers returning to work, Keats' classic Autumnal ode, and watery poetry by Thomas Hardy and Charles Tomlinson. There's also James Joyce and Thom Gunn, and Sean Street reading his paean to a jazz great, 'Hearing Buddy Bolden'.


SUN 17:00 Painful Medicine (b04fz6lb)
Addictions researcher, Dr Sally Marlow, investigates fears that easy access to powerful painkillers could be creating a large, but hidden problem of addiction.

Painkillers are widely available over-the-counter, and combinations containing codeine, which is addictive, can be purchased from pharmacists and on the internet.

Teenager, Alice, tells Sally about secretly buying huge numbers of painkillers on her way to school while she was wearing her school uniform. She used her lunch money to buy multiple packs from several stores, switching shops when she was questioned by pharmacists.

And Steve describes how his serious codeine addiction began after treating tooth pain with the drug. The side effects helped his anxiety and for years he was doctoring tablets in order to increase his codeine intake.

Some health professionals believe easy access is fuelling a potential health crisis and say those with serious dependency problems, are hidden below the healthcare radar.

Only a tiny percentage of people with an addiction to painkillers find their way to traditional substance misuse services, fuelling concerns that there is a large, but hidden group, who aren't getting help with their dependency.

David Grieve, who set up the charity, Over-count, 21 years ago after his own serious addiction to over-the-counter cough mixture, believes the number of people dependent on painkillers is growing, fuelled by easy availability on the internet.

Between 30-35% of visitors to his website say when they are refused purchases by pharmacists, they buy online instead.

Fabrizio Shiffano, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Hertfordshire and a member of the government's Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, demonstrates how easy it is to buy potent painkillers online and Dr Paolo DeLuca, a senior research fellow in addictive behaviour at King's College, London, tells Sally about a three year international study, the Codemisused Project, which aims to discover the scale of codeine use and misuse. Dr DeLuca is leading the British arm of the study and he hopes that research will fill the current gap in knowledge so that if action is needed to reduce the risk to individuals, it can be based on evidence.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b04g6lbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mwg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b04g6mwj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g6mwl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b04g79p3)
In Ernie Rea's box of delights this week, you can hear from the scientist who danced with an octopus hundreds of feet below the sea, and a cameraman who sings happy birthday to beluga whales. We hear of heroes ancient and modern, from Achilles and Lawrence of Arabia to Ellen McArthur. But do you have to be a bit bonkers to be a genuine hero? The comedian Omid Djalili gives an hilarious account of one of his first stand-up gigs; and there's a touching on-air reunion between a woman who has recently lost her sight and the blind woman whom she taught in Sunday School over 60 years ago.

Book of the Week – Hopeful: The Autobiography (Radio 4, 1st to 5th Sept)
Shared Planet – Belugas (Radio 4, 1st Sept)
The Life Sub-Aquatic (Radio 4, 3rd Sept)
Penguin Post Office (Radio 4, 1st to 5th Sept)
Agree to Differ – Jerusalem (Radio 4, 3rd Sept)
Lives in a Landscape – Branscombe Chalet Owners (Radio 4, 5th Sept)
Witness - The Port Arthur Massacre (Radio 4, 2nd Sept)
The Documentary – Delivering The King's Speech (World Service, 2nd Sept)
Digitising Stalin (Radio 4, 1st Sept)
Archive on 4 – No More Heroes? (Radio 4, 6th Sept)
Tupac Shakur, Hip-Hop Immortal (Radio 4, 4th Sept)
Wordaholics (Radio 4, 3rd Sept)
The Poet Librettists (Radio 4, 6th Sept)
BBC Proms Plus Intro – Respighi's Roman Triptych (Radio 3, 1st Sept)
In Touch (Radio 4, 2nd Sept)


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b04g79p5)
Mike's annoyed with Jazzer for not watching the milk van, which has been stolen. Hayley's worried about Roy, who's not himself. She tries to get information from preoccupied Mike, who gets worked up when he discovers the van has been abandoned and burnt out. Everything's piling up on him.

Josh enjoys independently inspecting the bees. He sympathises with Ruth, as her mother Heather recovers in hospital. Heather has clearly had her confidence knocked, but enjoyed her cheeky card from Josh and Ben. Because Heather can't manage in her own house now, she will have to sell it. Ruth explains to Josh that she could live in a warden controlled flat, to keep her independence. Ruth's keen to visit her more often.

It's Josh's birthday on Saturday. He'll be starting driving lessons.

Rob points out to Helen that she hasn't said anything since Jess's visit. Helen doesn't see any need for a paternity test. Rob asks Helen if she believes him. She says yes. Relieved, he brightly tries to carry on as normal.

But Helen can 't help feeling paranoid. Mike makes a remark about there being 'odd people about'. He's talking about the van thieves, but Helen thinks he knows something about Jess showing up. With village gossip, what if Pat and Tony know about Jess turning up pregnant?


SUN 19:15 Gossip from the Garden Pond (b04g7d6q)
The Tadpole and the Dragonfly

The Tadpole played by Julian Rhind Tutt and the Dragonfly played by Alison Steadman, reveal the truth about life in a garden pond, in the first of three very funny tales, written and introduced by Lynne Truss, with sound recordings by Chris Watson.

The jaunty Tadpole revels in his youth as he darts about the pond, generally avoiding his neighbours because most of them want to eat him! "When are you going to grow up?" asks the Dragonfly. This is far from easy as the tadpole is quick to point out, as he has to go through a whole traumatic body-changing metamorphosis. The only disadvantage, he reckons, of being young and immature of course, is that you have no hands, which makes things tricky when you want to wave at anyone or take a selfie, but it's a small price to pay for the freedom of youth reckons our happy-go-lucky fellow, until a strange dream signals a life-changing event. "One minute you're wiggling, wiggling. and the next you look absolutely daft waving your bottom around, coz there's nothing on the end of it"

The Dragonfly is lighter than air, quick, beautiful; all dazzling wings and observant eyes . She is also quite highly sexed and living life at a great rate knowing that she doesn't have much time. Having spent months and months living in the murk and mud of the garden pond as an ugly, aggressive nymph, her life was transformed when she felt impelled to climb up a stem and was transformed into an adult. She is dazzling; with her aerial acrobatics, fine wings and long slender limbs. But she knows she hasn't long to live and before she dies, she must feed and find a mate "I'm gorgeous, I'm ready ... and I'm hot, hot, hot".

Producer Sarah Blunt.


SUN 19:45 Jessie Kesson Short Stories (b04g7dxh)
Country Dweller's Year

The first in a series of readings from the work of the acclaimed Scottish author Jessie Kesson. Best known for her novels "Another Time, Another Place" and "The White Bird Passes", Jessie Kesson's writing was often inspired by events from her own life and by the landscape of North East Scotland.

Tonight, extracts from her "Country Dwelller's Year", first published in monthly instalments in the Scots Magazine during 1946. These finely honed observations of the natural world and the rhythms of the farming year were written when Jessie Kesson and her husband lived in Morayshire as cottar farm workers.

Glossary:
Cottar ..... farm labourer who occupies a cottage in return for their services
Howe ..... low-lying land
Orra loon ..... a lad employed to do miscellaneous unskilled work
Hairst ..... harvest

Jessie Kesson (1916 - 1994) was a prolific writer of novels, poems, stories, newspaper features and radio plays. She came through a hard start in life (born in the Inverness workhouse, raised in an Elgin slum, removed from her neglectful but much-loved mother to an orphanage in Aberdeenshire) with a passionate determination to be a writer. She combined a successful writing career with a variety of jobs, from cleaner to artist's model, and was a social worker for nearly twenty years, settling finally in London with her husband.

The full text of "Country Dweller's Year" is published by Kennedy & Boyd as "A Country Dweller's Years: Nature Writings By Jessie Kesson", edited and introduced by Professor Isobel Murray.

Reader ..... Claire Knight
Writer ..... Jessie Kesson
Abridger ..... Kirsteen Cameron
Producer ..... Kirsteen Cameron.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b04g1drf)
To ice or not to ice?

The ALS ice bucket challenge has become a viral phenomenon. People around the world have been dousing themselves in ice-cold water and in the process have raised over $100 million for charity. But a true nerd doesn't run with the herd, and Tim Harford is only going to do the challenge if the facts stack up. He investigates whether a viral challenge like this is good for charitable giving overall, and whether there are reasons to be more choosy about the charities we give to.

In the wake of the latest conflict in Gaza, many commentators have argued that there's a 'rising tide' of anti-Semitism in Europe. More or Less looks at the evidence to find out what we know about anti-Semitism, and whether they're right.

It's a 'fact' beloved of English teachers around the world: that Shakespeare, the greatest playwright in English, also had the greatest vocabulary. But research published earlier this year suggests English teachers might have to look elsewhere to establish the superiority of the Bard - apparently his vocabulary lags behind the best and most famous rappers of the last decades. Is this comparison fair, and if so, does it diminish the Bard's lustre?

And Jamie Oliver and Michelle Obama have both claimed that increasing levels of obesity mean that the current generation of young people are likely to live shorter lives than their parents. Tim delves into the statistics with Oxford University's Sir Richard Peto to find out if they're right.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b04g1drc)
Joan Rivers, Sir David Mitchell, Werner Franz, Candida Lycett Green, Sandy Wilson

Matthew Bannister on

The acerbic and controversial American comedian Joan Rivers. Ruby Wax pays tribute.

The Tory MP Sir David Mitchell, who also ran the El Vino's wine business. We hear from his son and fellow MP Andrew Mitchell.

Werner Franz, the last surviving crew member of the Hindenburg - the German Zeppelin which burst into flames, killing 35 of those on board.

The writer Candida Lycett Green, daughter of Sir John Betjeman, and, like him, a campaigner to conserve England's architectural heritage.

And Sandy Wilson, who wrote the hit musical The Boyfriend and jealously guarded its every performance.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b04g6kqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b04g6z5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b04g14v0)
Thanks for the Memory

The internet and and the rapid rise of social networking creates the possibility of remembering forever most of life's most significant (and insignificant) moments - maybe all of them.
Peter Day hears from people building businesses based on this new extension of the human mind, and asks whether total recall really is a good idea.

Producer: Mike Wendling.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04g7dxk)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04g7dxm)
Sarfraz Manzoor analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b04g13zx)
Nicole Kidman; Iain Sinclair on M; Moon buggies in Bletchley Park

With Francine Stock.

Nicole Kidman discusses the research she carried out for her latest thriller, Before I Go To Sleep, in which she plays a woman who wakes up every morning with no memories.

Novelist Iain Sinclair waxes darkly about Fritz Lang's masterpiece M, which introduced Peter Lorre to an unsuspecting public.

Going to a conventional cinema seems so last century, as films are now being shown in boats, forts, boxing rings and, for one weekend only, Bletchley Park. The Film Programme takes a whistle-stop tour of the more unusual venues where we can watch a movie this month.

Film critic Tim Robey and cinema programmer Clare Binns tell Francine which of the three hundred films playing at the Toronto Film Festival they are looking forward to.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04g6z5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 08 SEPTEMBER 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04g6mxp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 The Educators (b04fzd9h)
Daisy Christodoulou

It's a relatively new dilemma for teachers. If the answer to almost anything is available with a search, should children be taught to remember facts, or how to find and use them?

Teacher and writer Daisy Christodoulou tells Sarah Montague why she thinks a generation of school children are being let down by discovery learning, which places emphasis on students finding out for themselves.

It's the opposite of traditional 'chalk and talk'. But have classrooms already moved too far towards skills and group work, in the interest of pleasing inspectors?

Based on her own time in classrooms, Daisy Christodoulou believes young people have vast gaps in their knowledge and understanding, and that traditional fact-based lessons would serve them better.

Presenter: Sarah Montague
Producer: Joel Moors.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b04g6z5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mxr)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g6mxt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mxw)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04g6mxy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04g7lhb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Martyn Atkins.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04g7lhd)
Badger Cull

It's round two of the badger cull, part of the government's strategy to tackle TB in cattle. It's a controversial policy, but one farmer from within the cull zone says he has seen his own herd go free of the disease for the first time in ten years. He believes it is down to the cull: 92 badgers were removed from his land in last year's campaign.

The Badger Trust says last year's pilot cull has been discredited as ineffective and not humane. They believe the government should give vaccination and other measures more time to work, and abandon the cull of badgers altogether.

The Farming Minister says the cull is just one tool in their eradication strategy for TB, and that they have learned valuable lessons from last year's cull, to make this year more effective and humane.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04g6my0)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvsrk)
Red-winged Blackbird

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the North American red-winged blackbird. The arrival of spring in the USA is heralded by the unmistakable "conk-ra-lee" call of the red-winged blackbird. The male blackbirds, who are un-related to the European blackbird, flutter their red and yellow wing-patches like regimental badges to announce their territories. The numbers of Red-winged blackbirds has increased spectacularly in the mid 20th century as more land was converted to growing crops on which the birds feed. Today at a winter roost hundreds of thousands, even millions of birds darken the skies over the plantations or marshes in which they will spend the night - a loud and unforgettable spectacle.


MON 06:00 Today (b04g7lhg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 The Educators (b04fc707)
Tony Little

Eton College in Berkshire is one of the world's most famous schools. With so many of its old boys having distinguished careers, an Eton education carries the expectation of success.

The school's name has also become a cultural shorthand for influence, privilege and wealth.

Tony Little became headmaster in 2002. A former pupil of the school, he talks to Sarah Montague about how Eton gets results, and whether there's anything in the ethos and practice that could apply to all schools.

He believes a British education is uniquely rich and varied, with much of the value being outside the classroom, but fears it is being eroded by an age of measurement.

Nineteen British prime ministers have been educated at Eton, alongside notable writers, actors and scientists. Tony Little says it asks something of all the boys there. "If they've done it, why not you?"

