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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 JUNE 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b046p520)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b046p074)
As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning

Malaga and more...

Laurie is in Almunecar and civil war begins. He drinks with men who are fighting the cause, before finding safe passage back to England.

But is this the end of his travels?

Laurie Lee's classic account of walking through Spain in the 1930s concluded by Tobias Menzies

Abridged in five episodes by Katrin Williams.

Producer: Duncan Minshull

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b046p522)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b046p524)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b046p526)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b046p528)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b046p542)
Prayer and reflection with Kevin Franz of the Religious Society of Friends.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b046p544)
'They are going to have to wait for us to die before they have any money'. A mother whose son, girlfriend and their baby live between two sets of parents because they can't afford to rent. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b046p52b)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b046p52d)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b046nxcz)
Series 27

Arundel, West Sussex

Tristan Gooley is the self-styled 'Natural Navigator' who makes his living teaching people how to orient themselves by using clues and signs within the landscape.

On today's Ramblings he takes Clare on one of his favourite walks, near Arundel in West Sussex. En route they take their bearings from the most fascinating and unlikely natural sources, and Clare hears where Tristan's passion for the outdoors began at the age of 10, on a sailing course on the Isle of Wight, and how that eventually led to his current career.

Tristan is an adventurer and explorer who has led expeditions across five continents. He's the only living person to have both flown solo and sailed singlehanded across the Atlantic.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b0474wjf)
Potatoes

There's good news and bad news for British potato growers this year. Many are reaping the benefits of optimum growing conditions in the spring, but the price of the crop has almost halved in the past year. From Maris Pipers to Maris Peers, Charlotte Smith looks at the UK's potato industry as she visits RG Abrey Farms in Norfolk. The family business grows 500 hectares of early maincrop and salad potatoes in the heart of the Brecklands. Farming Today This Week also explores Scotland's potato seed exports, walks a potato field with an agronomist and hears what could be behind the fall in the price of the crop.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b046p52g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0474wjm)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b0474wjy)
Helen Fielding

Richard Coles and Suzy Klein are joined by Bridget Jones creator Helen Fielding, seventh Python Carol Cleveland, and Stuart J Cole who was abandoned as a baby, sent to Jamaica to live with family he had never met, and who turned his life around during a spell in prison. We go to Glyndebourne to meet Caroline and Andrew Thomson and Sandra and Ian Pusey who found real-life love at the opera, radiator salesman Phil Neville tells us what it's like to be a victim of mistaken identity and has a go at football commentary, John McCarthy visits the Isle of Wight where the dawn rose on satellite and radio technology, and Jersey Boy Ryan Molloy shares his Inheritance Tracks.

Helen Fielding's anonymous column in The Independent newspaper led to a novel, then another, two films to match and, after a break of 14 years, 'Mad About The Boy', the third instalment of Bridget's trials and tribulations now graces bookshelves around the world.

Caroline and Andrew Thomson and Sandra and Ian Pusey celebrated at Glyndebourne's current production of Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, which runs until July 11th.

Stuart J Cole's books 'Two Years' and 'A Message to my Family' tell the story of his extraordinary life and are available online.

Carol Cleveland will be reunited with the other members of Monty's Flying Circus ahead of their upcoming show Monty Python Live (mostly) which runs 1st -20th July at The O2 in London. Her book Pom Poms Up! is out now.

Ryan Molloy is currently starring in 'The Jersey Boys' on Broadway. He inherits 'The Night' by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, and passes on Donny Hathaway's 'A Song For You'.

Producer: Alex Lewis.


SAT 10:30 Ilkley Tour Baht 'at... (b0474wk2)
How did a county best known for cricket, flat caps and fatty beer, persuade a delegation of Frenchman to award it the first two stages of the world's greatest cycling race? From one-armed time trialists to a cycling mad Michelin starred chef, Yorkshire has a surprising pedalling history.

The bike allowed many to escape the city. Smog left behind. This century-old machine is now visible along towpaths, A-roads, pavements and in parks. They have fashionably slim wheels, signalling a new demographic, the Lycra-clad, peloton-inhabiting, cycling commuter. And West Yorkshire's Ilkley is home to the fastest growing cycling club in the country.

Brian Robinson, the first Briton to win a stage of the Tour, is now 83 but still cycles twice a week.

Simon Gueller - Michelin starred chef, once 15 stone, now a slender athlete who is out on his bike six times a week - welcomed the Tour delegation and cooked the Yorkshire lamb that helped the county win the bid. Cycling has changed his life.

Gary Verity - the CEO of Visit Yorkshire who had the idea to bring the Tour here whilst shaving one morning - is a sheep farmer by trade, but now passionate about cycling and sure to shed a tear when 200 of the best cyclists race into Harrogate to end the first stage.

Cycling is everything to some in the Yorkshire Dales. Beryl Burton was a supreme time trialist, the best all rounder for 25 years. Her daughter Denise and her husband Charlie share their memories of this great woman.
Presented by Hardeep Singh Kohli

Produced by Barney Rowntree
A Hidden Flack production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0474wkl)
Jackie Ashley of The Guardian looks behind the scenes at Westminster.The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0474wkn)
I Never Got to Florence

Correspondents' stories. Few British go to the Italian seaside town of Alassio these days but the library created for them there is still going - just. Coffee prices are rocketing in Brazil and the producers in this country which traditionally produces 'an awful lot of coffee' are concerned. There's a despatch from Baghdad, the Iraqi capital which is now a target of ISIS and other Sunni rebels. The problems pile up for the French president -- but he takes time off to praise an artist who only ever paints in black. And from the USA, we find out what happened to Little Germany, once a thriving part of New York City. Today, little more than a distant memory.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b0474wkv)
Debt mismanagement; £4m fine for mis-selling investments; will your insurer pay out during a national emergency?

Paul Lewis presents the latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b046p4n3)
Series 84

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guest panellists Susan Calman, Romesh Ranganathan and Holly Walsh.

Produced by Katie Tyrrell.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b046p52j)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b046p52l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b046p4n9)
Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Lord Forsyth, Lord Falconer, Lindsey German

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Durham School in County Durham with the former Secretary of State for Scotland, Lord Forsyth, Barrister and former Justice Secretary, Lord Falconer, Paralympian Baroness Tanni Grey Thompson and Lindsey German Convenor of the Stop the War Coalition and a founder of the People's Assembly movement.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0474xc4)
Austerity, Iraq, Assisted Dying

Your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

This week your views on austerity and the government's welfare reforms, whether the situation in Iraq poses a security risk to the UK, and the Assisted Dying Bill.

Presented by Anita Anand.
Produced by Maire Devine.


SAT 14:30 Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles (b0474xcb)
Derek Jacobi and Hayley Atwell lead an all-star cast in a thrilling new dramatisation, re-imagining Ray Bradbury's timeless fable of doomed Martian colonisation.

When the first expedition to Mars mysteriously disappears, Earth sends a second to find out what happened. But the real mission is classified. And only Captain Wilder knows the truth.

Dramatised for radio by Richard Kurti and Bev Doyle.

Original Music: Imran Ahmad
Sound Design: Alistair Lock
Executive Producer: Dirk Maggs

Producer/Director: Andrew Mark Sewell
A B7 Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Ata Kak and the Crate Diggers (b046kwq5)
It's 2002. On a makeshift stall in Cape Coast, Ghana, Brian Shimkovitz, a young American ethnomusicologist, buys a cassette tape. The bright yellow cover features a picture of the artist clutching a microphone and sporting a denim jacket, black cap worn backwards and dark sunglasses. He's called Ata Kak.

The tape is packed away and forgotten, re-discovered a few years later in New York.
It's the start of an obsession.

Brian is one of a handful of bloggers, DJs and record label bosses who are digging up musical gems from across Africa, previously unheard in the West and giving them a new lease of life. They're the crate diggers; enthusiasts of new sounds and exotic rhythms found in piles of dusty LPs lying forgotten across the African continent and beyond. Brian Shimkovitz started a blog called Awesome Tapes From Africa. Inspired by his fellow American and European crate diggers, it's now a fledgling record label.

Mark Coles follows Brian as he searches for Ata Kak, a hunt that takes him around the world at great personal expense. Who is the man behind this bizarre blend of excited shrieks, raps and 90's beats who, unknowingly, now has a fanbase of cool kids, online music geeks and world music devotees?

Mark meets Andy Morgan, music writer and former manager of world music superstars Tinariwen and Miles Cleret from Soundway Records. Plus he talks to Ebo Taylor, a Ghanaian highlife legend, now 78 years old and pursuing an international career after appearing on Soundway's first compilation. In a financially compromised music industry, what can Brian hope to offer an obscure Ghanaian rapper?

But first, he just has to find him....

Produced by Rebecca Maxted and Eva Krysiak
A Wise Buddah Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0474xcl)
Weekend Woman's Hour

The inspiring story of Antoinette Tuff who saved pupils and staff at a US school, threatened by a gunman.

Susie Orbach discusses why negative body image can affect pregnant women and new mothers, and maybe unconsciously passed on from mother to child.

Lorraine Pascale on fostering and we hear the experience of a young foster carer when few people under the age of 40 consider it.

Theologian and Methodist Minister Frances Young talks about her experience of bringing up her son Arthur, born with a severe learning disability forty-five years ago.

Lesley Boulton, pictured in an iconic photo during 1984 Yorkshire Miners' strike, describes the moment she was approached by a police officer on horseback wielding a baton.

Author Maeve Haran on why sixty today is the new forty.

And we explore the psychology of shoe shopping against a survey that shows almost half of women bought shoes that don't actually fit. Why?

Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Anne Peacock.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0474xcn)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b046ny89)
The Muslim Pound

How big is the market for halal - not just food, but holidays, fashion and music too? Muslim consumers - and how best to serve them - are the topics this week. Evan Davis talks to entrepreneurs who think they know the answer and asks how much can established companies learn from them.

Guests :

Shelina Janmohamed, Ogilvy Noor
Elnur Seyidli, HalalBooking.com
Shazia Saleem, ieat foods

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b046p52n)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b046p52q)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b046p52s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0474xd3)
Suggs, Janet Suzman, David Schneider, Chris Stewart, Arthur Smith, Moulettes, Pete Fij and Terry Bickers

Clive goes One Step Beyond with Madness frontman Suggs. As well as playing at the Queen's Jubilee and the Olympics Closing Ceremony with Madness, Suggs has been busy penning his autobiography 'That Close'. After spending the last few months taking his theatrical show 'Suggs: My Life Story in Words and Music' around the UK, he talks to Clive about his colourful life so far.

Clive talks to South African/British director and acclaimed actor Janet Suzman. Janet is part of the Jermyn Street's South Africa season. The summer event features five weeks of theatre from some of South Africa's most acclaimed playwrights and best-loved performers. Clive is sharing company with Her Majesty again, as Janet was awarded a DBE in the 2011 Birthday Honours for services to drama.

Arthur Smith talks to Genesis drummer turned sheep farmer Chris Stewart. It's been two decades since he moved to his farm on the wrong side of a river in the mountains of southern Spain and Arthur talks to Chris about his new book charting the ups and downs of ex-pat life. Having once joined the circus, Chris will feel at home in the tangle of talent of the Loose Ends studio.

Clive delves into the darkest of comedy with actor, writer and director David Schneider. In his play Making Stalin Laugh Schneider tells the story of the Moscow State Yiddish Theatre. The theatre was one of the most respected and critically acclaimed in the world, until its most prominent writers were executed at the hands of Stalin in 1952 - in an event known as the Night of the Murdered Poets.

This week's music is from Moulettes, who perform Lady Vengeance from their album Constellations. And more music from Peter Fij and Terry Bickers, performing Out of Time from new album Broken Heart Surgery.

producer Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b0474xd5)
Series 16

Alligators and Warm Beer

Writer Clara Glynn creates a dramatic response to a story in the week's news.

Ara's desperate to swot up on what it means to be British, to pass the citizenship test but the village library has been closed down and she has no access to a computer. Help is on hand thanks to Lady Rose, but is this a random act of kindness or does she have another agenda?

Producer: David Ian Neville.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0474xdh)
The Fault in Our Stars, The Silkworm, Making Stalin Laugh, Making Colour, The Human Factor

The Fault In Our Stars, starring Shailene Woodley, is the screen adaptation of John Green's best selling young adult novel of the same name about a pair of love struck teenagers both of whom are terminally ill with cancer. Brought together at a cancer support group the pair embark on a pilgrimage to Holland to meet the author of a book on dying. Green himself was a hospital chaplain and the story is based on an actual encounter with a dying 16 year old girl.

Following on from the huge success of The Cuckoo's Calling a second novel from Robert Galbraith - aka JK Rowling. Featuring private investigator Cormoran Strike it merges an old fashioned detective story with Jacobean tragedy, whilst providing insight into literary London, a grisly murder and a page turning plot.

Comedian and actor David Schneider's new play Making Stalin Laugh - at the JW3 Community Centre in London - tells the story of the Moscow State Yiddish Theatre which in the 1920s was one of the most respected in the world. Chagall designed for them, Prokofiev, Stanislavski and Eugene O'Neill all saluted them. By 1952 the surviving members of the troupe had all been purged - executed by Stalin on the same day in August. Making Stalin Laugh tells their story, with at its centre the most celebrated Yiddish actor of his generation, Solomon Mikhoels.

Making Colour at London's National Gallery is the first ever exhibition of its kind in the UK and was developed from the National Gallery's own internationally recognised Scientific Department's work into how artists historically overcame the technical challenges in creating colour. As well as paintings it includes objects such as early textiles, mineral samples and ceramics and shows the huge impact the development of synthetic paint had on major art movements such as Impressionism.

And The Human Factor: The Figure in Contemporary Sculpture brings together major works by 25 leading international artists who have fashioned new ways of using the human form in sculpture over the past 25 years. Featuring work from Jeff Koons, Mark Wallinger and Yinka Shonibare, exhibits include two re-imaginings of Edgar Degas's famous Little Dancer Aged Fourteen and in a work by French artist Pierre Huyghe a live beehive adorns a cast in concrete of a beautiful reclining nude woman.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0474xdk)
A History of the N-Word

There are some words in English that are so controversial that they are shortened to a single letter lest they cause offence. Perhaps the most inflammatory is the N-word. The proxy barely disguises the racial insult, "nigger", which has topped lists of ugly and hateful words since it was first uttered in the seventeenth century. It has regularly wounded black people, its target, down the ages. When, for instance, the African American boxer, Muhammad Ali, was asked why he resisted the draft in the Vietnam War, he is alleged to have said: "No Vietnamese ever called me nigger."

Ellah Allfrey looks at its evolution from its origins as a mispronunciation of the Spanish "negro" in the 17th century. She illuminates how and why the capitalised "Negro" became the more acceptable version of the word in the 1920s (the landmark adoption of Negro by the New York Times was in 1930); through to the subsequent re-appropriation of the N word in rap and hip-hop culture. But even when coming from the mouths of black people the N word continues to cause offence. There have been calls for the word to be banned. But is this possible or desirable?


(Photo credit - AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 Philip K Dick - Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (b046j873)
Episode 1

By Philip K. Dick
Dramatised by Jonathan Holloway

Philip K. Dick's cult sci-fi novel inspired the film Blade Runner. Set in a world devastated by nuclear war, a San Francisco bounty hunter is on a mission to retire a group of rogue androids. James Purefoy and Jessica Raine star in this new adaptation.

In post-war 1992 androids are becoming indistinguishable from human beings, even in their capacity to love, and bounty hunter Rick Deckard is tasked with locating and retiring a rogue group of escaped androids who have fled a life of slavery and returned to Earth.

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b046p52v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b046l802)
British Values

The 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta on the 15th of June next year has taken on a whole new level of importance and symbolism. It's now become a major plank in the government's response to the Trojan Horse controversy in some Birmingham schools. Historians may have argued for decades about the true significance of the document, but today politicians are clear - this is now about "British Values" - what they are and the role they should play in education. The only trouble is you have to define them first. And David Cameron wouldn't be the first politician to come unstuck there. Writing about it this week he started one paragraph with "freedom", followed quickly by "tolerance" and only 37 words later had resorted to "fish and chips". So how do we define these values? Perhaps they're being the kind of socially responsible parent who wants to instil their values in to their children and who's willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their spare time to become a school governor to help their local community? What if those parents happen to be Muslims who want their schools to have more of an "Islamic" ethos in an attempt to insulate their children against the "corrupting" effects of British society? What should you do when the values of a community clash with wider social norms? How tolerant should we be? Is it the role of the state to define and dictate what values should be taught in schools, or should that be the job of parents? Can you even teach values or are they something that we absorb gradually? Is this really about what is, or isn't being taught in a small group of schools in Birmingham, or is it more a crisis of confidence in our society about what we should and shouldn't value? Moral Maze - Presented by Michael Buerk.

Witnesses are Ted Cantle, Myriam Francois-Cerrah, Sunder Katwala and Alasdair Palmer.

Produced by Phil Pegum.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b046j96d)
(5/12)
Why do a serenade to Rita, the largest private university in India, and a cockney catch-phrase, collectively suggest ladybirds?

