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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 MAY 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b041yrd6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b042bjzl)
Richard Benson - The Valley

Episode 5

Abridged from Richard Benson's epic family saga The Valley, the focus of this Book of the Week is on the story of the author's grandmother - Winnie Hollingworth (1909 - 2002) - and her life in the mining villages of the Dearne Valley in South Yorkshire.

This remarkable social history draws on years of research, interviews and anecdote which chart generations of carousing and banter, tears and fights all set against the background of a close-knit community where almost everybody worked either in the mines or the mills.

Richard Benson's first book, THE FARM which related the story of his own parents and brother and their livelihood in the Yorkshire Wolds was described as ' an extraordinary mixture of hardness and tenderness, wit and slog.. wonderful ' Ronald Blythe author of Akenfield. It went on to be a no.1 bestseller.

This new book is a powerful and moving achievement - it follows Winnie from her first romantic encounter: 'her heart beating hard and fast down in her whalebone and elastic' to her final years sitting in the lounge of a long rubber-tiled room with high-backed chairs around the walls.. ' where 'the residents either roost mutely or chat while their eyes search the room for a younger person who might play the piano for them.'

Ep 5. Children become adults, and Winnie and Harry grow frail, but there are still surprises in store.

Read by Richard Stacey
PRODUCER: JILL WATERS

Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC 4Extra.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041yrd8)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041yrdb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041yrdd)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b041yrdg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b041yrk9)
A short reflection and prayer with Andrea Rea.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b041yrkc)
"The gunmen came and snatched her." iPM speaks to the father of one of the abducted school girls in Nigeria. And one listener tells us why he's English and not British. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b041yrdj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b041yrdl)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b041yjy5)
The Avon Gorge, Bristol

With Brunel's iconic Clifton Suspension Bridge towering over head, pull on your hiking boots and join Felicity Evans as she steps away from Bristol's busy city streets and delves into the dense undergrowth of the Avon Gorge.

As a haven for rare plant species, it's been classed as one of the top three botanical sites in England and with peregrine falcons circling overhead and goats roaming the land below, you could be forgiven for thinking you are in the most wild of rural landscapes - but in reality you are just a stone's throw from Bristol's City Centre.

Felicity meets with botanist and rock climber Libby Houston, who for over 30 years has explored the craggy edges of the Avon Gorge, identifying and even discovering rare plant species - one of which, 'Houston's White Beam', bears her name.

Further along the gorge Felicity joins Ben Scouse as he does his daily check on his six 'hairy conservationists' otherwise known as the six billy goats who have been bought in to graze the land in order to support the cultivation of the rare plants.

Looking upwards, author and naturalist Ed Drewitt takes Felicity peregrine spotting and reveals their history with the gorge and their royal connections and finally, Merchant Venturer Francis Greenacre explains how this land - so close to a city - came to be preserved as a wild and wonderful open space.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b042cq7x)
Farming Today This Week: Grass

To unearth the importance of grass for UK farmers, Charlotte Smith visits a beef farmer in Gloucestershire who feeds his livestock purely on grass and hay. Ian Boyd grazes his Hereford cows on permanent grassland during the summer months and on wildflower meadows over the winter. Farming Today This Week also speaks to the Pasture Fed Livestock Association about why they believe grass-fed livestock helps enrich both UK grasslands and the end product.

Farming Today This Week also hears from the British Grassland Society and why the Wildlife Trusts will present a petition to the Secretary of State, Owen Paterson, asking for more protection of our meadows. Marie Lennon meets a farmer on the Somerset Levels who is restoring his grassland after the floods and Caz Graham speaks to a dairy farmer in Cumbria who is fanatical about grassland management.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b041yrdn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b042cq7z)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b042cq81)
Jay Rayner and the Inheritance Tracks of Julian Lloyd Webber

Richard Coles in London and Suzy Klein in Bristol from the Bristol Food Connections Festival with food writer Jay Rayner, The Inheritance Tracks of Julian Lloyd Webber, Nick Hunt following in the footsteps of Patrick Leigh Fermor on his 2,500 mile walk from Rotterdam to Istanbul, JP Devlin meeting urban gull expert Peter Rock on a Bristol rooftop, poetry from Elvis McGonagall, Vicky Harrison who is knitting Bristol in miniature and Romy Gill, chef and restaurant owner on the immeasurable joys of modern Indian food.

Jay Rayner, food critic, author and jazz pianist joins Richard in the studio. 'Kitchen Cabinet' starts on BBC Radio 4 on 10 May.

Richard Smith aka Elvis McGonagall performs poems on Bristol and food. Elvis McGonagall is on Radio 4 on Wednesday nights at 2300 with a new show 'Elvis McGonagall Looks on the Bright Side'.

Romy Gill runs Romy's kitchen in Thornbury (near Bristol) and is a chef/owner. Brought up in West Bengal she talks to Suzy about her early life, running a small business and why Bristol is so interesting for food.
JP Devlin roams the streets of Bristol to record a crowdscape.

Nick Hunt took Patrick Leigh Fermor's epic walk to Istanbul in the early 1930's to heart and followed, pretty much, in his exact footsteps in about half the time. 'Walking the Woods and the Water: in Patrick Leigh Fermor's footsteps from the Hook of Holland to the Golden Horn' by Nick Hunt (Nicholas Brealey Publishing) is out now.

JP meets Peter Rock, the UK's leading urban gull expert, on a Bristol roof with some breeding pairs.
Vicky Harrison and a team of merry crafters have been knitting the city of Bristol. Vicky talks to Suzy about 'Briswool' and how communities can come together creatively.

Julian Lloyd-Webber's Inheritance Tracks are The March from the Love For Three Oranges by Prokofiev and The Little Beggar Boy by Piazzolla played by Julian and Jiaxin Lloyd-Webber.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 The Art of Keynes (b042cq83)
It's March 1918. Sticking out from a hedge in rural Sussex is a brown-paper package containing a painting of 6 apples, Cézanne's famous 'Pommes'.

It's been left there by the economist John Maynard Keynes, who's been dropped at the end of the lane leading to his friends, the artists Clive and Vanessa Bell's home, and can only manage to carry his suitcases.

Writer and broadcaster Nicholas Wapshott tells the extraordinary and largely unknown story of how Keynes persuaded the British government to take paintings in lieu of France's war debt.

So as shells rained down on Paris, Keynes was buying priceless works by Manet, Delacroix, Degas, Gaugin and many more which now hang in the National Gallery and the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. The National Gallery didn't rate Cézanne so Keynes kept 'Pommes' for himself and later hung it over his bed.

Featuring: Nicholas Penny, Director of the National Gallery, Stephen Keynes (the economist's great nephew) and Keynes expert Victoria Chick.

Producer: Trevor Dann

A Trevor Dann production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in May 2014.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b042cq85)
Jackie Ashley of The Guardian asks if political mavericks are on the rise. A pollster wonders if Scots are telling the truth about which way they'll vote in the independence referendum. And how solid is Labour's support for the High Speed 2 rail link?

The editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b042cq87)
The Heroes of Baghdad

Global viewpoints. In this edition: Kevin Connolly visits the Baghdad book market and salutes the bravery of those who carry on with their daily lives amid a constant threat of violence; Jeremy Bowen considers the impact on the Middle East of the apparent coming together of the two rival Palestinian factions; Chris Terrill is on a perilous day out with the fishermen of Mauritania in west Africa; Katy Watson is in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo where housing is a serious problem - this is a place with the world's largest slum population. And fish and rice they are used to, but Robin Lustig was in the Burma's Irrawaddy Delta when the locals, for the first time, were invited to sample German sausages and tomato ketchup.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b042cq89)
Paul Lewis talks to a teacher whose account was frozen by Barclays when her mum sent her some money. It paid compensation - but she couldn't spend it because her account remained frozen while the bank investigated. What was going on?

Copycat websites that appear to be government sites for driving tests, passports, and so on, but are not, and charge premiums for passing details on to the correct website are still fooling the public and appearing top of the search engines. Why can't the government or the search engines control them?

Two well-known finance firms are offering shares to the public in the next month or so: Saga, the financial products and holiday firm; and TSB. Both want retail investors to buy them. But is it sensible to buy shares cold in Initial Public Offerings? Paul Lewis talks to Stephen Wilmot from the Investor's Chronicle.

Lloyds has scrapped all overdraft charges on its Islamic bank accounts. In fact it has scrapped overdrafts - planned and unplanned - on them. Is this a good way to avoid the high cost of overdrafts? Or religious discrimination?

Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b041yr8w)
Series 43

Episode 3

Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team present a comic take on the week's news. With guests Marcus Brigstocke, John Finnemore, Laura Shavin and Grace Petrie.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Sarah Morgan and Andy Wolton. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b041yrdq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b041yrds)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b041yr92)
George Eustice MP, Mary Creagh MP, Kelvin MacKenzie, Jack Monroe

Following the broadcast of this edition of Any Questions (Friday 2nd /Saturday 3rd May), the following candidates are standing alongside panellist Kelvin MacKenzie for the St George's Hill ward in Elmbridge Borough Council in Surrey:
Simon Foale (Conservative)
Thomas Wicks (Labour)
Other panellists include Farming Minister George Eustice MP; Shadow Transport Secretary Mary Creagh MP; Kelvin MacKenzie; and Jack Monroe; with chair Jonathan Dimbleby. This programme was broadcast from the Knowle West Media Centre in Bristol as part of the Bristol Food Connections festival.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b042cq8c)
Weapons in schools; rent controls; tougher sentencing; Jeremy Clarkson

This week Labour pledged to introduce tighter controls on the rental market. Landlords and tenants react.
Your views on whether teachers need support to cope with violent pupils.
Should the law be harsher on perpetrators of sexual and indecent abuse.
And then there's the question of Jeremy Clarkson's BBC future....

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Angie Nehring

PHONE: 03700 100 444 (Lines Open at 1230pm)
EMAIL: any.answers@bbc.co.uk
TWITTER: Tweet us using hashtag BBCAQ.
TEXT: Text us on 84844.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b042cq8f)
On Her Majesty's Secret Service

James Bond seems more interested in gambling at the Casino Royale than tracking down elusive SPECTRE chief Blofeld. Then he meets Tracy, emotionally disturbed daughter of mafia boss Draco.
Now he has a double motive: seek and destroy Blofeld, and prevent Tracy killing herself.

Impersonating a College of Arms official Bond infiltrates Blofeld's Swiss mountain-top lair. He learns that Blofeld and aide Irma Bunt are brainwashing young women. Why? Is biological warfare involved? Backed by 'M' and Draco, Bond mounts an air assault. But can he pin down monstrous Blofeld? And what will happen to Tracy?

Toby Stephens is on top form as 007. A stellar cast includes Joanna Lumley, Alfred Molina, Alex Jennings, Lisa Dillon, John Standing, Janie Dee, Lloyd Owen, Joanna Cassidy, Clare Dunne and Julian Sands, with Jarvis himself as the voice of Fleming.

Specially composed music: Mark Holden and Michael Lopez
Dramatised by Archie Scottney

Director: Martin Jarvis
Producer: Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b042cq8h)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Mel C and Girl Power; Caitlin Moran; Beverley Knight

Highlights of the Woman's Hour Takeover. What guest Editors, J.K Rowling, Dame Kelly Holmes, Naomi Alderman Baroness Doreen Lawrence and Lauren Laverne wanted us to talk about on the programme.

Does today's new wave of popular feminism owe a debt to Girl Power? Lauren Lavern catches up Caitlin Moran, the author of of How to be a Woman, the book credited with putting the fourth wave of feminism on the pop cultural radar.

Three women in Baroness Doreen Lawrence's family including herself have had to deal with the problem of fibroids - benign growths in the uterus. Why are black women three times more likely than Caucasian women to have them? What treatment is being offered and how more women can avoid hysterectomies?

J K Rowling on a subject very close to her heart Multiple Sclerosis. Her mother Anne was diagnosed with MS when she was just 35 and died 10 years later. We look at new research into the disease and try to find out why Scottish women have the greatest risk of developing the disease.

Plus writer and video game maker Naomi Alderman helped us to celebrate a game changer in science and technology - Rivka Issacson. Plus the power and the myth of shoes, the joy of juicing and an emotional performance from Beverley Knight of her song Fallen Soldier about Stephen Lawrence.


SAT 17:00 PM (b042cq8k)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b041yrkc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b041yrdv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b041yrdx)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041yrdz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b042cq8m)
Clive Anderson, Paul Merton, Gerald Scarfe, Jo Nesbø, Clare Grogan, Bob Log III, Tinariwen

In a special show from the BBC Radio Theatre Clive talks to writer, actor, comedian and presenter Paul Merton. Paul is about to return to Shakespeare's Globe for the 15th annual Comedy Store Players gig. The players will arrive on the world-famous Globe stage with no script and only the faintest idea of where the night will take them and their willing audience for one night only on Monday 26 May at 8.00pm.

Clive talks to renowned cartoonist and illustrator Gerald Scarfe about NOISE Festival 2014. The festival offers creative talent the chance to bypass traditional routes into the creative industries and submit work to be judged by industry professionals or 'curators'. Submissions are open now until end of May, followed by showcase events in London and Manchester. Gerald is the curator for Illustration and talks to Clive about mentoring the creative talent of tomorrow.

Nikki Bedi talks to author and musician Jo Nesbø about going from whodunnit to 'who smelt it dealt it' in his children's book 'Doctor Proctor Fart Powder: The End of the World, Maybe.'

As a newly restored version of Gregory's Girl is set to be released on the 5th May, Clive talks to Clare Grogan about her role in the heart-warming coming of age British classic. Grogan was 17 and waitressing in Glasgow when she was handpicked by director Bill Forsyth to play Susan.

Music from North Malian 8 piece Tinariwen who perform 'Chaghaybou' from their album 'Emmaar'. More music comes from helmet-clad one-man-band Bob Log III performing 'The Rattler' from his album 'Log Bomb'.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b042cq8p)
Amal Alamuddin

London barrister Amal Alamuddin has become engaged to one of the world's most elusive bachelors, Hollywood A-lister George Clooney. But she is an impressive figure in her own right. As a high-flying human rights lawyer she has defended the likes of Julian Assange of Wikileaks, former Ukrainian president Yulia Tymoshenko and the former head of Libyan intelligence Abdallah Al Senussi. She has also been an adviser to Kofi Annan of the UN on Syria and to the UN tribunal on the assassination of Lebanese prime minister Rafik Hariri. Mark Coles talks to those who know her well.

Produced by Rebecca Kesby and Arlene Gregorius.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b042cq8r)
Comics at the British Library; Sunny Afternoon; the Kinks musical; Edward St Aubyn's latest novel; Tom Hollander as Dylan Thomas

The exhibition Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in The UK at The British Library looks back at nearly 2 centuries of comic book art in this country. Looking at and reflecting the social mores of their time, they provide an insight into the society that created them. What insight will our reviewers gain?

Edward St Aubyn's newest novel tells the story of the jury judging the Elysian Prize for Literature. If you've not heard of it, that's because it doesnt exist. The book includes extracts from novels nominated for the award, but does this satire skewer or flatter the world of literary prizes?

Sunny Afternoon is a musical based around the songs and career of The Kinks - a hugely influential group of the 60s and 70s. The world of juke box musicals - trying to shoe-horn a pop performer's catalogue into a slight narrative - has proved a popular and easy device in the past, with mixed success. How can this musical play at London's Hampstead Theatre successfully get around the potential pitfalls?

Blue Ruin is an award-winning independent US film; a gruesome revenge story following a normally placid modest man who seeks retribution on the killer of his parents. But it all spirals rapidly out of control.

In the centenary year of Welsh poet's Dylan Thomas birth, A Poet in New York is part of BBC Wales' coverage to mark the occasion. It's a distinctly unflattering portrayal of Thomas' last few days, drunk and fatally ill in an unfamiliar city. But does it capture his genius?


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b042cq8t)
Ray Gosling: Sum Total

Ray Gosling was a voice - a great voice to hear on the radio, or to read on the page, or to draw you into a TV screen. Until his death in 2013, he was also a contradiction. As a young man he stood up for the underdog, and challenged local council slum clearance plans in the St Annes district of his adopted home, Nottingham. And he was always a significant campaigner for gay rights in the UK. But in 1979 he voted for Margaret Thatcher, regretting it afterwards. He was eccentric and - for some - difficult to work with. But he remained popular in the street, and on the public transport he always used. It often seemed his broadcasting work might dry up, but he kept re-inventing himself. Never having cared about money, he went bankrupt after his partner died in the late 1990s, then lost his house, but made award-winning TV documentaries about his predicament. When his career finally imploded in 2010, after making false admissions of "mercy" killing on television, people far and wide wondered: why? While this programme cannot claim to know the real answer, it identifies the inner conflicts and flaws that made Ray Gosling's talent - his voice - so original in the first place.

In this programme, writer and publisher of Ray's work, Mark Hodkinson, talks to people who knew Ray Gosling best, including his sister Juliet, his friends in Nottingham, London and Manchester, and people who worked with him, in the BBC and ITV. We hear about his bohemian and rackety life, starting as a teddy boy in the 1950s and a habitue of Soho in the 60s - and his relationships with, among others, Brian Epstein, T.S. Eliot, Joe Orton, Beryl Bainbridge, Francis Bacon and Colin MacInnes. And we rediscover Ray's voice in the words he spoke and wrote, from his earliest published work in books like Sum Total to the broadcast work in which he found the extraordinary in "ordinary" people and places, in programmes he made for BBC radio including Who Owns Britain, Gosling In The High Street, and Semi Detached From Reality, and television, including Two Town Mad, On Site, Bankrupt and Ray Gosling: OAP.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b041vcqk)
Ring for Jeeves

Episode 2

In this classic comedy-thriller Jeeves is on loan to young Lord Rowcester (Bill).