Presenter: Sarah Montague
Producer: Joel Moors.


MON 09:30 The Ideas That Make Us (b03b2v70)
Series 1

Agony

The Ideas That Make Us is a Radio 4 series which reveals the history of the most influential ideas in the story of civilisation, ideas which continue to affect us all today.

In this 'archaeology of philosophy', the award-winning historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes begins each programme with the first, extant evidence of a single word-idea in Ancient Greek culture and travels both forwards and backwards in time, investigating how these ideas have been moulded by history and have impacted on history and the human experience. Here Bettany explores the idea of agony with cricket columnist Gideon Haigh, classicist Professor Paul Cartledge, philosopher Martin Warner and kate Mosse, best-selling author of 'Labyrinth' and 'The Taxidermist's Daughter'.

Other ideas examined in The Ideas that Make Us are idea, desire, fame, justice, wisdom, comedy, liberty, hospitality and peace.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b04g7lhj)
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

An Animal of No Significance

4 Extra Debut. Yuval Noah Harari's groundbreaking account of humankind's history - from apes to world dominance. Read by Adrian Scarborough.

Adrian Scarborough reads from Yuval Noah Harari's groundbreaking account of humankind's remarkable history from insignificant apes to rulers of the world.

100,000 years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one.

Far-reaching and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human, ending with a look at what lies ahead for humankind.

Abridged by Penny Leicester.
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04g7r94)
Rosie Boycott on reinvention; Whither the fringe?

Nadia Manzoor likes to take a light-hearted view of what it is to be young, Muslim, and female in the UK today - from her unique perspective as a British-Pakistani stand-up comedian. . Nadia Manzoor joins Jane Garvey to talk about her life as a young British-Pakistani woman, and how her life experiences proved rich material for her show.

Sir Tony Hawkhead from Action For Children on why siblings are so often separated when they go into care.

As life expectancy increases, jobs for life become a thing of the past and pensions fail to provide enough to live on. many more of us are re-inventing ourselves. So how easy is to take up a different career or juggle different projects? What qualities do you need? How useful is the internet? Rosie Boycott, currently the Mayor of London's Food Advisor and Sophia Stuart, currently a digital strategist, have both reinvented themselves. They join Jane in the studio.

Last week the first ever Community History Prize for Women's History was awarded by the Women's History Network. The prize celebrates history projects which are by, about or for women in a local or community setting. The winner is the Women in Industry - St Ives Archives which looked at the often forgotten industrial heritage of clothes and textile manufacture. Jane is joined by Professor Maggie Andrews and Maggie Davies of the St Ives Project.

Claudia Winkleman has decided to give her signature fringe the chop in order to present the new Strictly Come Dancing series. Celebrity hairdresser Denise McAdam and hair historian Caroline Cox talk to Jane about the highlights and lowbrows of the fringe.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Erin Riley.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04g7r97)
Craven: Series 5 - Family Man

Episode 1

Craven Series 6: Family Man

Created and Written by Amelia Bullmore
A Red Production Produced by Savvy Productions

Episode 1

The Crime Drama series Craven returns for a 6th series starring Maxine Peake as DCI Craven.

"Right. I have to tell this one. You won't want to hear it but don't shrink away. We'd all like to. I'd read about similar cases of course but I'd never worked on one. You'd have to be a pretty stupid police officer not to wonder if one will come your way. It came our way two days before Christmas. A man killed his children. We knew who, very early on. This isn't about that. It's about why."

Writer......................................................Amelia Bullmore
Executive Producer................................. Nicola Shindler
Director / Producer..................................Justine Potter
Sound Engineer ......................................Alisdair McGregor
Sound Designer.......................................Eloise Whitmore
Police Consultant ....................................Keith Dillon

A Red Production produced by Savvy Productions for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 The Mother of the Sea (b04g7rd5)
Every year in Uto, a remote town at the Southern tip of Japan, a festival is held to celebrate a woman known locally as the Mother of the Sea.

She's not a figure from folklore, or an ancient goddess, but a British scientist, who never even visited Japan.

She was Kathleen Drew, and her work studying the lifecycle of edible seaweed on the North Wales coastline in the 1940s revolutionised the Japanese production of nori – that dried edible seaweed you find wrapped around sushi in high-end restaurants and convenience stores around the world.

Her discovery, picked up by chance 6000 miles away from her lab in Manchester, enabled nori farmers in Japan to turn this nutrient rich food stuff from a gambler's harvest to a reliable large scale crop.

Now they gather each year on 14th April at the Drew Monument, inscribed with Kathleen's image, to give thanks to her with Shinto prayers, offerings and specially composed songs. Looking out over the nori fields of the Ariake sea they ask Kathleen, who died not long after publishing her ground breaking study, to watch over them and increase their yields.

Quentin Cooper has been fascinated by Kathleen's remarkable story since he heard about it by chance several years ago. He travels to Uto to celebrate the Drew Festival with the fishermen there and to hear why a scientist all but forgotten in her home country means so much to them.

Producer: Hannah Marshall

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in September 2014.


MON 11:30 The Pale Horse (b04g7rd7)
Episode 1

by Agatha Christie
dramatised by Joy Wikinson

New adaptation of this atmospheric murder mystery with an ingenious scam at its heart.

A dying woman confesses a terrible secret about a 'pale horse' to her priest, giving him a list of names as she does so, but the priest dies before we can find out any more. It's down to our hero, Mark Easterbrook, a young-fogey historian to get to the bottom of it. Part One.

Directed by Mary Peate.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b04g6my2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b04g825j)
8 September 1914 - Isabel Graham

As plans for the local regatta gather pace, life for the Grahams will never be the same again.

Written by: Sarah Daniels
Music: Matthew Strachan
Directed and produced by: Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b04g825l)
Who owns your car? Lost luggage, raw denim and Moocs

Shari Vahl finds out why a man was told to hand over a car he thought he owned because of a fraud committed by a previous owner - five years ago.

Have you ever arrived at your holiday destination only to find your luggage hasn't? There is far less luggage lost than in the past, but for those bags still unclaimed it's off to the auction house.

And would you buy a 'new' pair of jeans that has been 'broken in' by a stranger for six months?


MON 12:57 Weather (b04g6my4)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b04g825n)
National and international news with James Robbins.


MON 13:45 Wow! How Did They Do That? (b0383jgn)
Episode 1

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Adam Lowe is the man who can recreate any object in perfect detail. His company Factum Arte has reproduced great works of art, such as Veronese's The Marriage at Cana which was taken by Napoleon's troops from Venice and now hangs in the Louvre. Adam created an exact replica which is now displayed in the original setting in the Palladian refectory in Venice. The next challenge was even more ambitious - a life size reproduction of Tutankamun' tomb. Roger Law travels to Madrid to discover the secrets behind these extraordinary creations.

Steve Haines also creates great works of art - for other artists. He is the craftsman behind some of the great monumental pieces of sculpture to be found in the UK and beyond. All this is produced in a modest workshop underneath the railway arches in Deptford, south-east London.

Two contrasting styles and two contrasting characters with one thing in common. Creating objects in perfect detail.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b04g79p5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b04g825q)
Greed Is Good

A fast-paced and blackly funny parable about the difficulty of leading a virtuous life in a financial sector that's constantly inviting you to take what you can get.

Inspired by the recent public enquiry into Ireland's financial crash Greed Is Good is a blackly funny, entirely fictional sequel to the same writer's The Bail-Out, broadcast in 2011.

Greed is Good asks the question - if the Bankers had the chance to do it all over again would they do it any differently? And the answer comes back loud and clear - are you kidding?

In a packed Dublin courtroom, the soul of modern Ireland is laid bare as a fictional former banker goes on trial. Among those giving evidence against him are a one-time colleague and a disgraced government regulator, both complicit in the bank's collapse. As they take turns testifying, they begin to realise that with their shared expertise they could make an illegal fortune without getting caught. And they convince themselves that if they put their wealth to socially responsible use, greed could turn out to be good....... But of course they know that that is just the thin end of a wedge which has left every man woman and child in Ireland owing £30k over the next 25 years.

An inside out look at the greed culture which just might conclude that many of those involved in finance could be suffering from a psychological illness - there must surely be some explanation for such reprehensible and even treasonous behaviour.

Writer ..... Hugh Costello
Producer ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b04g825s)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 50th series.

In almost forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian McKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of celebrity guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the famous panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 5

Comedian and writer Dave Gorman
Novelist and journalist Philip Hensher
Presenter, critic and author Libby Purves
Writer, poet and former Children's Laureate Michael Rosen

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Producer ... Carl Cooper.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b04g703w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Casa Negra: The Real Casablanca (b04g83zy)
The past fifteen years have been a tumultuous time for Morocco, with the arrival of a new, more progressive king and reaction against terrorist bombings in 2003 helping to galvanise a burgeoning arts community - and nowhere has this been more the case than in the country's largest city of Casablanca. Film-makers and musicians there have been at the vanguard of those questioning repressive political and social structures, in part because it is the city where earlier experiments with a more capitalistic economic model have led to a particularly apparent division between rich and poor. Professor Andrew Hussey, who's been visiting the city for many years, hears from many of the key players in what's been labelled the Nayda movement - including the director of the ground breaking movie 'Casa Negra' and the rapper whose recent imprisonment for criticising the police suggests that the movement still has some distance to go before Moroccan artists can fully exploit the freedoms enjoyed by those in Europe and the USA who have offered them such inspiration.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b04g8400)
Religious History of Iraq

Today life for religious minorities in Northern Iraq is perilous as the militant Islamist group, Islamic State, continues to attack a range of diverse groups across the country in its pursuit of establishing a new Caliphate. But in this programme Ernie Rea and guests explore how up until the 20th century Iraq was known as a harmonious melting pot of religious and ethnic diversity. How true is that assessment? What has happened to change that? Is there any way for Iraq to step back from the brink? And could a Caliphate ever be part of the solution?

Joining Ernie Rea to discuss the current situation in Iraq from a religious perspective are Gerard Russell, former British and United Nations diplomat and author of "Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East"; Dr Erica Hunter, Senior Lecturer in Eastern Christianity in the Department of Religions at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London: and Dr Reza Pankhurst author of The Inevitable Caliphate.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.


MON 17:00 PM (b04g8402)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g6my6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b04g8404)
Series 70

Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons hosts his 900th edition of Just A Minute and Paul Merton, Holly Walsh, Sheila Hancock and Russell Kane try to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b04g851v)
Susan's in the dairy to help with a last minute order, but also desperate to share some gossip with Clarrie. They discuss 'very pregnant' Jess, who walked in to the shop. She and Clarrie speculate on when Jess and Rob broke up. Susan says Rob could be another Brian Aldridge. Helen almost overhears them.

Helen tells Tony about Jess, to emphasise that Jess is a troubled woman. Tony senses there's more going on. Helen hides her upset. It has nothing to do with Rob. Tony and Pat discuss it.
Pat and Tony's grandson Rich (now known as Johnny) shows up out of the blue at Bridge Farm. They're delighted to see him looking so grown up. He has used their birthday money gift to pay for his travel to come and say thanks. They wonder what he should call them. He's happy with 'gran and grandad'.

Johnny's only just off the coach, but is keen to help them guide the cattle into a crush. He tells Pat and Tony that he failed his GCSEs but is good with his hands. At least he got a B grade in Design Technology Johnny asks Pat and Tony to talk to his mum Sharon, who's enrolled him at 6th form college. He doesn't want to go.

They put Johnny up in John's bedroom. Pat says it's lovely to have him here.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b04g851x)
A Most Wanted Man, Eliasson and Turner at Tate, Breeders

Philip Seymour Hoffman's final film A Most Wanted Man, based on the novel by John le Carré, is reviewed by Mark Eccleston; Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson discusses his exhibition influenced by JMW Turner at Tate Britain with Kirsty Lang, and critic Charlotte Mullins reviews a major new exhibition Late Turner at the same gallery, and Tamzin Outhwaite and Ben Ockrent on their play Breeders.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04g7r97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b04g86bx)
Series 4

Enhancement

Pints and Philosophical Problems with Matthew Sweet. In this series, Matthew asks whether the sun will rise tomorrow, whether one person should be poisoned to save five others and whether a female tennis champion deserves the same prize money as her male counterpart. This week, should we take a pill that would make us less racist and less aggressive? In the snug with Matthew is philosopher Julian Savulescu.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b04g10zm)
A Song for Spanish Miners

In the Spanish mining town of Turon a male choir meets once a week for rehearsals. They often sing to the patron saint of miners Santa Bárbara Bendita. Since 1934 miners have been singing this beautiful song in memory of four miners killed in a mining accident in the Maria Luisa mine. Coal mining, once a major industry in Spain, has been in decline for years and in the next few years the EU's subsidies for non-profitable pits will stop altogether. For most miners the closure of pits signals the death of their communities. Natalio Cosoy travels to northern Spain to talk to the miners and their families. Will Santa Bárbara Bendita watch over them as they face an uncertain future? James Fletcher producing.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b04fz4vn)
Belugas

The St Lawrence River in south east Canada is a popular spot for many species of whale including a resident small population of the world's only entirely white whale, the beluga. Plans to build a new terminal in the St Lawrence to ship oil from northern Canada to the rest of the world have made some of the residents of one particular tourist town particularly concerned. The protesters claim the development will be right at the heart of the belugas critical habitat, which at worst could threaten the future survival of this small population. As the demand for oil increases are some wildlife casualties inevitable? And as attention turns further north into the icy waters of the Arctic are we adequately prepared to clean up in the event of a spill?