Marcel Berlins and Fred Housego of the South of England will face this conundrum, as they take on Val McDermid and Roddy Lumsden of Scotland, in the latest contest of lateral thinking and cryptic connections. Fred and Marcel suffered a defeat in the first programme of the series and badly need to make up some points in this week's contest.

Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair, and will be awarding points depending on how much help he has to give the panel in unravelling the programme's notoriously complex questions. The programme also includes a selection of the best questions suggested by listeners.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b046j877)
Poetry and Music

Roger McGough presents a programme examining the long relationship between poetry and music. Poets through the ages have collaborated with musicians from every genre from classical to drum and bass, taking in folk, punk and reggae. Featuring Edward Elgar, Sir John Betjeman, ee cummings, Gregory Porter, Michael Horovitz, Joan Baez, Leonard Cohen, John Cooper Clarke, Benjamin Zephaniah, Kate Tempest and the Scaffold.



SUNDAY 22 JUNE 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0474xgm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Tao Lin - A Message of Unknown Purpose (b0474xj1)
Peter Marinker reads Tao Lin's curious tale about the discovery of a message from the future in which an elderly prisoner talks about the invention and misuse of a sleep machine. "In 2042, after major worldwide catastrophes in the second and third decades of the 21st century, the world is drastically different. It's much, much worse and maybe more exciting, depending on who you ask." A vision emerges of a society addicted to sleep.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins

In reviewing cult author and poet Tao Lin's novel, Taipei, the TLS writes, "a daring, urgent voice for a malfunctioning age"


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0474xgp)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0474xgr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0474xgt)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0474xgw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0474xj3)
Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon

The bells of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b046l80n)
Series 4

Sandra Newman

The American author Sandra Newman explains why, while most of us would like to be cool, it is best not to try too hard.

Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks in which speakers air their thinking, in front of a live audience, on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect culture and society.

Presenter: Kamin Mohammadi
Producer: Estelle Doyle.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0474xgy)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0474xk8)
Exploration

"There are few treasures of more lasting worth than the experiences of a way of life that is in itself wholly satisfying. Such, after all, are the only possessions of which no fate, no cosmic catastrophe, can deprive us; nothing can alter the fact if for one moment in eternity we have really lived."

Drawing on these words from the explorer Eric Shipton, the British writer and mountaineer Stephen Venables considers the importance of exploration.

Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0474xkb)
Animal Film Stars

Helen Mark visits Kenny Gracey on his County Armagh farm. Kenny and his wife Jennifer farm a large selection of rare breed livestock. They have taken advantage of Northern Ireland's burgeoning film industry to combine traditional farming with breeding and training animal stars for film and television, including hit series Game of Thrones.
Presented by Helen Mark and produced in Bristol by Ruth Sanderson.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0474xh0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0474xh2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0474xkq)
Canon Andrew White, Women Bishops, spiritual music

Canon Andrew White, the Vicar of Baghdad talks to Edward about the plight of Christian's in Iraq.
In Berlin, a project to have a mosque, a synagogue and a church under the same roof is under way. It was organised by a Protestant pastor who says it's unique - in no other place do the three faiths share premises. Steve Evans reports. We speak to Catholic historian and writer Michael Walsh to assess the works of the Vatican Bank and its future as the Pope took the unprecedented step of sacking four of the five Cardinals appointed to oversee the activities of the Bank. We assess the life and legacy of Rabbi Nachman Sudak who died last week . A leader in the Lubavitch community
Rabbi Shmuel Lew tells us why he was so influential. This year's City of London Festival is celebrating girls' cathedral choirs with a new commission. Composer Judith Bingham tells Sunday about the work and how the century's old tradition of boy's choirs is complimented by an ever-increasing number of girls' choirs.It's 50 years since permanent deacons were allowed to be ordained in the Catholic Church. Kevin Bocquet reports on what the diaconate has brought to the Church at a time when vocations to the priesthood are falling. Today the Fes festival has become not only very popular but a beacon of religious tolerance and religious pluralism in the middle of the Muslim world. John Laurenson reports.As the vote for women bishops looms in Synod in a few weeks we look at the psychology of change with Professor Marilyn Davidson from Manchester Business School.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Zaffar Iqbal

Editor
Christine Morgan

Contributors
Canon Andrew White
Michaael Walsh
Judith Bingham
Professor Marilyn Davidson
Rabbi Shmuel Lew.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b0474xks)
Cure International UK

Sophie Winkelman presents The Radio 4 Appeal for Cure International UK.
Registered Charity No 1094705.
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope ' Cure International UK'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0474xh4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0474xh6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b0474y36)
In Harmony with God's Voice

Beverley Humphreys explores the transforming power of the voice in a service from St. David's Uniting Church, Pontypridd, with music from the BBC National Chorus of Wales. Music Director: Adrian Partington. Organist: Simon Bell. Producer: Karen Walker.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b046p4nc)
If You Haven't Got Anything Nice to Say...

AL Kennedy argues that our obsession with gossip is affecting our public discourse, and corrupting its content.

She traces the history of gossip, explores how gossip is edging out real news and how it's taken over our political lives.

"Gossip obscures truth" she writes, "sours our outlooks on each other and can trivialise any debate". She concludes that "we really could do with a lot less of it".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tqln)
Lesser Whitethroat

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Kresovnikoff presents the Lesser Whitethroat. A loud rattling song from a roadside hedge announces that Lesser whitethroats are back from their African winter homes.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0474y9m)
We discuss if Iraq can remain a united country and hear of a 19th century charity in France that is still helping British emigres. Reviewing the Sunday papers: tennis champion Virginia Wade, philosopher A.C. Grayling and political commentator Steve Richards.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0474y9p)
Peggy has a difficult day. Meanwhile, Elizabeth is converted.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b0474yct)
Judy Murray

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is Judy Murray.

A tennis coach since she was 17, she's the current British captain of the Fed Cup, the premier team competition in women's tennis, and was herself at one time ranked 8th in Britain - achievements worth celebrating.

But what she's best known for is being the ultimate tennis mum. Both her sons have reached the top flight of the game - one as Wimbledon mixed doubles champion, the other becoming the first Brit to win the men's singles in 77 years. In the moments after Andy Murray's heroic win on Centre Court last year it was to her he turned pumping his fists and roaring - as if to say 'we have done it'.

Judy's many followers on social media know how she spends her time - countless hours travelling up and down the country coaching and working to inspire children to take up the game.

She says, 'I've always been competitive. I'm like Andy, or maybe he's like me - I wear my heart on my sleeve. And when something is great, then yep, I am right into it'.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b046kr4b)
Series 69

Episode 5

How hard can it be to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition and deviation? Very! As Paul Sinha, Patrick Kielty, Shappi Khorsandi, and Gyles Brandreth find out. Nicholas Parsons keeps the score and the peace.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b0474yd3)
Sweeteners: The answer to our sugar cravings?

Sheila Dillon asks whether sweeteners could be the way for us to cut down sugar but to keep enjoying sweet treats.
Presented by Sheila Dillon and produced in Bristol by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0474xh8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b04754xn)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 David Blunkett: A Political Life (b0493dmq)
Almost 45 years since he was first elected to Sheffield City Council, David Blunkett has announced he's stepping down as MP. The former Home Secretary speaks to John Humphrys about his life in politics, the affair that cost him his post and succeeding as a blind man in Westminster. Producer: Katie Prescott. Editor: Jamie Angus.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b046p07s)
Tiverton, Devon

Eric Robson and the team visit Tiverton, Devon. Matt Biggs, Pippa Greenwood and Anne Swithinbank take questions from a local audience.

Produced by Victoria Shepherd.
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

NB:

Please be aware that the Hottentot fig is listed as an invasive species under Schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 with respect to England, Wales and Scotland. As such, it is an offence to plant or otherwise cause this species to grow in the wild.

This week's questions and answers:
Q: I have two clumps of Lupins planted about 60 yards (about 54 metres) apart. One is covered in aphids, the other is aphid free, why might this be? Does the panel have any tips to avoid aphids?

A: Different aphids have different preferences and the Lupins might be at different stages of growth. To avoid aphids next year, put strips of tin foil on the flower bed adjacent to the affected plants. The light reflected off the tin foil confuses the aphids and they are deterred from settling on the plant.

Q. I'm building up a rockery, can you recommend local and exotic plants that will grow around the rocks?

A. Local varieties include dwarf alpine varieties, like the Silene maritima, with pretty Campion-like flowers. You could also try Campanula portenschlagiana, Aubretias and Louisias.
A more exotic plant that would grow well would be the Carpobrotus (Hottentot Fig). Lithodora 'Heavenly Blue' would do well, as would Rock Roses,Sempervivums and Daphne Blagayana. You could also try cushion plants such as Saxifraga 'Tumbling Waters'.

Q. The leaves of my Skimmia japonica rubella have yellowed. What has happened?

A. This is a classic symptom of wet weather and clay soil. To treat the plant, use foliar feed. Mix epsom salts with water and a dash of washing-up liquid and pour this mixture over the leaves. This will help stimulate chloroplast production - returning the leaves to a healthier green colour. However, do be prepared for a bit of die back.

Q. Can the panel recommend perennials that I can leave in the ground?

A. Japanese Anemones, Sedums and Irises can be left in the ground. Other good options include
Gillenia trifoliata, Dicentras, Spectabilis,Thalictrums and Crocosmias.

Q. I have a 6ft (1.8 metre) high, north-facing drystone wall. Can the panel suggest some plants to enhance its appearance?

A. Japanese Quince, Chaenomeles speciosa nivalis, Actinidia kolomikta, climbing Hydrangea or Hydrangea Seemanii could be grown up the wall. You might like to try nestling plants in between the stones. Ivy-leaved Toadflax and ferns would work well. Gooseberry bushes do well in the shade if you wanted to grow fruit.

Q. Hail stones have gone through the leaves in my garden. The holes have now browned and they look bad. Will cutting off the leaves stimulate fresh leaf growth?

A. No. The plant will suffer if you remove most of the leaves. Just remove the leaves that look like they might have a secondary infection such as grey mould. You could do a little gentle pruning to tidy up and encourage stem growth.

Q. I have a confusion of raspberries on my allotment and I'm not sure which are summer fruiting and which are autumn fruiting. Hence, my pruning has been random. None of the plants are particularly fruitful. Should I start again?

A. Yes. Choose a new sight and build up a mound of soil before planting. Stick to autumn fruiting varieties as they tend to better in clay soil.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0475524)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces conversations from Cumbria, Suffolk and Devon about age differences in marriage, the learning curve in adoption, and collaboration in writing and illustrating.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Philip K Dick - Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (b047cz98)
Episode 2

By Philip K. Dick
Dramatised by Jonathan Holloway

Philip K. Dick's cult sci-fi novel inspired the film Blade Runner. Set in a world devastated by nuclear war, a San Francisco bounty hunter is on a mission to retire a group of rogue androids. James Purefoy and Jessica Raine star in this new adaptation.

Bounty hunter Rick Deckard is on a mission to locate and retire a rogue group of androids who have escaped a life of slavery on Mars and returned to Earth. But now that androids are almost indistinguishable from human beings, 'retirement' begins to feel more like murder and Deckard's morals get in the way of the job. The boundaries continue to blur when he develops feelings for the beautiful and sentient Rachael Rosen, herself an android.

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0475566)
Sandra Newman, Roopa Farooki, John Banville, Courttia Newland

US author Sandra Newman on her new novel, 'The Country of Ice Cream Star', set in a post-apocalyptic US, plus British author Courttia Newland and Sandra Newman in discussion about writing across racial lines.

Sandra Newman is the author of two novels, and several works of non-fiction. Kate Atkinson said of Newman's new novel: 'I can't remember when I last read something so original or sophisticated or emotionally engaging or so breathtakingly ambitious.'

Acclaimed author Roopa Farooki on her new novel, The Good Children, looking at the 1940s generation of children in Pakistan who were brought up to obey, and what happened when they chose no longer to be 'Good Children'. Roopa Farooki was born in Lahore, Pakistan, and brought up in London. She has written six novels to critical acclaim, and has been twice longlisted the Orange Prize.

Plus, award-winning Irish writer John Banville on the book he'd never lend.

And finally, in another in the occasional series of insider tip offs from the publishing world, Meike Ziervogel of Peirene Press recommends Sarah Pickstone's 'Park Notes'.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b0475568)
Stages of Life

Roger McGough presents poems on a range of subjects including machines, butterflies, and the stages of life we go through. Poets featured include John Donne, Edna St Vincent Millay, Jean Sprackland and Louis MacNeice. Readers are Jasmine Hyde and Finbar Lynch.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b046kybw)
Inside the Abattoir

The recent furore over halal meat has focused attention on how our meat is killed and processed.

But beyond the ethical and religious debate over halal, are there bigger concerns about how abattoirs are regulated and policed?

Companies have been fined for failing to remove body parts associated with the human form of mad cow disease, BSE.

Now there are plans to shake-up the inspection process which critics say this could lead to more infected animals entering the food chain.

There are also claims that vets based in abattoirs to monitor animal welfare - and inspectors who check meat we eat is safe - regularly face threats and intimidation.

Allan Urry investigates the grim realities of the slaughterhouse.

Producer: Carl Johnston.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b0474xd5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0474xhb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0474xhd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0474xhg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b047556v)
We hear inspiring stories of hope and survival. From the man who escaped death when he fell to into a mountain crevasse to the wannabe gangster who switched sides to become a police officer. We tackle the subject of boring football commentary and offer a beautiful Brazilian soundtrack for the world cup. If football is not your thing that we have the action hero Modesty Blaise, a British spy who's the female equivalent of James Bond.

Outlook (World Service - All Week)

Hail Marys and Miniskirts (Radio 4 - 18th June)

Marginalia - (Radio 4 - 16th June)

Dangerous Visions - Iz (Radio 4 - 17th June)

Ata Kak and the Create Diggers (Radio 4 - 17th June)

15 Minute Drama - Modesty Blaise (Radio 4 - All Week)

Auntie and the Miners (BBC Sheffield - 18th June)

BBC Radio 1Xtra's Stories - Sound of the Police - (Radio 1Xtra - 15th June)

Book of the Week - As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning (Radio 4 - All Week)

Paco Peña - The Spirit of Flamenco (Radio 2 - 16th June)

Today (Radio 4 - All Week)

Gilles Peterson's Musica Brasileira (Radio 2 - 17th June).


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0475580)
Shula & Alistair are going to see Dan at Sandhurst for Old College Sunday, and Shula's keen to look her best. They watch him on parade, so proud. Shula notices Dan has changed so much. Dan shares some photos from exercise Long Reach in Wales and talks about his mates. They had a few hairy moments during their training operation, but he's proud that his platoon did well. Shula still finds it hard not getting much time with Dan. But Alistair points out how well Dan is doing.

At Greenbury Fields festival, Elizabeth and Roy wake up together in his tent. Whilst chuffed Roy is pinching himself and quite chipper, Elizabeth feels unwell - too much cider last night.
Hayley calls Roy. She and Abbie are making cupcakes for his return.

Roy feels there was always a spark between him and Elizabeth. But while she doesn't regret what happened, Elizabeth says it can't go anywhere. When they get home, everything goes back to normal.
Roy comes home and gives Hayley a necklace. Hayley's missed Roy and is glad to have him home.


SUN 19:15 Tom Wrigglesworth's Open Letters (b01hxpy6)
Series 2

Junk Mail

Sony Award-winning comic Tom Wrigglesworth performs the last in his series of open letters.

Now he's taking issue with his local curry house and their addiction to junk mail.

Tom also tracks the development of advertising and marketing - a development trajectory which has now led us to the rather ridiculous stage where we can be "Facebook friends" with Jacob's Crackers.

Written by Tom Wrigglesworth, James Kettle and Miles Jupp.

Producer: Simon Mayhew-Archer

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2012.


SUN 19:45 Writing Lives (b0475590)
Swimming Lessons

Writing Lives is a series of short stories by writers new to Radio 4 and based on personal experience.

In the countryside beyond Moscow, during the time of perestroika, a young Englishwoman learns about life and love in the new Russia. Then late one night, her and a companion slip into a river and drift downstream.

Victoria Field is a Kent-based writer and poetry therapist. This is her first commission for BBC Radio 4.

Read by Jane Whittenshaw

Producer: Paul Dodgson
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b046p07z)
Fans of Radio 2's Alex Lester, the self-professed Dark Lord, are in open revolt at the news that he's being moved from his midweek early morning slot to the weekend. They're also angry that his old slot is to be filled with repeats. In the first programme of the new series, Roger Bolton talks to BBC Radio 2 Controller Bob Shennan about his decision to reduce the station's live broadcasting through the night.

Also, is the BBC responsible for some of UKIP's recent successes by giving the party too much coverage? Ric Bailey, the BBC's Chief Political Adviser, takes us through how the corporation aims to ensure impartiality in its political reporting.