Jeeves is exerting his fish-fed brain to the utmost to assist Bill to raise money. His lordship must pay the debts he has accrued while working, in disguise, as an Epsom bookie. Might obtaining Rosie Spottsworth's valuable diamond pendant help? Would it be useful for Bill to dance the Charleston with Rosie? Could the ghost of Lady Agatha further the cause? Will Rosie purchase the Abbey?

Finally Jeeves has a solution to dazzle and amaze us all.

A stellar cast in Rosalind Ayres' sparkling production. Martin Jarvis as Jeeves now brings his award-winning Broadway characterization to the Classic Serial, abetted by Jamie Bamber, Joanne Whalley, Rufus Sewell, Glenne Headly, Christopher Neame and Ian Ogilvy.

RING FOR JEEVES. R4 Classic Serial - 2 Episodes

Episode 1 - Sun 20th April 3pm. Wk 16. Rptd 9pm Sat 26th April 2014. Wk 17.
Episode 2 - Sun 26th April 3pm. Wk 17. Rptd Sun 4th May 9pm. Wk 18.

An all-star cast brings P.G. Wodehouse supremely funny 1950s horse-racing novel to galloping life. Dramatised by Archie Scottney. Jeeves, on loan to young Lord Rowcester (Bill), devises a plan to assist his impoverished new master sell his crumbling pile to a wealthy American widow. But will she buy it?

There's also White Hunter Captain Biggar on the trail of a bookie and his clerk who conned him at Epsom races. Who are they? Could they in fact be Bill and Jeeves? Will the captain unmask them? Will Jeeves and his gigantic fish-fed brain win the day?

Finally our impeccable 'gentleman's personal gentleman' has a solution to dazzle and amaze us all. A stellar cast in Rosalind Ayres' sparkling production. Martin Jarvis, having played Jeeves on Broadway and in various one-man performances, now brings his award-winning characterisation to the Classic Serial, abetted by Rufus Sewell, Joanne Whalley, Glenne Headly, Jamie Bamber, Christopher Neame and Ian Ogilvy.

Dramatised by Archie Scottney
Director Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b041yrf1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Four Thought (b041yjnw)
Series 4

Philippa Perry

Philippa Perry explains why story telling is so powerful and how the stories we tell to and about ourselves affect our mental wellbeing.
Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks in which speakers air their thinking, in front of a live audience, on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect culture and society.
Presenter: Ben Hammersley
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SAT 22:30 Wireless Nights (b01f68sh)
Series 1

Overnight Delivery

Jarvis Cocker prowls the dark, finding stories of the night people in a Prix Italia winning series.

Tonight, in an edition which won the Prix Italia for Extraordinary Originality and Innovation - a top European radio prize - the theme is Overnight Delivery. Jarvis boards the red-eye, taking a transatlantic flight of the imagination - peering down at the human dramas beneath as the world slowly rotates - accompanied by Jarvis' own musical selections.

As Jarvis reaches cruising altitude, he finds himself gripped by the compelling life and death stories of a shepherdess in the midst of a very difficult birth, a transplant nurse on late shift and a priest who performs the role of deliverance ministry - in layman's terms: exorcism.

But this dark night is not without light relief, as Jarvis muses on the trying experience of long haul air travel, revealing his own antidote to a fear of flying: Hugh Grant.

Producer: Laurence Grissell


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b041vvvy)
Series 4

Aberystwyth University

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from Aberystwyth University, "The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Welsh Literature & Folklore, Information Management and Art History and the questions involve alien visitations, a mechanical lifesize doll, a perfect circle, a shark, some scorpions and Swedish massage.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

In this series, the universities are Bristol, Kent, Bedfordshire, Birmingham, Nottingham & Aberystwyth.

Overflow (incl Cast Lists)

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. As well as "The Now Show" he has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, on subjects as varied as "The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen" and "Getting The Gongs" - an investigation into awards ceremonies - as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's 2008 Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called "The Genuine Particle". This makes him the perfect host for a show which aims to be an intellectual, fulfilling and informative quiz, but with wit and a genuine delight in exploring the subjects at hand.

The 3rd Degree is a Pozzitive production, produced by David Tyler. His radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, The Brig Society, Thanks A Lot, Milton Jones!, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, My First Planet, The Castle and even, going back a bit, Radio Active. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul & Pauline Calf Video Diaries, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b041vcqp)
Series 3

Cross-dressing Poets

Paul Farley asks some poets, Kate Clanchy Adam Foulds and Patrick McGuinness, about their trafficking in prose. What does moving from one to the other do to each? Meanwhile the artist Richard Long reads some of his walks in words. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 04 MAY 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b042cqd7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 8.51 to Brighton (b01l7wwc)
Anywhere Else, by Tam Hoskyns

A series of short stories written by new writers to radio. Each writer has taken the 8.51 to Brighton and given the journey their own twist, introducing us to characters whose lives have changed by taking that particular train.

Episode 2 of 3: Anywhere Else by Tam Hoskyns
This is the story of a man who travels with a case full of complications and it is on this journey that he begins to unravel who he really is and hopefully where he is actually going. A cathartic tale read by James Fleet.

Recorded in front of an audience at The Old Courtroom as part of 2012's Brighton Festival.

The stories are introduced by Lynne Truss.

Director: Celia De Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b042cqd9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b042cqdc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b042cqdf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b042cqdh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b042cs59)
St George's Church, Poynton

The bells of St George's Church, Poynton, Cheshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b042cq8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b042cqdk)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b042cs5c)
Nationalism

Mark Tully examines the bonds that bind nations. What makes a nation, and how can different homelands be brought together in a single entity? And is nationalism a good or a bad thing?

Mark chooses a reading from Rabindranath Tagore who maintained that expending our energy on building a nation diverts us from higher pursuits; and another from Virginia Woolf who felt, as a woman, excluded from British notions of nationhood. On the other hand, words from Pope John Paul II about Poland, his home country's, struggle for independence from Soviet domination suggest a positive side to nationalism, if people search for what they have in common rather than stress what divides them.

And Mark talks with historian, Ananya Vajpeyi who concludes that that search should go deep into the past, and that India is an example to the world of how people of different religions, ethnicities and cultures can live side by side in one nation.

The presenter is Mark Tully. The readers are Fiona Shaw, Brian Cox and Frank Stirling.

The producer is Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b042cs5f)
Adders of Loch Lomond

On the eastern edge of Loch Lomond adders are preparing for another summer. Spring-time sun has coaxed them from their winter hibernacula and as the weather warms males have begun to look for potential mates. The adder is one of the most studied and yet misunderstood British animals. With distinct markings and predictable habits individual adders can be tracked for years by the people who know how, exposing their mysterious behaviours. Yet adders are still despised by some, unaware that their docile and cautious nature makes the risk of their painful, but very rarely dangerous, bite very small. Trai Anfield joins Chris McInerny on a showery, but warm early April morning to seek out these beautiful and captivating reptiles.
Produced by Ellie Sans.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b042cqdm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b042cqdp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b042cs5h)
Rose Hudson-Wilkin; New Archbishop of Liverpool; Welfare to work

This week the Most Reverend Malcolm McMahon was installed as the ninth Archbishop of Liverpool - Edward speaks to him about his new role.

There's a push to get more ethnic minority clergy into senior positions in the Church of England. Chair of the task group , the Bishop of Rochester James Langstaff discusses with the Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin, Speaker's Chaplain to the House of Commons, why this is not happening.

How has the Catholic community responded to the death of the teacher Ann Maguire at Corpus Christi College in Leeds? We talk Monsignor Paul Fisher parish priest of the school.

George Osborne's flagship policy at the last Conservative Party Conference known as "Community Work Placements" or "Help to Work" launched this week but over a hundred voluntary sector organisations have opted out of providing placements for the scheme, including Christian charities such as the Salvation Army and the YMCA. Bob Walker reports.

20 years ago women were ordained as priests in the Church of England, we look back at this historic event with the Rev Angela Berners-Wilson, who was one of the first to be ordained.

Australian Church leaders are calling for a major review of the way the government treats asylum seekers following riots earlier this year at an offshore processing centre.

Chinese authorities have launched a new clampdown to curb the rise of Christianity in the country. Edmond Tang, former Director of the Department of East Asian Christian Studies at Birmingham University explains why.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Dan Tierney

Editor
Amanda Hancox

Contributors
Most Reverend Malcolm McMahon
Rose Hudson-Wilkin
Monsignor Paul Fisher
Bishop of Rochester James Langstaff
Rev Angela Berners-Wilson
Edmond Tang.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b042cs5k)
British Heart Foundation

Charlotte Thornett, whose mother has heart failure, presents The Radio 4 Appeal for the British Heart Foundation.
Registered charity no. 1114760. Registered as a Charity in Scotland No. SC039426
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'British Heart Foundation'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b042cqdr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b042cqdt)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b042cs5m)
'Faithful witnesses'.
Live from The Lighthouse Christian Centre, a multi-cultural community church in Salford.
Pastor Alex Robertson and preacher Pastor Paul Hallam explore how those who witnessed the resurrected Jesus were inspired, and look at ways in which the Christian story continues to guide people's lives and work today.
Producer: Simon Vivian.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b041yr94)
Digging Digitally

"The archaeological wonders of today" writes Mary Beard "don't come from heroic subterranean exploration, still less from the efforts of teenagers with their spades and trowels in damp Shropshire fields. They are much more often 'virtual'".

Mary reflects on the new face of archaeology - far removed from the days of Heinrich Schliemann who famously claimed "to have gazed on the face of Agamemnon".

She traces the history of virtual archaeology from the early 1900s and admits "part of me thrills to the magic of the technology, and to the sheer bravura of displaying the plans of lost buildings, even lost towns, at the touch of a few buttons". She recognises it's far cheaper, quicker and leaves ruins where they are safest: under the ground.

But she also admits a feeling of nostalgia for the old ways. When she sees an exciting new discovery, "my heart just itches to get out my spade and my trowel and go and actually dig it up".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcnt)
Red-throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the red-throated diver. The eerie wails of a red-throated diver were supposed to foretell rain. In Shetland the red-throated diver is called the "rain goose" but anyone who knows the island knows that rain is never far away. Like all divers, red-throats are handsome birds with sharp bills, perfect for catching fish. In summer they have a rusty throat patch and zebra-stripes on the back of their neck but in winter they're mainly pearly grey and white.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b042cs5p)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b042cs5r)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b041vcq7)
The Omagh Bombing

The Omagh bomb was the worst massacre in Northern Ireland's modern history. On Saturday the 15th of August a massive bomb placed by the so-called Real IRA killed two unborn twins, six men, twelve women and eleven children. The dead included Protestants, Catholics and a Mormon. The blast wave was so powerful that the bodies of several victims were never found.

The bombing was "a barbaric act intended to wreck Ireland's aspirations for peace and reconciliation," said President Clinton who came to walk amongst the wreckage. Only four months earlier Northern Ireland's main political parties had signed up to the Good Friday agreement, power sharing was on its way and the Provisional IRA was on ceasefire.

No one has ever been convicted in connection with the massacre at Omagh but in April 2014, Seamus Daly was arrested and charged with 29 counts of murder over the attack.

The 43-year-old bricklayer, originally from Culloville, County Monaghan, but now residing in Jonesborough, County Armagh, also faces counts of causing the explosion in Omagh and possession of a bomb in the County Tyrone market town with intent to endanger life or property.

In this episode of The Reunion, recorded shortly before charges were brought against Daly, Sue MacGregor is joined by Kevin Skelton whose wife Mena was killed by the bomb, Michael Gallagher and Victor Barker whose sons Aiden and James also died, former RUC police constable Richard Scott, and by BBC Northern Ireland's Political Editor Mark Devenport.

Producer: Emily Williams
Series Producer: David Prest

THE REUNION is a Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b041vvw6)
Series 13

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Lloyd Langford, Jon Richardson, Katherine Ryan and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Wales, Fish, Mouths and Perfume.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer - Jon Naismith.
A Random production for BBC Radio4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b042cs5w)
Behind the Scenes at BBC Food and Farming Awards 2014

The first of two-part special on the prestigious BBC Food and Farming Awards - now in its 14th year on Radio 4 and being hosted in Bristol for the first time.
The awards celebrate individuals, businesses and organisations across the UK who produce quality food and change lives.
In this episode Valentine Warner, Chair of the judges, discovers the food, music and animation which all played their part in the 2014 Awards ceremony
Bristol chef Barny Haughton prepares a celebratory meal for the finalists using their own products and recipes.
Valentine also discovers the challenges of representing food in music as David Ogden composes a piece of music for the Awards. And students from the University of the West of England work on representing food in animation.
The BBC is recording and transmitting food-related editions of some of the nation's favourite radio programmes throughout the Bristol Food Connections festival, which takes place from 1 to 11 May.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b042cqdw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b042cs5y)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 The Invention of... (b042jcxs)
Brazil

Episode 1: The Portuguese

Forget the beach volleyball, carnival, and the rest - here's the truth about Brazil. The murder rate is among the highest in the world. The economic inequality is visible wherever you go. Behind the happy cultural imagery there lies a much darker Brazil, the result of an extremely dark colonial history when this land was little more than a giant farm worked by slaves.

In The Invention of Brazil, Misha Glenny traces the gaps between the image and reality, beginning with the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500. More slaves were transported to Brazil than anywhere else, more than the United States, more than anywhere.

"There were many Africans who served as interpreters," Joao Reis explains, "who could tell the slaves: 'You are not going to be eaten by those whites'. And that was the African fear - that they were being brought to an unknown world by whites where they would be eaten."

Misha Glenny and producer Miles Warde travel from the favela of Rocinha in Rio de Janeiro up the coast to Salvador, the first capital of Brazil, and then back to Sao Paulo, economic powerhouse of the south. On the way they meet contributors including the anthropologist Peter Fry; Americo Martins of Rede TV; historian Lilia Schwarz; and bestselling author Laurentino Gomez. Further contributions from Luciana Martins, David Brookshaw and Patrick Wilcken, author of Empire Adrift.

From the team behind The Invention of Germany and The Invention of Spain.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b041yf8l)
Gloucestershire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Gloucestershire. Answering local gardeners' questions are Chris Beardshaw, Pippa Greenwood and Anne Swithinbank.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant producer: Darby Dorras.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. What can I do to give my paved front garden the 'wow' factor?
A. If you have any areas of soil, you could plant something woody like a Caryopteris. You could plant a Pieris in a container. You could also plant a Sparmannia or a Purple Yam (a kind of Diasporia) or Pennesetum grasses.

Q. Does the panel think that I could cut my box hedges (Buxus Sempervirens) down to about 4 to 6 inches (10-15 cm) from 15 inches (38cm)?
A. The Box will come back from very hard pruning, but Box can suffer from box blight. When pruning you must ensure that the foliage is thoroughly wet and the tools used are all clean and sterile. Prune when the plant is actively growing, and it's a good idea to prune one side of the hedge per season to give the plant a better chance of surviving the trim.

3) Q. I have tried growing Acanthas and have good leaf growth, but no flower growth. Could the panel suggest the best growing conditions for this plant?
A. If you grow the plant in a smaller container or a smaller area, this will help encourage flower growth. Ensure the plant is kept moist (but with good drainage) and is exposed to lots of sunshine. You could also use high-pot-ash feed to encourage growth and try growing the plant in calcium rich soil.

4) Q. Is the growth of Mistletoe on an elderly Medlar Tree (Mespilus Germanica) harming the growth of the tree? If so, what is the best method of getting rid of it?
A. The Mistletoe won't cause too much damage so long as the growth is proportional to the tree. If you harvest the Mistletoe in the proportions that you harvest the fruits of the Medlar tree, a balance will be achieved.

5) Q. Will planting more fruit trees in a fruit cage keep the weeds away?
A. Yes, you could plant some Cherries, Golden Gages, Plums, Rhubarb, Red Gooseberries (Whinham's Industry is a good variety). You could also have a go at growing Japanese Wine Berry.

6) Q. What does the future hold for a 40ft (12m) high Larch tree, the top 30ft (9m) of which looks dead?
A. The dying wood is fabulous for wildlife, so you can let it decay naturally.
Be careful of the wood falling, this could be dangerous. If you do wish to prune down to the healthy growth, this will not harm the tree. It might be worth investigating what caused the upper part of the tree to die, this could be a case of phytopthora.

7) Q. Would it cause damage to prune the main stems of a 25-year-old climbing rose in order to encourage growth further down the plant?
A. Pruning would be necessary to encourage growth further down the plant. You must prune gradually (a third of the stems each season) and train the fresh growth to create a fan structure. Don't be afraid to be ruthless with the stems you chose to prune.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b042csf2)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover hears from Devon, Wales and Suffolk about memories of being crowned Queen of the May, calling time on the insidious creep of social media, and nostalgia for pen on paper, all in the Sunday Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b042d57m)
Anthony Trollope's Dr Thorne

Episode 1

Anthony Trollope's Dr Thorne by Michael Symmons Roberts

When Frank Gresham proposes to Dr Thorne's niece Mary on his twenty first birthday, his parents are horrified. Mary is poor and her parentage is unknown. To save the indebted Greshambury estate Frank must marry for money, not love. A rich heiress is hastily thrust towards him as a more suitable prospect.

Written by Michael Symmons Roberts
Directed by Susan Roberts
Produced by Charlotte Riches

Dr Thorne is the third instalment in a new series of dramatisations of Anthony Trollope's complete Barchester Chronicles. Dr Thorne has always kept the parentage of his niece and ward Mary a secret. When young Frank Gresham, the heir to the aristocratic Greshambury estate, expresses his desire to marry Mary, she suddenly finds her standing in society under scrutiny. Dr Thorne realises that the secret he has concealed for so long can no longer stay secret.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b042d57p)
Christos Tsiolkas - The Slap

With James Naughtie.