MON 21:30 The Educators (b04fc707)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b04g6my8)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b04g8d49)
Gordon Brown sets out a timetable for greater Scottish devolution.
Looking ahead to Pres Obama's speech on his strategy against Islamic State.
Could Zeebrugge suffer the same problems with migrants as Calais?
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04g8d4c)
The Children Act

An Ultimatum: a Rook for a Knight

Juliet Stevenson begins Ian McEwan's powerful and haunting new novel, The Children Act - a story about faith, love and the Law and about the welfare of children and the duty of those who care for them.

Fiona Maye is an esteemed High Court Judge presiding over cases in the Family Court and admired for her 'godly distance and devilish understanding'. But beneath her professional composure, her happy marriage of thirty years is suddenly in trouble and a recent case has caused her heartache. Now she faces a life or death decision.

For religious reasons, a beautiful seventeen-year-old boy is refusing life-saving treatment, and his devout parents support his wishes. Should the secular court overrule sincerely held faith? What really lies in the boy's best interests?

Ian McEwan is one of the UK's leading novelists, his many novels include Atonement, Enduring Love and On Chesil Beach.

The reader is Juliet Stevenson
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b04fz6kw)
Speaking, Listening and the English GCSE

Chris Ledgard presents a discussion on the teaching of speaking and listening in schools and the way it's now assessed in the English GCSE. Can students really be taught to be eloquent speakers, and if so, how?

Taking part are Christine Blower, General Secretary of the National Union of Teachers; writer and thinker Tom Chatfield, and Neil Mercer, Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04g8d4f)
Tension over the future of the United Kingdom and the uncertain situation in Iraq were the main issues when David Cameron briefed MPs on last week's NATO summit in Wales. Susan Hulme has the main points from the Prime Minister's Commons statement and the reactions of MPs to it.

Also on the programme:

* Parliament's public spending watchdog examines the performance of private sector firms that carry out contract work for the Government.
* How well are Ministers doing in stopping young British Moslems from becoming radical Jihadists?
And
* The latest in the long-running row over allegations that Northern Ireland's "On The Run" criminals were given letters that amounted to an amnesty.



TUESDAY 09 SEPTEMBER 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b04g6mz3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b04g7lhj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mz5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g6mz7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g6mz9)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b04g6mzc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04g8fk2)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Martyn Atkins.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b04g8fk4)
Badger cull

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvtbk)
Florida Scrub Jay

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the Florida scrub jay. Less than 6,000 Florida scrub jays exist in the wild, yet these are some of the most intelligent creatures in the world. Long term research has revealed an extraordinary intelligence. If other jays are around, a bird will only hide its food when the other bird is out of sight. It will even choose a quieter medium, and rather than pebbles for example, to further avoid revealing its hidden larder to sharp-eared competitors.


TUE 06:00 Today (b04g8fqf)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 What's the Point of...? (b04g8hr0)
Series 6

The Royal Warrant

Over 800 companies enjoy the right to display a royal crest and the words 'by appointment'. They range from a chimney-sweep to a maker of helicopters. The Royal Warrant has been a much-prized accolade to trade since the middle ages - but what's it for? Quentin Letts talks to the fixer of the royal microphones, the purveyor of the royal canapes and the supplier of the royal salmon-flies - not to mention the royal ratcatcher - and asks them why they're special.

Producer: Peter Everett.


TUE 09:30 Witness (b04g8hr2)
Remembering Chairman Mao

The Chinese leader Mao Zedong died on September 9th 1976. American Sidney Rittenberg first met him in the 1940s and he spent half a century living in communist China. Hear his memories of one of the world's great revolutionaries.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b04g8hr4)
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

The Cognitive Revolution

Adrian Scarborough continues reading from Yuval Noah Harari's ground-breaking account of humankind's remarkable history from insignificant apes to rulers of the world.

How gossip united us and mythology maintained law and order

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Gemma Jenkins


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04g8hr6)
Women and the referendum; Sophie Hannah writes Poirot; Generation Sensible

52% of the four million people eligible to vote in the Scottish referendum on September 18th are female. Previous research indicated that many of them were undecided or less in favour of independence than their male counterparts. However, a poll at the weekend suggested women's support for 'Yes Scotland' has risen from 33% to 47%. With ten days to go Jane speaks to campaigners from both sides to investigate the current state of affairs. Crime writer Sophie Hannah has brought Hercule Poirot back to life in a new novel, The Monogram Murders. She describes how it feels to be an Agatha Christie super-fan and step into the literary shoes of her heroine. Ruzwana Bashir, a successful, young businesswoman has been inspired by the revelations from Rotherham to talk publicly about the abuse she suffered as a child. She explains to Jane why it's so hard for British-Asian women to speak out about sexual abuse. Is the current crop of twenty-somethings cleaner living than previous generations? Official statistics show alcohol consumption amongst younger people falling for the first time since the 1950s. So what is behind the shift?

Presenter: Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04g8hr8)
Craven: Series 5 - Family Man

Episode 2

Craven Series 6 Episode 2

In Episode 2 of the Police drama Craven by Amelia Bullmore, It is Christmas eve, just a few hours since Briony Cook returned from a quick visit to her mother, to find her children dead in their beds and her husband gone.

Adam Cook the children's father, has been found barely alive, rescued from a suicide attempt in his car by the man who owned the garage. The team are working hard to discover not who did it, but why.

Writer......................................................Amelia Bullmore
Executive Producer................................. Nicola Shindler
Director / Producer...................................Justine Potter
Sound Engineer .......................................Alisdair McGregor
Sound Designer........................................Eloise Whitmore
Police Consultant .....................................Keith Dillon

A Red Production produced by Savvy Productions for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b04g8hrb)
Giant Otters in the Pantanal

The Pantanal is a huge wetland which lies predominantly within the borders of Brazil. It boasts a diverse array of wildlife including the giant otter, which at two meters long is the world's largest species of otter. Protected by its remote location and the difficulty and expense of developing wetlands, the Pantanal has remained largely intact. However Brazil has seen years of rapid economic development, and while growth may have slowed for now, it's only a matter of time before the opportunities the Pantanal holds will be worth the costs. In this episode Monty Don finds out what the future holds for the Pantanal.


TUE 11:30 The Lost Genius of Judee Sill (b04g8hrd)
"I coulda sworn I heard my spirit soarin'
Guess I'm always chasin' the sun
Hopin' we will soon be one
Until it turns around to me, then I try to run"

Ruth Barnes delves into the extraordinary story of the musician Judee Sill.

The first act signed to David Geffen's Asylum Records in the early 1970s, Judee Sill produced two astonishingly beautiful albums in her lifetime.

Seemingly emerging from the Laurel Canyon scene, her music wove a diverse tapestry of influences - from gospel piano to Bach, rhythm and blues to country, forty-part vocal harmonies blending into piano ballads...

So why did Judee Sill disappear from view? Ruth Barnes traces Judee's peculiar life story - hearing tales of armed robberies, reform school and addiction, alongside musical invention and heartstopping songs.

With contributions from family, friends, lovers and devotees of her music including JD Souther, XTC's Andy Partridge, Jim Pons, Tommy Peltier and 'Whispering' Bob Harris.

Producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in September 2014.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b04g6mzf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b04g8hrg)
9 September 1914 - Gabriel Graham

With the magistrate court in session and the local regatta, it's a busy day for Gabriel...

Written by: Sarah Daniels
Music: Matthew Strachan
Directed and produced by: Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b04g8hrj)
Call You and Yours: Why do people drop out of university?

Today on Call You and Yours we're asking why so many people drop out of university.
Record numbers of students won university places this year but a number won't stay the course. Some will leave with no degree and big debts for fees and living costs.
Recent research suggests that first impressions are everything - a shabby environment with no one on hand to help sours the experience for some people from day one.
Why do you think people quit university and what can you do to choose college and the course that you'll enjoy? Are universities doing too little to keep students happy or do students expect too much?Email us now to come on the programme youandyours@bbc.co.uk. Or call us after 11 - on 03700 100 444.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b04g6mzh)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04g8hrl)
National and international news with James Robbins.


TUE 13:45 Wow! How Did They Do That? (b038c0dk)
Episode 2

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

In a converted garage in rural Cambridgeshire, Wesley West has been busy creating real objects out of almost anything he can find. His garden is full of robots made of cartons and iron creatures of various shapes and sizes, and he has worked in advertising for many years making finely crafted objects for his clients. All Wesley's ingenious solutions are made by hand then filmed or photographed, and no computer is involved. Roger steps into an intriguing world where everything is, in its own way, real.

Tim Webber on the other hand does all his effects on the computer. He works at Framestore, a post-production house in London, and he is the magician behind the Harry Potter films. Roger joins him in Soho to find out how these visual effects are created, and what it is that British artists can offer the film industry.

Two contrasting creators, both of whom have plenty to offer in ingenuity and skill, either with or without the aid of a computer.

Producer Mark Rickards.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b04g851v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b02ykrdb)
The Sensitive

Terma

By Alastair Jessiman. The psychic detective returns in the first of two new cases (the second is tomorrow afternoon). A journalist goes missing after building up a dossier on a powerful crime family. Thomas is brought in by police to investigate his disappearance.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/director: Bruce Young.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b04g6k93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b04g8hrn)
When Mosquitoes Attack!

Jheni Osman investigates whether the threat of mosquito-borne disease is moving closer to home in the UK. She joins Public Health England's Medical Entomologist, Jolyon Medlock, hunting for signs of the invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito in the motorway service stations of Kent. The mosquito has been spreading across the world in waste tyres exported for recycling. Jheni spends an evening as the bait in a trapping study, designed to find out whether there is a risk of West Nile Virus being spread by mozzies already living in the UK. And, it seems the boom in water butts has provided mosquitoes with a perfect breeding ground in our back gardens.

Producer: Sarah Swadling.


TUE 16:00 Build and Be Damned (b04g8hrq)
The Victorians famously built wildly ambitious infrastructure projects, like roads, railways, sewers and tunnels. David Wighton asks whether we should copy their example.
The Victorians and their predecessors have been celebrated for their forward thinking, building assets which are continuing to benefit the British economy. Yet some of their grandest projects left investors broke or actually created headaches for later generations. So - which is more important: cost-benefit reports or sheer boldness of vision? David Wighton finds that the lessons from the past turn out to more complex than they first appear.
Producer: Sandra Kanthal.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b04g8jh3)
Series 34

Labi Siffre on Arthur Ransome

Singer-songwriter Labi Siffre discusses the life and work of Arthur Ransome.

Siffre says that the Swallows and Amazons books taught him responsibility for his own actions and also a morality that has influenced and shaped him throughout his life.

Series in which Matthew Parris invites his guests to nominate the person who they feel is a great life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2014.


TUE 17:00 PM (b04g8jh5)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g6mzk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Meet David Sedaris (b03npb2y)
Series 4

The Sea Section; Dog Days

One of the world's best storytellers is back on BBC Radio 4.

This week, dealing with family tragedy in 'The Sea Section' and some comic verse about our canine friends in 'Dog Days'.

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04g8jh7)
Freddie lays into Elizabeth for forgetting about Nigel in her affair with Roy. He says Lily's sick about it as well. Freddie feels awful seeing Hayley and not telling her what's going on.

Jazzer's managing with the new rental milk van. Maybe they should buy one, he thinks. Mike says maybe, but it won't be his concern, which makes Jazzer think.

Shadowing Tony, Johnny asks about moving cows. He's keen to help Tony weld an ark tomorrow - quite a skill, warns Tony. But Johnny just wants to watch and pick it up. Johnny admits he's not good at talking to his mum, Sharon. It was great of Pat to speak to her and arrange for him to stay for the weekend.

Johnny learns about turkeys. Eddie buys a batch around this time of year to fatten for Christmas and sell locally. Johnny asks about his dad (John) and how he got started with pigs.

Otto the bull causes a blockage at the gateway. He's never been awkward before, says Tony. Then Jazzer's scooter causes the cattle to panic. Johnny thinks on his feet and steers the bull away to safety. Despite his concern, Tony appreciates Johnny's quick thinking. Eddie says that boy's a born stockman.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04g8jh9)
Man Booker Prize Shortlist; James Ellroy; Joyce DiDonato; the Wallace Collection

Cathy Rentzenbrink from The Bookseller gives her verdict on the Man Booker Prize shortlist; James Ellroy, perhaps best known for his LA Quartet books, which include LA Confidential and The Black Dahlia, is set to publish his largest book to date. ‘Perfidia’ revolves around the brutal murder of a Japanese family on December 6th, 1941; a day before the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor and it sheds light on the violence that was happening in the city of Los Angeles on the cusp of America's entrance into WW2. Joyce DiDonato reveals what's on her latest CD of Bel Canto opera arias; and we get a sneak preview of the Great Gallery at the Wallace Collection which opens its doors again after two years, during which time it has been redesigned and the paintings rehung.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04g8hr8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 High St Fashion: Weaving New Threads (b04g8jhc)
The collapse of the Rana Plaza clothing factory in Bangladesh was the deadliest disaster in the history of the garment industry. It brought about a series of recriminations, alliances, promises and calls for change.

With Bangladesh's clothing industry, predicted to quadruple in size over the next twenty years, a New York based private equity firm has come up with an idea to make Bangladesh's factories sustainable and efficient - as well as profitable. With backing from the Soros family, Tau Investment Management's plan is a bold one. They aim to provide a capitalist solutions to capitalism's failures.

The Guardian's Sarah Butler travels to Dhaka to meet Tau's owners and asks whether the Bangladesh factory owners need their help.

Producer: Barney Rowntree
A Tonic production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b04g8jhf)
Registration statistics; Making a plan; Feedback on audio description

Tony Rucinski CEO of the Macular Society and Dr Catey Bunce of Moorfields Eye Hospital, interpret statistics from a new National Health Care Information Service report, indicating a reduction in blind or partially-sighted registration amongst older people.
Matthew Johnson presents his column on Making a Plan.
Listeners feedback to last week's item on audio-description.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Cheryl Gabriel.


