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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 22 FEBRUARY 2014

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b03vgryd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b03vh0c2)
Barbara Taylor - The Last Asylum

Episode 5

The Last Asylum begins with Barbara Taylor's visit to the innocuously named Princess Park Manor in Friern Barnet, North London - a place of luxury flats and careful landscaping. But this is the former site of one of England's most infamous lunatic asylums, the Middlesex County Pauper Lunatic Aslyum at Colney Hatch. At its peak, this asylum housed nearly 3,000 patients - including, in the late 1980s, Barbara Taylor herself.

Writing about The Last Asylum, Booker prize winner and memoirist, Hilary Mantel said, ''We believe our response to mental illness is more enlightened, kinder and effective than that of the Victorians who built the asylums. Can we be sure? Barbara Taylor challenges complacency, exposes shallow thinking, and points out the flaws and dangers of treatment on the cheap. It is a wise, considered and timely book'.

Darian Leader has described it as 'Superb, Riveting, insightful and relentlessly honest'.

Episode 5:
Gradually perspective returns, 'something inside me shifts'. The author recalls the return of hope but she also wonders if today's mental health system would offer the same space for recovery that she was able to find.

Reader: Maggie Steed

Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Jill Waters production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vgryg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vgryj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vgryl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b03vgryn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03vh239)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day presented by the Rev Bob Fyffe of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b03vh23c)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b03vgryq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b03vgrys)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b03vgq25)
Series 26

Rachael Kiddey, Avon Estuary

This series is themed 'Ramblings Revisited' as Clare Balding walks again with some of her favourite and most memorable guests.

In March of 2006 Clare Balding went rambling with Rosie Barrett and her two children, Rachael and Rob. They took her on their local walk around the Avon Estuary in south Devon. It had always been part of their lives, as a route for venting teenage tantrums or simply as a ramble to the pub, but after Rosie's other son, Hugh, died of cancer at the age of 19 the walk took on a deeper significance. The family, and a hundred others, planted trees in Hugh's memory on a nearby hillside and a new section of the walk was created through dense woodland.

For this programme Clare revisits Rachael and Rosie and follows the same route. Rob can't make it this time, but in his place is Jonno, Rosie's husband. It's now 11 years since Hugh died and of course the trees have grown; meanwhile Rachael now works in academia where her speciality is - appropriately enough - memory, landscape and therapeutic heritage.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b03vtcwd)
Farming Today This Week: Rural planning; Building and the countryside

The mission is on to get Britain building. The government wants to see nearly a quarter of a million new homes built each year by 2016. This week, we're looking at what a building boom could mean for our rural communities.

Charlotte Smith visits Kemble, a village of around 300 houses in Gloucestershire. Kemble is on a rail mainline to London and has a shop, a school and a pub.

However, Kemble is set to grow, planning permission has recently been granted for 50 new houses on farmland. Charlotte speaks to the chairman of Kemble and Ewen Parish council who originally opposed the plans, but are now set to welcome the new development into the village.

With land prices holding strong, and each local authority having its own targets for housebuilding, finding new places to build on can be tricky for developers, but could prove lucrative for farmers. Charlotte visits the farm in Kemble which is selling its land for the new housing development. She also stops off at the village pub to see how the new homes could benefit local trade.

We also hear from the Country Land and Business Association who are calling for more affordable homes and the Campaign to Protect Rural England who want to see appropriate development in the countryside.

Sarah Falkingham visits the Yorkshire Dales to find out how proposed changes to rules on barn conversion to for domestic use have caused controversy on both sides. We also hear how locating industry and business in the countryside could provide a boost to the rural economy.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Jules Benham.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b03vgryv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b03vtcwg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Thought for the Day and Weather.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b03vtcwj)
Chef Yotam Ottolenghi

Richard Coles and Andrea Catherwood meet chef and cookery writer Yotam Ottolenghi who talks about his life and work, JP Devlin meets a quilting group, travel writer Rory MacLean celebrates the volatile and extraordinary city of Berlin, the step sister of Anne Frank, Eva Schloss, shares her Inheritance Tracks, Alison Maguire talks about the loss of her young daughter to the rare and devastating disorder Mitochondrial Disease, Anne Olivier Bell, a 'Monuments Woman', talks about her work in 1945 trying to save art stolen or under threat of destruction by the Nazis- and meeting George Clooney, three listeners say 'thank you' for a past kindness large or small and Jamie Hunter talks about realising his childhood dream: flying as a specialist aerial photographer.

Produced by Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 When Garry Met Tony (b03vtcwl)
BBC Radio 4's "Today" sports presenter Garry Richardson has a secret passion - Big Band. An even greater secret passion is to sing with one.

But Big Band is a dying art whose future depends on a few old timers determined to keep the art alive. Garry meets one of them, Tony Douglas, the charismatic 84-year-old leader of a legendary amateur band who invites Garry to train for the headline vocal spot at their next big booking.

We join Garry as he explores the future of Big Band while on the bumpy road towards vocal stardom. Garry issued a challenge on Radio 4's Saturday Live: "Find me a Big Band for me to sing Frank Sinatra with". Responding to that challenge was Tony Douglas, who now runs the amateur Big Band at the celebrated London adult education institute Morley College - a college whose past staff members include Gustav Holst, Michael Tippett and Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Garry rehearses a Frank Sinatra hit with the Morley Big Band. Along the way, he takes tips from singer Kurt Ellings, big band devotee Michael Parkinson and the legendary big band musician and singer Buddy Greco.

Garry also discovers more about the origins of big band music as dance music, sustaining Second World War morale before declining in the wake of rock and roll. But, as he finds out, the genre has not disappeared but morphed into a diverse and chameleon-like form whose future, while not certain, is fiercely defended by devotees.

The climax of the programme is when Garry finally performs at the Spice of Life jazz club in Soho. Is the man whose only claim to musical ability is playing the vibes with both hands, a second Sinatra?

Producer: Kati Whitaker

A Kati Whitaker production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b03vtcwn)
Modern Alchemy

We look at some of the most ingenious ways in which entrepreneurs and scientists are turning useless junk into precious gold, or at least extracting the elements we can go on using.

Joining Bridget Kendall are:

South African Professor of Chemical Engineering Alison Lewis, who's developed a new technique which can freeze contaminated water, and recover both pure water and the so-called 'toxins' as usable products.

Dr Angela Murray's project Roads to Riches retrieves microscopic amounts of platinum group metals - lost from cars' catalytic converters - from road dust, then uses bacteria to convert them back into catalyst, for example for hydrogen fuel cells.

Journalist Adam Minter's book Junkyard Planet reveals how the billion-dollar global recycling trade works. From his vantage point in China, he says that even the worst, dirtiest recycling is still better than the very best mining.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b03vtg9y)
The Hyenas Come to Town

London may be infested by urban foxes and Delhi beseiged by urban monkeys but Addis Ababa, as Martin Fletcher's been seeing for himself, is plagued by urban hyenas -- and they're ugly-looking creatures! David Stern's been living in Kiev, Ukraine, for five years -- and has had to get used to living with a revolution on his doorstep. A quarter of a million people, some estimate, have been detained in Syria by either the authorities or the rebels; Lyse Doucet's been talking to two men who know a lot about detainees. The long-serving leader of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, is ninety years old and Kim Chakanetsa has been finding out what people there think of their president, who's been in power nearly 34-years. And Neal Razzell's been making a programme with two reporters, one from China, the other from Japan. The programme's about the strained relationship between those two countries. But how did the reporting team get on?


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b03vtgb0)
Aviva data breach

AVIVA BELIEVA
'I believe you're with Aviva...' so begins a sales spiel from a claims chaser received by many Aviva customers after one of its employees stole details of people who had recently had accidents and passed them on to claims companies. The insurer is writing to tens of thousands of customers warning what might happen.

MONEY ON THE VERIZON
Vodafone sold its US subsidiary Verizon for £84bn and is giving about £52bn of that money back to its shareholders. They will get about 30p cash and 72p worth of Verizon shares for each Vodafone share they own. For the 130,000 individual shareholders that will mean an average pay out of about £1000 cash and £2465 worth of Verizon shares. What should you do with this windfall? And will HMRC or the IRS want a bite out of it?

AS CLEAR AS MIFID
The Markets In Financial Instruments Directive II (the II stands for 2!) will usher in a new era of honesty and openness about the true cost of investing. So say its supporters. But with nearly three years to go before it actually begins will the financial services industry find ways to continue to hide the true cost of investing? Already we are being told some popular investments may not be covered.

BRANCHING IN
Barclays, Santander and Cooperative Bank are planning to close hundreds of branches over the next year or so. Others may follow. But more and more of us never visit a branch - some banks are purely online. So does it matter? Two experts debate the future of the bank branch.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b03vh0cv)
Series 83

Episode 2

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guest panellists including Bob Mills.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b03vgryx)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b03vgryz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b03vh0d1)
Alistair Carmichael MP, Laurie Penny, Frank Field, Nadhim Zahawi MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Blundells School in Tiverton, Devon, with Secretary of State for Scotland Alistair Carmichael, Conservative backbench MP Nadhim Zahawi MP, New Statesman columnist Laurie Penny and Labour backbench MP Frank Field.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b03vtgb2)
Food banks and Ukraine

Your views on the Church's concern about the increasing numbers of people using food banks. Is the government right to make accessing welfare tougher? Or should we be doing more to cater for those caught in 'hunger crisis'? And Ukraine: is EU involvement a good thing?

Anita Anand hears your reaction to the subjects discussed in Any Questions? by the Secretary of State for Scotland, Alistair Carmichael, Nadhim Zahawi - MP for Stratford-on-Avon, Frank Field - MP for Birkenhead and journalist and author, Laurie Penny.

You can have your say on any of the subjects discussed on Any Answers? just after the news at 2pm on Saturday. Call 03700 100 444 from 12.30, e-mail anyanswers@bbc.co.uk, tweet using #BBCAQ, or text 84844.

Presenter: Anita Anand.
Producer: Alex Lewis.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00yddnm)
Classic Chandler

The Lady in the Lake

Derace Kingsley, a wealthy businessman, hires Marlowe to find his estranged wife Crystal. Kingsley fears that rich, reckless Crystal may have got herself into a scandal and the last place she was known to have been was a resort called Little Fawn Lake. Toby Stephens plays Philip Marlowe in a landmark series bringing all Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe novels to Radio 4.

Dramatised by Stephen Wyatt
Directed by Claire Grove

In 1939 Raymond Chandler created a different kind of detective, the fast-talking, trouble seeking Californian private eye Philip Marlowe, for his great novel The Big Sleep. This series brings all the Philip Marlowe novels to Radio 4's Saturday Play. The Big Sleep 1939, Farewell My Lovely 1940, The High Window 1942, The Lady in the Lake 1943, The Little Sister 1949 and The Long Goodbye 1953, and two lesser known novels, Playback 1958 and Poodle Springs, unfinished at the time of his death in 1959.

Toby Stephens is best known for playing megavillain Gustav Graves in the James Bond film Die Another Day (2002) and Edward Fairfax Rochester in the BBC television adaptation of Jane Eyre (2006). In autumn 2010 Toby starred as a detective in Vexed, a three-part comedic television series for BBC Two. He also made his debut at the National Theatre as George Danton in Danton's Death.

Marlowe is a character we think we know, but do we? He is a moral man in an amoral world. This is California in the '40's and 50's, as beautiful as a ripe fruit and rotten to the core, reflecting all the tarnished glitter of the American Dream. The police are corrupt. The businessmen are well-heeled racketeers with politicians in their pockets and their daughters have gone to the bad. It is the taxi-drivers, maids and bartenders who restore Marlowe's faith in human nature. They scratch out a living at the bottom of the pile and Marlowe is there with them, in his shabby office with its cracked sign and no air-con, waiting for the next client to walk through the door.

Raymond Chandler was born in Chicago, but spent most of his boyhood and youth in England, where he attended Dulwich College. In 1919 he returned to the United States, settling in California, where he eventually became director of a number of independent oil companies. The Depression put an end to his business career, and in 1933, at the age of forty-five, he turned to writing, publishing his first stories in Black Mask. By the time he published his first novel, The Big Sleep (1939), featuring the iconic private eye Philip Marlowe, it was clear that he had not only mastered a genre but had set a standard to which others could only aspire. He died in 1959.

Stephen Wyatt (dramatist) is a Sony Award Winning Playwright. Recent work for R4 includes dramatising three of the Complete Ripley series including The Talented Mr Ripley for Saturday Afternoon, The Yellow Plush Papers for 11.30am and Tom Jones for Classic Serial. His original play Memorials for the Missing won a Sony Award in 2008.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b03vtgb4)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Vicki Wickham; Shopping with mum; Prince

As Prince causes quite a stir in London and Manchester, we look at the appeal he holds for his female fans. Does he empower women, or just use his feminine image and female collaborators just to further his success?

The National Childbirth Trust wants the government to improve the diagnosis and treatment of tongue-tie in the UK. The parenting charity says detection is patchy and means affected babies are left unable to feed properly for weeks or even months. So should professionals routinely check for and treat tongue-tie?

Vicki Wickham, music pioneer and editor of the iconic British music television show 'Ready, Steady, Go' has recieved an OBE for services to music. She talks about booking the Beatles, working with Dusty Springfield and bringing Motown to Britain.

Seven members of the Oxford grooming ring were jailed for a total of 95 years in June 2013 after an 18-week trial at the Old Bailey. They groomed, raped and prostituted girls as young as 11 in Oxford between 2004 and 2012. We hear from 'Lara', one of the young girls who survived that abuse and her mother, 'Elizabeth'.

And why a photo of the female defence ministers of Sweden, Norway caused such a fuss. Is it so controversial for a woman to be put in charge of her country's defence? The highs and lows of a shopping trip with your mother.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Katie Langton.
Programme Editor Beverley Purcell.


SAT 17:00 PM (b03vtgb6)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b03vgr6z)
Life After CEO

Business leaders spend their lives climbing the corporate ladder, so what happens when it is time to step off? Evan Davis and guests discuss life after CEO.

Guests:
Lord Browne of Madingley, former Chief Executive of BP
Kate Wilson, former MD of Scholastic UK, Managing Director of Nosy Crow
Robert Polet, former CEO of Gucci Group

Producer: Kent DePinto.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b03vgrz1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b03vgrz3)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vgrz5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b03vtgb8)
Ray Davies, Lucy Kirkwood, Heydon Prowse, Tom Wrigglesworth, Nikki Bedi, Mariam the Believer, John Harle and Marc Almond

Clive is Face to Face with Kinks founder Ray Davies who discusses his book "Americana: The Kinks, the Road and the Perfect Riff", about travelling and performing across the USA during some of the most unsettling years in American history.

British playwright Lucy Kirkwood, whose writing credits include the award winning Chimerica and TV series Skins, speaks to Clive about her latest work 'The Smoke' which airs on Sky 1 this month.

Award winning comedian Tom Wrigglesworth talks to Clive about his new show 'Utterly at Odds with the Universe', which takes him on an emotional journey from childhood to adulthood, exploring the poignant and profound relationship with his granddad.

Nikki Bedi interviews actor turned TV prankster Heydon Prowse, one half of Bafta winning comedy team behind 'The Revolution Will Be Televised', more recently writing and directing the short piece 'Bonus Street' in response to the Channel 4 series Benefits Street.

PLUS there's music from Swedish outfit Mariam The Believer who perform 'Above The World' from their latest album 'Blood Donation', out now via Moshi Moshi.

More music from Marc Almond and John Harle who perform 'Black Widow' from their forthcoming album 'The Tyburn Tree', released Monday 24th February via Sospiro.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b03vtgbb)
Series 15

The Lonely Passion of Judith McCrudden

The award-winning series in which writers create a fictional response to the week's news. In a week which has seen debate around a possible 'fair innings approach' to the allocation of drugs to patients dependent on criteria of 'wider social benefit', and in which scientists warned that loneliness in old age is twice as bad for your health as obesity, Lucy Caldwell takes a look at the things we value most in life and how we in turn are valued.

The Lonely Passion of Judith McCrudden
By Lucy Caldwell

An elderly woman finds herself considering what her life is really worth.

Novelist and dramatist, Lucy Caldwell is the author of three novels, 'Where They Were Missed' (2006), 'The Meeting Point' (2011), which was awarded the Dylan Thomas Prize, and 'All the Beggars Riding' (2013), chosen for Belfast's and Derry's One City One Book initiative. Lucy's stage plays ('Leaves', 'Guardians', 'Notes to Future Self') and radio dramas ('Girl From Mars', 'Avenues of Eternal Peace', 'Witch Week', 'The Watcher on the Wall') have won awards including the George Devine Award and the Imison Award. In 2011 she was awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature for her body of work to date.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b03vtgbd)
Nymphomaniac; True Detective; A Taste of Honey

Will Gompertz is joined by this week's reviewers Ekow Eshun, Viv Groskop and Gillian Slovo. They've watched both parts, some four hours in total, of Lars von Trier's controversial film, Nymphomaniac. We hear what they make of the provocative director's latest offering which focuses on the sexual adventures of Joe, played by Charlotte Gainsbourg and Stacy Martin.

True Detective is the latest TV series from HBO, the US network behind The Sopranos, The Wire and, most recently, Game of Throne. Does the new eight part drama starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson live up to form?

The British Library's Beautiful Science exhibition explores how scientists visualise their discoveries, from diagrams to graphs and maps. The curators have raided the Nation's greatest collection of scientific texts for illustration, but how will their choices inspire visitors?

Gary Shteyngart's Little Failure is his memoir about emigrating from the USSR as a small child and growing up in New York. It's a story about family, the immigrant experience and writing - territory he's explored before in his novels. Does his memoir allow for something more honest?

And we review the National Theatre's revival of the kitchen sink classic, A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney which stars Lesley Sharp as a resilient single mother. How well does the gritty, social realism translate to the modern stage?

Presenter: Will Gompertz
Producer: Ruth Watts.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b03vthkv)
The Death of the Spiv

The poet Paul Henry traces the slippery movements of "The Spiv" through the archives. When Paul was a young man he was captivated by the slick, smooth-talking Private Joe Walker in the TV sitcom 'Dad's Army'. A few years later, on his first trip to London, he was soon parted from his money by a man selling dodgy cutlery from a suitcase in Petticoat Lane. Ever since then, he's been fascinated by this tricksy stereotype, and so he has gone through the archives to find out where the factual and the fictional Spiv has gone.