Australian novelist Christos Tsiolkas responds to readers' questions about his award-winning debut The Slap.
The book generated considerable debate - should you slap a child who's misbehaving, but isn't yours? In this controversial novel Tsiolkas presents an apparently harmless domestic incident from eight very different perspectives and examines how its aftermath reverberates through the lives of everyone who witnesses it happen.
He explains how he uses this one event to discuss the realities of contemporary Australian society - its materialism and racial prejudices, and how lives of the immigrants' children are so different from their parents'.

June's Bookclub choice is Room by Emma Donoghue

Produced by Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 The Fisher Poets Gathering (b042d57r)
Katrina Porteous visits the fishing port and cannery town of Astoria, Oregon, to report on, and take part in the Fisher Poets Gathering.

Years ago Jon Broderick, who fishes for salmon in Alaska, visited the famous gathering of cowboy poets in Elko, Nevada. Jon knew, not least from listening to radio traffic between boats on the fishing grounds, that fishermen and women, too, celebrated their way of life, complained about their lot, and sent each other up in verse, song and stories. So, with his friend Jay Speakman he organised the first Fisher Poets Gathering, in Astoria, at the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon.

That was 17 years ago; now for a weekend every February (when the fishing is quiet) fisher poets come from all over America - Florida, Maine, Chesapeake Bay, Alaska. These tough characters, who all know someone who has drowned, stand up and, unembarrassed, completely naturally, read their poems. Hundreds listen: there are sessions in bars and readings all over town. There are workshops, exhibitions, and the community radio station broadcasts proceedings, live.

This year, for the first time, a poet came from beyond the United States. Katrina Porteous lives in the Northumbrian fishing village of Beadnell. For years she has worked with, recorded and written about fishing people there.

She hears astonishing work: from Dave Densmore, on his boat Cold Stream; from Moe Bowstern, an extraordinarily prolific writer about the lives of fisher women; from Richard King who fishes in Alaska, and farms in Hawaii. She meets, too, Lloyd Montgomery, an Aleut fisher poet. And wherever they are from, Katrina discovers, fisher poets share concerns over sustainability - of fish stocks, their communities, their way of life.


SUN 17:00 The Party of No (b041xdgt)
When the Democrats and Barack Obama won the US Presidency in 2008 - relatively comfortably - many in the Republican Party were genuinely shocked and they retreated to lick their painful wounds. A new political movement emerged, the Tea Party, which re-invigorated the defeated, demoralized Republicans, the GOP. The Tea Party dedicated itself to complete opposition both to Obama's presidency and to anyone they felt were compromising with the president. Long-standing Republican politicians were removed and many of those who remained shifted to the right, adopting Tea Party rhetoric. Republican opposition, encouraged by the Tea Party, destroyed many of President Obama's hopes in the last six years. In 2013, US federal lawmaking was brought to gridlock, shutdown, and impotence. Now, though, there's a growing sense that the Tea Party is a threat to the GOP's future - that it is weird and backward looking. "Establishment" Republicans are fighting back.
As the Republicans set out to regain the White House, BBC North America Editor Mark Mardell asks if the GOP can change sufficiently to regain power or whether it will remain The Party of No?

Producer: John Murphy.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b042cq8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b042cqdy)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b042cqf0)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b042cqf2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b042d6xg)
I wonder how you'd take it if someone told you 'your heid's foo o' mince' or that you've a voice like a parrot. How can a trumpeter to play without an instrument? Or a poetry teacher get by without an iambic pentameter? From the wonderfully belligerent sounds of the rainforest cicada and the insight of the industrial revolution's writers - to 19th century Paris and the Fisher Poets Gathering in Oregon.

Voices from Our Industrial Past (Radio 4 - 11am Wednesday 30th April)
Great Lives (Radio 4 - 4.30pm Tuesday 29th April)
State of the Nation (Radio 4 - Friday 2nd May 3.45pm)
Archive on 4: Ray Gosling - The Sum Total (Radio 4 - Saturday 3rd May 8pm)
Isy Suttie's Love Letters (Radio 4 - Wednesday 30th April 6.30pm)
15 Minute Drama - Le Donne (Radio 4 - All-Week 7.45pm)
Today (Radio 4 - All-Week 6am)
Inside Science (Radio 4 - Thursday 1st May 9pm)
The Fisher Poets Gathering (Radio 4 - Sunday 4th May 4.30pm)
No Triumph, No Tragedy (Radio 4 - Tuesday 29th April 9.30pm)
Suicide Watch (Radio 4 - Monday 28th April 8pm)
Saturday Drama: On Her Majesty's Secret Service (Radio 4 - Saturday 3rd May 2.30pm)
Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side (Radio 4 - Wednesday 30th April 11pm)
They Didn't Fade Away - 50 Years of the Pirates (Radio 2 - Monday 28th April 10pm).


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b042d6xj)
Dan's packed and ready to leave for Sandhurst. Alistair and Shula drive him there, have a good look around and take it all in. Dan reports in, ironing board under his arm, and is shown to his quarters. He's given overalls to wear until the uniforms are handed out on Thursday.

Shula and Alistair eventually say goodbye with a hug. He'll see them again in five weeks. On the way home, Shula starts to cry.

Pat's annoyed with Tony for spoiling the good work she'd done to get Tom to open up. Pat gets Roy to help her find a clue as to where Tom has gone. Could Brenda know something? It's a long shot, says Roy. But he leaves Brenda a message anyway, asking if she's heard anything from Tom.

Jazzer's hungover and late in for work with the pigs. He's clearly struggling on his own, without Tom. He also has sheep shearing work coming up with Ed. Tony's anxious that Tom returns in time for the organic inspectors.

Roy and Jazzer chat about Loxfest. Roy's contracting an events manager to take care of booking the acts. In the meantime, Jazzer looks forward to May Day tomorrow. Beer, food and cake. What's not to like?


SUN 19:15 Bird Island (b042l2xt)
Series 2

Episode 1

Ben, a young scientist working in Antarctica, tries to adapt to the loneliness by keeping a cheery audio diary on his Dictaphone.

In this episode, Ben is all consumed by a new cereal bar while Jane and Graham are completing the Penguin Census.

Ben ...... Reece Shearsmith
Graham ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Jane ...... Katy Wix
Beverley ...... Alison Steadman

Atmospheric comedy about a cheery scientist based in Sub-Antarctica by Katy Wix.

It’s Ben’s trip of a lifetime, but in a vast icy landscape with dodgy internet. Feeling lonely, he shares his thoughts via an audio 'log' on his dictaphone.

Graham is a fellow nerdy scientist so their exchanges are mumbled. Ben’s even more awkward around new arrival Jane, though he’s not entirely sure why.

Producer: Tilusha Ghelan

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2014.


SUN 19:30 Don't Start (b01ml8b3)
Series 2

The Notebook

What do long term partners really argue about? Sharp new comedy from Frank Skinner returns for a second series. Starring Frank Skinner and Katherine Parkinson.

The first series of Don't Start met with instant critical and audience acclaim: "That he can deliver such a heavy premise for a series with such a lightness of touch is testament to his skills as a writer and, given that the protagonists are both bookworms, he's also permitted to use a flourish of fine words that would be lost in his stand-up routines". Jane Anderson, Radio Times.

"Writing and starring in the four-parter Don't Start (Radio 4) Frank Skinner gives full rein to his sharp but splenetic comedy. He and his co-star Katherine Parkinson play a bickering couple exchanging acerbic ripostes in a cruelly precise dissection of a relationship". Daily Mail

... "a lesson in relationship ping-pong" - Miranda Sawyer, The Observer.
Series 2 follows hard on its heels. Well observed, clever and funny, Don't Start is a scripted comedy with a deceptively simple premise - an argument. Each week, our couple fall out over another apparently trivial flashpoint - the Krankies, toenail trimming and semantics. Each week, the stakes mount as Neil and Kim battle with words. But these are no ordinary arguments. The two outdo each other with increasingly absurd images, unexpected literary references (the Old Testament, Jack Spratt and the first Mrs Rochester, to name a few) and razor sharp analysis of their beloved's weaknesses. Underneath the cutting wit, however, there is an unmistakable tenderness".

Frank says:
"Having established in the first series that Neil and Kim are a childless academic couple who during their numerous arguments, luxuriate in their own and each other's learning and wit, I've tried in the second series to dig a little deeper into their relationship. Love and affection occasionally splutter into view, like a Higgs boson in a big tunnel-thing, but can such emotions ever prevail in a relationship where the couple prefers to wear their brains, rather than their hearts, on their sleeves? Is that too much offal imagery?

Episode 1: The Notebook
Frank's apparently innocent discovery of an old notebook strangely rekindles Kim's former enthusiasm for Frisbee throwing.

Directed and produced by Polly Thomas
An Avalon Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Stories from Songwriters (b042l2xw)
Sunset to Break Your Heart, by Barb Jungr

The first in a series of three specially commissioned short stories from songwriters Barb Jungr, Eliza Carthy and You Are Wolf (also known as Kerry Andrew).

Three songwriters turn their hand to short story writing for the first time for BBC Radio 4.

Suranne Jones reads Barb Jungr's heartbreaking story set on the Shetland Islands which takes its title from one of Barb's songs, 'Sunset to Break Your Heart'. Singer-songwriter Barb Jungr has been described as "the best thing to come out of Rochdale since Gracie Fields". She draws on her Czech and German heritage to blend European style with her English roots. Billy Bragg described Jungr as our greatest living interpreter of Dylan songs, and Jeremy Irons chose a Barb Jungr song as one of his Desert Island Discs.

Hattie Morahan reads Eliza Carthy's unusual and playful fairy tale, 'The Announcer's Daughter'. Eliza has been nominated for the Mercury Prize twice and grew up immersed in the world of traditional music - her parents are folk legends Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson. She approaches the tradition in new and innovative ways creating utterly contemporary work.

You Are Wolf - the artist also known as Kerry Andrew - is a singer, songwriter and composer who specialises in experimental vocal music and uses a loop machine to layer her astonishing voice. For her debut short story she interweaves song and story, singing traditional inspired counterpoints to her story 'One Swallow'.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b041yf8s)
British Law: Made in Brussels?

Tim Harford and the More or Less team return for another series on Radio 4.

How much British law is made in Brussels? In the lead up to the European elections, UKIP have put the issue back in the spotlight with posters claiming it's 75%. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg says it's 7%. Who's right? And how do we go about working out how much say the EU has in British law?

As the aerial search for the Malaysian Airlines plane missing in the Indian ocean is called off, could the statistical ideas of an 18th century Presbyterian minister help find the plane?

And it's 60 years since Sir Roger Bannister became the first man to run a mile in less than four minutes. Tim Harford speaks to Sir Roger to find out if four minutes really was seen as an 'impossible' barrier and debunk some myths surrounding his famous run.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b041yf8q)
Bob Hoskins, U Win Tin, Ian McIntyre, Gailene Stock

Matthew Bannister on

The actor Bob Hoskins who starred in the films Mona Lisa and the Long Good Friday, the TV play Pennies from Heaven and Guys and Dolls at the National Theatre. We have tributes from Sir Richard Eyre and Gemma Craven.

Also, the Burmese journalist and activist U Win Tin, right hand man to Aung Sang Suu Kyi in the pro Democracy movement.

Ian McIntyre, the BBC broadcaster and manager. He presented Analysis on Radio 4 and went on to be the network's Controller.

And Gailene Stock, the Australian ballet dancer who became the principal of the Royal Ballet School. Deborah Bull pays tribute.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b042cq89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b042cs5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b041yjyk)
Battery Matters

Out of juice?

Perhaps the biggest problem facing makers of new technology is battery power.....or lack of it. The battery is so critical that engineers design handheld devices around the battery, rather than the other way round. It's not just mobile phone and wearable technology manufacturers that are striving for longer lasting batteries, the electric vehicle is stalling (so to speak) because of the short distances between recharging and a limited service life of the battery.

So what are businesses doing to reinvent the battery? Is an average annual gain in capacity of 6% really the best we can do?

We'll ask whether Lithium-Air batteries can revitalise the electric car market, explore whether flexible graphene batteries and solar cells hold the key to enhancements in mobile phone battery life and look at the 3D printing of micro batteries the size of a grain of sand.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b042l2xy)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b042l2y0)
Dennis Sewell of the Spectator looks at how newspapers covered the week's big stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b041yjy7)
Paths Of Glory, Blue Ruin, Walerian Borowczyk

With Francine Stock.

Stanley Kubrick's wife Christiane reveals how they met and fell in love on the set of World War I drama Paths Of Glory, and why he was misunderstood by the British press.

The star and director of Blue Ruin, Macon Blair and Jeremy Saulnier, discuss their award-winning revenge thriller, and how the director had to dip into his own pocket, and his wife's, to get the film made.

Walerian Borowczyk is best known as the director of La Bete, a surreal fantasy that was banned in cinemas across the country in the late 70s. Before that, he was regarded as one of the greatest film-makers of his generation, and a new season at the BFI hopes to restore his reputation.

Anthony Chen, the director of Ilo Ilo, discusses his award-winning autobiographical tale about growing up in Singapore during the financial crash of the late 90s, and why Singapore audiences don't like art-house movies.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b042cs5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 05 MAY 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b042j3w8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b041y1mx)
Ethnography Award: The Winner

The winner of Thinking Allowed's first Ethnography award, in association with the British Sociological Association.

Laurie Taylor and a team of esteemed academics - Professor Beverley Skeggs, Professor Dick Hobbs, Professor Henrietta Moore and Dr Louise Westmarland - set themselves the task of finding the study that has made the most significant contribution to ethnography over the past year. In the past, ethnographic studies have cast light on hidden or misunderstood worlds, from the urban poor in 1930s Chicago to the mods and rockers in British seaside towns in the 1950s. This year they considered submissions of startling range, colour and diversity, in the process learning much about the struggles of the war wounded 'amputees' of Sierra Leone; the ties between mothers and daughters on a working class housing estate in South Wales; the hedonistic excess of young holidaymakers in Ibiza; and the dreams and desires of young women in hostess bars in Cambodia. After much passionate debate, finally the winner can be revealed.

Laurie Taylor presents a programme about the winning entry which, in the judges' view, has made the most significant contribution to ethnography, the in-depth analysis of the everyday life of a culture or sub culture.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b042cs59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b042j3wb)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b042j3wd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b042j3wg)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b042j3wj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b042j8xs)
A short reflection and prayer with Andrea Rea.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b042j8xv)
Bristol Food Connections

This special edition of Farming Today comes from the Food Connections Festival in Bristol. Charlotte Smith hosts a panel discussion, involving Patrick Holden from the Sustainable Food Trust, Professor Darren Reynolds from the University of the West of England, and chef and food writer Valentine Warner. The panellists and audience discuss the issue of food provenance: where our food comes from, how it's produced, how it reaches us, and whether it matters anyway.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b042j3wl)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b042300k)
Wetland Dawn Chorus

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the third of four recordings marking Dawn Chorus Day: a dawn chorus from the marshes of North Warren in Suffolk. On clear moonlit nights the chorus can be an almost continuous chatter and includes reed and sedge warblers, reed bunting and even a bittern, with its booming, foghorn-like call.


MON 06:00 Today (b042j8xx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b042j8xz)
Simon Armitage on Greek Tragedy

Anne McElvoy talks to the poet Simon Armitage about his dramatisation of The Last Days of Troy. His play, based on Homer's epic, reveals how cycles of conflict and revenge, pride and self-deception continue throughout history. Greek myth is at the heart of a new opera, Thebans, in which the playwright and poet Frank McGuinness draws on the tragedy of the mythical monarch Oedipus and his daughter Antigone. Natalie Haynes explores what happens when troubled teenagers become enthralled by Greek tales of cruel fate and bloody revenge in her debut novel, while Kenan Malik goes on a quest for a moral compass.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b042j8y1)
Eleanor Marx: A Life

Childhood

Rachel Holmes's new book is the lively, engaging and informative life story of the daughter of Karl Marx. Beginning with Eleanor's upbringing in a happy and creative household - where she enjoyed the company of her parent's friends including Engels - and moving on to tell of her achievements as a feminist, and activist and also her troubled love life.

Her achievements are remarkable, she was instrumental in preserving her father's memory by sorting through his letters and laying the foundations for his biography. She was a pioneering feminist who made as profound a contribution to British political thought as Mary Wollstonecraft.

Her personal life was turned upside down by a family secret and a lover. She adored the socialist campaigner and would be playwright Edward Aveling, but he was a cheat and and broke her heart in a series of humiliations.

Rachel Holmes is the author of The Secret Life of Dr James Barry and The Hottentot Venus: The Life and Death of Saartjie Baartman. She is the co-editor, with Lisa Appignanesi and Susie Orbach, of Fifty Shades of Feminism.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman who is perhaps best known for playing Chrissie Watts in Eastenders for two years. Radio 4 audiences have regularly enjoyed her performances in comedy and drama, and more recently she has written dramas for the network.
Abridged by Julian Wilkinson.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b042j8y3)
Women and rural life

Jane Garvey speaks to women from Carmarthen to Cambridgeshire and Cumbria to Somerset to get a sense of the challenges and pleasures of leading a rural life.
We speak to three women about the impact flooding on the Somerset Levels has had on their lives.
Julia Wilson from the Rural Development Council, Cumbria and Melanie Murdoch of AGE UK in Cambridgeshire discuss the challenges of isolation in rural communities.
23 year old Caryl Hughes is the first young person to be awarded a one year scholarship to run the National Trust's Llyndy Isaf farm in Snowdonia - she gives us a tour of the sheep farm and tells us about her love of what's considered to be one of the most beautiful hill farms in Wales.
And Women in Rural Enterprise was set up ten years ago by Polly Gibb and now has 60 networks around the country. We talk to Polly about setting up a rural business along with Helen Culshaw of Ascendency Internet Marketing and Rebecca Rayner of Glebe Farm Foods.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b042j8y5)
HighLites: Wash and Blow

Episode 1

by Steve Chambers and Phil Nodding. 1/5 Bev, the meanest hairdresser in Britain, and Shirl, the stupidest, head out to sea on a cruise round the Fjords. Bev sees it as a perfect opportunity for a bit of extra business.