TUE 21:00 Urine Trouble: What's in Our Water (b04g8kc9)
You have a headache and take a pill. The headache is gone, but what about the pill?

What we flush away makes its way through sewers, treatment works, rivers and streams and finally back to your tap. Along the way most of the drugs we take are removed but the tiny amounts that remain are having effects. Feminised fish in our rivers, starlings feeding on Prozac-rich worms, and bacteria developing antibiotic resistance; scientists are just beginning to understand how the drugs we take are leaving their mark on the environment.

The compounds we excrete are also telling tales on us. Professor of Chemistry, Andrea Sella, gets up close and personal with music festival toilets to find out what the revellers are swallowing, and hears from scientists who are sampling our rivers to learn about our health.

Producer: Lorna Stewart.


TUE 21:30 What's the Point of...? (b04g8hr0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b04gbx1k)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04g8kcc)
Pro-union party leaders prepare to visit Scotland.
Is China trying to take control of the South China sea?
The app which tries to diagnose Parkinson's disease.
With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04g8kcf)
The Children Act

Other People's Problems

Juliet Stevenson continues Ian McEwan's powerful and haunting new novel, The Children Act - a story about faith, love and the Law and about the welfare of children and the duty of those who care for them.
Fiona Maye is an esteemed High Court Judge presiding over cases in the Family Court and admired for her 'godly distance and devilish understanding'. But beneath her professional composure, her happy marriage of thirty years is suddenly in trouble and a recent case has caused her heartache. Now she faces a life or death decision.
For religious reasons, a beautiful seventeen-year-old boy is refusing life-saving treatment, and his devout parents support his wishes. Should the secular court overrule sincerely held faith? What really lies in the boy's best interests?
Ian McEwan is one of the UK's leading novelists, his many novels include Atonement, Enduring Love and On Chesil Beach.
The reader is Juliet Stevenson
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


TUE 23:00 The Guns of Adam Riches (b01qnrn0)
Series 1

The Ballad of Big Rich

Brand new character comedy from 2011 Edinburgh Award winner, Adam Riches. With fast-paced, offbeat sketches, songs (there are no songs) and a generous dollop of audience interaction. Also starring Cariad Lloyd and Jim Johnson.

This week, Adam Riches takes the listener back to the Wild West to tell the story of Big Rich, a sass-talkin', gun-totin' cowboy who just so happened to have sat on the front row.

Written by Adam Riches
Produced by Simon Mayhew-Archer and Rupert Majendie.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04g8kck)
The South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Shaun Wright, who is resisting calls for him to step down over the Rotherham child sex abuse scandal, appears before the Home Affairs Committee. And the deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg says that a "No" vote would be likely to change the face of the UK. Sean Curran reports.



WEDNESDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b04g6n0h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b04g8hr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g6n0k)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g6n0m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g6n0p)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b04g6n0r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04g8lnb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Martyn Atkins.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b04g8lnd)
Badger vaccination, Cull marksman, Tilling machinery

As the latest badger cull gets under way in Gloucestershire and Somerset, vaccinating badgers is being explored by the Wildlife Trusts in some 'edge areas'. It's the method already being trialled in Wales.

Last week the government relaunched a scheme that offers financial support to vaccination projects in 'edge areas', those places most at risk of tb spreading from the South West and the West Midlands; it includes some, but not all, of Cheshire where a survey of road kill badgers has found that one in four were carrying the disease. Caz Graham visited farmer Bill Mellor just outside Stockport. His farm won't automatically qualify for DEFRA help for vaccination as he falls outside the edge area, but he's still considering the pros and cons of a vaccination programme. They were joined by Tom Marshall from the Cheshire Wildlife Trust.

As the harvest finishes and planting next years crops begins, farmers minds are turning to tillage. Anna Hill gets in to some heavy machinery to see how new technology is helping farmers.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Ruth Sanderson.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvyfs)
White-Bearded Manakin

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the White-Bearded manakin of tropical South America. The sound of party-poppers exploding in a forest clearing tells you that white-bearded manakins are displaying at a lek. At a carefully chosen spot each male clears the forest floor of leaves and other debris before his performance begins. The commonest display is the snap-jump. As he jumps forward he strikes the back of his wings together creating a loud snapping sound followed by an excited "pee-you" call. Snap-jumps are often followed by grunt jumps or a manoeuvre known as "slide-down-the-pole". These displays continue throughout the day, but intensify when females visit.


WED 06:00 Today (b04g8lng)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Great Lives (b04g8m0t)
Series 34

Stella Rimington on Dorothy L Sayers

Dame Stella Rimington, former director of MI5 and a celebrated crime writer herself, nominates for a Great Life that of Dorothy L Sayers.

Sayers' first Lord Peter Wimsey novel was published in the 1920s, the Golden Age of crime fiction, and he is still very much with us, appearing often on BBC Radio 4 Extra.

She went on to enjoy a huge popularity with her crime novels and then turned to writing Christian essays and plays, most notably the series for the BBC on the life of Christ – which stirred up a great controversy as no-one had before impersonated Jesus on the radio.

Dame Stella tells Matthew Parris why the paradoxes and contradictions in Dorothy Sayers' life fascinate her, and explains how Sayers' writing influences her own. With Seona Ford, chairman of the Dorothy L Sayers Society.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


WED 09:30 Publishing Lives (b03bs78d)
Series 1

George Weidenfeld

Writer and former publisher, Robert McCrum meets George Weidenfeld to talk about his extraordinary publishing life.

Weidenfeld left his native Austria at the time of the Anschluss in 1938, the last survivor of a remarkable band of European émigrés - including André Deutsch, Paul Hamlyn and Ernest Hecht - who transformed the clubby world of British publishing after the Second World War.

Gambler, opportunist, intellectual, socialite, and still working at 94, Weidenfeld is a living witness to the changes that have taken place in British publishing over the last century.

In 1955, the exiled Russian author Vladimir Nabokov's novel 'Lolita' was published in Paris. Graham Greene had recognised it as a masterpiece, but in England the story of an obsessive sexual relationship between a 12-year-old girl and a middle-aged man was too hot to handle.

Only Weidenfeld, an outsider standing apart from the Fifties cultural consensus, dared to take the gamble and defy the censor. 'Lolita' became Weidenfeld's first bestseller - 200,000 copies in hardback alone. It was a milestone for his publishing house and for English literature.

Featuring George Weidenfeld and Lady Antonia Fraser.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b04g8q51)
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

The Agricultural Revolution

Adrian Scarborough continues reading from Yuval Noah Harari's ground-breaking account of humankind's remarkable history from insignificant apes to rulers of the world.

How the agricultural revolution was history's biggest fraud.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Gemma Jenkins


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04g8q53)
Clare Balding; Embarrassing parents; Nana Mouskouri

Clare Balding was the runaway star of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Now hailed a national treasure (and OBE recipient), Clare talks to Jenni Murray about being openly gay, her rather eccentric family and live reporting. She also discusses the benefits of walking, which she writes about in her new book, Walking Home - My Family and Other Rambles. Hola! Magazine was founded in Barcelona by a young married couple Antonio and Mercedes Sanchez Junco. They pasted the first edition together in the spare room of their Barcelona flat and the edition sold out. 70 years later, the company, still family owned and run, publishes 30 editions of the bestselling magazine around the world, including Hello! In the UK which was first published in 1988. Jenni talks to Mamen Sánchez Perez, granddaughter of the founders. Judy Murray has spoken about her son Andy's embarrassment over her appearance on Strictly Come Dancing. But isn't being embarrassed by your parents a rite of passage every child has to go through? Self-confessed embarrassing mother & comedian Maxine Jones actor & comedian and child of embarrassing parents Tiff Stevenson. And Jenni talks to international music star Nana Mouskouri about her 50 year career in which she has recorded over 1500 songs and sold more than 350 million records.

Presenter: Jenni Murray.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b04g8q55)
Craven: Series 5 - Family Man

Episode 3

Craven Series 6 - Episode 3

It's Christmas Day. A skeleton staff of Craven, Watende and Bird continue the Police investigations into the murder of Adam and Briony Cooks' 3 children.

Craven has little appetite for a Christmas Dinner after a morning in the mortuary while Bird leaves his Turkey on low and his wife with carers to come in to work.

Briony Cook begins to open up to Watende about her husband as she tries to understand how her husband Adam could commit such a crime.

Writer ......................................................Amelia Bullmore
Executive Producer...................................Nicola Shindler
Director / Producer.................................... Justine Potter
Sound Engineer ......................................Alisdair McGregor
Sound Designer........................................Eloise Whitmore
Police Consultant ............................................Keith Dillon

A Red Production Produced by Savvy Productions for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b04g8q57)
Elsie and Netta - Home Is Where the Heart Is

Fi Glover introduces two Jamaican-born women who both settled in Cardiff after the war and now reflect on their lives here and what they miss from Jamaica.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 AL Kennedy: Holding Hands (b04754xq)
There is something uniquely intimate and comforting about holding someone's hand. Perhaps because it's something that begins in childhood - our small hand enveloped in that of other, stronger, larger hands.

We associate it with comfort, concern, care. And then, for a while, we abandon it - not holding your parents' hands is a sign that you have grown up - only to have the joy of rediscovering new shades of meaning in the gesture.

As adults, we may hold hands with our own children. Hand holding may be a part of courtship - it's not as flashy as a kiss, but can be a clear signal to ourselves and others that we are together - it can be a subtle brush or glancing touch, it can be a complex form of foreplay.

We may also have our hands held at times of stress and crisis - sometimes by people we don't even know. And we may hold the hands of the sick and even the dying as they leave us, or after they have gone.

We separate the joyful hand holding from the horrible - hand holding can induce emotions and by contrast, unruly emotions can be the reason to reach for a hand.

Novelist AL Kennedy talks to scientists Professors Roger Lemon and Steve Jones, Rabbi Julia Neuberger, GP Adnan Siddiqui, triple amputee Giles Duly and poet-undertaker Thomas Lynch. She visits Monkey World to find out about hand holding among non-human primates, and we hear from her mum amidst the voices of people remembering holding hands.

Producer: Kate Bland

A Cast Iron production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2014.


WED 11:30 Wordaholics (b04g8q5c)
Series 3

Episode 2

Comedians Josh Widdecombe and Helen Keen, Dictionary Corner's Susie Dent and classics scholar Natalie Haynes vie for wordy supremacy under the watchful eye of chair Gyles Brandreth.

Lexicographer Susie Dent admits to the words she finds most difficult to spell; science lover Helen Keen grumpily dismantles the portmanteau word 'murse'; Natalie Haynes works out what 'kyacting' is, and does some to boot; while Josh Widdecombe tries to ban the word 'chilllax'.

The panel also guess what some foreign words which have no direct equivalent in English.

Writers: Jon Hunter and James Kettle.

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2014.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b04g6n0t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b04g8q5f)
10 September 1914 - Adam Wilson

Adam and Jessie make an alarming discovery in the church yard at St Jude's...

Written by: Sarah Daniels
Music: Matthew Strachan
Directed and produced by: Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b04g8qf8)
Smart meters, More delays for Green Deal

After the cold August and the hot September we'll discuss what that means for shops and how it can dent profits. More about delayed payments from the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund. And one of Britain's top shoe designers on why flats are dominating the catwalks this year.


WED 12:57 Weather (b04g6n0w)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b04g8qfb)
National and international news with James Robbins.


WED 13:45 Wow! How Did They Do That? (b038xmcc)
Episode 3

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Chris Wise is one of the most outstanding engineers of his generation. Responsible for the Stockton-on-Tees Infinity Bridge and the revamp of the Barcelona bullring, these were complicated projects resolved by Wise in a cool and stylish way. His best known work is the Velodrome for the London Olympics, a place where Roger's second guest also made his mark. Piers Shepperd is the man who made sure the opening ceremony went with a bang. As chimneys reached for the sky whilst the world held its breath, Shepperd was behind the scenes making sure the technology performed with his stopwatch.

Roger Law meets these two hugely talented backroom boys to find out how it was all done.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04g8jh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01djrpk)
Ben Musgrave - The British Club

Sub-Inspector Mondol is a Bangladeshi detective with a few problems: a body in a pool, a tight, ex-pat British community and a Superintendent who doesn't want to rock the boat. All too swiftly, Mondol finds himself in the murky world of unregulated property development, heroin addiction and bribery. What choices will he make? A compelling detective story by award winning writer Ben Musgrave.

Pianist.....Dave Morecroft
Cultural Consultant.....Sabir Mustafa
Language Advisor.....Manoshi Barua

Produced and directed by Sarah Bradshaw

Notes

Ben Musgrave grew up in Bangladesh, India and Britain. An experienced theatre writer, Ben won first prize in the 2007 inaugural Bruntwood playwriting competition at the Manchester Royal Exchange. Ben's most recent stage play 'His Teeth' was described by The Manchester Guardian as 'entirely gripping'. This is Ben's first play for radio and he emerged through the BBC Writers Room "Sparks" scheme.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b04g8qfd)
Borrowing and Debt

Need some extra cash? If you're thinking of using a credit card or personal loan what's the cheapest way to borrow? What are the dangers you need to avoid and who can help if you're struggling to repay? Let the Money Box Live team talk you through the options. Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk.

Consumers borrowed £1.1 billion on credit cards and unsecured loans in July, up from £655 million in June according to the Bank of England.

While some use their credit cards for large or one-of purchases, debt advice charities are frequently called by people who rely on credit cards to help with daily living costs.

When a change in circumstances or loss of income damages your budget, what's the smartest way to manage and how do you keep control?

Who can help you negotiate with lenders when borrowing becomes unaffordable or you can't repay?

