Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b03h6z3w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b03h7grj)
Martin Sandler - The Letters of John F Kennedy

Episode 5

Letters to and from President Kennedy are published in book form and edited by Martin W Sandler to mark fifty years since the assassination of 1963. And a selection, abridged in five episodes by Penny Leicester, reveal the drama and tensions to do with American foreign policy. Other letters reveal Kennedy's wit and warmth when contacting friends and family:

5. Kennedy receives a vivid communique from his advisor JK Galbraith about the practicalities of shelter during nuclear attack. Later he writes to the British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan - words of social nicety and trepidation about the Russians.

Readers Colin Stinton, Richard Laing, Peter Marinker and Trevor White

Producer Duncan Minshull.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03h6z40)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03h6z42)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03h6z44)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b03h6z46)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03h7gww)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Frances Finn.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b03h7gwy)
"I'm here to rescue this family" - an iPM listener attempts to save his alcoholic wife but finds that as she gets sober, his life unravels. Your News is read by Jenni Murray. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b03h6z48)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b03h6z4b)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b03h6yrx)
Moseley Bog

Felicity Evans visits the land that inspired Tolkien's Middle Earth and discovers how this Birmingham Bog also kick started the Urban Wildlife Movement.

From the ages of four to eight , J.R.R. Tolkien, author of 'The Hobbit' and 'The Lord of the Rings', lived with his mother and brother opposite Sarehole Mill on the Wake Green Road in Birmingham, a short walk from what is now Moseley Bog and 'Joy's Wood', a local nature reserve. As a boy, it is into this unexpected patch of woodland that Tolkien would disappear - both literally and in his imagination. Years later he would cite this period of his life as the inspiration for the landscapes and characterless of his now legendary books. A century on, urban development of the ever increasing Birmingham City has stopped short of this special site. This rural idyll, just three miles from Birmingham's city centre was preserved by local mum, Joy Fifer who launched a local campaign in the 80's which went on to start a national urban wildlife movement. It is now cared for by enthusiastic volunteers and enjoyed by the local school children who still disappear into this land and their imaginations - much as Tolkien did so many years before them.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b03hmf7k)
Farming Today This Week

How can rural schools overcome issues of funding, transport, recruitment and isolation in order to be successful? In Farming Today This Week, Charlotte Smith explores these challenges and the solutions which schools have come up with in order to remain open.

In a special collaboration with BBC local radio, Farming Today This Week hears from rural schools up and down the country - from innovative school 'twinning' projects in Suffolk, flexi-schooling in the Peak District, transport issues in Cornwall and schools in Oxfordshire which are sharing staff to save money. Campaigners say current Government funding is weighted in favour of large schools in urban areas, as it is calculated on a per-head basis with an additional pupil premium for students who claim free school meals. Per-head funding presents additional challenges for smaller schools which could struggle if their numbers drop below a certain threshold.

However, some schools are succeeding, despite being isolated. Charlotte Smith spends a day at Fairfield High School in Herefordshire. With around 450 pupils it's one of the smallest secondary schools in England. However, it has achieved three consecutive outstanding Ofsted reports. We hear how it gets results, and how its staff address the challenges of running a rural school.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Jules Benham.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b03h6z4d)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b03hmh3f)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b03hmh3h)
Owen Sheers, Molly Crabapple, Rose and Douglas Hadfield, Mat Horne

Richard Coles and Suzy Klein with poet Owen Sheers, Guantanamo artist Molly Crabapple, South Seas travellers Rosemary and Douglas Hadfield, 17 year old Lauren who found herself without a home, Elisa Berry who found herself looking after JFK's nieces on the day he was assassinated, and actor Mat Horne's Inheritance Tracks.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 10:30 How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love My Albatross (b038xrjh)
Music writer Pete Paphides runs through the 5 stages of grief following a huge hit record with stories from some of those who know including Mike Batt, Ralph McTell, Colin Vearncombe, Ivan Doroschuk and Sandie Shaw.

Many artists are best known for doing something - be it a hit, or an album or for having an intense, sustained period of success that is hard to maintain in the long-run. In the case of Ralph McTell it's the song 'Streets of London', for Ivan Doroschuk from Men Without Hats it's 'The Safety Dance', for Mike Batt, a prolific songwriter and producer, his Womble years are often remembered first, Sandie Shaw has never been able to forget 'Puppet on a String' and Colin Vearncombe's band Black's albatross track was Wonderful Life.

The five stages a musician goes through of dealing with their albatross are uncannily similar to the five stages of grief that follow bereavement or news of a terminal illness. These were identified by psychiatrist Elizabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book On Death & Dying (they also form the narrative arc of Bill Murray's character in Groundhog Day). They include denial, bargaining, anger, depression and finally acceptance.

How I Stopped Worrying And Learned To Love My Albatross walks through these five stages, with lots of testimony from people who have been through all the different points in the curve of self-realisation - punctuated, of course, with lots of clips of all their great songs.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b03hx23j)
The Forum in Beijing: Digital China

Bridget Kendall chairs a wide-ranging discussion in Beijing about the internet in China: with nearly 600 million Chinese now online, how is the spread of social media changing the nature of their society? How much is free expression really curtailed by the Great Firewall of China and the recent legislation aimed at curbing the spread of 'rumours' on the net? And is the ability to share the minutiae of their lives online making the young in China politically apathetic? Photo credit: Jackie Zhang


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b03hmh3m)
The Noise of the Typhoon

The noise and devastation of Typhoon Haiyan: Andrew Harding on the first town in the Philippines to feel the force of the storm; Charles Haviland on how the furore surrounding the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Sri Lanka has pushed the Tamil north of the country into the news spotlight; Nicholas Wade travels to Jerusalem to hear people's views about the latest attempts to reach a Middle East peace settlement; Moldova and other former Soviet satellites are due to sign a trade deal with the EU and Tessa Dunlop has been finding out that not everyone there feels it's a good idea to turn their backs on Russia; and Will Ross has been taking time off from the hard news of Nigeria to take a look at its thriving arts scene - and a novel use for the xylophone!

From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b03hmh3p)
Interest rates rising; Postcode jitters; Frontier investing

This week, the Bank of England raised its 2013 GDP growth forecasts upwards. The raft of positive news for the UK economy, including the fall in unemployment to 7.6%, has provoked headlines and speculation about when interest rates are going to rise. Could it be 2014? 2015? Or 2016? People with mortgages obviously want to know. So do savers who want better rates of return. Money Box investigates.

