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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 26 APRIL 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0418zs8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b0418wy7)
The Land Where Lemons Grow

Episode 5

A journey to Calabria, in the deep south of Italy, to discover one of the rarest and most precious of citrus fruits: the bergamot.

Bergamot is the product of a natural cross-pollination between a lemon tree and a sour orange that occurred in Calabria in the mid-seventeenth century. It's very particular about its environment and fruits successfully only on a thin strip of land that runs for seventy-five kilometres from the Tyrrhenian coast to the shores of the Ionian Sea.

Mixing travel writing, history and horticulture, Helena Attlee's celebratory journey through Italy explores the special place that citrus holds in the Italian imagination.

Read by Francesca Dymond

Written by Helena Attlee

Abridged by Laurence Wareing

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron

First broadcast on Radio 4 in 2014.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0418zsb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0418zsd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0418zsg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0418zsj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0419018)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b041901b)
'He says I'm a liar and it's all made up. I'm going to have to prove that it isn't.' One listener describes facing her father in court. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0418zsl)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0418zsn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b0418rck)
Walking on Water, Isles of Scilly

Without quite walking on water, Helen Mark uses a very low spring tide to walk between Tresco and Bryher, two of the Isles of Scilly. She meets people who delight in what is revealed on the seabed, such as 3,000 year old Neolithic field walls, indicating the time when the islands were a single landmass.
Local harbour master Henry Birch stands with Helen at the mid point between the islands which normally sits 5 meters below the sea.

Helen hears how it's all possible because of what must surely be one the best words to have up your sleeve during a game of Scrabble: syzgy, which is when the sun, moon and earth are aligned creating the extreme highs and lows known as spring tides.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b041txvf)
Great British Beef Week

To mark Great British Beef Week, Charlotte Smith visits beef farmer Tom Jones and some of his pedigree herd of Hereford and Dexter cattle at the foot of the Black Mountains in Powys.

Tom sells his beef direct to top London restaurants, farms without subsidy and openly admits he's not a fan of continental cattle, choosing only to rear native breeds. So how does he make his business work? While moving a lazy hereford bull called Kingmaker and a feisty dexter heifer onto fresh pasture, Charlotte hears how Tom went from studying drama to selling joints of beef.

Tom is the first to admit he's a romantic when it comes to farming, describing the bucolic sight of hereford cows grazing on a summer's evening. But he's a business-minded pragmatist too and, donning his butcher's apron, shows Charlotte how to cut up a forequarter of hereford beef.

And we look back at a week of special reports including a beef open day in Gloucestershire and a discussion about continental versus native cattle breeds.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0418zsq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b041txvh)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b041txvk)
Alex Bellos

Rev Richard Coles and Andrea Catherwood with maths writer Alex Bellos, English-speaker Caroline Sarll who decided to bring her children up to be bilingual, Charlie Corr whose childhood dream came true when he met Pele, Frank McCauley from lowly Salford City FC who've caught the eye of Manchester United's famous 'Class of '92', Ken Jones who was caught in an avalanche, and Simon Duncan and Mark Atkinson whose band's name earned them a Banksy. Plus the Inheritance Tracks of writer and broadcaster Judy Finnigan.

Alex Bellos's new book is Alex Through the Looking-Glass. His first maths book was the hugely acclaimed Alex's Adventures in Numberland. He set up favouritenumber.net, a global survey to find the world's favourite number. His book on Brazilian football Futebol: The Brazilian Way of Life has been revised and updated with a new chapter for the 2014 World Cup. He ghostwrote Pele: The Autobiography. He blogs about maths for The Guardian.

On June 25 1966, 13 year-old Charlie Corr ran onto the pitch at Hampden to meet his football idol Pele. The moment was captured on camera and the picture was printed recently in the Sunday Mail in Scotland.

Caroline Sarll and her husband are both native English speakers but she decided to bring up their two daughters to be bilingual in German.

Ken Jones survived an avalanche in Transylvania in 2003. His book Darkness Descending is out now.

Simon Duncan and Mark Atkinson's original band name was Exit Via The Giftshop. They changed it to Brace Yourself and gained a Banksy

Writer and broadcaster Judy Finnigan's book Eloise is out now.

Frank McCauley has been involved with Salford City FC for 30 years and is now a member of the committee.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 Zeitgeisters (b03z081s)
Series 2

Sonia Friedman

BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz meets the cultural entrepreneurs whose aesthetic sense infects and influences our daily lives... who know what we want, even when we do not... the men and women whose impact goes beyond mere commerce, it shapes contemporary culture.

Programme 4. Sonia Friedman - the prolific West End and Broadway producer whose shows Ghosts, Chimerica, Book of Mormon and Merrily We Roll Along have just scooped fourteen Olivier awards. In fact, it was Laurence Olivier who interviewed her for her first job as a stage manager at the National Theatre. Since when she co-founded the theatre company Out of Joint before forming her own production company in 2002 and becoming possibly one of the most powerful impresarios of the West End and Broadway.

Producer: Clare Walker.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b041txvp)
Zooming Out

It is easy to be hoodwinked into thinking the world you see and experience is the most important part of reality. This week you are invited to leave the perspective of earth and zoom out into space to discover what can be seen from thousands of miles away. Joining Bridget Kendall for the journey are space archaeologist Sarah Parcak, artist Mishka Henner, and cosmologist Max Tegmark. (Photo: Planet Earth from space courtesy of Nasa/ Getty images)


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b041txvr)
Dilemma in Damascus

Despatches: Syrians, exhausted by a seemingly unending conflict, face agonising decisions over their future, Lyse Doucet. Misha Glenny's in Rio as violent protests continue less than two months before the Brazilian city hosts the World Cup. The far-right Front Nationale could emerge from next month's European elections as the best-supported party in France -- Emma Jane Kirby encounters Euroscepticism, verging on Europhobia, in the south of the country. Matthew Teller's in Qatar: its economy's growing at nearly twenty per cent a year but its people are finding it hard to cope with a rapid pace of change. And Simon Worrall in the United States hears a love song as he witnesses the annual migration of Hispanic workers to Long Island.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b041txvt)
Selftrade, Co-Op Bank, Pensions advice, Buy-to-let

SELFTRADE
Customers of the online investment platform Selftrade have been complaining about being told they must answer 39 detailed personal questions about their identity and wealth or risk having their accounts and their investments frozen. They say many of the 39 questions are unnecessary and intrusive such as 'total net worth' and 'over what timeframe was this wealth generated?' and in which country did it arise. Why are they being asked these questions? And does the firm have the right to do so under threat of freezing their assets?

CO-OP BANK
The Labour Party stamped its foot this week and announced it will leave the Coop Bank - and take its overdraft with it. The party cites 'commercial reasons'. Some local authorities have already gone. So should individual Co-op customers leave too? Just how safe is money/mortgage/loan/insurance/funeral plan with the Coop Bank or Group?

PENSIONS ADVICE
The Chancellor promised in March that everyone reaching pension age would be given "free, impartial, face-to-face advice" about what to do with their pension pot. And he would spend £20 million working out how to achieve it. One of the first things the money was used for was to change the word 'advice' to the word 'guidance'. And to describe the pensions industry as 'cool' on the idea would be to redefine absolute zero as quite chilly. So will it happen? And how?

BUY TO LET..
...or borrowing to invest as it might be called, was invented 18 years ago by mortgage lenders and the lettings industry to help people buy property on a mortgage to rent it out - and to boost both their businesses. The industry wants to celebrate this 'coming of age' by showing that buy to let is one of the best asset classes when it comes to getting a return on an investment. But is it?


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b0418x6g)
Series 43

Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by special guest Holly Walsh for a comic romp through the week's news. With Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin and Jon Holmes.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Sarah Morgan, Carrie Quinlan and Kev Core. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0418zss)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0418zsv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b0418xyk)
Grant Shapps MP, Tim Aker, Baroness Grender, Dan Jarvis MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Casterton Business and Enterprise College in Great Casterton, Rutland with the head of the UKIP Policy Unit Tim Aker, the new Lib Dem Peer Baroness Grender, Shadow Justice Minister Dan Jarvis MP and the Conservative Chairman Grant Shapps MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b041txvw)
UKIP, zero-hours contracts, threats to world peace, wind farms

This week UKIP suspended a council candidate for sharing "repellent" views on Twitter. Your views on whether cases like this distract from its message on immigration.
Labour has pledged to act against zero-hours contracts, employers and employees discuss the issue.
Listeners discuss whether Tony Blair was right to say whether the West must put aside differences with Russia to join forces against the threat of Islamic extremism.
And do you agree with the government's decision to stop subsidising onshore wind farms and concentrate instead of offshore wind?
Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Angie Nehring

PHONE: 03700 100 444 (Lines Open at 1230pm)
EMAIL: any.answers@bbc.co.uk
TWITTER: Tweet us using hashtag BBCAQ.
TEXT: Text us on 84844.


SAT 14:30 Roddy Doyle on Radio 4 (b041v063)
The Guts

Twenty six years on and we are back in Dublin with Jimmy Rabbitte, the ex-manager of The Commitments. Jimmy is now 47, married to Aoife and has 4 kids. Life has been rather good since we last met him, keeping a foot in the music industry and doing well during the boom. However, life is about to change for them all as Jimmy has just discovered he is ill. This is a story about friendship and family, about facing death and opting for life and maybe, just maybe, realising you can still live the dream.

Going To Hell was performed by More Than Conquerors.
Adapted by Peter Sheridan
Producer: Gemma McMullan
Directed by: Eoin O'Callaghan.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b041v09k)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Juliette Binoche; Midwives; Victoria Coren

Juliette Binoche - star of The English Patient and Chocolat on her latest film 'A Thousand Times Goodnight' in which she plays a war photographer torn between her job and a family worried for her safety.

At the Liverpool Women's Hospital we discuss midwife shortages in England with Cathy Warwick from the Royal College of Midwives, Head of Midwifery at the hospital Cathy Atherton and Dr Dan Poulter, the health minister with responsibility for maternity.

Victoria Coren Mitchell on why her latest European Poker Tour victory is even more significant to her than her first.

One of the Woman's Hour Game Changers, Julie Bailey on her Cure the NHS campaign.

Textile designer and fashion icon, Celia Birtwell on what clothes and fashion have meant to her during a long career. And we discuss the origins of an enduring wardrobe staple, the Breton stripe with fashion editor Melanie Rickey and fashion historian Amber Butchart.

Ben Harper and his mother Ellen tell us why they've collaborated on an album for the first time and sing Learn It All Again Tomorrow.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b041v272)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news, presented by Emma Jane Kirby.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b041901b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0418zsx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0418zsz)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0418zt1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b041v276)
Brenda Blethyn, Marion Bailey, Phina Oruche, Emma Freud, Birds of Chicago, La Chiva Gantiva

Clive Anderson is joined by Brenda Blethyn, Marion Bailey and Emma Freud for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Birds of Chicago and La Chiva Gantiva.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b041v278)
The Glazer Family

The owners of Manchester United find themselves under the spotlight once again following the sacking of manager David Moyes, Alex Ferguson's replacement. American billionaire Malcolm Glazer and his family faced a hostile reaction from many fans when they took over the club in 2005. The Glazers control a large business empire in the US including shopping centres and an American football team, The Tampa Bay Buccaneers. They have attempted to keep their liives private but have been unable to avoid media attention. Jo Fidgen talks to friends, foes and observers.

Produced by Rebecca Kesby.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b041v27b)
John Simm in Prey; Privacy at the Donmar; Simon Armitage's Troy; Exhibition; Chris Marker

Privacy is a new play at London's Donmar Warehouse, looking at the way we inadvertently give away valuable private information through our use of modern communication technology - phones, computers. Is this a surprise?

Director Joanna Hogg's third film, Exhibition, continues her exploration of a very British awkwardness in the ways we relate to each other and our environment. It's a quiet film but does it have an important message?

The Last Days of Troy is Simon Armitage's theatrical reimagining of Greek Legend; telling timeless tales in modern language.

John Simm plays a policeman framed for a crime he didn't commit and determined to clear his name in Prey. The creative team behind it have tried to make it edgier and visually unconventional. Is it a cut above the usual police drama?

Chris Marker was a French artist whose work influenced film-makers including Terry Gilliam and James Cameron. An exhibition at London's Whitechapel Gallery looking back at his life is crammed full of imaginative peculiarities and controversial items.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b041v27d)
The Siege of Dien Bien Phu

After the humiliations of WW2 France was insistent on reasserting itself as a world power. In their Vietnamese colony the nationalists led by Ho Chi Minh were just as determined to gain independence. The showdown to a seven-year guerrilla war came in 1954 at the battle of Dien Bien Phu. Survivors, politicians and historians explain how the horrors of a 56-day siege ended with the French garrison being virtually wiped out. In Paris desperate politicians even considered using American atomic weapons to try to save Dien Bien Phu.

Julian Jackson, Professor of Modern French History at Queen Mary, London, recounts how French soldiers lost an empire in the mountains of Vietnam and how 60 years later the defeat still resonates in contemporary France. For the other European powers it marked the beginning of the end for their colonies in Africa and the Far East. Dien Bien Phu was the first time native forces had defeated a modern well-equipped army. The lessons were not lost on rebels from Kenya to Malaya.

It also had profound implications for the onset of the Cold War. In Washington the battle led to President Eisenhower's first articulation of the domino theory about the possible expansion of communism. For Moscow and Beijing, Dien Bien Phu represented a great leap forward. For the USA the political vacuum left by the French abandonment of Indochina was to lead to their own 10-year war in Vietnam.

Produced by Keith Wheatley
A Terrier Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b0414qty)
Ring for Jeeves

Episode 1

Brilliantly funny comedy-thriller.

Jeeves is on loan to young Lord Rowcester (Bill). Wooster is absent, attending a school designed to teach the aristocracy to fend for itself. Jeeves has to exert his gigantic fish-fed brain to help his new master raise money by selling his crumbling pile to a wealthy American widow.

She thinks the Abbey is wonderful, full of ghosts. (Her hobby: psychic phenomena.) Will she buy it? There are complications. It's damp. She has fibrositis. Plus Bill's fiancée Jill mistrusts 'Rosie's' motives. There's also bluff Captain Biggar on the trail of a bookie and his clerk, who conned him at Epsom races and have somehow gone to ground in the Abbey. They are in fact Bill and Jeeves. Will he unmask them? Will Jeeves be on hand to provide more than brandy?

Dazzling star cast; witty production. Martin Jarvis having played Jeeves on Broadway now brings his award-winning characterization to the Classic Serial, abetted by Rufus Sewell, Joanne Whalley, Glenne Headly, Jamie Bamber and Ian Ogilvy.

Dramatised by Archie Scottney
Director Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4

RING FOR JEEVES. R4 Classic Serial - 2 Episodes

Episode 1 - Sun 20th April 3pm. Wk 16. Rptd 9pm Sat 26th April 2014. Wk 17.
Episode 2 - Sun 26th April 3pm. Wk 17. Rptd Sun 4th May 9pm. Wk 18.

An all-star cast brings P.G. Wodehouse supremely funny 1950s horse-racing novel to galloping life. Dramatised by Archie Scottney. Jeeves, on loan to young Lord Rowcester (Bill), devises a plan to assist his impoverished new master sell his crumbling pile to a wealthy American widow. But will she buy it?

There's also White Hunter Captain Biggar on the trail of a bookie and his clerk who conned him at Epsom races. Who are they? Could they in fact be Bill and Jeeves? Will the captain unmask them? Will Jeeves and his gigantic fish-fed brain win the day?

Finally our impeccable 'gentleman's personal gentleman' has a solution to dazzle and amaze us all. A stellar cast in Rosalind Ayres' sparkling production. Martin Jarvis, having played Jeeves on Broadway and in various one-man performances, now brings his award-winning characterisation to the Classic Serial, abetted by Rufus Sewell, Joanne Whalley, Glenne Headly, Jamie Bamber, Christopher Neame and Ian Ogilvy.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0418zt3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Would That Work Here? (b0418p7y)
Japan: Cashless Community Care for the Elderly

Japan: cashless community care for the elderly

Claire Bolderson concludes a series of thought-provoking debates which look at something another country does well, or differently, and ask would that work here?

The UK, like many countries, faces the problems of an increasingly ageing society. The number of people aged 65 and over is projected to rise by 23% from 10.3 million in 2010 to 16.9 million by 2035. How can we provide and pay for their care?

Japan is at the forefront of the ageing crisis, with the highest proportion of elderly citizens in the world. By 2030, almost a third of the population will be 65 or older. At the same time the overall population is shrinking, leaving fewer young working people to shoulder the burden of paying for care for the elderly.

One creative response to this challenge at local level has been a cash-less system of time-banking. Under the fureai kippu system, individuals donate time to looking after the elderly, and earn credits which they can - in theory at least - "cash in" later for their own care, or transfer to elderly relatives in other parts of the country.

Could something similar work here, or do we have very different attitudes to community and volunteering? Who would benefit from such a cash-less scheme, and who might lose out? Could it be scaled up to meet the escalating needs of a growing elderly population?

Produced by Ruth Evans and Jennie Walmsley
A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b0415hbb)
Series 4

University of Bedfordshire

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from the University of Bedfordshire, "The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Psychology, Theatre and Sports Science and the questions involve Konstantin Stanislavski, Geoff Hurst, osmium and cauliflowers.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

In this series, the universities are Bristol, Kent, Bedfordshire, Birmingham, Nottingham & Aberystwyth.