Why not ask our team about their views and experience. Ruth Alexander will be joined by:

Terry Donohoe, StepChange Debt Charity.
Liz McVey, StepChange, Scotland.
Rachel Springall, Moneyfacts.
Alex Neill, Which?

Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 Urine Trouble: What's in Our Water (b04g8kc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 The Educators (b04g8qfg)
Paul Howard-Jones

Most parents will have witnessed the magnetic effect of computer games on children. The combination of skill, memory and risk, leading to an eventual prize, can engage people of any age for hours at a time.

Paul Howard-Jones is a psychologist specialising in education and neuroscience. He tells Sarah Montague why a better understanding of what makes games so compelling, could lead to more effective teaching.

Research suggests that combining a reward with an element of risk-taking can increase the brain's appetite for learning and success.

In classrooms this could mean pupils collecting a running score, as they would in a game, then risking some of their points on a chance outcome, such as a roulette wheel spin.

Paul also discusses research into sleep, memory, and transcranial electrical stimulation - putting a low voltage across the scalp - and the impact these things have on our ability to learn.

Presenter: Sarah Montague
Producer: Joel Moors.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b04g8qvp)
Murdoch on Page 3; Protecting journalists' sources; AP uses robots

It's been revealed how police investigating 'Plebgate' obtained the telephone records of Tom Newton Dunn, the Political Editor of the Sun, without his consent. The law generally requires the police to go to a judge to argue for the disclosure of journalistic sources. However, it transpires the Met police used the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) to obtain data which revealed his source. Matthew Ryder, QC, explains the law and how it's being used, and Stig Abell, Managing Editor of the Sun on his concerns for what this could mean for journalism.

The media mogul Rupert Murdoch has tweeted that Page 3 is, 'old fashioned'. This week, the Sun has gone for four days without publishing a topless Page 3 girl. So, does this signal the end of Page 3 at the paper? Steve hears from Stephanie Davies-Arai from the No More Page 3 campaign on why she hopes the message from the man at the top might signal change.

One of the world's largest news organisations, Associated Press, is using technology to generate thousands of financial reports without the need of reporters. AP argues it will free journalists to spend more time on reporting. Steve speaks to Lou Ferrara, Managing Editor of AP, about 'robotic journalism' overtaking the human touch.

Radioplayer, the online listening platform run by the BBC and commercial radio has unveiled a prototype hybrid car adaptor which scans DAB, FM and internet sources to get the best signal.
Twenty-seven million vehicles still don't have DAB radio. Michael Hill, Managing Director of the Radioplayer explains why he thinks this technology will transform the move towards digital.


WED 17:00 PM (b04g8qvr)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news, with Eddie Mair.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g6n10)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Tom Wrigglesworth: Utterly at Odds with the Universe (b04g8rhd)
Adapted from his sell-out Edinburgh show Tom Wrigglesworth takes an emotional journey exploring his profound relationship with his granddad, and comes to fully understand the influence he has had on his life.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b04g8rhg)
Elizabeth finds Roy for a talk. They agree things can't go on the way they are. Roy agrees. He'll bite the bullet and leave Hayley. But that's not what Elizabeth meant. This relationship doesn't have a future. Elizabeth admits that she has felt a new lease of life. Roy has been so important to her. But she won't let Roy do anything to attempt to turn it into more - and break up his family. Elizabeth also hates how her own children are so upset, horribly involved in their lie.

Elizabeth suggests that Roy starts looking for another job. Geraldine can take on more duties. Elizabeth wants a mutual agreement that he'll leave, but angry Roy says she'll have to sack him.
Johnny's keen to help with milking. Eddie tells Ed not to worry about Mike. Jazzer's probably blown things out of proportion. But Mike finally tells Ed he and Vicky are leaving Ambridge. Ed worries for his own future.

Hayley spots Roy browsing online for jobs. She's not stupid and asks what's happened. Roy says Elizabeth is letting him go. Hayley's stunned - why?! Hayley senses there's something going on, but doesn't say, simply asking Roy to explain what has gone wrong. Roy says it's just time he moved on.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b04g8rhj)
Rufus Wainwright, The Leftovers, Anthony Caro, Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra

With Samira Ahmed

Singer-songwriter and composer Rufus Wainwright on his Late Night Prom; a review of The Leftovers the latest series to come from the creator of Lost; we take a look at the late Sir Anthony Caro's final sculptures; and the story behind the Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra, the first from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Produced by Ella-mai Robey.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04g8q55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b04g8rhl)
Can Civility Survive?

CAN CIVILITY SURVIVE?

We live in a world that is being globalised by ever-accelerating trade and technology.

And we live in a world that is being tribalised by resurgent group identities.

In such a world, can the complex, delicate codes of civility - the hidden wiring of civilisation - survive?

Future Proofing challenges three people from very different disciplines to find out.

Mathematician Hannah Fry talks to a woman whose mother's railway suicide provoked a storm of online abuse.

And she gathers all tweets sent in the UK in the week before the programme, to test out where and when we Brits are at our most uncivil.

Literary scholar Ian Sansom travels to meet a couple of London police officers who have retired to Cumbria to run a fish and chip shop. Is the countryside really more civil than the city? And what does Geoff Mulgan, one of our leading scholars of the future, make of Ian's findings?

Meanwhile, journalist Saira Shah revisits the terrifying story of her brother's wrongful imprisonment in a Pakistani torture prison - and how her understanding of the codes of civility helped her get him out.

And so, finally, Hannah, Saira and Ian meet to compare notes and try to fathom whether civility has a future - and if so, how it will have to adapt to survive in the 21st century.

Producers: Laurence Grissell and Phil Tinline.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b04g8rhn)
Series 4

Creative Women

Anna Beer asks why we don't hear more music composed by women.

She argues that many creative women still live, as they have for centuries, in the shadow of the courtesan. Using the stories of female composers from Medici-era Florence to twentieth-century Britain, she shows how excellent music composed by women has been ignored or overlooked, and explains why.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b04g8hrn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Great Lives (b04g8m0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b04g6n12)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b04g8rw8)
A special programme recorded at Glasgow university to discuss the Scottish referendum with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04g8rwb)
The Children Act

A Matter of Extreme Urgency

Juliet Stevenson continues Ian McEwan's powerful and haunting new novel, The Children Act - a story about faith, love and the Law and about the welfare of children and the duty of those who care for them.

Fiona Maye is an esteemed High Court Judge presiding over cases in the Family Court and admired for her 'godly distance and devilish understanding'. But beneath her professional composure, her happy marriage of thirty years is suddenly in trouble and a recent case has caused her heartache. Now she faces a life or death decision.

For religious reasons, a beautiful seventeen-year-old boy is refusing life-saving treatment, and his devout parents support his wishes. Should the secular court overrule sincerely held faith? What really lies in the boy's best interests? Tonight the lawyers state their case while the clock ticks.

Ian McEwan is one of the UK's leading novelists, his many novels include Atonement, Enduring Love and On Chesil Beach.

The reader is Juliet Stevenson
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


WED 23:00 Jigsaw (b04g8rwd)
Series 2

Episode 3

The rapid-fire and surreal sketch show series.

Starring award-winning stand-up comedians Dan Antopolski, Tom Craine and Nat Luurtsema

Producer: Colin Anderson.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2014.


WED 23:15 Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard (b01jrknw)
Series 3

The End of the World Is Nigh

Step into the magically mundane world that is the life of 21st Century Wizard Mordrin McDonald. An isolated 2000 year-old Scottish sorcerer with enough power in his small finger to destroy a town, yet insufficient clout to get a speed bump installed outside his cave by the local council. Even for such a skilful sorcerer, modern life is rubbish!

In this episode, Mordrin (David Kay) is enlisted by fellow wizard Bernard The Blue (Jack Docherty) to help tackle a fiery meteor which is heading straight to earth and is threatening to wipe out all civilisation. However, Mordrin's attention is swayed from the task in hand by news that Heather has a new boyfriend in the shape of slimy patter merchant Aiden. (Donald Pirie). Will Mordrin be able to be distracted long enough from aiming pot shots at Aiden to save the world from certain doom?

Mordrin is deadpan, dry and makes delicious jams. He initially set up his jam-making business Fruity Potions as a plc for income tax relief, but has found it a useful vehicle to help him bolster his skill set and his range of products and services. (Even a wizard has to diversify these days.) He's been running Fruity Potions from his cave for the past few years, in between completing the odd quest as instructed by the Wizard Council. In the past, his services were to help kings in battles of good and evil, or as he prefers to put it 'assisting with neighbour disputes'. Now it can range from killing the odd Jakonty Dragon to an array of end of the world-type scenarios.

Written by David Kay & Gavin Smith.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04g8rwg)
Susan Hulme hears impassioned appeals for a 'no' vote in the Scottish independence referendum. There are bitter exchanges over the child sex abuse scandal in Rotherham. And Boris Johnson reveals his plans to clear the air.



THURSDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04g6n28)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b04g8q51)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g6n2b)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g6n2d)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g6n2g)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04g6n2j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04g8w63)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Dr Martyn Atkins.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b04gc0pb)
Bovine TB Cattle Vaccine, New EU Agriculture Commissioner, Poaching

Ireland's former environment minister Phil Hogan has been tipped as the next EU Agriculture Commissioner. He will take over from the Romanian Dacian Ciolo in November, if his appointment is approved by the European Parliament. Charlotte Smith discusses Hogan's background and what the change in leadership will mean for British farmers with Rose O'Donovan, editor of the Brussels-based publication Agrafacts.

As part of our week-long look at "all the tools in the box" in the fight against Bovine TB, we examine the development of a cattle vaccine. Clare Salisbury has a special report from Ethiopia where small-scale field studies are being carried out to test the efficacy of the BCG vaccine in cattle. It is not licensed for use in the UK because of EU legislation. Charlotte asks farming minister George Eustice how much longer British farmers have to wait.

Landowners will come together at today's National Anti-Poaching Conference in Uttoxeter to look for better ways of tackling poaching. The romantic image of taking the odd pheasant or rabbit 'for the pot' conceals a much darker reality, according to the British Association for Shooting and Conservation.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvvnn)
Dupont's Lark

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the Dupont's lark of southern Europe and North Africa. The European home for the Duponts lark is the arid grasslands of south-east Spain where Spaghetti Westerns were once filmed. The Dupont's lark is notoriously difficult to find as it skulks between tussocks of dry but at dawn and again at sunset, male Dupont's larks emerge from their hiding places and perform display flights over their grassy territories. As they rise into the sky their song is a melancholy refrain, which once heard is rarely forgotten.


THU 06:00 Today (b04gc0pd)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 Andy Warhol: Time Regained (b04gc0pg)
Lenny Henry travels to Pittsburgh, USA, home town of bad-boy Pop Artist Andy Warhol, to get to the bottom of a mystery, inside a box...

At the city's lavish Warhol Museum, Lenny meets the men and women sifting through the contents of 610 so-called Time Capsules, an artwork - as Warhol considered it - consisting of 300,000 strange and eclectic objects that the artist assembled across the last 13 years of his life, up to his death in 1987.

And Lenny joins an audience of devoted Andy Warhol fans and art-historians as the Museum's conservation team unwrap - for the first time ever - the contents of the penultimate unopened Capsule, a cardboard box sealed by the artist 30 years ago in 1984... What will Capsule 528 contain? So far, in their previous unwrappings, the archivists have discovered original Warhol paintings, photographs, prints and memorabilia of almost unimaginable variety, not to mention packets of chocolate and sweets, toenail clippings, a cement block - even thousands of used postage stamps...

Along the way, Lenny Henry also gets to meet one of the artist's closest associates, his assistant Benjamin Liu, as well as the man for whom he was always 'Uncle Andy', Warhol's nephew, Donald.

Warhol embarked on his Time Capsule project in 1974, some years after the heyday of his legendary Factory when he was adding controversial film-making to his revolutionary multi-image picture making featuring Campbell's soup tins and such icons as Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley and Jackie Onassis. Throughout, Warhol remained a laconic and mysterious communicator, responding to interviewers with strange and enigmatic non-answers. When asked whether he was happy to see his pictures on people's walls, Andy replied "oh, no. I like them in closets".

Producer: Simon Elmes.


THU 09:30 The Wood Pushers (b04h8792)
A close encounter with the street chess players of Greenwich Village in New York, who play for money on the stone tables in Washington Square park.

For these players, chess is like life - a game of survival, of war, of tricks and traps - with many paying their bills and living costs from the money they win at the tables.

These are highly skilled chess players who take on the general public for money. Some are homeless - and a world away from the official tournament scene and stuffy formalism usually associated with the game. Chess is returned to its roots as a street-level pastime - fast, aggressive, winner takes all.

Watching some of them play, it's somewhere between street magic, confidence trick and the most serious tournament - snappy patter disguises the sharpest moves in quick time. These players don't lose often. The nearby Village chess shop is a hub where players can take a break on long winter afternoons, or after the parks are cleared at night. It's been a fixture of the Village for many years.

This programme – filled with the sounds of Washington Square and its nearby chess rooms - features a mix of characters who've been playing there for many years, and for whom chess is a spiritual anchor as well as an economic lifeline.

Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b04gc0pj)
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

The Scientific Revolution

Adrian Scarborough continues reading from Yuval Noah Harari's ground-breaking account of humankind's remarkable history from insignificant apes to rulers of the world.

The discovery of ignorance and the quest for immortality.

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Gemma Jenkins


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04gc0pl)
Biba at 50

Barbara Hulanicki celebrates the 50th Birthday of Biba. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Cooks the Perfect Drop Scone with pumpkin seeds. This Sunday Amy Winehouse would have celebrated her 31st Birthday. Her mum Janis Winehouse shares the challenges and heartbreak of dealing with her daughter's tragic addiction to drink and drugs. Plus from the Woman's Hour Achieve we hear from one of the founders of the Family Planning Association in the UK, Dr Helena Wright.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04gc0pn)
Craven: Series 5 - Family Man

Episode 4

Episode 4 of Craven: Family Man by Amelia Bullmore.