One of the spiv's earliest incarnations was a real life conman from the turn of the 20th century called Henry the Spiv Bagster, but the etymology of the word itself is nearly as evasive as a spiv.
It's the protean quality of the spiv, the imagined and the real, that is really appealing. Paul follows him as he dips in between light and shade - from the comic representations in the form of his beloved Private Walker and Arthur English to the far murkier and occasionally psychotic characters in films like 'They Made Me a Fugitive'.

Paul looks at the specific social and economic conditions of post-war Britain that arguably made a spiv of everyone, and tries to find out where he may have disappeared to now, in these days of relative plenty.

With contributions from actor Alan Ford, crime historian Clive Emsley, critic Robert Hanks, columnist Owen Jones and amateur historian Rob Baker who tells Paul about the horrific murder of a real life spiv. Rich archive includes 'Hancock's Half Hour' where Sid hosts a celebration of the return of rationing, first hand testimony from a self-confessed former spiv, and an interview with George Cole.

Producer: Sarah Langan.


SAT 21:00 The Barchester Chronicles (b03vd163)
Anthony Trollope's Barchester Towers

Games at Ullathorne

3/3
Games at Ullathorne
by Anthony Trollope, dramatised by Nick Warburton

Miss Thorne brings the whole of Barchester together for a summer Fete - and unwittingly introduces the two adversaries, Mr Arabin and Mr Slope. But now their rivalry is at a height, each having realised their love for the widow, Eleanor Bold.

Music composed by David Tobin, Jeff Meegan and Julian Gallant

Director: Marion Nancarrow

Barchester Towers is the sequel to The Warden. Starting 4 years later, it follows Mr Harding, his daughter Eleanor and his son-in-law, Archdeacon Grantly. Eleanor has returned home after Archdeacon Grantly has accused her of wanting to marry Obidiah Slope. Her disappointment in Francis Arabin has increased, as he seems to be more interested in the tantalising Madeline Neroni. Unknown to Eleanor, Madeline is encouraging her brother, Bertie, to pursue Eleanor too. And on top of all this, there are still two unanswered questions: who will be Warden of Hiram's Hospital and who will replace the old Dean if he dies?

The Barchester Chronicles is Anthony Trollope's much-loved series of witty, gently satirical stories of provincial life set within the fictional cathedral town of Barchester and the surrounding county of Barsetshire. With a focus on the lives, loves and tribulations of the local clergy and rural gentry, the canvas is broad and colourful, with a wonderful set of iconic characters whose lives we become intimately involved in as they grow up, grow old and fall in or out of love and friendship across the years.

And the Barchester Chronicles return with "Dr Thorne" in May.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b03vgrz7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b03vgnjs)
Science and Morality

As the flood waters rise and gales rip through the country the debate about climate change has erupted with new energy, with both sides claiming the scientific and moral high ground. So where does that leave us? Whether it's climate change, GM crops or the latest IVF technique - how should we make moral decisions when the facts are in dispute? Environmentalists accuse the sceptics of being climate change "deniers" with all the emotional charge that comes with that word "denier"; while the sceptics accuse the environmentalists of following a quasi-religious cult that is more about controlling people's freedoms than it is about anything to do with the weather. Both claim the science backs up their position and accuse the other side of ignoring and twisting the evidence. Do we rely too much on science being the only reliable and neutral source of knowledge? How often have you heard politicians fall back on the phrase "the science shows that..." when they're promoting their own values and policies? Is science filling in the moral vacuum left by our increasing scepticism of traditional forms of authority? Or is the scientific method the only thing that's saving us from dressing up our own prejudices as moral, right and just? Increasingly we live in an age when we want answers and we want them now. But arguably, we also live in an age when our scientific illiteracy is matched only by our philosophical ignorance. Thankfully the Moral Maze is here to help. Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Claire Fox, Michael Portillo, Giles Fraser and Anne McElvoy.

Witnesses are James Panton, Canon Dr Alan Billings, Angie Hobbs and Dr Evan Harris.

Produced by Phil Pegum.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b03vdfyc)
(11/17)

How often would a hebdomadal meeting take place? And in which town do the football team St Mirren play their home games? Russell Davies puts these and many other general knowledge questions to today's competitors, who come from Leeds, Accrington, Grimsby and York.

Today's winner will become the eleventh person to go through automatically to the semi-finals - but with just two weeks to go before the semi-finals begin, they'll all be trying to score as many points as they can, in the hope of securing one of the sought-after places for the highest-scoring runners-up.

As always, a Brain of Britain listener gets the chance to win a prize by outwitting the contestants with quiz questions of his or her own devising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b03vd167)
Roger McGough presents a selection of listeners poetry requests, from Lewis Carroll to Billy Collins via Kipling and Rossetti. There's also a close look at the poetry of Raymond Carver. With readers Harriet Walter and Guy Paul.



SUNDAY 23 FEBRUARY 2014

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b03vshws)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Heidi Amsinck - Copenhagen Confidential (b01hdzqy)
The Suitcase

Read by Jack Klaff

In these three specially-commissioned tales by Heidi Amsinck, Copenhagen and its surrounds are places of twilight and shadows: mysterious places where strange, occasionally bad things happen.

The Suitcase
Hopkins is a commercial traveller on his first trip to Copenhagen, but things go awry after his baggage goes missing at Kastrup airport.

Heidi Amsinck, a writer and journalist born in Copenhagen, has covered Britain for the Danish press since 1992, including a spell as London Correspondent for the broadsheet daily Jyllands-Posten. Heidi has written numerous short stories for radio including, most recently, the three story set Danish Noir (2010) which was also produced by Sweet Talk for BBC Radio 4. A graduate of the MA in Creative Writing at Birkbeck, University of London, Heidi lives in Surrey with her husband and two young sons.

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vshwv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vshwx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vshx0)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b03vshx2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b03vzhmx)
All Saints Church, Allesley, Warwickshire

The bells of All Saints Church, Allesley, Warwickshire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b03vgnjv)
Series 4

Nothing to Lose

Byron Vincent discusses nature versus nurture, and society's obligations to its weakest.

In a powerful, personal talk, Byron tells the story of his own childhood on a troubled housing estate, of how his surroundings shaped him, and of the choices he felt forced to make. Faced with similar circumstances he asks who can say they would make different choices. Byron explores the moral consequences of this for the rest of our society.

Introduced by Kamin Mohammadi.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b03vshx4)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b03vzhn7)
Father and Son

Being the father of a son who's about to turn 21, Hardeep Singh Kohli is drawn to reflect on this special parental relationship.

With reference to the writings of Marilynne Robinson, Cormac McCarthy and Arthur Miller, and music by Terry Riley, The Lemonheads and John Lennon.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio Four.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b03vcywy)
A Starling Eruption

Each year the reedbeds of the Somerset Levels become the winter home for hundreds of thousands of starlings. Making their way from across the UK and Europe these birds have found a safe haven to roost with plenty of food nearby. The famous evening murmuration, fantastic formations of huge flocks of starlings coming in to roost, brings hundreds of visitors to the levels each winter. But far fewer people see the spectacle of the dawn eruption when the starlings take off en masse to start their day foraging in the surrounding fields. Simon Clarke of Natural England talks Trai Anfield through the spectacle on Shapwick Heath. When it is all over and three quarters of a million starlings have departed for the day, thoughts turn to the reedbed and the effect the presence of so many birds has on their winter roost site and the animals they share it with.
Produced by Ellie Sans.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b03vshx6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b03vshx8)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b03vzhnn)
Pre-Nups; Exorcism; Welfare Reform

From Papal Meetings with the Council of Cardinals to the creation of nineteen new Cardinals, Shelagh Fogarty talks to the BBC's David Willey in Rome about this week's events at the Vatican.

Felicity Finch reports on how the recent floods have meant burials have become impossible in certain areas of the country.

Next week the Government considers proposals for legislation on pre-nuptial agreements, Shelagh discusses what it could mean for the institution of marriage, with the Right Reverend Mark Davies, Roman Catholic Bishop of Shrewsbury and Baroness Ruth Deech, Former Lecturer in Family Law.

As cult classic The Exorcist is reworked for Radio 4, Shelagh explores how the depiction of the Devil has changed down the years and whether it reflects society's perceptions, with Catholic Film Critic, Father Peter Malone.

Next week the European Parliament will vote on a proposal to criminalise people who pay for sex. Our reporter Trevor Barnes looks at how this could impact on those working in the sex-trade industry.

In the week that the Welfare system became a battle ground between Church and State, the Rt Revd David Walker, Bishop of Manchester, John Battle, Anti-Poverty Campaigner with the Leeds West Debt Forum and Peter Hitchens, Columnist for the Mail on Sunday discuss how welfare can be reformed in a way that is morally right.

Producers:
Jill Collins
Amanda Hancox

Contributors:
Bishop of Shrewsbury, the Right Reverend Mark Davies
Baroness Ruth Deech
Father Peter Malone
Rt Revd David Walker, Bishop of Manchester
John Battle
Peter Hitchens.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b03vzhnq)
The Cure Parkinson's Trust

Gavin Hastings presents the Radio 4 Appeal for The Cure Parkinson's Trust.
Reg Charity: 1111816 ( England & Wales) SCO44368 (Scotland)
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'The Cure Parkinson's Trust'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b03vshxd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b03vshxg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b03vzhns)
God So Loved the World

'God so loved the World.' A favourite bible verse of the international congregation at Wesley's Chapel whose diverse make up means it can be heard in over 50 languages there. Preacher: Leslie Griffiths (Superintendent); Organist: Elvis Pratt; Music Director: Andrew Earis; Producer: Clair Jaquiss.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b03vh0d3)
United We Fall

Roger Scruton argues for a voice for the English in the debate over Scottish independence. "As an Englishman I naturally ask why my interests in the matter have never been taken into account."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thswl)
Canada Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the Canada goose. These large black-necked geese with white cheeks and chinstraps are native to Canada and the USA. The first reference to them in the UK is in 1665 when English diarist, John Evelyn, records that they were in the waterfowl collection of King Charles II at St. James' Park in London.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b03vzhnv)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b03vzhnx)
See daily episodes for detailed synopsis.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b03vzhnz)
Professor Hugh Montgomery

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is Professor Hugh Montgomery.

His area of academic specialism is intensive care medicine and he's also known for his pioneering genetic research into the ACE fitness gene - which determines our capacity for either strength or endurance.

In themselves significant achievements. But he is also, a children's author, an ultra-marathon runner and the current holder of the world record for playing piano underwater. At the age of only 15 he was also part of the dive team that investigated the treasures of The Mary Rose.

He says, "I've learnt that life can end randomly and pointlessly at any time. I don't want to be on my death bed and think 'damn! I wish I'd learnt to paint and write songs'".

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b03vdknk)
Series 68

Episode 2

Radio 4's classic panel game in which the contestants are challenged to speak for one minute without hesitation, deviation or repetition on any subject given to them by the legendary host Nicholas Parsons.

The players in this first episode are Alun Cochrane, Rebecca Front, Russell Kane and Paul Merton. Subjects include "The Femme Fatale" "Bread or Toast" and "Previously on Just a Minute...".


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b03vzhp5)
The Future of Fairtrade

Matthew Hill reports on the future of Fairtrade as the label marks its 20th anniversary. Some are arguing that a new initiative is weakening the foundation's founding vision.

Produced in Bristol by Emma Weatherill.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b03vshxj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b03vzhpk)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Mapping the Void (b03s6mf0)
Dr Kat Arney meets the people trying to change the world one map at a time. These are volunteers who use their free time to map the world's unmapped places and people.

She sees how being on a map affects people's work, education and rights. And in extreme weather or after a natural disaster, she hears how mappers might help us to find the people who have fallen off the maps. She also hears from crisis mappers, people who source any information they can after tragedies to document what is happening on the ground as fast as possible.

This story starts in January 2010, when a huge earthquake hit the island nation of Haiti. Thousands of miles away, a group of American students heard about the damage, logged onto their laptops and started mapping any post-disaster information they could find online. Their aim was to help the rescue and relief services save as many lives as possible.

Four years on, international contingents of cartographers now deploy after every natural disaster, and in areas of political unrest and civil war. They scour the internet for cries for help on social media, then mark them on maps to try to get help to people who need it most.

There's also a project making a continual effort to make the most accurate physical map of the globe. Contributing could mean joining a mapping party in London. Or cycling around rural Uganda with a GPS device.

Thousands of volunteers are now spending their spare time contributing to these efforts. Some of those who started it all have become internationally recognised in a new area of expertise. As volunteers assemble around the world, Dr Kat Arney asks how powerful these maps can be and also assesses the problems that come with them.

Produced by Clare Salisbury and Jolyon Jenkins.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2014.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03vh0cj)
Wyke Regis, Weymouth

Peter Gibbs chairs GQT from Wyke Regis, Weymouth. Chris Beardshaw, Bunny Guinness and Anne Swithinbank answer questions from the audience of local gardeners.

Also in this episode, Chris Beardshaw explores Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens to find out what the incredible Jurassic Coast can teach us about plant history, and James Wong visits Bob Flowerdew's garden for the last in a series of winter topical tips.

Produced by Darby Dorras.
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:

Q. Does the panel have any knowledge of using low powered LED light panels to extend the day length for newly germinated seedlings?

A. Only in the past few years have they become usable because they now provide the correct spectrum of light to encourage healthy plant growth. Compared to the old growing lamps, they are much more cost effective and burn a lot cooler. They do provide the potential to grow things all the year round; however, it might be more efficient to wait a few weeks and sow them in the traditional manner under a cloche or propagator. It is the early plants, such as cucumbers and tomatoes, which need the extra warmth. The layers of glass surrounding them reduce their light levels, so LED panels can be really beneficial.

Q. I had a strange scaly pest covering my Blackcurrants last year. Should I be worried if I see it again?

A. It is likely to be a type of scale. They will be sucking the sap from the stems and leaving their eggs behind. You should try pruning them out and be very vigilant. Eggs will be over-wintering, so check the new growth with a magnifying glass and apply a soft soap solution too deter them. The scale only affects the older stems, so prune back hard and only leave young stems.

Q. I am trying to create a 'fedge' using Willow saplings. Can I leave them in pots to reduce their growth?

A. A 'fedge' is a hybrid between a fence and a hedge. You will need big pots and will have to maintain them. Clip at least five times a year to retain any form. You will find that they will self-graft where they are able to touch other plants.

Q. I have two Honeysuckles in my garden: one evergreen and one deciduous. They have become very woody and are no longer attractive. Would it be ok to cut them right back or should I start again?

A. It is fine to cut them to the ground but you will lose the flowers. You could cut a third each year to save some of the flowers. You may find that you only have one or two very long, old stems and little young growth to cut further down. If this is the case, try bringing some upper young growth down to the ground and encourage them to root by pegging them. Think about adding other plants, such as the hybrid flowering Clematis Jackmanii Superba. Some of the thornless roses, such as the primrose-like Rosa Banksiae 'Lutea' would work with Honeysuckle. The general rule is to prune after flowering and you won't miss a season.

Q. How can I get nice compact heads on my Cauliflower and Calabrese Broccoli?

A. Cauliflower is not easy to grow. They need generous spacing and really firm ground. Plant them in a deep drill and it will fill in as they are growing. The ground should not have been recently dug over. Make sure you cover them over so that the caterpillars don't get to them.

Q. The local roundabouts have recently been replaced by traffic islands. What can we do to inject planting back into our streets?

A. Try adding street trees to compensate. You could also try flowering hardy annuals such as Cosmos, Nigella or Calendula. They would only require a skim of soil and would look amazing for the summer period. They are also very cheap and easy to grow. Sow the seeds and you will be able to walk away for nine months before strimming them down and starting again.

Q. What could I plant in a redundant wellington boot to give me a colourful display later in the year?

A. You need to put some holes in the bottom, add some pebbles to make it sturdy and fill it with good, gritty potting compost. As the boot is a pink colour, you could use a trailing, dark-coloured Petunia.
It would be worth planting a range of bulbs and annuals for the autumn. The Guernsey Lily Nerine Sarniensis is a lovely option. It has explosions of fluted curved petals and an almost jeweled frosted finish.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b03vzhpx)
The Exile of Solzhenitsyn

In February 1974, Russia's most famous dissident writer, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, was sent into exile in the West.

His widow, Natalia, remembers the day the Soviet policemen came to their house and took him away. The couple would spend the next 20 years living in Europe and the US.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b03vzvmc)
Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice

Episode 1

by Jane Austen
Dramatised by Charlotte Jones

Mrs Bennet is determined to get her five daughters married off and secure a future for them all.
And when Mr Bingley a wealthy man arrives in the neighbourhood she wastes no time in making his acquaintance.

Director ..... Sally Avens

Published just over 200 years ago Pride and Prejudice remains one of the Nation's favourite novels; with its intellect and wit it appeals to a broad range of readers. It stands the test of time by dealing with the timeless issues of love, social class, money and mistaken judgements and by having a witty and clever though flawed heroine at its heart. Elizabeth Bennet is a thorough radical for her time and perhaps the first heroine to ask is it possible to have it all?

Pippa Nixon takes on the role of Elizabeth; she received rave reviews for her Rosalind in 'As You Like It' ' a rising young star'.
Jamie Parker (Darcy) has played Henry V at the National and is shortly to portray Hamlet on Radio 4.
Double Olivier Award winner Samantha Spiro takes on Mrs Bennet and Toby Jones Mr Collins.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b03vzvmf)
Sally Beauman, Darragh McKeon, Hamid Ismailov and Margie Orford

Sally Beauman first turned heads in the literary world in 1987 with her novel Destiny, when she received the biggest advance yet paid for a debut. Since then she's written many best-sellers including Rebecca's Tale - a re-working of Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca, and more recently The Landscape of Love set partly in the 1990s. Her latest epic, The Visitors, takes us back to Egypt in the 1920s where we have a ringside seat at the discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamun.

It was in the early hours of the 26th of April, 1986 that the world's worst nuclear disaster happened at Chernobyl. While the authorities battled secretly with the explosion in Reactor 4, the Western world started to notice the signs of nuclear fallout. This attempted cover-up and the secrecy around the Chernobyl disaster was at the heart of the Soviet Union's nuclear testing programme as well.