Overflow (incl Cast Lists)

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. As well as "The Now Show" he has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, on subjects as varied as "The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen" and "Getting The Gongs" - an investigation into awards ceremonies - as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's 2008 Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called "The Genuine Particle". This makes him the perfect host for a show which aims to be an intellectual, fulfilling and informative quiz, but with wit and a genuine delight in exploring the subjects at hand.

The 3rd Degree is a Pozzitive production, produced by David Tyler. His radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, The Brig Society, Thanks A Lot, Milton Jones!, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, My First Planet, The Castle and even, going back a bit, Radio Active. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul & Pauline Calf Video Diaries, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b0414qv2)
Series 3

Episode 3

In Belfast, Paul Farley and fellow poets remember Seamus Heaney six months after his death. With contributions from Michael Longley, Don Paterson, Leontia Flynn and Ciaran Carson. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 27 APRIL 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b041v2dx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 8.51 to Brighton (b01l7mc3)
Along the Line, by Alison Fisher

A series of short stories written by new writers to radio. Each writer has taken the 8.51 to Brighton and given the journey their own twist, introducing us to characters whose lives have changed by taking that particular train.

Episode 1 of 3: Along the Line by Alison Fisher.
This is the story of generations following in each others footsteps. How journeys are repeated time after time and extraordinary things happen in unextraordinary ways. The 8.51 to Brighton has meant more to the family in Alison Fisher's story than they will ever know.

Read by Deborah Findlay and recorded in front of an audience at The Old Courtroom as part of 2012's Brighton Festival. The stories are introduced by Lynne Truss.

Director: Celia De Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041v2dz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041v2f1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041v2f3)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b041v2f5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b041v54q)
St Wilfred's, York

The bells of St Wilfred's Roman Catholic Church, York.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b041v278)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b041v2f7)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b041v54s)
The Elephant

Mark Tully investigates the significance of the ancient cultural and spiritual connections between humans and elephants.

Demon, god, Lord of the Jungle, beast of war and of servitude, both temple and carnival attraction, the elephant inspires awe, affection and fear in equal measure. We worship elephants and enslave them, love them and kill them in their thousands.

In conversation with photographer, conservationists and founder of The World Wide Fund for Nature, Belinda Wright, he discusses the myriad qualities of the elephants of Asia and Africa.

The programme includes literature and music from Africa, India, Europe and America, with work by D.H Lawrence, Heathcote Williams, George Orwell, Jack Mapango, Claude Debussy, June Tabor and Henry Mancini.

The Readers are Adjoa Andoh, Michael Feast and Francis Cadder.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b041v54v)
Mendip Voles

Living World presenter Chris Sperring this week joins Dr Fiona Mathews, Senior Lecturer in Mammalian Biology at Exeter University on a quest to unravel the secrets behind one of the most abundant if secretive mammals in the UK - the vole. Travelling to the Mendip Hills in Somerset their journey begins with the knowledge that there are five types of vole found in the UK, water voles, bank voles, Orkney voles, Guernsey voles and field voles; five species not to be confused with similarly sized mice. At nearly 1000 feet above sea level, the Mendip Hills is a hotspot for both field and bank voles and as Chris and Fiona set out to see a vole for themselves it proves much harder than they think. Despite an estimated population of 75 million field voles in the UK these animals lead a precarious and all too brief life. Living for just a few months voles are prolific breeders and populations can fluctuate up to tenfold on a three to four year cycle which can have drastic effects on the species which prey on them including arguably Britain's most loved bird, the barn owl.

Produced by Jim Farthing.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b041v2f9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b041v2fc)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b041vcpx)
Canonisations of Popes John XXIII and John Paul II

As Pope Francis prepares to make history by canonising Popes John XXIII and John Paul II in front of millions in Rome today, Edward Stourton talks to Cardinal Vincent Nichols about what this event means for the Catholic Church. We have live reports from William Crawley in Rome and the BBC's Adam Easton in Poland. The BBC's Rome Correspondent, Alan Johnson, reports on the build up to this historic event in Vatican City and Trevor Barnes assesses the life of Pope John XXIII.

Also in the programme Rahul Tandon gives Edward Stourton an update on the on-going Indian Elections, the Church of England explains why it continues to invest in Wonga and Baroness Cox and lawyer Aina Khan discuss why Sharia Councils are unfairly treating Muslim women seeking divorce settlements.

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox
Producer: Peter Everett

Contributors:
John Thavis
Cardinal Vincent Nichols
Baroness Cox
Aina Khan.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b041vcpz)
The Prison Radio Association

Jon Snow and Lyn Knapton present The Radio 4 Appeal for the Prison Radio Association.
Registered Charity: 1114760 (England/Wales).
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Prison Radio Association'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b041v2ff)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b041v2fh)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b041vcq1)
Mass from Our Lady and the English Martyrs, Cambridge reflecting on saints present and past: St Thomas and Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII. Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor describes the atmosphere in Rome as two former Popes are canonised today. Father Christopher G. Colven from St James's Roman Catholic Church, Spanish Place in London gives the homily. Monsignor Peter Leeming presides. The Director of Music is Nigel Kerry. The organist is James Dixon.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b0418xym)
Mile Milestone

Mary Beard looks forward to the 60th anniversary of the first "four minute mile". But in the midst of the celebrations, she argues that we should also remember that Roger Bannister's victory was a "glaring display of class division".

Maybe appropriate then that this month also sees the return of that "wonderful working-class... comic-strip hero, Alf Tupper".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcdf)
Little Grebe

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the little grebe. Little grebes are our smallest grebes. They're dumpy birds with dark brown feathers and in the breeding season have a very obvious chestnut patch on their necks and cheeks. Little grebes are secretive birds, especially in the breeding season when they lurk in reeds and rushes or dive to avoid being seen.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b041vcq3)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b041vcq5)
Helen and Alice come to the rescue.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b0076y1y)
World Cup 1966

Even if you weren't there, or watching it on television, even if you weren't born on the 30th July 1966, it's a date etched on the heart of every England football fan. It's the day England, at Wembley, after progressing through a tournament full of controversy, excitement and some extraordinary upsets, won the World Cup.

Inside the stadium were almost 94,000 fans. On television, the audience was 400 million. Watching it now, it seems somehow more than four decades away. It's not just the grainy black and white film - it's the cropped hair and short shorts of the players, the lack of logos on the England shirts - just three heraldic lions; it's also the measured, understated commentary of Kenneth Wolstenholme, all on his own throughout the match.

The goals, when they came, produced little jumping about and no hysteria - it was more a case of a rather satisfied jig. When Bobby Moore took the trophy from the Queen and held it up for the crowd to see, he didn't forget to wipe his hands first. It was, without doubt, England's greatest sporting victory.

In this episode of The Reunion, originally transmitted in 2006, Sue MacGregor gathers five men - three of them players - who made that day so extraordinary.

Hat-trick goal scorer Sir Geoff Hurst, and his fellow West Ham player Martin Peters; George Cohen, known as Mr. Dependable, who played for Fulham; the man in charge of BBC television's coverage of the match, Alan Weeks; and one of the all important admin men - the team liaison manager for the London matches throughout the tournament, Alan Leather.

Producer: Chris Green
Series Producer: David Prest.
THE REUNION is a Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b0415hbl)
Series 13

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Alex Horne, Lucy Beaumont, John Finnemore and Jack Dee are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Legs, The Internet, Dogs and The Middle Ages.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer - Jon Naismith.
A Random production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b041vcq9)
Plantains and pleasure; Jamaican food in the UK

Tim Hayward on the evolution of Jamaican food in the UK with chefs and cooks in Bristol.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b041v2fk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b041vcqc)
News and analysis presented by Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 India Uncorrupted? (b041vcqf)
It's one of the most exciting general elections that India has ever seen, thanks to a new party born out of the India Against Corruption movement that swept the country in 2011. The Aam Aadmi Party - the party of "the common people"- is challenging everything about how politics is done in India. Although the party is not predicted to win many seats this time, it is constantly in the media and has radically changed the political debates of this Election with its message of transparency, accountability and addressing the needs of India's poorest.

With an old fashioned twig broom as its logo and a white Gandhi cap with the words "I am a common man" as its trademark, the new party seems to have captured the mood of the country. But how lasting will its impact be beyond the General Election? Mukti Jain Campion reports from New Delhi.

Producer Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise Production.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0418wym)
Nissan Car Factory

Peter Gibbs presents GQT from the Nissan Car Factory in Sunderland. Taking audience questions are Matt Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank.

Bob Flowerdew takes on the ultimate scrapheap challenge, and Matt Biggs gives advice on transporting plants from the garden centre.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. What should I plant in my garden to get colour in the Autumn?
A. You could try planting Chrysanthemums, in particular Korean Chrysanthemums. You could also try Dahlias. Asters also bring colour in the autumn months. Aster Andenken An Alma Pötschke is a particularly bright variety, as are the King George Aster, the New England Aster and the Aster Michaelmas Daisy. You could also try planting Nerines, the Clerodendrum Bungei is a good variety.
All these plants will need hardier plants nearby to provide wind protection. Sea Buck Thorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides) would be a good option.

Q. Could the panel suggest vegetables to grow in a shady garden?
A. Most vegetables will have a hard time growing in the shade. It would be better to grow soft fruits such as Raspberries, Blackcurrants, Tae Berries, Strawberries and Bramble Berries which all grow well in dappled shade. You might also try growing Mint, Parsley, Jerusalem Artichokes and Globe Artichokes. To increase the light in the plot, you could paint the walls white to increase light reflection. Raising the bed would also increase light exposure.

Q. Could the panel recommend a perennial Fuchsia that would thrive on a south-facing wall in a pot?
A. The gold-leafed Fuchsia Magellanica would be a good option when put with some Actea (formerly known as Cimicifuga). Lady Boothby and Lady Bacon are also good varieties.

Q.I have been growing Marigolds alongside my tomatoes to keep away the white fly, but have recently read criticisms of this technique. What is the panel's opinion on companion growing to keep away garden pests?
A. French or African Marigolds will keep the whitefly away. Petunias can also trap white fly and green fly to prevent the spread of this pest, as will types of White Tobacco.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b041vcqh)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover introduces conversations from Cumbria, Wales and Leicester about life with unstable epilepsy, work with search and rescue dogs, and a family predisposed to adventure. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b041vcqk)
Ring for Jeeves

Episode 2

In this classic comedy-thriller Jeeves is on loan to young Lord Rowcester (Bill).

Jeeves is exerting his fish-fed brain to the utmost to assist Bill to raise money. His lordship must pay the debts he has accrued while working, in disguise, as an Epsom bookie. Might obtaining Rosie Spottsworth's valuable diamond pendant help? Would it be useful for Bill to dance the Charleston with Rosie? Could the ghost of Lady Agatha further the cause? Will Rosie purchase the Abbey?

Finally Jeeves has a solution to dazzle and amaze us all.

A stellar cast in Rosalind Ayres' sparkling production. Martin Jarvis as Jeeves now brings his award-winning Broadway characterization to the Classic Serial, abetted by Jamie Bamber, Joanne Whalley, Rufus Sewell, Glenne Headly, Christopher Neame and Ian Ogilvy.

RING FOR JEEVES. R4 Classic Serial - 2 Episodes

Episode 1 - Sun 20th April 3pm. Wk 16. Rptd 9pm Sat 26th April 2014. Wk 17.
Episode 2 - Sun 26th April 3pm. Wk 17. Rptd Sun 4th May 9pm. Wk 18.

An all-star cast brings P.G. Wodehouse supremely funny 1950s horse-racing novel to galloping life. Dramatised by Archie Scottney. Jeeves, on loan to young Lord Rowcester (Bill), devises a plan to assist his impoverished new master sell his crumbling pile to a wealthy American widow. But will she buy it?

There's also White Hunter Captain Biggar on the trail of a bookie and his clerk who conned him at Epsom races. Who are they? Could they in fact be Bill and Jeeves? Will the captain unmask them? Will Jeeves and his gigantic fish-fed brain win the day?

Finally our impeccable 'gentleman's personal gentleman' has a solution to dazzle and amaze us all. A stellar cast in Rosalind Ayres' sparkling production. Martin Jarvis, having played Jeeves on Broadway and in various one-man performances, now brings his award-winning characterisation to the Classic Serial, abetted by Rufus Sewell, Joanne Whalley, Glenne Headly, Jamie Bamber, Christopher Neame and Ian Ogilvy.

Dramatised by Archie Scottney
Director Rosalind Ayres
A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b041vcqm)
Sadie Jones, Peter Buwalda, Will Self

Mariella Frostrup talks to Sadie Jones, author of The Outcast, about her latest novel Fallout, which tells the story of four young friends trying to forge their way in 1970s London theatreland. She discusses what drew her to a decade when radical theatre makers challenged the system, why romantic love was so powerful, and destructive, then and recalls the music that fuelled the novel.

The best-selling 'Bonita Avenue', by the Dutch writer Peter Buwalda, has taken Europe by storm and is now being published in English. He reveals why he chose to put internet porn at the heart of a novel which many have compared to Franzen and Roth and he discovers something he didn't know about his own work.

Does where you write, shape what you write? Will Self takes listeners on a tour of the garrett that has been his bolthole for nearly twenty years. And the renowned publisher, Philip Gwyn Jones, tips a forthcoming book for this year's prizes.

Producer: Di Speirs.


SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b041vcqp)
Series 3

Cross-dressing Poets

Paul Farley asks some poets, Kate Clanchy Adam Foulds and Patrick McGuinness, about their trafficking in prose. What does moving from one to the other do to each? Meanwhile the artist Richard Long reads some of his walks in words. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 Teachers vs Government: Seventy Years of Education Policy (b03ynt6y)
The 1944 Education Act laid the foundations for the modern education system. It extended free secondary education to all and introduced the tripartite system (grammar, technical and modern). It also set in train a common national distinction between primary and secondary education at 11.

It was welcomed by teachers as it recognised the importance of education for all children and it was a consensus policy that was part of the optimism about what could be achieved after the war.

But fifty years later the relationship between the teaching profession and the Government had changed to be one based on conflict. In 1999 David Blunkett was booed at the NUT conference and taunted with chants of "bring back the Tories". When the electorate finally did give the teachers a Conservative Education Secretary, relations between the Government and the teachers sank to an all-time low.

Roy Blatchford is Director of the National Education Trust. He has worked in education over the last five decades as a teacher, head teacher and inspector. In this programme he tells the story of modern education from 1944 to the present day and how it went from consensus to conflict, and from a world where qualifications were for just a tiny elite to one where all students are in school or training until the age of 18, with close on 50% going on to higher education. He speaks to key decision-makers from the period, including several former secretaries of state to ask how much of the original vision has survived and what the story of education over the last 70 years tells us about what the future might hold for Britain's schools.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b041v278)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b041v2fm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b041v2fp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041v2fr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b041vcqr)
This past week brought a moving programme based on the Welsh choral classic Myfanwy. And a wonderfully comic series of dramas written by and starring Rebecca Front and her brother Jeremy. We also heard: Jack Dee's masterclass in the art of the put-down; the Indian jazz trumpeter Chic Chocolate, the Satchmo of Bombay; and the man who teaches Glaswegian English to newly-arrived Polish bus-drivers.
All that and Kenneth Branagh ablaze in Shakespeare.
Produced by Dave James

Word of Mouth
Open Country
The Land Where Lemons Grow
Bombay Jazz
Tittle Tattle
A Gripping Yarn
Drama on 3: Antony and Cleopatra
The 18th Century Season
Soul Music
Would That Work Here?
15 Minute Drama - Incredible Women
The Unbelievable Truth
Composer of the Week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b041vcqt)
Tom's hiding away from everyone except for Roy. He's desperate to explain things to Kirsty, but Roy tells him she's in Costa Rica with a friend. Tom knows no one wants to see him - Helen's not responding either. Tom feels sick as he looks around at the pile of presents and thinks about the wedding debt. Roy gets on the case returning gifts to try to salvage funds.

People are gossiping and speculating on Brenda having something to do with Tom's decision to jilt Kirsty. Roy tells Kenton it's not true. He implores him to spread that message and head off the rumours.

Pat's desperate to talk to Tom. Tony's bitter about Peggy and blames her for filling Tom with big ideas - helping Tom with money for his and Kirsty's house and contributing to the mounting problem. Tony tells Peggy this.

Kenton and David shift Phil's old piano back to Brookfield for Jill. Jill will now be staying in Pip's old room. Jill's happy to be home. Hearing the piano played (by Ben) is like having a bit of Phil back in the house.


SUN 19:15 Tim FitzHigham: The Gambler (b041vcqw)
Series 1

Episode 4

Comedian and adventurer Tim FitzHigham recreates an 18th Century bet, attempting to travel 25mph on water using only the means available to a gentleman in 1765. History books record of the original attempt, "Something snapped, there was a fatality and the wager was abandoned." Last in series.


SUN 19:45 Infinite Possibilities and Unlikely Probabilities (b041vcqy)
Serving Children

Three contemporary stories by Anita Sullivan - commissioned specially for Radio 4 - set in a seaside town and exploring a wider world that co-exists with our everyday lives.

Serving Children:

Lem waits tables at a local restaurant, but he brings so much more than food to the customers.

Anita Sullivan has written a number of plays and short stories for BBC Radio, among them 'Countrysides' (2011), 'The Last Breath' (created with Ben Fearnside, 2012) and the adaptation for 'An Angel At My Table', which won Best Audio Drama (series or serial) at the BBC Audio Drama awards in 2014.