Produced by Jessica Dromgoole and directed by Colin Guthrie.

The enduring comedy of Bev, the bitter and vindictive Chief Stylist, played by Lorraine Ashbourne, and Shirley, her fond and foolish assistant, played by Rosie Cavaliero.

'Wash 'n' Blow', is the fourth 15 minute series of HighLites.


MON 11:00 Tutor Proof (b042j8y7)
Peter White tests the claims of academics at Durham University that they can reduce the impact of tutoring on the outcome of the 11-plus.


MON 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b042j8y9)
Series 1

A Paler Shade of White

Episode 5. A Paler Shade of White

In episode 5, the penultimate part of Hilary Lyon's comedy narrative series ' Secrets and Lattes', normally laid-back Trisha, (Julie Graham) is wrong-footed when she comes face to face with a very unexpected visitor whilst Clare (played by Hilary Lyon) drives herself (and everybody else for that matter) mad with her obsessive decorating, induced by her increasing anxiety about her husband's uncharacteristic behaviour. It would appear that even though their new Edinburgh cafe business is growing, one sister's life is definitely unravelling while the other's may be starting to knit together again, so long as she can keep her head.............

Meanwhile temperamental opera-loving Polish chef, Krzysztof ( Simon Goodall) doesn't know whether he is coming or going with Trisha and is being driven to distraction (and drink) whilst whacky teenage waitress, Lizzie ( Pearl Appleby) is unusually subdued and secretive after a rubbish night out. Is the 'Cafe Culture' makeover really going to make a difference or are they all just, in their own ways, painting over the literal and metaphorical cracks?

Director..................................Marilyn Imrie
Producers....Moray Hunter and Gordon Kennedy
An Absolute production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b042j8yc)
Flight Compensation

Parents left with bills of thousands of pounds for student accommodation their children can't use. Why 60s bands that sold millions of records and played some of the biggest venues in the world are now touring local town halls across the UK. And, the economy is improving but are you noticing it yet? We'll be re-visiting some of the people we spoke to during the downturn.


MON 12:57 Weather (b042j3wn)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b042j3wq)
Boko Haram admits to abducting 200 girls in Northern Nigeria, while families and friends protest government inaction to rescue them. Shaun Ley asks ex Prisons Minister, Crispin Blunt how a violent criminal could have been sent to an open prison in London from which he has absconded. What can Europe do to prevent the takeover of Astrazeneca on adverse terms for patients and health services? Why ANC rule has not brought promised prosperity to South Africans preparing to vote in a general election. And Northern Ireland Secretary, Teresa Villiers says the political and legal process in Ulster can survive the contentious arrest of Sinn Fein leader, Gerry Adams.


MON 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b042j8yf)
In the Beginning

In this first of ten programmes on experimental psychology, Martin Sixsmith examines its origins in the work of philosophers such as John Locke and scientists like Luigi Galvani, who in the 1700s investigated nerve impulses in frogs. He looks at the popular psychology of Victorian times including phrenology and physiognomy, going behind the scenes at the Science Museum with curator Philip Loring. And he talks to historian and philosopher John Forrester of Cambridge University.

Produced by Sara Parker
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b042d6xj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0156mty)
A Shoebox of Snow

Albert & Renie haven't left their flat in decades. They are cocooned by every object they have ever owned.
One pocket watch, one rule book, one cap. Railway issue.
One chiming clock, engraved '25 years service'.
One chiming clock, engraved '50 years service'.
But their lifetime of memories needs to be cleared from the Clover Block, as this model post war estate is now to be demolished.
Every edition of the Daily Mirror since 1941.
Every edition of the National Union Of Railwaymen newsletter since 1941
69 years of appointment diaries - notes about the weather to each date.

And Christopher an ex-DJ turned "council man" is tasked with persuading them to de-clutter and move out, before the flats are blown up and his baby is due.

Renie and Albert Grace keep their memories piled high, boxed and safe in their tower block flat, with no need for the outside world. Every object triggers a memory, a chapter in their lives together -
one roller skate left leg ,
one plaster cast right leg,
one snowstorm of Dreamland Margate

They claim it always snows for the good stuff, and they keep that too in A Shoebox of Snow. Not just to see it, but to hold it, smell it, feel the weight of it.

As Christopher's relationship with this couple deepens, he reflects on his own difficult relationship with pregnant girlfriend Janine- played by the writer Julie Mayhew.

But the date for demolition approaches and Christopher must find out -What are they saving it all for?
We have been asking the public, cast and crew "What are the stories behind the objects you save?" - some are featured in the programme and linked to on the Radio 4 website as the production airs.
We leave this afternoon play with Richard Briers and Edna Doré sharing objects they treasure.

Producer: Justine Potter
A Red Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Food and Farming Awards (b03nycpj)
The 2014 BBC Food and Farming Awards

Sheila Dillon presents this year's BBC Food & Farming Awards. From Best Takeaway to Best Food Market producer, the judging team reveal the "best of the best" in British food and drink.

At a ceremony described by Jamie Oliver as the "Oscars of the food world", Sheila and her co-host, cook and food writer Valentine Warner, take us through the stories of the finalists and announce this year's winners.

It's the climax of a process that started with Radio 4 listeners sending in thousands of nominations in ten different categories. It took the team of experts six months to sift through, select finalists and then embark on a food adventure across the UK.

As the programme explains, to find the winners, each judge visited the finalists as they produced, cooked and sold their food and drink. At the ceremony at St George's theatre in Bristol the outcome of that work was revealed by award givers Jamie Oliver, Raymond Blanc, Mary Berry and Mitch Tonks. It's a story and a programme that will leave you inspired..... and perhaps a little peckish.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


MON 16:00 The 3rd Degree (b041zcmf)
Series 4

University of Nottingham

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from the University of Nottingham, "The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are British History, Management Studies and Philosophy and the questions range from the International Monetary Fund., Kierkegaard and Wagner to the Fat Slags and Goofy

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

In this series, the universities are Bristol, Kent, Bedfordshire, Birmingham, Nottingham & Aberystwyth.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive Television production for BBC Radio 4

Overflow (incl Cast Lists)

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. As well as "The Now Show" he has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, on subjects as varied as "The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen" and "Getting The Gongs" - an investigation into awards ceremonies - as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's 2008 Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called "The Genuine Particle". This makes him the perfect host for a show which aims to be an intellectual, fulfilling and informative quiz, but with wit and a genuine delight in exploring the subjects at hand.

The 3rd Degree is a Pozzitive production, produced by David Tyler. His radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, The Brig Society, Thanks A Lot, Milton Jones!, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, My First Planet, The Castle and even, going back a bit, Radio Active. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul & Pauline Calf Video Diaries, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b042jcx6)
Series 5

Broken

Digital devices operate in binary ways; either they're working or they're a brick! Aleks Krotoski asks what this means for our natural instincts as tool builders and tool breakers?

As technology becomes more resistant to prying fingers and minds are we losing the ability to imagine it differently? Take the dying art of tuning an engine it can make cars faster and more efficient but only comes through a symbiotic relationship between mechanic and machine and of course every child knows the joy of taking something apart to see how it works at least until they're caught doing it

Are these the same sensibilities we see in the digital world? From hacking to playing a video game in such a perverse way as to see if it can be broken? Do the constraints of digital technology lock us out of our devices; licensing us to only use them in the prescribed ways, that while convenient are also dis-empowering?

Producer: Peter McManus.


MON 17:00 PM (b042jcxb)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b042j3ws)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b042jcxg)
Series 13

Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Tony Hawks, Susan Calman, Phill Jupitus and Miles Jupp are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: The Brain, Victorians, Toads and Cooking.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer - Jon Naismith.
A Random production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b042jcxn)
May Day begins with disaster for Lynda. Ian has to tend to a wounded chef, leaving Lynda in need of someone to present the prizes for the cake competition. Lynda's then stranded with a flat bicycle tyre. PC Burns comes to her aid and drives her back to Ambridge.

Burns notices Pat, who had asked to speak to him later. Burns wonders what it could be about. Fallon tells Burns about Tom and how he jilted Kirsty and then disappeared.

Emma enjoys some kids' gossip about Lynda being arrested for drink-driving. When Lynda overhears Emma talking about it, she says it must have come from Tilly Button - the May Queen.

PC Burns buys an item from Fallon and suggests that she consider going into business. She has a knack for doing up old junk.

Nic wins a prize for her cake. Emma is naturally put out. Clarrie's shocked and delighted to win two prizes, for Special Occasion and Most Creative cake.

PC Burns is revealed as the guest presenter of the prizes. He gets tongues wagging with a little kiss on Fallon's cheek when giving her a prize. Fallon's annoyed with Burns for 'taking advantage'. Lynda later tells Fallon to snap him up while he's still available.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b042jcxq)
Michael Nyman at 70

Kirsty Lang presents a special programme dedicated to one of Britain's most commercially successful composers, Michael Nyman, as he celebrates his 70th birthday. Perhaps best known for his film scores, including Jane Campion's The Piano, his minimalist music can also be enjoyed in the form of operas, string quartets, song cycles and now symphonies. Kirsty is joined by classical music critics, Fiona Maddocks and Jonathan Lennie, to discuss his music and legacy; woodwind player, Andy Findon, who's been a member of the Michael Nyman Band since the 1980s; singer David McAlmont, who wrote The Glare, a song cycle of news stories, with Nyman; and by the composer himself who talks about, among other things, The Hillsborough Symphony, soon to have its premiere, and how that came about.

Presenter: Kirsty Lang
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b042j8y5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Invention of... (b042jcxs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:30 on Sunday]


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b041ybj7)
Arizona: The Missing Migrants

Each year, thousands of illegal migrants try to enter the United States via a treacherous journey across the Arizona desert. Some succeed, while others are captured by US border patrols and are immediately deported - but not everyone is so fortunate. A growing number simply drop dead from exhaustion.

The Missing Migrant Project works on identifying the deceased, piecing together clues found in the personal effects collected alongside the decomposed bodies found in the desert.

In this programme, the BBC's Mexico correspondent Will Grant travels to Tucson, Arizona to meet project co-founder Robin Reineke to learn of the challenges facing her office in the small southwestern city of Tucson - which has the third-highest number of unidentified bodies in the United States, after New York and Los Angeles.

Migrant rights groups say the vast expansion of the US Border Patrol has exacerbated the problem because the heightened policing of the border along traditional urban crossing points has forced clandestine border crossers out into the wilds of the desert.

Such tough border protection is popular among many American voters, especially in conservative border states like Arizona and Texas - but some locals have shown sympathy, heading out into the desert to leave water, food and blankets in the hope of saving the lives of desperate migrants.

In Mexico, Crossing Continents also meets the relatives of those who have died in the desert, revealing their motivations to move north - motivations which they share with many men, women and children from across Latin America, who are still willing to risk their lives embarking on this increasingly dangerous and potentially deadly trip.

Reporter: Will Grant
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.


MON 21:00 Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different (b041xbxc)
Born Smart

To say one's child might be brighter than the norm is obnoxious. To suggest it's genetic, just adds insult to injury. To publish scientific findings confirming that the reason some children do better than others at school is due to differences in their DNA, is controversial. Share these findings with Michael Gove's education advisor and, it seems, you're asking for trouble. When, at the end of last year, scientists did just that, there was a furore: what if it leads to streaming at birth, gross inequality, eugenic dystopia?

Adam Rutherford charts the rise, fall and rise of scientific interest in this area over the last hundred years, picking his way through an inordinate amount of historical and political baggage to find out why we find it so difficult to have a sensible discussion about the genetics of intelligence.

At best, he might be told to check his privilege. At worst, he'll be a Nazi sympathizer. But for all Adam's liberal views, and perhaps because of them, he is determined to tackle this elephant in the classroom.

By pretending there are no differences between us, we risk other prejudices. Watching children work really hard and fail to achieve much academically is painful. At the lower end of the intellectual spectrum, there's broad acceptance that you don't shout at a child with special needs: "Could do better!". But in the middle of a middle class world hell-bent on creating little miracles, the notion that there are losers as well as winners in the genetic lottery, is not welcome.
Is a deep-seated and morally-upright desire for social justice a good reason to avoid a whole area of scientific inquiry? Let alone a rather less morally-upright desire for there to be no barriers, genetic or otherwise, to the genius of one's own children?

Scientists who studied the genetic basis of intelligence in the 70s and 80s describe how they were howled down by colleagues, accused of being Nazis, and victims of a scientific witch-hunt. The main focus of scientific interest was on things that could be changed: the environment at home or at school, our ability to nurture, not our nature. The social not the biological sciences.

Today, there's a renewed interest in our genetic inheritance: how it links us to our ancestors or an increased risk of cancer. And a tentative resurgence of interest in the genetics of intelligence.

One great fear is that the winners in this genetic lottery will become ever more advantaged and obnoxious. Not fears that were shared by Darwin's half-cousin, Francis Galton, who coined the term eugenics. In 1869, he published Hereditary Genius, the first scientific study of the inheritance of intelligence. Himself a child genius, he wondered if his prodigious talent was inherited from his very clever ancestors.

Worried by the poor quality of recruits for the Boer War, Galton fantasised about a world in which children were subjected to countless physical and mental tests. Those who were deemed fit were given permission to reproduce, while the unfit were sent to labour camps. Not surprising then that we are a bit anxious about the science of human genetics that he founded.

Today, worried that our children are falling behind in the global league tables on academic performance, perhaps we have our own fears about degeneration? Meantime, there's a renewed interest in standards and measuring in schools and in the genetic basis of intelligence.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b042j8xz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b042j3wv)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b042jcxv)
Boko Haram admits to kidnap of Nigerian schoolgirls.
We report the latest from Ukraine.
Looking ahead to forthcoming euro elections.
With Roger Hearing.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b042jcxx)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 6

Apocalyptic thriller by Louise Welsh.

London is in meltdown as a deadly virus, "The Sweats", continues to spread through the population. Ignoring the chaos around her, survivor Stevie Flint is determined to discover who, or what, killed her boyfriend.

Louise Welsh is the author of five highly acclaimed novels including "The Cutting Room" and, most recently, "The Girl on the Stairs". Louise has been the recipient of several awards including The John Creasey Memorial Dagger, the Saltire First Book Award, the Glenfiddich/Scotland on Sunday, Spirit of Scotland Writing Award and City of Glasgow Lord Provost's Award for Literature. In 2007 she was included in Waterstone's list of Twenty-five Authors for the Future.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Sian Preece

Writer: Louise Welsh

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b041xbxt)
Time

Michael Rosen's version of a Brief History of Time, well sort of ...! He asks what is time and explores the words we use to talk about it. He looks at some of the earliest devices for measuring time and talks to some who believe they've got an answer to the question of what it is and when it began. Oh and along the way Michael gets in a muddle over a maths equation!

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


MON 23:30 Essex, My Essex (b03w38q3)
Essex born and bred, writer Ian Sansom goes back to the county which made him who he is.

Ian's grandparents moved there from east-end London to fulfil their dreams. For them, Essex was a promised land of milk and honey, of golden harvests and Harvester restaurants.

Ian left 30 years ago and hasn't really been back since.

But a lot can happen in 30 years and in that time just about everything has happened to Essex. When Ian left there was no Essex man, no jokes about Essex girls, no Birds of a Feather, no Gavin and Stacey, and The Only Way is Essex was a mere glint in the average commuter's eye.

Now, with the London-overspill county occupying a new space in the public imagination, Ian retraces his steps back to the place where he was born and which made him who he is.

Talking to people who've stayed there, meeting family and friends, going back to landmarks that meant something to him in his younger days, Ian finds out what's changed in Essex since he left.

Between the low-rise housing and out-of-town retail parks, he finds an anarchist community which uses the county as a place to reimagine life's possibilities, a secret nuclear bunker from which a post-apocalyptic Essex generation would emerge and a retired vice Lord Lieutenant who hopes limericks can change perception of Essex girls.

This is it. This is his Essex.

Producer: Conor Garrett.



TUESDAY 06 MAY 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b042j3xp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b042j8y1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b042j3xr)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b042j3xt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b042j3xw)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b042j3xy)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b042jfvs)
A short reflection and prayer with Andrea Rea.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b042jfvv)
Newts, Pests, Pirbright Prosecution, Milk Prices

Three of the UK's biggest milk processors are cutting farmers' prices. They blame a slump in the global markets.

The Pirbright Institute has been prosecuted for not meeting safety requirements during experiments with Foot and Mouth disease.

And, why rare great crested newts are costing one farmer thousands of pounds.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b042326r)
Urban Dawn Chorus

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough introduces the final recording marking International Dawn Chorus day. The urban dawn chorus was recorded by Chris Watson in Whitechapel, London as part of a project to enable the children of the Royal London Children's Hospital to hear the wildlife sounds on their doorstep. Birds featured include the robin, blackbird, great tit and house sparrow.


TUE 06:00 Today (b042jfvx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Future Is Not What It Used to Be (b042jfvz)
The baby boom generation came of age when it was accepted knowledge that innovation and productivity would always lead to higher standards of living. The generations which followed assumed this truth would continue into the future indefinitely. With the crash of 2008 the upward mobility the middle classes assumed was their right evaporated, and it is unlikely to return.