Guest Presenter Ellah Allfrey discusses how the Soviet's nuclear legacy is influencing today's literature with Darragh McKeon whose debut, All That is Solid Melts into Air, whose novel looks at the dreadful events that took place at Chernobyl from the perspective of those living in the Soviet Union at the time, and Hamid Ismailov, who explores the lives of a close knit family living near a nuclear testing site in rural Kazakhstan in his novel The Dead Lake.

Margie Orford sat her final university exams while detained during South Africa's State of Emergency in 1985, after being arrested at a protest march. Having won a Fulbright Scholarship to New York she became a journalist and writer with an interest in the language of violence and the role of women in South Africa.

She turned from fact to fiction almost 10 years ago with her first Clare Hart novel, Like Clockwork, and she's now written her 5th. Margie talks about her latest novel Water Music and explains the power of writing in the new South Africa

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b03vzvmh)
A dollop of nonsense and a hint of spring

Roger McGough presents a selection of listeners poetry requests, including a helping of nonsense from Mervyn Peake and Guy Wetmore Carryl, a hint of spring from Wordsworth, and a poem in praise of Galoshes. Readers are Harriet Walter and Guy Paul.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b03vf0f7)
Repeat Offenders

Probation staff are currently being told where they will be working under a radical reform of the service. The government is transferring the management of low and medium risk offenders to private companies and high risk cases will be handled by a national probation service.

The Justice Secretary, Chris Grayling, says the reforms are necessary to cut reoffending rates and save money which will be ploughed back into providing support to all prisoners who have served less than 12 months.

But opponents claim the reforms are being rushed in and will put the public at risk.

Last month, it was announced the plans have been delayed. They were due to come into effect in May but the start date has been put back until July.

The new private providers will only be paid in full if they achieve a reduction in reoffending. The programme speaks to one of the companies bidding for the contracts which says payment by results will lead to innovation and visits a prison which says it is already achieving success in a pilot scheme working with prisoners serving under 12 months.

But Home Affairs correspondent Danny Shaw also talks to probation staff about their fears for the future of partnership working and hears why some of them are threatening to quit the service.

Producer: Paul Grant.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b03vtgbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b03vshxl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b03vshxn)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vshxq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b03vzvmk)
Julian Worricker selects highlights from the previous seven days of BBC Radio.

Produced by Stephen Garner


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b03vzvmm)
Rob surprises Helen with some tickets to the see Oklahoma, but she's not sure it's suitable for Henry. But when Rob convinces her to ask Pat to babysit, Pat tells Helen she's busy. Pat explains to Tony that Rob's got to get used to the reality of living with a small child. Pat is Henry's grandmother, not a relief child minder.

Disappointed Helen apologises to Rob. He doesn't want to waste the day and decides they should go shopping for a new bed for Henry instead. In the shop Rob enjoys playing the family man, even when other shoppers are looking.

Happy Pat and Tony are admiring their new suckler herd. Pat feels Tony was trying to send a message to Peggy as well as to Tom. Tony tells Pat that he wants them to feel that they still have a future. With the new cows, they're back where they belong.

Tom and Kirsty are out house viewing but Tom is distracted. He is still-shell shocked by Tony's surprise decision to bring in new cows. Kirsty is upset by how strained Tom and Tony's relationship has become. She feels it's starting to affect the wedding planning. She urges Tom to talk to Tony.


SUN 19:15 Kerry's List (b01sd5gh)
Series 1

Episode 3

The third in a four-part sketch show co-written by and starring comedian and actress Kerry Godliman.

Kerry is a married mother of two, a stand up comedian and has two children. Her life can only properly function with her daily list - if she didn't compile this vital list, her life would simply fall apart.
Each week, this series looks at a different list and delves into Kerry's madcap world by looking at various elements of that week's list in sketches, narrative and stand up.

In this third episode, Kerry's List involves bleaching mugs, napping, sorting out cobwebs, distressing a chest of drawers, organizing CDs, keeping my friend's secret, growing vegetables and buying Puy Lentils.

Joining Kerry is her husband Ben (played by her real husband Ben Abell) and her five year old daughter Elsie (played by Melissa Bury) together with a range of bizarre characters - including an enthusiastic council environment worker, some disgruntled satsumas, a bored therapist, a Fairy Jeanmother and a very keen gym instructor.

Any busy parent who's ever compiled a list of their own will relate to Kerry Godliman's incident filled world.

The cast includes David Pusey (who co-wrote the series), Bridget Christie, Lucy Briers, Rosie Cavaliero and Nicholas Le Prevost.

Kerry Godliman is fast establishing herself as a highly skilful stand up comic and actress, from her recent appearances on Live at The Apollo (BBC 1), Derek (C4) and Our Girl (BBC 1).

Producer: Paul Russell
An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Shorts (b03vzwc1)
Series 13

Bethlehem House

Scottish Shorts, the best writing from Scotland
Bethlehem House by Merryn Glover
A return to a childhood location brings back painful memories for an ex-pat. Reader Ann Louise Ross. Produced by Eilidh McCreadie

Australian by passport, born and brought up in South Asia and now living in Scotland, Merryn Glover's stories have been widely published and her plays have been performed on stage and on radio. Her debut novel A HOUSE CALLED ASKIVAL is set in India and spans 70 years of its recent history. More information can be found at www.merrynglover.com.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b03vh0cq)
The Today programme says its "fair, balanced and impartial" in its science coverage. The statement came in response to comments after interviewing former Chancellor of the Exchequer Lord Lawson, a climate change sceptic, alongside Sir Brain Hoskins, Professor of Meteorology and Director of the Grantham Institute of Climate Change at Imperial College. Today was the cause of further frustration on Monday when many listeners felt a story about genetically modified potatoes had no opposing side represented. We speak to some of those listeners about Today's coverage of controversies in science.

British success at the Sochi Winter Olympics has created added interest in the games - as well as an 'enthusiastic' response from TV commentator Aimee Fuller to snowboarder Jenny Jones' bronze medal win last week. But what about radio coverage from Sochi? We'll be asking the Head of BBC radio sport, Richard Burgess, why 5Live Sports Extra has been quiet throughout the games when listeners have an appetite for more from Sochi.

The BBC's Director of Television, Danny Cohen, has promised no more all-male comedy panel shows. We find out from the Radio 4 Commissioning Editor for Comedy whether Radio 4 will also go so far as to ban all-male comedy shows.

And Feedback listener and folk music enthusiast Diana Butler takes us behind the scenes at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards to find out whether the network is pushing this once niche music into the mainstream.

Producers: Karen Pirie and Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b03vh0cn)
Sir Tom Finney CBE, Sid Caesar, Ian McNaught-Davis, Els Borst, Louise Brough

Matthew Bannister on

The footballer Sir Tom Finney, who played loyally for Preston and England. His friend Jimmy Armfield pays tribute.

The comedian Sid Caesar who dominated American entertainment TV in the 1950s

The climber and broadcaster Ian McNaught-Davis, who took part in the live TV coverage of the ascent of the Old Man of Hoy - and went on to explain computers to BBC viewers. Sir Chris Bonington shares his memories.

Els Borst, the Netherlands' first medically qualified Minister of Health, who brought in a new law on euthanasia.

And the tennis player Louise Brough - who won many Grand Slams, including, in 1950, the Wimbledon singles, women's doubles and mixed doubles all in the same year.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b03vtgb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b03vzhnq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b03vdkrb)
A Is for Anonymous

The wish to be anonymous in our dealings with private companies or governments, in commenting on the news or in daily life seems to be increasing.

For some, anonymity is an ironic response to the cult of celebrity that usually preoccupies us. For others, being anonymous enables us to reject the endless celebration of the individual that characterises our times and instead to find comfort and ease in the unidentifiable mass.

Frances Stonor Saunders examines if the desire for being unknown - whether by the NHS or your search engine - is set to be the new trend of our times.

She explores with those who use the cloak of anonymity - including whistleblowers, authors and medical practitioners - the benefits which concealing your identity can confer. But she also considers the dangers of not being identifiable and how these pitfalls may affect the rest of society.

Producer Simon Coates.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b03vzwc5)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b03vzwc7)
Iain Dale of LBC looks at how newspapers covered the week's biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b03vgq27)
John Ridley on 12 Years a Slave

Francine Stock talks to John Ridley, the Oscar nominated screenwriter of 12 Years a Slave about the journey from first historic hand account to the big screen also and the portrayal of race in mainstream cinema today. Critic Jonathan Romney critiques the work of director Jim Jarmusch whose latest movie 'Only Lovers Left Alive' hits theatres this week. Award winning production designer Maria Djurkovic and film historian Kim Newman discuss the enduring appeal of the French musical The Umbrellas of Cherbourg. Dialect coaches Andrew Jack and Julia Wilson-Dickson let the Film Programme in on the tricks of their trade.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b03vzhn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 24 FEBRUARY 2014

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b03vshyt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b03vgf4m)
The Great Indoors

The Great Indoors. Laurie Taylor talks to cultural theorist Ben Highmore about his history of the family home in the 20th century and how houses display currents of class, identity and social transformation.

Also, the evolution of the bathroom. Architectural historian Barbara Penner looks at that most intimate space in the home, and considers how it became an international symbol of key modern values, such as cleanliness, order and progress.

Producer: Torquil MacLeod.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b03vzhmx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vshyw)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vshyy)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vshz0)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b03vshz2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03wy182)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day presented by the Rev Bob Fyffe of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b03w010w)
GM, Shellfishing losses, Ramularia

Cornish shell fishermen are asking for government help, after the recent storms. They say they've lost tens of thousands of pounds' worth of lobster and crab pots and, as it's difficult to get insurance on equipment, some fear this could put them out of business.

The Danish government is about to spend a million pounds on research into ramularia, a fungal disease which affects barley, particularly in the North of England, Scotland and Scandinavia. Charlotte Smith hears from a researcher at Scotland's Rural College, which is also involved in the project.

And genetic modification - one of the most contentious topics in modern agriculture. Farming Today embarks on a week looking at how it works, how it's regulated, its benefits and its drawbacks.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b03vshz4)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thvvc)
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the lesser spotted woodpecker. Lesser spotted woodpeckers are the smallest of our three woodpeckers and about the size of a house sparrow. They have horizontal white stripes across their backs, hence their old name of 'barred woodpecker'. The lesser spotted woodpecker is one of our most elusive birds. For most of the year it's relatively silent but in late February and March, males begin to stake out their territories in old woods and orchards by calling loudly and drumming softly.


MON 06:00 Today (b03w010y)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b03w0110)
Adair Turner on the Politics of Finance

Tom Sutcliffe discusses money with the American economist Charles Calomiris, who looks back at the history of financial disasters and argues that they're caused more by government failures, than individual bankers. The former head of the Financial Services Authority, Adair Turner, might agree on the need for structural changes, but famously said 'heads should roll' in the banking industry, and has damned much of the banks' trading activities as 'socially useless'. If there has been a moral vacuum at the heart of the banking industry, are there lessons to be learnt from Islamic banking? The financial advisor Harris Irfan believes it's a system that is more equitable and transparent. Seventy five years ago Steinbeck's great depression novel, Grapes of Wrath, was published and Maggie Gee explores its legacy and asks where the wrath is now?

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b03w0112)
Solomon Northup - 12 Years a Slave

Episode 1

The memoir which inspired Steve McQueen's Oscar nominated film of the same title.

This powerful first-hand account of the degradations and evils of slavery was published in 1853 - eight years before the American Civil War and twelve years before the abolition of slavery in the United States in 1865.

Solomon Northup, the son of an emancipated slave, was a free man who lived with his wife and children in New York, working as a carpenter and violinist. In 1841, two circus promoters offered Northup a high-paying job and he travelled south with them to Washington D.C. Soon after arriving in the capital, he was drugged, beaten and sold into slavery. Threatened with murder should he ever reveal what had happened, he spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity in Louisiana.

After his rescue, Northup was reunited with his family and went on to publish this eloquent and important memoir. It was an immediate bestseller.

Reader: Rhashan Stone

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03w0114)
Mary Wilson; Woman's Hour Power List Review

Mary Wilson, founding member of one of the most successful female singing groups in recording history, The Supremes. Eve Pollard and Anne McElvoy review the Woman's Hour Power List 2013. Women and WWI - a widow's story. In an archive recording Kitty Morter, recalls the moment her young husband Percy joined the Army and Laura Clouting from the Imperial War Museum talks about recruiter and music hall star Vesta Tilly. Seida Saric, Country Director of Women for Women International Bosnia and Herzegovina, on women's role in building stable communities following conflict.

Presenter Jane Garvey
Producer Jane Thurlow.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w0116)
Lindsay Ashford - The Mysterious Death of Jane Austen

Episode 1

Twenty-six years have passed since the death of Jane Austen. Armed with a lock of Austen's hair as perhaps her best clue, Anne Sharp, former governess to the Austen family and Jane's close friend, has decided at least to tell her story-a story of family intrigues, shocking secrets, forbidden loves, and maybe even murder.

Upon its publication in the UK, Lindsay Ashford's fictional interpretation of the few facts surrounding Jane Austen's mysterious death sparked an international debate and uproar. None of the medical theories offers a satisfactory explanation of Jane Austen's early demise at the age of 41. Could it be that what everyone has assumed was a death by natural causes was actually more sinister? Lindsay Ashford's vivid novel delves deep into Austen's world and puts forth a shocking suggestion-was someone out to silence her?

Andrew Davies, who has a phenomenal track record in adaptation, has collaborated with Eileen Horne in recent years, first as writer and producer on a new TV version of Room with a View (2007) and as writer and editor on The Purple Land for Radio 4 (2011).

Written by Lindsay Ashford
Adapted by Eileen Horne and Andrew Davies

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 Out of the Ordinary (b03w0118)
Series 2

The Secrets of Picking Up Women in Public

In a new series bringing stories from the left field, Jolyon Jenkins investigates the underground brotherhood of "pick up artists" - men who claim to have have turned the art of seduction into a science.

It all started with a best-selling book written ten years ago called The Game, which revealed the existence of a band of men who had incredible success with women, not because of their looks, but because they had apparently deconstructed the mystery that is the feminine psyche. As a result of the book, men around the world formed pick up artist societies or "lairs". There are trainers, coaches, videos and forums. They have their own vocabulary and acronyms. The central tenet of their faith is that men can approach random women out of the blue and, provided they structure the interaction right, success is virtually guaranteed.

Jolyon spends an afternoon roaming the West End with members of the "London Seduction Society", and then joins a weekend bootcamp in which four unconfident, inexperienced men are trained by expert seducers in how to pick up women in Oxford Street. Is it all deeply misogynistic or just another form of self-help?

Presenter/producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 11:30 In and Out of the Kitchen (b03w01zk)
Series 3

The Travel Piece

Damien confronts his hatred of barbecuing while Mullaney is sorting out his “shoffice".

Written by Miles Jupp.

Damien Trench ...... Miles Jupp
Anthony ...... Justin Edwards
Ian Frobisher ...... Philip Fox
Marion Duffett ...... Lesley Vickerage
Damien's Mother ...... Selina Cadell
Ray Jarrow ...... Christopher Brand
Shooting Instructor ...... Christopher Brand

Producer: Sam Michell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b03w01zm)
Working in the cotton industry

The first of our special reports into the cotton industry. Behind every pound you spend on a t-shirt is a complex process involving the toughest factory conditions in the world. You and Yours has been given exclusive access to see what some of the companies are doing to try and change that. Today we report from India what it is like for children working in the industry.

How the police are protecting older people from being victims of fraud by arresting them.

And why students are turning to food banks.


MON 12:57 Weather (b03vshz6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b03vshz8)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Let's Talk About Rama and Sita (b03w01zp)
A Good Man?

Award-winning poet and broadcaster Daljit Nagra takes stories from the Ramayana into his community and finds the ancient tales alive with contemporary Asian dilemmas. Examining Rama, as a warrior, a husband and a son, he asks whether he is a useful role model for men today.

Contributors include Hindu teacher and theologian, Akhandhadi Das, Kripamoya Das - Senior Priest at Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna Temple, musician Kuljit Bhamra, playwright Amber Lone, Jatinder Verma - Artistic Director of Tara Arts, and students from Avanti House Free School in Stanmore.

Producer: Julian May


MON 14:00 The Archers (b03vzvmm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b03w01zr)
I Am Anonymous

by Mateusz Dymek. Hacktivist Marco has promised his wife he won't mess around online again. But the arrest of an old comrade-in-arms makes this promise harder and harder to keep.

Directed by Abigail le Fleming.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b03w01zt)
(12/17)
Russell Davies welcomes competitors from East Yorkshire, Worcestershire, Lancashire and North Wales to Media City in Salford for the last of the 2014 heats. Up for grabs is the last of the automatic places in this year's Brain of Britain semi-finals.

As well as competing with one another to answer the questions, the contestants have to grapple with puzzles submitted by a listener, who'll win a prize if they can't answer the questions successfully.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b03vzhp5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Crikey DM! David Jason's Tribute to Cosgrove Hall (b03ccz0r)
In 1983 Cosgrove Hall Films' Danger Mouse topped the TV ratings with 21 million viewers – beating Coronation Street. To this day, the Bond-style secret agent, super hero mouse holds the record for viewers of a British children's TV show.

The voice of Danger Mouse himself - Sir David Jason - tells the colourful story of Cosgrove Hall, the legendary Manchester animation company behind so many of the nation's best-loved children's TV programmes.

For 30 years, BAFTA and EMMY award-winning animation duo Brian Cosgrove and the late Mark Hall delighted children (and often adults) with their many memorable creations - from the often surreal Chorlton and the Wheelies, Jamie and the Magic Torch, and Count Duckula, to remakes of cherished classics like Noddy, Andy Pandy and Bill and Ben.

Cosgrove Hall's extensive back catalogue also includes Wind in the Willows, Cockleshell Bay, Roald Dahl's The BFG, Engie Benjy and Kenny Everett's daft animated space adventure Captain Kremmen, as well as animated lost episodes of Doctor Who.

Sir David explores Cosgrove Hall's triumphs - as well as the tragedies that led this iconic company to close and its historic studios to be knocked down. He also considers the company's legacy and influence on today's British animation industry - and beyond.

And he offers a rare insight into its colourful working relationship with stars like Kenny Everett as well as revealing the truth behind the rumours that Danger Mouse is set to make a comeback. As DM's sidekick Penfold would say, Crikey!