Reader: Tom Riley

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b0418x12)
With The Archers taking a dramatic turn this week (switch off if you don't want to hear a spoiler before the omnibus on Sunday!), listeners question its recently appointed editor, Sean O'Connor, about whether he's making their favourite programme too tabloid. Are some characters undergoing personality transplants? And why, on Good Friday, were some Archers listeners left upset by what they felt was an irreverent approach to the Passion story?

Also this week, we hear from just some of the many listeners who felt that BBC Radio news went over the top with the story that Manchester United manager David Moyes' had been sacked. Football fans and phobics alike want to know why it was placed at the top of bulletins and news programmes throughout the day, rather than in the sports bulletin.

And Roger Bolton pays a visit to the nerve centre of BBC Radio 4 Extra to find out how they resurrect the radio legends of the past. The predominantly archive station is in its second decade, so are there still treasures to be found in the BBC archives? And is some comedy from a different era too offensive to be broadcast?

It's our last programme of this series but please keep your comments and questions about BBC Radio coming in. We'll be back in the summer.

Producer: Lizz Pearson
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b0418x10)
Mark Shand, Mrs Pilkington Garimara, Derek Cooper, Wally Olins, Julian Wilson

Matthew Bannister on

The playboy and conservationist Mark Shand who devoted his life to saving the Asian elephant.

The aboriginal author Mrs Pilkington Garimara, whose book "Follow The Rabbit Proof Fence" highlighted the experiences of Australia's 'stolen generation'.

The Radio 4 presenter Derek Cooper, who founded The Food Programme.

Wally Olins who pioneered the business of brand consultancy in the UK, advising companies like Bovis and British Telecom. Sir Martin Sorrell pays tribute.

And the BBC's former racing correspondent Julian Wilson.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b041txvt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b041vcpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b0418rd0)
Korea Change: The End of the South Korea Model?

South Korea is at a turning point. The country is one of the economic miracles of the twentieth century, transforming itself from extreme poverty at the end of the Korean War to one of the richest nations in the world. The government supported families to establish huge 'chaebol' companies which are now world renowned names such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. These companies epitomise the development of South Korea as a nation - Samsung started as a general store and is now one of the largest manufacturers of smartphones in the world.

However South Korea is now the country with the highest suicide rate in the world. The Koreans work the longest hours in the OECD group of rich nations and these chaebol companies are no longer creating enough jobs. Are these signs of a society in stress?

For In Business this week, Peter Day travels to Seoul to find out about the Korean government's strategy to solve these economic issues: 'The Creative Economy'. Korea aims to become Asia's 'start-up nation' in the next three years, and is throwing vast sums of money into the technology sector to encourage people to become entrepreneurs. But this is a career choice that has until recently been seen as a failing in South Korean society. Can a government change a culture?

How is the 'creative economy' working out? And what does Korea's experience tell other nations, such as China, which are en route to transform from a developing economy to a rich, established one?

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b041vcr0)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b041vcr2)
Kevin Maguire of the Mirror looks at how newspapers covered the week's big stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0418rcm)
Mia Wasikowska; Joanna Hogg; Neil Brand on Noah

Actress Mia Wasikowska talks about acting with camels in Tracks, the true story of Robyn Davidson who walked 1700 miles across the Australian desert.

Director Joanna Hogg discusses her latest dissection of middle-class alienation in Exhibition about two artists who have to leave their dream home, a modernist house in West London.

Composer Neil Brand unpicks Clint Mansell's score for Noah and discovers the "God chord".

The Film Programme follows two teams competing in Sci-Fi London's 48 hour film challenge, in which they have to make a short movie in only two days.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b041v54s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 28 APRIL 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b041v2gs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0418p7k)
The Ethnography Award 'Short List'

The Ethnography award 'short list': Thinking Allowed, in association with the British Sociological Association, presents a special programme devoted to the academic research which has been short listed for our new annual award for a study that has made a significant contribution to ethnography, the in-depth analysis of the everyday life of a culture or sub culture. Laurie Taylor is joined by three of the judges: Professor Beverley Skeggs, Professor Dick Hobbs and Dr Louise Westmarland.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b041v54q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041v2gv)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041v2gx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041v2gz)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b041v2h1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b041vhbx)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b041vvv9)
HS2 and Wildlife, Aphid Catching, Why Grass Matters

The Wildlife Trusts are demanding £420 million should be spent on conservation along the route of the HS2 rail line. MPs will debate HS2 later today.

The world's longest running insect survey turns 50 this week. Charlotte Smith visits the Aphid traps at Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire.

And, about 60% of UK agricultural land is grass. We begin a week examining this fundamental ingredient in milk and meat production.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:56 Weather (b041v2h3)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcnt)
Red-throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the red-throated diver. The eerie wails of a red-throated diver were supposed to foretell rain. In Shetland the red-throated diver is called the "rain goose" but anyone who knows the island knows that rain is never far away. Like all divers, red-throats are handsome birds with sharp bills, perfect for catching fish. In summer they have a rusty throat patch and zebra-stripes on the back of their neck but in winter they're mainly pearly grey and white.


MON 06:00 Today (b041vvvc)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b041vvvf)
The Future of Capitalism

Anne McElvoy talks to the social theorist Jeremy Rifkin who foresees the gradual decline of capitalism and the rise of a collaborative economy. As new technology enables greater sharing of goods and services, Rifkin argues that it provides a challenge to the market economy. The sociologist Saskia Sassen warns that the majority of people may not enjoy the fruits of this new world as increasing inequality, land evictions and complex financial systems lead to their expulsion from the economy. The Conservative MP Kwasi Kwarteng looks back at the history of international finance and how gold and war have shaped the economic order of today.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b041vvvh)
Richard Benson - The Valley

Episode 1

Abridged from Richard Benson's epic family saga The Valley, the focus of this Book of the Week is on the story of the author's grandmother - Winnie Hollingworth (1909 - 2002) - and her life in the mining villages of the Dearne Valley in South Yorkshire.

This remarkable social history draws on years of research, interviews and anecdote which chart generations of carousing and banter, tears and fights all set against the background of a close-knit community where almost everybody worked either in the mines or the mills.

Richard Benson's first book, THE FARM which related the story of his own parents and brother and their livelihood in the Yorkshire Wolds was described as ' an extraordinary mixture of hardness and tenderness, wit and slog.. wonderful ' Ronald Blythe author of Akenfield. It went on to be a no.1 bestseller.

This new book is a powerful and moving achievement - it follows Winnie from her first romantic encounter: 'her heart beating hard and fast down in her whalebone and elastic' to her final years sitting in the lounge of a long rubber-tiled room with high-backed chairs around the walls.. ' where 'the residents either roost mutely or chat while their eyes search the room for a younger person who might play the piano for them.'

Ep. 1 : Miner, Walter Parkin brings his wife Annie to the Dearne Valley; at the age of fourteen their daughter Winnie goes into service, but her father's unpredictable temper exacerbated by war injuries, does not make her life easy.

Read by Richard Stacey
Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b040yzlm)
Woman's Hour Takeover

J.K. Rowling

J.K. Rowling is our first Guest Editor.

Multiple Sclerosis affects roughly 100,000 people in the UK and three times as many women as men will develop the disease. The incidence of MS is higher in Scotland than in any other country in the world. J.K. Rowling's mum Anne died of an aggressive form of the disease nearly 15 years ago and in her memory she has helped to fund the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic, part of the University of Edinburgh, which is pioneering research into neural regeneration and patient care.

Her passion for Scottish Rugby is something that many fans may not know. We look at the current state of Scottish Women's Rugby, what is being done to make the sport more attractive to women and what needs to be done to help the sport grow more.

The UN estimates that up to eight million children around the world live in institutions. These are often called orphanages or children's homes, although at least four out of five of those children in institutional care have living parents. What's inspired J.K. Rowling to get involved with helping children reunite with their families?

Plus shoes. They hurt our feet and our bank balance, and yet to so many of us they are objects of desire. Jo is no exception, she's often wondered why women are so fond of this particular item of clothing. From high heels to statement brogues, we explore the complex and fascinating world of women and their relationship to their footwear and ask, what is the power and myth of the shoe?


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b041vvvk)
Le Donne

Episode 1

Set in modern day Naples - vibrant, picaresque, and for some, terrifying - where the Camorra has its hands in virtually every enterprise, - Series Two of 'Le Donne' ('The Women') focuses on Caterina Riccardi, a beautiful, privileged wife and mother. In Series One, she discovered that her husband Franco was actually a vicious Camorra boss. Her eldest son Nino was murdered and Caterina herself was forced to kill rival boss Vito Caporrino in an ultimately futile attempt to save her thirteen-year-old son Amedeo from being killed.

Now, she has to face the consequences of her actions, and come to terms with her grief and guilt while trying to maintain a close relationship with her daughter Antonella, who still believes that her father is innocent.

Torn between wanting to confess all to the authorities; run away and start a new life; or take on her husband's murderous mantle while he is in prison, Caterina finds her morality, courage and resourcefulness tested to the limit...

1/5. Set in contemporary Naples. With her husband Franco in prison, Caterina must decide whether to join the Camorra and become leader of the Riccardi clan.

Written by Chris Fallon. Based on an original idea by Rosalynd Ward and Chris Fallon.

Chris Fallon is a writer and director. He has previously written for film and television as well as writing adaptations for radio. He has sold and optioned scripts to Paramount and Warner Bros. His short film 'Killing Joe' was nominated for an Academy Award.

Original music composed and performed by Simon Russell.

Produced by Rosalynd Ward.
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b041vvvm)
Series 16

Getting the House Ready

74 year old Myf Barker is turning her enormous home into a wedding venue in the hope that it will make money. Kate Lamble meets the family and uncovers memories amid the chaos.

Purton House has been lived in by Myf, her late husband and her children for decades. It's a rambling family mansion with grounds, and an organic farm attached. But Myf has an eye to the future and wants to leave the house to her children as a viable business. So she's working to turn the property into a venue where weddings can be held and bridal families can stay the night.

Her main job is to convert the upstairs rooms so that they meet the standards of the most exacting couples. Old furniture has to be renovated, walls have to be painted and new bathrooms are being put in. Myf will even have to move out of her own bedroom which is being turned into a sitting room.

It's a daunting workload. Will it be ready on time?

Kate Lamble meets Myf, some of her grown up children including daughters Rowie and Talia and also Glenn, the son she fostered. She hears about the renovations and finds out what the house and its landscape symbolises for all of them, especially since the death of Rowie's husband Alex several years ago.

Producer; Emma Kingsley.


MON 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b041vvvp)
Series 1

Heart Failures

Episode 4. Heart Failures

It's the Edinburgh festival in episode 4 of Hilary Lyon's comedy narrative series, 'Secrets and Lattes' and it's drama and fireworks all round.

Business is booming in the Edinburgh cafe that erstwhile free spirit Trisha (played by Julie Graham) has recently opened with her sensible solvent older sister, Clare, (Hilary Lyon) but, sadly, things seem to be unravelling for everybody else on the personal front.

Trisha finds herself not only propping up her sister as she becomes increasingly distraught about her husband's behaviour, but she also ends up providing refuge for teenage waitress Lizzie ( Pearl Appleby) who, despite her buoyant facade, is definitely in need of some tlc.

Thankfully, temperamental opera-loving Polish chef, Krzyzstof (played by Simon Greenall) is back on top form again and it appears that, even for the broken-hearted, eating birthday cake and drinking fizz on the top of a hill can actually be good for you..........

Directed by: Marilyn Imrie

Producers: Moray Hunter and Gordon Kennedy
An Absolute production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b041vvvr)
Equity release mortgages

Equity release mortgages are getting increasingly popular but they come at a cost. Hear how you can get stung by big fees if you want to repay early. Despite new rules coming into force in January people are still getting big bills because their children are spending hundreds of pounds - often accidently - on online games. Plus, Talk Talk increases its broadband prices.


MON 12:57 Weather (b041v2h5)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b041v2h7)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b041vvvt)
Lock 'Em Up

This week, Martin examines the evolution of psychology's medicalised model, clinical psychiatry.

In this programme, he traces the origins of the asylum movement, visiting London's 'Bedlam' hospital, the York Retreat, the centre of 'moral treatment' in the late Eighteenth Century, and the dark Victorian buildings of the former Winwick asylum.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b041vcqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b041vvvw)
Higher

The Price of Partnership

Higher: Ep 1 The Price of Partnership by Joyce Bryant
Teaching has become a dirty word at Hayborough University and when a new Dean of Research Development comes on board she urges partnerships abroad. So an international research centre for Pier and Wharf ethics is mooted. The only problem is the person sent to set it up - academic snob and sociopath, Professor David Poll.

Produced by Gary Brown

More barbed satire from the higher education establishment ranked 132nd in the University league tables. The Department of Geography at the new University of Hayborough is under pressure to find new sources of funding and to broaden its horizons. So when a new Dean of Research Development, Cherry Swat comes on board she urges partnerships abroad. An international research centre for Pier and Wharf ethics is mooted in the African Republic of Epithea. Everything seems to be going smoothly for the university until they realise the student they have recently expelled just happens to be the President of Epithea's son.

Starring Sophie Thompson, Jeremy Swift and Jonathan Keeble.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b041vvvy)
Series 4

Aberystwyth University

A quiz show hosted by Steve Punt where a team of three University students take on a team of three of their professors.

Coming this week from Aberystwyth University, "The 3rd Degree" is a funny, lively and dynamic quiz show aimed at cultivating the next generation of Radio 4 listeners whilst delighting the current ones.

The Specialist Subjects in this episode are Welsh Literature & Folklore, Information Management and Art History and the questions involve alien visitations, a mechanical lifesize doll, a perfect circle, a shark, some scorpions and Swedish massage.

The show is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in a genuinely original and fresh take on an academic quiz. Being a Radio 4 programme, it of course meets the most stringent standards of academic rigour - but with lots of facts and jokes thrown in for good measure.

Together with host Steve Punt, the show tours the (sometimes posh, sometimes murky, but always welcoming!) Union buildings, cafés and lecture halls of six universities across the UK.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the 'Highbrow & Lowbrow' round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, film, and One Direction... In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, were particularly lively, and offered plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides...

The resulting show is funny, fresh, and not a little bit surprising, with a truly varied range of scores, friendly rivalry, and moments where students wished they had more than just glanced at that reading list...

In this series, the universities are Bristol, Kent, Bedfordshire, Birmingham, Nottingham & Aberystwyth.

Overflow (incl Cast Lists)

The host, Steve Punt, although best known as a satirist on The Now Show is also someone who delights in all facets of knowledge, not just in the Humanities (his educational background) but in the sciences as well. As well as "The Now Show" he has made a number of documentaries for Radio 4, on subjects as varied as "The Poet Unwound - The History Of The Spleen" and "Getting The Gongs" - an investigation into awards ceremonies - as well as a half-hour comedy for Radio 4's 2008 Big Bang Day set in the Large Hadron Collider, called "The Genuine Particle". This makes him the perfect host for a show which aims to be an intellectual, fulfilling and informative quiz, but with wit and a genuine delight in exploring the subjects at hand.

The 3rd Degree is a Pozzitive production, produced by David Tyler. His radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, The Brig Society, Thanks A Lot, Milton Jones!, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, My First Planet, The Castle and even, going back a bit, Radio Active. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul & Pauline Calf Video Diaries, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b041vcq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The First Action Movie (b041vvw0)
The Mottershaws of the Sheffield Photo Co. are not as famous as Hollywood but they made their mark.

Filmmaker Penny Woolcock brings the Mottershaws' most pioneering work back to life - a little-known silent film called Daring Daylight Burglary that they say influenced the classic Great Train Robbery.

Making it, the Mottershaws worked out how to tell fictional stories on location and tell them well: chase sequences, revenge motives, trains leaving stations pursued and just missed or caught as they pull away... these are just some of the thriller tropes we take for granted now: the Mottershaws made them work in 1903.

Two generations of Mottershaw did it, both called Frank, using a camera built by young Arthur. Penny meets the next two generations of Mottershaw, both still in pictures, father and son, both called John.

The Mottershaws' early films sold internationally, but then the States - with its sunshine and crowds and money - took over from European independents like the Sheffield Photo Co. What happened to the filmmakers, after their few years of success and to the Sheffield Photo Co?

With Judith Buchanan, Professor of Film and Literature at the University of York and Audio Descriptions by Radio 3's Louise Fryer.

Producer: Frances Byrnes

A Rockethouse production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in April 2014.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b041vvw2)
Series 5

Quantize

Aleks krotoski asks how human beings can cope with a world saturated by data. For some it is clay to be moulded and built with while for others it is the route to self knowledge. But it exists in overwhelming volumes like grains of sand on a beach. Turning it into things we can understand is now an imperative and artists and designers around the world are constantly looking for ways to summarise and symbolise what we are learning about the world around us through this tsunami of numbers.

The programme's contributors include designers Brendan Dawes and Nicholas Felton, Professor of philosophy at the Oxford Internet Institute Luciano Floridi, Scientist and composer Domenico Vicinanza, writer Amelia Abreu.
Producer: Peter McManus.


MON 17:00 PM (b042wv7q)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news, presented by Eddie Mair.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041v2h9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b041vvw6)
Series 13

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Lloyd Langford, Jon Richardson, Katherine Ryan and Graeme Garden are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as: Wales, Fish, Mouths and Perfume.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer - Jon Naismith.
A Random production for BBC Radio4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b041vvw8)
Jennifer's clearing kitchen space for the builders to start, although work is delayed until next week. Brian's sciatica plays up, partly from the strain of the tractor work he's doing for Adam. But also from bumping into all the kitchen clutter now occupying his office, he claims.