Martin Wolf, chief economics commentator of the Financial Times, asks how the work force of the future will be changed by the advancements of technologies. How should governments respond to a jobs market which is hollowing out opportunities for traditional educated professions and how will rewards for innovation and income for labour be distributed without creating a society plagued by endemic inequality?

We will speak with optimists and pessimists on both sides of the argument to find out how the repercussions of these changes will affect the way we all live now and well into the future.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b042jfw1)
Eleanor Marx: A Life

The Paris Commune

Rachel Holmes's new book is the lively, engaging and informative life story of the daughter of Karl Marx. Today, it is 1871 and the Paris Commune is underway. Eleanor and her sisters are caught up in the bloody events. Later, a bid for independent living is hampered by the strictures and social mores of the day.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman
Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b042jfw3)
Kirsty Wark on misogyny; Nazneen Rahman; Mindfulness

Jane Garvey talks to Kirsty Wark about her new documentary which looks at whether offensive sexism and misogyny is on the rise.

Professor Nazneen Rahman is number three game-changer on the Woman's Hour Power List 2014 and a pioneer in the field of clinical genetics. We hear about the potential benefits of testing for women with breast and ovarian cancers.

70 MPs and peers have attended classes in mindfulness - so what could this, relatively new, development in the field of mental health have to offer the rest of us?

And in August 2006 the image of schoolgirl Molly Campbell dominated the media. She disappeared from the Outer Hebrides where she lived with her mother, spending the next few years in Pakistan with her father and siblings. Jane talks to Molly and her mother about a new play which focuses on their untold story.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b042jfw5)
HighLites: Wash and Blow

Episode 2

by Steve Chambers and Phil Nodding. 2/5 The cruise has been a good way for Bev and Shirl to drum up a little illicit hairdressing business below deck. The storm may have passed but it's not going to be all plain sailing.

Produced by Jessica Dromgoole and directed by Colin Guthrie.


TUE 11:00 Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different (b042jhl3)
Born Equal

In this the second part of his investigation of the rise, fall and rise of the genetics of intelligence, Adam Rutherford explores an era post World War Two when behavioural genetics fell far from grace. The social not biological sciences reigned supreme in the the study of intelligence and differences between children were attributed to nurture not nature.

Adoption studies were conducted to demonstrate the power of different home or school environments to transform lives.

More recent studies, however, reveal that nurture is not what most of us imagine. Parenting accounts for just a small part of the variation between children's academic performances. The environment in the womb is as important, if not more so, than conditions at home or in the classroom. Not to mention the role of chance.


TUE 11:30 Sir Neville at 90 (b042jhl5)
Sue MacGregor talks to the conductor Sir Neville Marriner as he celebrates his 90th birthday.

In 1958 Sir Neville founded the Academy of St Martin in the Fields with a group of friends. It was formed as a conductorless chamber ensemble of top class musicians and in the early years they gathered to rehearse in the front room of Sir Neville's Kensington flat.

Sue MacGregor meets Sir Neville and Lady Marriner in that same room. They look back over his extraordinary career, from his days as an LSO violinist and his early work for the BBC, and chart his development as a celebrated conductor and the growth of the Academy into an orchestra of international renown: together they have recorded more than 500 discs, making them one of the most productive partnerships ever.

There are contributions from musicians who have been members of the Academy for many years, including Tristan Fry and Kenneth Sillito; pianist Murray Perahia, who is the Academy's Principal Guest Conductor; and violinist Joshua Bell, who became Music Director in 2011. Record producer Andrew Keener gives some insights into working with one of the most recorded conductors in history, and Dame Janet Baker describes one of her distinguished recordings with Sir Neville, made under very difficult circumstances.

The music includes some of his best-loved recordings, like Vivaldi's Four Seasons and the award-winning soundtrack for Amadeus, as well as rare finds from the BBC archive: a broadcast by his first chamber group, formed during student days, and a "stereophonic test transmission" which may well be the Academy's earliest surviving recording. And we eavesdrop on rehearsals for Sir Neville's Birthday Concert, given at the Royal Festival Hall.

Producer: Susan Kenyon
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b042jhl7)
Call You and Yours

Call You and Yours, presented by Shari Vahl, explores what it will take to get us moving as new research from the Ramblers says a third of adults wouldn't consider walking more than twenty minutes to get from one place to another. That's even though NHS advice is for a hundred and fifty minutes a week! Would you consider standing up all day at work as a solution? How about tax incentives? How do we persuade the office workers, the drivers, the couch potations to change their habits and really use the stairs not the lift?


TUE 12:57 Weather (b042j3y0)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b042j3y2)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b042jhl9)
Brains and Brass Instruments

Martin Sixsmith investigates how medical research helped identify different areas of the brain - from the speechless patient of French physician Paul Broca to the brain damaged American railway worker Phineas Gage.

He looks at how new ways to measure time helped German psychologists like Wilhelm Wundt to assess the speed of thought, whilst in Britain archivist Subhadra Das explains the impact on psychology of Sir Francis Galton's statistical mass observations.

Produced by Sara Parker
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b042jcxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b042jhlc)
Frank Zappa and Me

In 1967 Pauline Butcher, a conventional English secretary, was sent to a London hotel on a typing assignment. The client turned out to be avant-garde American musician Frank Zappa. Frank asked Pauline to type out the lyrics of his album, Absolutely Free, a task she found extremely baffling. Out of this chance encounter, and unlikely meeting of minds, a friendship quickly grew, and Pauline was invited to go and work for Frank in Los Angeles, where the regular visitors to his log cabin in the Hollywood Hills included Mick Jagger, Eric Clapton and Captain Beefheart. It was the height of the Summer of Love which would soon come to a violent end when Charles Manson soured the hippie dream. But it would be the rise of the Women's Liberation Movement that finally led Pauline to follow her own path.
Adapted by Matt Broughton from Pauline's memoir 'Freak Out - My Life with Frank Zappa.'

Directed by Kate McAll
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b042jhlf)
Series 5

Explorers

Josie Long goes on an adventure as she presents a sequence of mini documentaries about exploration.

With tales of riding cellos down the mountain side and romantic exploration on the U Bahn.

Great Bear Rainforest
Produced by Elizabeth Arnold

Die Fremde
Produced by Phil Smith

Out of the Blocks (Extract)
Produced by Aaron Henkin and electronic musician Wendel Patrick

Everest Glissando
Feat. Stephen Venables
Produced by Hana Walker-Brown

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b042jhlh)
The Future of Our Food

Costing the Earth debates one of the most important issues facing the planet that affects all of us: Where will our food come from in the decades ahead.

The world population is expected to rise to 9 billion by 2050. That's another 2.5 billion mouths to feed, roughly the number of people currently living in China and India today.

Tom Heap is joined by an panel to chew over the question of what the world will eat as populations rise, climate changes and vital resources are depleted.

The panel is made up of experts from the world of food and agriculture: Professor Charles Godfray from the Oxford Martin Programme for the Future of Food; Colin Tudge, the man behind the Campaign for Real Farming; new Groceries Adjudicator, Christine Tacon; Sean Rickard an economist who specialises in food and farming; Tristram Stuart: winner of the award for 'Best Initiative in British Food' at last week's BBC Food and farming awards, the food waste campaigner behind the Feeding the 5000 and Pig Idea projects.

With Tom Heap in the chair they'll be debating whether we should put our faith in huge industrial agri-industry to feed the ever expanding world population or could organic farming hold the key? Will genetic modification be embraced as famine takes hold? Will vast factory farms pop up to avoid people going hungry, or will future farming operations be more holistic and community based, with everyone doing their bit to produce food for their friends and neighbours? Will we need to turn to algae, lab-grown protein and insect farms to keep our bellies full or will the developed world enjoy an artisan-baked, craft-brewed lifestyle whilst the rest of the planet scrapes a living from depleted soils?

Presenter: Tom Heap
Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b042jhlk)
Words That Wound

Words can change lives, bring hope ,but they can also be scary, cruel and cause offence. Michael Rosen explores whether online abuse has more of an impact on us today than face to face.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b042jhlm)
Series 33

Isy Suttie on Jake Thackray

Jake Thackray hated being known as the north country Noel Coward, but at the height of his fame the description stuck. His songs are very British, but his influences were European - Georges Brassens and Jacques Brel.

Nominating Jake Thackray is Isy Suttie, Dobby from Peep Show and star of the A-Z of Mrs P.
The presenter is Matthew Parris and the producer Miles Warde.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


TUE 17:00 PM (b042jhlp)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b042j3y4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section (b042jhzs)
Series 3

Sara Pascoe and James Acaster

Stand-up Alex Horne and his band explore the theme of technology through live music and comedy.

With songs about a record player, hoover and a teasmaid amongst others.

They're joined by guest comedians Sara Pascoe and James Acaster.

Producer: Julia McKenzie

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2014.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b042jjx9)
Adam is feeling the pressure with Charlie driving him hard. David offers to help out. David and Ruth are benefitting from having Jill stay, so he has more time available to help.

Helen wants to talk to Kirsty, keen to know she's not still angry. Tony's angry with Tom for what he's doing to his mother, who is struggling to sleep.

PC Burns visits edgy Pat and tries to reassure her that Tom won't harm himself. He suggests using Facebook to appeal to people, but Tony says no, it will affect business. Suppliers and contractors should think Tom's on honeymoon as planned.

David asks Alistair about Dan at Sandhurst. Shula's proud of Dan but clearly not happy.

David and Adam discuss the upcoming Open Farm Sunday. Adam won't be doing it unless work has calmed down. David also mentions it's the Year of the Family Farm. David offers to do more tractor work in the tractor for Adam. He enjoys it.

David asks Adam about the new road plans. Does Brian know anything?

Tony and Pat are happy to find out that their cow that died didn't have TB. Movement restrictions will be lifted. Tony spitefully looks forward to telling Tom how wrong he was. But Pat doesn't know if Tom is coming back.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b042jjxc)
Irvine Welsh; The Wind Rises review; Rachel De-lahay

Trainspotting author Irvine Welsh talks to Samira Ahmed about his new novel The Sex Lives of Siamese Twins, which is set in contemporary Miami. Advertising expert Rory Sutherland unpicks the row over the Morrisons baguette beamed onto the Angel of the North. A cheeky stunt gone wrong or a violation of much-loved public art? Rachel De-lahay's new play Circles focusses on Birmingham's number 11 outer circle bus route and investigates cycles of violence and what it takes to break them. Hayao Miyazaki's latest animated film The Wind Rises has been announced as his last. The writer and director who brought us Howl's Moving Castle and Spirited Away bows out with the story of Jiro, a young man who dreams of flying and becomes a designer of aeroplanes as the Second World War looms. Critic Robbie Collin reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b042jfw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Cyprus: Divided Memory, United Future? (b042jn7d)
After fifty years of division policed by UN peacekeepers, there is new hope for a settlement on the island of Cyprus, once known as the "graveyard of diplomats." Writer Maria Margaronis travels through the Greek Cypriot south and the Turkish Cypriot north to understand how this tiny country torn in two and why has it proved so difficult to stitch it back together.

In the 1950s, under British colonial rule, members of the Greek Cypriot majority launched the violent EOKA campaign for Enosis, or union with Greece. Turkish Cypriots, under threat and enlisted for help by the British, mounted a counter-offensive for partition. Britain withdrew in 1960, leaving an independent state unloved by its citizens. By 1963 violence had broken out again; the capital was partitioned and Turkish Cypriots withdrew into separate enclaves. In 1974, the military dictatorship in power in Athens overthrew the Cyprus government to declare Enosis; Turkey invaded and took over a third of the island. Some 200,000 Cypriots became refugees in their own land; there are still missing people from both communities. Since then, repeated attempts at a settlement have failed. The Greek Cypriot Republic of Cyprus is an EU member; the Turkish Republic of Cyprus is unrecognised by any country but Turkey. The two are separated by a UN-controlled buffer zone, and until 2003, there was no crossing and no direct communication between them.

Fifty years ago Cypriots lived together as neighbours; now they have separate histories and no common language. And yet, there are plenty of contacts, friendships, even marriages between them; the divided island has been at peace for 40 years. Maria talks to inter-communal couples, to soldiers who once shot each other and are now fast friends, and to pragmatists on both sides about what it is to live this surreal paradox. She visits the frozen spaces of the UN buffer zone like Nicosia Airport where time has stood still in 1974, and encounters the frozen spaces of history and memory, where shards of grief still linger: a school commemoration of the EOKA struggle, a Greek Cypriot refugee settlement & the ruins of the former luxury holiday resort of Varosha. What does it take for people to leave the past behind? Why might they cling onto it? And, in a world that's changed completely since 1974, can the inhabitants of this strategically located island ever really hope to determine their own future?

Producer: Mark Burman.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b042jn7g)
Speaking Across the Generations, part 2

Two visually impaired people in their twenties, exchange experiences of schooling, family and employment, with two visually impaired people in their seventies. How are things different? Are there still similarities and have attitudes changed?
Fred Reid is an historian who lost his sight when he was fourteen back in 1952.
Jean MacDonald was born in 1931 with a visual impairment and went out to work to support her family when she was fourteen.
Jonjo Brady is 22 and studying law at university.
19 year old Joy Addo wants to run her own events management company.
Together they discuss schooling, employment and social opportunities from their own unique perspectives.


Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Editor: Andrew Smith

Photo: Joy Addo, Jonjo Brady and Peter White.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b042jn7j)
Are mental health services in crisis? Claudia Hammond talks to Sue Bailey, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, about her fears that mental health is at a tipping point and could be heading towards its own Stafford Hospital style scandal. Martin McShane from NHS England and Minister for Care and Support, Norman Lamb, respond. Claudia talks to historian, Jay Winter about why he believes shell shock in World War One was hugely underdiagnosed. And she hears from Mindout, a support group for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Brighton and a finalist in the All in the Mind mental health awards.


TUE 21:30 The Future Is Not What It Used to Be (b042jfvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b042jn7l)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b042jn7n)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 7

London is in chaos as the deadly virus known as "The Sweats" continues to spread through the population. Despite the danger, survivor Stevie Flint refuses to leave the city; she is determined to complete her investigation into the mysterious death of her boyfriend, Doctor Simon Sharkey.

She has learned that Simon was working on a controversial treatment for cerebral palsy. Returning to his flat in search of more evidence, she makes another shocking discovery.

Apocalyptic thriller written by Louise Welsh.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Sian Preece

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 23:00 Act Your Age (b00zsjz7)
Series 3

Episode 2

Simon Mayo hosts the three-way battle between the comedy generations to find out which is the funniest.

Will it be the Up-and-Comers, the Current Crop or the Old Guard who will be crowned, for one week at least, as the Golden Age of Comedy?

Jon Richardson is joined by Andi Osho, Rufus Hound teams up with Andrew Maxwell and Ted Robbins is paired with both Roger De Courcey and Nookie Bear.

Devised and produced by Ashley Blaker and Bill Matthews.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b042jn7s)
Sean Curran reports on Labour's fears for jobs if Pfizer takes over AstraZeneca. MPs hear diisturbing evidence about female genital mutilation. And where have all the barristers gone?

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 07 MAY 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b042j3yz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b042jfw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b042j3z1)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b042j3z3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b042j3z5)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b042j3z7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b042jpjm)
A short reflection and prayer with Andrea Rea.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b042jpjp)
Turbines on the Wash, Wheat Rust, Malting Barley, Salad Days

Scottish arable farmers who grow barley for malt whisky production are angry about new EU rules which will require them to plant other crops in rotation. The European Commission says the move is needed to reduce monocultures which deplete the soil.

Last summer was a record for sales of salad. The weather this summer might be in the lap of the gods, but lettuce growers are already gearing up for their peak season.

Anna Hill visits scientists who are helping farmers in the fight against one of the most damaging diseases to afflict wheat: Yellow Rust.

And, can fishermen and wind turbines coexist in The Wash?

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0423ctf)
Reed Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the reed bunting. The reed bunting makes up for its lack of musicality with striking good looks. Male birds have jet black heads and a white moustache and look stunning on a spring day as they sit on shrubs or sway on reed stems, flicking their tales nervously and chanting a simple refrain.


WED 06:00 Today (b042jpjr)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b042jpjt)
Gruff Rhys, Brigid Keenan, Richard Kerridge, Corey Baker

Libby Purves is joined by writer and journalist Bridget Keenan; singer and songwriter Gruff Rhys; dancer and choreographer Corey Baker and nature writer Richard Kerridge.

Brigid Keenan gave up a career as a fashion journalist to become the wife of a diplomat, living in Nepal, Ethiopia, Syria, the Gambia and Azerbaijan. In her latest book, Packing Up, the couple are posted to Kazakhstan and they are facing their biggest adventure so far - the prospect of retirement. Packing Up - Further Adventures of a Trailing Spouse is published by Bloomsbury.

Gruff Rhys is a singer and songwriter who performs solo and with several bands including Super Furry Animals. His latest project, American Interior, was inspired by a trip across the US to retrace the steps of his distant relative John Evans. Evans left Snowdonia in 1792 to find a mythical Welsh-speaking Native American tribe, the Madogwys. Gruff has produced an album, film, book and app and will be performing songs from the album at The Brighton Festival and at the Soho Theatre.

Corey Baker is a dancer and choreographer from New Zealand. He is international resident choreographer for this year's International Dance Festival in Birmingham. He is working with members of the public and professional dancers on a piece called A Haka Day Out based on the traditional Maori war dance.