A postcode muddle has hit insurance cover for residents on a new build estate. Your new house is built with windows, a roof, your own front door and a road leading up to it. All it needs is a postcode. Without that it can't be insured . And nor can your car. Even your credit card may not work without the new postcode. So whose job is it to give you one? And why does it sometimes take so long? Bob Howard reports.

The world is changing. So should you invest money outside the UK in what are called emerging markets? Investments in emerging markets didn't do very well this year. But that leads some experts to believe that is a buying signal. Others say forget emerging and embrace frontier markets for the best returns. And some still think you are safer in a good old FTSE tracker. Three investment experts unpick the issues.

And China's got talent - especially when it comes to financial advisers. More than a thousand young hopefuls for the title 'best financial adviser' were whittled down to 20 who will now compete for the top ten in a TV final in China of 'Money's Got Talent'. Would you be influenced by a financial adviser you'd seen on TV? Would it make you more aware of the need to get a grip on your finances? Or is it just a bit of fun?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b03h7gsh)
Series 82

Episode 2

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with panellists Susan Calman, Andrew Maxwell and Hugo Rifkind joining regular guest Jeremy Hardy.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b03h6z4g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b03h6z4j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b03h7gsp)
Margaret Hodge MP, David Starkey, Dame Helen Ghosh, Jeremy Hunt MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Chartwell in Kent with the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt MP, Chair of the Public Accounts Committee Margaret Hodge MP, TV historian David Starkey and Dame Helen Ghosh Director General of the National Trust.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b03hmh3r)
Sri Lanka; Dedicated GPs; Horse welfare

Radio 4 listeners have their say on some of the issues raised during Any Questions:

How appropriate was it to hold the Commonwealth Conference in Sri Lanka considering the political situation there?

Surely everyone should have a dedicated doctor and not just those over 75?

And, does the panel consider that the human consumption of horse meat could improve horse welfare as suggested by Princess Anne today?

Presenter: Anita Anand
Producer: Joe Kent.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b03hmh3t)
Christopher Lee - Air-Force One

Martin Jarvis directs a stellar American cast, headed by Stacy Keach, Glenne Headly, Susan Sullivan, Steven Weber - and introduced by Josh Stamberg - in Christopher Lee's extraordinary play.

On November 22nd, 1963, President John F Kennedy was assassinated by a sniper while riding in an open-topped limousine in a motorcade in Dallas, Texas.

What happened immediately after the assassination?

Theories explored in Lee's riveting drama are based on Federal, classified and academic research, diaries and recollections, and statements by Mrs Kennedy - a mix of substantiated and contested documentation. He focuses, first, on the hospital mortuary, and then aboard Air Force One where former Vice President Lyndon B Johnson insists that Judge Sarah Hughes conducts the 'swearing-in' before take-off. Also present in the overcrowded aircraft is Kennedy's widow, Jackie, in a state of shock, still covered in blood. The play becomes a tense thriller as surprising events occur on board.

Other parts: Tracy Pattin, Darren Richardson
Sound design: Wesley Dewberry, Mark Holden
Producer: Rosalind Ayres
Director: Martin Jarvis

A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Tim Key's Easy USSR (b03h30gb)
"I remember exactly where I was when I was first exposed to Vyacheslav Mescherin's tunes. I was at a dinner party and the host handed me the sleeve with a glint in her eye. She thought I might quite like it. The insinuation was that none of the other guests would. She was right."

Nine years ago, comedian and poet Tim Key was given a copy of a CD entitled Easy USSR Vol. 2. One car journey to Devon and four consecutive listens later, and he was hooked. The strange yet catchy sounds of Vyacheslav Mescherin's Ensemble of Electronic Musical Instruments have underscored his life and his work ever since. On stage and on the radio, Mescherin's music lies beneath him like a crashmat.

With very little information available about Mescherin, Tim sets out to find out more about the man.
His search takes him from one of the world's leading Theremin players to a Soviet Cosmonaut. Tim discovers that, far from the obscure rarity it is today, in the 1960s and beyond Mescherin's music was a quirky soundtrack to life in the Soviet Union - on radio, TV and even in factories. The futuristic sounds of the electronic instruments he pioneered provided the perfect accompaniment to the space race era. Nearly twenty years after his death, many Russians can hum Mescherin's tunes, yet few know his name.

But what of the rumours that Mescherin's sounds were blasted into space? And will Tim be able to find more of the music he craves?

Producer: Peggy Sutton
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b03hmh3w)
Weekend Woman's Hour; Oprah Winfrey; Lilly Allen video

Oprah Winfrey discusses her latest role, as Gloria Gaines, in The Butler; her memories of the civil rights movement in America; and explain what drives her ambition. Why Mondays are a good day for advertisers to bombard you with products. Is the video for Lily Allen's first single in four years feminist, or further reinforcement of misogynistic attitudes throughout the music industry, as well as reinforcing stereotypes of race and class. Camp, homosexual flirting on Saturday night primetime TV is not unusual - would we be as happy to see lesbians flirting in the same way? Plus Biddy Baxter, legendary Editor of Blue Peter on her pioneering career. Ann Cairns of Mastercard on being part of the WH Power List. And singer songwriter Nadine Shah talks about her debut album and performs live in the Woman's Hour Studio.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b03hmh3y)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b03h71c0)
Shipping

It's the lifeblood of the world's economy, moving most of our imports and exports and around the globe. But shipping is changing: vessels and ports are getting bigger and competition for trade is coming from the Far East.

Evan Davis and guests from the world of shipping discuss how ports are run and how the shipping business manages the risk of accidents and piracy.

Guests:

James Cooper - CEO of Associated British Ports. , a private company which owns and runs 21 ports in the UK.
Kenneth MacLeod - Chairman of Stena Line UK and President of the UK Chamber of Shipping.
Rupert Atkin - CEO of Talbot Underwriting and Chairman of the Lloyd's Market Association.

Producer - Smita Patel.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b03h6z4l)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b03h6z4n)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03h6z4q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b03hmh40)
Robert Vaughn, Anne Reid, Russell Kane, Zawe Ashton, the Pedrito Martinez Group, Lizzo

Clive's on a mission with The Man from U.N.C.L.E, actor Robert Vaughn, whose career has spanned over fifty years, with such film credits as 'Bullitt'. Robert's currently treading the boards as Juror #9 in 'Twelve Angry Men'. Twelve jurors have murder on their minds and a life in their hands as they decide the fate of a young delinquent. 'Twelve Angry Men' is at London's Garrick Theatre until 2nd March 2014.