Jennifer's worried about Adam who is working to Charlie's long evening maize schedule. Exhausted Adam covers Brian's shift as well, as Brian's clearly suffering.

Helen and Rob fend off speculation from Clarrie, changing the subject from Tom and Kirsty to Clarrie's upcoming birthday. Helen asks Clarrie to make sure people know that Brenda had nothing to do with Tom and Kirsty's breakup.

Helen feels the emotion of Henry's first day at nursery but Rob can tell it's not the only thing tugging at her. Rob sympathises about how difficult things are for Helen regarding Kirsty. Helen's worried about her friendship. Could Kirsty really not ever want to see Helen again? Rob encourages Helen to let Kirsty cool off. He even has good words to say about Kirsty's character, despite not hitting it off at first. Rob's keen to help Helen and her family in any way he can. He's part of the family now.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b041vvwb)
David Haig; Ziggy Marley; Prey

In tonight's Front Row: David Haig talks to John Wilson about his play, Pressure - which he also stars in - about the weatherman who persuaded Eisenhower to postponed the D-Day landings because of an incoming storm; Ziggy Marley explains the importance of reggae in his music, and Sky's Special Correspondent Alex Crawford reviews A Thousand Times Good Night - starring Juliette Binoche as a photojournalist. Also in the programme: a review of ITV's new series Prey, with John Simm as a detective trying to clear his name.

Image Credit: Drew Farrell.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b041vvvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Suicide Watch (b041ysdk)
More American veterans of the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq dying by their own hands than dying in combat in recent years. What's behind the surge in suicides by veterans of America's wars of the 21st century?

Michael Goldfarb interviews veteran families who have lost children or spouses to suicide, speaks with military psychiatrists, and visits volunteer suicide helplines staffed by veterans to find out what stresses are unique to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. he asks, are today's young soldiers cut from a different cloth than those who fought in Vietnam or Korea?

He also looks ahead asking if the psychological traumas from service over the last 14 years are a problem that will continue to unfurl deep into the 21st century.

Producer: Julia Hayball
A Certain Height production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b0418rcc)
South Korea: Sex in the Sunset Years

It's the generation that raised South Korea from the ashes of war to one of the richest, most technologically advanced countries on earth. Even without a Confucian tradition of filial piety, you'd think they'd at least be made comfortable in their old age. But they're not. South Korea has the highest rates of suicide and relative poverty among seniors in the rich world. For some this has meant finding a second career to make ends meet. At a park in Seoul, Lucy Williamson finds an old profession getting some surprising new recruits.


MON 21:00 Save the Moon! (b0418kft)
Professor Chris Riley speaks to space lawyers, scientists and commercial spaceflight entrepreneurs and argues that we need to act now to preserve the Moon for all mankind.

There is a new race to the Moon. Companies around the world are competing to get there first and anyone with enough cash can book their place on a lunar break. Alongside tourism, there are commercial interests. The Moon contains valuable rare minerals as well as a potential source of fuel.

The Moon is under threat. It is supposed to belong to all of us yet thousands of people have already bought lunar plots. One former astronaut believes he can legally claim ownership of a piece of lunar soil.

As the Moon opens for business, so does the potential for commercial exploitation. What can be done to save it?

Producer: Sue Nelson
A Boffin Media production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b041vvvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b041v2hc)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b041vvwd)
Publicist Max Clifford guilty of sex offences.
Teacher at Leeds high school stabbed to death.
MPs debate HS2 rail link.
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b041vvwg)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 1

Apocalyptic thriller by award-winning novelist Louise Welsh.

At the height of a hot London summer, in which people are falling seriously ill from a highly contagious virus, TV shopping channel presenter Stevie Flint goes in search of her boyfriend, who has stopped returning her calls.

Louise Welsh is the author of six highly acclaimed novels including "The Cutting Room" and "The Girl on the Stairs". She is the recipient of several awards including The John Creasey Memorial Dagger, the Saltire First Book Award, the Glenfiddich/Scotland on Sunday, Spirit of Scotland Writing Award and the City of Glasgow Lord Provost's Award for Literature. In 2007 she was included in Waterstone's list of Twenty-five Authors for the Future.

Reader ..... Nadine Marshall
Abridger ..... Siân Preece
Writer ..... Louise Welsh
Producer ..... Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b0418kg6)
Scots

Michael Rosen goes to Glasgow to learn the language of Scots and discovers that Scotland's second language is enjoying greater usage among young people and foreigners. He speaks to Glasgow bus driver James Lillis who has been giving classes to Polish drivers to help them understand passengers, student Lorna Wallis whose online poem Tae A Selfie, written in the style of Robert Burns went viral, and to comedian Sanjeev Kohli, a proponent of the Scots vernacular.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b041vvwj)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster, as MPs return from their Easter break.



TUESDAY 29 APRIL 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b041v2j6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b041vvvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041v2j8)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041v2jb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041v2jd)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b041v2jg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b041vyyh)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b041vyyl)
Mango Ban, Flood-Fighting Grass, Leek Harvest

Imports of Indian Alphonso mangoes will be banned from Thursday to protect UK salad crops from an insect called tobacco whitefly, which transmits harmful viruses to tomatoes and cucumbers. Are product bans really the best way to protect Britain from invasive pests? Anna Hill hears from Uday Dholakia, chairman of the National Asian Business Association, who explains why the ban will deprive Asian communities of their "King of Fruits". He believes treating infested mangoes with either hot water or radiation is a more constructive way of ensuring safe supply chains. Anna also talks to Dr Helen Roy from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology who has given evidence to Parliament's Environmental Audit Committee on how well the UK is coping with the threat from invasive species.
Sarah Swadling has a report from a research site in Devon where Rothamsted Research and Aberystwyth University are trialling hybrid grasses which could help prevent flooding. Their deep root systems open up the soil structure - but will farmers buy into the science?
And we follow a group of 'gleaners' as they gather up fruit and vegetables that would otherwise go to waste.
Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Anna Jones.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcq9)
Fulmar

Series of stories about British birds, inspired by their calls and songs. Kate Humble presents the fulmar.


TUE 06:00 Today (b042wrmd)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b041w2p9)
Raul Midon

Raul Midón has been described by the New York Times as "a one-man band who turns a guitar into an orchestra and his voice into a chorus." He has collaborated with Herbie Hancock and Stevie Wonder, along with contributing to recordings by Jason Mraz, Queen Latifah and Snoop Dogg and the soundtrack to Spike Lee's She Hate Me. The New Mexico native, blind since birth, has released seven albums since 1999, including State of Mind, his break-through album

He tells Peter White about his determination to shatter stereotypes - including those encountered as a child when he was told that his blindness meant "you can't do this, you can't do that," He and his twin brother Marco are both blind - the result of damage caused after being placed in incubators following their premature birth. Their Mum, Sandra, was adamant from the outset that her sons should be given every opportunity to achieve and the boys eventually went on to college together.

Raul tells Peter of his shyness as a boy growing up in rural New Mexico and the wasted opportunities when it came to meeting girls, for example. But he embraces the life he has achieved and says that he would not take the chance to see if it was offered to him now: "My life has been set up around this and I would not want my life to be about figuring out how to deal with seeing - I want my life to be about what it's about right now."

Peter questions Raul about the benefits and disadvantages of having a twin brother who is also blind: "there was this knowledge that you weren't totally alone in the world as a blind person.".


TUE 09:30 Witness (b041xbx5)
The Fall of Idi Amin

In April 1979, the brutal Ugandan dictator, Idi Amin, was ousted by invading Tanzanian troops. It was the culmination of a six month conflict between the two countries, which had been triggered by Amin's ill-fated invasion of northern Tanzania.

In parts of Uganda, the invading troops were greeted as liberators. During the eight years of Idi Amin's rule, it's estimated that up to 400,000 Ugandans were killed by the regime.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b042bfnl)
Richard Benson - The Valley

Episode 2

Abridged from Richard Benson's epic family saga The Valley, the focus of this Book of the Week is on the story of the author's grandmother - Winnie Hollingworth (1909 - 2002) - and her life in the mining villages of the Dearne Valley in South Yorkshire.

This remarkable social history draws on years of research, interviews and anecdote which chart generations of carousing and banter, tears and fights all set against the background of a close-knit community where almost everybody worked either in the mines or the mills.

Richard Benson's first book, THE FARM which related the story of his own parents and brother and their livelihood in the Yorkshire Wolds was described as ' an extraordinary mixture of hardness and tenderness, wit and slog.. wonderful ' Ronald Blythe author of Akenfield. It went on to be a no.1 bestseller .

This new book is a powerful and moving achievement - it follows Winnie from her first romantic encounter: 'her heart beating hard and fast down in her whalebone and elastic' to her final years sitting in the lounge of a long rubber-tiled room with high-backed chairs around the walls.. ' where 'the residents either roost mutely or chat while their eyes search the room for a younger person who might play the piano for them.'

Ep.2. On a summer evening in 1929 Winnie goes to her first dance at the Miners' Welfare Hall.

Read by Richard Stacey
Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b040yzsh)
Woman's Hour Takeover

Kelly Holmes

Kelly Holmes focuses on one of the subjects she is most passionate about: healthy eating and wellbeing. What can we all learn from athletes about how exercise and staying motivated can change the game in our own lives?


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b041xbx9)
Le Donne

Episode 2

Set in modern day Naples - vibrant, picaresque, and for some, terrifying - where the Camorra has its hands in virtually every enterprise, from prostitution and drug running, to rubbish collection and street vendors. Series Two of 'Le Donne' ('The Women') focuses on Caterina Riccardi, a beautiful, privileged wife and mother. In Series One, she discovered that her husband Franco was actually a vicious Camorra boss. Her eldest son Nino was murdered and Caterina herself was forced to kill rival boss Vito Caporrino in an ultimately futile attempt to save her thirteen-year-old son Amedeo from also being killed.

Now, she has to face the consequences of her actions, and come to terms with her grief and guilt while trying to maintain a close relationship with her daughter Antonella, who still believes that her father is innocent.

2/5. Caterina is now the reluctant head of the Riccardi clan but rival family, the Caporrinos, pose a threat to her authority and possibly her life.

Written by Chris Fallon.
Based on an original idea by Rosalynd Ward and Chris Fallon.

Chris Fallon is a writer and director. This is his second series of 'Le Donne'. He has previously written for film and television as well as writing adaptations for radio. His short film 'Killing Joe' was nominated for an Academy Award.

Original music........................................Simon Russell.
Pianist...................................................Isobel Tombling

Producer/Director: Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different (b041xbxc)
Born Smart

To say one's child might be brighter than the norm is obnoxious. To suggest it's genetic, just adds insult to injury. To publish scientific findings confirming that the reason some children do better than others at school is due to differences in their DNA, is controversial. Share these findings with Michael Gove's education advisor and, it seems, you're asking for trouble. When, at the end of last year, scientists did just that, there was a furore: what if it leads to streaming at birth, gross inequality, eugenic dystopia?

Adam Rutherford charts the rise, fall and rise of scientific interest in this area over the last hundred years, picking his way through an inordinate amount of historical and political baggage to find out why we find it so difficult to have a sensible discussion about the genetics of intelligence.

At best, he might be told to check his privilege. At worst, he'll be a Nazi sympathizer. But for all Adam's liberal views, and perhaps because of them, he is determined to tackle this elephant in the classroom.

By pretending there are no differences between us, we risk other prejudices. Watching children work really hard and fail to achieve much academically is painful. At the lower end of the intellectual spectrum, there's broad acceptance that you don't shout at a child with special needs: "Could do better!". But in the middle of a middle class world hell-bent on creating little miracles, the notion that there are losers as well as winners in the genetic lottery, is not welcome.
Is a deep-seated and morally-upright desire for social justice a good reason to avoid a whole area of scientific inquiry? Let alone a rather less morally-upright desire for there to be no barriers, genetic or otherwise, to the genius of one's own children?

Scientists who studied the genetic basis of intelligence in the 70s and 80s describe how they were howled down by colleagues, accused of being Nazis, and victims of a scientific witch-hunt. The main focus of scientific interest was on things that could be changed: the environment at home or at school, our ability to nurture, not our nature. The social not the biological sciences.

Today, there's a renewed interest in our genetic inheritance: how it links us to our ancestors or an increased risk of cancer. And a tentative resurgence of interest in the genetics of intelligence.

One great fear is that the winners in this genetic lottery will become ever more advantaged and obnoxious. Not fears that were shared by Darwin's half-cousin, Francis Galton, who coined the term eugenics. In 1869, he published Hereditary Genius, the first scientific study of the inheritance of intelligence. Himself a child genius, he wondered if his prodigious talent was inherited from his very clever ancestors.

Worried by the poor quality of recruits for the Boer War, Galton fantasised about a world in which children were subjected to countless physical and mental tests. Those who were deemed fit were given permission to reproduce, while the unfit were sent to labour camps. Not surprising then that we are a bit anxious about the science of human genetics that he founded.

Today, worried that our children are falling behind in the global league tables on academic performance, perhaps we have our own fears about degeneration? Meantime, there's a renewed interest in standards and measuring in schools and in the genetic basis of intelligence.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b041xbxf)
Series 18

Adagio in G minor

Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor, is one of the most popular and moving pieces of music but, as academic and composer Andrew Gant explains, it wasn't written by Albinoni and is now attributed to the twentieth century Italian composer, Giazotto.

Award-winning veteran BBC foreign correspondent, Malcolm Brabant recalls the ' cellist of Sarajevo', Vedran Smailovic, playing it everyday for weeks amidst the wreckage of the beautiful city, as Serbian gunfire raged around.

Virginia McKenna explains how the piece became so special to her and her late husband, Bill Travers, who died twenty years ago this month, the piece was played at the beginning and end of his memorial service.

And TV producer, Gareth Gwenlan reveals why it was chosen as the theme for the character played by Wendy Craig, in the seventies sitcom, Butterflies.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b041xbxh)
Call You and Yours: Cancer Survival Rates

Cancer survival rates are improving constantly but there are concerns that improvements can still be made at the GP level. Why are our survival rates still lagging behind countries in Europe? Call 03700 100 444 [calls cost no more than to 01, 02 landline numbers] or email youandyours@bbc.co.uk.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b041v2jj)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b041v2jl)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b041xbxk)
The Cuckoo's Nest

From the late Eighteenth Century, the treatment - or containment - of mentally ill people was taken out of the hands of the church and into the hands of doctors.

Martin talks to psychiatrist Professor Tom Burns about changing models of treatment and to Joanna Moncrieff, author of The Myth of the Chemical Cure.

Producer: Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b041vvw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b041xbxm)
Higher

Restructure

Higher: Episode 2 Restructure by Joyce Bryant

The Vice Chancellor wants to restructure three departments into two, so one of the Deans is for the chop. Jim Blunt is determined it is not going to be him. But he hasn't reckoned on the Dean of Arts, baby faced killer Roland Keith Chubb.

Producer Gary Brown

The Vice Chancellor has to restructure the faculties of Arts, Humanities and Performing Arts into two faculties. This means "Scoping synergies using robust but flexible procedures so that they can maintain a missionary posture". In other words - someone's for the chop.

Meanwhile in Epithea David is preparing to launch his Centre for Pier and Wharf ethics. But the President keeps on mentioning 'Baksheesh'.

Starring Sophie Thompson, Jonathan Keeble and Jeremy Swift.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b041xbxp)
Series 5

Mystery

Josie Long investigates small mysteries in this sequence of mini documentaries.

Hearing tales of ghost ships, hidden underground kingdoms and the disappointment of discovering the banality of your family's secrets.

The items featured in the programme are:

Finding Sumo
Produced by Bob Carlson
First broadcast in 'Family Justice' on UnFictional:

Love Letters
Feat. Alan Dearn

Ryou-Un Maru
Produced by Martin Johnson

The Underground Kingdom
Feat. Ross Sutherland

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b041xbxr)
Chemical Weapons: 100 Years On

With the end of April being the deadline for Syria's President Assad to sacrifice his entire arsenal of chemical weapons, Tom Heap finds out the nitty-gritty of how they're going to be disposed of. This involves previously untried methods such as neutralising the most dangerous chemicals on board an American vessel, the MV Cape Ray. This, as we'll hear, presents its own problems. Other Syrian chemicals will be destroyed in Port Ellesmere in Cheshire, as well as in the United States, Germany and Finland.

Tom puts these efforts of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) into a historical perspective, exactly 99 years after the first recorded use of chemical weapons in Ypres during the First World War.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b041xbxt)
Time

Michael Rosen's version of a Brief History of Time, well sort of ...! He asks what is time and explores the words we use to talk about it. He looks at some of the earliest devices for measuring time and talks to some who believe they've got an answer to the question of what it is and when it began. Oh and along the way Michael gets in a muddle over a maths equation!

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b041xdgm)
Series 33

Deborah Moggach on Arnold Bennett

Novelist and screenwriter, Deborah Moggach, nominates the Potteries writer Arnold Bennett, whose work she thinks has been wrongly overlooked, as he was considered as being too popular.

Moggach believes that because he was a working writer who earned his living writing both serious and light fiction, he was not taken seriously until after his death in 1931, despite his books being hugely popular during his lifetime. Bennett wrote many novels including ‘Anna of the Five Towns’ and ‘The Old Wives Tale’.