Richard Kerridge is a nature writer and leads the MA in creative writing at Bath Spa University. As a child he loved to encounter wild creatures such as newts, lizards and marsh frogs. In his book Cold Blood - part natural history guide, part memoir - he writes about our relationship with nature. Cold Blood - Adventures with Reptiles and Amphibians is published in hardback by Chatto and Windus.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b042jpjw)
Eleanor Marx: A Life

Free Love

Rachel Holmes's new book is the engaging and informative life story of the remarkable daughter of Karl Marx. Today, it is the 1880s and Eleanor falls in love and makes a difficult choice.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman
Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b042jpjy)
Deborah Warner; Cook the Perfect Tapas; Lilian Pizzzichini

The Virgin Mary is Christianity's most important female figure, but little is revealed about her in the Bible. The Testament of Mary, at the Barbican in London addresses the question of how Mary might have felt about the extraordinary and violent events of her son's life.
The radical Nigerian Islamic group Boko Haram, whose name loosely translates as "Western education is forbidden", has admitted that it abducted more than 200 girls from their school in Northern Nigeria three weeks ago. Pressure on the Government to find the girls remains intense, and pressure from the international community is increasing. So what does this tragedy say about the role of women in Nigerian society?
In 2006 writer Lilian Pizzichini was addicted to drink and drugs, but holding down a job. She took the advice of a fortune teller and bought a 70-foot narrowboat moored on the Grand Union Canal in London. Her memoir "Music Night at the Apollo" - charts her 12 months on the boat, her descent into addiction, and how she learnt about her working-class roots.
Lady Mary Feilding was a Victorian philanthropist who founded a charitable body called The Working Ladies' Guild in 1877. Records relating to the early years of the Guild have recently been re-examined and these documents provide a fascinating insight into the lives of these 'distressed gentlewomen' in Victorian Britain.
Plus Sam Clark, chef and co-founder of Moro restaurant, will Cook the Perfect Tapas dish - grilled peppers with crispy capers.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b042jpk0)
HighLites: Wash and Blow

Episode 3

by Steve Chambers and Phil Nodding. 3/5 The pressure is on for Bev and Shirl - the business, the money, the talent contest and the missing pastry are occupying their minds.

Produced by Jessica Dromgoole and directed by Colin Guthrie.


WED 11:00 In Defence of Pushy Parents (b042jpk2)
Picked on by the media, feared by teachers, banned from the touchlines on sports day - pushy parents are public enemy number one. In this programme, self-professed pushy parent Rosie Millard launches a spirited defence, arguing that pushy parents are a much maligned force within society.

Rosie's view is not a popular one, from psychologists who warn that overbearing parenting can damage a child's health, to teachers who argue that they spend more time dealing with pushy parents than they do actually teaching, there are no shortage of people lining up to have a pop.

With Britain's children slipping down the international league tables, Rosie hears from controversial "Tiger-Mom" Amy Chua who explains that the hard-line East Asian parenting style instils within children discipline and focus that is lacking from many children in the West.

In Manchester, Rosie speaks to the head teacher at one of the country's top primary schools who states that her school's consistently excellent results would simply not be possible without its bevy of pushy parents.

Rosie argues that being a pushy parent is about more than just a child's education, it's also about helping your children blossom through extracurricular pursuits. At the Golders Green Rapidplay Chess Tournament, Rosie meets 9 year old chess prodigy Joshua Altman and his "hardcore chess mum" Hillary.

Pushy parents also play a vital role in spurring on youngsters for sporting successes, we hear from Paralympic gold medallist Josef Craig who explains that his medal glory would have been impossible without his parents' drive and support.

Presenter: Rosie Millard
Producer: Max O'Brien
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Gloomsbury (b042jpk4)
Series 2

Two Broads Broadcasting

Vera is terrified when she receives a letter inviting her to do a lecture tour of America, and instantly begins a search for plausible excuses. But when Ginny asks her to help present a programme on BBC Radio about modern poetry. her anxiety is swiftly forgotten. Vera sees a chance to read one of her poems on the radio and share the limelight with those two wonderfully modern poets, TS Jellitot and DH Lollipop.

Henry warns Vera not to underestimate Ginny, however, who won't allow Vera to read anything unless Ginny agrees to it... and Ginny does not think that Vera's poem is modern enough to be in her programme.

What Ginny has not bargained for is the prudery and authority of Lord Reith who will not allow TS Jellitot to appear on her programme, because his American accent will corrupt the listeners and banishes DH Lollipop from Broadcasting House because of the constant sexual references in his language.

It falls to Vera to save the day by impersonating TS Jellitot and DH Lollipop live on air and then to get one over on Ginny by reading out her poem before Ginny can stop her. The broadcast falls apart, but Vera returns Sizzlinghurst the victor. Back at home, over a brandy or two, Henry reminds Vera about the prohibition movement in America. Reason enough for Vera to wriggle out of her lecture tour. Chin chin!

GLOOMSBURY - THE SERIES
Green-fingered Sapphist Vera Sackcloth-Vest shares a bijou castle in Kent with her devoted husband Henry, but longs for exotic adventures with nervy novelist Ginny Fox and wilful beauty Venus Traduces. It's 1921, the dawn of modern love, life and lingerie, but Vera still hasn't learnt how to boil a kettle.

Producer: Jamie Rix
A Little Brother Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b042jpk6)
'Black boxes' in cars and dashboard cameras

How new technology is exposing motor insurance fraud.

Why the government's offering us cash for doing up our own homes.

The new law making it legal to copy CDs for personal use

And with more streaming TV services offering different content, how do you know what to buy?
(CORRECTION: We'd like to make it clear that contrary to the suggestion that Sky TV has seen an overall drop in the number of its subscribers, the company's latest figures - which also now include people signing up to its pay-as-you-go streaming service - show they actually gained customers).

Presenter: Winifred Robinson.
Producer: Jon Douglas.


WED 13:00 World at One (b042j3z9)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b042l24h)
The Mind Observes the Mind

In this programme Martin Sixsmith examines the evolution of psychology on both sides of the Atlantic, from the founding father of American psychology William James to the Gestalt movement in Germany, through the rise of behaviourism in the United States to the cognitive revolution of the 1960s.

He talks to the veteran psychologist George Mandler, who was part of that revolution, about how it still influences thinking today.

Produced by Sara Parker
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b042jjx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b042l782)
The Sensitive

Underground Man, pt 1

1 / 2. Glasgow's disused underground tunnels are the hunting ground for an injured ex-soldier who threatens to kill three men he holds responsible for cheating him out of an inheritance. When one of the men under threat goes missing, Glasgow psychic, Thomas Soutar, helps police in their search - but Thomas and his girlfriend, Kat, soon find there's danger much closer to home. By Alastair Jessiman. The concluding episode is tomorrow.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/director: Bruce Young.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b042l784)
Paying for Long-Term Care

Do you need help funding long term care? For help and advice, call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk

If you, a relative or friend can no longer manage alone, how do you find out about getting help with daily activities, medical needs or adapting a home to make life easier?

What will a care assessment involve and can you challenge a decision if you believe it is wrong?

If the time has come to move into a residential home, how do you choose one and what will it cost?

Who will pay for care, the Local Authority, the NHS or you?

Can welfare benefits help and what are the pros and cons of the financial products on offer?

Whatever your question, presenter Paul Lewis will be joined by:

Pat Lacroix, Advisor, Independent Age.
Garry Macdonald, Advisor, Independent Age Scotland.

Lisa Morgan, Partner and Nursing Care Specialist, Hugh James.

Brian Tabor, Chartered Financial Planner, Carematters.

To talk to the team call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b042jn7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b042l786)
Baristas; 'People' History

The rise & fall of the working class: Laurie Taylor talks to Selina Todd, social historian at St Hilda's College, Oxford, about her sweeping study of ordinary British people between 1910-2010. Rooting her analysis in first person accounts from factory workers, servants and housewives, she reveals a hidden history full of the unexpected: How many of us know that cinema audiences once shook their fists at Winston Churchill? Also, US sociologist, Yasemin Besen-Cassino, discusses her research on 'baristas', the preparers of coffee across the urban world. She finds a group of affluent young people who'll work for poor wages if they're associated with a 'cool' brand.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b042l788)
Patten & Paxman depart; Channel 5 sold; Sunday Herald says 'yes'

Lord Patten has stood down from his role as chairman of the BBC Trust due to ill health. The former cabinet minister who took the job in 2011, has presided over a time which included three director generals and scandals such as excessive executive pay. Now begins the quest to find a replacement. But, with charter renewal due in 2016, and the very future of the BBC Trust being debated, finding the right candidate could prove challenging. Chair of the DCMS Select Committee John Whittingdale talks to Steve Hewlett about the kind of person required, and former Trustee Richard Tait about how this could impact on the organisation.

American media group Viacom which owns Nickleodeon, MTV and Comedy Central has bought Channel 5 for £450 million. It will be the first US broadcaster to buy a UK channel with a public service remit. Why is Channel 5 so attractive to Viacom? And what are they likely to do with it? We hear from Tara Conlan, media reporter for the Guardian.

Jeremy Paxman has announced he's to leave Newsnight in order to get to bed at a decent time. Famous for his acerbic interrogation of guests, he's long been the programmes most popular presenter. So, what now for a programme that's been suffering a decline in audience figures? Steve Hewlett talks to two former Newsnight editors, Richard Tait and Sian Kevell, about the direction they'd now take the programme.

Scotland's Sunday Herald has become the first mainstream newspaper to support independence. Is it a cynical ploy to boost readership? The paper say it will remain balanced in it reporting but how easy is it to do when you have come out in favour of the Yes campaign. Steve speaks to Richard Walker, editor of the Sunday Herald about the decision.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b042l78b)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b042j3zc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Isy Suttie's Love Letters (b042l78d)
Series 2

Rosa and Matthew

Isy Suttie returns to BBC Radio 4 with a brand new series of her Sony Award Winning show, recounting a series of love stories affecting people she's known throughout her life, told partly through song.

Sometimes Isy has merely observed other people's love lives; quite often she's intervened, changing the action dramatically - for better or worse. Intertwined within these stories are related real life anecdotes from Isy's own, often disastrous, love life.

In this episode, Isy recounts the tale of Rosa and Matthew, a hypnotherapist and an osteopath who work a few doors apart and find it difficult to express their feelings for each other.

With her multi-character and vocal skills, and accompanied by her guitar, Isy creates a hilarious and deeply moving world, sharing with us her lessons in life and love.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b042l78g)
Roy tells Elizabeth to go ahead and book bands for Loxfest. The licence is in hand. Elizabeth is daunted by the scale of their project. Roy has decided who to contract as the events manager and Elizabeth supports him. They agree to have a stage for local bands as well.

Jill raves about Fallon's efforts on May Day, getting the hall together and creating the atmosphere. Fallon's upcycled goods stall certainly did good business. Jill is hosting Clarrie's 60th birthday party, lending a Brookfield barn. Nic and Emma are in charge of catering.

Brian's disgruntled as building work starts on the new kitchen, with lots of racket. The lovely floor has to be dug up as well. Brian feels his sciatica is getting better. But Jennifer is horrified that he secretly planned to do tractor work at night for Adam.

Dan is finding his first week at Sandhurst tough but he's coping fine. Jill is more worried about Shula, who seems to think Dan is having a terrible time.

Roy invites Elizabeth to a local music festival, Greenbury Fields, to give her an idea of what it's all about. Jill thinks it's a good idea. Roy invites Jolene to do a set at Loxfest. She'll check if the rest of the Midnight Walkers are up for it - they'd better get rehearsing asap.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b042l78j)
Antony Gormley & Simon Starling; Alice Hoffman; David Henry Hwang

Antony Gormley and Simon Starling reflect on the influence of Henry Moore on a new generation of sculptors, author Alice Hoffman discusses her latest novel The Museum of Extraordinary Things, the story of love between two vastly different souls in New York during the volatile first decades of the twentieth century and Rachel Campbell-Johnston discusses the Turner Prize shortlist and what the choices say about the world of contemporary art. Tony Award-winning playwright David Henry Hwang on his play Yellow Face, which explores issues of race and identity through the the playwright's real life involvement in protests about the casting of Jonathan Pryce in Miss Saigon and, as Russia's entry for Eurovision is booed, music journalist John P Lucas talks us through the political pressures of the competition.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b042jpk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Leader Conference (b042l78l)
Series 4

Episode 2

Andrew Rawnsley presents the second programme in a new series of the live, studio-based debate programmes which take the form of newspaper leader conferences.

He is joined by five prominent journalists, who write leading articles or editorials for their newspapers, representing the press in the nations of the UK and across the English regions as well as the leading national newspapers.

Three subjects in the news will be decided upon and discussed. Two of these reflect current events at home and abroad - and prompt lively and provocative discussion. The third subject is in a lighter vein.

Contributions from listeners are also encouraged throughout the programme and particularly at the start for the component they shape most: that final leader which is heard towards the end of the programme.

Following the discussion of each of the three subjects, Andrew invites one of his guests to draw up on air the "leader" for that subject setting out its main points. This important component of the programme helps ensure that resolution of the debate is achieved for listeners and that the full range of views expressed is reflected.

The leaders are posted online at the Radio 4 website following the programme.

Producer Simon Coates.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b042l78n)
Series 4

Rebecca Mott

Rebecca Mott says we should come to see prostitution exactly as we now see slavery - as an abuse of human rights - and therefore only total abolition is acceptable.

Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks in which speakers air their thinking, in front of a live audience, on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect culture and society.

Presenter: Ben Hammersley
Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b042jhlh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b042jpjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b042j3zf)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b042l78q)
Syrian rebels leave Homs - what future now for the opposition? South Africa votes and India election violence with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b042l78s)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 8

Apocalyptic thriller by Louise Welsh.

London's population is being decimated by a deadly virus known as "The Sweats". In spite of the chaos around her, survivor Stevie Flint continues to search for answers to who, or what, caused the death of her boyfriend, Doctor Simon Sharkey.

She's discovered that Simon and his colleagues were developing a controversial treatment for cerebral palsy. Their company, Fibrosyop, was being investigated by a journalist who was killed in a street mugging a few days before Simon. The coincidence seems to confirm Stevie's suspicions that Simon was murdered.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Sian Preece

Writer: Louise Welsh

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 23:00 Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side (b042l78v)
Series 1

The Winner Takes It All

Episode 2. The Winner Takes It All.

Elvis is persuaded, much against his will, to engage with society's apparent mania for competitions. The opportunities are legion: karaoke, writing in to magazines, the competition for best kept caravan park and a local poetry slam

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4

Written by Elvis MacGonagall, with Richard Smith, Helen Braunholtz-Smith and Frank Stirling.

Stand-up poet, armchair revolutionary, comedian and broadcaster Elvis McGonagall (aka poet and performer Richard Smith) is determined to do something about his bitter, dyspeptic and bloody minded view of contemporary life. There are good things out there, if he could only be bothered to find them. From his home in the Graceland Park near Dundee, the Scottish punk poet goes in search of the brighter side of life. With the help of his dog,Trouble, his friend, Susan Morrison, and his own private narrator, Clarke Peters, Elvis does his very best to accentuate the positive - he really does. Recorded almost entirely on location, in a caravan on a truly glamorous industrial estate somewhere in Scotland.

As Elvis, poet Richard Smith is the 2006 World Poetry Slam Champion, the compere of the notorious Blue Suede Sporran Club and appears regularly on BBC Radio 4 ("Saturday Live", the "Today Programme", "Arthur Smith's Balham Bash", "Last Word", "Off The Page" and others as well as writing and presenting the popular arts features "Doggerel Bard" on the art of satiric poetry and "Beacons and Blue Remembered Hills" on the extraordinary resonance of A.E. Housman's 'Shropshire Lad', which was recorded on location as well.
(further info at www.elvismcgonagall.co.uk).


WED 23:15 I, Regress (b018xs90)
Series 1

Episode 1

A dark, David Lynch-ian comedy, ideally suited for an unsettling and surreal late night listen. 'I, Regress' sees Matt Berry (The IT Crowd, Garth Marenghi's Dark Place, Snuff Box) playing a corrupt and bizarre hypnotherapist taking unsuspecting clients on twisted, misleading journeys through their subconscious.

Each episode sees the doctor dealing with a different client who has come to him for a different problem (quitting smoking, fear of water, etc). As the patient is put under hypnosis, we 'enter' their mind, and all the various situations the hypnotherapist takes them through are played out for us to hear. The result is a dream- (or nightmare-) like trip through the patient's mind, as funny as it is disturbing.

Episode 1: Karen House-Water (Katherine Parkinson) visits Dr Berry to treat her fear of water, and finds that the cure can sometimes be worse than the disease - via mermaids, the titanic, and talking dolphins.

The cast across the series include Katherine Parkinson (IT Crowd), Morgana Robinson (The Morgana Show), Simon Greenall (I'm Alan Partridge), Jack Klaff (Star Wars, For Your Eyes Only), Tara Flynn (The Impressions Show, Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle), Alex Lowe (Barry From Watford, The Peter Serafinowicz Show), and Derek Griffiths (Playschool, Bod, and The Royal Exchange).

A compelling late night listen: tune in and occupy someone else's head!

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b042l78x)
The Labour leader, Ed Miliband, repeats his call for David Cameron to commit to an independent assessment of whether Pfizer's proposed takeover of the British pharmaceutical firm, Astra Zeneca, is in the national interest.
At Prime Minister's Questions, Mr Cameron says the most important intervention the government could make was to back British jobs and medical research.
Former City Minister Lord Myners tells MPs that the Co-Op needs urgent reform and criticises the mutual for a series of governance failures.
The Commons debates changes made to the Government's Immigration Bill by the Lords.
And question time sees Scottish Nationalists attack the campaign to keep Scotland in the UK, describing some of its claims as "demeaning, insulting, nonsense".
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 08 MAY 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b042j40c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b042jpjw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b042j40f)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b042j40h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b042j40k)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b042j40m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b042ldyj)
A short reflection and prayer with Andrea Rea.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b042ldyl)
Farmer manslaughter trial, Leatherjacket plague

A farmer who was charged with manslaughter has been found not guilty, after a trial at Nottingham Crown Court. Paul Waterfall was charged after the death of rambler Roger Freeman, who died when he was attacked by cattle in a field on Mr Waterfall's farm in 2010. Charlotte Smith hears about the trial, and asks the Ramblers and the National Farmers Union for their reaction to the verdict. Is it time for a change in the law about keeping livestock in fields with footpaths?