Clive's unzipped with larger than life comedian Russell Kane, whose new big-small show tackles the issue of smallness. We Brits love it - being tiny but fierce, close but distant. Russell addresses the issue of keeping things small when life gets big. He's touring 'Smallness' until May 2014.

Robin Ince dreams of a life with actress, poet and writer Zawe Ashton, whose character 'Vod' is now in her second year of uni in the third series of Channel 4 sitcom 'Fresh Meat'. Vod's back from her travels with more than everyone bargained for - in the shape of her new Mexican lover. So, stock-pile the Jäger and bring on the bants! 'Fresh Meat' is on 18th November at 22.00.

Clive cuts a rug with actress Anne Reid, who's back on our screens playing retired widow Celia opposite Derek Jacobi's Alan in 'Last Tango in Halifax'; the story of two septuagenarian sweethearts. When Celia's partner Alan suffers a heart attack, the couples' nuptials hanging in the balance. Will she once again lose the love of her life? 'Last Tango In Halifax' is on 19th November at 21.00 on BBC One.

With music from The Pedrito Martinez Group, who perform 'Drume Negrita'. And from U.S rapper Lizzo, who performs 'Batches and Cookies' from her album 'Lizzobangers.'

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b03hmh42)
Sachin Tendulkar

India means Sachin and Sachin means India. So how did a shy 16-year-old cricketer come to embody a nation and its hopes and dreams? Sachin Tendulkar's career spanned a period of remarkable change in what is now one of the world's biggest developing economies. As he plays his 200th and final test match, Tim Franks looks at how Sachin's progress mirrored and even inspired India's over a quarter of a century.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b03hmh44)
Mojo revived; The Counselor; Paul Smith at the Design Museum

The coincidence of a really hot cast and the restaging of a play by a writer whose most recent work was lauded and awarded should be a guarantee of a hit. Jez Butterworth's Mojo was originally staged at The Royal Court in London 18 years ago. His stratospheric success with Jerusalem and a cast that includes Ben Wishaw and Rupert "Ron Weasley" Grint (making his West End stage debut) means there is a lot of press attention and positivity towards "Mojo" at the Harold Pinter Theatre, but is there enough substance beneath the hype?

The Counselor is a film with an impeccable pedigree - starring Cameron Diaz, Javier Bardem, Brad Pitt, Penelope Cruz, directed by Ridley 'Bladerunner' Scott, script by Cormac 'No Country for Old Men' McCarthy, it can't go wrong. Or can it?

Fatima Bhutto is a young writer who comes from the famous Pakistani dynasty, and her first novel The Shadow Of The Crescent Moon follows poetry, journalism and non fiction - telling the story of her father's murder. She's been acclaimed for her writing, so is this novel a successful transition into a new genre or treading on new and uncertain ground?

The designer Paul Smith's career began 43 years ago in a tiny windowless shop in Nottingham and now his 'empire' extends to 37 countries around the globe. The Design Museum in London has an exhibition looking at his career and achievements, and it even includes a recreation of his office with a desk so cluttered he's never been able to sit at it, but what does it reveal about the man and his work?

There's a new series on BBC2 looking at Britain during the Cold War. Historian Dominic Sandbrook considers how the UK dealt with the possible threat of nuclear armageddon and a world where nobody was above suspicion. How did the government respond and how did it affect the British people? It's a fascinating subject; how successfully can TV boil it down to a 3 part series?

Sarfraz Manzoor is joined by Ekow Eshun, Esther Freud and Miranda Sawyer

Producer: Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b03hmh46)
The Kennedy Book Depository

To mark the 50th anniversary President Kennedy's death, Mark Lawson looks at how his death has been reflected in novels, film and television.

We'll probably never know with absolute certainty exactly what happened on November 22nd 1963 in Dealey Plaza, Dallas, but that very imprecision allows creative artists full rein to exercise their narrative muscles. Oliver Stone's film 'JFK' suggested that the death was a complex conspiracy; Charles McCarry's 'The Tears of Autumn' put it down to revenge for the death of a Vietnamese General; and Don Delillo's 'Libra' conjures the backstory of the supposed assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. With archive recordings of Don Delillo and Oliver Stone and newly recorded contributions from veteran thriller writer and ex-CIA agent Charles McCarry and Richard North Patterson.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b03gtvty)
Evelyn Waugh - Sword of Honour

Unconditional Surrender

by Evelyn Waugh
Dramatised by Jeremy Front
Evelyn Waugh's satirical WW2 masterpiece:
After injuring his knee during a parachute jump, Guy believes his wartime experience is at an end, but then he receives orders to fly to Italy on a secret mission.

Directed by Tracey Neale

Evelyn Waugh's trilogy of novels mark a high point in his literary career. Originally published as three volumes: Officers and Gentlemen, Men at Arms and Unconditional Surrender they were extensively revised by Waugh, and published as the one-volume Sword of honour in 1965, in the form in which Waugh himself wished they to be read. They are dramatised for the Classic Serial in seven episodes.

This is a story that continues to delight as we follow the comic and often bathetic adventures of Guy
Crouchback. Witty and tragic, engaging and insightful, this work must be counted next to 'Brideshead Revisited' as Waugh's most enduring novel. Sword of Honour effortlessly treads the line between the personal and the political - it is at once an indictment of the incompetence of the Allied war effort, and a moving study of one man's journey from isolation to self fulfilment.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b03h6z4s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b03h429b)
Should charity begin at home?

The devastation left by the super-typhoon Haiyan is now becoming all too plain to see. Great swathes of the Philippines have simply been flattened in its path. The official death toll is now put at 10,000, but that's almost certain to rise. More than nine million people have been affected and many are now struggling to survive without food, shelter or clean drinking water. A massive international relief effort is now underway and the UK has pledged £6 million in aid and adverts from charities appealing for donations from the public have appeared in many national newspapers. In such an inter-connected world coverage of the disaster and the calls for aid and donations will quite rightly continue for some time, but in such a world, where we have so detailed knowledge of the desperate needs of people like those in the Philippines, is it still morally tenable to believe that charity should begin at home? Of course there are those who would argue that these things are not mutually exclusive, that one does not preclude the other and there is no moral hierarchy of need. But if that's the case why has the plight of Syrian refugees not ignited the same kind of response? So far the UN's £2.7bn appeal for Syrian refugees is only 50% funded as many people and government's manage to turn a blind eye to the suffering. Do we have to accept that it is just human nature to put your loved ones first? Or is giving to strangers more virtuous than giving to kith and kin?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Michael Portillo, Claire Fox, Matthew Taylor, Giles Fraser. Witnesses: Dr Beth Breeze, Gareth Owen, Jonathan Foreman, Peter Singer.