Roger will also be investigating the mysterious case of Radio 4's missing shipping forecast and why the Radio iPlayer catch-up service has been cut from smart TVs. And we'll be going behind-the-scenes to find out about "lost" BBC archive programmes sent in by members of the public.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b046p07x)
Gerry Goffin, Freydis Sharland, Alexander Shulgin, Francis Matthews

Matthew Bannister on

The lyricist Gerry Goffin - who, with his wife Carole King, wrote some of the biggest hits of the sixties and seventies. They include Will You Love Me Tomorrow, You Make Me Feel Like A Natural Woman and Up On The Roof.

Also: the pioneering woman pilot Freydis Sharland, who delivered aircraft during the war and once flew a Tempest from the UK to Pakistan.

Alexander Shulgin - the American chemist known as the Godfather of psychedelic drugs.

And the actor Francis Matthews best known for playing the suave spy Paul Temple on TV - and providing the voice of the puppet Captain Scarlet.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0474wkv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0474xks)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b046kr4l)
Courting Trouble

When does flirting go too far? In a changing world, can we agree on what is acceptable behaviour? Sexual harassment is much in the news, new laws and codes are in place. Legal definitions are one thing, but real life situations can be a lot messier and more uncertain. Mixing expert analysis of the issues with discussion of everyday scenarios, Jo Fidgen asks: what are the new rules of relationships?
Producer: Chris Bowlby.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b04755dx)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b04755dz)
Nosheen Iqbal of the Guardian looks at how papers covered the week's big stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b046nxd3)
Toby Jones; Fanny Ardant; Chinese Cinema before the Revolution

With Francine Stock.

Toby Jones discusses what it was like working with young refugees whose life stories form the plot of Leave To Remain, and reveals some tantalising details about his role as Captain Mainwaring in the forthcoming film adaptation of Dad's Army.

French star Fanny Ardant plays a sixtysomething woman who embarks on an affair with a man twenty years her junior in Bright Days Ahead. She tells Francine why she doesn't approve of the term 'cougar' and why we shouldn't worry about getting older.

Spring In A Small Town is considered one of the best Chinese films ever made. Released in 1948, a year before the Communists took power, the film was banned and its director Fei Mu fled to Hong Kong, where he died a couple of years later. In the week that it opens in British cinemas, The Film Programme discovers how the Shanghai film industry rivalled Hollywood before the Communist revolution.

Dale Dye is an ex-Marine and military adviser on war movies like Saving Private Ryan and Platoon. He reveals why and how he puts actor through their paces in boot camp.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0474xk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 23 JUNE 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b04755g1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b046l7zr)
Late-Modern Hipsters - Before the Windrush

Before the Windrush - Laurie Taylor talks to John Belchem, Professor of History at the University of Liverpool, about his study of race relations in 20th century Liverpool. Long before the arrival of the Empire Windrush after the Second World War, the city was already a teeming mix of different nationalities and races. Black Liverpudlians pioneered mixed marriages and parentage but they also experienced rejection and discrimination. Nisha Katona, city born resident and trustee of National Museums Liverpool, joins the debate.

Also, Bjorn Andersen, a sociologist at the University of Gothenburg, discusses the phenomenon of the late modern 'hipster', the young bohemian of the cosmopolitan city.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0474xj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04755g3)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04755g5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04755g7)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b04755g9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b04755lx)
Prayer and reflection with Kevin Franz of the Religious Society of Friends.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b04755lz)
Tenant Farming in Scotland, Farmers in the Media, Cow Perfume

Tenant farming in Scotland is in severe decline and a new report has highlighted the problems facing those renting farms.
The Agricultural Holdings Legislation Review Group, led by Scotland's rural affairs secretary Richard Lochhead, has spent six months gathering evidence and looking for ways to improve the fortunes of tenanted land and the people farming it.
Short-term lets, lack of investment, limited access to subsidy payments for new entrants and tricky landlord/tenant relations are all to blame for the shrinking sector, according to its interim report.
Not the best farming news to announce at the Royal Highland Show, which finished on Sunday. Our reporter Nancy Nicholson has a full report including interviews with the Scottish Tenant Farmers Association and Richard Lochhead.
Bill Gates has donated $100,000 to a project in California which hopes to confuse malaria-carrying mosquitoes by making cows smell like humans, so they bite the animals instead of people. Charlotte Smith hears from Dr Agenor Mafra-Neto, leading the project, on how it could reduce the spread of the disease.
All this week on Farming Today we'll be exploring the changing image of farmers. Are they perhaps the new celebrity chefs?! Charlotte talks to Caroline Drummond, chief executive of LEAF about their training courses to improve farmers' communication skills.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


MON 05:56 Weather (b04755gc)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvggm)
Corn Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall begins May with the corn bunting. Corn buntings may be plain-looking birds which sing their scratchy songs from cornfields, but their private lives are a colourful affair and a single male bird may have up to 18 partners.


MON 06:00 Today (b0477j48)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0477j4b)
Joyce DiDonato and Julie Bindel on Women Behaving Badly

Tom Sutcliffe talks to the director Erica Whyman about a series of plays by the RSC which focus on the idea that 'well behaved women rarely make history'. The historian Helen Castor looks back at the Middle Ages to some of the earliest roaring girls, while the soprano Joyce DiDonato brings alive Mary, Queen of Scots, the tragic hero of Donizetti's opera. The political activist Julie Bindel has been behaving badly since she came out as a lesbian in the 1970s. She looks at what it means to be gay in 2014 and whether the genuine gains that have been achieved in the last forty years have castrated a once-radical social movement.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b03th7pn)
Month of Madness

Sarajevo

Professor Christopher Clark unpicks the complex sequence of events during the July Crisis, leading to outbreak of the First World War, from the perspective of the key centres of decision-making – in Berlin, Paris, St Petersburg and London.

He analyses how these countries reacted to the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary in Sarajevo on 28th June 1914 and casts fresh light on the causes of the First World War, offering a new interpretation of the catastrophe.

This short-run crisis was the most complex event in modern history - yet Professor Clark argues that, far from being a slow sequence of events in which bungling leaders walked blindly to war, it was a fast-paced crisis that contains lessons and parallels for our own world. There was no 'slithering over the brink' as Lloyd George later claimed, but rather a sequence of clear-eyed steps. The July Crisis of 1914 was a 'Month of Madness', not because the men who made it were themselves mad, but because its outcome was completely catastrophic and completely unnecessary.

In the first programme, Professor Clark travels to Sarajevo to tell the story of extraordinary chances that led to the assassinations of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie Chotek on 28th June 1914, conveying a sharp sense of the dramatic sequence of events that day and how they were shaped by the geography of the city.

The repercussions of the assassinations - comparable to the effect of 9/11 - exemplify the transformative power of a terrorist event. But the murders were not a pretext for a war decided in advance - nor did they make conflict inevitable.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0477j4g)
Penelope Leach; Women and gambling; Loneliness

Psychologist Penelope Leach on dealing with the difficult process of splitting up when children are involved. The impact on women of easy access to gambling in our homes. Loneliness at different life stages explored across the week - today actor Patricia Greene who plays Jill Archer in Radio 4's The Archers talks about the challenges faced in your eighties. Engineer Professor Sarah Hainsworth describes her work on the remains of Richard III in an interview marking the first National Women in Engineering Day.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Anne Peacock.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0477j4j)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 3

Episode 1

Wisal, the son of the wealthy and powerful village warlord, would like to marry Zarlakhta. But she is already betrothed to her cousin and the marriage will go ahead if his heroin addiction is cured. Wisal is horrified that his own brother has been hired to keep the bridegroom off heroin until after the wedding - an event Zarlakhta's mother is determined will take place for financial reasons.

A slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pak-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, no electricity and no phone - but hi-tech drones fly overhead.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for the Pashtoon people of this untamed area.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey
Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas
Executive Producer: John Dryden

Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 The Little Stamp that Became the Most Valuable Thing in the World (b0477j4l)
Joshua Levine explores the psychology of collecting through the life of a very expensive stamp.

A smudgy reddish little stamp, 1856 British Guiana 1-Cent Magenta - is the only one of its type in existence. Its sale in 2014 [where it achieved a US auction price of nearly $10,000,000] followed the death of its most recent owner, American multi-millionaire John Du Pont, who died in a secure mental hospital in Pennsylvania, while serving a life sentence for the murder of his closest friend, Dave Schultz, an Olympic gold medal winning wrestler.

Writer and historian Joshua Levine charts the life of the stamp - something of a checkered history - and tells a parallel story of the psychology of collecting.

Discovered by a 12-year-old Scottish boy in 1873, he sold the 1-Cent Magenta for a few shillings. Five years later it was bought by the Austrian, Phillipp Von Ferrary, the owner of the greatest stamp collection the world has ever seen. His entire collection was stolen by the French government, who sold it in 1919.

The stamp then passed through several hands, including those of Arthur Hind, an English textile dealer living in New York, who legend has it aquired the only other 1-Cent Magenta in existence - which he set alight, exclaiming 'Now there's only one again!".

Why do humans feel the need to collect, categorise and classify?

As we examine these stories of bitterness and misfortune, should we attribute a curse to the little stamp? Or should we, instead, blame it on the irresponsibility, greed and sense of entitlement which so often accompanies great wealth and privilege.

Producer: Gemma Newby

A Goldhawk production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2014.


MON 11:30 Rudy's Rare Records (b00yj2hq)
Series 3

Lights Out

Father and son comedy set in the finest old-school record shop in Birmingham.

Rudy is determined to prove to his girlfriend Doreen that she's finally met her match. He's even persuaded Adam to keep out of the way while he cooks Doreen a romantic meal for her birthday. The power supply across the West Midlands, however, has even more surprising treats in store.

Written by Danny Robins
Produced by Lucy Armitage.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b0477m6n)
Car Hire in Spain, Cashless Society and Squeezed Suppliers

The Spanish Consumer Organisation says illegal car hire practices are harming their country's reputation. We find out how you can avoid being ripped off when you rent a car abroad.
Could you live without cash? As one street experiments by using cards only we take a look at the future of money and ask if we really are ready to ditch the pounds and pence.
And we investigate the multibillion pound companies that are squeezing their suppliers to make even more money.


MON 12:57 Weather (b04755gf)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b0477m6q)
A court in Egypt has sentenced three al-Jazeera journalists to seven years in jail for spreading false news and supporting the Muslim Brotherhood. We hear from the broadcaster's managing director and a British correspondent given 10 years in absentia.

As the American Secretary of State, John Kerry, holds talks with Iraqi leaders in Baghdad, we ask a former general in the Jordanian Army about ISIS's advances to his country's border. We also hear from the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, Lord Carlile, about the threat posed by returning British jihadis.

An independent adviser accuses the government of "moving the goalposts" on badger culls. The farming minister, George Eustice, responds.

And should Iceland call time on its national currency?

Presented by Edward Stourton.


MON 13:45 Just So Science (b0477m6s)
Series 2

How the Camel Got His Hump

Returning for a second series, Vivienne Parry considers the animals of Rudyard Kipling's much loved Just So Stories for Children. Assisted by researchers of 'infinite sagacity' (that means they're awfully clever) she'll discover if science can yet explain how the camel got his hump, the kangaroo his hop or the elephant his trunk. Kipling's tales are brought to life by the actor Samuel West.

In How the Camel Got his Hump, Kipling's beast is as grumpy as they come and is punished for his laziness. Vivienne talks to Dr Lulu Skidmore, Director of the Camel Reproduction Centre in Dubai about the tricky business of Camel IVF and the truth about just how grumpy (and lazy) these beasts are. The reader is Samuel West. Producer: Rami Tzabar.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0475580)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0477m6v)
Brought to Light

Katie is a medical student who has grown up in post-Good Friday Agreement Northern Ireland and her country's past hasn't impacted on her or been of much interest to her. Until she discovers some old newspapers in her grandmother's attic that is, and suddenly and devastatingly her world comes crashing down around her. Her father is not the man she believed him to be: he has been in prison for an atrocity he carried out during the Troubles.

Katie is distraught and feels betrayed. How could her parents have kept this from her? How could her father have ever done something so terrible? As Katie struggles to come to terms with her father's past she puts her own future at university in jeopardy, but how can she ever understand what he did and why, much less forgive him?

Sophie Harkness stars as Katie in a story of a family trying to come to terms with the secrets of the past.

Writer Francis Turnly's previous credits for Radio 4 include 'Hinterland', 'Point of Departure', 'Homestead', 'Baldi' and 'Pressing the Flesh'.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b0477m6x)
(6/12)
Explain why the symbol of Charlie Chaplin's dictator, and the company which merged with Mobil, might both have come under the scrutiny of MI5's Twenty Committee?

Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair for the latest contest of cryptic connections, with Wales and Northern Ireland both playing their second match of the current series. Wales badly need a win if they're to stand a chance of retaining their title as Round Britain Quiz champions.

David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander play for Wales, while Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney are the regulars for Northern Ireland. They'll win points depending on how far they get in answering the programme's convoluted questions without help. The more clues Tom has to give them, the fewer points they'll earn.

As always, the programme includes some of the best recent question ideas received from listeners.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b0474yd3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Arnold of the Five Towns (b0477m6z)
Writer Arnold Bennett was a man of many worlds.

Born in 1867 amidst the roar and industry of The Potteries, he became a giant of the London literati, renowned far beyond the capital for works such as The Old Wives' Tale, The Card and Anna of the Five Towns.

But Bennett was not just a novelist. From screenplays to 'how to' books, Evening Standard articles to Woman magazine, he was wildly prolific, unashamed of earning a living from his art, and as capable of describing the minutiae of grand hotels as he was the life of the charwoman.

Mourned by the likes of Lord Beaverbrook and Somerset Maugham when he died in 1931, Arnold Bennett earned a level of wealth and celebrity in his lifetime of which many writers might now only dream.

So why does this man - who once wrote in his journal that he "would not care a bilberry for posterity" - seem to have somewhat fallen from fame? What's his legacy in his hometown? And what could his life and work say to 21st century Britain?

Bennett fan Samira Ahmed reappraises the reputation of this self-made man from the Potteries, visiting places as diverse as The Savoy Hotel and Stoke City FC. She tours Burslem's Bennett landmarks, delves into the archive at the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery and walks the floorboards of the Middleport Pottery as she hears how it inspired one of Bennett's best-loved works.

Interviewees include Dame Margaret Drabble, historian and MP Tristram Hunt, writer Sathnam Sanghera and many others.

Producer: Alice Bloch

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in June 2014.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b0477m71)
Christianity and Gender Identity

Ernie Rea and guests discuss Christian perspectives on Gender identity.
Within the last 40 years it has been possible for people to undergo sex reassignment surgery. British law was changed ten years ago to enable them to change the sex given on their birth certificates. What challenges do these developments throw up for Christian thought and practice? Ernie is joined by Rev Rachel Mann, a transgender priest in the Church of England, Dr Vicky Gunn who teaches practical theology at Glasgow University and Dr Don Horrocks, head of public affairs at the Evangelical Alliance and Research Associate at the London School of Theology.


MON 17:00 PM (b0477m73)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04755gh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b0477m75)
Series 69

Episode 6

Just how hard can it be to talk for 60 seconds without hesitation, repetition or deviation? Paul Merton, Kevin Eldon, Joe Lycett and Sheila Hancock find out in Just A Minute with the legendary Nicholas Parsons keeping order.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0477m77)
Preparing for the bonfire party on Lakey Hill, David talks to Mike about Route B. He's deadly serious and both are appalled by Charlie's positive views.

Whatever happens, Ruth is not giving up the cows. She wonders whether they need a contingency plan, in case the worst does happen - perhaps a bridge for the cows. Ruth admits that Charlie had a point about the compensation they'd get. They could invest in new buildings and machinery.

Vicky and Bethany are going to Birmingham for a music class for Beth. It will be a regular thing. Vicky's making some good friends - other mums of kids with Down's syndrome.
David gets things ready for the barbecue. The bonfire will be huge. All they need now is a guy. David looks for his old tweed jacket.

Jennifer takes Peggy to her solicitor appointment, to sort out Jack's probate. Tired Peggy turns down Jenny's invitation to tea. Peggy is morose after the solicitors. It seems so final now - doors closing on the past and nothing to look forward to. Peggy wants to be alone to bury Ben's ashes in the garden.

Lilian and Jennifer visit Peggy to give Ben a send-off. Peggy secretly gives Lilian the matinee jacket she has knitted for her. Peggy tells Lilian not to worry about her - she's fine.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0477nrt)
Manic Street Preachers; Chef reviewed; Carnegie winner Kevin Brooks

John Wilson with the Manic Street Preachers ahead of their appearance at Glastonbury. Kevin Brooks, winner of the 2014 Carnegie Medal for children's literature for his novel The Bunker Diary. Allegra McEvedy reviews the film Chef. And war artist Anna Redwood documents the Desert Rats last tour of duty in Afghanistan.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0477j4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Special Relationship: Uncovered (b0477nrw)
Peter Hitchens re-examines the relationship between the USA and UK, suggesting that - instead of an intimacy based on their shared histories, cultures and language - the real relationship is one of tactfully-concealed hostility.

Since French military and naval intervention won America its independence, the new Republic has been Britain's most consistent real rival with the Burning of the White House its most potent symbol.