Producer: Kellie Redmond
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b03w02s6)
Are Institutions in Decline?

The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, recently suggested that the Church of England may be extinct within a generation unless it learns to connect with young people. The Church of England is the most obvious example of a religious institution in serious decline, but it's certainly not the only one. Why is this happening? If our major religious institutions die, who will notice? And what might take their place?
Joining Ernie to discuss the future of religious institutions are the Rev Sam Wells, Vicar of St Martin in the Fields in London and a visiting Professor in Christian Ethics at Kings College London; Linda Woodhead, Professor in the Sociology of Religion at Lancaster University; and Jasjit Singh, Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Leeds.

Producer: Rosie Dawson.


MON 17:00 PM (b03w02s8)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vshzb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b03w02sb)
Series 68

Episode 3

The panel game in which the contestants are challenged to speak for one minute without hesitation, deviation or repetition on any subject given to them by the legendary host Nicholas Parsons.

This week's players are Sheila Hancock, Richard Herring, Josie Lawrence and Paul Merton. Subjects include 'Hot Cross Buns' and 'How to Win an Argument with a Teenager'.

Producer: Tilusha Ghelani.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b03w02sd)
Jill is settling in to life at Brookfield. Ruth is overjoyed to have help around the house. Jill feels it's the least she can do for them.

Conversation is still strained between Tom and Tony. Tom feels Tony is out of his depth making a move to beef cattle, but Tony feels Tom is really implying he's too old to learn. Tom accepts he'll have to reduce his own order of new weaners.

Following an inspection from the insurers, Kenton and Jolene discuss the rain damage. Jolene berates Kenton for not clearing the drains when she asked. Although things could have been worse, Jolene is still upset about her ruined clothes.

Jill is organising a talk for the WI from PC Burns about home security. Jolene remarks on what a catch he is. Jill hopes this might encourage a turnout from some younger members.

Tom confides in Kirsty that he thinks the future of the farm is in jeopardy. Kirsty is pleased she has the wedding and honeymoon to distract her. Wanting to go back to their roots, Kirsty suggests an eco-friendly, albeit pricey, rainforest lodge in Costa Rica. Tom wants it to be the trip of a lifetime and decides they should just book it.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b03w02sg)
The Book Thief; Joseph Rykwert; Isy Suttie; Monologues for black actors

With John Wilson.

Based on the bestselling novel by Markus Zusak, the film of The Book Thief - starring Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson - tells the story of a spirited young girl Liesel in World War II Germany. Liesel finds solace from the war by stealing books and sharing them with others. Novelist Meg Rosoff reviews.

Professor Joseph Rykwert is one of the few critics to win the prestigious Royal Gold Medal for architecture for a body of work that includes the ground-breaking book The Idea Of a Town. Written in 1963, it warned of the problems of traffic congestion in cities and the rise of the high-rise building. He tells John if anything has improved over the last 50 years.

The comedian and actress Isy Suttie, from the TV series Peep Show, discusses her new stage role in a 'musical fable' The A-Z of Mrs P, about Phyllis Pearsall, the woman who set out to map an entire city in 1936, resulting in the classic A-Z map of London.

Two books of monologues for black actors have been published to provide young performers with a diverse range of speeches to use at auditions. The monologues are taken from the Black Play Archive and have been compiled by theatre producer Simeilia Hodge-Dallaway. She and actor Jimmy Akingbola explain why these books are needed and discuss whether there is a glass ceiling for black British actors.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w0116)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 My Teacher Is an App (b03w02sj)
The Classroom of the Future

In a leafy suburb of Silicon Valley, 9 year olds lie on their tummies on the floor, log on to their silver Chromebooks, and begin doing maths lessons. Their teacher logs on as coach and gives one-to-one instruction...exactly where it's needed.

The Khan Academy is an online teaching service whose mission is to provide a free world-class education to anyone, anywhere. In Bill Gates' view, it's "a radical rethinking of what it means to go to school". With 10 million users every month logging onto their online videos, Salman Khan - the Academy's founder - is arguably the most important teacher in the world.

"We're losing some of our most creative minds" Salman Khan tells Sarah. "The current model of education is 200 years old...we have to change that". He argues that - for the first time - technology is now available to provide totally "personalized learning". "This is really a once in a lifetime opportunity....we just can't mess it up".

In this programme, Sarah sets out to discover what the classroom of the future will look like.

She visits a Rocketship school in a deprived part of San Jose. Around a quarter of the school day in this primary is spent online. As a result, they've laid off teachers, reinvested the money so that those they've kept are paid up to 50% more than teachers in nearby schools - and their results have soared. "Our students are now competing with some of the most affluent in the state" says the headmaster, Preston Smith. But their model is highly controversial.

Sarah also talks to Nolan Bushnell, the "father of modern video gaming" and founder of Atari. His latest venture is a company called BrainRush. Bushnell believes children can learn almost anything through video games. As Sarah gets to grips with the names of South American countries in one of Bushnell's new video games, he tells her "We want to make education addictive. In this brave new world, school has to compete for the engagement of the mind. And a teacher with a piece of chalk can't compete".

We meet Rupert Murdoch's head of education, Joel Klein. His company has developed a tablet that they're rolling out to schools across America. "Our ambition, whether it's our tablet or other people's tablet, would be that every kid would have one of these things. The more we can get entrepreneurs and private capital to move into this space...the better the education system is going to be". It's big business. "Are you planning to sell these tablets in the UK" Sarah asks Klein. "Right now our focus is on the U.S. If and when it becomes appropriate for us to think about expanding we'll look around the world".

Much of the running on this new world of online education is being done by people who stand to make a great deal of money.

Is this the future of education - the answer to the present funding crisis? Have traditional teaching methods outlived their usefulness? And how do children learn best?

There are many sceptics. And from some unusual sources. Sarah meets the teachers and parents of the Waldorf School - where three-quarters of the pupils have parents working for companies like Google, Apple and Yahoo - but whose classrooms don't have a single computer.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b03w02sl)
Life by Lottery

Should we use chance to solve some of our most difficult political dilemmas? From US Green Cards to school place allocation, lotteries have been widely used as a means of fairly resolving apparently intractable problems. Jo Fidgen asks whether the time has come to consider whether more of society's problems might be solved by the luck of the draw.

Producer: Leo Hornak.


MON 21:00 Nature (b03vdx7w)
Series 8

In Search of Humpback Whales

Every year between January and April, Humpback whales from all around the North Atlantic Ocean gather in an area called Silver Bank 100km north of the Dominican Republic to breed. After calving, the whales migrate north from these lower latitudes to their high latitude, summer feeding grounds.
In June, wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson travelled to Husavik on the north coast of Iceland where he joined a whale watching trip to look for Humpback whales on their feeding grounds - and perhaps even see some of the same animals which he had recorded on their breeding grounds earlier in the year.
For many years scientists thought that male humpbacks whales only sing on their breeding grounds but in Iceland, Marianne Rasmussen and her PhD student have recorded whales singing on their feeding grounds in winter during the past four years. This has also been observed elsewhere, and one theory is that these are young immature whales singing. The songs of Humpback whales are quite astonishing; "gorgeous peals of sound, sounded like everything that a cello can do .. and organised as though it were part of a song" says Katy Payne who studied the evolving nature of these songs. The whales in any single population sing the same song, but the songs gradually evolve and change over time, for reasons which are not fully understood. There is still much debate as to why males sing; one theory is that it's to stimulate the females into oestrous. At Silver Bank, Chris found himself surrounded by whales hanging vertically, head down, motionless in the shallow waters created by a coral platform. When he lowered a pair of hydrophones (underwater microphones) beneath the boat, the clear waters were filled with the beautiful, haunting songs of Humpback whales.
Producer Sarah Blunt.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b03w0110)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b03vshzd)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b03w02sn)
Ukraine: will Russia intervene?
Inside Syria's Yarmouk refugee camp.
Uganda's president confirms anti-gay legislation.
With Roger Hearing.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03w02sq)
Dubliners

Grace (Part Two)

Naturalistic in style, 'Dubliners' depicts an array of characters, graduating progressively from childhood, through adolescence, to maturity, culminating in the final story, 'The Dead'. The stories each centre on the idea of a moment of epiphany, but are grounded in the minutiae of daily life. Stories of love, loss, con men, friendship, alcoholism, marriage, politics and family, combine to create a unified world, a celebration of a city, in the unparalleled prose of its most famous son.

Abridger ..... Doreen Estall
Reader ..... Stephen Rea
Producer ..... Stephen Wright
Music by ..... Neil Martin.


MON 23:00 Short Cuts (b03bds44)
Series 4

Fictions

Josie Long presents a sequence of unbelievable mini documentaries looking at bending the truth, fantasists and outright liars.

Josie hears how the writer Ross Sutherland invented a mysterious secret society by accident and looks for secrets scratched into the sidewalks of San Francisco by an enigmatic writer known only as 'Nikko'.

The items featured in the programme are:

Hearts and Crafts
Featuring the voices of Harriet Craft

Fictions
Featuring Raji James

Wash Club
Featuring Ross Sutherland

Nikko
Originally broadcast in the episode 'Standouts' on Snap Judgement

Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03w1325)
The unfolding events in Ukraine are discussed by MPs and peers. Mark D'Arcy has the best of a statement given to the Commons by the foreign secretary William Hague. Also on the programme, why should family holidays cost more during school holiday time than school term time? The government suffers a defeat in the House of Lords over changes to the state pension. Reaction to the decision of ATOS to stop making work capability assessments. And MPs argue over changes to criminal justice legislation.



TUESDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2014

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b03vsj07)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b03w0112)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj09)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vsj0c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj0f)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b03vsj0h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03wy17f)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day presented by the Rev Bob Fyffe of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b03w03b6)
Booming farm business, Early flowers, Flooded earthworms

New research is published today, to mark the start of the annual NFU conference, the last one for the current president. Figures on the contribution made by the farming sector to the UK economy make surprising reading.

For nearly two months, whole swathes of farmland and pasture have been underwater. Grass has been damaged, crops have drowned, and seawater has made some land unusable. But how has the flooding affected creatures like earthworms which benefit the soil? Anna Hill finds out.

And the weather's finally starting to feel like spring, with blossom and buds are appearing, but for flower growers it may not be good news. The unusual weather conditions we've had this winter have combined to create a situation which could affect the price and availability of daffodils at Easter.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Campbell.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwm0)
Golden Pheasant

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the golden pheasant. Golden pheasants are native to the mountains of China where they live in thick bamboo forest. The males are brightly-coloured; gold and scarlet, with a long tail and a cape of black and orange which they use to woo the much duller brown females. From the late 1800's Golden Pheasants were introduced to many bird collections and shooting estates around the UK. Today the strongest colonies are in East Anglia.


TUE 06:00 Today (b03w1380)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b03w03bb)
Sue Black

Forensic anthropologist Professor Sue Black began her career with a Saturday job working in a butcher's shop. At the time she didn't realise that this would be the start of a lifelong fascination with anatomy.

Her job has taken her to some extreme and challenging locations to identify human bodies, such as Kosovo, where she uncovered evidence used in the UN's War Crimes Tribunal in The Hague.

Back home, Sue has been integral in solving many high-profile criminal cases, including cracking Scotland's biggest paedophile ring in 2009.

In The Life Scientific, Jim Al-Khalili asks how she deals with the emotional pressures of the job, and why she is so fascinated by the inner workings of the human body.

In her spare time, Sue Black also advises crime fiction authors like Val McDermid, providing inspiration for new plotlines and characters.

In return, Val and a group of writers have offered to help with Sue's latest challenge - fundraising for a mortuary. This facility will use new techniques to embalm bodies and promises to revolutionise the way surgeons are trained.

Producer: Michelle Martin.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b03w03fy)
City Women and Motherhood

Andrea Catherwood decided to give up her career as a foreign correspondent after she had her first child as leaving him for weeks or months at a time to report from the frontline was something she felt she wasn't able to do. Instead she moved into presenting the news.

Last month Nigel Farage said controversially that if women in the City were prepared to sacrifice family life they could do just as well as men.

But there are now a number of senior City women who do combine their careers with motherhood. Charlotte Crosswell is Chief Executive Officer of the trading derivatives platform of NASDAQ in London and a mother of one, so how does she make it work ?
This programme was first broadcast in 2014 and Charlotte Crosswell is now the current CEO of Innovative Finance.
The producer is Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b03w0gw4)
Solomon Northup - 12 Years a Slave

Episode 2

Extracts from the powerful memoir which inspired Steve McQueen's Oscar nominated film of the same title.

Solomon Northup was a free man who worked as a carpenter in the state of New York. In 1841, two circus promoters offered him a high-paying job and he travelled south with them to Washington D.C. Soon after arriving in the capital, he was drugged, beaten and sold into slavery. Threatened with murder should he ever reveal what had happened, he spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity in Louisiana.

After his rescue, Northup was reunited with his family and went on to publish this eloquent and important memoir. It was an immediate bestseller.

Reader: Rhashan Stone

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03w0gw6)
Alice Herz-Sommer; Plus-size fashion

Maternity leave - have we got it right in the UK? Writer Deborah Coughlin on the lack of plus size fashion on the high street; concert pianist Alice Herz-Sommer, the oldest known survivor of the Holocaust, died at the weekend at the age of 110; The Office of National Statistics release new data on teenage pregnancy tomorrow - rates have fallen significantly in recent years - we explore the drop in numbers and why UK levels are still higher than those in other western European countries.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w0gw8)
Lindsay Ashford - The Mysterious Death of Jane Austen

Episode 2

Twenty-six years have passed since the death of Jane Austen. Armed with a lock of Austen's hair as perhaps her best clue, Anne Sharp, former governess to the Austen family and Jane's close friend, has decided at least to tell her story-a story of family intrigues, shocking secrets, forbidden loves, and maybe even murder.

Upon its publication in the UK, Lindsay Ashford's fictional interpretation of the few facts surrounding Jane Austen's mysterious death sparked an international debate and uproar. None of the medical theories offers a satisfactory explanation of Jane Austen's early demise at the age of 41. Could it be that what everyone has assumed was a death by natural causes was actually more sinister? Lindsay Ashford's vivid novel delves deep into Austen's world and puts forth a shocking suggestion-was someone out to silence her?

Andrew Davies, who has a phenomenal track record in adaptation, has collaborated with Eileen Horne in recent years, first as writer and producer on a new TV version of Room with a View (2007) and as writer and editor on The Purple Land for Radio 4 (2011).

Written by Lindsay Ashford
Adapted by Eileen Horne and Andrew Davies

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Nature (b03w0gwb)
Series 8

Bewitched by Dragonflies

In 1985, a dragonfly landed on Ruary Mackenzie Dodds. Up until this time, he had never had much interest in insects, but so astonished and bewitched was he by "this beautiful" insect which had landed on his shirt, that he decided to find out more about dragonflies and in time that led to the founding of The Dragonfly Project to enthuse and educate people about dragonflies. In August 2013, Ruary 'handed over the baton' of the Dragonfly Project to The British Dragonfly Society who will continue this work alongside their own work to conserve dragonflies and their wetland habitats, but Ruary's eagerness to share his enthusiasm for these insects continues "I don't know what it is about dragonflies ... they absolutely electrify me ... I get so excited when I see them in the air". In this programme, Ruary searches for dragonflies and their larvae amongst the reeds and watery places of Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire and offers a fascinating insight into their lives. He's not disappointed there are common and ruddy darters, as well as brown and migrant hawkers darting, dashing and hovering over the reeds, or ovipositing their eggs in the water. Robin Wootton describes their extraordinary versatility; "They really have all the capabilities of a helicopter but they do it much quicker" and Milly Sharkey reveals how these insects can see colour and polarised light, even underwater in the larval stage; an advantage in a murky pond. Dragonflies can be traced back in the fossil record over 300 million years, and yet we still have much to learn about these 'Horse Stingers' and 'Devils Darning Needles' as they were once called, being falsely believed to sting or bite, when instead they are quite harmless. Just 'like a little piece of flying crystal' says Ruary.
Producer Sarah Blunt.


TUE 11:30 Shine like Tokyo - Northern Soul Goes East! (b03bd23y)
DJ Russ Winstanley unleashed the Wigan Casino on the world playing Northern Soul to thousands of young people in the club's legendary all-nighters.

The 70s were the heyday of the music genre and the Wigan Casino even beat New York's Studio 54 for title of Billboard Magazine 'best disco in the world' in 1978.

Northern Soul is often thought to be firmly rooted in place and time but four decades on from the opening of the Wigan Casino, Annie Nightingale discovers how it's capturing the imagination of people as far east as Japan.

She looks back at the roots of Northern Soul before hearing from DJs spinning their discs in Kobe, a Northern Soul band in Tokyo and regulars at night spots in several Japanese cities.

Soulies in England and Japan reflect on what it is that helps them 'keep the faith' while Annie tries to work out if there's a connection between the Northern England of the 70s and the Japan of 2013.

Producer: Liam Starkey
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b03w0gwd)
Call You and Yours: Fast Fashion - Affordable or Exploitative?

Fast fashion, whether it's high end or high street. Should we care more about the provenance of the clothes we buy rather than the price? Call or email Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b03vsj0k)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b03vsj0m)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Let's Talk About Rama and Sita (b03w0gwg)
A Good Marriage?

Award-winning poet and broadcaster Daljit Nagra takes stories from the Ramayana into his community and finds the ancient tales alive with contemporary Asian dilemmas. Today he examines the marriage of Rama and Sita and explores its relevance to marriage today.

Contributors include Jatinder Verma, Artistic Director of Tara Arts, playwright Amber Lone, Akhandhadi Das - Hindu teacher and theologian, Bhavit Mehta - director of London's South Asian Literature Festival, members of the City Hindus Network, and the congregation of Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna Temple.

Producer: Marya Burgess


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b03w02sd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 McLevy (b03w0gwj)
Series 10

The Cat's Claw

Victorian detective drama, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode two: The Cat's Claw.

Derelicts in Leith are being attacked and killed in the street. McLevy investigates two cases where the victims have been scarred as if by the claw of an animal.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b03w0gwl)
Series 6

Glasgow

Jay Rayner and his team of food experts are in Glasgow for this week's episode of The Kitchen Cabinet.