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b03gvqm7)
(9/12)
Why would Sportin' Life, Rumpole and Columbo make a flush with the King of Diamonds and the Jacks of Hearts and Spades?

Tom Sutcliffe has the answer to this and plenty more of Round Britain Quiz's trademark cryptic questions, in the latest heat which pits the South of England against Northern Ireland. Fred Housego and Marcel Berlins are hoping to get their own back on Roisin McAuley and Brian Feeney who beat them in their previous clash, earlier in the series.

As usual, the programme includes several questions provided by Round Britain Quiz listeners, and Tom will also be revealing the answer to the question he left unanswered at the end of last week's edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b03gtvv2)
Series 2

City Streets and Seashores

Paul Farley meets Roy Fisher and Michael Longley: two of the greatest older poets at work in English today. City streets and the seashore sing loud in their poems. Roy Fisher's long sequence City about Birmingham is the best poetic account of modern urban life. Michael Longley has been writing lyric poems about a short stretch of the coastline of County Mayo for decades. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b03hczkw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b011vg9f)
Alexandros Papadiamandis - The Boundless Garden

The Gleaner

Mark Williams reads from an anthology of 19th century Greek short stories. It's Christmas and Achtitsa has neither food nor money. Then she hears from her long lost son in America...

Alexandros Papadiamandis (1851 - 1911) was born on the western Aegean island of Skiathos, where many of his short stories are set.

In these stories he explores the souls of ordinary men and women as they succumb to, or struggle against, the power of evil, and try to deal with life's ambiguities. Aware of the way in which the past breathes life into the present, Papadiamandis also delves into Greek mythology, as it survived through people's belief in supernatural wonders on both land and sea.

Mark Williams is well known as one of the stars of the BBC TV's The Fast Show ("Suits you, sir..!!") and for the role of Ron Weasley's father in the Harry Potter films.

Translated by Elizabeth Key Fowden
Abridged by Roy Apps

Producer: David Blount
A Pier Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03hczky)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03hczl0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03hczl2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b03hczl4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b03hmngl)
Those were the bells of St. Thomas the Martyr, Oxford.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b03hmh42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b03hczl6)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b03hmngn)
Harmony

Mark Tully pulls up a piano stool and tries to understand the concept of harmony in the company of pianist and composer David Owen Norris, who suggests that it has more to do with mathematics than melody.

We might think that it is obvious what is harmonious and what is not, but our sense of musical harmony has developed over time - as David Owen Norris illustrates at the keyboard with the help of excerpts from Claude Debussy and Barbara Streisand.

But are we born with a sense of harmony? Do other cultures have a different appreciation of harmony? And just how did Beethoven manage to turn the chord of C Major into dissonance?

Producer: Adam Fowler.
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b03hmngq)
Winged Buffet

Every autumn Spurn Point National Nature Reserve is inundated with small migrating birds from continental Europe. Exhausted from their journey across the North Sea blackbirds, redwings, stonechats and other small birds make easy picking for one of the UK's most charismatic birds of prey. Also the smallest falcon in the UK, merlin are dynamic and quick - blink and you'll miss them as they dash past on the hunt.
Chris Sperring meets Peter Wright, former head ranger of the Yorkshire Dales National Park and an expert in merlin having studied them in their upland breeding habitat for many years. Chris and Peter join Andy Gibson, the Outer Humber officer for the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust who shows them what attracts merlin - and other birds of prey to Spurn Point National Nature Reserve.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b03hczl8)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b03hczlb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b03hmngs)
Pope Francis has only been in the job for 8 months but already his huge popularity has been named the 'Francis Effect'. But does it extend to atheists and left wing liberals too? Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland and Terry Sanderson from the National Secular Society join Edward to discuss.

Following the death of the composer John Tavener, Edward explores Tavener's life and how his "way towards God has been to write music".

In the second of two reports from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kati Whitaker finds out how the Heal Africa hospital has been working with faith groups to resolve disputes.

Religion and Dr Who, not frequently associated with one another, but in the run up to the 50th anniversary of the famous time lord Dr Andrew Crome of Manchester University has published a book entitled 'Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith'. He joins Edward to tell him why.

Typhoon Haiyan has devasted areas of the Phillipines. Kevin Bocquet has met members of the Filipino community in the UK to find out how they are responding to the disaster.

The first woman bishop will be enthroned in the Church of Ireland at the end of this month. Edward speaks to Pat Storey to find out what her journey to becoming a bishop has been.

While the Church of Ireland are soon to enthrone their first woman bishop, General Synod meets next week in London to discuss, amongst other things, women bishops. Edward is joined by Reverend Anne Stevens from the group Women And The Church to discuss.

Producers: Annabel Deas and Dawn Bryan
Series producer: Amanda Hancox

Contributors:
Dr Andrew Crome
Jonathan Freedland
Terry Sanderson
Reverend Anne Stevens
Reverend Pat Storey.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b03hmngv)
Children in Need

Sir Terry Wogan appeals on behalf of Children in Need.
Donations: BBC Children in Need Appeal, PO Box 1000, London W12 7WJ, or you can give online at bbc.co.uk/pudsey, or call 0345 733 2233 (Calls to 03 numbers are charged at no more than UK geographic rates (as for 01 and 02 numbers) and will be included as part of any inclusive minutes. This applies to calls from any network including mobiles.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b03hczld)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b03hczlg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b03hmngx)
A Vision of Heaven

'A Vision of Heaven.' CS Lewis' biographer Professor Alister McGrath preaches live from Lewis' Parish Church of Holy Trinity Headington Quarry on the outskirts of Oxford in this service marking the fiftieth anniversary of the author's death. With Canon Angela Tilby and the Vicar of Holy Trinity The Revd Tim Stead. Director of Music: Sarah Lister. Producer: Philip Billson.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b03h7gsr)
Self Confident Culture

Will Self argues for greater British cultural self confidence in the debate over the wearing of the veil.

Apologies are not needed for an insistence on uncovered faces in court, he says, and the best safeguard against extremism is engagement with the Western philosophic tradition and its multicultural influences.