It is Boxing Day. Adam Cook is finally out of hospital following his attempted suicide and the murder of his 3 children.

Watende and Craven execute a careful interview strategy to try and get him to not only confess, but help them understand why a man would kill his own children.

Writer ........................................................Amelia Bullmore
Executive Producer.....................................Nicola Shindler
Director / Producer.................................... Justine Potter
Sound Engineer .........................................Alisdair McGregor
Sound Designer..........................................Eloise Whitmore
Police Consultant ......................................Keith Dillon

A Red production produced by Savvy for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b04gc0pq)
Thailand's Slave Fishermen

It has one of the largest fishing fleets in the world and much of the catch from Thailand's fishing boats ends up on Japanese, European and American plates. Yet the industry stands accused of profiting from slave labour.

The BBC's Becky Palmstrom investigates this tale of modern day slavery. She travels to Thailand and Myanmar to find out why and how illegal migrants are being forced onto Thai fishing boats, many of them working for months unpaid. She hears allegations of cruelty and even murder.

In Thailand Becky meets Ken, from rural Myanmar, who hoped to make a better life for himself and his ageing parents. He ended up being trafficked twice onto Thai fishing boats. The BBC team was able to bring his parents, back in Myanmar, the first news they had had of their son for four years.

The Thai authorities admit that most of their fishing fleet is unregistered and much of it relies on illegal migrant labour. The Thai government insists it is making every effort to clamp down on trafficking and forced labour in its fishing industry. Yet the US State Department has recently downgraded Thailand to Tier 3 in its "Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP)" - a measure of how little it believes Thailand is doing to curb the problem.

Producer: John Murphy.


THU 11:30 Give Order Please (b03bddd2)
The traditional Working Men's Club is in a state of decline, as the heavy industries and sense of collectivism that supported them fade and disappears. Ian McMillan looks at the clubs of Doncaster to learn more about a movement that has provided social interaction, education, recreation and support to working class communities for over a hundred years.

Doncaster is home to around 80 members' clubs, including Armthorpe Social Club and Institute, Rossington Miners' Welfare, Mexborough Concertina Club and The Trades Club. Some are thriving, some just about surviving. Around 60 of the town's former clubs are no longer in business.

Doncaster is also home to brothers Dave and Keith Angel, local musicians who, having been brought up steeped in club culture, started out their own musical careers in these unforgiving yet grounding venues. Their lifelong affection for Working Men's Clubs has resulted in Dave and Keith completing a social history of clubs in the area, which was originally started by their Dad in the 1970s.

With their help, Ian is on a mission to find out more about the origins of these clubs, how they have adapted and changed over the years, the reasons for the decline and what, if anything, is being done to keep the existing clubs alive.

In addition to anecdotes from Keith and Dave Angel, the programme also features contributions from Ruth Cherrington, writer of Not Just Beer and Bingo!: A Social History of Working Men's Clubs, singer Lyn O'Hara, club officials and the working men (and sometimes women) who patronised the tap rooms and concert halls.

Producer: Kellie While

A Smooth Operations production for Radio 4 first broadcast in September 2013.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b04g6n2l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b04gc0ps)
11 September 1914 - Kitty Wilson

There's a storm brewing down at harbour and no shelter for some...

Written by: Sarah Daniels
Music: Matthew Strachan
Directed and produced by: Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b04gc0pv)
Retail suppliers, Consumer complaining, Food atrocities, nPower, Port Isaac

Is our demand for cheap food in supermarkets damaging farmers, small businesses and the people that work for them? The competition commission recognised there were problems in the supply chain and appointed a Grocery Code Adjudicator, who can fine supermarkets if they don't treat their suppliers fairly. The problem is, the adjudicator can only look at the direct suppliers - the people further down the chain have very little protection.

Would you eat a lasagne pizza? Are foods like this a crime? Nisha Katona is a purist when it comes to her food - no Chicken Tikka flavoured Blackpool rock for her. But food historian Dr Annie Gray, who has on occasion enjoyed a creme egg and spam toastie, says it's just snobbery and should eat whatever combinations we like.

Port Isaac is a fishing village on the North Cornish coast. It was quaint and best-known for being near Rock and Padstow. Until ten years ago when Martin Clunes turned up - called it Port Wenn and started filming the ITV series Doc Martin. Now coachloads of tourists turn up - and the village economy has changed. But what do the locals make of the turnaround. Our reporter Melanie Abbott has been finding out.

The government wants more housing benefit claimants to live in private rented accommodation. It was supposed to be a way of dealing with the declining social housing stock in the UK, and a way of strengthening links between local authorities and private landlords. But, according to a report released today by the Chartered Institute of Housing, private landlords are becoming more reluctant to let to claimants. Earlier this year the National Landlords Association called on homelessness charities to do more to help vulnerable tenants.

No doubt plenty of you spend a fair bit of time shouting at the radio. But does it listen?
Well BBC Research and Development - that's the boffins to you and me - are working on broadcasts which change their scripts based on the location of the listener. It doesn't matter where you live, your own local landmarks - even the weather near you - will appear in the story. It's called Perceptive Radio and you can find out more by logging on to Futurebroadcasts.com

Figures from the Financial Ombudsman Service show which financial institutions and products are attracting the most complaints. And big, it seems is not beautiful. Over the last six-months Lloyds Banking Group received around 58,000 complaints, while - for example, Sainsbury's Bank received 45 complaints in the same period. So have the smaller institutions just had a good six months or are they better at dealing with customers fairly.


THU 12:57 Weather (b04g6n2n)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b04gc0px)
National and international news with James Robbins.


THU 13:45 Wow! How Did They Do That? (b039c5cv)
Episode 4

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Charlie Paton may not be able to turn water into wine but he is working on making seawater turn into a cooling system for hot and arid countries. The invention could increase crop yields in the driest parts of Africa as it uses a natural resource to cool greenhouses. As he says, "It's counter-intuitive to most people. Anybody who knows anything knows you don't have seawater in greenhouses and you don't have greenhouses in arid countries. On every level it is the opposite of what we do." Yet he believes this system can and will work, as he explains to Roger Law.

Roger's second guest helped create some of the most useful objects for those with disabilities by recognizing what they themselves wanted. Roger Coleman first got involved in a friend's kitchen after she developed multiple sclerosis. 'I asked her what the most important thing was about the design. She said 'I want the neighbours to be jealous!'. It was a real light bulb moment for me. That's about being like everyone else."

It set Roger on the path of designing a whole range of things that people really wanted, from the big button telephone to brightly coloured seating for kids in special schools which helped integrate them into the classrooms. It also led him to develop medical equipment for the NHS that suited users in hospital, such as a unique design for a resuscitation trolley.

Two contrasting inventors who are changing the world one small design at a time.

Producer Mark Rickards.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b04g8rhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01bbd8l)
John Steinbeck - The Pearl

Dramatisation of John Steinbeck's novella by Donna Franceschild.

A captivating and atmospheric parable set in a small Mexican fishing village about the greatest pearl ever found and the tragic impact its discovery has on one young family.

Director: Kirsty Williams.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b04gc2xw)
Dennis Potter and the Forest of Dean

"Strange and beautiful, a heart shaped place between two rivers" is how television playwright and author, Dennis Potter described the Forest of Dean, where he grew up. On the 20th anniversary of his death, Felicity Evans explores the landscape that shaped much of his work.

The Forest has a rich industrial heritage which Forester and Freeminer, Rich Daniels explains at the former site of the New Fancy coal mine. The old spoil heap now provides spectacular views across the Forest. In the distance, you can see Cannop Ponds and the pit where Dennis' father was a miner.

Then it's to Berry Hill, the place where Potter grew up and visited frequently with his own family. Firstly to "Spion Kop", the Potter family home where artist John Belcher now lives and then onto some of the locations used in Potter's work.

Felicity meets historian and verderer, Ian Standing who talks about his role in upholding Forest law and culture and shows us the oak trees that Lord Nelson planted.

Finally from the ancient forest to the very modern as we visit a nearby café in Coleford to talk to teenagers from the Forest Youth Forum about what it's like to live in the Forest of Dean today. How does the landscape affect them? Dennis Potter was concerned that the "New Foresters" would have no sense of community and not realise how special and unique it is. Were his fears unfounded?


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b04g6z5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b04g79nz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b04gc2xy)
Pride; Anton Corbijn on Philip Seymour Hoffman; screenwriters secrets

With Francine Stock.

The producer of Pride, David Livingstone, discusses the film's evolution from script to screen and reveals what he thinks about his comedy being touted as the next Full Monty.

A Most Wanted Man director Anton Corbijn talks about working with Philip Seymour Hoffman in his last starring role before his untimely death earlier this year.

Is being a writer on a film a thankless task ? Jeremy Brock, whose credits include the adaptation of The Last King Of Scotland, reveals the plight of the lowly scribe.

Clare Binns and Tim Robey discuss the highlights of this year's Toronto Film Festival and assess Oscar hopefuls like the Stephen Hawking bio-pic The Theory Of Everything.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b04gc2y0)
Jack the Ripper; Future of Scottish science

Jack the Ripper "identified"
Some of us are morbidly fascinated by the legend of Jack the Ripper - not the world's first serial killer, but the one that coincided with the birth of mass media, and set the ghoulish tone for the 20th century's obsession with murderers. This week a shawl acquired at an auction in 2007 is in the spotlight. Claimed to be found in 1888 at the murder scene of a woman asserted to be the fourth victim of the supposed Ripper, DNA evidence from the fabric is stated to imply one of the most plausible suspects - Aaron Kosminski. However, there are many problems with this "identification" sequence - some historical, some legal, and some scientific. Adam Rutherford focuses on the science by speaking to Jari Louhelainen, a forensic geneticist at Liverpool John Moores University, who produced the forensic analysis. Jon Wetton, another forensic geneticist at the University of Leicester, offers broader insight into how DNA can be used in detecting crime.

Future of Scottish science
Scottish science has a rich history: Alexander Fleming, James Watt, Dolly the sheep and much, much more. This week, with the upcoming referendum on independence, Dr Adam Rutherford takes the opportunity to look at the future of science in Scotland. He's joined by scientists representing the Academics for Yes and Better Together campaigns. Making the case for independence are Dr Stephen Watson and Professor Mike Lean, both from the University of Glasgow. Dr Patrick Harkness, also from the University of Glasgow, and Professor Hugh Pennington, emeritus professor at the University of Aberdeen, make the case for remaining in the union.

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b04gc2y2)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g6n2q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b01m171v)
Edinburgh 2012

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure; regular guest on The Now Show; and popper-upper in things like Miranda and Family Guy, presents a special edition of his sketch show, recorded at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

The first series, broadcast last year, was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. It featured Winnie the Pooh coming to terms with his abusive relationship with honey; how The Archers sounds to people who don't listen to the Archers, and Jekyll and Hyde's tricky housekeeping arrangements. This show won't feature any of those things, but that's ok, because it will feature other things, and they'll be funny too.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme is written by and stars John Finnemore, with Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.

Producer: Ed Morrish.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b04gc2y4)
Rob tells Johnny about the set up at Berrow Farm, encouraging him to come for a visit. Johnny's surprised to learn that the cows are kept indoors on sand. Peggy points out it's a modern, efficient operation. Rob says they welcome debate at Berrow Farm.

Rob and Peggy are impressed to hear about Johnny's quick thinking with Otto. Johnny wonders what to call Peggy, settling on 'great gran' (although she says Peggy might be simpler).

Pat admits to Peggy that Johnny's running her ragged. He also seems obsessed with his father. But Pat's delighted, especially as Tony seems so happy. Peggy warns Pat about letting Johnny get too settled. She advises Pat to phone Sharon.

Helen's feeling paranoid about the possibility of Peggy knowing something about Jess. Rob reassures Helen and persuades her to bring Henry to the hunt to take her mind off it.

Ed and Jazzer decide to drown their sorrows in the cider shed at the news of Mike leaving Ambridge. Jazzer suggests they take over Mike's business. Ed's not sure. They have to do something though. Ed's desperate.

Johnny tells Tony he wants to stay and work on the farm - just like his Dad.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b04gc2y6)
Cilla; Will and Kate on stage; Tudor portraits; Ted Hughes' animal poems

Including a review of Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black in a new three part series about the singer's early career, and an interview with actors Oliver Chris and Lydia Wilson as they return to their roles as Will and Kate in Mike Bartlett's King Charles III. Also on the programme, historian Jessie Childs reviews a new exhibition of Tudor portraiture and artefacts at the National Portrait Gallery, and poet Alice Oswald discusses the animal poetry of Ted Hughes.

Presenter: Razia Iqbal
Producer: Ellie Bury.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04gc0pn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b04gc2yl)
Racism in Northern Ireland

Since April, police have recorded 218 racially motivated crimes in Belfast - at least one a day. Family homes have been attacked, a Ku Klux Klan flag has flown and apparently xenophobic slogans were seen on bonfires during the Eleventh Night celebrations in July. The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) has even launched a special operation to tackle the problem.

But who is behind the apparent rise in racist incidents? Helen Grady heads to Belfast to investigate.

Why are racist incidents becoming more frequent? And why are they recorded more often in loyalist neighbourhoods?


THU 20:30 In Business (b04gc3sr)
Which way now for Scottish businesses?

Peter Day talks to businesses in Scotland and asks how they see the future in the light of the referendum campaign. Could there be a return to the status quo or has so much changed already as a result of the political debate, regardless of which way the vote goes?