Answering questions from the audience are resident food historian Dr Annie Gray, Catalan cuisine specialist Rachel McCormack, Scottish-Indian fusion chef Angela Malik, and chef James "Jocky" Petrie, who was Head of Creative Development at Heston Blumenthal's 'Fat Duck' restaurant for eleven years.

From the UK's most 'Vegan-Friendly City 2013', the panel explores the history of veganism, tastes an unusual Victorian curry recipe, and asks what to feed a vegetarian who won't eat vegetables or pulses.

Also in this week's programme, we discuss the Glaswegian relationship between food and football, the grand tradition of Afternoon Tea, and the new culinary experiences we should all seek out.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Victoria Shepherd.
Assistant Producer: Darby Dorras.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b03w0gwn)
A Greener Way to Go

Many of us are trying to lead a greener life, but how many of us will continue the trend to its logical conclusion... into death? On this week's Costing the Earth, Tom Heap takes to the ocean waves, the forest floor, and the lab, to try and suss out the 'greenest way to go'.

Over 70% of us here in the UK choose to be cremated, and the majority of the rest are buried - '6 feet under' - in traditional cemeteries. But for those who might worry about the fossil fuel cost of being burned, or the toxic embalming fluids commonly used in burial, there are other options on the table.

We take a blustery boat trip just off the Isle of Wight with one of the UK's only 'Marine Funeral Directors', to hear about the specially designed coffins that help you sink to your final resting place beneath the waves. And if you don't fancy sleeping with the fishes, how about sleeping beneath the shade of a mighty oak? Tom heads to the picturesque Downs of East Hampshire to hear how your final resting place could go hand in hand with an ambitious reforestation project. And he takes a glance into the future of the industry too, with two methods which could be out of a science fiction novel. How would you like your mortal remains to be chemically dissolved in high pressure alkali solution? Or perhaps freeze-dried and frozen, then shattered into an organic powder? And will these 'futuristic' new methods of getting our 'Ashes to Ashes', ever become available on our own shores?

Produced in Bristol by Emily Knight.


TUE 16:00 The Design Dimension (b03w0j48)
Series 1

Design and Truth

Design is one of the most powerful forces in our lives. None of us can avoid its influence. It's a ubiquitous element of our world that determines how we feel, what we do and whether we succeed or fail. In this four-part series, the architectural writer Shumi Bose explores its power to affect us, for better and worse.

In each episode of 'The Design Dimension' Shumi charts a different aspect of our relationship to design - desire, damage, choice and, finally, truth.

In the last programme of this series, Shumi investigates the concept of 'truth' in design. We hear from a mapmaker who believes that "maps are arguments about places" and that they never accurately represent the world, a pair of artworld pranksters who challenge our expectations of architecture, and we explore how powerful - and potentially misleading - the ways in which we visualise data can be.

Produced by Alan Hall and Hana Walker-Brown
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b03w0562)
Andrew Maxwell and Kamila Shamsie

Irish stand-up comedian Andrew Maxwell and Pakistani writer Kamila Shamsie disagree totally over the books each recommends as a must-read, but find common ground with Harriett Gilbert's choice - Doris Lessing's first impressions of the English. Andrew is a John Steinbeck fan, and chooses his first successful novel, Tortilla Flat. Kamila picks Clear Light Of Day by Anita Desai, which is set in Old Delhi post-partition. Harriett's choice is the little-known but compelling memoir In Pursuit of the English by Doris Lessing. Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b03w0j4b)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vsj0p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Dilemma (b03w0j4d)
Series 3

Episode 4

Sue Perkins puts Nick Doody, Angela Barnes, Dominic Lawson and Cush Jumbo through the moral and ethical wringer.

The panellists attempt to resolve dilemmas based around horses and awkward family situations.

Plus a real-life dilemma about identity - and an attempt to help an audience member with affairs of the heart.

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b03w0j4g)
Jim and Alan discuss the Jack Woolley window they're planning to install in the church. Alan is concerned about finalising a design for it. Jim suggests a design competition at the local school, which everyone can then have a vote on.

Kirsty tells Helen that she's decided not to buy the designer dress she picked out. It's just too expensive. Mindful of the uncertainty at Bridge Farm, Kirsty wants to simplify the wedding for Tom's sake.

Alan tells Jim that he's planning on conducting The Imposition of the Ashes at this year's Lent service. He's hopeful that this, along with the passion play which will tour the area during Holy Week, will mean that Lent will kick off with a bang.

Helen tells Rob that she thinks Kirsty is compromising too much with her wedding. Rob is distracted trying to build Henry's new bed. When it all falls over, he loses his temper and asks them to leave him to it.

Remorseful Rob later apologises and Helen is grateful for his hard work. Henry is overjoyed too. Rob tries to call Jess but gets her voicemail. He leaves a message. He needs to talk to her. Soon.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b03w0j4j)
Stewart Lee, Jonathan Creek, Versailles

With John Wilson.

Critic Matt Wolf discusses the reasons that new musicals from both Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice will be closing early, on the same day.

Comedian Stewart Lee returns to our screens this weekend with series 3 of the Bafta-winning Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle. This time satirist Chris Morris is taking Armando Ianucci's role as counsellor/interrogator, intercut with the cynical, meta stand-up that Lee is known for. He discusses the differences between the Stewart Lee we see onscreen and his real personality.

Alan Davies returns to our screens in the first new series of Jonathan Creek for five years, the offbeat crime drama written by One Foot in the Grave's David Renwick. Davies reprises his central role as an inventor of magic tricks who also has a talent for solving mysteries. Critic Naomi Alderman gives her response to the show's return.

Playwright Peter Gill discusses his World War I drama Versailles, about the treaty that would define the future of Europe, the Middle East and the rest of the world.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w0gw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b03w0j4l)
Deadly Hospitals?

Each year the number of deaths in every hospital in England is recorded and compared with national averages for the range of patients and conditions treated. The results are published by a company called Dr Foster in The Hospital Guide.

The Guide has a solid reputation. Its findings are studied and used by leaders of the NHS. Dr Foster's statistical expert says that high mortality statistics should act as a 'smoke alarm' raising investigation of standards at a hospital. The Care Quality Commission praises Dr Foster's "powerful analysis of hospital trusts" and the Health Secretary says: "We expect all hospitals to examine this data carefully and take action wherever services need to improve".

But some leading statisticians question the reliability of mortality statistics as an indication of clinical quality. And they believe that many pockets of poor practice go undetected in hospitals with good mortality scores.

Critics also see the publication of such data as an invitation to the press to distort the available evidence by calculating numbers of 'needless deaths' within the NHS. Such calculations have in fact been produced and then given widespread publicity. The NHS Medical Director calls them "clinically meaningless and academically reckless". But they continue to make the front pages.

Gerry Northam reports from hospitals which have "worryingly high" mortality statistics according to Dr Foster and asks how much this really shows about their quality of care.

Producer : Ian Muir-Cochrane
Editor : David Ross.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b03w0j4n)
RNIB on accessible information from DWP; Is radio becoming too visual?

The Royal National Institute of Blind People is threatening legal action against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) because they say visually impaired people are receiving information regarding decisions on their benefits in formats they can't read.

Radio is increasingly becoming coupled with visual imagery - with listeners being directed to websites to view video content of items. Also with the advent of digital radio, music titles, artists and records are not always announced. Peter White asks contributors from the BBC and also from commercial stations, is radio becoming too visual and are the needs of visually impaired listeners taken in to account enough?

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat
Editor: Andrew Smith.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b03w16j6)
Selenium & Vitamin E supplements in men, Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, Childhood Constipation

Selenium supplements have hit the headlines with reports that men taking them can increase their risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. Dr Mark Porter talks to leading expert on selenium, Margaret Rayman, Professor of Nutritional Medicine at the University of Surrey, to find the truth behind the story.

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease that kills more people in the UK than breast cancer. It's caused by the thickening and scarring of the part of the lung that forms the barrier between blood and air and can make your chest sound like it's full of Velcro. Mark talks to Luca Richeldi, Professor of Respiratory Medicine at the University of Southampton, about why it can be mistaken for asthma or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease - what used to be called emphysema and bronchitis. Also in the programme, as many as 1 in 20 children will experience long term constipation with no underlying cause and which doesn't get better with dietary changes. Mark visits a specialist clinic at Addenbrooke's hospital in Cambridge to meet families managing the problem.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b03w03bb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b03w0j4s)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03w0j4v)
Dubliners

The Dead (Part One)

Naturalistic in style, 'Dubliners' depicts an array of characters, graduating progressively from childhood, through adolescence, to maturity, culminating in the final story, 'The Dead'. The stories each centre on the idea of a moment of epiphany, but are grounded in the minutiae of daily life. Stories of love, loss, con men, friendship, alcoholism, marriage, politics and family, combine to create a unified world, a celebration of a city, in the unparalleled prose of its most famous son.

Abridger ..... Doreen Estall
Reader ..... Stephen Rea
Producer ..... Stephen Wright
Music by ..... Neil Martin.


TUE 23:00 2525 (b03ph1bv)
Episode 4

In the year 2525, if man is still alive, if woman can survive... then it may sound something like this. Set 511 years in the future, 2525 invites you to hear more snippets of our future from talking toilets to the church devoted to the worship of The Beatles.

Written by Colin Birch, Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris, Jane Lamacraft, Alex Lowe, Paul Putner, Tim Perry, John Luke Roberts and Eddie Robson

Produced by Ashley Blaker
A John Stanley production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03w12vs)
Keith Macdougall reports on a row over medical data. MPs inquire into the impact of flooding on transport. And the trade deal to beat all others.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 26 FEBRUARY 2014

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b03vsj1j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b03w0gw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj1l)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vsj1n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj1q)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b03vsj1s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03wy198)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day presented by the Rev Bob Fyffe of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b03w1646)
NFU conference, Alternatives to GM, Fly-tipping

The farming minister George Eustice has assured members of the National Farmers' Union that protecting farmland from flooding will remain a long-term priority. In his speech at the NFU conference in Birmingham he revealed more details of how a ten million pound relief fund to help flood-hit farmers will be spent and said that restoring pasture and productive arable land will be a priority. Although the fund is now open for applications, half the money will be kept in reserve for those farmers whose land is still under water and can't yet put a price tag on the damage.

We also explore how GM-free crop technology could both improve resistance to pests and diseases, and produce more food. Anna Hill speaks to Dr David Shaw who has spent over a decade breeding Sarpo potatoes - a variety which is resistant to late blight. She also hears from the National Institute of Agricultural Botany, which has develeped a variety of high-yielding wheat using an ancient cereal called goat grass. By cross-breeding the goat grass with conventional wheat, scientists say they've managed to breed greater genetic variety back into the hybrid plant.

The Sentencing Council, which issues guidelines on offences in England and Wales, is putting in place tougher penalties for breaking environmental laws. The guidelines will also cover run-off from fields and the correct storage and disposal of agricultural wastes. Those who break the law by fly-tipping or incorrect disposal could now serve up to eighteen months in prison and face unlimited fines.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Jules Benham.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwdy)
White-fronted Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the white-fronted goose. Flocks of White-Fronted Geese return each year to their favourite wintering areas, the bogs and and saltmarshes of Ireland and the Severn Estuary as well as western Scotland, although smaller flocks are found elsewhere. John Aitchison recorded the musical yapping of white-fronted geese for Tweet listeners as they flew over his home in western Scotland.


WED 06:00 Today (b03w1648)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b03w164b)
Sacha Corcoran, Austin and Howard Mutti-Mewse, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, David Probert

Libby Purves meets educationalist Sacha Corcoran; film fans Austin and Howard Mutti-Mewse; writer Gideon Lewis-Kraus and auctioneer David Probert.

Sacha Corcoran is the new principal of Dv8 Academy which opens later this year. Based in East London, Dv8 Academy will teach 16 to 18-year-olds - specialising in the creative industries such as music technology, performance, fashion and event management. After a difficult start as a 16-year-old single mother, Sacha turned her life around and has worked in education since 1994. She was awarded a MBE this year for services to education.

As children twins Austin and Howard Mutti-Mewse began writing to Hollywood stars including Lillian Gish, James Stewart and Ginger Rogers. The twins began writing these letters at 11. By 18 they were visiting their favourite actors at home and this unique access captured a bygone age of Hollywood glamour. Their new book, I Used to be in Pictures - An Untold Story of Hollywood, chronicles the life they experienced with some of the greatest names in feature films. I Used to be in Pictures - An Untold Story of Hollywood is published by ACC Publishing Group.

Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a writer and journalist. Disillusioned with life as a Fulbright scholar in Berlin in 2007, he set out on three ancient pilgrimages. In his new book, A Sense of Direction, he recounts these journeys which take him from the Camino de Santiago in Spain to a solo circuit of 88 Buddhist temples on the Japanese island of Shikoku and finally to the tomb of a famous Hassidic mystic in the Ukraine. A Sense of Direction is published by One.

David Probert is an auctioneer. His career started at Hereford's Old Livestock Market which closed three years ago. David is featured in Chewing the Cud, a documentary about the historic market which features the memories of local people who used it over the years. Chewing the Cud is showing at The Courtyard, Hereford as part of the Borderlines Film Festival.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b03w164d)
Solomon Northup - 12 Years a Slave

Episode 3

Extract from the powerful memoir which inspired Steve McQueen's Oscar nominated film of the same title.

Solomon Northup was a free man who worked as a carpenter in the state of New York. During a visit south to Washington in 1841, he was kidnapped and sold to a slave trader. He spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity in Louisiana.

After his rescue, Northup was reunited with his family and went on to publish this important memoir; a vital testimony of the cruel realities of life as a slave in the American south.

Reader: Rhashan Stone

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03w164g)
Power List 2014; Jack Monroe; Grooming; Police fitness

The launch of the 2014 Power list - new theme, new panel. Cook, blogger and campaigner against food poverty, Jack Monroe, cooks the perfect falafel. Are police fitness tests biased against female officers? What can be done to stop young girls being groomed and exploited by gangs? Jenni Murray presents.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Eleanor Garland.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w164j)
Lindsay Ashford - The Mysterious Death of Jane Austen

Episode 3

Twenty-six years have passed since the death of Jane Austen. Armed with a lock of Austen's hair as perhaps her best clue, Anne Sharp, former governess to the Austen family and Jane's close friend, has decided at least to tell her story-a story of family intrigues, shocking secrets, forbidden loves, and maybe even murder.

Upon its publication in the UK, Lindsay Ashford's fictional interpretation of the few facts surrounding Jane Austen's mysterious death sparked an international debate and uproar. None of the medical theories offers a satisfactory explanation of Jane Austen's early demise at the age of 41. Could it be that what everyone has assumed was a death by natural causes was actually more sinister? Lindsay Ashford's vivid novel delves deep into Austen's world and puts forth a shocking suggestion-was someone out to silence her?

Andrew Davies, who has a phenomenal track record in adaptation, has collaborated with Eileen Horne in recent years, first as writer and producer on a new TV version of Room with a View (2007) and as writer and editor on The Purple Land for Radio 4 (2011).

Written by Lindsay Ashford
Adapted by Eileen Horne and Andrew Davies

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:00 The Long March (b03w164l)
Escape

The Long March, which started in October 1934, is the founding myth of modern China. Mao Zedong and 86,000 Red Army men and women started the epic journey in Jiangxi province, battling their way across 8,000 miles of plains, rivers and mountains to escape Chiang Kai-Shek's Nationalists. Only a few thousand of them made it to the end a year later. Mao called the march "a manifesto", a symbol of the endurance needed to build a new China, but in a way the March has never ended - it has endlessly been retold in speeches, books and films and reinterpreted to meet China's changing preoccupations. In these programmes Edward Stourton follows in the footsteps of the Long March to explore what actually happened and why it still matters so much today. In his journey he uncovers the raw reality of the March and the way it is remembered in the official histories and meets a remarkable 98 year old veteran who survived it all.

Producer: Phil Pegum.


WED 11:30 HR (b03w164n)
Series 5

Wild About Gorillas

In this new run of Nigel Williams' comedy dramas, Peter's ex-wife Kate who has moved in, proposes a trip to the zoo. Not even Peter can turn a picnic outing into a hair-raising ordeal. Or can he?

Directed by Peter Kavanagh

Peter (Jonathan Pryce) and Sam (Nicholas Le Prevost) are joined by Kate (Kate Fahy) the new resident at Sam's home. Unsurprisingly however, a little female sanity fails to halt Peter's madcap antics, or Sam's reverting to his role as HR manager to restore order. This trip to the zoo proves no exception as Peter decides to walk on the wild side. And we are reminded of Kate's hidden feelings of love for her nightmare ex-partner Peter.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b03w164q)
Fraud by phone, cosmetic surgery

Police say they are frustrated that phone companies have not taken swifter action to protect their vulnerable customers against fraud. Hundreds of people have been called by criminals and conned into passing on their credit card details. Phone companies could prevent this fraud, but many have so far failed to take action.

The government has taken steps to better regulate cosmetic surgery, but many industry figures believe the new rules fall short of what's needed to protect consumers.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


WED 13:00 World at One (b03vsj1v)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Let's Talk About Rama and Sita (b03w164s)
A Good Woman?

Award-winning poet and broadcaster Daljit Nagra takes stories from the Ramayana into his community and finds the ancient tales alive with contemporary Asian dilemmas. Is Sita a valuable role model for women today?

Contributors include playwright Amber Lone, musician Kuljit Bhamra, Jatinder Verma - Artistic Director of Tara Arts, Bhavit Mehta - director of London's South Asian Literature Festival, members of the City Hindus Network, and students from Avanti House Free School in Stanmore.

Producer: Marya Burgess


WED 14:00 The Archers (b03w0j4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b03w16g8)
Jonesy

by award-winning writer Tom Wells. Jamie gets the run of the BBC Radio Drama sound department to tell his own story - the heroic journey of Withernsea lad Jamie 'Jonesy' Jones from chronic asthma sufferer to graduate in GCSE PE.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b03w16j4)
Power of Attorney

If you're struggling to manage your financial or personal affairs and want to find out about Power of Attorney, call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk.

Health conditions or even an accident can drastically alter your ability to keep on top of everyday finances such as bills, shopping, benefits or monitoring bank and savings accounts.

You can arrange for a trusted person or friend to manage some or all of your affairs, by setting up a Third-Party Mandate or Power of Attorney. To find out about the different schemes, what to consider and how to set them up, call or e-mail Lesley Curwen and guests.