"Of course British culture will be changed by the cultures of our recent immigrants, but surely our greatest desideratum is precisely this: to be the heirs, possessors and transmitters of a legacy that is ready and able to adapt."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwxfp)
Siskin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Siskin. Siskins are visiting our gardens as never before. These birds now breed across the UK and cash in on our love of bird-feeding. They are now regular visitors to seed dispensers of all kinds.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b03hmnnd)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b03hmnng)
For detailed descriptions please see daily programmes.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b03hmntl)
Malorie Blackman

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the writer Malorie Blackman.

A prolific and multi-award winning author she has powered her way to success not just through talent but determination and perseverance. From the careers mistress who told her, "black people don't become teachers," to the 82 rejection letters she received before she was published, significant parts of her life seem to have been spent proving people wrong. A technology wiz, her first career was in computing. As a writer her books have tackled challenging themes: bullying, teenage pregnancy, racism and terrorism.

Currently Children's Laureate, her own formative years were spent in South London where as a little girl she went from thinking everyone was her friend to feeling, as a teenager, that the world was her enemy.

She says, "Good stories made me reassess the world and people as I thought I knew them. Great stories made me reassess myself."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b03gvsln)
Series 60

Episode 1

The 60th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the Playhouse Theatre in Weston-super-Mare, where regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by John Finnemore, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b03hmpwl)
Why is Grimsby's smoked fish special?

Fenland celery has recently joined a select list of only fifty-five British foods to achieve the same EU protection as champagne, stilton and Melton Mowbray pork pies.

But what difference will this status realistically make to the people who grow it?

Sheila Dillon investigates the longer term impact of PGI status on another iconic English product, Grimsby Traditional Smoked Fish.

She visits Grimsby fish market to meet the owner of the only remaining Grimsby-based fishing fleet, Andrew Allard, the chief executive of Grimsby Fish Merchants Association Steve Norton, and Richard Enderby, whose family have been smoking fish for generations.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b03hczlj)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b03hmpwn)
We hear the latest from the Philippines as aid efforts continue plus we ask if reconstruction or relocation is the better solution for areas destroyed by the typhoon.

We're in Iraq to look at the security situation in the country more than four years after UK combat operations ended.


SUN 13:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b0376x76)
Series 1

Lord Tebbit

In this series, Peter Hennessy, the leading historian of modern Britain, asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. In each week's conversation, he invites his guest to explore what influenced their thinking and motivated them to enter politics, their experience of events and impressions of people they knew, and their concerns for the future.
Peter's guest in this week's programme is Lord Tebbit (Norman Tebbit), the former Conservative Cabinet Minister and loyal ally of Margaret Thatcher. He served as Employment Secretary in the early 1980s and then became Conservative Party Chairman.
After serving in the RAF and working as an airline pilot, Norman Tebbit first entered Parliament in 1970 at the age of thirty-nine. His trenchant style of politics provoked Michael Foot to describe him as a "semi-house-trained polecat". Norman Tebbit was also nicknamed "the Chingford skinhead" (he was MP for Chingford) and was caricatured as a leather-clad "bovverboy" puppet in TV's 'Spitting Image'.
In October 1984, Norman Tebbit and his wife were seriously injured in the IRA's bomb attack on the Grand Hotel, Brighton. After the 1987 election, he left the Cabinet in order to ensure that his disabled wife received proper care. Norman Tebbit continues to voice his forthright views, notably on Britain's relationship with Europe, in the House of Lords.
Presenter, Peter Hennessy. Producer, Rob Shepherd.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03h7gs3)
Rochdale Pioneers Museum

Eric Robson and the team visit the birthplace of the modern co-operative movement at the Rochdale Pioneers Museum. Taking questions are panellists Christine Walkden, Bob Flowerdew and Pippa Greenwood.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. Could the panel recommend a plant that will discourage Leek Moth?

A. A lot of pests find their host plant by searching for its scent, so growing something pungent nearby can work to distract them. Carrots work well to keep pests away from Allium. You can't completely rely on this technique though. If you don't dig up all of last year's Leeks and wait until they have flowered, you can plant the bulbs at the end of August. This way your Leeks will be growing outside of the Leek Moth season. Fleecing or mesh over the crop will prevent the female moth from laying her eggs.

Q. House sparrows have made a recent return to the Rochdale area after a number of years. Could you suggest any flowers or shrubs that will encourage them to stay?

A. A diverse garden is key to maintaining wildlife throughout the year. Choose plants with late berries and flowers. Cyclamen and the winter flowering bulbs will all attract insect life. It is also important to create a habitat that will suit them, such as ivy or installing boxes. If you have the room, you could plant Wheat seeds. The birds will have a store of seeds to feed from over the winter. You could also try Milk Thistle Silybum Marianum which produces very oily seeds.

Q. I have a cutting of a Himalayan Honeysuckle. Where should I put it, what are its preferred growing conditions and what size will it grow to?

A. They are very tolerant plants and will grow in a range of different soil types. They are often used as hedging and are very easy to nurture. They can grow to quite a size (up to 10ft/3m across) but are very easy to cut back.

Q. I have planted Snow Queen Rose in a tub with compost and manure. It is in a north-facing garden and is positioned by the house for shelter. How should we care for it?

A. It will be completely reliant on you for moisture and for food. You should start to feed it from mid-spring next year. It will dry out very easily in a container. In the winter months, insulate the pot so that the compost doesn't freeze.

Q. How can I prevent nettles from repeatedly growing back on a patch of scrubby land?

A. If they are growing happily, they will grow back each time you chop them down. You could plant grass for the first year and mow it weekly. Or try digging them out in January/February when the ground has thawed and the roots give way easily. A herbicide will require two to three applications in August and September, but it does make the garden look a mess.

Q. I have a steep, west-facing slope backing onto moorland. Can you suggest any plants that will survive in this exposed position and spread horizontally so as to subdue the grass that is still trying to grow?

A. Cornuses or suckering plants would work. Try Willows, Dogwoods or Alders which will stabilize the ground and provide colourful stems. You could introduce Rubus Cockburnianus or Biflorus. Conifers always provide reliable evergreen cover. Osmaronia or Nutalia is a suckering shrub that doesn't get too tall and has wonderful white flowers in the spring. You also can't go wrong with the hardy Juniper Horizontalis.

Q. We planted a Silver Birch - Betula Pendula Golden Beauty - in a pit of heavy, clay soil about four years ago. It has not really grown and the canopy diminishes each year. What could we do to encourage it?