As a journalist, Bennett also wrote self-help and lifestyle articles for magazines including 'How to Bathe a Baby Part One' and 'Do Rich Women Quarrel More Frequently Than Poor?'

Gyles Brandreth has been a lifelong Bennett fan and believes him to be one of the greatest writers of the 20th century who deserves to be rediscovered.

Presenter: Matthew Parris.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


TUE 17:00 PM (b041xc1w)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news, presented by Eddie Mair.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041v2jn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Down the Line (b010m9tg)
Series 4

Episode 7

The return of the ground-breaking, Radio 4 show, hosted by the legendary Gary Bellamy; brought to you by the creators of The Fast Show.

Down The Line stars Rhys Thomas as Gary Bellamy, with Amelia Bullmore, Simon Day, Felix Dexter, Charlie Higson, Lucy Montgomery, and Paul Whitehouse.

Special guests are Rosie Cavaliero, Julia Davis, Robert Popper, Adil Ray and Arabella Weir.

Producers: Charlie Higson and Paul Whitehouse
A Down The Line production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b041xdgp)
Peggy and Jennifer are both concerned about overworked and tired Adam. Brian's sciatica means he can't help out. They also discuss Tony and Pat. Peggy wonders whether Tony was right. Is she to blame for Tom and Kirsty's wedding demise by helping to map out Tom's future for him? Jennifer assures Peggy she did nothing wrong.

Adam could do without Charlie's interference but is out of luck. Charlie criticises Adam's work. Adam is behind schedule and they need to be ready to drill as soon as possible. Adam defends himself but is clearly too tired for a spat. Charlie's disappointed that Adam doesn't have more fire in his belly.

Pat asks Tom if she can come and see him, but he insists he needs to sort things out himself.
Peggy visits Tom and offers some support. Tom hates himself, but Peggy gets him to face up to whether, in his heart of hearts, what he did was right - for himself, if no one else. He admits it was. Peggy later tells Pat that there's no doubt Tom's feelings about John go very deep.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b041xdgr)
Paul Heaton and Jacqui Abbott; Bad Neighbours; sculptor Phillip King; and Sally Wainwright

Sculptor Phillip King on his career as he turns 80 this week, Paul Heaton and Jacqui Abbott have released an album together for the first time since their multi-million selling days of The Beautiful South. They talk to John about their reunion and about Paul's belief in the importance of maintaining a "lippy" attitude. Writer Sally Wainwright talks about turning to crime with BBC One's Happy Valley after the success of Last Tango in Halifax; and we review Seth Rogan's latest film Bad Neighbours.

With John Wilson.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b041xbx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Party of No (b041xdgt)
When the Democrats and Barack Obama won the US Presidency in 2008 - relatively comfortably - many in the Republican Party were genuinely shocked and they retreated to lick their painful wounds. A new political movement emerged, the Tea Party, which re-invigorated the defeated, demoralized Republicans, the GOP. The Tea Party dedicated itself to complete opposition both to Obama's presidency and to anyone they felt were compromising with the president. Long-standing Republican politicians were removed and many of those who remained shifted to the right, adopting Tea Party rhetoric. Republican opposition, encouraged by the Tea Party, destroyed many of President Obama's hopes in the last six years. In 2013, US federal lawmaking was brought to gridlock, shutdown, and impotence. Now, though, there's a growing sense that the Tea Party is a threat to the GOP's future - that it is weird and backward looking. "Establishment" Republicans are fighting back.
As the Republicans set out to regain the White House, BBC North America Editor Mark Mardell asks if the GOP can change sufficiently to regain power or whether it will remain The Party of No?

Producer: John Murphy.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b041xtm9)
Blind magistrates; reading printed documents; listener feedback.

In England up until 2001, blind people were not permitted to hold the office of magistrate. It is now estimated that there more than 60 performing this function. Ian Pearson is a blind court chairman, and Paul Millross has been serving on the bench for just on a year. They talk to Peter White about some of the problems that still exist within the judicial system for some blind magistrates.

Reading printed documents is still one of the barriers that technology hasn't quite managed to fully resolve for visually impaired people, but this week, we test drive two developments in this area. While scanning software on a Smartphone isn't all that new, it's now much cheaper and more freely available than in the past. Ian Macrae, Editor of the magazine Disability Now demonstrates one app he finds useful.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Editor: Andrew Smith


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b041xtmc)
Claudia Hammond is joined by mental health campaigner, Marion Janner to discuss some of the entries to the All in the Mind mental health awards. She hears from one pair of finalists, Helen and Lin. Helen nominated her mental health nurse, Lin in the professional category. Helen explains the difference Lin's help made and how she believes she saved her life. Also in the programme in World War I the Craiglockhart hospital near Edinburgh was a military psychiatric hospital treating shell shocked soldiers. Claudia travels to the hospital to see recently discovered editions of The Hydra - a magazine produced by patients and edited by Wilfred Owen with poems by Siegfried Sassoon who were both patients. Claudia hears how the magazine didn't talk directly about treatment or how soldiers were ill, referring instead to someone feeling a little seedy or not at the top of their game. And while the celebrated poets have made the magazine famous she finds out that the other contributions from regular soldiers are as equally moving.


TUE 21:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b041w2p9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b041xtmf)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b041xtmh)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 2

At the height of a hot London summer, in which people are falling seriously ill from a highly contagious virus, TV shopping channel presenter Stevie Flint has discovered the body of her boyfriend, Simon Sharkey, lying dead in his bed. Still in shock, Stevie waits for the emergency services to arrive.

Apocalyptic thriller by the award-winning writer Louise Welsh.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Siân Preece

Writer: Louise Welsh

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 23:00 Act Your Age (b00zm0mc)
Series 3

Episode 1

Simon Mayo hosts the three-way battle between the comedy generations to find out which is the funniest.

Will it be the Up-and-Comers, the Current Crop or the Old Guard who will be crowned, for one week at least, as the Golden Age of Comedy.

Holly Walsh is joined by Henry Paker, Lucy Porter by Miles Jupp and Tom O'Connor teams up with Duggie Brown.

Devised and Produced by Ashley Blaker and Bill Matthews.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2011.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b041xtmm)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 30 APRIL 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b041v2kj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b042bfnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041v2kl)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041v2kn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041v2kq)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b041v2ks)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b041xttw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b041xyjt)
Badger cull, beavers and grass

DEFRA has confirmed that the 2nd year of the badger culling pilots in England won't be scrutinised by an Independent Expert Panel. The Panel's report on last year's cull in Somerset and Gloucs found that some humaneness and effectiveness targets hadn't been met.

A YouGov survey has found 60% of Scots would be happy with the reintroduction of Beavers to the Scottish countryside.

And, the race against time to restore pastures devastated by the Somerset Levels flooding.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcqw)
Stone Curlew

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the stone curlew. Stone curlews belong to a family known as 'thick-knees' but their country name of 'goggle-eyed plover' suits them better. Their huge staring yellow eyes serve them well at night when they're most active. By day, they lie up on sparse grassland or heath where their streaky brown-and-white plumage camouflages them superbly.


WED 06:00 Today (b041xyjw)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b041xyjy)
Sir Richard Eyre, Andrew Fusek Peters, Abbie Ross, Peter Francis

Libby Purves is joined by writer Abbie Ross; director Sir Richard Eyre; poet and and wild swimmer Andrew Fusek Peters and Peter Francis, warden of Gladstone's Library.

In 1972 when Abbie Ross was two her cosmopolitan parents moved from London to rural Wales to lead an alternative lifestyle. In her book, Hippy Dinners, she recreates this childhood - in particular her parents' friendships with local hippies and their embarrassing taste for hummus, cheesecloth and yoga. Hippy Dinners - A memoir of a rural childhood is published by Transworld.

Sir Richard Eyre CBE is a director of theatre, film, television and opera who brings his latest production of The Pajama Game to London's West End. He started his career in regional theatre before becoming director of the National Theatre in 1987. He has directed numerous productions including Betty Blue Eyes, Quartermaine's Terms and Stephen Ward: The Musical. He won the 2014 Olivier Award for Best Director for his production of Ibsen's Ghosts. His film and television credits include Notes on a Scandal; Iris; Henry IV Parts I and II and Tumbledown for which he won a BAFTA. The Pajama Game is at The Shaftesbury Theatre, London.

Andrew Fusek Peters is a poet and storyteller. His new book Dip - Wild Swims and Stories from the Borderlands is the story of his year of wild swimming in rivers, lakes, waterfalls and hidden pools. The book is an honest account of his recovery from a bout of severe depression and how swimming helped him regain a sense of purpose. Dip - Wild Swims and Stories from the Borderlands is published by Rider.

Peter Francis is an Anglican priest who became the warden of Gladstone's Library in 1997. Britain's only Prime Ministerial library, it was founded by the Victorian statesman himself and, following his death in 1898, became the national memorial to his life and work. Peter was instrumental in developing the Islamic Reading Room Project, a resource to nurture dialogue between Christians and Muslims.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b042bg3x)
Richard Benson - The Valley

Episode 3

Abridged from Richard Benson's epic family saga The Valley, the focus of this Book of the Week is on the story of the author's grandmother - Winnie Hollingworth (1909 - 2002) - and her life in the mining villages of the Dearne Valley in South Yorkshire.

This remarkable social history draws on years of research, interviews and anecdote which chart generations of carousing and banter, tears and fights all set against the background of a close-knit community where almost everybody worked either in the mines or the mills.

Richard Benson's first book, THE FARM which related the story of his own parents and brother and their livelihood in the Yorkshire Wolds was described as ' an extraordinary mixture of hardness and tenderness, wit and slog.. wonderful ' Ronald Blythe author of Akenfield. It went on to be a no.1 bestseller.

This new book is a powerful and moving achievement - it follows Winnie from her first romantic encounter: 'her heart beating hard and fast down in her whalebone and elastic' to her final years sitting in the lounge of a long rubber-tiled room with high-backed chairs around the walls.. ' where 'the residents either roost mutely or chat while their eyes search the room for a younger person who might play the piano for them.'

Ep 3. Winnie's pregnancy, the catalyst for her marriage turns out to be a false alarm, but when she becomes pregnant again, she and Harry decide they can just about afford to move into their own home.

Read by Richard Stacey
Producer: Jill Waters
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b040z014)
Woman's Hour Takeover

Naomi Alderman

Naomi Alderman, today's Guest Editor, investigates why transgender women don't always feel welcomed by feminists and why some feminists have a problem with including them, with Paris Lees and Finn MacKay. She celebrates some of the game changing women in science and technology and talks to Dr Rivka Isaacson about her work. Naomi is joined by Reni Eddo Lodge and Sarah Hughes to discuss whether TV dramas like Game of Thrones or The Fall are problematic for women. And she looks at public speaking with Professor Lis Howell and Rachel Caldecott - why is it so dominated by men? Jane Garvey presents.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b041xyk2)
Le Donne

Episode 3

Set in modern day Naples - vibrant, picaresque, and for some, terrifying - where the Camorra has its hands in virtually every enterprise, from prostitution and drug running, to rubbish collection and street vendors. Series Two of 'Le Donne' ('The Women') focuses on Caterina Riccardi, a beautiful, privileged wife and mother. In Series One, she discovered that her husband Franco was actually a vicious Camorra boss. Her eldest son Nino was murdered and Caterina herself was forced to kill rival boss Vito Caporrino in an ultimately futile attempt to save her thirteen-year-old son Amedeo from also being killed.

Now, she has to face the consequences of her actions, and come to terms with her grief and guilt while trying to maintain a close relationship with her daughter Antonella, who still believes that her father is innocent.

3/5. Set in contemporary Naples. Franco is released from prison for Antonella's eighteenth birthday party. Caterina has to hide her true feelings about him. But the party does not quite go according to plan.

Written by Chris Fallon.

Based on an original idea by Rosalynd Ward and Chris Fallon.

Chris Fallon is a writer and director. This is his second series of 'Le Donne'. He has previously written for film and television as well as writing adaptations for radio. His short film 'Killing Joe' was nominated for an Academy Award.

Credits

Caterina Riccardi........................................Indira Varma
Salvatore Beccafichi...................................Anton Lesser
Franco Riccardi...........................................Danny Webb
Antonella Riccardi.......................................Rebecca Callard
Marisa Pirenisi............................................Juliet Aubrey
Leo.............................................................Danny Mahoney
Carlo Caporrino..........................................Carl Prekopp
Senator Ferrezano.....................................Rufus Wright
TV Reporter................................................Federay Holmes
Newsreader................................................Vaughan Savidge

Original music.............................................Simon Russell
Pianist........................................................Isobel Tombling
Writer.........................................................Chris Fallon

Producer/Director.......................................Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 Voices from Our Industrial Past (b041xyk4)
The industrial revolution was possibly the single most significant event in world history - the moment when one small nation left behind its agrarian past and entered decisively on the pathway to modernity. But what did it all mean for the ordinary people, who with their strong backs and nimble fingers did the most to power it?

All the great Victorian commentators - Engels, Dickens, Blake - painted Britain's industrial times in a very dark hue: the introduction of new working patterns which compelled men to work at the relentless pace of the machines; families squeezed into dark, disease-ridden cities and nothing but the workhouse for those who slipped through the net. Since then and although there were a few dissenting voices, for the most part this collective chorus of doom continues to colour the way we think about our industrial past.

In this programme, Professor Emma Griffin unpicks the dark myth of Britain's industrial revolution using accounts of everyday life written by working people. If we stop, and really listen to what these voices are trying to tell us, she says, we hear a version of our industrial past that contains a few surprises. They were often quick to gain advantage from industrialisation and as individuals, they expressed their own agency in many different ways.

Emma explores the lives of four men living and working during the industrial revolution - John Lincoln, Benjamin Shaw, William Marcroft and Emanuel Lovelin. While all come from desperately poor backgrounds and suffer though many adversities, their lives are by no mean downtrodden and all have benefitted from the opportunities that industrialisation brings. We bring John, Benjamin, William and Emanuel's voices to life once more.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway Productions.


WED 11:30 Gloomsbury (b041xyk6)
Series 2

The Theory and Practice of Hanky Panky

Vera and Henry are undecided about whether it is time for their Eton-educated sons, Charlie and Fred, to be told the facts of life. Neither parent feels that they are sufficiently qualified to discuss the birds and bees with their sons, so they go in search of somebody who is. Ginny and Lionel, conveniently staying, are invited to contribute, but it soon becomes clear that they are urgently in need of sex education themselves.

The Goslings deliver conflicting opinions: Mrs Gosling is affronted by the very mention of the facts of life, whilst Gosling, dealing with pollination on a daily basis, would happily talk of nothing else all year.

Finally a willing educator is found. Venus, deeply broody for her first child, volunteers to rush down to Eton and enlighten Charlie and Fred over ginger beer and crumpets. Worried lest they should suddenly become grandparents before their time, Henry and Vera swiftly call a halt to the whole scheme and pack Venus off to climb Everest instead.

GLOOMSBURY - THE SERIES
Green-fingered Sapphist Vera Sackcloth-Vest shares a bijou castle in Kent with her devoted husband Henry, but longs for exotic adventures with nervy novelist Ginny Fox and wilful beauty Venus Traduces. It's 1921, the dawn of modern love, life and lingerie, but Vera still hasn't learnt how to boil a kettle.

Producer: Jamie Rix
A Little Brother Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b041xyk8)
New figures show that people with learning disabilities are living for years in what are meant to be short term NHS assessment centres. Many are children hundreds of miles from home. Ministers say it must stop but health managers say there's no where else to put them. You and Yours investigates.
Plus the latest selfie trend revives legacy technology - we meet the youngsters taking pictures with old style polaroid cameras that develop while you watch.
And the British are back buying property in Spain - is it worth the trouble and risk involved?


WED 13:00 World at One (b041v2kw)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b041xykb)
The Snake Pit

Martin talks to clinical psychologist Vaughan Bell about different forms of mental disturbance - psychoses and neuroses - and their manifestation in popular culture, including the Polanski film Rosemary's Baby and the poetry of Spike Milligan. And he meets Dolly Sen, a film-maker who's experienced psychosis for most of her life.

Producer: Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b041xdgp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b041xykd)
Higher

Rebrand, Relaunch

Higher: Ep 3 Rebrand, Relaunch by Joyce Bryant

To Jim's dismay Roland becomes Vice Chancellor and image consultants 'Harsover Tutt' are brought in to rebrand the university. Jim feels he's being forced out. Will he find an ally in Karen?

Producer Gary Brown

In the subsequent fall out from the University's dealings with a discredited African Dictator, it is decided to rebrand and relaunch the University. The first thing to do is sack the Vice Chancellor and ease Roland Chubb in. This makes Jim's position very tenuous, but Roland determines to get him out. He sneakily offers Karen the Deanship - is this the end of Jim Blunt?

Starring Sophie Thompson and Jonathan Keeble.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b041xykg)
DIY Investing

During this programme it was stated that Capital Gains Tax is charged at 40% which is not the case. Capital Gains Tax for individuals is charged at 18% or 28% depending on the total amount of taxable income. The CGT Annual Exempt Amount for individuals this tax year (2014/15) is £11,000.

Want to be a DIY Investor? Whether you're new to investing and wondering where to start or you would like to expand the range of investments you already hold why not ask the panel for their view.

Should you consider gilts, funds, investment trusts, bonds or shares?

What are the choices if you're looking for a lower risk investment to buy and hold?

Or perhaps you want to keep an eye on your cash and trade more frequently?

Maybe you want to ask about the New ISA rules?