And Scotland could be in for a plague of craneflies - or "daddy-longlegs" - this summer. Numbers of their larvae, known as leatherjackets, are at their highest level for nearly forty years.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0423fpl)
Whimbrel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the whimbrel. Whimbrels are sometimes known as 'seven whistlers' from the number of notes in their call and in parts of the English midlands these sounds in the darkness gave rise to a folk tale about the six birds of fate which flew around the heavens seeking the seventh. When they were all reunited, went the story, the world would end. Mercifully, it wasn't true but it was our ancestor's way of interpreting the mystery of nocturnal migration.


THU 06:00 Today (b042ldyn)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b042ldyq)
The Sino-Japanese War

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-45. After several years of rising tension, and the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, full-scale war between Japan and China broke out in the summer of 1937. The Japanese captured many major Chinese ports and cities, but met with fierce resistance, despite internal political divisions on the Chinese side. When the Americans entered the war following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Japanese found themselves fighting on several fronts simultaneously, and finally capitulated in August 1945. This notoriously brutal conflict left millions dead and had far-reaching consequences for international relations in Asia.

With:

Rana Mitter
Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at the University of Oxford

Barak Kushner
Senior Lecturer in Japanese History at the University of Cambridge

Tehyun Ma
Lecturer in Chinese History at the University of Exeter

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b042ldys)
Eleanor Marx: A Life

A Secret

Rachel Holmes's new book is the engaging and informative life story of the remarkable daughter of Karl Marx. Today, Eleanor's campaigns for equality are making inroads. Later, an unexpected revelation turns her world upside down and leaves her profoundly shaken.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman
Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b042ldyw)
Will Hillary Clinton stand for US President?

Will Hillary Clinton stand for President? Women and the Indian elections. Remembering Linda Smith, game changing woman of comedy. Childcare policy - social engineering or supporting parents? Recorder quartet I Flautisti play live. With Jenni Murray.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b042ldyy)
HighLites: Wash and Blow

Episode 4

by Steve Chambers and Phil Nodding. 4/5 The pressure is mounting, but Bev is hoping to turn the visit of the head judge of the talent competition to her advantage.

Produced by Jessica Dromgoole and directed by Colin Guthrie.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b042ldz0)
Argentina: GM's New Frontline

The transgenic revolution in agricultural production turned Argentina into one of the world's largest producers and exporters of genetically modified soybean and corn. But there is unease across the nation's vast GM belt, especially about health. In the northerly province of Chaco, the Minster of Public Health wants an independent commission to investigate cases of cancer and the incidence of children born with disabilities.

Produced and presented by Linda Pressly.


THU 11:30 Getting the Picture (b03q6bqj)
2. He Seduces Everybody!

David Bailey discusses with Tim Marlow the less well-known - but just as definitive - aspects of his portraiture. These include the documentary photographs he has taken on trips around the world which date back to his National Service in Singapore in the 1950s.

Bailey explains how the writer Rudyard Kipling and the explorer Sir Richard Burton fired his youthful imagination. He also talks about his reaction to the New York of the early 1960s and meeting Andy Warhol there. To a doubtful Tim, who wonders if there will be a change of heart, Bailey initially claims his recent punishing trip to India's Nagaland will also be his last foreign foray. This programme reveals if Bailey will in fact do more work abroad and, if so, where.

Bailey also discusses the joint ventures he has undertaken, including those with his wife Catherine, and with the artist Damien Hirst. Hirst, in turn, reveals how he and Bailey came to work together and what their collaborations have achieved.

As the opening of his show at London's National Portrait Gallery draws near, Bailey looks back on some of the shots that give him special pleasure.

And Catherine tells Tim that Bailey "seduces everyone from behind the camera". She adds, "He does it to me, he does it to everybody!"

The second of two programmes about Bailey’s work.

Producer Simon Coates

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2014.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b042ldz2)
Home buyers complaints about solicitors on the rise with a failure to hand over stamp duty to the taxman an increasing complaint.

Will Morrison's low price strategy save them or finish them?

The man who has been crossing the channel for a pound a trip for twenty years

The government says its campaign to cut a billion units of alcohol is on track.

The London borough that's attempting to clamp down on so called 'buy to leave' property speculators.

What's the secret of staying power in London's West End.

A rise in online banking has led to an increase in consumer errors; what do you do if you pay money into the wrong account?


THU 12:57 Weather (b042j40p)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b042j40r)
Martha Kearney presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b042ldz4)
War

Martin Sixsmith looks at the ways in which war has influenced psychology.

He examines the impact of shellshock and the treatment methods of pioneer doctors like W.H. Rivers at Craiglockhart Hospital in Scotland. He talks to military psychiatrist and Falklands veteran Dr Morgan O'Connell and to Edgar Jones, Professor of the History of Psychiatry at Kings College London. And he explains how war changed society's attitude to mental health and boosted psychology as a profession.

Produced by Sara Parker
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b042l78g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b042ldz6)
The Sensitive

Underground Man, pt 2

2 /2. Two men are dead and the police are searching Glasgow's disused underground tunnels for their prime suspect, an injured ex-soldier. Psychic Thomas Soutar senses that danger is imminent - but the realisation comes too late to prevent his girlfriend, Kat, from disappearing. By Alastair Jessiman.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/director: Bruce Young.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b042ldz8)
Brooklands Racetrack

With the growing Formula 1 schedule and following, there's an increasing appetite for motor racing. Helen Mark heads to Weybridge in Surrey to visit Brooklands - claimed to be the world's first purpose-built motor racing circuit to hear how one Hugh Locke-King's passion for speed led him to have the track designed and built on his land, almost bankrupting him.

The site was used for land speed records even before the first race and also became a centre for aviation development. It reached its heyday in the 1920s and 30s but World War II saw it taken over by the Ministry of Defence and its decline as a circuit.

Enthusiasts from the Brooklands Society fought to preserve it - both by digging the track free of overgrowing weeds and by getting it listed - and the museum continues to celebrate the records and achievements marked in its history. Malcolm Campbell's grandson Don Wales shares about his family's love of the track.

Helen Mark heads to the track in style - in a 1929 four and a half litre Bentley - to see how it's used today. Members of the Vintage Sports Car Club (VSCC) take tests, both of vehicles and drivers, around planned courses but how will Helen fare on her spin up test hill and the historic banking?

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b042cs5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b042d57p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b042ldzg)
Frank; Miyazaki; Lesbian Cinema

With Francine Stock.

Frank is the story of a singer who never takes off his over-sized papier mache head, on-stage or off. The director Lenny Abrahamson reveals why the film is only partly based on singer Frank Sidebottom, who also wore an over-sized papier mache head and had his own television programme in the 1990s.

Stacie Passon, the director of Concussion, discusses her new drama about a suburban mother who becomes a call girl for other affluent women, and shares her reservations about the celebrated gay film Blue Is The Warmest Colour.

As his last film, The Wind Rises, is released in British cinemas, The Film Programme presents a guide to the world of master Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki.

The Film Programme finds out how The Creepy Guys got on in the awards ceremony for Sci Fi London's 48 Hour Film Challenge.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b042ldzj)
Colin Pillinger; Fire? Artificial DNA

Artificial DNA
DNA is the molecule of life, conserved across all living species for 4 billion years. But now scientists have made a new, artificial version, by introducing two extra letters, not found in nature, into the genetic code of a common microbe.
The E. coli bacteria are able to grow and replicate as normal despite these artificial additions.
In future, this research might create organisms that can make new proteins, which could offer new drugs and vaccines.

What is fire?
A listener wrote in to ask about fire – what is it? And what is the difference between a super-hot gas and plasma? We went straight to Dr. Guillermo Rein, Mechanical Engineer at Imperial College and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Fire Technology. It turns out, they’re great questions and even the experts can’t quite agree on the answers.

Obituary - Colin Pillinger
British planetary scientist Professor Colin Pillinger, best known for his 2003 attempt to land a spacecraft on Mars, has died aged 70. .

Oxford Maths Institute
The new Maths Institute at Oxford University is named the Andrew Wiles Building, after the mathematician, who solved Fermat’s Last Theorem. The Institute includes some nods to other mathematical theories included in the design. From the never-ending Penrose paving at the entrance to lighting based on solving complex equations and mathematical illusions build into the construction. The architects hope the building will inspire the next generation of mathematicians.

Carlos Frenk
Professor Carlos Frenk, astronomer at Durham University has just joined the ranks of Steven Hawking, Edwin Hubble and Albert Einstein by winning the Royal Astronomical Society’s Gold Medal for Astronomy.


Producer: Fiona Roberts


THU 17:00 PM (b042ldzm)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b042j40t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Cabin Pressure (b01qjc6k)
Series 4

Yverdon-Les-Bains

Sitcom by John Finnemore about the pilots of a tiny charter airline.

Love is in the air as Douglas and Herc fight it out over the fruit tray, and hope springs eternal as Martin has the interview of his life.

Cabin Pressure is a sitcom about the wing and a prayer world of a tiny, one plane, charter airline staffed by two pilots: one on his way down, and one who was never up to start with. Whether they're flying squaddies to Hamburg, metal sheets to Mozambique, or an oil exec's cat to Abu Dhabi, no job is too small, but many, many jobs are too difficult.

Written by John Finnemore
Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for the BBC.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b042ldzr)
Jennifer's had enough of all the kitchen work, so joins Adam taking a few sheep back out. David is out on the tractor for Adam. David meets Charlie who's not really happy with the work so far but turns on the charm a bit. He says he's grateful to David for helping out, as Adam is clearly struggling.

David and Brian comment on young-looking Charlie, who seems a bit of a tyrant. Adam's annoyed to be told to rework the tilth to make it finer, but Brian says Charlie has a point. It's not what Adam wants to hear.

David grills Brian about plans for the new road. Brian says he knows nothing and David speculates on Damara being involved.

Jennifer is getting miffed with all the kitchen renovation, and has started to understand Brian's displeasure. They've dealt with serious delays and the place is a mess. Jennifer complains to Pat, who politely declines the offer of Jennifer's old kitchen. Jennifer apologises for being thoughtless. Pat clearly has more important things (Tom) on her mind.

Jennifer unintentionally upsets Pat by talking about the time Kate went missing and a body had to be identified. She was trying to be reassuring, as Kate was ok. Jennifer tries to reassure Pat that Tom will turn up.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b042ldzt)
Yinka Shonibare, Water Babies, Akhil Sharma, women film directors

The artist Yinka Shonibare MBE talks to Kirsty Lang about his latest work The British Library, a study of immigration in Britain, currently showing at the Brighton Festival. US Novelist Akhil Sharma's new novel Family Life is based on his own family history and the tragedy of his brother's death, so why a novel rather than a memoir? A new report released this morning highlights a significant lack of female film directors on the big and small screen. Drama director Beryl Richards reflects on the findings. And as a new musical version of The Water Babies opens this week at Curve Theatre in Leicester, which features a waterfall, video projections of the performers singing under water and a hologram of Richard E Grant, the director, video designer and one of the actors discuss the mixture of musical theatre and special effects.

Producer Jerome Weatherald
Image: The British Library by Yinka Shonibare MBE.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b042ldyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b042ldzw)
Jihadi Converts

Converts to Islam are far more likely to be involved in terrorist incidents than those who were born into Muslim families: converts account for around a quarter of terrorist convictions in Britain since 9/11 yet they represent only 2-3% of the UK's Muslim population.

As the anniversary of the murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby by two Muslim converts approaches, the Today programme's Zubeida Malik investigates why new Muslims appear to be so vulnerable to the call of jihadi recruiters. She hears the stories of converts lured by extremists and talks to terrorism expert Professor Peter Neumann.

Producer: Anna Meisel.


THU 20:30 In Business (b042ldzy)
The Sharing Economy

Home swaps, driving your neighbour's car, private car parking in your drive, even renting your neighbour's clothes. They are all part of a new style of collaborative enterprise in which nearly everyone can join and (maybe) make money: the 'shared economy'.

It's breaking cover, growing fast and could be important. Perhaps the best known example is Airbnb but many more companies have sprung up allowing people to share their things and even their time. And now companies are trying to make money out of what makes all this sharing possible: trust.

But existing regulations and laws are set up for traditional businesses such as hotels and car hire companies, and that is causing problems. Peter Day investigates the opportunities and snags of the sharing economy and asks if it could become a big democratic movement.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b042ldzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b042ldyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b042j40w)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b042lfkf)
Nigeria's President says he will find the kidnapped schoolgirls.
Human rights abuses in South Sudan.
Protecting marine life in Costa Rica.
Can rude shop assistants boost sales?
With Caroline Wyatt.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b042lfkh)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 9

Apocalyptic thriller by the award-winning author Louise Welsh.

Stevie Flint has survived 'The Sweats', a deadly virus that is decimating the population of London. Despite the danger, she is completely focused on investigating the mysterious death of her boyfriend. Searching for clues, she has sought help from Iqbal, an IT expert, to access her murdered boyfriend's laptop. But now Iqbal isn't answering his telephone and Stevie fears that something bad has happened to him, too.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Writer: Louise Welsh

Abridger: Sian Preece

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 23:00 A Short Gentleman (b019rqh1)
Episode 4

QC Robert's nemesis approaches, along with Edward, basset hound of doom.

Hugh Bonneville stars as Robert Purcell, QC, a perfect specimen of the British Establishment, who applies faultless legal logic to his disastrous personal life.

Conclusion of Jon Canter's comic novel 'A Short Gentleman' adapted by Robin Brooks.

Robert Purcell ..... Hugh Bonneville
Geoffrey ..... Paul Moriarty
Father ..... James Hayes
Elizabeth ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Judy ..... Tracy Wiles
Pilkington ..... Ewan Bailey
Sergeant Carl Prekopp
Isbabel Lauren Mote
Max Ted Allpress
Alan ..... Gerard McDermott

Director: Jonquil Panting

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b042lflt)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 09 MAY 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b042j41t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b042ldys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b042j41w)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b042j41y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b042j420)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b042j422)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b042lmsl)
A short reflection and prayer with Andrea Rea.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b042lmsn)
Discards ban, Wind turbine subsidies, Young Farmers in the charts

British fishing fleets are demanding clarity and detail on the discards ban which comes into effect for some fisheries next year, and all of them by January 2016. The European-wide ban on throwing unwanted fish back into the sea followed a high profile campaign, but fishermen who met in London this week say they're not clear on how it will work. Barry Deas, chief executive of the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations, tells Charlotte Smith why he thinks some discarding should still be allowed to protect certain fish stocks. Fisheries minister George Eustice gives his response.

Sarah Falkingham has a report from a Wind Farm Open Day in West Yorkshire where farmers are being urged to submit applications, in case the Conservative Party's pledge to end subsidies for new on shore turbines comes to pass. The Party say there is enough wind power to meet EU energy targets so they won't subsidise new turbines if they win next year's general election.

And rapping farmers! Essex Young Farmers are hoping their charity single 'Put That Hoe Down' will make it into the top 40 this weekend, to coincide with the national Young Farmers AGM in Blackpool. Remember...you heard it on Farming Today first.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0423j3r)
Pied Flycatcher

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the pied flycatcher. The pied flycatcher is the voice of western woods, as much a part of the scenery as lichen-covered branches, mossy boulders and tumbling streams. When they arrive here in spring from Africa the black and white males, which are slightly smaller than a house sparrow, take up territories in the woodland and sing their lilting arpeggios from the tree canopy.


FRI 06:00 Today (b042lmsq)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b041vcq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b042lmss)
Eleanor Marx: A Life

Love and Betrayal

Rachel Holmes's new book is the engaging and informative life story of the remarkable daughter of Karl Marx. Today, the poignant conclusion finds Eleanor betrayed and humiliated by the man she loves.

Read by Tracy-Ann Oberman
Abridged by Julian Wilkinson
Produced by Elizabeth Allard


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b042lmsv)
Lily Cole

Model and actor, Lily Cole, talks about her role as one of the world's most beautiful women - in her first full stage debut as Helen of Troy.

It's recently been reported in the American press that gun ownership among women is on the rise. Why are so many women in the US taking up the right to bear arms?

It's forty years since four Swedes won the Eurovision Song Contest and went on to make pop history. Agnetha, Bjorn, Benny and Anni-Frid - went on to become one of the most successful bands of all time. How key were the two women to the Abba phenomenon?

Mikey Cuddihy was orphaned at the age of nine and adopted, along with her four siblings by her uncle,Tom. At the time she was living in the US, but shortly after her uncle adopted her, she found herself on an unexpected trip to England and installed at Summerhill School in Suffolk, the experimental school that believed and still does, that children's motivation comes from within, lessons are optional, and the children make up their own rules.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b042lmsx)
HighLites: Wash and Blow

Episode 5

by Steve Chambers and Phil Nodding. 5/5 After a difficult week Shirl has a lot on her mind and it looks like Bev is heading for a showdown.

Produced by Jessica Dromgoole and directed by Colin Guthrie.


FRI 11:00 Bird-Mothers of the Border (b042lmsz)
The German city of Saarbrücken is separated from the French town of Saarguemines by just 20 kilometres... and a whole host of cultural differences regarding motherhood. On the German side of the border, the term "raven-mother" has long been used to stigmatise mothers who work. On the French side, women risk being perceived as "mother-hens" if they stay at home to look after their children.