A. The pit in which you planted it will have turned into a sump. The tree will be drowning. You could try digging it out and replanting it at a higher position. Fill the pit with stony waste and stake the Birch really well.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b03hmpwq)
Sunday Edition - Man Talk

Fi Glover introduces four conversations between men, ranging from managing a NHS Trust to being a football hooligan, via fishing in the Irish Sea and enjoying pickled eggs in a pub, in the Sunday Edition of Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b03hn1m3)
Dostoyevsky - The Russian Gambler

Episode 1

A brilliant, penniless, pianist gets a job as tutor to the daughter of a wealthy Russian oligarch living in London and is sucked into a world of obsession and chance.

A modern-day take on Dostoevsky's The Gambler, by writer/actor Dolya Gavanski, with Ed Stoppard, Matthew Marsh and Graham Seed.

The Russian Gambler is Dolya Gavanski's first drama for Radio 4. As an actor she worked with Steve Coogan and Michael Winterbottom on The Trip and with Angelina Jolie in the Bosnian film In the Land of Milk and Honey. Her radio work includes The Mumbai Chuzzlewits, The Bid and UTZ for Radio 4 and Massistonia on Radio 3.

Casting: Toby Whale,
Script Editor: Mike Walker,
Sound Design: Steve Bond.

Original music composed by Sacha Puttnam.
All music performed by Sacha Puttnam.

Directed and Produced by John Dryden
A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b03hn1m5)
Scott Turow; Paul Bailey and Manda Scot on gay literature; Charlie Hill

Scott Turow talks about his latest novel Identical, a dark thriller set amongst America's warring political families, which he's based around the Greek myth of the twins Castor and Pollox. Turow's identical twin boys are Paul and Cass Gianis - one of whom pleaded guilty to murder and served 25 years in prison, but were they both implicit?

November sees the re-issue of The Charioteers by Mary Renault, marking the 60th anniversary of the first publication of the book. It has been described by many as a landmark work in gay literature, coming out when it did in 1953 at a time when male homosexuality was still banned in the UK. To discuss this ground-breaking novel and others which highlighted the lives and issues surrounding same sex relationships, Mariella is joined by Manda Scott, Chair of the Historical Writers' Association and the author of the Boudicca and Rome series and the writer Paul Bailey, who as a young man was part of that underground world that Mary Renault was addressing.

Charlie Hill discusses mediocre literature and a book so badly written that reading it could damage your health. It's the plot of his new novel, aptly called 'Books' which charts the war waged by Richard , a booze soaked, dog eared Brummie bookshop owner, against Gary, the bestselling author of 'male-confessional-lad-lit', whose book is so mediocre that it proves fatal to its readership.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b03hn1m7)
Series 2

The Waste Remains

Paul Farley introduces new poems on the old theme of autumnal rot and mulch. New poems from Alice Oswald, Steve Ely, Maurice Riordan, Frances Leviston and a first British listening in on the American poet Robert Wrigley: a master observer of roadkill. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b03h3fx6)
A Healthy Market?

The biggest ever slice of the NHS is up for grabs in Cambridgeshire. Ten bidders, including NHS hospital trusts and private companies Serco, Virgin Care and Circle, are competing for a five year contract to run older peoples' services. It will be worth a minimum of £700,000. The successful bidder will provide everything from podiatry and occupational therapy to dementia treatment and end of life care. The stakes are high. But how much will patients be told about how the bid was won? With commissioners advertising dozens of other big money tenders, File on 4 looks at the secrecy surrounding NHS contracts when they're awarded and when they're challenged. Does commercial confidentiality make public accountability impossible? And how far does the competitive market improve healthcare for patients?

Reporter Jane Deith
Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b03hmh42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b03hczll)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b03hczln)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03hczlq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b03hn2rp)
The best of BBC Radio this week chosen by John Waite

On this week's Pick of the Week, as we approach the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy, John Waite hears how the conspiracy theories that still surround his death were started just minutes after he was killed - and by the man who would replace him, Vice-President Lyndon Johnson. There are more "what-ifs" on the programme in a play that asks - what would have happened to the Beatles - and to modern music - if they'd failed their audition with George Martin? Also, could Robbie Williams have been a poet rather than a song-writer? Judge for yourself when Britain's most successful solo artist turns to verse.

Programmes chosen this week:

Air Force One: How I stopped worrying and learned to love my albatross: Radio 4
In Britten's Footsteps: Radio 4
Andrew Maxwell's Public Enemies: Radio 4
Free Thinking: What's Eating You? : Radio 3
All in the Mind: Radio 4
Afternoon Drama: Sorry Boys You Failed the Audition: Radio 4
Fan Power: Radio 4
Tim Key's Easy USSR: Radio 4
5Live Drive Tuesday 12th November 2013: Radio 5Live
Beatles at the BBC: Radio 2.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b03hn2rr)
Shula's drumming up support for the organ fund. Neil has got a band together for the peal. This includes Lily, although Elizabeth was nervous about her joining the bell ringers for such a big undertaking. David looks forward to catching up with Daniel. Ruth says it must be great for Shula to have him home from the States. Shula hides her reservations about Darrell.

David gets Ruth to take a break from learning lines for Lynda's Christmas production. He springs an anniversary surprise on her. They're going to Budapest for a long weekend. Josh has been brilliant helping David arrange it.

Keen to help Darrell find a flat, Shula speaks to Lilian. Lilian talks to Darrell to get an idea of his situation, but his mind is elsewhere. He distractedly reminisces about Elona and Rosa and when he gets on to what a great boss Paul was, uneasy Lilian ends the conversation..

Shula's running a session on owners bonding with their horses, which is hugely popular with middle-aged women. Lilian broaches the subject of Darrell. She's given it careful consideration but as he's on benefits (that's her excuse, anyway) she can't rent an Amside property to him.


SUN 19:15 I'm Dave Podmore, Get Me Out There (b03hn2rt)
After his over-exuberant victory celebrations at the Oval, Dave Podmore finds himself in the celebrity doghouse.

A brush with death at his local reservoir then annoys Pod even more, if only for thwarting his plan to get on series 2 of "Splash!" with Tom Daley. It's a good job Radio One County's Andy Hamer is on hand to take his speeding points, as not even Pod would do that to his wife. (She's already banned after she covered for him last time).

With Ashes fever upon us again, Pod knows that Down Under is the place to be, but the big question is will he get picked... for a juicy jungle payday on "I'm a Celebrity"?