Whatever your question, joining presenter Ruth Alexander to share their views and experience will be:

Darius McDermott, Managing Director, Chelsea Financial Services.
Rebecca O'Keeffe, Head of Investment, Interactive Investor.
Merryn Somerset Webb, Editor-in-Chief, MoneyWeek.

To talk to the team call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b041xtmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b041y1mx)
Ethnography Award: The Winner

The winner of Thinking Allowed's first Ethnography award, in association with the British Sociological Association.

Laurie Taylor and a team of esteemed academics - Professor Beverley Skeggs, Professor Dick Hobbs, Professor Henrietta Moore and Dr Louise Westmarland - set themselves the task of finding the study that has made the most significant contribution to ethnography over the past year. In the past, ethnographic studies have cast light on hidden or misunderstood worlds, from the urban poor in 1930s Chicago to the mods and rockers in British seaside towns in the 1950s. This year they considered submissions of startling range, colour and diversity, in the process learning much about the struggles of the war wounded 'amputees' of Sierra Leone; the ties between mothers and daughters on a working class housing estate in South Wales; the hedonistic excess of young holidaymakers in Ibiza; and the dreams and desires of young women in hostess bars in Cambodia. After much passionate debate, finally the winner can be revealed.

Laurie Taylor presents a programme about the winning entry which, in the judges' view, has made the most significant contribution to ethnography, the in-depth analysis of the everyday life of a culture or sub culture.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b041y1mz)
BBC Trust's review of News; Lachlan Murdoch

A BBC Trust review into the corporation's news and current affairs output says t it needs to do more to make an impact. The report found that audiences looking for quality investigative journalism rated Channel 4 higher than the BBC. It also said that on and off screen diversity needs to be addressed. In his first interview for the Media Show, James Harding, head of BBC News, sets out how he's going to improve coverage. Also in the studio; Richard Sambrook former director of Global News and the BBC and Stewart Purvis, non-executive director of Channel Four and former editor in Chief at ITN, discuss how improvements might be made at a time when money needs to be saved.

Lachlan Murdoch, son of Rupert, has been appointed non-executive co-chairman of both entertainment company 21st Century Fox and global newspaper company News Corp, alongside his father. He's finally been persuaded to rejoin the family business, and now looks set to be the heir to his father's empire. Richard Aedy, Presenter of The Media Report on ABC Radio National in Sydney, Australia - where Lachlan has been based - tells Steve Hewlett what's being made of the appointments back in the Murdochs' home country.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b041y1n1)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041v2ky)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Isy Suttie's Love Letters (b041y1n3)
Series 2

Eleanor and Mr Woodfield

Isy Suttie returns to her Derbyshire home town of Matlock and observes the unfolding romance between dinner lady, Eleanor, and teacher, Mr Woodfield.

Both are unhappily married, but find solace in their workplace friendship.

Isy's Sony Award winning show, recounts a series of love stories affecting people she's known throughout her life, told partly through song.

Sometimes Isy has merely observed other people's love lives; quite often she's intervened, changing the action dramatically - for better or worse. Intertwined within these stories are related real life anecdotes from Isy's own, often disastrous, love life.

With her multi-character and vocal skills, and accompanied by her guitar, Isy creates a hilarious and deeply moving world, sharing with us her lessons in life and love.

"A voice you want to swim in" The Independent

Producer: Lyndsay Fenner

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2014.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b041y1n5)
Susan and Jennifer talk cakes for May Day. Emma's making a Dalek and Fallon's busy promoting the event online. Jennifer won't be entering the cake bake as she can't even get to her tins at the moment. The builders start on the kitchen next week.

Jennifer innocently offers Susan her old kitchen units but Susan says no thanks to her cast offs. Emma's later annoyed with Susan for saying no. Emma could have done with those herself. Apologetic Susan points out that it could be a while yet before Emma and Ed have a place of their own.

Dan's preparing for army life and goes shopping for an ironing board with Shula. Dan tries on a smart suit and Shula is moved that he looks the spitting image of his blood father, Mark. Jennifer realises that Dan leaving is going to be an emotional wrench for Shula.

Eddie's in search of an idea for Clarrie's 60th birthday. Not to be outdone by Nic, Emma says she'll think of something. Neil finally comes up with the winning idea - a 1970s theme party. Eddie loves the idea.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b041y1n7)
The Black Keys; Neil Jordan on Bob Hoskins; Joel Dicker

John Wilson remembers the actor Bob Hoskins, whose death was announced today, talking to director Neil Jordan and actress Cathy Tyson about Hoskins' Oscar nominated performance in the film Mona Lisa.

Sports presenter Eleanor Oldroyd reviews Next Goals Wins, a film about the American Samoa football team, who after suffering the worst loss in international football history (31-0 to Australia), attempt to qualify for the World Cup.

Swiss novelist Joël Dicker is a publishing sensation - his novel The Truth About The Harry Quebert Affair has won prizes in Europe and been translated into 38 languages. Now it's arrived in the UK. The novel is an intricate murder mystery and an exploration of writing and the writing industry. Joël Dicker talks to John Wilson about being at the centre of a publishing whirlwind and how similar - or not - his own life is to that of his glamorous novelist hero.

Grammy award winning duo The Black Keys discuss their new album Turn Blue. Guitarist Dan Auerbach and drummer Pat Carney reflect on their transition from garage band to stadium success, the impact of break-ups; and life on the road.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b041xyk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Leader Conference (b041yjnt)
Series 4

Episode 1

Andrew Rawnsley presents the first programme in a new series of the live, studio-based debate programmes which take the form of newspaper leader conferences.

He is joined by five prominent journalists, who write leading articles or editorials for their newspapers, representing the press in the nations of the UK and across the English regions as well as the leading national newspapers.

Three subjects in the news will be decided upon and discussed. Two of these reflect current events at home and abroad - and prompt lively and provocative discussion. The third subject is in a lighter vein.

Contributions from listeners are also encouraged throughout the programme and particularly at the start for the component they shape most: that final leader which is heard towards the end of the programme.

Following the discussion of each of the three subjects, Andrew invites one of his guests to draw up on air the "leader" for that subject setting out its main points. This important component of the programme helps ensure that resolution of the debate is achieved for listeners and that the full range of views expressed is reflected.

The leaders are posted online at the Radio 4 website following the programme.

Producer Simon Coates.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b041yjnw)
Series 4

Philippa Perry

Philippa Perry explains why story telling is so powerful and how the stories we tell to and about ourselves affect our mental wellbeing.
Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks in which speakers air their thinking, in front of a live audience, on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect culture and society.
Presenter: Ben Hammersley
Producer: Sheila Cook.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b041xbxr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b041xyjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b041v2l1)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b041yjny)
Nigerians protest over kidnapped girls, Iraq elections, Bob Hoskins remembered, with Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b041yjp0)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 3

At the height of a hot London summer, in which people are dying from a highly contagious virus, TV presenter Stevie Flint has discovered the body of her boyfriend, Simon Sharkey, lying dead in his flat.

Stevie has herself been laid low by the virus and, after eight days in bed, has finally recovered enough to act upon instructions left for her in a letter from Simon. She must deliver a mysterious package to his colleague, Malcolm Reah, at St Thomas' Hospital.

Extracts from the tense new thriller by the award-winning author Louise Welsh.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Siân Preece

Writer: Louise Welsh

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 23:00 Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side (b041yjp2)
Series 1

A Dog's Dinner

Stand-up poet, armchair revolutionary, comedian and broadcaster Elvis McGonagall (aka poet and performer Richard Smith) is determined to do something about his bitter, dyspeptic and bloody minded view of contemporary life. There are good things out there, if he could only be bothered to find them.

From his home in the Graceland Park near Dundee, the Scottish punk poet goes in search of the brighter side of life. With the help of his dog,Trouble, his friend, Susan Morrison, and his own private narrator, Clarke Peters, Elvis does his very best to accentuate the positive - he really does. Recorded almost entirely on location, in a caravan on a truly glamorous industrial estate somewhere in Scotland.

In the first episode, A Dog's Dinner, Elvis finds out what's so good about haute cuisine and celebrity chefs.

As Elvis, poet Richard Smith is the 2006 World Poetry Slam Champion, the compere of the notorious Blue Suede Sporran Club and appears regularly on BBC Radio 4 ("Saturday Live", the "Today Programme", "Arthur Smith's Balham Bash", "Last Word", "Off The Page" and others as well as writing and presenting the popular arts features "Doggerel Bard" on the art of satiric poetry and "Beacons and Blue Remembered Hills" on the extraordinary resonance of A.E. Housman's 'Shropshire Lad')

Written by Elvis MacGonagall, with Richard Smith, Helen Braunholtz-Smith and Frank Stirling.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Bunk Bed (b041yjp4)
Series 1

Episode 5

Everyone craves a place where their mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander.

This is the nearest faraway place for Patrick Marber and Peter Curran. Here they endeavour to get the heart of things in an entertainingly vague and indirect way. This is not the place for typical male banter.

From under the bed clothes they play each other music from The Residents and Gerry Rafferty, archive of JG Ballard and Virginia Woolf. Life, death, work and family are their slightly warped conversational currency.

Writers/Performers:

PETER CURRAN is a publisher, writer and documentary maker. A former carpenter, his work ranges from directing films about culture in Africa, America and Brazil to writing and presenting numerous Arts and culture programmes for both radio and television.

PATRICK MARBER co-wrote and performed in On The Hour and Knowing Me, Knowing You..with Alan Partridge. His plays include Dealer's Choice, After Miss Julie, Closer and Don Juan in Soho. Marber also wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay for the film Notes on a Scandal.

Producer: Peter Curran.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b041yjp6)
The Prime Minister clashes with the Labour leader after Ed Miliband complains that the taxpayer was "ripped off" when Royal Mail was privatised.
Mr Miliband tells MPs that a group of City investors received, what he called, a golden ticket to buy and sell large amounts of shares.
But David Cameron says the sell-off had been a success and accuses Mr Miliband of behaving like "old Labour" and painting himself into the red corner.
The Home Secretary announces an overhaul of police stop and search powers.
MPs debate the European economy and the most senior official in the Commons announces he is to retire at the end of August.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 01 MAY 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b041v2m4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b042bg3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041v2m6)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041v2m8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041v2mf)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b041v2mh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b041ybhv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b041ybhx)
Cheese ban, Oyster farming, grass

As of today, China has placed a temporary ban on cheese imports from the UK. It follows an inspection tour of European dairy plants by Chinese officials. There were concerns about processing plant maintenance, air sanitisation, raw milk transport temperatures and chemical storage. Charlotte Smith asks whether UK consumers should be concerned.

After almost 100 years, shellfish farming has returned to a seaside village in Somerset. Volunteers in Porlock aim to revive the ancient tradition. BBC Somerset's Charlie Taylor was there as the first oyster and mussel spawn were placed in the water.

And as Farming Today continues to look at the importance of grass, a dairy farmer in Cumbria explains why he is so fanatical about grassland management.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Lucy Bickerton.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b041ybhz)
Woodland Dawn Chorus

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents a dawn chorus recorded in Rutland Water. The outpouring of song is so dense that it is almost impossible to single out individual species but includes blackbirds, song thrushes, robins and newly-arrived migrants like garden warblers.


THU 06:00 Today (b041ybj1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b041ybj3)
The Tale of Sinuhe

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss The Tale of Sinuhe, one of the most celebrated works of ancient Egyptian literature. Written around four thousand years ago, the poem narrates the story of an Egyptian official who is exiled to Syria before returning to his homeland some years later. The number of versions of the poem, which is known from several surviving papyri and inscriptions, suggests that it was seen as an important literary work; although the story is set against a backdrop of real historical events, most scholars believe that the poem is a work of fiction.

With:

Richard Parkinson
Professor of Egyptology and Fellow of Queen's College at the University of Oxford

Roland Enmarch
Senior Lecturer in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool.

Aidan Dodson
Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Bristol

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b042bjp5)
Richard Benson - The Valley

Episode 4

Abridged from Richard Benson's epic family saga The Valley, the focus of this Book of the Week is on the story of the author's grandmother - Winnie Hollingworth (1909 - 2002) - and her life in the mining villages of the Dearne Valley in South Yorkshire.

This remarkable social history draws on years of research, interviews and anecdote which chart generations of carousing and banter, tears and fights all set against the background of a close-knit community where almost everybody worked either in the mines or the mills.

Richard Benson's first book, THE FARM which related the story of his own parents and brother and their livelihood in the Yorkshire Wolds was described as ' an extraordinary mixture of hardness and tenderness, wit and slog.. wonderful ' Ronald Blythe author of Akenfield. It went on to be a no.1 bestseller.

This new book is a powerful and moving achievement - it follows Winnie from her first romantic encounter: 'her heart beating hard and fast down in her whalebone and elastic' to her final years sitting in the lounge of a long rubber-tiled room with high-backed chairs around the walls.. ' where 'the residents either roost mutely or chat while their eyes search the room for a younger person who might play the piano for them.'

Ep 4. Life in the Dearne changes with the outbreak of the Second World War. Harry continues to develop his musical and entertaining career, with more nights out on the circuit.

Read by Richard Stacey
Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b040z035)
Woman's Hour Takeover

Doreen Lawrence

Doreen Lawrence (this year's number one game changer on the Power List) talks about the people who inspired her, from Maya Angelou to Barack Obama. She also investigates why fibroids are more common in Afro Caribbean women and discusses treatment options with Mr Yacoub Khalaf, Consultant at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital in London.
The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust runs a number of training programmes and bursaries designed to help young people from the black community to gain access to the professions. So what are the best ways to make sure all young people are able to fulfil their potential? We discuss with Minister for Skills and Enterprise, Matthew Hancock and Lee Elliot from education think-tank The Sutton Trust.
And Beverley Knight sings Fallen Soldier.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b041ybj5)
Le Donne

Episode 4

Set in modern day Naples - vibrant, picaresque, and for some, terrifying - where the Camorra has its hands in virtually every enterprise, from prostitution and drug running, to rubbish collection and street vendors. Series Two of 'Le Donne' ('The Women') focuses on Caterina Riccardi, a beautiful, privileged wife and mother. In Series One, she discovered that her husband Franco was actually a vicious Camorra boss. Her eldest son Nino was murdered and Caterina herself was forced to kill rival boss Vito Caporrino in an ultimately futile attempt to save her thirteen-year-old son Amedeo from also being killed.

Now, she has to face the consequences of her actions, and come to terms with her grief and guilt while trying to maintain a close relationship with her daughter Antonella, who still believes that her father is innocent.

4/5. Set in contemporary Naples. Senator Ferrezano has been murdered. Caterina knows that her rival, Carlo Caporrino, is to blame and that she must act before he kills again.

Written by Chris Fallon.

Based on an original idea by Rosalynd Ward and Chris Fallon.

Chris Fallon is a writer and director. This is his second series of 'Le Donne'. He has previously written for film and television as well as writing adaptations for radio. His short film 'Killing Joe' was nominated for an Academy Award.

Original music................................................Simon Russell
Pianist...........................................................Isobel Tombling
Writer............................................................Chris Fallon

Producer/Director:Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b041ybj7)
Arizona: The Missing Migrants

Each year, thousands of illegal migrants try to enter the United States via a treacherous journey across the Arizona desert. Some succeed, while others are captured by US border patrols and are immediately deported - but not everyone is so fortunate. A growing number simply drop dead from exhaustion.

The Missing Migrant Project works on identifying the deceased, piecing together clues found in the personal effects collected alongside the decomposed bodies found in the desert.

In this programme, the BBC's Mexico correspondent Will Grant travels to Tucson, Arizona to meet project co-founder Robin Reineke to learn of the challenges facing her office in the small southwestern city of Tucson - which has the third-highest number of unidentified bodies in the United States, after New York and Los Angeles.

Migrant rights groups say the vast expansion of the US Border Patrol has exacerbated the problem because the heightened policing of the border along traditional urban crossing points has forced clandestine border crossers out into the wilds of the desert.

Such tough border protection is popular among many American voters, especially in conservative border states like Arizona and Texas - but some locals have shown sympathy, heading out into the desert to leave water, food and blankets in the hope of saving the lives of desperate migrants.

In Mexico, Crossing Continents also meets the relatives of those who have died in the desert, revealing their motivations to move north - motivations which they share with many men, women and children from across Latin America, who are still willing to risk their lives embarking on this increasingly dangerous and potentially deadly trip.

Reporter: Will Grant
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.


THU 11:30 Getting the Picture (b03phd4f)
1. The Camera Has Attitudes

David Bailey's portrait photographs are world famous, instantly recognisable and have charted decades of fashion, celebrity and notoriety.

"You can't be judgmental and be a photographer," Bailey says in the first of two programmes in which he tells Tim Marlow, how he’s gone about producing the images which have defined our times.

Bailey reveals how he got started and how the portraiture that shot him to fame makes fashion photography more potent. "I thought the best way to sell the frock is through the girl. If the girl doesn't work, the picture doesn't work," he says.

As he lights Tim's own photographic portrait and selects the cameras for the shoot, Bailey discusses how he has gone about portraiture over the last 50 years or more.

In the central London studio which houses his archive of images, Bailey also reveals to Tim how he made his name with photographs of such stars as Marianne Faithfull, most notably for "Vogue".

And Tim talks to Marianne Faithfull herself about the two striking images of her which Bailey shot - in youth and in later years - and the sharply contrasting views she has of them now.

As this first programme draws to a close, the first shots of Tim's photographic session with Bailey are taken.