The first half of the 20th century was characterised by unprecedented hostility between the two nations and American support for Britain in both World Wars came at a price. Peter Hitchens argues that Lend-lease during the war was not an act of friendship, but a cynical subsidy, and much was demanded in return - our gold reserves and bases in the Caribbean. At Bretton Woods, he suggests, Britain came under irresistible pressure from the US to abandon Sterling's position as a major reserve currency, ceding it to the US dollar.

After 1945, the 'help' stopped. The post-war years saw the Suez humiliation, brutal (however well-deserved) pressure on Britain to submit to the European Union, and a series of events which show that the United States only observed the Special Relationship when it suited - treating Britain as a junior rather than an equal partner.

With pro-active argument and surprising revelations, Peter Hitchens challenges the received wisdom and attempts to show that Uncle Sam was always out to replace the British Empire with its own global leadership.

Producer: Kati Whitaker.
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0477nry)
Varieties of Capitalism

What is the best form of capitalism? The free-market form found in countries such as the UK and the United States, or the more collaborative model which is common across Northern Europe?

Some British politicians, from both the left and right, are somewhat starry-eyed when it comes to the way other countries run their economy and have even suggested the UK could improve its lot by importing practices found across Scandinavia and Germany. But is that remotely possible?

In this edition of Analysis, Britain politics correspondent for The Economist Jeremy Cliffe investigates the different forms of capitalism defined by the Varieties of Capitalism school - most-famous for the book of the same name published in 2001.

He begins by working out what makes a 'Liberal Market Economy' and a 'Coordinated Market Economy', and then digs deeper to find out how these different models formed in the first place.

He discovers a deep web of intertwined government institutions which have been shaped over decades and centuries by each individual country's culture. It turns out that transplanting a different way of doing things from one country to another is just not that simple - but does that mean politicians should just give up trying to do something different?

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b046kwq3)
The Modern Naturalist

Monty Don presents a special Shared Planet in front of an audience from the Hay Festival. Naturalists have always relied on and contributed to the illustrated guide book to observe and record wildlife, but is this so today? The modern naturalist has more than just books at their disposal, with field guides on mobile phones and tablet computers giving more than just words; sounds and moving pictures too. Monty Don asks whether the traditional naturalist skills are disappearing and with them the naturalist, or whether technology in an increasingly crowded world are liberating naturalists to observe and record wildlife in a different way generating a new generation of naturalists fit for the planet they share with nature.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0477j4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b04755gk)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0477ns0)
Jail sentences for Al Jazeera journalists in Egypt.
The US pledges intense support for the Iraqi government.
Secret recording of un-diplomatic words about David Cameron.
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0477ns2)
Remember Me Like This

Episode 1

Summer, the Texas Gulf coast - and Justin Campbell, missing for four years, is found. His abductor is taken into custody. His parents, his younger brother, his grandfather, and Justin himself, each begin their own uncertain journey towards a new life.

With infinite care for each other they begin to negotiate the wounds of the past four years, the isolation, the betrayal the grief for what has been lost.

As they begin to remake their family they learn that, contrary to reassurances from the authorities, the man who took Justin away has been let out on bail. In the dusty and sweltering heat of high summer the small town prepares to celebrate Justin's return at their annual shrimp festival but the trial date looms over all of them.

"In this deeply nuanced portrait of an American family, Bret Anthony Johnston fearlessly explores the truth behind a mythic happy ending. In Remember Me Like This, Johnston presents an incisive dismantling of an all too comforting fallacy: that in being found we are no longer lost." - Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones.

"It is as a writer that I admire the architecture of Remember Me Like This, the novel's flawless storytelling. It is as the father of three sons that I vouch for the psychological authenticity of this depiction of any parent's worst fears. Emotionally, I am with this family as they try to move ahead-embracing 'the half-known and desperate history' that they share. I love this novel."-John Irving

Episode 1:
Eric Campbell, for four years 'The Father of the Missing Boy' is taking a shower in a house that isn't his own, when he receives a phone call.

Read by Clarke Peters
Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC 4 Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Short Cuts (b03zb4b6)
Series 5

Waking Life

Josie Long presents a sequence of brief encounters, true stories and short documentaries in which the boundaries between 'real' life and dreaming blur.

From the addictive, perception-altering qualities of romantic love through to a surreal story about recording dreams. We hear from the legendary film editor and director Walter Murch about the dreamlike qualities of cinematic narratives and the psychologist Susan Blackmore's experience of looking down from the ceiling at her own body.

The items featured in the programme are:

Waking Life
Feat. Susan Blackmore
Prod. Sara Parker

Dreaming
Feat. Walter Murch

The Man Who Could Record Your Dreams
Prod. Bob Carlson
Originally broadcast on Unfictional
An extended version of this story can he found here: http://www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/uf/uf110909the_man_who_could_re

Last Words
Feat. Kester Brewin

Love is a Drug
Feat. Helen Fisher
Prod. Hana Walker Brown

Answer Machine
Found sound from Tape Findings
http://www.sweetthunder.org/tapes/

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0477ns4)
The Government rejects Labour demands for an urgent review into the delayed roll-out of the Government's flagship welfare reform, Universal Credit.
Labour's Rachel Reeves says the introduction of the new benefit is being hit by computer problems and accuses ministers of incompetence.
The Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, says the new benefit is helping thousands of people, who Labour had "written off".
MPs question the relaxation of licensing rules for minicabs.
Peers debate the role the armed forces and press for the recruitment of more mental health social workers.
And MPs investigate security on the railways.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 24 JUNE 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b047704c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b03th7pn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b047704f)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b047704h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0477055)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b047705l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0482xmf)
Prayer and reflection with Kevin Franz of the Religious Society of Friends.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0477nz1)
Cattle DNA Tests, Badger Culling, The Archers, Unclaimed Flood Money

With only four days until applications close, 80% of the Government's grant fund for restoring flooded farmland in England has yet to be claimed. Farmers say paperwork for the first phase of the scheme was too complicated. The Farming Minister George Eustice tells Anna Hill that he's halved the length of the application form and made the process much simpler.

DEFRA has defended the badger culling pilots in England against criticism of the changes it's making to monitoring methods.

Why newborn pedigree Aberdeen Angus calves will be DNA tested.

And continuing our exploration of the way farmers are portrayed in the media, we take a trip to Ambridge.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tt1kv)
Yellowhammer

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the yellowhammer. The yellowhammer is a member of the bunting family and its name comes from "ammer" the German for bunting. It's one of the few British birds to have its song transcribed into words and seems to be saying ..a little bit of bread and no cheese".


TUE 06:00 Today (b0477pgs)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b0477pgv)
Sandy Knapp

Botanist Sandy Knapp tells Jim Al Khalili about her adventures in the wilderness of South America collecting and studying many thousands of plants from a group vital for human nutrition. She talks about her time growing up in Los Alamos in New Mexico, surrounded by a "sea of physicists" and how her love of the outdoors inspired her to take up botany.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b0477pgx)
Reeta Chakrabarti meets Iram Ramzan

Reeta Chakrabarti, the BBC's UK affairs' correspondent, speaks to people who have found a voice outside the mainstream media, through the medium of blogging.

Today Reeta meets Iram Ramzan, whose blog reflects her life, as what she calls a 'progressive Muslim woman'. She started blogging as a journalism student because it was expected of her, but some of her opinions have begun to attract a wider audience: she's been interviewed by the Sun and quoted by mainstream journalists. However Iram has also been the subject of twitter-abuse. Reeta asks her if she's taking a risk by blogging so openly - anonymity was something she never considered.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b03th7qw)
Month of Madness

Vienna

Professor Christopher Clark unpicks the complex sequence of events during the July Crisis, leading to outbreak of the First World War, from the perspective of the key centres of decision-making.

In 1914, Vienna was the capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, ruled by the ancient Hapsburg dynasty.

Archduke Franz Ferdinand was the heir to the throne and, after his assassination in Sarajevo on the 28th June 1914, the Austro-Hungarian decision-makers met in Vienna to consider what course of action to take against Serbia.

In this programme, Professor Christopher Clark explores the mind-set inside the Austrian administration during the tense days of July 1914, where he says, a 'militant group think' seized hold of the decision-makers, bent on settling their old scores with Serbia.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0477pgz)
Ellie Simmonds; anti-depressants; dealing with loneliness

Paralympic champion Ellie Simmonds on success, baking and her first book for children. She was Star Baker in her episode of The Great Comic Relief Bake Off last year and she's just published a children's story called Best Cake for a Best Friend which follows the fictional eight year old character Ellie as she tries to change the world around her through baking.

There's been a considerable increase in the numbers of anti-depressants prescribed in the UK over the last decade. Last year more than 50 million prescriptions were issued in England alone. As part of our Staying Sane series we explore the role of anti-depressants in keeping ourselves healthy and free from danger. Are GPs prescribing them too often or are we just getting better at diagnosing depression? How effective are they are and do we know how they really work? We'll be hearing from a listener, Karen who wishes she had taken them earlier. We'll also be hearing from psychiatrist Dr Joanna Moncrieff who questions their efficacy and safety and from Dr Maureen Baker, chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners.

According to data launched last week, Britain is the loneliness capital of Europe - we're less likely overall to know our neighbours or have strong friendships than people living anywhere else in the EU. Jane talks to psychotherapist Philippa Perry and to Marion McGilvary who has written about what it's like to be sociable and yet still feel a deep sense of loneliness.

And, from the Woman's Hour archive, Althea Gibson, the first African-American tennis player to win a Grand Slam title.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Erin Riley.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0477ph1)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 3

Episode 2

Village shopkeeper Sardar Aka has two wives at war. Now his new young wife is about to give birth, tensions are heightened. Sardar Aka is praying for a boy. Meanwhile his eldest daughter, Kashmala, who must live with her late husband's family, is unhappy because her father-in-law forbids her to teach at the new school. She asks her parents about the wartorn village near Jalalabad which they fled to make their home in the mountains.

A slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pak-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, no electricity and no phone - but hi-tech drones fly overhead.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for the Pashtoon people of this untamed area.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey
Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas
Executive Producer: John Dryden

Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b0477ph3)
Spix Macaw - Conservation Triage

How does the world of conservation set its priorities? Shared Planet reports from Qatar and the effort being spent to save the Spix Macaw from extinction in captivity. Occasionally, when the battle to save a species from extinction has almost been lost, the only alternative is to catch the remaining individuals to be kept safe and bred in captivity with no certainly of ever being returned to the wild. In this episode of Shared Planet Monty Don asks whether last hope fights to prevent single extinctions are viable or do we need to start prioritising conservation funding to secure the future or greater numbers of species?


TUE 11:30 Bella Hardy Goes Home (b0477r69)
Bella Hardy, Radio 2's Folk Singer of the Year 2014, is also a song-writer - and she plays the fiddle too. Most of the time she's on tour or living in her adopted home city of Edinburgh but, in this programme, she goes back to her roots - Edale in the High Peak of Derbyshire.

She talks to friends old and young about the special character of the valley where she grew up. She explains how so many of her songs were inspired by this dramatic landscape, and she celebrates her 30th birthday with an evening of singing at the Rambler Inn.

Everywhere she goes - on the train, in the pub, at the local school - there's home-made music. Is it folk? Well, as Louis Armstrong said, "All music is folk music; I never heard a horse sing."

Producer: Peter Everett
A Pennine Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b0477r6c)
Call You and Yours - The Perils of Social Media

What's gone wrong for YOU online?

Ever put something on social media you wished you hadn't - that is still haunting you?

Or perhaps somebody put something up about YOU that you can't remove

We'll have experts on hand to talk us through the pitfalls of posting pictures, tweeting jokes or having a chat on what YOU think is a private medium.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0477069)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b04795tn)
Edward Stourton presents national and international news.


TUE 13:45 Just So Science (b04795tq)
Series 2

The Crab That Played with the Sea

In The Crab that Played with the Sea, Kipling tells the tale of arrogant and mischievous Pau Amma the mighty King Crab who eventually gets his comeuppance. For Palaeontologist Richard Fortey, it's the indestructible horseshoe crab that should be regarded as truly regal, with its copper-rich blue blood and incredible longevity, having remained almost stubbornly the same for nearly 500 million years. The reader is Samuel West. Producer: Rami Tzabar


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0477m77)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Burning Both Ends: When Oliver Reed Met Keith Moon (b017x3pl)
The story of one of the most infamous, unexpected and touching of friendships between two icons of the 1970s, Oliver Reed and Keith Moon.

Starring Sean Pertwee as Oliver Reed, and Arthur Darvill as Keith Moon.

Other members of the cast include Matthew Gravelle, Richard Nichols, Bethan Walker and Claire Cage.

In the mid-1970s, Oliver was an international movie star, and Keith was a rock 'n' roll legend, the drummer for rock band, The Who. Both were famous for their partying and boozing, as well as their undeniable talents. Mercurial and unpredictable, both men were at the top of their game - but the top can be a very lonely place.

Then they met, on the film set of The Who's epic rock opera, Tommy. What followed was a revelation - in each other they found a true kindred spirit, their own shadow image.

This is a story of madness and mayhem, antics and adventures, but also of love and loss - the dangerous, dazzling brilliance of two unbridled spirits connecting, but then the huge pain when one of them dies prematurely.

Recounting the electrifying "bruv-affair" between these two iconic figures, Burning Both Ends is the story of two men who found in each other a true friend, and who loved each other as fiercely as they partied...

Written by Matthew Broughton - inspired by true events, but scenes and characters have been created for dramatic effect.

Directed by Sam Hoyle.

A BBC Cymru/Wales production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2011.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b04795ts)
Helen Castor and Tom Holland return with the latest research that's Making History.

Today's programme includes what the French really thought about the Allied bombing raids on their cities, why the Spanish still can't face remembering their civil war, and London to Great Yarmouth in around 10 minutes - 200 years ago.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Helen Castor

Produced by Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b04795tv)
Series 4

Episode 1

The Human Zoo is a place to learn about the one subject that never fails to fascinate: ourselves. Are people led by the head or by the heart? How rational are we? And how do we perceive the world?

It's a curious blend of intriguing experiments to discover our biases and judgements, with explorations and examples taken from what's in the news to what we do in the kitchen - all driven by a large slice of curiosity.

Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick University, will be on hand as guide and experimenter in chief, together with the many other experts popularising a fast-growing subject in academia and the bookstores.

Presenter: Michael Blastland
Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b04795tx)
Policing Social Media

Cases of cyber-bullying on social media are becoming more and more common - and the police are often the first to hear about them. On this week's Law in Action, Joshua Rozenberg asks just how much time are the police spending on dealing with social media disputes?

Speaking to the programme is Chief Constable Alex Marshall, head of the College of Policing, who estimates that as much as half of a front-line officer's daily workload is spent dealing with calls related to online disputes. Some are very serious indeed, others less so - but where should the police and the public draw the line on what constitutes a crime?

Also: Last week a group of five Native Americans persuaded the US Patent and Trademark Office to cancel six long-standing trademarks previously registered by the Washington Redskins American football team, on the basis that the team's name is derogatory. Law in Action speaks to NYU Law professor Christopher Jon Sprigman about how this was possible, and what it means for one of football's most-famous franchises.

In another landmark case, Joshua Rozenberg speaks to solicitor Michael O'Kane about a recent private prosecution - thought to be the biggest of its kind, costing the businessman who brought the case around £1 million of his own money. But why was the case not brought through the usual channels of the CPS or Serious Fraud Office?

Finally: Should humans be the only species with legal rights? Law in Action speaks to lawyer Steven Wise, president of The Nonhuman Rights Project - an American organization working toward legal rights for members of species other than our own.

CONTRIBUTORS

Chief Constable Alex Marshall, CEO The College of Policing

Prof Christopher Jon Sprigman, New York University Law School

Michael O'Kane, Peters & Peters

Steven Wise, The Nonhuman Rights Project

Producer: Keith Moore
Series Producer: Richard Fenton Smith.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b04795tz)
India Knight and Alvin Hall

Journalist and author India Knight and financial adviser Alvin Hall talk about books they love with Harriett Gilbert.

India Knight selects Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym, a novel which contrasts the lives of two women in 1950s England. With comedy, delightful character portraits and a dark edge, poking fun at the conventions of the time, Harriett describes it as 'like a cuddly toy with teeth'.

A medical miracle is at the heart of the book chosen by Alvin Hall: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. This true story tells of the life of an African-American woman whose aggressive cancer cells were used to develop treatments for Polio, AIDS, and in thousands of other medical studies. The book weaves together stories of race, poverty and injustice and its atmosphere transports Alvin Hall back to his childhood.

Harriett Gilbert's pick has been a phenomenon in Russia in recent times: The Winter Queen by Boris Akunin. This tongue-in-cheek adventure of a young detective, Erast Fandorin, is a blistering yarn and references dozens of other detective novels and classics of Russian literature.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 17:00 PM (b04795v1)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b047706c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Life: An Idiot's Guide (b0436hkz)
Series 3

Multiculturalism

Comedian, Stephen K Amos is joined by Stephen Grant, Nish Kumar and Andrew Maxwell to compile an idiot's guide to multiculturalism.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b04795v3)
Tony releases a trailer load of noisy weaners from Neil into the field. Tony hopes this happy vision is a sign of things to come. He wonders how they'll manage without Tom, though. Pat hopes Tom will be home soon, when his head is together and his debts are sorted.