Producer: Jon Harvey
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Nadine Gordimer - A Flash of Fireflies (b03hn2rw)
A Chip of Glass Ruby

Marking Nobel Laureate Nadine Gordimer's death in July, the last in this series of stories from her remarkable career as a writer and political activist.

In this tale of personal bravery, set during apartheid in South Africa, a bewildered husband struggles to cope with his wife's political activism.

Read by Raad Rawi
Abridged and produced by Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b03h7gs9)
Was last week's edition of Radio 4's Profile programme sexist? Some Feedback listeners have accused the programme of just that after a profile of the new Director of Public Prosecutions, Alison Saunders, featured numerous references to her cooking and baking abilities. In this week's Feedback, the Editor of Profile, Richard Knight, defends the programme.

Roger Bolton also speaks to Ric Bailey, the BBC's Chief Political Advisor, about the challenges facing the Corporation in the lead up to the Scottish Referendum. How can it ensure impartiality in its coverage? The BBC Trust has launched a 12 week consultation seeking views on the BBC Executive's proposed additional guidelines for reporting on the referendum. Visit the BBC Trust website to find out how you can have your say.

Also this week, meet the new generation of Just A Minute panellists who are giving Paul Merton, Sue Perkins, and Graham Norton a run for their money on Radio 4 Extra's Junior Just a Minute.

And a radio fan digs out a rare edition of Feedback from almost exactly thirty years ago and finds an unexpectedly topical item about Radio 4 continuity announcer Susan Rae.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b03h7gs7)
A British composer, a Northern Irish MP, a Romanian architect, a German mayor and a British supercentenarian

Matthew Bannister on the prolific composer Sir John Tavener, who wrote a seven hour epic called The Veil, and music performed at Princess Diana's funeral.

Eddie McGrady - the respected SDLP MP for South Down in Northern Ireland who worked tirelessly for peace and helped to negotiate the Good Friday agreement.

Anca Petrescu - the architect who built an enormous palace for the Romanian dictator Nicolai Ceaucescu - it's the world's second largest building.

And Manfred Rommel, son of the German General Erwin Rommel and Mayor of Stuttgart for many years. We have a tribute from Viscount Montgomery who became his friend.

Plus Grace Jones, who has died aged 113 years old.

Producer: Laura Northedge.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b03hmh3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b03hmngv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b03gvslv)
France: Sinking Slowly?

The French are far more attached to the idea of a centralised, big state than their Anglo-Saxon counterparts. The philosophy behind it, Colbertism, holds that the economy of France should serve the state and that the state should direct the economy.

But as France's big state looks less affordable, some French intellectuals are arguing that it is time that French identity became less tied to the dirigiste idea. Former BBC Paris Correspondent Emma Jane Kirby travels to France to meet those questioning their country's traditional resistance to economic reform.

Producer: Fiona Leach.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b03hn2ry)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b03hn2s0)
Iain Martin of the Telegraph looks at how newspapers covered the week's biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b03h6yrz)
Jude Law on Dom Hemingway; Lee Daniels on The Butler; Vivien Leigh's centenary

The latest news from the world of film.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b03hmngn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b03hczmq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b03h428y)
Work and Consumption; Neo-liberal Economics

The truimph of Neoliberal economics in the post Recession world. Laurie Taylor talks to US Professor of Economics, Philip Mirowski, about his analysis of why neoliberalism survived, and even prospered, in the aftermath of the financial meltdown of 2008. Although it was widely asserted that the economic convictions behind the disaster would be consigned to history, Mirowski says that the opposite is the case. He claims that once neoliberalism became a Theory of Everything, providing a revolutionary account of self, knowledge, markets, and government, it was impossible to falsify by data from the 'real' economy. Neoliberalism, he suggests, wasn't dislodged by the recession because we have internalised its messages. Have we all, in a sense, become neoliberals, inhabiting "entrepreneurial" selves which compel us to position ourselves in the market and rebrand ourselves daily? Also, why do work almost as hard as we did 40 years ago, despite being on average twice as rich? Robert Skidelsky, Emeritus Professor of Political Economy, suggests an escape from the work and consumption treadmill.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b03hmngl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03hczms)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03hczmv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03hczmx)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b03hczmz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03j9m24)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Frances Finn.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b03hng12)
In April 2012 Defra selected six areas to trial its plans for voluntary biodiversity offsetting - that's compensating for the loss of wildlife habit as a result of building work. When development destroys a natural habitat, developers are asked to stump up the cash for "bigger or better nature sites". The six pilots got underway in April 2012 in Devon, Doncaster, Essex, Greater Norwich, Nottinghamshire and Warwickshire, and will come to an end in April next year. The problem is they haven't actually piloted anything yet. Although there are some plans in the pipeline, nothing's happening on the ground. Heidi Thompson, from the Greater Norwich pilot, tells Charlotte the scheme's been a "resounding failure".

When the EU reached an agreement to end fish discards earlier this year, the move was widely welcomed. But new research shows that just ending discards alone may not be enough to keep fish stocks sustainable. We hear from Professor Alistair Grant, who supervised the work by the University of East Anglia.

And kicking off a week about CAP reform, Charlotte discusses the ins and outs of the Common Agricultural Policy with the Farmers Guardian political editor, Alistair Driver.

Presented by Charlotte Smith produced in Bristol by Anna Jones.


MON 05:56 Weather (b03hczn1)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx2qh)
Pied Wagtail

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Pied Wagtail. In winter, pied wagtails can often be seen roosting in towns and cities in large flocks. By day, pied wagtails are often obvious in fields feeding on insects but they're equally at home on our streets gleaning prey from pavements and road surfaces.