Producer: Simon Coates

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2014


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b041ybj9)
Consumer news with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b041v2mk)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b041v2mm)
News and current affairs presented by Martha Kearney.


THU 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b041ybjc)
Sane in Insane Places

Psychiatric treatments have had their fair share of controversy.

In this episode, Martin looks at the extraordinary popularity of lobotomies during the middle of the last century, the continued use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and the 'anti-psychiatry movement' of RD Laing in the 1960s.

Producer: Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b041y1n5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 The Interrogation (b041ybjf)
Series 3

Kellie

by Roy Williams, with Kenneth Cranham and Alex Lanipekun. The story of Kellie.

Sean agrees to go for a drink with his old schoolfriend, Kellie. Little does he know what he's letting himself in for. Exciting series-ender.

Directed by Mary Peate
Original music by David Pickvance.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b041yjy5)
The Avon Gorge, Bristol

With Brunel's iconic Clifton Suspension Bridge towering over head, pull on your hiking boots and join Felicity Evans as she steps away from Bristol's busy city streets and delves into the dense undergrowth of the Avon Gorge.

As a haven for rare plant species, it's been classed as one of the top three botanical sites in England and with peregrine falcons circling overhead and goats roaming the land below, you could be forgiven for thinking you are in the most wild of rural landscapes - but in reality you are just a stone's throw from Bristol's City Centre.

Felicity meets with botanist and rock climber Libby Houston, who for over 30 years has explored the craggy edges of the Avon Gorge, identifying and even discovering rare plant species - one of which, 'Houston's White Beam', bears her name.

Further along the gorge Felicity joins Ben Scouse as he does his daily check on his six 'hairy conservationists' otherwise known as the six billy goats who have been bought in to graze the land in order to support the cultivation of the rare plants.

Looking upwards, author and naturalist Ed Drewitt takes Felicity peregrine spotting and reveals their history with the gorge and their royal connections and finally, Merchant Venturer Francis Greenacre explains how this land - so close to a city - came to be preserved as a wild and wonderful open space.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b041vcpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b041vcqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b041yjy7)
Paths Of Glory, Blue Ruin, Walerian Borowczyk

With Francine Stock.

Stanley Kubrick's wife Christiane reveals how they met and fell in love on the set of World War I drama Paths Of Glory, and why he was misunderstood by the British press.

The star and director of Blue Ruin, Macon Blair and Jeremy Saulnier, discuss their award-winning revenge thriller, and how the director had to dip into his own pocket, and his wife's, to get the film made.

Walerian Borowczyk is best known as the director of La Bete, a surreal fantasy that was banned in cinemas across the country in the late 70s. Before that, he was regarded as one of the greatest film-makers of his generation, and a new season at the BFI hopes to restore his reputation.

Anthony Chen, the director of Ilo Ilo, discusses his award-winning autobiographical tale about growing up in Singapore during the financial crash of the late 90s, and why Singapore audiences don't like art-house movies.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b041yjy9)
Mice & Men; Fuel from CO2; fRMI; Insect calls

A recent paper demonstrated that mice show elevated stress levels in the presence of male hormones. What implications does this have for future mouse research? Adam Rutherford heads to University College London to speak to Dr Clare Stanford, who works with mice and men.

How do you get jet fuel from thin air? Just add water, carbon dioxide and a large amount of concentrated sunlight. A team from the European Solar Jet Project has, for the first time, proved that you can make 'green' or carbon neutral paraffin, the hydrocarbon used in jet fuel. It's feasible; the next step is to try and make this process commercially viable.

Neuroscience is a fast growing and popular field, so naturally there are an abundance of stories reported in the press often illustrated with a beautiful picture of the brain. But despite the advances, when an area of the brain 'lights up" it does not tell us as much as we'd like about the inner workings of the mind. Adam Rutherford speaks to neuroscientists to get to the bottom of what brain imaging can be useful for and when over-interpretation is an issue.

Our resident zoologist Dr Tim Cockerill recently found himself filming animals deep in the jungles of Borneo. Before he left, we gave him an audio recorder to see what he could discover about the animal communities there, just by listening to them. It seems you can set your watch by some of their calls.

Producer: Marnie Chesterton.


THU 17:00 PM (b041yjyc)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news, presented by Eddie Mair.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041v2mp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Cabin Pressure (b01qdzc4)
Series 4

Xinzhou

Sitcom by John Finnemore about the pilots of a tiny charter airline.

It's cold, it's dark & there's no food on board. What better time for Gertie to decide to fall to bits? And what worse time for Arthur to try out his maths skills?

Cabin Pressure is a sitcom about the wing and a prayer world of a tiny, one plane, charter airline; staffed by two pilots: one on his way down, and one who was never up to start with. Whether they're flying squaddies to Hamburg, metal sheets to Mozambique, or an oil exec's cat to Abu Dhabi, no job is too small, but many, many jobs are too difficult...

Written by John Finnemore
Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for the BBC.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b041yf8j)
Jill's happy to be back in the Brookfield kitchen. Jill and Shula discuss the plan for a new road with a distracted Pat. Shula says plans are being made public at the next council meeting.

Dan starts at Sandhurst on Sunday. Shula's going to miss him hugely. Shula feels heartbroken that Dan and his father Mark never knew each other. Dan has Mark's cufflinks though. Jill encourages Shula to let Dan go with good grace. He'll thank her for it. She can be really proud of Dan.

Tom finally lets Pat see him. Tom's emotions are very raw and Pat comforts him. Tom's full of remorse for letting everyone down. He opens up about what drove him to jilt Kirsty. Everything became too much to handle and he felt that his whole life is a fake. Tom breaks down as he says that it all goes back to John. Pat begs Tom to tell her about it.

Pat and Tony discuss Tom and his 16-year burden regarding John. Tony doesn't buy it and calls Tom arrogant. Tony and Tom argue and Tom leaves. Pat is horrified.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b041yjyf)
Jon Ronson; Julian Anderson; 24; Comics Unmasked

With Matthew d'Ancona

Jon Ronson discusses Frank - which he co-wrote with Peter Straughan (The Men Who Stare At Goats). The fictional film was inspired by Jon's experience of touring in Frank Sidebottom's cult band. Ronson talks about why he didn't make a biopic, his relationship with Sidebottom creator Chris Sievey; and working with Michael Fassbender, who plays Frank and wears a fake head for the majority of the film.

The multi Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning series, 24, is about to return. Four years have passed and Kiefer Sutherland's Jack Bauer is now living in London and being hunted by the CIA. But then Jack learns of a threat to kill the US President during an official visit to the British Prime Minister, and decides he has to come out of hiding, to prevent it. Critic Sarah Crompton joins Matthew to assess how Jack fares this side of the Atlantic.

Award winning composer Julian Anderson talks about his new opera Thebans, based on Sophocles' tragedies.

From early Victorian pamphlets to the latest underground offerings, a new exhibition explores the world of British comics. It includes work by Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore and Posy Simmonds and a specially commissioned piece by Tank Girl artist Jamie Hewlett and looks at the way graphic novels have entertained, shocked, disturbed and amused readers for over two hundred years.

Producer Timothy Prosser.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b041ybj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b041yjyh)
Sexual Harassment in Westminster

Simon Cox investigates allegations of abuse of power, a culture of silence, a lack of protection for junior staff and how effective measures introduced to combat the problem are likely to be.


THU 20:30 In Business (b041yjyk)
Battery Matters

Out of juice?

Perhaps the biggest problem facing makers of new technology is battery power.....or lack of it. The battery is so critical that engineers design handheld devices around the battery, rather than the other way round. It's not just mobile phone and wearable technology manufacturers that are striving for longer lasting batteries, the electric vehicle is stalling (so to speak) because of the short distances between recharging and a limited service life of the battery.

So what are businesses doing to reinvent the battery? Is an average annual gain in capacity of 6% really the best we can do?

We'll ask whether Lithium-Air batteries can revitalise the electric car market, explore whether flexible graphene batteries and solar cells hold the key to enhancements in mobile phone battery life and look at the 3D printing of micro batteries the size of a grain of sand.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b041yjy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b041ybj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b041v2mr)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b041yjym)
Justice debate after Gerry Adams arrest, Kenyan oil discovery, Kiev admits lost control of Eastern Ukraine, with David Eades.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b041yjyp)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 4

Apocalyptic thriller by the award-winning novelist Louise Welsh.

London is in meltdown as the deadly virus known as "The Sweats" spreads rapidly through the population. Despite the danger, survivor Stevie Flint is determined to continue her search for answers to the mysterious death of her boyfriend, Dr Simon Sharkey.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Siân Preece

Writer: Louise Welsh

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


THU 23:00 A Short Gentleman (b019fxjh)
Episode 3

When dealing with his wife's lover, Robert employs his deadliest weapon: being a gentleman.

Hugh Bonneville stars as Robert Purcell, QC, a perfect specimen of the British Establishment, who applies faultless legal logic to his disastrous personal life.

Jon Canter's comic novel 'A Short Gentleman' adapted by Robin Brooks.

Robert Purcell ..... Hugh Bonneville
Elizabeth ..... Lyndsey Marshal
Max ..... Ted Allpress
Isobel ..... Lauren Mote
Mona/Ticky ..... Katherine Jakeways
Geoffrey ..... Paul Moriarty
Anthony ..... Carl Prekopp
Penelope ..... Tracy Wiles

With Adjoa Andoh, Ewan Bailey, Adam Billington and James Hayes.

Director: Jonquil Painting

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b041yjyr)
Alicia McCarthy reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 02 MAY 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b041v2np)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b042bjp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b041v2nr)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b041v2nt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b041v2nw)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b041v2ny)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b041yd3y)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Revd Andrew Martlew.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b041yd40)
BBC Food & Farming Awards

Farming Today brings you the results of the BBC Food and Farming Awards. Charlotte Smith presents the programme from the awards ceremony in Bristol, and meets the winner of the Outstanding Farmer of the Year category - dairy farmer Neil Darwent. She gets his reaction, and asks the judges, Adam Henson and Mike Gooding, what made them choose him.

Farm incomes are up by 13% on last year - but is it a real rise, or an illusion of statistics? Charlotte talks to a financial expert at an agricultural consultancy to get his opinion.

And the project to photograph red squirrels in Northern Ireland, which ended up also recording a second rare species by accident!

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b041yd42)
Heather Moorland Dawn Chorus

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the second of four recordings marking the dawn chorus, this time the heather moors of Allendale in Northumberland. Songs featured are that of the curlew, skylark, golden plover and redshank.


FRI 06:00 Today (b041yd44)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b0076y1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b042bjzl)
Richard Benson - The Valley

Episode 5

Abridged from Richard Benson's epic family saga The Valley, the focus of this Book of the Week is on the story of the author's grandmother - Winnie Hollingworth (1909 - 2002) - and her life in the mining villages of the Dearne Valley in South Yorkshire.

This remarkable social history draws on years of research, interviews and anecdote which chart generations of carousing and banter, tears and fights all set against the background of a close-knit community where almost everybody worked either in the mines or the mills.

Richard Benson's first book, THE FARM which related the story of his own parents and brother and their livelihood in the Yorkshire Wolds was described as ' an extraordinary mixture of hardness and tenderness, wit and slog.. wonderful ' Ronald Blythe author of Akenfield. It went on to be a no.1 bestseller.

This new book is a powerful and moving achievement - it follows Winnie from her first romantic encounter: 'her heart beating hard and fast down in her whalebone and elastic' to her final years sitting in the lounge of a long rubber-tiled room with high-backed chairs around the walls.. ' where 'the residents either roost mutely or chat while their eyes search the room for a younger person who might play the piano for them.'

Ep 5. Children become adults, and Winnie and Harry grow frail, but there are still surprises in store.

Read by Richard Stacey
PRODUCER: JILL WATERS

Abridged and directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC 4Extra.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b040z1cq)
Woman's Hour Takeover

Lauren Laverne

Lauren Laverne presents the final programme in the Takeover.

Power Lister Caitlin Moran invites her for a cuppa in her kitchen to talk all things women. So what is Caitlin's real relationship with power, money and family life? How has the success of 'How To Be A Woman' transformed the working class teenager from Wolverhampton? And what do you say to your daughters about feminism when you're watching music star Rihanna performing in very few clothes?

Did Girl Power make feminism accessible? The Spice Girls burst onto the music scene in 1996 and since then have sold 80 million records world-wide. Their extraordinarily success meant that young girls were introduced en mass to the Spice Girls take on Girl Power, which emphasised the importance of female friendship and independence. At the time some feminists criticised Girl Power for being superficial and consumerist, but what effect has it had on their fans, most of whom are now women in their mid to late twenties?

Plus The Staves - the acoustic folk-Americana playing sisters - take time out from working on their next album to play live in the Woman's Hour studio.

Presenter: Lauren Laverne
Producer: Kat Wong.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b041yd46)
Le Donne

Episode 5

Set in modern day Naples - vibrant, picaresque, and for some, terrifying - where the Camorra has its hands in virtually every enterprise, from prostitution and drug running, to rubbish collection and street vendors. Series Two of 'Le Donne' ('The Women') focuses on Caterina Riccardi, a beautiful, privileged wife and mother. In Series One, she discovered that her husband Franco was actually a vicious Camorra boss. Her eldest son Nino was murdered and Caterina herself was forced to kill rival boss Vito Caporrino in an ultimately futile attempt to save her thirteen-year-old son Amedeo from also being killed.

Now, she has to face the consequences of her actions, and come to terms with her grief and guilt while trying to maintain a close relationship with her daughter Antonella, who still believes that her father is innocent.

5/5. Set in contemporary Naples. Franco is about to be released from prison; Carlo Caporrino is planning another murder. Trapped and confused, Caterina wants to reject the Camorra for good but can she do it?

Written by Chris Fallon.
Based on an original idea by Rosalynd Ward and Chris Fallon.

Chris Fallon is a writer and director. This is his second series of 'Le Donne'. He has previously written for film and television as well as writing adaptations for radio. His short film 'Killing Joe' was nominated for an Academy Award.

Original music....................................Simon Russell.
Pianist...............................................Isobel Tombling

Writer................................................Chris Fallon
Producer/Director...............................Rosalynd Ward
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 With Humble Duty Reports... (b041yd48)
After Labour's election victory in 1997, the MP Janet Anderson was appointed a government whip and found herself in a role unique in the British constitution. As Vice-Chamberlain of the Royal Household, Janet was charged with writing a daily message to Her Majesty the Queen on the proceedings in Parliament. Janet's messages went beyond the usual humdrum, regaling the Queen with a daily soap opera of life in the House of Commons, from the disappearing transport minister to the secret deals done with the Opposition to prevent the viewing of a critical football match being interrupted by parliamentary votes. Her accounts make vivid the characters, rivalries and absurdities of the Palace of Westminster in the first year of Tony Blair's government.

Producer: Adam Bowen.


FRI 11:30 Hobby Bobbies (b037jn8d)
Series 1

Dangerous Dogs

The useless officers are dispatched to investigate a nuisance caller and her dangerous dog - but stumble into the local drugs racket.

Britain's longest serving PCSO is paired with the laziest in Dave Lamb's sitcom. (Dave is the voice of TV's Come Dine With Me)

Geoff............................Richie Webb
Nigel............................ Nick Walker
The Guv....................... Sinead Keenan
Jermain.........................Leon Herbert
Bernie...........................Chris Emmett

Producer: Steve Doherty

A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b041yd4b)
How to stop criminals stealing your house.
Food companies are too quick to use "May Contain" labels, say campaigners.
Busy doing nothing; the joys of a pointless walk.
How do you turn around a failing hospital?
What can ethical business structures add in a modern industrial economy?
The beach hut that's being left to fall apart
The wrong Note! Manchester United drop plans for singing areas.
The winners are crowned at the Food and Farming awards?


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b041yf8d)
Alyssia and Jessica - Time to Hit Delete

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who believe it's high time to call time on their engagement with social media - another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b041v2p0)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b041v2p2)
We're in Ukraine as forces attempt to remove pro-Russian separatists. We debate if those convicted of knife crime should be jailed automatically. Plus our survey suggests unions more trusted than big business.


FRI 13:45 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b041yf8g)
Care in the Community

At the end of this week of programmes examining psychiatry, the medicalised model for treating mental illness, Martin outlines the impact of reforms during the latter half of the Twentieth Century that resulted in the closure of Britain's Victorian asylums and a new policy of 'care in the community'.

Series consultant, Professor Daniel Pick, Birkbeck, University of London.

Producer: Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b041yf8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Sally Griffiths - The Right Call (b041yr8t)
Following a sudden move to Swansea, Jo and Adrian are forced to reassess their relationship with their teenage daughter, Lexie.

Trying to appear normal under immense pressure begins to take its toll.

Sally Griffiths's gripping drama about keeping secrets in a tight-knit family.

Jo .... Anastasia Hille
Adrian .... Michael Bertenshaw
Lexie .... Tamsin Topolski
Mair .... Eiry Thomas
Becky .... Carys Eleri

Director: Gemma Jenkins

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2014.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b041yf8l)
Gloucestershire

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from Gloucestershire. Answering local gardeners' questions are Chris Beardshaw, Pippa Greenwood and Anne Swithinbank.

Produced by Howard Shannon
Assistant producer: Darby Dorras.
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. What can I do to give my paved front garden the 'wow' factor?
A. If you have any areas of soil, you could plant something woody like a Caryopteris. You could plant a Pieris in a container. You could also plant a Sparmannia or a Purple Yam (a kind of Diasporia) or Pennesetum grasses.