Later, Tony needs Pat's help to chase after the unruly pigs. Tony ends up far too tired to go to the bonfire.
Lilian proudly shows Lynda her matinee jacket for Leonie's baby. Sceptical Lynda puts Lilian on the spot. She asks lots of questions about how she knitted it - what size needles did she use, etc. Lilian evasively changes the subject.

The bonfire party is well attended. Lynda has made "No to Route B!" and "Save the Am Vale Environment" placards.

With Ben's help, David has made a guy which clearly resembles Justin Elliot, although David insists it's sheer coincidence. Ruth's annoyed with David, who says it's simply a symbol of corporate greed. As the guy burns, Ruth wants David not to let things get so personal. But it might be too late, as they hear Lynda chanting "Down with Justin Elliot".


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b04795v5)
Seve reviewed; Dennis Hopper's photographs; composer David Arnold

Dennis Hopper starred in cult films like Easy Rider and Apocalypse Now - but he was also a fine photographer. In tonight's Front Row, Eamonn McCabe and John Wilson consider a new exhibition of Hopper's images.
Also in the programme: composer David Arnold - whose soundtracks include Bond films, Sherlock and the London 2012 Olympic closing ceremony - on his new musical Made in Dagenham; a review of the biopic Seve - the rags-to-riches story of charismatic golfer Seve Ballesteros.
Plus a look at the art market's incredible growth over the past twenty years: some contemporary pieces now sell for tens of millions of pounds - can these prices ever be justified?


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0477ph1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b04795v7)
Yarl's Wood

On the day a parliamentary committee is due to take evidence about the Yarl's Wood immigration removal centre, Simon Cox investigates claims of sexual abuse and poor health care for the women held there.

Campaigners and detainees tell File on 4 about "a culture of disbelief" which they say exists among healthcare staff and which they claim is putting women at risk.

Serco - the company that runs the centre - insists it provides a good standard of care, but a former member of staff, speaking publicly for the first time, says concerns he raised were ignored by senior managers.

The programme also investigates claims of inappropriate sexual contact between staff and detainees and allegations of sexual abuse by staff.

Several employees were dismissed last year over sexual encounters with women being held at the centre and the House of Commons Home Affairs select committee have called the managing director of Serco to give evidence about the sexual abuse claims.

Simon Cox investigates - and hears why some MPs believe it is time for the centre to be closed.

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b04795v9)
Banking and Blogging

Listener Adrienne Chalmers receives an apology from the Clydesdale Bank and Lee Kumutat goes to Hove to meet 91 year old Jessie Bowler who talks about the impact her failing sight is having on her life, in particular the difficulties she has now reading. Jessie mentions Calibre lending library which she finds very useful for accessing audio books.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b04795vc)
Claudia Hammond hosts the All in the Mind Awards Ceremony from the Wellcome Collection in London, and meets all the finalists.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b0477pgv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b04795vf)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b047zt1d)
Remember Me Like This

Episode 2

Summer, the Texas Gulf coast - and Justin Campbell, missing for four years, is found. His abductor is taken into custody. His parents, his younger brother, his grandfather, and Justin himself, each begin their own uncertain journey towards a new life.

With infinite care for each other they begin to negotiate the wounds of the past four years, the isolation, the betrayal the grief for what has been lost.

As they begin to remake their family they learn that, contrary to reassurances from the authorities, the man who took Justin away has been let out on bail. In the sweltering heat of high summer the small town prepares to celebrate Justin's return at their annual shrimp festival but the trial date looms over all of them.

"In this deeply nuanced portrait of an American family, Bret Anthony Johnston fearlessly explores the truth behind a mythic happy ending. In Remember Me Like This, Johnston presents an incisive dismantling of an all too comforting fallacy: that in being found we are no longer lost." - Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones.

"It is as a writer that I admire the architecture of Remember Me Like This, the novel's flawless storytelling. It is as the father of three sons that I vouch for the psychological authenticity of this depiction of any parent's worst fears. Emotionally, I am with this family as they try to move ahead-embracing 'the half-known and desperate history' that they share. I love this novel."-John Irving

Episode 2:
It's the summer holidays and 14 year old Griff Campbell is embarking on his first romance. He and Fiona are about to get better acquainted when his grandfather, Cecil shows up.

Read by Clarke Peters
Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Clayton Grange (b047bstc)
Series 2

Episode 3

Geoff can't resist using a 'bring your child to work day' to do some controversial genetic manipulation, whilst Saunders trials a bionic suit that recycles your own urine. Will this be his first success?

This is Clayton Grange, top secret Scientific Institute with a government brief to solve the global fuel crisis, cheer people up and make war just a bit more gentle. Meet the scientists who are a bit rubbish at life. And not much better at science.

Anthony Head leads the team thinking the unthinkable.

Comedy by Neil Warhurst with additional material by Paul Barnhill.

Professor Saunders ...... Anthony Head
Geoff Prowse ...... Neil Warhurst
Roger Bucks ...... Paul Barnhill
Alice Jameson ...... Stephanie Racine
Gwynnie ...... Heather Craney
Simon Prowse ...... Albie Warhurst
Izzy ...... Cassie Layton
Announcer ...... Clive Hayward

Director: Marion Nancarrow

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2014.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b047bstf)
The Health Secretary promises a new package of measures to "boost safety and openness" in the health service in England.
Jeremy Hunt tells MPs that a review will be set up, with the aim of creating an open and honest reporting culture in the NHS.
For Labour, Andy Burnham accuses Mr Hunt of signing away day-to-day control of the NHS.
The Government reveals an estimated 48,000 immigrants may have fraudulently obtained English language certificates despite being unable to speak English.
George Osborne and Ed Balls clash over the impact of an increase in interest rates as the Bank of England Governor, Mark Carney, plays down the prospect of an imminent rise.
And Lenny Henry gives a warning that the BBC's plans to increase the number of people from minorities are set to fail.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



WEDNESDAY 25 JUNE 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b047707k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b03th7qw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b047707m)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b047707q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b047707v)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0477080)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0483c11)
Prayer and reflection with Kevin Franz of the Religious Society of Friends.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b047bsy6)
Neonicotinoid Ban, Groceries Code Adjudicator Conference, Agricultural Journalism

The agri-chemical company Syngenta has applied to Defra for a derogation on the EU ban on neonicotinoids so British farmers can plant seeds treated with the insecticide this autumn. Without it they warn next year's crop of oilseed rape could fail. Environmental campaigners say the request is "outrageous" and the ban is in place to protect pollinators.
It comes as a group of international scientists publish a review of 800 scientific papers looking at the impact of neonicotinoids, the most widely used agri-chemical in the world. It claims they are damaging a wide range of invertebrates, such as earthworms, bees and butterflies; the effects of which could spread up the food chain to birds and reptiles. The analysis, known as the Worldwide Integrated Assessment, recommends tighter regulation and a dramatic reduction in global use - if not the total phasing out of neonicotinoids.
Anna Hill chairs a discussion between Guy Smith, vice president of the NFU and Nick Mole from Pesticide Action Network, a group that campaigns to reduce pesticide use.
Anna also meets Michael Pollitt, outgoing agricultural editor at the Eastern Daily Press. Covering his 30th Royal Norfolk Show, he shares his thoughts on how the image of farming has changed over four decades in journalism.
And the Groceries Code Adjudicator Christine Tacon on the success of her first annual conference.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced in Bristol by Anna Jones.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ttqwv)
Turtle Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the turtle dove. The soft purring song of the turtle Doves are mentioned in the Song of Solomon in the Bible: " The voice of the turtle is heard in our land". They are migrants from sub-Saharan Africa and are now a treat to see here in the UK where they breed in farmland and scrub where they can find weed seeds for their growing young.


WED 06:00 Today (b047bzkr)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b047bzkt)
Zelda la Grange, John Moloney, Rattlesnake

Mariella Frostrup is joined by former personal assistant to Nelson Mandela, Zelda la Grange; comedian John Moloney and country-blues musician Rattlesnake.

Zelda la Grange grew up in South Africa as a white Afrikaner who supported the rules of segregation. Yet just a few years after the end of apartheid she became Nelson Mandela's trusted assistant for the next 19 years. In her book, Good Morning, Mr Mandela, she tells the story of how a young woman had her life, beliefs and prejudices transformed by the President of South Africa. Good Morning, Mr Mandela is published by Allen Lane.

Rattlesnake Annie - known as Rattlesnake - is a country-blues musician. Born of Cherokee heritage on a cotton and tobacco farm in Paris, Tennessee, she began writing songs at 10 and soon afterwards formed a trio with her cousins, The Gallimore Sisters. At16 she was lured to Memphis by blues and rock n' roll where she learnt her craft under the tutelage of Muddy Waters and Lightnin' Hopkins. Her latest album is called World Of Love.

John Moloney is a stand-up comedian. He is co-founder of the Balham Comedy Festival which is celebrating 30 years of London's comedy club, Banana Cabaret. Acts performing include Reginald D. Hunter, Susan Calman and Milton Jones. A former language teacher before turning to comedy, John cut his teeth on the Red Wedge tour during the 1980s and became a regular at London's Comedy Store. His new series will be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 later this year.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b03th82b)
Month of Madness

Berlin

Professor Christopher Clark unpicks the complex sequence of events during the July Crisis, leading to outbreak of the First World War, from the perspective of the key centres of decision-making.

Many historians have identified Germany as primarily responsible for plunging Europe into war in 1914, with their issuing a blank cheque of unconditional support to Austria-Hungary for war against Serbia.

In this programme, Professor Christopher Clark reconsiders why the German administration made this bold offer. He shows how the administration was divided. Kaiser Wilhelm II, the German monarch, urged restraint in the New Palace at Potsdam, but to no avail as his power was limited. His generals pushed for war. Yet, Clark argues, they envisaged a fast and quick local war and did not believe the situation would escalate.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b047bzkw)
Loneliness; Barbara Kruger; Honey & Co; Bad girls in fiction

Our series on loneliness continues as we find out why parenthood can be an isolating experience and how it changes as your children grow up. Conceptual artist Barbara Kruger talks how she combines bold slogans, text and image to investigate the dynamics of power in popular culture. Cook The Perfect falafel and tabule salad with Honey & Co; Authors Zoe Pilger and Emma Jane Unsworth are writing about literary bad girls. What is the attraction of female anti-heroines? The numbers of women taking up archery has increased. Anna Bailey went to meet the members of the Aquarius Archery Club in London as they met for their weekly coaching session.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b047bzky)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 3

Episode 3

Now that Zarlakhta's heroin-addicted bride groom has fled, her family face a rocky financial future. Her brother even suggests they should return to the lowland village they left to escape the fighting - at least they own a little land there.

Little does the family know that the wealthy landowner's son, Wisal, is keen to persuade his mother, Shah Bibi, to approach Zarlakhta's mother with a marriage proposal. When she does so, Bakhtawara's pride nearly destroys her daughter's marriage chance.

A slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pak-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, no electricity and no phone - but hi-tech drones fly overhead.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for the Pashtoon people of this untamed area.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey
Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas
Executive Producer: John Dryden

Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 Linard's Travels (b047bzl0)
Deep and distinguished, yet rugged and wise, Linard Davies serves the next customer wanting their bag wrapped in cling film at the Airport Travel Agency in San Francisco. Linard deals with the packages that the airlines won't and swears by his motto, 'We don't say no'.

Perhaps it's this can-do attitude that has earned him a reputation for dealing with urns. 'We must have had over a hundred urns'. A traffic cop stored his father's ashes with Linard while putting on a function at his house. He would occasionally pop in and ask, 'How's my dad doing?'. Linard would reply, 'He's doing great, he ain't bothering nobody!'

A Korean girl flying to Atlanta left the ashes of her mother with Linard, never to be picked up. He now considers the deceased his business partner, talking to her on long night shifts. Yet he does feel a little responsible for 'Grandma' as he calls her, as he accidentally broke the urn and the ashes scattered onto the floor. So Grandma is now forever in San Francisco Airport.

The Airport Travel Agency deals with all kinds of artefacts, from a set of house keys to a bass violin, kayak, or extra-large dog kennel (minus the dog). The unofficial historian of the Airport Travel Agency, Carol, gives us a run down of the strangest items - clown shoes, 10-foot tall carved wooden doors from Bali and a set of fresh moose antlers, to name just a few.

Producer: Peter Shevlin
A BlokMedia production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 A Charles Paris Mystery (b047bzl4)
Corporate Bodies

Episode 1

by Jeremy Front
Based upon the novel by Simon Brett

Bill Nighy stars as the louche but loveable actor Charles Paris. Charles is filming a corporate video when a young secretary is murdered. But when he comes under suspicion for the murder Charles knows he must find the killer.

Charles ..... Bill Nighy
Frances ..... Suzanne Burden
Will ..... Tim McInnerny
Maurice ..... Jon Glover
Brian ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Heather ..... Jane Whittenshaw
Trevor ..... Wilf Scolding
Ken ..... David Cann
Paramedic ..... Scarlett Brookes

Directed by Sally Avens.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b047bzl6)
You and Yours

Wonga pay compensation after sending fake legal letters to debtors. Should soft drinks with sugar be taxed? Threat of MOT failure fails to halt diesel car drivers from removing pollution filters. The online reviewers who post again and again and again. Presenter: Shari Vahl
Producer: Kevin Mousley


WED 12:30 Face the Facts (b047wfym)
Inside the Young Footballer Industry

Face the Facts investigates how the professional club academies recruit thousands of young footballers - some of them only five years-old. Critics say it's a system that operates on an industrial scale which damages grass roots "fun" football and guarantees disappointment for thousands of players and their families. Yet, when the 2013-14 Premier league season kicked off last August, only 75 of the 220 starting players were qualified to play for England. And despite often being described as "the best club league in the world," the English Premier League (EPL) has seen a gradual decline in the performance of the national team. Greg Dyke responds for the Football Association and General Secretary Nic Coward responds for the EPL

Presenter:John Waite
Producer:Nick Jackson
Editor:Andrew Smith.


WED 13:00 World at One (b047bzl8)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news.


WED 13:45 Just So Science (b047bzlb)
Series 2

The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo

The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo. Jon Hutchinson and Maria Nilsson discuss how the Kangaroo got his hop and why Skippy is no longer considered Australian - at least, genetically. The Reader is Samuel West. Producer: Rami Tzabar


WED 14:00 The Archers (b04795v3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b047bzld)
Hatch, Match and Dispatch

Uncle Harry by Gary Brown

Mark's life is nicely well-ordered...despite his dysfunctional family, terrifying future father-in-law/boss, and on-going blackout problem. But that's until Uncle Harry gets in the way. Things get increasingly messy as Mark goes on a quest to discover his true identity.

A comedy about grief and the true meaning of family

Isn't it strange that the registering of life's important moments happens in a sterile municipal office? Everyone's got a story as to how they got there. The first of a series of six quirky plays that start in a Register Office and end in a birth, marriage or death.

Mark ..... Dylan Edwards
Uncle Harry ..... Ewan Bailey
Elaine ..... Denise Black
Helen ..... Katherine Jakeways
Lionel ..... Christian Patterson
Charlotte ..... Rachel Redford
Dad ..... David Cann

Written by Gary Brown
Directed by Helen Perry

A BBC Cymru Wales production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b047bzlg)
Consumer Rights

Problems with goods and services? What are your rights to replacements, refunds or repairs?
Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Whether you've a problem with a leaky conservatory, a package that didn't arrive or a purchase that just doesn't work properly, what are your rights and how can you enforce them?

Joining presenter Ruth Alexander to tackle your dilemmas will be:

Joanne Lezemore, Consumer Specialist.
Jane Negus, European Consumer Centre.
David Sanders, Trading Standards Institute.

Call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may e higher.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b04795vc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b047bzlj)
History of Surfing; Coffee Shops and Idleness

Surfing - a political history. Laurie Taylor looks beyond the tanned bodies, crashing waves and carefree pleasure, talking to Scott Laderman, Associate Professor of History at the University of Minnesota. His study traces the rise of surfing in the context of the rise of imperialism and global capitalism. From its emergence in post annexation Hawaii and its use as a diplomatic weapon in America's Cold War to the low wage labour of the surf industry today; he uncovers a hidden history involving as much blood and repression as beachside bliss. Also, Pelle Valentin Olsen, graduate student at the University of Oxford, explores the Baghdad coffee shop, idleness and the emergence of the bourgeoisie. He's joined by Graham Scambler, Emiritus Professor of Sociology at University College, London.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b047bzll)
Hacking trial special

The former News of the World editor Andy Coulson has been found guilty of conspiracy to hack phones. His predecessor Rebekah Brooks has been cleared of all charges, in a trial which has been one of the most lengthy and expensive in criminal history. Steve Hewlett discusses what the trial has revealed about the culture of an industry competing to break the biggest stories; the relationship of the press with politicians and public bodies, and asks what damage the scandal has done to Rupert Murdoch's empire. A panel of media insiders also consider how the fallout from the hacking story, namely the Leveson inquiry and new press regulations, has impacted on journalism. Joining Steve is Nick Davies, the Guardian journalist who exposed the phone hacking scandal; Neil Wallis, former Deputy Editor of the News of the World; Lord Norman Fowler, former chairman of the House of Lords select committee on communications; journalist and Executive Director of Hacked Off, Joan Smith; Harriet Harman, Labour's Deputy Leader on her calls for tough regulation, and Peter Preston, former editor of the Guardian.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b047bzln)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b047708f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Start/Stop (b03bsb9c)
Series 1

Two Parties

by Jack Docherty

A new sitcom about three couples sailing off in to the sunset. And sinking. This week two parties provide a particular challenge.