Peter Day assesses the future through the eyes of video games companies in Dundee, young entrepreneurs in Edinburgh and established Scottish business leaders.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b04gc2y0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Andy Warhol: Time Regained (b04gc0pg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b04g6n2x)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b04gc3st)
Pistorius not guilty of murder, Scotland campaign heats up, US woos Arab allies over Islamic State - with David Eades.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04gc3sw)
The Children Act

For the Sake of Religion

Juliet Stevenson continues Ian McEwan's powerful and haunting new novel, The Children Act - a story about faith, love and the Law and about the welfare of children and the duty of those who care for them.

Fiona Maye is an esteemed High Court Judge presiding over cases in the Family Court and admired for her 'godly distance and devilish understanding'. But beneath her professional composure, her happy marriage of thirty years is suddenly in trouble and a recent case has caused her heartache. Now she faces a life or death decision.

For religious reasons, a beautiful seventeen-year-old boy is refusing life-saving treatment, and his devout parents support his wishes. Should the secular court overrule sincerely held faith? What really lies in the boy's best interests? Tonight Fiona hears from all sides and takes an unorthodox approach.

Ian McEwan is one of the UK's leading novelists, his many novels include Atonement, Enduring Love and On Chesil Beach.

The reader is Juliet Stevenson
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


THU 23:00 Ayres on the Air (b01ms34r)
Series 4

Spring

Popular poet Pam Ayres presents a series of poetry and sketch shows about the seasons.

Starting with Spring, Pam ponders flowers and animals, spring elections plus she has some unusual tips for spring cleaning.

Her poems include: I Was Standing by the Cow; Heaps of Stuff; Barking: Fleeced and the Snoring Poem.

With Felicity Montagu and Geoffrey Whitehead

Producer: Claire Jones.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra in September 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04gc3vz)
* After President Obama announces air strikes against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, what will the British Government's policy be? Sean Curran reports on exchanges in the Commons.

Also on the programme:

* Criticism from MPs of the person appointed to lead the Government inquiry into historic child sex abuse.

* Fall-out to the news that banking groups are considering leaving Scotland for England if the Scots vote in favour of independence.

* Is it time for the Chancellor to scrap taxes on energy consumption?

* Can stability be achieved in the disputed area of Kashmir?



FRIDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04g6n41)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b04gc0pj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04g6n43)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04g6n45)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04g6n47)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04g6n4b)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04gc8nt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Martyn Atkins.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b04gc8ny)
Free-range eggs, TB testing for shows, Cute sheep

Free range egg producers have been up in arms this week over claims that their hens have higher rates of disease and injury and die earlier than birds kept in cages. Charlotte Smith discusses the pros and cons of both systems with two leading producers. Roger Gent's free-range hens produce around 18,000 eggs a day. Elwyn Griffiths' hens live in cages known as 'enriched colony', which are larger than old-style battery cages; his hens produce 2.5 million eggs a day.

Measures to control the spread of Bovine TB don't just affect farmers in the hotspots and edge areas. They're also having an indirect impact on some events that are the backbone of the farming calendar. The Westmorland County Show has taken place every September since 1899. But this year, for the first time, all exhibiting cattle had to have a pre-movement TB test. Around 420 cattle took to the show-rings just outside Kendal on Thursday but that's down by around 100 on last year. And there are fears that some small agricultural shows won't survive if pre-movement testing becomes the norm.

And meet the Valais Blacknose - a fluffy breed of Swiss sheep that's melted the heart of a successful cattle breeder in Scotland. So much so, he bought a flock just because they're cute.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04dvtjk)
Wrybill

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Sir David Attenborough presents the New Zealand wrybill. The wrybill is an inconspicuous wader yet it is unique. It is the only bird in the world whose bill is bent sideways , and as it happens, always to the right. In the shingly, gravelly world it inhabits alongside fast flowing rivers, the wrybill's beak is the perfect shape for finding food. With neat, rapid movements, it sweeps aside small stones to reveal insects beneath. Endemic to New Zealand in winter dense flocks gather and display, their highly co-ordinated aerial movements having been described as a flung scarfe across the sky.


FRI 06:00 Today (b04gc8p2)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b04g6zg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b04gc8p4)
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

And They Lived Happily Ever After

Adrian Scarborough continues reading from Yuval Noah Harari's ground-breaking account of humankind's remarkable history from insignificant apes to rulers of the world.

The world's a better place, but are we any happier?

Abridged by Penny Leicester
Produced by Gemma Jenkins


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b04gcdt0)
Children's Television

Listen With Mother; Thomas the Tank Engine; Grange Hill; Blue Peter and the Teletubbies. Over the last 50 years the UK has built a reputation for producing some of the most high quality children's programming in the world. For many years children were happy to sit comfortably and watch with mother but the last decade has seen enormous changes in children's viewing. It's estimated that around 71% of under 12 year olds have access to a tablet device for viewing. And with an increasing range of technology available and a growing number of dedicated children's channels, how are children changing the ways in which they view television? To discuss the state of children's television and its future Jenni is joined by leading women in the industry: Kay Benbow; Controller & Portfolio Head at CBeebies, Anne Wood; Head of Ragdoll Productions, creator of the Teletubbies; Anna Home, Chief Executive, Children's Film and Television Foundation and Tina McCann, MD of Nickelodeon UK.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b04gcdt2)
Craven: Series 5 - Family Man

Episode 5

Craven Series 6 - Episode 5

It's the week of the court case

"Adam Cook was charged with the murders of his three children on the 27th of December and remanded in custody the following day. Our Prosecution Barrister was Alice Thompson, QC. She's good. She looks like she washes with soap and water and people trust her."

And Craven wants him to face up to what he has done.

"I want his wife to hear why he did it 'cause she's torturing herself that she made him flip and I think a woman should be free to change her mind about a man without having her children killed. I want the public to hear it."

The team put a strong prosecution together, but their case is more than matched by the brilliant Douglas Farino.

Written by: Amelia Bullmore
Executive Producer.....................................Nicola Shindler
Director / Producer.....................................Justine Potter
Sound Engineer .........................................Alisdair McGregor
Sound Designer..........................................Eloise Whitmore
Police Consultant .......................................Keith Dillon

A Red production produced by Savvy for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b04gcdt4)
Series 17

Racing Drivers

Gerry Marshall was one of the most famous racing drivers of his generation; a larger-than-life character with big appetites, who eventually died of heart failure behind the wheel at Silverstone in 2005. His son, Gregor, always wanted to follow in his father's footsteps, but Gerry discouraged him, saying "what's the point, you'll never be as good as me".

But Gregor hasn't given up on his dream of racing. He has bought a vintage car, similar to the one his father raced, and is restoring it, with the help of two of his father's old friends - fellow ex-racer Denis, and car salesman Brian, known as "Slim". For Denis and Brian, it's a chance to relive their youths. Brian in particular is itching to get behind the wheel again, to smell the petrol fumes and hear the noise of the track.

They plan to get the car ready for Gregor to race in the summer season. Meanwhile, Gregor is trying to get in some track time, using a friend's borrowed car. But it's not all straightforward, as the car breaks down on its first outing ...

Presenter: Alan Dein
Producers: Jolyon Jenkins and Polly Weston.


FRI 11:30 My First Planet (b04bw6ny)
Series 2

One Small Naughty Step for Man

Day 32 and the colony teacher tells Carol & Richard to go and sit in the naughty airlock. Meanwhile Lillian has to face a deadly rival, armed only with a marker pen and the common cold

The return of the hit sitcom starring Nicholas Lyndhurst and Vicki Pepperdine ("Getting On") set on a shiny new planet.

Welcome to the colony. We're aware that, having been in deep cryosleep for 73 years, you may be in need of some supplementary information.

Personnel:
Unfortunately, Burrows the leader of the colony has died on the voyage so his Number 2, Brian (Nicholas Lyndhurst), is now in charge. He's a nice enough chap, but no alpha male, and his desire to sort things out with a nice friendly meeting infuriates the colony's Chief Physician Lillian (Vicki Pepperdine), who'd really rather everyone was walking round in tight colour-coded tunics and saluting each other. She's also in charge of Project Adam, the plan to conceive and give birth to the first colony-born baby. Unfortunately, the two people hand-picked for this purpose - Carol and Richard - were rather fibbing about being a couple, just to get on the trip.

Add in an entirely unscrupulous Chief Scientist, Mason and also Archer, an idiot maintenance man who believes he's an "empath" rather than a plumber, and you're all set to answer the question - if humankind were to colonise space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Written by Phil Whelans
Produced and Directed by David Tyler.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b04g6n4h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b04gcdt6)
12 September 1914 - Alice Macknade

There's a birthday at the Macknades' but not much to celebrate...

Written by: Sarah Daniels
Music: Matthew Strachan
Directed and produced by: Lucy Collingwood
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b04gcdt8)
Fracking, futuristic house selling, fashionable drinking

We hear from two listeners given conflicting advice over home insurance in possible fracking areas.

How computer generated imagery is the new weapon in selling your home.

Why one man wouldn't let it lie when his bank charged him for his overdraft.

A motorist tells us he got a shocking deal over his electric sports car.

Does being a self-published author mean you are going it alone, or you are just a reject from the publishing houses?

And is real ale REALLY becoming a popular pint among younger drinkers?

Producer: Pete Wilson
Presenter: Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04g6n4l)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b04gcdtb)
National and international news with Edward Stourton.


FRI 13:45 Wow! How Did They Do That? (b039pdst)
Episode 5

Roger Law goes in search of the entrepreneurs who are behind some of the Britain's best designs and inventions.

Ross Lovegrove has earned the nickname 'Captain Organic' through his extraordinary designs based on organic shapes and forms. Roger Law visits his studio and finds him inspired by anything from an elephant skull to a honeycomb. As he explains, Lovegrove draws on the experiences of mankind over the ages. "Ten thousand years ago most of our ancestors lived in caves. They made things from organic material and I don't think we've moved far from that." From this starting point Lovegrove has developed the most extraordinarily beautiful objects which can be used in everyday life.

Hussein Chalayan has created his innovative work in the world of fashion. Roger Law talks to him about how he sees his role. "I am a designer," he says, "but I happen to have a narrative approach". Chalayan has become famous for his bold and daring productions, and he explains his thinking behind the events which showcase his work. Roger gets to discuss dresses that can reconfigure whilst being worn, including one which can disappear completely. "Startling stuff," concludes Roger, "especially if you happen to be wearing it at the time.".


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b04gc2y4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Brief Lives (b04gcdtd)
Series 7

Episode 5

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly. Ep 5 of 6

Sarah has always had a difficult relationship with her father, Saul. So matters become complicated when she and her sister Rebecca cross swords over the care of him. And Frank and Cheryl make a momentous decision about their future.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b04gcfmd)
Postbag at Barnsdale

Eric Robson hosts a correspondence edition of the horticultural panel programme from Barnsdale Gardens. Matt Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood are joined by Nick Hamilton to answer questions sent in by post, online and through social media.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions and answers:

Q. Is it safe to feed delicate seedlings with the tank water, which when being discharged can contain rust from the tank? Does iron rust have an adverse effect on the plants?

A. Too much iron in the soil could be a problem for seedlings, but it shouldn't cause too much harm to established plants. Try to avoid using it on containers as the contaminant can build up and become more of an issue.

Q. Am I better having vertical or horizontal growing containers for Strawberries?

A. Choose vertical pots if you are short of space. Traditional strawberry pots with holes in the sides are too small. If you do choose a pot, add a pipe of grit with holes to the middle and water through that. Buckets make good containers because they can be suspended and keep the plant away from pests.

Q. For at least 10 years I have grown Runner Beans in tubs with a wigwam of canes on a very sunny south facing patio. Early on the yield was excellent but has declined over the years with 90 % of the flowers falling off without setting this year. Can you help?

A. The problem is usually a shortage of water. Perhaps the compost isn't retaining the moisture. The canes could possibly carry a disease. The variety shouldn't have any effect.

Q. I have inherited some Blueberry bushes and I am not sure what to do with them. How should they be pruned and re-potted?

A. Blueberries can be left for many years without being cut back. If you do prune, take out the old growth and leave the young shoots. Look out for scale by going along the stem and simply rubbing it off. You need to use ericaceous, lime-free compost. They ideally need a cubic metre per Blueberry, but most people don't have that much room. They need a lot of water but beware of water-logging.

Q. At the end of the garden a mixed hedge separates the garden from a field. Blackthorn shoots keep appearing in the grass. I assume these are runners from the hedge. I am reluctant to paint them with glyphosate for fear of damaging the bushes in the hedge. Is there any other way of removing these runners or would it be safe to use glyphosate gel?

A. They could be runners or separate plants that have sprouted from the Blackthorn stones. Dig a trench close to the hedge, severing all of the sucker roots to ensure they aren't connected to the main hedge. You could tease the runners out from the grass and the lawn will recover quite quickly.


FRI 15:45 Opening Lines (b04gcfmg)
Series 16

The Fox by Fiona Melrose

Another chance to hear Fiona Melrose's story in the series which gives emerging short story writers their radio debut.

Philip Jackson reads Fiona Melrose's meditative tale evoking a rural England, largely untouched by the modern world. A dead fox triggers memories and connections for an elderly farmer.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins.

South African writer, Fiona Melrose was inspired to write this story while living in Suffolk. The story formed the starting point of her first novel, Midwinter, which was published in November of last year.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b04gcfmj)
Rev Ian Paisley, Sir Donald Sinden, Caroline Gooding, Anthony Smith, Andrew McLaglen

Matthew Bannister on former First Minister of Northern Ireland and DUP leader Ian Paisley.

The actor Sir Donald Sinden. Dame Judi Dench and Gyles Brandreth pay tribute.

Anthony Smith, the writer and broadcaster who enjoyed ballooning and travelled across the Atlantic on a home-made raft at the age of 84.