Q. Does the panel think that I could cut my box hedges (Buxus Sempervirens) down to about 4 to 6 inches (10-15 cm) from 15 inches (38cm)?
A. The Box will come back from very hard pruning, but Box can suffer from box blight. When pruning you must ensure that the foliage is thoroughly wet and the tools used are all clean and sterile. Prune when the plant is actively growing, and it's a good idea to prune one side of the hedge per season to give the plant a better chance of surviving the trim.

3) Q. I have tried growing Acanthas and have good leaf growth, but no flower growth. Could the panel suggest the best growing conditions for this plant?
A. If you grow the plant in a smaller container or a smaller area, this will help encourage flower growth. Ensure the plant is kept moist (but with good drainage) and is exposed to lots of sunshine. You could also use high-pot-ash feed to encourage growth and try growing the plant in calcium rich soil.

4) Q. Is the growth of Mistletoe on an elderly Medlar Tree (Mespilus Germanica) harming the growth of the tree? If so, what is the best method of getting rid of it?
A. The Mistletoe won't cause too much damage so long as the growth is proportional to the tree. If you harvest the Mistletoe in the proportions that you harvest the fruits of the Medlar tree, a balance will be achieved.

5) Q. Will planting more fruit trees in a fruit cage keep the weeds away?
A. Yes, you could plant some Cherries, Golden Gages, Plums, Rhubarb, Red Gooseberries (Whinham's Industry is a good variety). You could also have a go at growing Japanese Wine Berry.

6) Q. What does the future hold for a 40ft (12m) high Larch tree, the top 30ft (9m) of which looks dead?
A. The dying wood is fabulous for wildlife, so you can let it decay naturally.
Be careful of the wood falling, this could be dangerous. If you do wish to prune down to the healthy growth, this will not harm the tree. It might be worth investigating what caused the upper part of the tree to die, this could be a case of phytopthora.

7) Q. Would it cause damage to prune the main stems of a 25-year-old climbing rose in order to encourage growth further down the plant?
A. Pruning would be necessary to encourage growth further down the plant. You must prune gradually (a third of the stems each season) and train the fresh growth to create a fan structure. Don't be afraid to be ruthless with the stems you chose to prune.


FRI 15:45 State of the Nation (b041yf8n)
Pot Luck

The second in a series of hard-hitting stories looking at the lives of those living on the economic margins of society in Britain today. In Lisa Blower's 'Pot Luck', a mother finds self-worth through those who have nothing in austerity-struck Stoke-on-Trent. The reader is Jaqueline Redgewell.

Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Jacqueline Redgewell
Writer: Lisa Blower left full-time academia to become a writer in 2006. Her story 'Broken Crockery' won The Guardian's National Short Story Competition in 2009, and her story 'Barmouth' was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award in 2013. Her first novel is titled 'Sitting Ducks'.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b041yf8q)
Bob Hoskins, U Win Tin, Ian McIntyre, Gailene Stock

Matthew Bannister on

The actor Bob Hoskins who starred in the films Mona Lisa and the Long Good Friday, the TV play Pennies from Heaven and Guys and Dolls at the National Theatre. We have tributes from Sir Richard Eyre and Gemma Craven.

Also, the Burmese journalist and activist U Win Tin, right hand man to Aung Sang Suu Kyi in the pro Democracy movement.

Ian McIntyre, the BBC broadcaster and manager. He presented Analysis on Radio 4 and went on to be the network's Controller.

And Gailene Stock, the Australian ballet dancer who became the principal of the Royal Ballet School. Deborah Bull pays tribute.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b041yf8s)
British Law: Made in Brussels?

Tim Harford and the More or Less team return for another series on Radio 4.

How much British law is made in Brussels? In the lead up to the European elections, UKIP have put the issue back in the spotlight with posters claiming it's 75%. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg says it's 7%. Who's right? And how do we go about working out how much say the EU has in British law?

As the aerial search for the Malaysian Airlines plane missing in the Indian ocean is called off, could the statistical ideas of an 18th century Presbyterian minister help find the plane?

And it's 60 years since Sir Roger Bannister became the first man to run a mile in less than four minutes. Tim Harford speaks to Sir Roger to find out if four minutes really was seen as an 'impossible' barrier and debunk some myths surrounding his famous run.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b041yf8v)
Abbe and Eyal - Pen to Paper

Fi Glover introduces a conversation remembering a courtship conducted via pen and ink, and its romantic advantages over today's glib communications via social media, proving once again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b041yf8x)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news, presented by Eddie Mair.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b041v2p4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b041yr8w)
Series 43

Episode 3

Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team present a comic take on the week's news. With guests Marcus Brigstocke, John Finnemore, Laura Shavin and Grace Petrie.

Written by the cast, with additional material from Sarah Morgan and Andy Wolton. Produced by Alexandra Smith.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b041yr8y)
May Day preparations are in full swing at the village hall. Fallon has everyone organised. PC Burns is doing a road safety roadshow. Jazzer's not too impressed by him, but Lynda anticipates Jazzer will eat his words along with his cake. Emma spies some 1970s crockery that she can use for Clarrie's party next Thursday. Ed and Jazzer will be doing the music and Brookfield is hosting in one of their barns.

Lynda resolves to find out more about the plans for a new road, as soon as May Day is out of the way.

Pat's worried about Tom after his argument with Tony. Roy decides to go and check on Tom. Jazzer invites himself round as well to cheer Tom up, grabbing a few beers on the way. Tom's place is very clean and tidy. Roy and Jazzer find a note and share it with Pat. Tom has gone away to get his head straight and says not to worry. Roy tries to reassure Pat that Tom will be ok, but Pat breaks down, worried about her "baby".


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b041yr90)
Fiona Shaw, Edward St Aubyn, Under Milk Wood

The Testament Of Mary, Colm Tóibín's Man Booker-nominated novella, has now been adapted for the theatre - starring Fiona Shaw and directed by Deborah Warner. Fiona Shaw joins Razia to discuss the effort and concentration required for a 100-minute monologue, and the way the production mixes religious and secular aspects.

Award winning revenge thriller Blue Ruin tells the story of an American man, Dwight Evans, who is seeking to kill his parents killers. As events unfold Evans, played by Macon Blair, undergoes a transformation from traumatised homeless drop-out to novice assassin. Mark Eccleston reviews.

Novelist Edward St Aubyn talks about his new book Lost For Words, a satirical look at the world of literary prizes.

And a new BBC and theatre production of Under Milk Wood to mark the centenary of Dylan Thomas' birth which includes contributions from Charlotte Church, Tom Jones and Michael Sheen.

Razia Iqbal - Presenter
Nicola Holloway - producer

Image Credit: Hugo Glendinning.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b041yd46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b041yr92)
George Eustice MP, Mary Creagh MP, Kelvin MacKenzie, Jack Monroe

Following the broadcast of this edition of Any Questions (Friday 2nd /Saturday 3rd May), the following candidates are standing alongside panellist Kelvin MacKenzie for the St George's Hill ward in Elmbridge Borough Council in Surrey:
Simon Foale (Conservative)
Thomas Wicks (Labour)
Other panellists include Farming Minister George Eustice MP; Shadow Transport Secretary Mary Creagh MP; Kelvin MacKenzie; and Jack Monroe; with chair Jonathan Dimbleby. This programme was broadcast from the Knowle West Media Centre in Bristol as part of the Bristol Food Connections festival.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b041yr94)
Digging Digitally

"The archaeological wonders of today" writes Mary Beard "don't come from heroic subterranean exploration, still less from the efforts of teenagers with their spades and trowels in damp Shropshire fields. They are much more often 'virtual'".

Mary reflects on the new face of archaeology - far removed from the days of Heinrich Schliemann who famously claimed "to have gazed on the face of Agamemnon".

She traces the history of virtual archaeology from the early 1900s and admits "part of me thrills to the magic of the technology, and to the sheer bravura of displaying the plans of lost buildings, even lost towns, at the touch of a few buttons". She recognises it's far cheaper, quicker and leaves ruins where they are safest: under the ground.

But she also admits a feeling of nostalgia for the old ways. When she sees an exciting new discovery, "my heart just itches to get out my spade and my trowel and go and actually dig it up".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind (b041yr96)
Omnibus Edition

Episode 2

In the second week of his series about the history of psychology and the mind, Martin examines the medicalised model for the care of mentally disturbed patients, psychiatry. He visits a Victorian asylum, traces changing treatments - from lobotomies and Electroconvulsive Therapy to pharmacological solutions - and he considers the impact of reforms that led to 'care in the community'.

Producer: Alan Hall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b041v2p6)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b041yr98)
Northern Ireland police granted another 48 hours to quiz Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams. Six years on from Cyclone Nargis, Robin Lustig reports from Burma, celebrity publicist Max Clifford is sentenced to 8 years in prison, and a massive landslide buries hundreds of homes in Afghanistan. With David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b041yr9b)
A Lovely Way to Burn

Episode 5

Stevie Flint has survived "The Sweats", a deadly virus spreading rapidly through the population of London. Convinced that her boyfriend, Dr Simon Sharkey, has been murdered, she ignores the chaos on the streets around her to continue her investigation into his death.

Worryingly, it appears that she has herself become a target, attacked in the car park at work. Now she is pinning her hopes on the expertise of a computer hacker to gain access to the secrets she believes lie within Simon's laptop.

Apocalyptic thriller by the award-winning author Louise Welsh.

Reader: Nadine Marshall

Abridger: Siân Preece

Writer: Louise Welsh

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b041xdgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b041yr9d)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b041yr9g)
Suzanne and Julie - Rustic Rites

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between former May Queens from Lustleigh in Devon, reflecting upon the pagan roots of the coronation that marked their transition into womanhood, and proving once again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b041vvvk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b041vvvk)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b041xbx9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b041xbx9)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b041xyk2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b041xyk2)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b041ybj5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b041ybj5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b041yd46)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b041yd46)

8.51 to Brighton 00:30 SUN (b01l7mc3)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b0418xym)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b041yr94)

A Short Gentleman 23:00 THU (b019fxjh)

Act Your Age 23:00 TUE (b00zm0mc)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b041xtmc)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b041xtmc)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b041txvw)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b0418xyk)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b041yr92)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b041v27d)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b041yjy9)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b041yjy9)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b041v54q)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b041v54q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b041vvwg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b041xtmh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b041yjp0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b041yjyp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b041yr9b)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b0418wy7)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b041vvvh)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b041vvvh)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b042bfnl)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b042bfnl)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b042bg3x)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b042bg3x)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b042bjp5)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b042bjp5)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b042bjzl)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b041vcq3)

Bunk Bed 23:15 WED (b041yjp4)

Cabin Pressure 18:30 THU (b01qdzc4)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b0414qty)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b041vcqk)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b041xbxr)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b041xbxr)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b0418rcc)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b041ybj7)

Down the Line 18:30 TUE (b010m9tg)

Drama 14:15 MON (b041vvvw)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b041xbxm)

Drama 14:15 WED (b041xykd)

Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side 23:00 WED (b041yjp2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b041txvf)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b041vvv9)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b041vyyl)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b041xyjt)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b041ybhx)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b041yd40)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b0418x12)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b041yjnw)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b041txvr)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b041vvwb)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b041xdgr)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b041y1n7)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b041yjyf)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b041yr90)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0418wym)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b041yf8l)

Getting the Picture 11:30 THU (b03phd4f)

Gloomsbury 11:30 WED (b041xyk6)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b041xdgm)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b041xdgm)

Hobby Bobbies 11:30 FRI (b037jn8d)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b0418rd0)

In Business 20:30 THU (b041yjyk)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b041ybj3)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b041ybj3)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 MON (b041vvvt)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 TUE (b041xbxk)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 WED (b041xykb)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 THU (b041ybjc)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 13:45 FRI (b041yf8g)

In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind 21:00 FRI (b041yr96)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b041xtm9)

India Uncorrupted? 13:30 SUN (b041vcqf)

Infinite Possibilities and Unlikely Probabilities 19:45 SUN (b041vcqy)

Intelligence: Born Smart, Born Equal, Born Different 11:00 TUE (b041xbxc)

Isy Suttie's Love Letters 18:30 WED (b041y1n3)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b0418x10)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b041yf8q)

Leader Conference 20:00 WED (b041yjnt)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 MON (b041vvvm)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b041v54v)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b041v276)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0418zs8)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b041v2dx)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b041v2gs)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b041v2j6)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b041v2kj)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b041v2m4)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b041v2np)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b041xyjy)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b041xyjy)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b041xykg)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b041txvt)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b041txvt)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b041yf8s)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0418zsj)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b041v2f5)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b041v2h1)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b041v2jg)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b041v2ks)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b041v2mh)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b041v2ny)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b041v2f7)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b0418zsl)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b041v2fc)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b041v2fh)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0418zt3)

News 13:00 SAT (b0418zsv)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 09:00 TUE (b041w2p9)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 21:30 TUE (b041w2p9)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b041vcqm)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b041vcqm)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b0418rck)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b041yjy5)

PM 17:00 SAT (b041v272)

PM 17:00 MON (b042wv7q)

PM 17:00 TUE (b041xc1w)

PM 17:00 WED (b041y1n1)

PM 17:00 THU (b041yjyc)

PM 17:00 FRI (b041yf8x)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b041vcqr)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0419018)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b041vhbx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b041vyyh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b041xttw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b041ybhv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b041yd3y)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b041v278)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b041v278)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b041v278)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b041vcpz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b041vcpz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b041vcpz)

Roddy Doyle on Radio 4 14:30 SAT (b041v063)

Sally Griffiths - The Right Call 14:15 FRI (b041yr8t)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b041txvk)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b041v27b)

Save the Moon! 21:00 MON (b0418kft)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 MON (b041vvvp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0418zsd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b041v2f1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b041v2gx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b041v2jb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b041v2kn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b041v2m8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b041v2nt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b0418zsb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b0418zsg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b0418zsx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b041v2dz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b041v2f3)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b041v2fm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b041v2gv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b041v2gz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b041v2j8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b041v2jd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b041v2kl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b041v2kq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b041v2m6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b041v2mf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b041v2nr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b041v2nw)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b041xbxp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0418zt1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b041v2fr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b041v2h9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b041v2jn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b041v2ky)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b041v2mp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b041v2p4)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b041v54s)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b041v54s)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b041xbxf)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b041vvvf)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b041vvvf)

State of the Nation 15:45 FRI (b041yf8n)

Suicide Watch 20:00 MON (b041ysdk)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b041vcq1)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b041vcpx)

Teachers vs Government: Seventy Years of Education Policy 17:00 SUN (b03ynt6y)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b0415hbb)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b041vvvy)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b041vcq5)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b041vcqt)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b041vcqt)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b041vvw8)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b041vvw8)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b041xdgp)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b041xdgp)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b041y1n5)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b041y1n5)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b041yf8j)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b041yf8j)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b041yr8y)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b041vvw2)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b0414qv2)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b041vcqp)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0418rcm)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b041yjy7)

The First Action Movie 16:00 MON (b041vvw0)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b041vcq9)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b041vcq9)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b041txvp)

The Interrogation 14:15 THU (b041ybjf)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b041vcqh)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b041yf8d)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b041yf8v)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b041yr9g)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b041y1mz)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b0418x6g)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b041yr8w)

The Party of No 20:00 TUE (b041xdgt)

The Report 20:00 THU (b041yjyh)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b0076y1y)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b0076y1y)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b0415hbl)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b041vvw6)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b041vcqc)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b041vvwd)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b041xtmf)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b041yjny)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b041yjym)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b041yr98)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0418p7k)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b041y1mx)

Tim FitzHigham: The Gambler 19:15 SUN (b041vcqw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b041vvwj)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b041xtmm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b041yjp6)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b041yjyr)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b041yr9d)

Today 07:00 SAT (b041txvh)

Today 06:00 MON (b041vvvc)

Today 06:00 TUE (b042wrmd)

Today 06:00 WED (b041xyjw)

Today 06:00 THU (b041ybj1)

Today 06:00 FRI (b041yd44)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zrcdf)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03zrcnt)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03zrcq9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03zrcqw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b041ybhz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b041yd42)

Voices from Our Industrial Past 11:00 WED (b041xyk4)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b0418zsn)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b0418zsq)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b0418zss)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b0418zsz)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b041v2f9)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b041v2ff)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b041v2fk)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b041v2fp)

Weather 05:56 MON (b041v2h3)

Weather 12:57 MON (b041v2h5)

Weather 21:58 MON (b041v2hc)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b041v2jj)

Weather 21:58 WED (b041v2l1)

Weather 12:57 THU (b041v2mk)

Weather 21:58 THU (b041v2mr)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b041v2p0)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b041v2p6)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b041vcr0)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b041vcr2)

With Humble Duty Reports... 11:00 FRI (b041yd48)

Witness 09:30 TUE (b041xbx5)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b041v09k)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b040yzlm)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b040yzsh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b040z014)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b040z035)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b040z1cq)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b0418kg6)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b041xbxt)

World at One 13:00 MON (b041v2h7)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b041v2jl)

World at One 13:00 WED (b041v2kw)

World at One 13:00 THU (b041v2mm)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b041v2p2)

Would That Work Here? 22:15 SAT (b0418p7y)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b041vvvr)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b041xbxh)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b041xyk8)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b041ybj9)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b041yd4b)

Zeitgeisters 10:30 SAT (b03z081s)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b041901b)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b041901b)