Producer ..... Steven Canny

Jack Docherty
Jack has an exceptional record of making stand-out comedy. He first performed at the 1980 Edinburgh Festival Fringe with the comedy sketch group The Bodgers and went on to write for radio and television including: Spitting Image, Alas Smith and Jones, Vic Reeves Big Night Out, Absolutely, The Lenny Henry Show, Max Headroom, Weekending, The News Huddlines and a ton of other things.
He has also performed in a huge variety of comedy shows including in The Comic Strip Presents, The Morwenna Banks Show, Monarch of the Glen, Red Dwarf V, The Old Guys and Badults. He has also featured in the Radio 4 comedies Baggage and Mordrin MacDonald - 21st Century Wizard and has appeared on various comedy panel shows including Have I Got News For You and It's Only TV But I Like It. Jack presented his own show The Jack Docherty Show which ran for 2 years on Channel 5.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b047bzlq)
Shula asks Elizabeth about the festival, teasing Elizabeth that she still has her wrist band on. With Roy they discuss food for Loxfest. Shelley Brazil's on board, but they've lost their litter pickers - probably to another, bigger event, thinks Roy.

Shula fills Elizabeth in on the bonfire last night, with its burnt effigy.

Elizabeth treats Roy to lunch as a thank you for his hard work. To Roy's relief, Elizabeth has found some litter pickers - girl guides. Roy compliments Elizabeth who becomes a little flirty before checking and politely excusing herself, leaving Roy to his lunch.

Alistair has bad news for Shula. One of the horses (Catesby) has strangles. Shula has a trying time talking to the difficult owner. She is rather short with Alistair afterwards.

Fallon has seen an email she perhaps wasn't meant to and now worries that Don Sandland might be selling Jaxx. Fallon complains to Alice about her life, but Alice reminds her about hunky PC Burns. Fallon's not sure. Maybe she's better off on her own. It's the last straw for Alice, who forces Fallon to text Harrison Burns and agree to a date.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b047bzls)
Lesley Manville and Richard Eyre, James Patterson, Nicholas Hytner, Ming

Kirsty Lang talks to actress Lesley Manville and director Richard Eyre about filming their award-winning production of Ibsen's Ghosts.

Best-selling author James Patterson on giving away his own money to UK bookshops.

National Theatre director Nicholas Hytner on Richard Bean's new play Great Britain, a satire on the press and politics.

And a review of the National Museum of Scotland's exhibition Ming: The Golden Empire. With art historian Duncan McMillan.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b047bzky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b047bzlv)
Anonymity and sex offences

Transparency is a cornerstone of the justice system, but are the scales of justice becoming dangerously unbalanced when it comes to sex crimes? 21 year old Ben Sullivan, the former president of the Oxford Union, is the latest man to say that his life has been ruined after allegations that he raped a fellow student and sexually assaulted another. He was arrested in May and held in a cell for 12 hours before being released on bail. It was 6 weeks before he was cleared, but in that time his name was published in the press and all over the internet turning his life upside-down. Under current legislation people who complain they've been the victims of sexual offences automatically receive anonymity but suspects do not. Is that fair? Being accused of committing a sex crime carries a unique stigma. In the wake of the fever of publicity about celebrities being investigated in operation Yewtree, are we in danger of treating the accused as guilty until proven innocent? It hasn't always been the case. From 1976 to 1988 both parties in such cases were granted anonymity. But is introducing more secrecy in to our courts the answer? And if we grant anonymity to those accused of rape, why not to those accused of child abuse, or child murder? The law on anonymity was changed because police said it made it difficult to gather evidence if they couldn't name the accused, but there are those who say that it now makes it far too easy make false allegations of rape. Are sex crimes so uniquely pernicious and hard to convict that we should rebalance the system in favour of victims? Could we ever go back to a system where both parties are named? How do you balance the scales of justice when it comes to rape and other sex crimes?
Moral Maze - Presented by Michael Buerk

Witnesses are Jill Saward, Nigel Evans, Holly Dustin and Tim Rustem.
Produced by Phil Pegum.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b047bzlx)
Series 4

Karl Sharro

Karl Sharro argues that the only way to overcome the housing crisis is to get rid of all planning regulations and let people build whatever they want.

Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks in which speakers air their thinking, in front of a live audience, on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect culture and society.

Presenter: Kamin Mohammadi
Producer: Estelle Doyle.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b047bzlz)
Anaesthesia

General anaesthetics which act to cause reversible loss of consciousness have been used clinically for over 150 years. Yet scientists are only now really understanding how these drugs act on the brain and the body to stop us feeling pain. Linda Geddes reports on the latest research using molecular techniques and brain scanners.

Linda visits the Anaesthesia Heritage Centre where William Harrop-Griffiths, President of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, tells her about the discovery of agents that knock us out.

As an operation takes place in the Royal United Hospital in Bath, Professor Tim Cook explains the role of the anaesthetist.

Linda talks to Professor Nick Franks of Imperial College, London, about his research into how anaesthetics work at the level of the cell. Irene Tracey, Professor of Anaesthetic Science at Oxford University, discusses how her fMRI scans of people as they slowly undergo anaesthesia have revealed how the brain switches off. Professor Steven Laureys, Head of the Coma Science Group at Liege University in Belgium, explains how understanding anaesthesia can help coma patients and what it tells us about the difficult question of human consciousness.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b047bzkt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b047708m)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b047bzm1)
New regulation call after hacking trial, is Ukraine confrontation inevitable? and the view of US-Iranians on the Iraq conflict - with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b047ztwt)
Remember Me Like This

Episode 3

Summer, the Texas Gulf coast - and Justin Campbell, missing for four years, is found. His abductor is taken into custody. His parents, his younger brother, his grandfather, and Justin himself, each begin their own uncertain journey towards a new life.

With infinite care for each other they begin to negotiate the wounds of the past four years, the isolation, the betrayal the grief for what has been lost.

As they begin to remake their family they learn that, contrary to reassurances from the authorities, the man who took Justin away has been let out on bail. In the dusty and sweltering heat of high summer the small town prepares to celebrate Justin's return at their annual shrimp festival but the trial date looms over all of them.

"In this deeply nuanced portrait of an American family, Bret Anthony Johnston fearlessly explores the truth behind a mythic happy ending. In Remember Me Like This, Johnston presents an incisive dismantling of an all too comforting fallacy: that in being found we are no longer lost." - Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones.

"It is as a writer that I admire the architecture of Remember Me Like This, the novel's flawless storytelling. It is as the father of three sons that I vouch for the psychological authenticity of this depiction of any parent's worst fears....I love this novel."-John Irving

Episode 3:
Justin Campbell has been reunited with his parents, the district attorney Solomon Garcia has arrested the man who was with Justin. Nobody can believe that, during four years of searching, Justin was only a few miles away.

Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Before They Were Famous (b01lv38v)
Series 1

Episode 1

Ian Leslie presents a new Radio 4 comedy show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of some of the world's best known writers. A project of literary archaeology, Leslie has found evidence in the most unlikely of places - within the archives of newspapers, periodicals, corporations and universities - showcasing the early examples of work by writers such as Jilly Cooper during her brief and unfortunately unsuccessful foray into the world of war reporting, and Hunter S Thompson in his sadly short-lived phase working in the customer relations department for a major American Airline.

These are the newspaper articles, advertising copy, company correspondence and gardening manuals that allow us a fascinating glimpse into the embryonic development of our best loved literary voices - people we know today for their novels or poems but who, at the time, were just people with a dream...and a rent bill looming at the end of the month.

Produced by Anna Silver and Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Tina C (b01b1jwx)
Tina C's Global Depression Tour

Australia

Country legend Tina C challenges the Secretary for the US Treasury, the Chairman of the Federal Reserve and the former CEO of Goldman Sachs.

Where they have failed, she can come up with a solution to the Global Recession.

So Tina has set off on a six country tour to prove it - and her next stop is down under.

Tina C ...... Christopher Green

With:

Andrew Cornell
Victoria Inez Hard
James Lailey

Musical arrangements by Duncan Walsh Atkins and Christopher Green

Director: Jeremy Mortimer.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b047bzm3)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



THURSDAY 26 JUNE 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b04770b7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b03th82b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04770b9)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04770bc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04770bf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b04770bh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0483c19)
Prayer and reflection with Kevin Franz of the Religious Society of Friends.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b047bzqv)
Land for Food Production, Farmers on Film, Ladybirds

Land in Britain is under increasing pressure from a growing population, and a report from the University of Cambridge says we could run out of land for food production and face a shortfall of around 2 million hectares by 2030. We hear from the lead author of the report, Andrew Montague-Fuller.

As Farming Today continues to look at farmers in the media spotlight, Charlotte Smith hears about two very different film projects, both with the aim of revealing the true stories behind the image of farmers.

And scientists have discovered that Harlequin ladybirds, which arrived in the UK around a decade ago, are eating our native species. Anna Hill speaks to Dr Peter Brown who lead the research to find out what this means for ladybird numbers.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvnnw)
Sandwich Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the sandwich tern. Sandwich terns are the UK's largest breeding terns and have shaggy black crests and a black bill with a yellow tip. They live in colonies on shingle or sandy beaches and were first described from birds seen in Sandwich in the 1780s by William Boys, a Kentish surgeon.


THU 06:00 Today (b047c310)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b047c312)
Hildegard of Bingen

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss one of the most remarkable figures of the Middle Ages, Hildegard of Bingen. The abbess of a Benedictine convent, Hildegard experienced a series of mystical visions which she documented in her writings. She was an influential person in the religious world and much of her extensive correspondence with popes, monarchs and other important figures survives. Hildegard was also celebrated for her wide-ranging scholarship, which as well as theology covered the natural world, science and medicine. Officially recognised as a saint by the Catholic Church in 2012, Hildegard is also one of the earliest known composers. Since their rediscovery in recent decades her compositions have been widely recorded and performed.

With:

Miri Rubin
Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History and Head of the School of History at Queen Mary, University of London

William Flynn
Lecturer in Medieval Latin at the Institute for Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds

Almut Suerbaum
Professor of Medieval German and Fellow of Somerville College, Oxford.

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b03th83h)
Month of Madness

The French in St. Petersburg

Professor Christopher Clark unpicks the complex sequence of events during the July Crisis of 1914, leading to outbreak of the First World War, from the perspective of the key centres of decision-making.

In this programme, Professor Clark travels to Paris. He discusses why Raymond Poincare, the French President, and the Russians under Tsar Nicholas II, extended the remit of their alliance, to cover the eventuality of a 'war of choice' in which Russia would attack Austria-Hungary on behalf of a Balkan client state.

St Petersburg and Paris thus created a geopolitical tripwire that made a general war highly likely if a quarrel were to break out between Austria and its turbulent neighbour - an extremely dangerous thing to do in Europe in 1914.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b047c314)
Dolly Parton - feminist icon? And poet Hollie McNish's Letter to an Unknown Soldier

Dolly Parton makes her debut Glastonbury performance this weekend. Her platinum blonde hair, sequinned styling, and famous cleavage make her instantly recognisable but it's her wit, her writing, and her huge hits that have made her a star. As she's said herself, "I may look fake, but I'm real where it counts." We look at her enduring appeal across the generations and ask; Is she a feminist icon?

On platform one of Paddington station in London, there is a statue of an unknown soldier who is reading a letter. 'Letter to an Unknown Soldier' is the name of a project which asks everyone to contribute to marking the outbreak of the First World War, by writing their own. All the letters the soldier receives will be published on a website in an effort to create a war memorial entirely from
words.

Widely seen as the mother of the Gothic Novel, Ann Radcliffe was the highest paid author of her time but despite this, has widely been ignored compared to writers like Jane Austen. This weekend, the University of Sheffield is holding a conference to celebrate her 250th anniversary. So why has she been forgotten and what influence does her writing have on contemporary gothic authors?

The charity Contact the Elderly organise tea parties across the country hosted by volunteers - to help older people feel less isolated. Volunteers get a lot out of it as do the people who attend. In the latest in our series on loneliness we look at ways to tackle or even prevent feeling lonely.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b047c316)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 3

Episode 4

Kashmala, the young widow, is very unhappy living in the household of her late husband. Her wealthy father-in-law Akbar Khan forbids her to teach at the local school. She tells her parents, Sardar Aka and Gulnara, that she would like to live and teach elsewhere - a scandal so great that it could endanger the whole family.

But Kashmala's troubles are forgotten when Sardar Aka's second wife goes into labour.

A slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pak-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, no electricity and no phone - but hi-tech drones fly overhead.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for the Pashtoon people of this untamed area.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey
Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas
Executive Producer: John Dryden

Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b047c318)
The Consequences of History

The foreign interventionists whose actions have contributed to today's violent events in Iraq. How Burmese rebels crash-landed a plane and then made off with its cargo of cash. Increasingly pressing challenges face the government of Kenya -- not least a drastic reduction in the number of people wanting to spend their holidays there. We are told that a refugee camp in Beirut might just be the best place to go and watch a match in the World Cup and find out why a village on the south coast of Spain is celebrating the life of the very English author Laurie Lee.


THU 11:30 Mark Morris: The Wild Card of Dance (b047c31b)
A portrait of one of the most fascinating figures in dance.

Flamboyant, theatrical, loud, choreographer Mark Morris is also a thoughtful, considered self-taught scholar of music.

And it's his extraordinary musicality that earned him, from the beginning, a reputation with musicians. The likes of Yo Yo Ma and Emmanuel Ax have sought him out as a collaborator.

In this programme, we accompany dance professor Stephanie Jordan to Sadler's Wells during Morris' visit to London, with exclusive access to his rehearsals, watching him direct his company in two new works. We also speak to two of his most experienced dancers in Dresden, and tour of his famous dance headquarters in Brooklyn, New York.

Interviewing New York critics Joan Acocella and Alastair Macaulay, as well as Mark Morris himself, we build up a profile of a brilliantly talented and visionary choreographer. The programme finds out why he places such value on music (and Baroque music in particular), how his distinctive style of choreography has evolved, and his aims for his company.

Producer: Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b047c31d)
Click and collect at railway stations

We head to the railway station with changing rooms where you can pick up and try on the things you bought online.

The Olympic ticket fraud that even caught out the family of one of Britain's best known swimmers. A man's been jailed again for failing to compensate victims.

And how olive oil is being tested to uncover products that aren't what they seem.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b04770c0)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b047c31g)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news.


THU 13:45 Just So Science (b047c31j)
Series 2

The Butterfly That Stamped

Kipling tells the story of a boastful butterfly who threatens to bring down a palace with the beat of his wings. But as Vivienne discovers, the butterfly effect is a real phenomenon in science. With chemist Andrea Sella and meteorologist Paul Davies. The reader is Samuel West. Producer: Rami Tzabar


THU 14:00 The Archers (b047bzlq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Gwyneth Lewis - A Hospital Odyssey (b047c9zz)
A woman sets off on a journey to save her husband's life. As she hears the dreaded diagnosis, cancer, the hospital lurches and her fear sets her on a quest to save him.

Confronting her deepest fears Maris's world slides into science-fiction. She must face dark creatures and tests of her resolve - a dragon in the bowels of the hospital, a Microbe's Ball, and The Cancer Mother herself.

Alexandra Roach stars as Maris and Alex Beckett as Wilson the talking dog in Gwyneth Lewis's drama is a contemporary version of The Odyssey set in an NHS Hospital.

Gwyneth Lewis was the first Poet Laureate of Wales. She wrote her original poem 'A Hospital Odyssey' drawing on very personal experience after her husband was diagnosed with cancer.