Change, however is in the air.

In Germany, demographic angst is forcing policy-makers to embrace new initiatives designed to make it easier for women to combine a family with a career. Suddenly, the country's raven-mothers have found themselves a whole host of high-placed allies who are looking to France's state-funded childcare system for inspiration.

Meanwhile, babies are causing a flap on the other side of the border too - but for very different reasons. There, French feminist thinker Elisabeth Badinter has issued a warning that France's inclement economic climate is leading a new generation of women to reject the uncertainty of the workplace for the security of the home. Mother-hens are on the rise and, according to Badinter, nothing less than France's proud feminist legacy is at stake.

Zoe Williams presents a tale of two cities, and two groups of women revolting against the status-quo. Raven-mother or mother-hen: Which role would you choose?

Producer: Kate Schneider
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Guests Are Like Fish (b042lmt1)
Episode 1

Guests are like Fish by Shelagh Stephenson

When ANNA and JIM left London to move to the country, they blithely issued invitations to come up and see us any time to all and sundry.

Unfortunately, most of those who take them at their word are the ones they never in a million years dreamt would turn up, with predictably disastrous results.

Each weekend, over 4 episodes, a different couple pitches up on their doorstep demanding food, more food, wine and roaring fires, when what they really need is prolonged therapy. And each week Anna and Jim swear they'll never do it again...Guests, like fish, tend to go off after three days.

Directed and producer by: Eoin O'Callaghan
A Big Fish production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b042lp8r)
Cohabiting legal issues, University fees, Smartphone love

How co-habiting is causing issues after a partner dies.

Also, why some students are unhappy after their course is changed AFTER they have paid, and can your phone find love?


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b042lp8t)
Gwen and Clive - Perfect Harmony

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a theatrical couple who met on stage in Oklahoma at Drury Lane in 1948 and have been together ever since, proving once again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b042j424)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b042j426)
Shaun Ley presents national and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b042lp8w)
We Do What We're Told

Following the Second World War, psychologists wanted to understand how so many ordinary Germans could have agreed to participate in the Nazis' atrocities.

Martin Sixsmith looks at their attempts to explain the banality of evil, including the controversial experiments of Stanley Milgram and Philip Zimbardo. And he talks to Oxford Professor Miles Hewstone about how far social psychology has come in clarifying how we think and act within a group.

Series consultant, Professor Daniel Pick, Birkbeck, University of London.

Produced by Sara Parker

A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b042ldzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b0151t3t)
Stephen Wyatt - Strangers on a Film

By Stephen Wyatt. To accompany Radio 4's Classic Chandler season, Patrick Stewart plays Raymond Chandler and Clive Swift is Alfred Hitchcock in their famous collaboration on 'Strangers on a Train'. In 1950, Alfred Hitchcock invited Raymond Chandler to work with him on a screenplay based on Patricia Highsmith's novel. Chandler was not only recognised as a fine novelist and had also received an Academy Award nomination for his original screenplay, The Blue Dahlia. The omens were good but their collaboration turned out to be a disaster.

Directed by Claire Grove.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b042lp8y)
Postbag Edition from Kew Gardens

Eric Robson hosts this correspondence edition from Kew Gardens. Matt Biggs, Pippa Greenwood and Matthew Wilson explore the extensive grounds, stopping off along the way to tackle questions sent in by post, email and Twitter.

Also this week, Matt James meets the American Ambassador and is given exclusive access to a very special London garden.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. I am moving into my new home in Newcastle with a south facing garden 9m (30ft) by 10m(33ft) enclosed by a high fence and a brick wall. I would like advice about the type and positioning of an apple tree. I love Egremont Russets so would like to know if this is a suitable location for such a tree.
A. It would be best to grow a variety of trees trained against a wall as espaliers or cordons. A free standing tree will take up too much room in the garden. Make sure you get some suitable pollinators in the area. This variety will grow well in the north-east of the country, and you could also try Ashmead's Kernel or Ribston Pippin.

Q. Could the panel suggest some plants that will survive the heat of a care home and still give colour and maybe scent?
A. Most plants will struggle to survive in warm, dry conditions all year round. Even Succulents and Cacti need a colder spell. Go for some summer flowering plants like Kalanchoe. You could also try Stephanotis although it is not an easy plant to grow. You can provide the humidity it will need by standing it in a tray of water or misting it.

Q. Could you suggest any trailing plants that could be planted inside ugly pots to disguise the outside? They are about 1ft (0.3m) high by 1ft (0.3m) in diameter and are concrete. The soil depth is about 50cm (19inches).
A. Ivy would be a good option as it is fast moving, self-clinging and affordable. You could add some summer flowering annuals such as Nasturtium, trailing Lobelia or trailing Geraniums such as Ivy Leaf. Aubretia would be a more permanent option.

Q. I have two apple trees in pots. Moss has started to grow in the pots, and so this year I want to plant something under the trees that will both discourage the moss and benefit the soil. Could the panel suggest something?
A. Firstly try to remove the moss without disturbing the apple tree roots. Bedding plants are the best option and there is something to suit everyone. Later on in the year try winter bedding such as Pansies or Pom Pom Daisies. Make sure that you give trees in pots a little bit more food and moisture.

Q. My garden is 13m long by 8m wide. The local council are going to build a school the other side of my fence which will be as tall as the house. What can I plant at the bottom of my garden that will grow rapidly and provide a good screen?
A. Try a variety of trees, as a hedge will simply provide a block shape rather than break up the view. Make yourself aware of the high hedge legislation. Try the River Birch for its great autumn colour. Also think about using Conifers or a Thuja. You could try a good species of Hornbeam which can be lightly clipped to create leaf retention in the autumn.

Q. I have struggled to grow grass on a south facing front lawn. I have re-seeded several times but it always dies off. We have discovered that there is about two inches of soil above what appears to be builders' rubble. What could we grow there instead of a lawn?
A. You need to remove some of the rubble because you don't know what is hidden and it could be mildly toxic or alkaline. Then try adding good quality topsoil. Mediterranean plants would usually grow well in these conditions but be careful if the soil has become very heavily compacted. Too much moisture may build up over winter and cause root death. Try Escholtzia from seed.


FRI 15:45 State of the Nation (b042lp90)
A Glass of Cold Water

In the last in a series of stories looking at the lives of those living on the economic margins of society, a young labourer tries to find solace and work in austerity-struck rural Wales.

Cynan Jones is the acclaimed author of four novels. His first novel, 'The Long Dry' won a Betty Trask award. His most recent novel is 'The Dig', of which Jon day in The Telegraph said: 'The Dig is more than a bleak portrait of what is now called the "rural economy". It is a book about the essentials: life and death, cruelty and compassion. It is a book that will get in your bones, and haunt you.'

Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Robert Wilfort
Writer: Cynan Jones


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b042lp92)
Sir George Christie, Leslie Thomas, Elena Baltacha, Sir William Benyon and Deborah Rogers

Matthew Bannister on

Sir George Christie, who ran the Glyndebourne opera at his family home in Sussex - and oversaw the rebuilding of the theatre.

Leslie Thomas, the Barnado's boy who drew on his experience of National Service to write The Virgin Soldiers. Frederick Forsyth and Sir Tim Rice pay tribute.

Deborah Rogers, agent to many leading writers. Ian McEwan and Dame Gail Rebuck remember her.

Sir William Benyon, the Conservative MP who championed Milton Kenyes and re-built the family's estate.

And Elena Baltacha, Britain's former number one tennis player, who died of liver cancer aged thirty.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b042lp94)
Food Bank Britain

Recent newspaper headlines tell us a million people are using food banks in Britain. Labour say it's a disgrace and getting worse, and the Prime Minister says the figure rose tenfold under Labour.

Are any of these numbers right? What do we really know about how many people are using food banks, and does this tell us anything about whether food poverty is increasing?

Tim Harford remembers Gary Becker, the Nobel prize winning economist who did more than anyone else to extend the tools of economic analysis to the problems of everyday life.

Alex Bellos tells the story of The Man Who Counted, a book of 'Arabic' mathematical tales. The book's author became a superstar in Brazil, but he also had a surprising story of his own.

And was Roger Bannister really the first person to run a four minute mile, or did 18th century fruit and vegetable seller James Parrott beat him to it? We hear the case in Parrott's favour from a former Olympic sprinter with a passion for 18th Century running statistics.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b042lp96)
Lynne and Glennice - Odd One Out

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a 37 year old widow and her mother about her dependency on her parents, and how their coupledom only serves to emphasise her own loss -
another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b042lp98)
Carolyn Quinn presents coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b042j428)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b042lp9b)
Series 43

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guest Nick Doody for a comic romp through the week's news. With Mitch Benn, Pippa Evans and Jon Holmes.

Written by the cast with additional material by Jane Lamacraft, Andy Wolton and Glenn Moore. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b042lp9d)
Eddie and Clarrie reminisce about the 1970s. Clarrie wonders where the years went, as they reflect on being working grandparents.

David's concerned about the new road plan. Susan's keen on the local investment, but Jill's not. Emma sings Jill's praises for being a party food inspiration, with Clarrie's 70s party coming up. Eddie has a fancy dress idea.

Susan and Clarrie gossip about worried Pat. She has been distracted at work, making odd little mistakes.

Shula's worried that Dan is struggling with Army life. The pace is relentless. Dan has made a friend though. Shula feels Alistair isn't bothered. Dan reminds Shula of Mark. She still thinks the Army is an infatuation and hopes it's short-lived.

Tony's pleased to point out their first Aberdeen Angus calf - new life at Bridge Farm. Tony's optimistic that things are going right at last. But Pat's still worried about Tom not coming back.

The organic inspector's coming next week. Tony's up to speed but Tom mustn't leave them in the lurch on his side of things. Pat's relieved to hear from Tom, but he's non-committal. Tony's getting worried about the inspection and the fear of Tom letting his business go down the tubes, on top of everything else.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b042lp9g)
Hofesh Shechter at the Brighton Festival; Michael Jackson's Xscape; South African theatre; Advanced Style

Acclaimed choreographer Hofesh Shechter talks to Kirsty Lang in his role as Guest Artistic Director for this year's Brighton Festival, and for her report she also visits a disused beer depot which is staging a production of Sir Harrison Birtwistle's chamber opera Down by the Greenwood Side. Also tonight, a review of Michael Jackson's second posthumous album Xscape; 20 years after Nelson Mandela's inauguration, young South African playwrights Amy Jeptha and Napo Masheane respond to the change their country has witnessed; and blog-turned-film documentary Advanced Style follows the sartorially elegant older women of New York.

Producer: Ellie Bury
Presenter: Kirsty Lang.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b042lmsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b042lp9j)
Ken Clarke MP, Vernon Coaker MP, Natalie Bennett, Paul Nuttall MEP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Worksop College in Nottinghamshire with Minister without Portfolio Ken Clarke MP, Leader of the Green Party Natalie Bennett, Deputy Leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall MEP and Shadow Defence Secretary Vernon Coaker MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b042ls0j)
The Paradox of Growing Old

Mary Beard reflects on recent TV programmes and newspaper articles about what's going on in care homes for the elderly.

She says she believes that in a few hundred years' time, "our treatment of old people will be as much of a blot on our culture as Bedlam and the madhouses were on the culture of the 18th century".

But she also argues that our view of dementia is a sanitized one. She says we have to recognize that dementia can make its sufferers truculent and aggressive...something that most of us - not just care workers on a minimum wage - would find very difficult to deal with.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b042ls0l)
Omnibus Edition

Episode 3

In the third week of his series about the history of psychology and the mind, Martin Sixsmith turns his attention to experimental psychology, starting with its foundations in the early philosophers and Victorian popular psychology.

He looks at the way medical cases in the 1800s began an understanding of different areas of the brain, how new ways to measure time helped German psychologists like Wilhelm Wundt to assess the speed of thought as well as the impact of Sir Francis Galton's statistical mass observations in Britain and how across the Atlantic, behaviourism gave way to the 1960s cognitive revolution which still influences thinking today.

He examines the influence of war and the rise of social psychology post war with controversial experiments which attempted to explain how so many ordinary Germans could have agreed to participate in the Nazis' atrocities.

Produced by Sara Parker
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b042j42b)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b042ls0n)
Amnesty International says the Nigerian military failed to act on warnings about the raid in which more than two hundred schoolgirls were kidnapped. A spokesman for the Nigerian government tells us the Amnesty claim is baseless. Despite President Putin asking separatists in eastern Ukraine not to hold votes on whether to split from the country, they are still going ahead. Andrew Hosken reports from Donetsk on how people feel about what the separatists are calling referendums. The Giro d' Italia cycle race began on the streets of Belfast. It's a gruelling race, but can it be as bad as the 1914 version? Only eight riders finished. The travel writer, Tim Moore, rode the 1914 route... on a 1914 bike. And with the European Elections only a couple of weeks away, what's troubling the the voters in Finland? Paul Moss went to find out. With Philippa Thomas.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b042ls0q)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 10

While London burns, Stevie Flint closes in on two of her boyfriend's medical colleagues, convinced that one of them is his killer. Apocalyptic thriller by the award-winning novelist Louise Welsh.

Read by Nadine Marshall

Abridged by Sian Preece

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b042jhlm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b042ls0s)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b042ls0v)
Claude and Tiah - Better Than Me

Fi Glover with a father and daughter from Chapeltown who are determined to resist the stereotypes of absent fathers and failure they believe people expect from their part of Leeds - another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b042j8y5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b042j8y5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b042jfw5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b042jfw5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b042jpk0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b042jpk0)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b042ldyy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b042ldyy)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b042lmsx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b042lmsx)

8.51 to Brighton 00:30 SUN (b01l7wwc)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b041yr94)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b042ls0j)

A Short Gentleman 23:00 THU (b019rqh1)

Act Your Age 23:00 TUE (b00zsjz7)

Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section 18:30 TUE (b042jhzs)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b042jn7j)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b042jn7j)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b042cq8c)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b041yr92)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b042lp9j)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b042cq8t)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b042ldzj)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b042ldzj)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b042cs59)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b042cs59)

Bird Island 19:15 SUN (b042l2xt)

Bird-Mothers of the Border 11:00 FRI (b042lmsz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b042jcxx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b042jn7n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b042l78s)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b042lfkh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b042ls0q)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b042bjzl)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b042j8y1)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b042j8y1)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b042jfw1)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b042jfw1)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b042jpjw)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b042jpjw)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b042ldys)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b042ldys)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b042lmss)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b042d57p)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b042d57p)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b042cs5p)

Cabin Pressure 18:30 THU (b01qjc6k)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b041vcqk)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b042jhlh)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b042jhlh)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b041ybj7)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b042ldz0)

Cyprus: Divided Memory, United Future? 20:00 TUE (b042jn7d)

Don't Start 19:30 SUN (b01ml8b3)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0156mty)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b042jhlc)

Drama 14:15 WED (b042l782)

Drama 14:15 THU (b042ldz6)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b0151t3t)

Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side 23:00 WED (b042l78v)

Essex, My Essex 23:30 MON (b03w38q3)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b042cq7x)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b042j8xv)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b042jfvv)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b042jpjp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b042ldyl)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b042lmsn)

Food and Farming Awards 15:00 MON (b03nycpj)

Four Thought 22:15 SAT (b041yjnw)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b042l78n)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b042cq87)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b042jcxq)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b042jjxc)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b042l78j)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b042ldzt)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b042lp9g)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b041yf8l)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b042lp8y)

Getting the Picture 11:30 THU (b03q6bqj)

Gloomsbury 11:30 WED (b042jpk4)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b042jhlm)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b042jhlm)

Guests Are Like Fish 11:30 FRI (b042lmt1)

I, Regress 23:15 WED (b018xs90)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b041yjyk)

In Business 20:30 THU (b042ldzy)

In Defence of Pushy Parents 11:00 WED (b042jpk2)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b042ldyq)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b042ldyq)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 MON (b042j8yf)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 TUE (b042jhl9)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 WED (b042l24h)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 THU (b042ldz4)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 FRI (b042lp8w)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 21:00 FRI (b042ls0l)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b042jn7g)

Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different 21:00 MON (b041xbxc)

Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different 11:00 TUE (b042jhl3)

Isy Suttie's Love Letters 18:30 WED (b042l78d)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b041yf8q)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b042lp92)

Leader Conference 20:00 WED (b042l78l)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b042cs5f)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b042cq8m)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b041yrd6)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b042cqd7)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b042j3w8)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b042j3xp)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b042j3yz)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b042j40c)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b042j41t)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b042jpjt)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b042jpjt)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b042l784)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b042cq89)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b042cq89)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b041yf8s)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b042lp94)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b041yrdg)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b042cqdh)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b042j3wj)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b042j3xy)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b042j3z7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b042j40m)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b042j422)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b042cqdk)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b041yrdj)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b042cqdp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b042cqdt)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b041yrf1)

News 13:00 SAT (b041yrds)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b041yjy5)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b042ldz8)

PM 17:00 SAT (b042cq8k)

PM 17:00 MON (b042jcxb)

PM 17:00 TUE (b042jhlp)

PM 17:00 WED (b042l78b)

PM 17:00 THU (b042ldzm)

PM 17:00 FRI (b042lp98)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b042d6xg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b041yrk9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b042j8xs)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b042jfvs)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b042jpjm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b042ldyj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b042lmsl)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b042cq8p)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b042cq8p)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b042cq8p)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b042cs5k)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b042cs5k)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b042cs5k)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b042cq8f)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b042cq81)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b042cq8r)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 MON (b042j8y9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b041yrdb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b042cqdc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b042j3wd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b042j3xt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b042j3z3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b042j40h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b042j41y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b041yrd8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b041yrdd)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b041yrdv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b042cqd9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b042cqdf)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b042cqdy)

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