Or perhaps you are having difficulty carrying out the tasks you've been asked to do. What standards should you expect from financial companies and what are your responsibilities?

Joining Lesley to answer your questions will be:

Alan Eccles, Public Guardian for England and Wales.
Sandra McDonald, Public Guardian for Scotland.
Caroline Bielanska, Solicitor, Solicitors for the Elderly.

To talk to the team call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Diane Richardson.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b03w16j6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b03w16p5)
Generational Divide; Webcam

'Webcam' - the use of webcam, especially through Skype, has recently become established as one more standard media technology, but one with profound implications for many facets of human life, from self-consciousness and intimacy to the sustaining of long-distance relationships and the place of the visual within social communications. Daniel Miller, Professor of Anthropology at University College London, talks to Laurie Taylor about a study which took him from London to Trinidad.

Also, the 'Generational' divide: Today's social problems are the problems of generations, according to much public debate. Terms such as the 'baby boomers' and the 'jilted generation' are a common feature of discussions about debts, access to higher education, housing or pensions. Jonathan White, Associate Professor of European Politics at the LSE, talks to Laurie Taylor about his sociological investigation of contemporary uses of the generational concept: where did this form of thinking originate and does it disguise more than it illuminates in terms of inequality in modern Britain? He's joined by Mary Dejevsky, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Buckingham and the chief editorial writer at The Independent.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b03w16p7)
BBC DG defends licence fee; Lord Hunt on IPSO; Paul Foot award

The Director General of the BBC, Tony Hall, has defended the use of the licence fee and dismissed calls, by some critics, for it to be shared with other broadcasters. Speaking to industry leaders at the Oxford Media Convention, he said the corporation faces tough choices in coming years as it faces competition from the likes of Google and Apple, and added that the status quo is not an option. He said efficiency savings are essential, but ruled out options like salami-slicing. So, what are the alternatives? How can the BBC modernise itself and save money? Steve Hewlett discusses ideas with Lis Howell, Director of TV and Broadcasting at City University, David Elstein, former Chief Executive of Channel 5 and now Chairman of Open Democracy and the Broadcasting Policy Group, and he talks to Patrick Barwise whose latest report for the Reuters Institute concludes that commercial broadcasters, and viewers, would be worse off if BBC TV did not exist.

The Paul Foot award for investigative and campaigning journalism has been won by David Cohen of the London Evening Standard for his work on gangs, which formed part of the newspaper's Frontline London campaign. David joins Steve in the studio to discuss his work, and the present state of investigative journalism.

And as the application deadline to be Chairman of the new press regulation body IPSO closes, we ask Lord Hunt, the current Chair of the Press Complaints Commission, whether he's thrown his hat into the ring.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki
Editor: Andrew Smith.


WED 17:00 PM (b03w16p9)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including Weather at 5.57pm.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vsj1x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (b03w16pc)
Series 1

High-Speed Rail

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is 'Help!'.

King of the one-liners, Milton Jones returns BBC to Radio 4 for an amazing 10th series in a new format where he has decided to set himself up as a man who can help anyone anywhere - whether they need it or not. Because, in his own words, "No problem too problemy".

But each week, Milton and his trusty assistant Anton set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. So when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

This week, there's rumours of a new rail line in the offing - and it's threatening a tiny delicate dormouse. So Milton decides he must put his foot down - carefully...

Written by Milton with James Cary ("Bluestone 42", "Miranda") and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show "House Of Rooms") the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton," returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill ("Spamalot", "Mr. Selfridge") as the ever-faithful Anton, and Dan Tetsell ("Newsjack"), and features the one and only Josie Lawrence working with Milton for the first time.

Producer David Tyler's radio credits include Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, Cabin Pressure, Bigipedia, Another Case Of Milton Jones, Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, The Brig Society, Giles Wemmbley Hogg Goes Off, The 99p Challenge, The Castle, The 3rd Degree and even, going back a bit, Radio Active.

Produced and Directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b03w16pf)
Tired from lambing, David is incredibly grateful when Jill appears with breakfast. Ruth is worried they woke her, but she insists that she's pleased to help. Ruth can't believe how lucky she is.

Rob phones Jess. He is adamant that they need to start divorce proceedings. Not wanting to discuss it, she hangs up. He later gets hold of her again and insists that it is possible to have a civilized divorce.

Lynda visits Jill who's found a pin from World War 1 amongst Phil's things. Lynda highlights the importance of continuing to commemorate those who fought. She tells Jill how well the launch of the 'Lives of the First World War' project went, but insists they've only scratched the surface. Lynda wants the village to do something to mark the anniversary of the start of the war, but it will take some thinking.

Emma arrives to clean Brookfield farmhouse, only to find that Jill has actually made more than a start. Jill invites Emma along to the WI talk on home security but Emma retorts she has nothing worth stealing anyway.

Emma relaxes when Ruth tells her Jill won't be staying permanently. Ruth encourages her to make the most of it. They're really going to miss Jill when she goes home.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b03w18fg)
Peter Gabriel; Paco Peña; Helen Oyeyemi; Great War in art; Mark Thomas

With John Wilson.

Peter Gabriel's film Back to Front documents the experience of performing his most commercially successful album, 1986's So, with the band he originally toured with. He tells John why despite being a famously forward looking artist, he wanted to revisit the album once more.

The National Portrait Gallery's exhibition The Great War in Portraits explores how artistic representations of the conflict and its participants changed as the fighting progressed. Beginning with magisterial portraits of leaders and generals and finishing with the anguished German expressionism of the Die Brücke group, the show depicts the vastly divergent experiences bound up in 'the war to end all wars'. Rachel Cooke reviews.

One of the world's most celebrated flamenco guitarists, Paco de Lucia, has died in Mexico, at the age of 66. In 2004, he was awarded Spain's prestigious Asturias Prize for Art as the "most universal of flamenco artists". We speak to his friend and fellow flamenco guitarist Paco Pena about his legacy and why he will be remembered as a revolutionary and a genius.

Helen Oyeyemi was listed as one of Granta's Best Young Novelists 2013. She wrote her first novel The Icarus Girl whilst studying for her A-levels - and secured a book deal on the same day as she received her results. Still only 29, she is about to publish her fifth title Boy, Snow, Bird. She talks to John about confronting issues of race in the novel, her love of fairy tale and myth and how Hitchcock inspired her lead character.

Mark Thomas discusses the legacy of controversial comedian Bill Hicks, who died 20 years ago today.

Producer: Rebecca Armstrong.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w164j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b03w18fl)
The Morality of Nationalism

This week the Moral Maze looks at the morality of nationalism. In Ukraine and the UK people are fighting and in the former case dying over the idea and the ideals of nationhood. Those are just the biggest headlines today; without pausing to think too hard you might add Syria, the Basque and Catalan regions of Spain and Tibet to the list and that's just from the news in the last seven days - let alone going further back in history to the breakup of Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Chechnya and Ireland. Nationalism and the struggle for national identity is a complex moral puzzle. What makes nationalism such a powerful and morally problematic force in our lives is the interplay of old feelings of communal loyalty and relatively new beliefs about popular sovereignty. On the one hand it undoubtedly expresses something deep in human nature - a yearning for self-determination and justice. But it can also come with darker tribal undertones of "us" and "them" and has been seen all too often through ethnic cleansing and genocide. To what extent should people be permitted to act on the basis of loyalty to those to whom they are specially related by culture, race or language? Are there benign forms of nationalism? Should enlightened people repudiate nationalism? What value should we attach to cultural diversity? Given the current examples of how nationalism can sometimes seem to be a force for good, and sometimes a force for very great evil what are the moral underpinnings of nationalism?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Melanie Phillips, Anne McElvoy, Matthew Taylor and Giles Fraser.

Witnesses are John Breuilly, Edward Lucas, Philippe Legrain and Gideon Calder.

Produced by Phil Pegum.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b03w18fn)
Series 4

Cult of Girls

Sharon Kinsella explores the Japanese 'cult of girls'.

Ranging from the surprising role of schoolgirls in Japanese culture to an unusual encounter with an intriguing figure in the Japanese men's movement, Sharon undermines the idea of a playful Japanese popular culture. Having studied Japan for 15 years, she describes how the almost warlike state of male-female relations instead plays out in unexpected ways.

Introduced by Kamin Mohammadi.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b03w0gwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b03w164b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b03vsj1z)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b03w18fs)
Northern Ireland's First Minister threatens to quit over secret letters
Ukraine opposition leaders announce a new cabinet
China's capital shrouded in a cloud of smog
And remembering flamenco guitar genius Paco de Lucia

The World Tonight with David Eades.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03w18fx)
Dubliners

The Dead (Part Two)

Naturalistic in style, 'Dubliners' depicts an array of characters, graduating progressively from childhood, through adolescence, to maturity, culminating in the final story, 'The Dead'. The stories each centre on the idea of a moment of epiphany, but are grounded in the minutiae of daily life. Stories of love, loss, con men, friendship, alcoholism, marriage, politics and family, combine to create a unified world, a celebration of a city, in the unparalleled prose of its most famous son.

Abridger ..... Doreen Estall
Reader ..... Stephen Rea
Producer ..... Stephen Wright.


WED 23:00 History Retweeted (b03w18g1)
The Premiere of Romeo and Juliet

History Retweeted sends us back in time as we hear people from the past comment on a series of major world events, in 140 characters or fewer.

It's the opening night of Romeo and Juliet and you are cordially invited to the premiere of a brand new play by the up-and-coming playwright Billy Shakespeare. Much the same as any other playwright, Shakespeare ponders how the play will be received. He needn't worry anymore as the 16th century now comes complete with wifi.

Bloggers review the show, fan-made plays are rife and the stars are interviewed on YouTube as one of Shakespeare's greatest blockbusters is 're-tweeted'.

Turning statuses into sounds, History Retweeted transports us to timelines gone by, feeding hashtags, trolls and trending topics into moments from history.

Featuring the voices of Tim Barnes and Simon Berry, Wayne Forester and Annabelle Llewellyn, Peter Temple and Jelly Macintosh - with Lucy Beaumont as the voice of The Computer.

Written by Tim Barnes and Simon Berry.

Produced by Sally Harrison
A Woolyback production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Nurse (b03w18yq)
Series 1

Episode 2

A brand new series starring Paul Whitehouse and Esther Coles, with Rosie Cavaliero, Simon Day, Cecilia Noble and Marcia Warren.

The series follows Elizabeth, a Community Psychiatric Nurse in her forties, into the homes of her patients (or Service Users in today's jargon). It recounts their humorous, sad and often bewildering daily interactions with the nurse, whose job is to assess their progress, dispense their medication and offer comfort and support.

Compassionate and caring, Elizabeth is aware that she cannot cure her patients, only help them manage their various conditions. She visits the following characters throughout the series:

Lorrie and Maurice: Lorrie, in her fifties, is of Caribbean descent and has schizophrenia. Lorrie's life is made tolerable by her unshakeable faith in Jesus, and Maurice, who has a crush on her and wants to do all he can to help. So much so that he ends up getting on everyone's nerves.

Billy: Billy feels safer in jail than outside, a state of affairs the nurse is trying to rectify. She is hampered by the ubiquitous presence of Billy's mate, Tony.

Graham: in his forties, is morbidly obese due to an eating disorder. Matters aren't helped by his mum 'treating' him to sugary and fatty snacks at all times.

Ray: is bipolar and a rock and roll survivor from the Sixties. It is not clear how much of his 'fame' is simply a product of his imagination.

Phyllis: in her seventies, has Alzheimer's. She is sweet, charming and exasperating. Her son Gary does his best but if he has to hear 'I danced for the Queen Mum once' one more time he will explode.

Herbert is an old school gentleman in his late Seventies. Herbert corresponds with many great literary figures unconcerned that they are, for the most part, dead.

Nurse is written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings, who have collaborated many time in the past, including on The Fast Show, Down the Line and Happiness.

Written by Paul Whitehouse and David Cummings with additional material from Esther Coles
Producers: Paul Whitehouse and Tilusha Ghelani
A Down the Line production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03w18ys)
David Cameron tells MPs that "a dreadful mistake" led to the collapse of the trial of John Downey, who was accused of the IRA bombing in Hyde Park in 1982.

But the Attorney General, Dominic Grieve, tells the Commons the judgement would not be appealed, in spite of a threat by Northern Ireland's First Minister to quit.

The Labour leader, Ed Miliband, challenges the Government over its commitment to tackling climate change.

Labour and Conservative MPs, from flood hit areas, threaten to withdraw support for the high-speed rail project, HS2.

And there are calls in the House of Lords for a cap on pension charges.

Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 27 FEBRUARY 2014

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b03vsj2z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b03w164d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj31)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vsj33)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj35)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b03vsj37)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03wy30z)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day presented by the Rev Bob Fyffe of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b03w2w5n)
New NFU president, Co-op farms, GM mosquitoes

Charlotte Smith reports from the second day of the NFU conference in Birmingham. The big news is that the NFU has a new leader, Meurig Raymond, and for the first time a woman has been voted onto the leadership team - Minette Batters is Deputy President.

As well as the election race, the big issues on the agenda on the last day of the conference were science and retail. On agri-science, Charlotte speaks to Haydn Parry, chief executive of British-based company Oxitec which is engineering genetically modified insects. It programmes the males, in pest species like mosquitoes and olive flies, to be sterile so when they mate, the offspring die. Haydn claims it's a way of reducing pest populations with minimum impact on the environment. Charlotte challenges him on how that might work in Europe, and the battle he faces to win public support for such controversial biotechnology.

On retail, Charlotte hears from Phil Hudson, the NFU's head of food and farming, about their rallying call to supermarkets and processors to 'Back the Business of British Farming'. He also gives his reaction to the news that the Co-op plans to sell off its 15 farms - a total of 42,500 acres - and asks what that could mean for British agriculture.

The NFU represents 47,000 farmers and growers across England and Wales but some organisations, including the Family Farmers Association, say the union fails in its duty to represent the smallest farms. Charlotte puts this to Devon dairy farmer and long-standing NFU office-holder David Horton. He explains how he has worked hard to bring "muddy boots" and not power suits into the NFU.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwxg)
Black-throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the black-throated diver. Black-throated divers are strong contenders for our most beautiful bird. Their breeding plumage with a neck barcoded in white, an ebony bib and a plush grey head, is dramatic. The black dagger-like bill and broad lobed feet are perfect for catching and pursuing fish which the divers bring to their chicks in nests on the shoreline of the Scottish Lochs on which they breed.


THU 06:00 Today (b03w2w5q)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b03w2w19)
The Eye

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the eye. Humans have been attempting to understand the workings and significance of the organ for at least 2500 years. Some ancient philosophers believed that the eye enabled creatures to see by emitting its own light. The function and structures of the eye became an area of particular interest to doctors in the Islamic Golden Age. In Renaissance Europe the work of thinkers including Kepler and Descartes revolutionised thinking about how the organ worked, but it took several hundred years for the eye to be thoroughly understood. Eyes have long attracted more than purely scientific interest, known even today as the 'windows on the soul'.

With:

Patricia Fara
Senior Tutor of Clare College, University of Cambridge

William Ayliffe
Gresham Professor of Physic at Gresham College

Robert Iliffe
Professor of Intellectual History and History of Science at the University of Sussex

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b03w2w1c)
Solomon Northup - 12 Years a Slave

Episode 4

Extract from the powerful memoir which inspired Steve McQueen's Oscar nominated film of the same title.

In this episode, Solomon describes the harsh realities of life as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation.

Solomon Northup's eloquent first-hand account of slavery was published in 1853 – eight years before the American Civil War and twelve years before the abolition of slavery in the United States in 1865.

Reader: Rhashan Stone

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03w2w1f)
Lillian Gish; Bea Campbell; One Million Lovely Letters

As we gear up for the Oscars on Sunday a treat from the Woman's Hour archive collection - an interview with Lillian Gish described as the First Lady of American Cinema. In a career that spanned 75 years she talks about playing her last heroine part at just 17 because she was beginning to look too old on screen, being cast in Birth of a Nation and the change from silent films to talkies.

In the light of the many cases nationwide of grooming still being investigated and prosecuted, how has the judiciary, the CPS and the government responded to remedying how young girls are treated once they are in the legal system?

Writer and feminist activist Beatrix Campbell tells us why she thinks the time has come to re-evaluate our society. She says we need a new way of thinking in order understand why violence against women has increased, rape is still committed with impunity and the struggle for equal pay has made so little progress.

And why Jodi Ann Bickley wants to spread happiness. She believes everyone deserves to hear they are loved. She's written to thousands of people to encourage them to never give up hope. She talks about the One Million Lovely Letters project and how it feels to receive emails from strangers all over the world sharing their problems.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Produced and Edited by Beverley Purcell.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w2w5s)
Lindsay Ashford - The Mysterious Death of Jane Austen

Episode 4

Twenty-six years have passed since the death of Jane Austen. Armed with a lock of Austen's hair as perhaps her best clue, Anne Sharp, former governess to the Austen family and Jane's close friend, has decided at least to tell her story-a story of family intrigues, shocking secrets, forbidden loves, and maybe even murder.

Upon its publication in the UK, Lindsay Ashford's fictional interpretation of the few facts surrounding Jane Austen's mysterious death sparked an international debate and uproar. None of the medical theories offers a satisfactory explanation of Jane Austen's early demise at the age of 41. Could it be that what everyone has assumed was a death by natural causes was actually more sinister? Lindsay Ashford's vivid novel delves deep into Austen's world and puts forth a shocking suggestion-was someone out to silence her?

Andrew Davies, who has a phenomenal track record in adaptation, has collaborated with Eileen Horne in recent years, first as writer and producer on a new TV version of Room with a View (2007) and as writer and editor on The Purple Land for Radio 4 (2011).

Written by Lindsay Ashford
Adapted by Eileen Horne and Andrew Davies

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b03w2wdb)
There for Eternity?

Correspondents with tales to tell. In this edition: Gabriel Gatehouse watching the unfolding revolution in Ukraine; Abigail Fielding-Smith in the Lebanese capital Beirut as the war in Syria creeps ever closer; Will Grant on the latest chapter in the extraordinary story of drugs baron Joaquin 'Shorty' Guzman; Rachel McCormack gets a taste of the heated argument in Spain over the possibility of Catalan independence and 12 hours across the Karakum desert: Jonathan Fryer has time on the train to consider the ripples of revolution and who, if anyone, might be here for eternity.