The Narrator ..... Deborah Findlay
Maris ..... Alexandra Roach
Wilson ..... Alex Beckett
Ludlow/ Hardy ..... Patrick Brennan
The Cancer Mother/ Nurse/ Bees ..... Heather Craney
Philoctetes/ the dragon/ Papilloma Virus/ Bees ..... Wilf Scolding
Hippocrates/ Administrator ..... Michael Bertenshaw

Music and sound design by Gary C. Newman

Director: Allegra McIlroy

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b047c31l)
Series 27

The Diamond Ramblers, Otterton

Clare Balding has a sparkling day out joining The Diamond Ramblers for a circular walk from the South Devon village of Otterton. The group came together after meeting up at a local slimming club and deciding to accelerate their weight lose by starting walking. Having now been together for just over two years, the eleven have lost more than thirty-six stone between them and despite most of the members being over sixty they now walk for miles together, cementing their friendship and their resolve to remain fit and healthy. With Clare, they share some of their thoughts on dieting, being overweight and the tremendous value they've found in walking out together.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0474xks)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0475566)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b047c31n)
The Golden Dream, Jersey Boys and Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie

Francine Stock talks to director Diego Quemada-Díez about his immigration odyssey The Golden Dream and the influence of his mentor Ken Loach. Neil Brand tinkles the ivories and discusses where Jersey Boys fits in to biopic musicals. Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie is out this week and the Film Programme takes a look at the successes and perils of the sitcom movie. Director Peter Berg on Afghanistan war film, Lone Survivor. Film Critic Andrew Pulver takes a look at the life of Eli Wallach, the star of The Good the Bad and the Ugly and the Magnificent Seven, who has died aged 98.
Presenter Francine Stock. Producer Ruth Sanderson.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b047c31q)
Longitude Prize Winner; Solar cells; New species; Fiji fisherwomen; Physics questions

Longitude Prize 2014 Winning Challenge
Antibiotics resistance has been selected as the focus for the £10m prize. The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned of a "post-antibiotic era" where key drugs no longer work and people die from previously treatable infections. The next step in the challenge is to tackle this resistance, by developing a simple, cheap, quick test that allows you to tell whether an infection is bacterial or not. This will conserve the 50% of antibiotics that are currently given in situations where they have no effect.

Solar Cells
A popular form of photovoltaic, or solar, cells is made using a harmful and expensive chemical called cadmium chloride. Now a team has found a new, cheaper, safer way of making solar cells by replacing the toxic element in the process with a material found in bath salts, magnesium chloride, and these are just as efficient. Professor Ken Durose from Liverpool University explains how it could reduce the cost of solar energy.

New Species
How easy is it to find a new species for science? Whilst in the Bornean jungle, Dr Tim Cockerill discovered that it was relatively easy - one fell in his cup of tea! It was a tiny parasitic wasp. Another new species, of the same type of parasitic wasp, was recently discovered in a school playground in the UK. So new insects seem to be quite easy to find, but what about a new mammal or bird? Tim reveals that finding the creature is just the start of a lot of work needed to get his finding published and accepted.

Fijian Fisherwomen
More and more conservationists are turning to local knowledge to work out the best way to save ecosystems. A great illustration of this grass-roots approach is underway in Fiji. They use a traditional system where villages will close an area of fishing grounds for a few months for fish stocks to recover. Conservationists are now learning about this system, known as 'tambu', to see if it can be used on a longer-term basis to help give fish stocks, that have become seriously depleted in the last few decades, a chance to recover.

Physics questions
University College London cosmologist, Andrew Pontzen answers questions sent in by listeners about why, given the immense heat at the Big Bang, is there so much hydrogen in the universe, and not more of the larger atoms, which are forged under conditions of great heat? And are black holes responsible for the missing matter in the universe?

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b047c31s)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04770c2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b01g61vw)
Series 8

It's a Nude Nude Nude Nude World

Ed Reardon leads us through the ups and down of his week, complete with his trusty companion, Elgar, and his never-ending capacity for scrimping and scraping at whatever scraps his agent, Ping, can offer him to keep body, mind and cat together.

Jaz Milvain asks Ed to curate a moving tribute to him and his work in film for the 'surprise' party that he's organising for his 60th birthday. Whilst Ed relishes the idea of a comedy 'roast' Jaz is looking for something more akin to a light sauté.
So it is that Ed tracks down Jaz's first masterwork, 'It's a Nude Nude Nude Nude World' to form the cornerstone of the tribute, not knowing that Fiona did a few day's work on it.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b047c31v)
Helen's interviewing for a new deputy manager. She doesn't seem bothered when Pat apologetically says she can't help, as Rob will be there to assist.

Helen is keen on an enthusiastic young male candidate, but Rob seems to favour an admittedly less charismatic but more experienced woman. Helen won't sleep tonight until she's made her decision so Rob helps her. Assuring her he doesn't want to interfere, Rob gently steers Helen to making a decision. She realises the answer has been staring her in the face. Despite having liked the young guy, Helen's now convinced they must hire the woman, Tina.

Burns and Fallon have their date. All seems well and Burns fancies going on to a club. He also reminds Fallon to accept his friend request on Facebook. Burns lends an ear when Fallon shares her career worries. He kindly gives her details of a potential contact for her upcycling.

During the date, Fallon regularly updates Alice on progress. Away from the table, Fallon checks Harrison out on Facebook.

Fallon goes home alone having not gone on to the club. Alice is disappointed, as Fallon explains why. She's horrified by his Facebook profile, with his laddish mates and dodgy photos. Fallon's not sure Harrison Burns is her kind of guy.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b047c31x)
Metallica, Scottish Art, Dr Zhivago, Beggar's Opera

Kirsty Lang discusses a huge exhibition of Scottish contemporary art which features over 100 artists at over 60 venues throughout Scotland.

Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich talks about headlining Glastonbury this weekend.

A review of new film Keeping Rosie, starring Maxine Peake as a disgruntled city high flyer.

How the novel Dr Zhivago was used as an ideological weapon by the CIA during the Cold War .

And Kneehigh's latest play, Dead Dog In A Suitcase, a reworking of John Gay's The Beggar's Opera, opens in Liverpool.

Image: ‘Real Life, Rocky Mountain’, courtesy of the artist Ross Sinclair


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b047c316)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b04795tx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b047c31z)
Single Product Companies

Can you conquer the world by selling only one product? Many companies start small, focusing their energies on a single item, with plans to expand into other areas once the business takes off. But not everyone wants to diversify. Some prefer to do one thing and do it well, rather than risk diluting the brand and perhaps also the quality of the goods. In this edition of The Bottom Line, Evan Davis talks to three companies that have stuck with the core product that made them a success in the first place. They'll discuss the benefits of keeping focused, the challenges of staying ahead of the game and explore the perils of relying on just one source of income. Does it make good business sense to put all your eggs in one basket?

Guests:

Vince Gunn, Managing Director, Crocs Europe

Carolyn Komminsk, Head of Creative, Maclaren

Bill Noble, Managing Director, WD40 Company

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b047c31q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b047c312)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b04770c4)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b047c470)
New Savile abuse report, EU leaders debate Commission president, Bosnians mark WWI with David Eades.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b047zz5v)
Remember Me Like This

Episode 4

Summer, the Texas Gulf coast - and Justin Campbell, missing for four years, is found. His abductor is taken into custody. His parents, his younger brother, his grandfather, and Justin himself, each begin their own uncertain journey towards a new life.

With infinite care for each other they begin to negotiate the wounds of the past four years, the isolation, the betrayal the grief for what has been lost.

As they begin to remake their family they learn that, contrary to reassurances from the authorities, the man who took Justin away has been let out on bail. In the dusty and sweltering heat of high summer the small town prepares to celebrate Justin's return at their annual shrimp festival but the trial date looms over all of them.

"In this deeply nuanced portrait of an American family, Bret Anthony Johnston fearlessly explores the truth behind a mythic happy ending. In Remember Me Like This, Johnston presents an incisive dismantling of an all too comforting fallacy: that in being found we are no longer lost." - Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones.

"It is as a writer that I admire the architecture of Remember Me Like This, the novel's flawless storytelling. It is as the father of three sons that I vouch for the psychological authenticity of this depiction of any parent's worst fears. Emotionally, I am with this family as they try to move ahead-embracing 'the half-known and desperate history' that they share. I love this novel."-John Irving

Episode 4:
Feeling reprieved, watching her old life as 'the bereaved mother' slip away from her, Laura Campbell begins to focus on the future. The two brothers share some memories.

Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Trodd en Bratt Say 'Well Done You' (b047c476)
Series 1

Episode 2

Nominated for Best Comedy in the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2015, Trodd en Bratt Say 'Well Done You' is a comedy sketch show written and performed by Ruth Bratt and Lucy Trodd, stars of Radio 4's Showstoppers.

This week there's a robbery in the Fings and Bobs shop, but Anja and Benjio are only too happy to help the robber find his way around. Meanwhile, Mary's dark secret threatens to ruin her church choir's concert; and Ruth tries to confront a colleague with a distracting verbal tick.

Written and performed by Ruth Bratt and Lucy Trodd

Supporting cast: Adam Meggido and Oliver Senton

Script Editor: Jon Hunter

Composer: Duncan Walsh Atkins

Producer: Ben Worsfield

A Lucky Giant production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b047c47f)
The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has apologised to the Commons for letting down the victims of Jimmy Savile. Susan Hulme covers his statement to MPs .
Also on the programme:
MPs reflect on the First World War.
At what level should the National Minimum Wage be set?
And will the Government be guaranteeing that we all receive professional pensions advice ?



FRIDAY 27 JUNE 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b04770fb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b03th83h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b04770fd)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b04770fg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b04770fj)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b04770fl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0483c2v)
Prayer and reflection with Kevin Franz of the Religious Society of Friends.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b047c5ym)
BBC Rural Affairs coverage; Cattle and rare butterflies; The value of woodlands

Planting more woodlands could bring the UK millions of pounds in economic and social benefits, according to a new report. Charlotte Smith speaks to one of its authors, Professor Ian Bateman, from the University of East Anglia.

A report commissioned by the BBC Trust delivers its conclusions on the BBC's coverage of rural stories and country life.

Rare Luing cattle are helping provide the perfect habitat for rare High Brown Fritillary butterflies in Cumbria.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sarah Swadling.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvryl)
Common Buzzard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the common buzzard. Common buzzards are stocky birds of prey which often soar on upturned wings. In Scotland they're sometimes called the tourists' eagle because of many golden eagles claimed by hopeful visitors. Common buzzards are increasing their range and numbers and range in the UK and their soaring flight over their territories is now a regular sight nearly everywhere.


FRI 06:00 Today (b047c76p)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b0474yct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b03th83q)
Month of Madness

London

Professor Christopher Clark unpicks the complex sequence of events during the July Crisis, leading to outbreak of the First World War, from the perspective of the key centres of decision-making.

As events unfolded in July 1914, all eyes were on the British and how they would react. In the final programme of his series, Professor Christopher Clark analyses British decision-making during the July Crisis.

At the centre of the events in London was the Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey. Of all the politicians who walked the European political stage in 1914, he was the most baffling. Professor Clark shows how the last-minute British decision to enter the war on the side of France and Russia, and to declare war on Germany, was a decision of world-historical import that transformed a local conflict into a global struggle.

Christopher Clark is Professor of Modern History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St Catharine's College. He is the author of Kaiser Wilhelm II, Iron Kingdom and - most recently - of the highly acclaimed and award-winning The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went To War in 1914.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b047c76r)
Sham marriages; Feeling lonely when you no longer work; Insects for eating

What are the signs of a sham marriage and how is the government trying to tackle the issue? We hear from a Registrar who gave evidence to the Home Office Select Committee this week.

Cricket cookies? Ants for breakfast? Food sustainability is a big global issue - could eating insects be the answer to finding new food sources to feed an increasing population? Over two billion people currently eat insects as part of their everyday diet but will it catch on in the West?

Forget the internet dating, many people find love on public transport - we hear from a woman who met her husband on the train and the editor of Rush Hour Crush, the daily column in The Metro that links up love struck commuters.

And on Woman's Hour this week, we've been hearing a range of voices in different circumstances on how being lonely affects them and the factors that contribute to it. Tomorrow we'll discuss how leaving work, through retirement or redundancy, can lead to feelings of isolation and loneliness.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b047c76t)
An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk: Series 3

Episode 5

We learn whether Sardar Aka has that longed-for son or another daughter.

Over in the Khan household, Akbar Khan is tired of the behaviour of Kashmala, his son's young widow. He and his mother suspect she is teaching in secret and so they develop a plan to keep her busy.

There seems to be good news, though, for Akbar Khan's elder son, Wisal, who is in love with Zarlakhta, the poorest girl in the village.

An Everyday Story of Afghan Folk is based on characters and storylines from PACT Radio's daily soap, made by and for the Pashtoon people of this untamed area. It's a slice of village life from the wild, mountainous Pak-Afghan borders where the only law is tribal law and there is no road, no electricity and no phone - but hi-tech drones fly overhead.

Based on a PACT Radio production led by John Butt
Written and directed in the UK by Liz Rigbey
Sound design by David Chilton
Music by Olivia Thomas
Executive Producer: John Dryden

Producer: Anne-Marie Cole
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 The New Viking Invasion (b047c76w)
In recent years, sperm has been shipped out of Denmark at an astonishing rate, producing thousands of babies worldwide - many in the UK. In 2006, the UK was not importing any Danish sperm, but by 2010 Denmark was supplying around a third of our total imports. Why are Danish donors in such demand? Is it simply a desire for the tall, blonde, blue-eyed, well-educated stereotype - or is there more to it?

Kate Brian, who has reported on fertility issues for two decades, hears from women who have been attracted by the range and availability of Danish donors. Some have been overwhelmed by the vast amount of detail that can be accessed online - typically, thirty pages about each individual, including voice samples and baby photos.

She investigates whether there is a problem with the UK's own system of recruiting and supplying donor sperm. One couple looked to Denmark after being told there was a ten-year wait in their area for a suitable donor. How common is this? Has the 2005 law change removing UK donors' rights to anonymity made a difference?

Kate also travels to Copenhagen to meet some of the 250 men who regularly donate at European Sperm Bank, receiving around £30 per visit. How rigorous is the selection process for becoming a donor? Is the incentive merely financial? And how do the men feel about producing potentially hundreds of children, many of which may contact them in years to come?

Producer: Steve Urquhart
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Polyoaks (b047c76y)
Series 3

Who's Afraid of the CQC?

Dr Phil Hammond and David Spicer's satire on some of the major issues thrown up by NHS reform. Among the many targets in their sights are the Care Quality Commission, patient records, privatisation, whistleblowing, time wasters and patient participation groups.

Will the NHS be safe in the hands of Pfizer? Why do doctors often look sicker than their patients? Would an NHS executive go private? How are doctors revalidated? What does that actually mean? And is that piece of dry skin on your heel anything to do with the amount you've been drinking lately? These and other questions may well be answered at Polyoaks - the flagship of enlightened West Country General Practice at the forefront of a constantly reforming NHS.

Nigel Planer stars as Dr Roy Thornton and Simon Greenall as his brother Dr Hugh Thornton in a clinic always at odds with itself over diagnoses, funding, clinical commissioning groups, Jeremy Hunt and the ever more dubious commercial activities of their associate TV's Dr. Jeremy (David Westhead), who is still juggling Dictionary Corner, a series of Malpractice suits and forgotten alimony payments.

Episode 4:
Who's Afraid of the CQC? In which the staff at Polyoaks are being assessed by the Care Quality Commission. Will they survive the experience?

Written by Dr Phil Hammond and David Spicer
Directed by Frank Stirling at Unique

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b047c770)
The rising costs of charging electric cars

Peter White hears about the electric car drivers who say they'd rather wait for a recovery vehicle than pay to top up their batteries.
The flight ticket website that's cancelling tickets but not refunding customers.
And why growing numbers of Londoners are selling up and moving out of the city.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b047c772)
Andrew and Stephen - Getting Married

Fi Glover introduces a Church of England vicar and his partner considering their plans to marry this summer, in spite of the Church's continued refusal to sanction gay marriage.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b04770fn)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b047c774)
Shaun Ley presents national and international news.


FRI 13:45 Just So Science (b047c776)
Series 2

The Elephant's Child

In Kipling's tale, the elephant got his trunk from a crocodile on the banks of the great grey-green greasy Limpopo river. But does science understand how the trunk really evolved? Vivienne talks to researchers Kathleen Smith and her husband William Kier about the wonders of muscular hydrostats (trunks, tongues and tentacles to you and me) whilst vet Jon Hutchinson ponders the elephant's aquatic origins. Last of the series. The reader is Samuel West. Producer: Rami Tzabar


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b047c31v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b015mzl8)
A Time To Dance

In July 1518 a terrifying and mysterious plague struck the medieval city of Strasbourg. By the time the epidemic subsided, heat and exhaustion had claimed many lives, leaving thousands bewildered and bereaved.

The South Bank, London. 2011. Is it happening again?

By Julian Simpson. Based on an original idea by Anita Sullivan.

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b047cb01)
Stottesdon, Shropshire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Stottesdon, Shropshire. Chris Beardshaw, Bob Flowerdew and Bunny Guinness answer the audience questions.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

Q. Within two weeks I must move three large Hellebores. Please could you advise me on the best way to replant my Niger, Orientalis and Pink Ice Hellebores in mid-summer.
A. They are not an easy plant to move when they are large and old. It might be best to plant new Hellebores in the autumn. Theoretically you could try digging with some small machinery.
If you do try to move them, first drench them in water, prune off as many of the leaves as possible and dig as deep as possible. Plant them into a well-prepared site. Subsequently keep it very well watered. Choose a protected, permeable site with dappled shade. Use shade netting if you are moving it on a sunny day.

Q. At what time of day should I water greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers? How much water a day should I use?
A. The more you water, the less flavoursome the tomato. You can judge by eye, only watering when the fruits are looking less plump than usual. Make sure you don't let them wilt. Cucumbers require a daily watering, perhaps twice a day. It is best to be consistent so that you can avoid splitting.