And the lawyer and disability rights campaigner Caroline Gooding - who played a key role in bringing about the Disability Discrimination Act of 1995.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b04gcfml)
Understanding the Scottish referendum polls

Tim Harford talks to the pollsters about how they are trying to gauge the political mood in Scotland ahead of the independence referendum next week. He interviews Anthony Wells of YouGov and Martin Boon of ICM. Plus, he analyses UKIP's Nigel Farage's claim that more than half the population of Scotland is on benefits.

"More people are suffering from malnutrition as a result of worsening food poverty, experts have warned", reported the BBC. But is this true? Tim Harford gets the facts straight with Professor Marinos Elia, who chairs the Malnutrition Action Group of the British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN).

And does the "Curse of Strictly Come Dancing" really exist? The tabloids think so, as they breathlessly report on the relationship break-ups of contestants and their dancing tutors on the BBC One show. But Tim Harford isn't so sure. He crunches the numbers with the help of John Moriarty, a maths lecturer at Manchester University.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ruth Alexander.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b04gcfmn)
Fiona and Natalie - A Very Special Bond

Fi Glover introduces an adoptive mother talking about her son with the mother who gave birth to him; their mutual love for him shines through.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject.


FRI 17:00 PM (b04gcfmt)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04g6n4p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b04gch03)
Series 44

Episode 1

Steve Punt is joined by Terry Mynott, David Quantick, Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin and Jon Holmes for a comic romp through the week's news.

Written by the cast with additional material from Andy Woolton, Carrie Quinlan and Alice Gregg. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b04gch05)
Josh enjoys some driving instruction from David. Feeding calves later, David jokes that Josh is doing a better job at that. Josh admits he's nervous about his first lesson tomorrow.

Leonie's still deciding on 'guide parents' for the baby. Lilian will be saying a few words at the naming ceremony. Keen not to be outdone, Lynda's choosing a poem that should be equally memorable.

Leonie has chosen a new name: Mungo. It isn't much of an improvement for harassed Lynda. She admits to Jim she'll struggle to hold her tongue.

Lynda receives a worrying text about the new road plans, which she shares with David and Josh. It seems Route B would be the cheapest option. This will have a lot of influence on the planners, so they'll have to redouble their campaigning efforts.

Devastated and angry, Hayley confronts Elizabeth. She hands back the locket, knowing what it means. After grilling Elizabeth for details, Hayley asks how Elizabeth could destroy her whole world. Doesn't she have enough already, without taking Hayley's husband?

Hayley has it out with Roy, who tells her he still loves her. But Hayley feels that Roy must love Elizabeth, or at least that she's not good enough for him. Where do we go from here, asks Roy. Hayley has no idea.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b04gch07)
Kate Mosse; Stellan Skarsgård; Glue reviewed; Sir Donald Sinden

Kate Mosse discusses her new novel The Taxidermist's Daughter and actor Stellan Skarsgård tells Kirsty about his role in Norwegian comic thriller In Order of Disappearance . Also tonight Rosie Swash reviews Glue, a new teen drama from the writer of Skins and Enn Reitel remembers Sir Donald Sinden, who he portrayed for Spitting Image.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Ellie Bury.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b04gcdt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b04gch09)
John Swinney MSP, Ruth Davidson MSP, Michelle Thomson, Jim Murphy MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Robert Gordon's College in Aberdeen with John Swinney MSP Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Sustainable Growth in the Scottish Government, and the Leader of the Scottish Conservatives, Ruth Davidson, Managing Director of Business for Scotland Michelle Thomson and Shadow Secretary of State for International Development Jim Murphy MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b04gch0c)
The Horror of War

Lisa Jardine says while documenting and commemorating the First World War we should not lose sight of its horror. "Wars are not heroic, even if they prompt acts of heroism by soldiers and civilians. Our young people, raised in a Britain at peace for 70 years, need to know that."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b04gch0f)
8-12 September 1914

Folkestone holds its annual regatta and Dieter's safety is threatened...

Written by: Sarah Daniels
Consultant Historian: Professor Maggie Andrews
Music: Matthew Strachan
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Directed and produced by: Lucy Collingwood
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04g6n4r)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b04gch0h)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b04gch0k)
The Children Act

I'll Sing Along with You

Juliet Stevenson continues Ian McEwan's powerful and haunting new novel, The Children Act - a story about faith, love and the Law and about the welfare of children and the duty of those who care for them.

Fiona Maye is an esteemed High Court Judge presiding over cases in the Family Court and admired for her 'godly distance and devilish understanding'. But beneath her professional composure, her happy marriage of thirty years is suddenly in trouble and a recent case has caused her heartache. Now she faces a life or death decision.

For religious reasons, a beautiful seventeen-year-old boy is refusing life-saving treatment, and his devout parents support his wishes. Should the secular court overrule sincerely held faith? What really lies in the boy's best interests? Tonight will a meeting in a hospital room clarify Fiona's mind?

Ian McEwan is one of the UK's leading novelists, his many novels include Atonement, Enduring Love and On Chesil Beach.

The reader is Juliet Stevenson
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b04g8jh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b04gch3d)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b04gch3g)
Jimmy and Andy - The Impact of Abuse

Fi Glover introduces two men who suffered sexual abuse from the same perpetrator in their teens, but only met when they gave evidence at the trial where he was convicted, as they try to come to terms with the painful aftermath.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b04g7r97)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b04g7r97)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b04g8hr8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b04g8hr8)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b04g8q55)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b04g8q55)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b04gc0pn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b04gc0pn)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b04gcdt2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b04gcdt2)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b04g1dw8)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b04gch0c)

AL Kennedy: Holding Hands 11:00 WED (b04754xq)

Agree to Differ 22:15 SAT (b04fzfxz)

Andy Warhol: Time Regained 09:00 THU (b04gc0pg)

Andy Warhol: Time Regained 21:30 THU (b04gc0pg)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b04g6kqy)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b04g1bsw)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b04gch09)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b04g6mn1)

Ayres on the Air 23:00 THU (b01ms34r)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b04gc2y0)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b04gc2y0)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b04g6z5c)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b04g6z5c)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b04g8400)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b04g8d4c)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b04g8kcf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b04g8rwb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b04gc3sw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b04gch0k)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b04g19vy)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b04g7lhj)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b04g7lhj)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b04g8hr4)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b04g8hr4)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b04g8q51)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b04g8q51)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b04gc0pj)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b04gc0pj)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b04gc8p4)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b04g79nz)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b04g79nz)

Brief Lives 14:15 FRI (b04gcdtd)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b04g6zg4)

Build and Be Damned 16:00 TUE (b04g8hrq)

Casa Negra: The Real Casablanca 16:00 MON (b04g83zy)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b04g8hrn)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b04g8hrn)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b04g10zm)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b04gc0pq)

Drama 14:15 MON (b04g825q)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b02ykrdb)

Drama 14:15 WED (b01djrpk)

Drama 14:15 THU (b01bbd8l)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b04g6k4q)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04g7lhd)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b04g8fk4)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b04g8lnd)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b04gc0pb)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b04gc8ny)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b04g8rhn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b04g6kqt)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b04g851x)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04g8jh9)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b04g8rhj)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b04gc2y6)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b04gch07)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b04g8rhl)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b04g1bsk)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b04gcfmd)

Give Order Please 11:30 THU (b03bddd2)

Gossip from the Garden Pond 19:15 SUN (b04g7d6q)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b04g8jh3)

Great Lives 09:00 WED (b04g8m0t)

Great Lives 21:30 WED (b04g8m0t)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b04g8jh3)

High St Fashion: Weaving New Threads 20:00 TUE (b04g8jhc)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b04gch0f)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b04g825j)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b04g8hrg)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b04g8q5f)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b04gc0ps)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b04gcdt6)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b04g14v0)

In Business 20:30 THU (b04gc3sr)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b04g8jhf)

Jessie Kesson Short Stories 19:45 SUN (b04g7dxh)

Jigsaw 23:00 WED (b04g8rwd)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 THU (b01m171v)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b04fz0wz)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b04g8404)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b04g1drc)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b04gcfmj)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b04gcdt4)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b04g6lbm)

Meet David Sedaris 18:30 TUE (b03npb2y)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b04g1c6v)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b04g6mvp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04g6mxp)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b04g6mz3)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b04g6n0h)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04g6n28)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04g6n41)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b04g8qfd)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b04g6kqw)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b04g6kqw)

Mordrin McDonald: 21st Century Wizard 23:15 WED (b01jrknw)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b04g1drf)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b04gcfml)

Music of the Forest 13:30 SUN (b04f9r4m)

My First Planet 11:30 FRI (b04bw6ny)

Nadine Gordimer - A Flash of Fireflies 00:30 SUN (b03gtxv7)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b04g1c73)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b04g6mvy)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04g6mxy)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b04g6mzc)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b04g6n0r)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04g6n2j)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04g6n4b)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b04g6mw0)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b04g1c7c)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b04g6mwb)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b04g6my2)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b04g6mzf)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b04g6n0t)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b04g6n2l)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b04g6n4h)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b04g1c75)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b04g6mw4)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b04g6mw8)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b04g1c7r)

News 13:00 SAT (b04g1c7h)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b04g6z5h)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b04g13rk)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b04gc2xw)

Opening Lines 15:45 FRI (b04gcfmg)

PM 17:00 SAT (b04g6lbk)

PM 17:00 MON (b04g8402)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04g8jh5)

PM 17:00 WED (b04g8qvr)

PM 17:00 THU (b04gc2y2)

PM 17:00 FRI (b04gcfmt)

Painful Medicine 17:00 SUN (b04fz6lb)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b04g79p3)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b04fyf2q)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b04g79p1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b04g1cyy)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04g7lhb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b04g8fk2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b04g8lnb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b04g8w63)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b04gc8nt)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b04g6lbp)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b04g6lbp)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b04g6lbp)

Publishing Lives 09:30 WED (b03bs78d)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b04fyz5d)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b04g825s)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b04g6z5m)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b04g6z5m)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b04g6z5m)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01mnxvj)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b04g6k4v)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b04g6mmz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b04g1c6z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b04g6mvt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04g6mxt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b04g6mz7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b04g6n0m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04g6n2d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04g6n45)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b04fz4vn)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b04g8hrb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b04g1c6x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b04g1c71)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b04g1c7k)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b04g6mvr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b04g6mvw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b04g6mwg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b04g6mxr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b04g6mxw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b04g6mz5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b04g6mz9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b04g6n0k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b04g6n0p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b04g6n2b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04g6n2g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b04g6n43)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b04g6n47)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b04g1c7p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b04g6mwl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04g6my6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b04g6mzk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b04g6n10)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04g6n2q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04g6n4p)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b04g6z5f)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b04g6z5f)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b04g6z5p)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b04g6z5k)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b04g6zg6)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b04g79p5)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b04g79p5)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b04g851v)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b04g851v)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04g8jh7)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04g8jh7)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b04g8rhg)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b04g8rhg)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b04gc2y4)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b04gc2y4)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b04gch05)

The Barchester Chronicles 21:00 SAT (b04fy3z7)

The Barchester Chronicles 15:00 SUN (b04g79nx)

The Brig Society 12:30 SAT (b04g1bsp)

The Educators 00:15 MON (b04fzd9h)

The Educators 09:00 MON (b04fc707)

The Educators 21:30 MON (b04fc707)

The Educators 16:00 WED (b04g8qfg)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b04g13zx)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b04gc2xy)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b04g703w)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b04g703w)

The Guns of Adam Riches 23:00 TUE (b01qnrn0)

The Ideas That Make Us 09:30 MON (b03b2v70)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b04g6k93)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b04g6k93)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b04g79nv)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b04g8q57)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b04gcfmn)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b04gch3g)

The Lost Genius of Judee Sill 11:30 TUE (b04g8hrd)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b04g8qvp)

The Mother of the Sea 11:00 MON (b04g7rd5)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b04gch03)

The Pale Horse 11:30 MON (b04g7rd7)

The Philosopher's Arms 20:00 MON (b04g86bx)

The Poet Librettists 15:30 SAT (b04fz4vq)

The Report 20:00 THU (b04gc2yl)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b04g6zg8)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b04g6zg8)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b04g6k95)

The Wood Pushers 09:30 THU (b04h8792)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04g79ns)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b04g8d49)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04g8kcc)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b04g8rw8)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b04gc3st)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b04gch0h)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b04g8d4f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b04g8kck)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b04g8rwg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b04gc3vz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b04gch3d)

Today 07:00 SAT (b04g6k4s)

Today 06:00 MON (b04g7lhg)

Today 06:00 TUE (b04g8fqf)

Today 06:00 WED (b04g8lng)

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Tom Wrigglesworth: Utterly at Odds with the Universe 18:30 WED (b04g8rhd)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b04dvrcj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b04dvsrk)

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Urine Trouble: What's in Our Water 21:00 TUE (b04g8kc9)

Urine Trouble: What's in Our Water 15:30 WED (b04g8kc9)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04g7dxk)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04g7dxm)

What's the Point of...? 09:00 TUE (b04g8hr0)

What's the Point of...? 21:30 TUE (b04g8hr0)

Witness 09:30 TUE (b04g8hr2)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b04g6lbh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b04g7r94)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b04g8hr6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b04g8q53)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b04gc0pl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b04gcdt0)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b04fz6kw)

Wordaholics 11:30 WED (b04g8q5c)

World at One 13:00 MON (b04g825n)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b04g8hrl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b04g8qfb)

World at One 13:00 THU (b04gc0px)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b04gcdtb)

Wow! How Did They Do That? 13:45 MON (b0383jgn)

Wow! How Did They Do That? 13:45 TUE (b038c0dk)

Wow! How Did They Do That? 13:45 WED (b038xmcc)

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Wow! How Did They Do That? 13:45 FRI (b039pdst)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b04g825l)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b04g8hrj)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b04g8qf8)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b04gc0pv)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b04g1cz0)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b04g1cz0)