THU 11:30 The Concrete and the Divine (b01rqnf3)
Under the umbrella of Glasgow architects Gillespie Kidd & Coia, Isi Metzstein and Andrew MacMillan seized on the momentary experimentalism of the Catholic Church after World War II to revolutionise church design.

This was a brave new world and the Catholic Church wanted their places of worship to meet the needs of a new era.

In a culture never quite comfortable with the high modern influences of Europe and America, Metzstein and MacMillan drew on the ideas of Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright with unparalleled freedom.

Their masterpiece was St Peter's Seminary at Cardross, which stood out like a spaceship in the modest construction yards of British architecture. It's a ghost space now, abandoned in 1980 just 14 years after completion.

While most of their churches are still in use, their Modernist design and location means they stand like monuments to a very different time; a time when Catholicism in Scotland was expected to spread its wings.

Jonathan Glancey explores Scotland's physical and spiritual landscape to discover more about the extraordinary lives of two of Britain's most talented architects.

Producer: Caitlin Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2013.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b03w2wdd)
Cotton imports

In Rahul Tandon's final report from India for You & Yours, he is joined by John Lewis' head of corporate responsibility to examine it's cotton supply chain.

Leaseholders explain why they feel short changed by the Government-backed Flood Re scheme that is to be introduced next summer.

And prisoners serving life sentences at Durham Jail are being rewarded for good behaviour by being allowed to keep budgerigars in their cells. The former world's strongest man, Geoff Capes tells us what made him fall for the birds.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Natalie Donovan.


THU 12:57 Weather (b03vsj39)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b03vsj3c)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Let's Talk About Rama and Sita (b03w2wdg)
A Good Planet?

Award-winning poet and broadcaster Daljit Nagra takes stories from the Ramayana into his community and finds the ancient tales alive with contemporary Asian dilemmas. The environment is central to its teaching, so what lessons does it have for the way we care for our planet today?

Contributors include Hindu teacher and theologian, Akhandhadi Das, Jatinder Verma - Artistic Director of Tara Arts, Kripamoya Das - Senior Priest at Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna Temple and members of the congregation, Satish Sharma - General Secretary of the National Council of Hindu Temples, and students from Avanti House Free School in Stanmore.

Producer: Clare Walker


THU 14:00 The Archers (b03w16pf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b03w2yn4)
Pixie Juice

by Ed Harris.

Indira Varma stars in a wickedly twisted fairytale - with real fairy.

Anya is struggling to run her Dad's tattoo parlour, as well as cope with her Dad's failing sight. When she gets a nocturnal visit from a tiny, magical creature, it seems, like all good fairytales, as though her luck will change. But Anya's not really the fairytale type. And pixies hire good lawyers.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b03w311l)
Series 26

Hopetoun with the Monday Walkers

In this series Clare Balding revisits some of her favourite walks and walkers from past programmes.

Here she travels to the Hopetoun Estate, just west of Edinburgh to meet up with a group of women she first met twelve years ago. The Monday walkers have been together for over twenty five years, when they first met Clare, their average age was early sixties, now it's mid seventies. They explain that although walking still keeps them fit, they do now tailor their routes to take account of the passing years. A wee dram may still be part of their days outings but skinny dipping is accepted as a past pleasure.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b03vzhnq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b03vzvmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b03w32bt)
Stellan Skarsgard on Nymphomaniac; Alexandre Desplat on Philomena; Unforgiven in Japanese; BAFTA-winner James Griffiths

Francine Stock talks to actor Stellan Skarsgard about his role in the latest film by Lars von Trier - Nymphomaniac. Playing in two parts, it runs to around four hours and includes challenging explicit material. Skarsgard appears alongside Charlotte Gainsbourg as a man who rescues her from an alleyway after a beating. He explains why he enjoys working with the controversial director.

Composer Alexandre Desplat discusses his score for Philomena which has been nominated for an Oscar. His work includes The Monuments Men, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Argo and Moonrise Kingdom. He describes the art of responding to the dynamics of a film script, without overwhelming it.

The Unforgiven both starring and directed by Clint Eastwood won four Oscars in 1993. Now the tale of assassins employed by wronged women in the Wild West has been remade by director Sang-il Lee with Ken Watanabe in the lead role. Sir Christopher Frayling and Alexander Jacoby discuss the cross fertilisation of the Western and Japanese Samurai film across the decades.

Plus James W. Griffiths on his BAFTA-winning short Room 8 and how the rigours of working to a pre-ordained script helped to drive his film. He shared the award with Sophie Venner.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b03w32bw)
Brain Machine Interfaces; Question on Gay Genes; Studying Drinking Behaviour

Neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis is one of the world's leading researchers into using the mind to control machines. He is involved in the "Walk Again Project" which aims to build a suit that a paraplegic person can wear and control so that he or she can kick a football at the opening ceremony of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. Adam is joined by biomedical engineer, Professor Christopher James from Warwick University, who puts the field of Brain Machine Interfaces in context.

Work published last week by Professor Ziv Williams looks at the possibility of rewiring the body. Paralysis is normally confined to spinal cord damage, not the limbs themselves. Ziv Williams' work aims to use implanted chips to bypass the injury and have the individual control their own paralysed arms.

Listeners ask if there is a gene for fundamentalist intolerance. We put the question to Professor Tim Spector, author of Identically Different.

Adam Rutherford heads down to the psychology department at London's South Bank University... for a pint. Dr Tony Moss has built a fake pub, complete with lighting, music and even a fruit machine, to make drinkers feel that they are in a real bar. He says the venue treads a middle ground between a sterile lab, and an actual pub, where there are too many variables to reliably study behaviour.

Professor John Shepherd from Cardiff studies alcohol and behaviour from the other end - the drunken nights out that end up in A&E. A few simple initiatives have helped reduce violence levels by 40%

Producer: Fiona Roberts.


THU 17:00 PM (b03w32by)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vsj3f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Jason Cook's School of Hard Knocks (b03w32c0)
Asking Out and First Dates

Field marshal of mirth and high priest of Hebburn, Jason Cook dispenses advice on how best to navigate the choppy waters of life and come out the other side without feeling woozy, using the full spectrum of his own experiences as his educational aids.

In this episode, Jason examines how to successfully ask someone out.

Discover the traps to be avoided when going on a first date - using Jason's trademarked "Place, Face, Case" methodology,

Stories from the audience help to throw more light on the matter in hand.

With Zoe Harrison and Neil Grainger.

Producer: Sam Michell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b03w32c2)
Jolene tells Ruth that the insurers are going to honour the claim for the Bull flooding, although she is concerned that it might increase their future premiums.

Kirsty and Helen get ready to attend the WI meeting. Rob is baby-sitting Henry. Helen is impressed with how good he's been this week.

Jill has been making an impression on Ben, having managed to coax him outside for some bird-watching. Ruth is planning to attend the WI meeting and Jill thinks she knows why. PC Burns is proving quite an attraction!

The women of Ambridge have turned out in force, prompting discussions about future talk ideas. PC Burns and his talk proves popular. Jill hopes they might recruit new, younger members to the WI as a result.

Jennifer is keen to discuss the First World War project with Lynda, who is excited by some photos she found in a book of David's. Jennifer thinks they might be able to track some of the families down and uncover more information.

Helen and Kirsty discuss what a great night they had, but Kirsty is still distracted. Helen admits Pat is worried too. She agrees with Kirsty. Tom and Tony need to talk to each other properly.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b03w32c4)
Marc Almond and John Harle; Willy Russell on Liverpool's Everyman Theatre; Gary Shteyngart

With Will Gompertz.

Marc Almond and John Harle discuss their new collaboration, The Tyburn Tree, a collection of songs about Gothic London, whose subjects include the Highgate Vampire, Jack The Ripper and the Elizabethan mystic John Dee.

50 years ago the Liverpool Everyman theatre opened its doors to the public for the first time. 40 years ago, Willy Russell provided the theatre with his first big hit play and their first London transfer - John, Paul, George, Ringo... and Bert. As the Everyman re-opens after an extensive three-year building project, Willy Russell discusses the theatre's past. Gemma Bodinetz, Artistic Director of the Everyman and Playhouse theatres, and theatre writer Lyn Gardner discuss what the role of the theatre building should be in the 21st century.

Gary Shteyngart, the Russian-born American author, whose books include The Russian Debutante's Handbook and Super Sad True Love Story, has recently released his memoir, Little Failure. Named after the nickname bestowed upon him by his mother, the book documents Gary's childhood in the Soviet Union, his move to America at the age of seven, and his life thereafter as a Russian Jewish immigrant and wannabe writer.

Glastonbury was named Best Festival at last night's NME Awards and this morning Dolly Parton announced that she has been booked for this year. Emily Eavis explains how they choose their megastar line-ups and what she intends to do with the festival as she takes a more prominent role in its planning.

Producer: Ellie Bury.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w2w5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b03w36r6)
Marius the Giraffe: Zoogenics?

Copenhagen Zoo's decision to kill Marius - an 18 month old healthy giraffe - and to perform a public autopsy in front of children sparked a global outcry. Despite receiving numerous death threats and hate emails, the zoo's scientific director insisted he had no choice but to kill Marius because there were already too many giraffes with similar genes in the European breeding programme.

Reporter Hannah Barnes travels to Denmark to explore the reasons behind the killing of Marius and other healthy animals. Back in Britain she talks to staff at British zoos to find out whether what the Danes did in public is happening behind the closed doors in the UK.

Producer: Anna Meisel.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b03w36r8)
Self-Improvement

Self-improvement: If you want to look better, feel better, perform better, there's no shortage of help available. Whether it's cosmetic surgery for the perfect body, fitness programmes to boost self-esteem, or self-help books to improve the mind, there's plenty of choice. But do they promise the world and fail to deliver - or give you the strength to achieve the personal growth you desire? Evan Davis and guests discuss the industry of making your life better.

Guests:

Jon Congdon, President and Co-Founder, Beachbody.com

Carole Tonkinson, Publisher, Harper NonFiction

John Ryan, Founder and Chairman, Make Yourself Amazing

Producer: Sally Abrahams.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b03w32bw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b03w2w19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b03vsj3h)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b03w2w1h)
Tensions over Crimea future, Merkel in UK, Question Time Afghan style, with David Eades.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03w36rb)
Dubliners

The Dead (Part Three)

Naturalistic in style, 'Dubliners' depicts an array of characters, graduating progressively from childhood, through adolescence, to maturity, culminating in the final story, 'The Dead'. The stories each centre on the idea of a moment of epiphany, but are grounded in the minutiae of daily life. Stories of love, loss, con men, friendship, alcoholism, marriage, politics and family, combine to create a unified world, a celebration of a city, in the unparalleled prose of its most famous son.

Abridger ..... Doreen Estall
Reader ..... Stephen Rea
Producer ..... Stephen Wright.


THU 23:00 Brian Gulliver's Travels (b00zsc2b)
Series 1

Jampoa

Brian Gulliver, a seasoned presenter of travel documentaries, finds himself in a hospital's secure unit after claiming to have had a number of bizarre adventures.

This week he travels to Jampoa where fame definitely equals fortune.

Written by Bill Dare
Produced by Steven Canny

Brian Gulliver's Travels is a new satirical adventure story from Bill Dare. The series has attracted an excellent cast led by Neil Pearson and award winning Mariah Gale. Cast includes fantastic actors Tamsin Greig, John Standing, Paul Bhattacharjee, Christopher Douglas, Vicky Pepperdine, Phil Cornwell, Jo Bobin and Katherine Jakeways.

For years Bill Dare wanted to create a satire about different worlds exploring Kipling's idea that we travel, 'not just to explore civilizations, but to better understand our own'. But science fiction and space ships never interested him, so he put the idea on ice. Then Brian Gulliver arrived and meant that our hero could be lost in a fictional world without the need for any sci-fi.

Satirical targets over the series: the medical profession and its need to pathologize everything; the effect of marriage on children; spirituality and pseudo-science; compensation culture; sexism; the affect of our obsession with fame.

Gulliver's Travels is the only book Bill Dare read at university. His father, Peter Jones, narrated a similarly peripatetic radio series: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03w2w1k)
Rachel Byrne reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 28 FEBRUARY 2014

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b03vsj4f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b03w2w1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj4h)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03vsj4k)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03vsj4m)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b03vsj4p)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03wy31k)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day presented by the Rev Bob Fyffe of Churches Together in Britain and Ireland.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b03w38ps)
Compensation for Fishermen; Chief Scientist on GM

In the same week the farming minister announced details of a £10 million Farm Recovery Fund, aimed at restoring flood-hit pastures, George Eustice has been meeting with representatives of the fishing industry. They're looking for an aid package, similar to that farming fund, to help cover lost earnings and replace damaged equipment after the recent bad weather. Charlotte speaks to Paul Trebilcock, chairman of the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations. He says the minister has made some welcome commitments but fell short of promising compensation.
Continuing our week-long discussion about the pros and cons of genetically modified crops, and insects. The Government's chief scientist Sir Mark Walport tells Charlotte why he believes GM innovation should be judged on a case-by-case basis.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Anna Jones.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03tj99h)
Wigeon

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the wigeon. Wigeon are dabbling ducks and related to mallards and teal but unlike these birds Wigeon spend much of their time out of the water grazing waterside pastures with their short blue-grey bills. The drakes are handsome-looking birds with chestnut heads and a cream forehead which contrasts well with their pale grey bodies.

John Aitchison recorded a flock of wigeon, for Tweet listeners, on a pool in Norfolk where they had found a safe place to roost on an island.


FRI 06:00 Today (b03w38pv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b03vzhnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b03w38px)
Solomon Northup - 12 Years a Slave

Episode 5

Final extract from the powerful memoir which inspired Steve McQueen's Oscar nominated film of the same title.

In this episode we learn how Solomon managed to prove that he was a free man and gained his release from slavery to return home to his family in the north.

Solomon Northup's powerful first-hand account of the degradations and evils of slavery was published in 1853 – eight years before the American Civil War and twelve years before the abolition of slavery in the United States in 1865.

Reader: Rhashan Stone

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03w38pz)
Minette Batters, Unlikely Friends, Forced Marriage Statistics, Muscular Dystrophy

17 year old Isata Kanneh-Mason is one of the final five pianists left in this year's BBC Young Musician of the Year competition. Jennifer Pike won Young Musician of the Year in 2002 aged just 12. We'll be asking Jennifer what advice she would give Isata on coping in the music business as a young soloist. Minette Batters has been voted vice president of the National Farmer's Union. It's the first time in their 105 year history that a woman has made it on to the leadership team. The latest Home office figures on forced marriage have been published this week - and the figures are down from last year. We'll be discussing whether they are a true reflection of the scale of forced marriage in the UK? On International Rare Diseases Day we'll be looking at how NHS England intends to support people with rare diseases such as Muscular Dystrophy.

Presenter Sheila McClennon
Producer Jane Worsley.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w38q1)
Lindsay Ashford - The Mysterious Death of Jane Austen

Episode 5

Twenty-six years have passed since the death of Jane Austen. Armed with a lock of Austen's hair as perhaps her best clue, Anne Sharp, former governess to the Austen family and Jane's close friend, has decided at least to tell her story-a story of family intrigues, shocking secrets, forbidden loves, and maybe even murder.

Upon its publication in the UK, Lindsay Ashford's fictional interpretation of the few facts surrounding Jane Austen's mysterious death sparked an international debate and uproar. None of the medical theories offers a satisfactory explanation of Jane Austen's early demise at the age of 41. Could it be that what everyone has assumed was a death by natural causes was actually more sinister? Lindsay Ashford's vivid novel delves deep into Austen's world and puts forth a shocking suggestion-was someone out to silence her?

Andrew Davies, who has a phenomenal track record in adaptation, has collaborated with Eileen Horne in recent years, first as writer and producer on a new TV version of Room with a View (2007) and as writer and editor on The Purple Land for Radio 4 (2011).

Written by Lindsay Ashford
Adapted by Eileen Horne and Andrew Davies

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 Essex, My Essex (b03w38q3)
Essex born and bred, writer Ian Sansom goes back to the county which made him who he is.

Ian's grandparents moved there from east-end London to fulfil their dreams. For them, Essex was a promised land of milk and honey, of golden harvests and Harvester restaurants.

Ian left 30 years ago and hasn't really been back since.

But a lot can happen in 30 years and in that time just about everything has happened to Essex. When Ian left there was no Essex man, no jokes about Essex girls, no Birds of a Feather, no Gavin and Stacey, and The Only Way is Essex was a mere glint in the average commuter's eye.

Now, with the London-overspill county occupying a new space in the public imagination, Ian retraces his steps back to the place where he was born and which made him who he is.

Talking to people who've stayed there, meeting family and friends, going back to landmarks that meant something to him in his younger days, Ian finds out what's changed in Essex since he left.

Between the low-rise housing and out-of-town retail parks, he finds an anarchist community which uses the county as a place to reimagine life's possibilities, a secret nuclear bunker from which a post-apocalyptic Essex generation would emerge and a retired vice Lord Lieutenant who hopes limericks can change perception of Essex girls.

This is it. This is his Essex.

Producer: Conor Garrett.


FRI 11:30 Making the Best of It (b03w38q5)
The Last Minutes

Daisy Haggard stars as Debra, a Crisis Branding Consultant brought in during a major boardroom crisis, with only minutes to manage how the truth comes out.

And what that truth is, exactly...

Series of comedies developed with the Comedians Theatre Company.

Debra ...... Daisy Haggard
Cassie ...... Tiffany Stevenson
Thomas ...... Matt Green
Jonah ...... Stephen Harvey
Phillip ...... Ben Norris

Written by Stephen Keyworth.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2014.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b03w38q7)
Fraud by phone

The extraordinary recording of a crook caught on tape by the man he was trying to fleece.

Is it ever ok to use electronic collars on dogs that deliver mild electric shocks to teach them to behave? The devices are banned in Wales but can be used in other parts of the UK. Now MPs in Westminster are debating whether that should change.