Q. I planted some onion sets in the autumn. They are very large but the foliage is still very green. Should I lift them now or wait longer?
A. It would be best to wait a little longer. They will continue swelling until late June. There is always a danger of mildew. The bigger the onion the harder it is to keep. Do not bend the necks down, as you will let disease in.

Q. My daughter has been promised a herb garden and we have provided her with Oregano, Thyme, Sage and Mint planted in individual 12 inch pots. Could the panel provide her with some tips?
A. We often 'over pot' herbs and the plants become lost within the soil and are surrounded by too many nutrients. The plants become soft and they lose flavour. You ideally want to grow them in impoverished conditions. They need a lot of sunlight. In the winter lift the pots from the ground to allow excess water to be released. You might want to make a mini cold frame in the cold months.

Q. We have a freestanding Wisteria. Is it possible to take cuttings?
A. It would be better to layer it and you could bring a pot up to it. Take a pot of gritty compost, raise it and pin down into it. Take fresh wood in early summer and scratch underneath the tissue, removing the outer layer of bark. You could use a hanging basket, filled with a soil-based compost. Layering is much more reliable than taking cuttings.


FRI 15:45 Food Chains (b047cb03)
Chocolate for Later

Written and read by Orange Prize-winning novelist Helen Dunmore at the Food Connections Festival in Bristol.

Marion is used to the long-haul flight to Australia. She makes the journey three times a year, to visit her son and his family, whose faces she pictures as she tells the kind and graceful flight attendant about them. But she can never get used to the airline food.

Specially commissioned for the festival, Helen Dunmore's intriguing and surprising story tells of loneliness, a deep need for attention, and sensuous delight.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b047cb05)
Felix Dennis, Norman Willis, Josephine Pullein-Thompson, Gerry Conlon, Eli Wallach

Matthew Bannister on

The multi millionaire magazine publisher Felix Dennis. He was one of the defendants in the notorious Oz Trial in the 1970s, lived a life of excess and later revealed a talent for poetry.

Also the moderate TUC leader Norman Willis, who tried in vain to end the miners' strike.

The writer Josephine Pullein-Thompson whose tales of pony club life delighted generations of young girls.

Gerry Conlon - one of the Guildford Four who were wrongly convicted of carrying out an IRA bombing in 1974.

And the actor Eli Wallach, best known for appearances in The Magnificent Seven and The Good The Bad and The Ugly.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b047cb07)
Lots of emails this week from listeners angered by BBC radio's lack of coverage of what was claimed to be a 50,000-strong demonstration against the coalition's cuts - even though it started just outside Broadcasting House. Was it, you wondered, evidence that the corporation's news coverage isn't as impartial as it claims?

Also under discussion - the "N word". Is it ever acceptable to use it on the air? Roger talks to the producer of Radio 4's Archive on 4 documentary A History of the N Word and Radio 4's Editor of editorial standards, Roger Mahony.

Elsewhere in the programme, the truth behind the story that Jack Dee threatened to resign from Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue; the release of a report on the quality and impartiality of BBC coverage of rural affairs; and the shipping forecast - beloved of Radio 4 listeners, but is it still used by those in peril on the sea?

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:55 1914: Day by Day (b03th9qk)
27th June

The Archduke Franz Ferdinand is visiting Bosnia for military manoeuvres.

Margaret Macmillan chronicles the events leading up to the First World War. Each episode draws together newspaper accounts, diplomatic correspondence and private journals from the same day exactly one hundred years ago, giving a picture of the world in 1914 as it was experienced at the time.

The series tracks the development of the European crisis day by day, from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand through to the first week of the conflict.

As well as the war, it gives an insight into the wider context of the world in 1914 including the threat of civil war in Ireland, the sensational trial of Madame Caillaux in France and the suffragettes' increasingly violent campaign for votes for women.

Margaret Macmillan is Professor of International History at Oxford University.

Presenter and Writer: Margaret Macmillan
Readings: Stephen Greif, Felix von Manteuffel, Jaime Stewart, Simon Tcherniak, Jane Whittenshaw

Researcher: Dawn Berry
Music: Sacha Puttnam
Sound Design: Eloise Whitmore
Broadcast Assistant: Hannah Newton
Development Consultant: Catriona Pennell

Producer: Russell Finch
Executive Producer: Joby Waldman

Assistant Producers: Phil Smith and Carly Maile

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b047cb09)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b04770fq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b047cb0c)
Series 84

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guest panellists Justin Moorhouse, Sara Pascoe and Bob Mills.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b047cb0f)
Charlie helps Jill load some honey jars in her car. Although they don't agree on the road, he assures her that farmers need beekeepers like her.

Ruth hopes Charlie didn't see the guy at the bonfire. She suggests to David a trip to the NEC livestock event next week.

Charlie confronts David about the guy. He's heard rumours about it being an effigy. David innocently says that it was nothing personal. Things get heated between them.

Busy Roy tells Hayley he needs to work late. He's actually hanging around in the office in the hope of seeing Elizabeth. Businesslike but warm, Elizabeth asks about possible headline band Quaintance Smith. Roy is waiting on a call from their manager.

Elizabeth gets back to the office and Roy's still there. He notices that she has taken off her wristband. It's clearly time to move on. Elizabeth puts Roy straight. She's not going to change her life and regular routine. He should go on home to Hayley.

Roy calls Hayley and tells her the change of plan. He'll be home shortly, so can she keep that special fish pie she's made for him?


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b047cdwp)
Mrs Brown's Boys D'Movie; Arcade Fire; Richard Wilson

Tonight's Front Row considers the big-screen debut of Mrs Brown, Brendan O'Carroll's TV creation. Whilst not receiving critical acclaim, the award-winning programme regularly attracts millions of viewers - so does it work as a film?

Also in the programme - Richard Wilson on performing Beckett's monologue, Krapp's Last Tape; Arcade Fire's Will Butler speaks from Glastonbury as the band prepares to go onstage; and Michelle Magorian recalls writing her classic novel, Goodnight Mister Tom.

Plus, how artists respond creatively to bridges.

Presenter: Matthew D'Ancona
Producer: Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b047c76t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b047cdwr)
Chris Bryant MP, Andrew RT Davies AM, Leanne Wood AM, Simon Jenkins

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Hoddinott Hall in Cardiff with the leader of the Welsh Conservatives Andrew R T Davies AM, Labour MP and Shadow Minister for Welfare Reform Chris Bryant, Plaid Cymru Leader Leanne Wood AM and Chairman of the National Trust and Guardian columnist Simon Jenkins.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b047cdwt)
Battling the Botnets

It's a tale of "shadowy white-hatted hackers, more shadowy black-hatted hackers and the possibility that the pricey electronic equipment lurking in our homes may not have our best interests at heart".

AL Kennedy reflects on the current spate of high-profile viruses that are threatening our computers ...invasive software that may be sending our bank details to criminals every time we connect to the internet.

She says as more sophisticated computers become part of more appliances, the potential for virus infection increases. So is it time, she asks, for us to rethink our devotion to these machines?

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Dangerous Visions (b047cdww)
Dark Minds

By Philip Palmer

A dangerous obsession with immersive virtual reality games has deadly consequences.

In the near future Harry is obsessed with totally immersive virtual reality gaming. Then one day he wakes up with a dead body lying next to him in bed. All evidence points to the fact that Harry is the killer. Harry even remembers doing it. But why? Did the violence of the games give him his gruesome blood lust? Or is something far more sinister going on?

Slowly Harry uncovers a conspiracy that has its roots in the illicit underbelly of the Internet.

Sex, violence and virtual reality combine in this futuristic thriller.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b04770fs)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b047cdwy)
Jean-Claude Juncker has been nominated as President of the European Commission, despite David Cameron's efforts. We ask how the row over Mr Juncker has left the UK's standing in the European Union. We analyse the UK's diplomatic efforts. And what do Eurosceptic Conservative MPs make of it all? Also, we speak to the medical student on work experience who made a big discovery, while researching cystic fibrosis. And Ukraine has finally signed an agreement with the EU - the one President Yanukovych, rejected... prompting the current chaos in the country. Where will it leave Ukraine's relationship with Russia?
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective with David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b047zzqq)
Remember Me Like This

Episode 5

Summer, the Texas Gulf coast - and Justin Campbell, missing for four years, is found. His abductor is taken into custody. His parents, his younger brother, his grandfather, and Justin himself, each begin their own uncertain journey towards a new life.

With infinite care for each other they begin to negotiate the wounds of the past four years, the isolation, the betrayal the grief for what has been lost.

As they begin to remake their family they learn that, contrary to reassurances from the authorities, the man who took Justin away has been let out on bail. In the dusty and sweltering heat of high summer the small town prepares to celebrate Justin's return at their annual shrimp festival but the trial date looms over all of them.

"In this deeply nuanced portrait of an American family, Bret Anthony Johnston fearlessly explores the truth behind a mythic happy ending. In Remember Me Like This, Johnston presents an incisive dismantling of an all too comforting fallacy: that in being found we are no longer lost." - Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones.

"It is as a writer that I admire the architecture of Remember Me Like This, the novel's flawless storytelling. It is as the father of three sons that I vouch for the psychological authenticity of this depiction of any parent's worst fears. Emotionally, I am with this family as they try to move ahead-embracing 'the half-known and desperate history' that they share. I love this novel."-John Irving

Episode 5:
As Justin's old life, his 'Away Life' in which he had a girlfriend, is declared off-limits, his younger brother is in the throes of first love, with Fiona.

Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b04795tz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b047cdx0)
Mark D'Arcy with the news from Westminster and a look back at the parliamentary week.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b047cdx2)
Floyd and Tommy - Losing the Beautiful Game

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between two footballers, who reflect on the importance of the game in their lives, and their dread of life without it.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b0477j4j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b0477j4j)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0477ph1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0477ph1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b047bzky)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b047bzky)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b047c316)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b047c316)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b047c76t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b047c76t)

1914: Day by Day 16:55 FRI (b03th9qk)

A Charles Paris Mystery 11:30 WED (b047bzl4)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b04795tz)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b04795tz)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b046p4nc)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b047cdwt)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b04795vc)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b04795vc)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b046kr4l)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0477nry)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0474xc4)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b046p4n9)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b047cdwr)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0474xdk)

Arnold of the Five Towns 16:00 MON (b0477m6z)

Ata Kak and the Crate Diggers 15:30 SAT (b046kwq5)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b047c31q)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b047c31q)

Before They Were Famous 23:00 WED (b01lv38v)

Bella Hardy Goes Home 11:30 TUE (b0477r69)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0474xj3)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0474xj3)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b0477m71)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0477ns2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b047zt1d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b047ztwt)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b047zz5v)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b047zzqq)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b046p074)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b03th7pn)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b03th7pn)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b03th7qw)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b03th7qw)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b03th82b)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b03th82b)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b03th83h)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b03th83h)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b03th83q)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0474y9m)

Burning Both Ends: When Oliver Reed Met Keith Moon 14:15 TUE (b017x3pl)

Clayton Grange 23:00 TUE (b047bstc)

Dangerous Visions 21:00 FRI (b047cdww)

David Blunkett: A Political Life 13:30 SUN (b0493dmq)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b0474yct)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b0474yct)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0477m6v)

Drama 14:15 WED (b047bzld)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b015mzl8)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 THU (b01g61vw)

Face the Facts 12:30 WED (b047wfym)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b0474wjf)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b04755lz)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0477nz1)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b047bsy6)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b047bzqv)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b047c5ym)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b046p07z)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b047cb07)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b046kybw)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b04795v7)

Food Chains 15:45 FRI (b047cb03)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b046l80n)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b047bzlx)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b0474xd5)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b0474xd5)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0474wkn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b047c318)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0477nrt)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b04795v5)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b047bzls)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b047c31x)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b047cdwp)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b047bzlz)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b046p07s)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b047cb01)

Gwyneth Lewis - A Hospital Odyssey 14:15 THU (b047c9zz)

Ilkley Tour Baht 'at... 10:30 SAT (b0474wk2)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b047c312)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b047c312)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b04795v9)

Just So Science 13:45 MON (b0477m6s)

Just So Science 13:45 TUE (b04795tq)

Just So Science 13:45 WED (b047bzlb)

Just So Science 13:45 THU (b047c31j)

Just So Science 13:45 FRI (b047c776)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b046kr4b)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b0477m75)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b046p07x)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b047cb05)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b04795tx)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b04795tx)

Life: An Idiot's Guide 18:30 TUE (b0436hkz)

Linard's Travels 11:00 WED (b047bzl0)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0474xd3)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b04795ts)

Mark Morris: The Wild Card of Dance 11:30 THU (b047c31b)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b046p520)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0474xgm)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b04755g1)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b047704c)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b047707k)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b04770b7)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b04770fb)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b047bzkt)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b047bzkt)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b047bzlg)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b0474wkv)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0474wkv)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b046l802)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b047bzlv)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b046p528)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0474xgw)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b04755g9)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b047705l)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0477080)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b04770bh)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b04770fl)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0474xgy)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b046p52b)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0474xh2)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0474xh6)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b046p52v)

News 13:00 SAT (b046p52l)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0474xkb)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b0477pgx)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0475566)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0475566)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0474xcn)

PM 17:00 MON (b0477m73)

PM 17:00 TUE (b04795v1)

PM 17:00 WED (b047bzln)

PM 17:00 THU (b047c31s)

PM 17:00 FRI (b047cb09)

Philip K Dick - Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? 21:00 SAT (b046j873)

Philip K Dick - Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? 15:00 SUN (b047cz98)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b047556v)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b046j877)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b0475568)

Polyoaks 11:30 FRI (b047c76y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b046p542)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b04755lx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0482xmf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0483c11)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0483c19)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b0483c2v)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b0474xks)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0474xks)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0474xks)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b046nxcz)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b047c31l)

Ray Bradbury - The Martian Chronicles 14:30 SAT (b0474xcb)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b046j96d)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b0477m6x)

Rudy's Rare Records 11:30 MON (b00yj2hq)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b0474wjy)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0474xdh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b046p524)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0474xgr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b04755g5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b047704h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b047707q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b04770bc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b04770fg)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b046kwq3)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b0477ph3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b046p522)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b046p526)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b046p52n)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0474xgp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0474xgt)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0474xhb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b04755g3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b04755g7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b047704f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0477055)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b047707m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b047707v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b04770b9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b04770bf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b04770fd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b04770fj)

Short Cuts 23:00 MON (b03zb4b6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b046p52s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0474xhg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b04755gh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b047706c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b047708f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b04770c2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b04770fq)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0474xk8)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0474xk8)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0477j4b)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0477j4b)

Start/Stop 18:30 WED (b03bsb9c)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b0474y36)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0474xkq)

Tao Lin - A Message of Unknown Purpose 00:30 SUN (b0474xj1)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0474y9p)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0475580)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0475580)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0477m77)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0477m77)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b04795v3)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b04795v3)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b047bzlq)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b047bzlq)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b047c31v)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b047c31v)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b047cb0f)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b046ny89)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b047c31z)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b046nxd3)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b047c31n)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b0474yd3)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b0474yd3)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b04795tv)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b0477pgv)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b0477pgv)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0475524)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b047c772)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b047cdx2)

The Little Stamp that Became the Most Valuable Thing in the World 11:00 MON (b0477j4l)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b047bzll)

The New Viking Invasion 11:00 FRI (b047c76w)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b046p4n3)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b047cb0c)

The Special Relationship: Uncovered 20:00 MON (b0477nrw)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0474wkl)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b04754xn)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0477ns0)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b04795vf)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b047bzm1)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b047c470)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b047cdwy)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b046l7zr)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b047bzlj)

Tina C 23:15 WED (b01b1jwx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0477ns4)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b047bstf)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b047bzm3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b047c47f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b047cdx0)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0474wjm)

Today 06:00 MON (b0477j48)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0477pgs)

Today 06:00 WED (b047bzkr)

Today 06:00 THU (b047c310)

Today 06:00 FRI (b047c76p)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Open Letters 19:15 SUN (b01hxpy6)

Trodd en Bratt Say 'Well Done You' 23:00 THU (b047c476)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b020tqln)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b02tvggm)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02tt1kv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b02ttqwv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b02tvnnw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b02tvryl)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b046p52d)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b046p52g)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b046p52j)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b046p52q)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0474xh0)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0474xh4)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0474xh8)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0474xhd)

Weather 05:56 MON (b04755gc)

Weather 12:57 MON (b04755gf)

Weather 21:58 MON (b04755gk)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b0477069)

Weather 21:58 WED (b047708m)

Weather 12:57 THU (b04770c0)

Weather 21:58 THU (b04770c4)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b04770fn)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b04770fs)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b04755dx)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b04755dz)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0474xcl)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0477j4g)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0477pgz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b047bzkw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b047c314)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b047c76r)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0477m6q)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b04795tn)

World at One 13:00 WED (b047bzl8)

World at One 13:00 THU (b047c31g)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b047c774)

Writing Lives 19:45 SUN (b0475590)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b0477m6n)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b0477r6c)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b047bzl6)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b047c31d)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b047c770)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b046p544)