We look at the phone apps that let you order and pay for your meal without the bother of speaking to a waiter and visit the entrepreneurs growing vegetables in tunnels beneath the streets of London.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Jon Douglas.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b03vsj4r)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b03vsj4t)
Russian military movements in Crimea . What support can the EU offer Ukraine ? Ex Ambassador Sir Tony Brenton and Lord Ashdown tell Ed Stourton they see trouble ahead. Was the badger cull cruel to badgers ? Who's next for Britain's European Commissioner after Cathy Ashton stands down ? And did MI5 think Sir Michael Redgrave was a 'useful idiot'?


FRI 13:45 Let's Talk About Rama and Sita (b03w38qc)
Patriot or Traitor?

Award-winning poet and broadcaster Daljit Nagra takes stories from the Ramayana into his community and finds the ancient tales alive with contemporary Asian dilemmas. He examines what they can still teach us about loyalty and betrayal.

Contributors include Kripamoya Das - Senior Priest at Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna Temple, playwright Amber Lone, Jatinder Verma - Artistic Director of Tara Arts, members of the City Hindus Network, Satish Sharma - General Secretary the National Council of Hindu Temples, and students from Avanti House Free School in Stanmore.

Producer: Julian May


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b03w32c2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b012fcym)
Torchwood - The Lost Files

Submission

In Ryan Scott's episode, Torchwood are chasing aliens down the M4, when Jack accidentally blows a hole in the Severn Bridge, and the SUV hits the water. Whilst submerged John, Gwen and Ianto hear a strange noise, which, back at the Hub they realise is a cry for help. They track the cry to its source which turns out to be the deepest part of the Ocean - the Mariana Trench. Ianto rings old Torchwood flame, Carlie Roberts, who's an expert in marine geology, and Jack pulls strings with the US government to get them all on board the USS Calvin, an Arleigh Burke class destroyer, which is heading for the Trench. From there they board the Octopus Rock, the only submarine built to withstand the pressure at that depth, and follow the signal. But when the Submarine crashes, the team are left at the mercy of a hungry alien.

Recorded at The Invisible Studios, by Mark Holden and mixed at BBC Wales by Nigel Lewis.

A BBC/Cymru Wales production, directed by Kate McAll.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03w39wt)
British Geological Survey, Nottingham

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme from the British Geological Survey headquarters in Nottingham. Chris Beardshaw, Matt Biggs and Pippa Greenwood answer the questions from the audience of local gardeners.

Produced by Howard Shannon.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions:

Q. What would the panel suggest to plant in a sunny garden to celebrate a Silver Wedding Anniversary to a geologist?

A. Lithops look fantastic on a sunny windowsill; they look like little stones, which means you will get the best of both geological and horticultural worlds. Another suggestion would be a Monkey Puzzle tree, one of the earliest trees to form, or a carnivorous plant such as the Venus Fly Trap. Ferns would be recommended, particularly the Dryopteris erythrosora and finally, in a sunny garden the Rock Rose would be a good suggestion.

Q. Can the panel suggest a ground-covering plant overhung by a large Leylandii tree, Rhododendron ponticum and holly? The soil is acidic with lots of shallow roots from nearby trees.

A. It would be recommended to investigate ferns, for example the hearts tongue fern which can be found in both dry and moist soils. Silicium hederifolium may grow well as it is often found in woodland under pines in acidic conditions. Also Lamiums, Vincas and Periwinkles are recommended, particularly the Vinca minor. Geranium macrorrhizum could work around the edges of your area. Plant deep on the perimeter where there is more moisture available and try and train the plants inwards and the roots will grow under as far as they can. Finally Trachystemon orientalis, the Alpine Strawberry (you won't get fruit but it will have good ground cover) and Euphorbia robbiae are also recommended.

Q. How do I start growing asparagus on my allotment?

A. Start from an established crown and it would be ideal to create a raised bed to avoid waterlogging if you have a wet or clay based soil, because while they do like a lot of moisture they hate being too wet. Having a bed of their own would also help with weeding to avoid damaging the asparagus. Avoid harvesting them too early, the recommended timescale would be to wait 3 years. Ideally have the bed south facing and mulch over the surface.

Q. How can I encourage my Cycas to bulk up?

A. Cycas are very slow growing and need to be kept moist. You should feed them once a month with half-strength general fertiliser. They rely on warmth, humidity and good light levels. You should also avoid over-feeding when growing a Cycas. Other ancient plants to consider growing are: Wollemi pines, Dicksonias & Equisetum.


FRI 15:45 Border Crossings (b03w39ww)
Letting Go

Set at Neidpath Castle on the banks of the River Tweed, Lily reflects on her English roots and her Scottish home. Gerda Stevenson reads her new story about conflict and liberty, the personal and the political.

Letting Go concludes Border Crossings, a pair of specially commissioned pieces by writers living on either side of the Border. Each explores the unique qualities of the debatable lands and the centuries of interlinked history between England and Scotland, the amity and the animosity.

Gerda Stevenson is an award-winning actor, writer and director. Radio 4 listeners will probably know her best as Steve, Paul's wife in The Paul Temple Mysteries. Her stage play Federer versus Murray was shortlisted for London Fringe Theatre Writing Award, 2010, and was runner-up for the Best Scottish Contribution to Drama on Edinburgh Fringe, 2011. In 2013, her poetry collection If This Were Real was published by Smokestack Books, and she won the YES Arts Festival Poetry Challenge.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard and Di Speirs.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b03w3g57)
Alison Jolly, Alice Herz-Sommer, Valery Kubasov, Mavis Gallant, Harold Ramis

Aasmah Mir on

The primatologist Alison Jolly who documented the social life of the ring-tailed lemur.

Alice Herz-Sommer - concert pianist and oldest known survivor of the Holocaust. The film-maker Christopher Nupen, who was her neighbour and friend, pays tribute.

Valeri Kubasov - one of the cosmonauts on the historic space mission of 1975 which saw the Russian Soyuz 19 link up with the American Apollo module. One of the US crew, astronaut Vance Brand, describes their first meeting.

Also: Canadian-born short-story writer Mavis Gallant. A former editor at Granta recalls a formidable woman whose observations of life were wonderfully unforgiving.

And professor of film and media history Ian Christie on the director and actor Harold Ramis - best known for films like 'Ghostbusters', 'Caddyshack' and Groundhog Day'.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b03w3g59)
Listen to this week's Feedback with the lights on because we're talking horror. Radio 4 has just broadcast an adaptation of The Exorcist, the 1971 novel which tells the story of the possession and battle for a little girl's soul and became an infamously head-spinning 1973 film. With demonic possession and very strong language, Radio 4's version was hardly a bedtime story, despite its 11pm slot. So why did they do it? And are the pictures scarier on the radio? Roger Bolton speaks to The Exorcist producer Gaynor MacFarlane and Radio 4's Commissioning Editor for Drama, Jeremy Howe.

Also, what does power really mean? We'll be speaking to the editor of Woman's Hour Alice Feinstein about the launch of this year's Power List. And we'll hear why forensic science can be incredibly moving.

We also discover what happens when a 21-year-old listener plays Roger Bolton for the day? Radio 1Xtra fan Claire Bynoe is our guide to Radio 1 and 1Xtra's Access All Areas - a month-long audience takeover that's seen young people controlling everything from DJs to playlists and watching and listening from all angles. Claire was one of a few listeners chosen to take part in Access All Areas Studios, which gave them the chance to do whatever they wanted in a BBC studio for an hour. She'll be putting Radio 1/1Xtra editor Rebecca Frank and producer Aled Haydn-Jones in the hot seat.

Producers: Karen Pirie and Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b03w3g5c)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including Weather at 5.57pm.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03vsj4w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b03w3g5f)
Series 83

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with regular panellist Jeremy Hardy and guest panellists including Hugo Rifkind and Susan Calman.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b03w3g5h)
Rob starts the day with a phone call from Jess. She's finally agreed to the divorce.

Kirsty again tries to convince Tom to talk to Tony. He admits that he's scared Tony won't care if he admits how he feels. Ironically, when Pat talks to Tony at Bridge Farm, he feels exactly the same as Tom. However, when they do talk, common ground is still not easy to find.

Kenton surprises Jolene with a new suede waistcoat to replace the one lost to the flooding. Jolene is overwhelmed and melts when Kenton apologises for not clearing the drains. Kenton is keen to mark Shrove Tuesday with an event at The Bull, and Jolene agrees - so long as she gets to wear her new waistcoat!

Rob visits Helen at the shop to give her the good news about the divorce. Helen is overjoyed and Kirsty is genuinely pleased for her too. Helen can't wait to tell Pat!

On the phone, Pat agrees that it's good news for Helen. But confiding in Tony, she still has reservations about Rob's true intentions.

Helen and Rob bask in a happy glow now that they can truly move on. Rob sits Helen down, and is keen to remember the moment as he asks her - will she marry him?


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b03w3g5k)
Damon Albarn on going solo; Maxine Peake; Jonathan Yeo; Suranne Jones; Kiran Leonard

Presented by John Wilson

Since Damon Albarn's introduction to the public as the lead singer of Blur, he's become famous for his collaborations with a wide range of partners including artist Jamie Hewlett, the next Artistic Director of the National Theatre Rufus Norris, and Soul legend Bobby Womack. As he prepares to play songs from his forthcoming debut solo album, for a special 6Music festival gig, Damon talks to John about going it alone.

Maxine Peake is one of the subjects in a new exhibition at the Lowry dedicated to portrait painter Jonathon Yeo. Maxine and Jonathan describe the experience of creating a portrait from their different perspectives. And when she's not being captured in oils, Maxine is the star of the BBC legal drama Silk where she plays the role of barrister Martha Costello QC. The new series of Silk starts this week and Maxine discusses how Martha's character has developed.

Suranne Jones plays one half of television police duo Scott and Bailey. The series, described as the "Cagney and Lacey of Manchester", arose out of Suranne's desire to find better parts for women. She's now playing one of Virginia Woolf's most distinctive creations, Orlando, in a new production at the Royal Exchange Theatre. Suranne discusses with John what this play, about a character who lives as a man and a woman, can contribute to our contemporary view of the gender divide.

The musician Kiran Leonard will be performing on the main stage of the 6Music festival on Saturday 1 March. He released his debut album last year at the age of 17 and he's a multi-instrumentalist who lists Mothers of Invention, Sufjan Stevens, Albert Ayler, Krzysztof Penderecki, and the Beach Boys, as just a handful of his influences. He'll be playing live on Front Row.

Producer: Ekene Akalawu.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03w38q1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b03w3g6v)
Simon Hughes MP, Maria Eagle MP, Amy Chua, Germaine Greer

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Bath Literature Festival with Justice Minister Simon Hughes MP, Shadow Secretary of State for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs Maria Eagle MP, Yale Law professor and author Amy Chua, and writer and broadcaster Germaine Greer.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b03w3g6x)
Our Love for Animals

Roger Scruton thinks we get our priorities wrong when we favour pets at the expense of wild animals.

"We must recognise that by loving our pets as individuals we threaten the animals who cannot easily be loved in any such way."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b01rkxxy)
Jack Shaefer - Shane

Jack Shaefer's classic western novel is adapted by Frances Byrnes.

A mysterious horseman, all dressed in black and wearing a six shooter, rides into an isolated valley in Wyoming. Call me Shane, he says. He's a skilled gunslinger, and soon finds himself drawn into a conflict between homesteaders Marian and Joe Starrett and ruthless cattle baron Fletcher, who wants to force the Starretts off the land. Marian is caught between the strong, dependable husband whom she loves, and the lean, handsome stranger whom she needs if she's to save her family.

Recorded by Mark Holden
Post production by Nigel Lewis

With music by Fernando Macias-Jimenez

Produced and Directed by Kate McAll

The Oscar winning film 'Shane' starred Paramount idol Alan Ladd in the title role, with Jean Arthur as Marian and Van Heflin as Joe.

Although the story of 'Shane' is fictional, elements of it are based on the 1892 Johnson County War between the small settlers in Wyoming and the bigger, wealthier ranchers.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b03vsj4y)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b03w3gz4)
Ukraine latest, Central African Republic warning, Palestinians head to Oscars, with David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03w3gz6)
Dubliners

The Dead (Part Four)

Naturalistic in style, 'Dubliners' depicts an array of characters, graduating progressively from childhood, through adolescence, to maturity, culminating in the final story, 'The Dead'. The stories each centre on the idea of a moment of epiphany, but are grounded in the minutiae of daily life. Stories of love, loss, con men, friendship, alcoholism, marriage, politics and family, combine to create a unified world, a celebration of a city, in the unparalleled prose of its most famous son.

Abridger ..... Doreen Estall
Reader ..... Stephen Rea
Producer ..... Stephen Wright.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b03w0562)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03w3gz8)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b03w0116)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b03w0116)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b03w0gw8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b03w0gw8)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b03w164j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b03w164j)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b03w2w5s)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b03w2w5s)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b03w38q1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b03w38q1)

2525 23:00 TUE (b03ph1bv)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b03w0562)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b03w0562)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b03vh0d3)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b03w3g6x)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b03vdkrb)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b03w02sl)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b03vtgb2)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b03vh0d1)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b03w3g6v)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b03vthkv)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b03w32bw)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b03w32bw)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b03vzhmx)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b03vzhmx)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b03w02s6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b03w02sq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b03w0j4v)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b03w18fx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b03w36rb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b03w3gz6)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b03vh0c2)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b03w0112)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b03w0112)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b03w0gw4)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b03w0gw4)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b03w164d)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b03w164d)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b03w2w1c)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b03w2w1c)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b03w38px)

Border Crossings 15:45 FRI (b03w39ww)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b03vdfyc)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b03w01zt)

Brian Gulliver's Travels 23:00 THU (b00zsc2b)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b03vzhnv)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b03vzvmc)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b03w0gwn)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b03w0gwn)

Crikey DM! David Jason's Tribute to Cosgrove Hall 16:00 MON (b03ccz0r)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b03vzhnz)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b03vzhnz)

Dilemma 18:30 TUE (b03w0j4d)

Drama 14:15 MON (b03w01zr)

Drama 14:15 WED (b03w16g8)

Drama 14:15 THU (b03w2yn4)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b012fcym)

Essex, My Essex 11:00 FRI (b03w38q3)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b03vtcwd)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b03w010w)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b03w03b6)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b03w1646)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b03w2w5n)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b03w38ps)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b03vh0cq)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b03w3g59)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b03vf0f7)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b03w0j4l)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b03vgnjv)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b03w18fn)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b03vtgbb)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b03vtgbb)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b03vtg9y)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b03w2wdb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b03w02sg)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b03w0j4j)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b03w18fg)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b03w32c4)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b03w3g5k)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b03vh0cj)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b03w39wt)

HR 11:30 WED (b03w164n)

Heidi Amsinck - Copenhagen Confidential 00:30 SUN (b01hdzqy)

History Retweeted 23:00 WED (b03w18g1)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b03w2w19)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b03w2w19)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b03w0j4n)

In and Out of the Kitchen 11:30 MON (b03w01zk)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b03w16j6)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b03w16j6)

Jason Cook's School of Hard Knocks 18:30 THU (b03w32c0)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b03vdknk)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b03w02sb)

Kerry's List 19:15 SUN (b01sd5gh)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b03vh0cn)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b03w3g57)

Let's Talk About Rama and Sita 13:45 MON (b03w01zp)

Let's Talk About Rama and Sita 13:45 TUE (b03w0gwg)

Let's Talk About Rama and Sita 13:45 WED (b03w164s)

Let's Talk About Rama and Sita 13:45 THU (b03w2wdg)

Let's Talk About Rama and Sita 13:45 FRI (b03w38qc)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b03vcywy)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b03vtgb8)

Making the Best of It 11:30 FRI (b03w38q5)

Mapping the Void 13:30 SUN (b03s6mf0)

McLevy 14:15 TUE (b03w0gwj)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b03vgryd)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b03vshws)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b03vshyt)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b03vsj07)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b03vsj1j)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b03vsj2z)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b03vsj4f)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b03w164b)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b03w164b)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b03w16j4)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b03vtgb0)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b03vtgb0)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b03vgnjs)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b03w18fl)

My Teacher Is an App 20:00 MON (b03w02sj)

Nature 21:00 MON (b03vdx7w)

Nature 11:00 TUE (b03w0gwb)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b03vgryn)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b03vshx2)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b03vshz2)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b03vsj0h)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b03vsj1s)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b03vsj37)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b03vsj4p)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b03vshx4)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b03vgryq)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b03vshx8)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b03vshxg)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b03vgrz7)

News 13:00 SAT (b03vgryz)

Nurse 23:15 WED (b03w18yq)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b03w03fy)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b03vzvmf)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b03vzvmf)

Out of the Ordinary 11:00 MON (b03w0118)

PM 17:00 SAT (b03vtgb6)

PM 17:00 MON (b03w02s8)

PM 17:00 TUE (b03w0j4b)

PM 17:00 WED (b03w16p9)

PM 17:00 THU (b03w32by)

PM 17:00 FRI (b03w3g5c)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b03vzvmk)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b03vd167)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b03vzvmh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b03vh239)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b03wy182)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b03wy17f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b03wy198)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b03wy30z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b03wy31k)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b03vzhnq)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b03vzhnq)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b03vzhnq)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b03vgq25)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b03w311l)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00yddnm)

Saturday Drama 21:00 FRI (b01rkxxy)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b03vtcwj)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b03vtgbd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b03vgryj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b03vshwx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b03vshyy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b03vsj0c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b03vsj1n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b03vsj33)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b03vsj4k)

Shine like Tokyo - Northern Soul Goes East! 11:30 TUE (b03bd23y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b03vgryg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b03vgryl)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b03vgrz1)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b03vshwv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b03vshx0)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b03vshxl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b03vshyw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b03vshz0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b03vsj09)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b03vsj0f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b03vsj1l)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b03vsj1q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b03vsj31)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b03vsj35)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b03vsj4h)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b03vsj4m)

Short Cuts 23:00 MON (b03bds44)

Shorts 19:45 SUN (b03vzwc1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b03vgrz5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b03vshxq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b03vshzb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b03vsj0p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b03vsj1x)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b03vsj3f)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b03vsj4w)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b03vzhn7)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b03vzhn7)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b03w0110)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b03w0110)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b03vzhns)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b03vzhnn)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 18:30 WED (b03w16pc)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b03vzhnx)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b03vzvmm)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b03vzvmm)

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The Concrete and the Divine 11:30 THU (b01rqnf3)

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When Garry Met Tony 10:30 SAT (b03vtcwl)

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