MON 06:00 Today (b03hng14)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b03hng16)
Gandhi's Early Years

Bridget Kendall looks back at the formative years of Gandhi with the historian Ramachandra Guha and opera director Phelim McDermott. At the turn of the twentieth century Gandhi spent more than twenty years in South Africa and England: Guha argues that these early experiences shaped his future ideas, while McDermott stages Gandhi's spiritual progress towards nonviolent protest in his production of the opera Satyagraha. Gandhi returned to India just after the outbreak of the First World War and the international historian David Reynolds looks at the legacy of the Great War, and its impact on the decision-makers of the future. The Editor of Prospect Magazine, Bronwen Maddox, explores its legacy.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b03hng18)
CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters

Episode 1

Originally broadcast in 2013, in the week marking the fiftieth anniversary of CS Lewis's death, and which saw a memorial stone to the author unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, Radio 4's Book of the Week marked the occasion with a reading of his famous letters from a senior to a junior devil.
Read by Simon Russell Beale
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall.
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03hng1b)
Rebranding feminism; WH power-lister Pinky Lilani

Does feminism need a rebrand? Thousands of girls and women have been left "painfully vulnerable" in the typhoon-struck Philippines, according to the International Development Secretary Justine Greening - we hear the latest from the region. Why the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists is proposing restrictions on labiaplasty in both NHS and private clinics following a rise in the number of women seeking the procedure. Plus Powerlister Pinky Lilani on the importance of networking in helping you achieve success and a hundred plays that showcase women's talents putting them centre stage.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Ruth Watts.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hng1d)
Love and Mettle

Episode 1

Love and Mettle
by Andrea Earl

The true and extraordinary story of the writer's own experience of building a house. Mrs T's husband is on the verge of retiring from his job as a Consultant Psychiatrist and life is running out. It's now or never. Have they got the bottle to gamble his entire lump sum on a building project? Has she got the courage to preside over a gang of builders? Can she get it done on time and on budget? Will their marriage survive with their dream intact?

Producer/Director - Pauline Harris.


MON 11:00 A Very Powerful Politician? (The First Year of the Bristol Mayor) (b03hnhjt)
A key plank of David Cameron's localism agenda was the opportunity for England's 10 largest cities to introduce elected mayors following the success of the London mayor. Only Bristol voted for one.

One year on from the election, Giles Dilnot finds out how new mayor George Ferguson is faring. What do Bristolians make of him with his trademark red trousers? We'll hear George Ferguson's assessment of his first year in office, speak to his supporters and opponents, and ask what difference, if any, has he made to the city's fortunes. And Giles meets Greg Clark, Minister of State for Cities, to find out if the fortunes of the city mayor could be revived around the country.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


MON 11:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b03hnhjw)
Series 9

The Intern

Ed Reardon leads us through the ups and down of his week, complete with his trusty companion, Elgar, and the curmudgeonly attitude to life that he's mastered over years of failure.

This week, the council is taking a holistic approach to cost-cutting and decides that Ed's writing class needs to get paid for some of their work. When it transpires that the class feels that they are wasting their time and thinking of joining the 'Bonkers About Baking' class Ed decides to set them the task of writing 'Hedgerow Jottings' and 'Tales from the Towpath' in an attempt to earn money and become real writers. Meanwhile, when the new intern at the agency turns out to be more than he seems, Ed finds himself maintaining his non-tax paying status by becoming the oldest intern in town and sharing an office with Ping.

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas
Produced by Dawn Ellis.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b03hnhjy)
Big banks and investment companies mis-selling financial products

We'll hear from the people who saved all their working lives for retirement only to lose their life-savings after being mis-sold investment plans. The rules changed at the end of last year to tighten up the industry but has it worked? If you're planning on being among the hundreds of thousands of people travelling to Glasgow to watch Commonwealth Games you could be facing a hefty hotel bill. Some so called budget hotels are charging more than one and half thousand pounds a night. And how pay as you go is revolutionising gyms across the UK.


MON 12:57 Weather (b03hczn3)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b03hnhk0)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b03hvn59)
Population

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), tells the story of a transformation in personal life in Britain, through the numbers that capture change on the grand scale.

He delves into the data for the big patterns and trends in history, finding new ways of thinking about the whole shape of the population - the balance between adults and children, for example, or the shifting shape of what we do with our lives, from infancy to retirement and death. He seeks answers in history to some of the problems that perplex us now, such as how badly austerity has bitten or the paradox of why no-one seems able to afford a house but so many people own one. And he tells these stories not just with data, but through people and the real experiences that bring the numbers to life.

In the search for data to measure how we've changed, the programme counts rotten teeth and adds up what people ate, what they own and throw away. What did we earn through the centuries, how do we know, and what could we do with it? What was our health like, or our homes, our jobs or education? What was the status and experience of women? And how has it all changed?

This is all presented with innovative radio techniques to capture data in sound - for example, new ways of creating graphs for the senses so that we can not just know, but feel, the changes.

Each of these ten programmes takes one theme, to explore how far we have made progress, and why it might continue, or falter.

Population:
Andrew Dilnot presents the first in a ten part series on the history of Britain seen through the numbers that describe the big trends and changes in the way we live, and the people whose stories bring the data to life. First, the population, and how it has abruptly reshaped through the centuries in a way that would make us unrecognisable to our ancestors.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

From 2013.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b03hn2rr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b03j5j4c)
Two Pipe Problems

I Get By with a Little Help from My Friends

By Michael Chaplin.

Following the sad death of Richard Briers earlier this year, in the first of these two final episodes of Two Pipe Problems, Stanley Baxter as Sandy is joined by Geoffrey Palmer as his friend and fellow sleuth William Parnes.

A new chef is in the kitchen at The Old Beeches and he's cooking up a storm and delighting the residents, with Sandy as his willing and enthusiastic sous-chef. But things begin to go badly wrong after a visiting concert party sing a Beatles song which triggers unhappy memories for Albie the Chef (played by the late Felix Dexter).

William and Sandy go in search of Albie and his son, and a successful father and son reunion is celebrated in song.

Young Terrell Forde, who recently starred in Matilda in the West End, joins the company to play and sing the role of Albie's son, accompanied by David Shaw-Parker as his step dad, David Holt as memory man Billy, and Tracey Wiles as the warm hearted Old Beeches care assistant Karen.

Cast:
Sandy Boyle .......................Stanley Baxter
William Parnes ...................Geoffrey Palmer
Albie ...................................Felix Dexter
Karen/ Sadie ......................Tracy Wiles
Billy ....................................David Holt
Edgar/ Lewis ......................David Shaw-Parker
Jonathan ............................Terrell Forde

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b03hvn5j)
(10/12)

Making their final appearance in the 2013 season of Round Britain Quiz are the teams from the Midlands and the North of England. Stephen Maddock and Rosalind Miles take on Jim Coulson and Diana Collecott, with chairman Tom Sutcliffe on hand to steer them through the fiendish questions if they need help.

The questions are available to read on the Round Britain Quiz pages of the Radio 4 website. As always there are several listeners' ideas among them. Tom will also be revealing the solution to the question he left unanswered at the end of last week's quiz.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b03hmpwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Scallop (b03hvn5q)
Maggi Hambling's controversial sculpture Scallop was unveiled on Aldeburgh beach in Suffolk in 2003.

It was the artist's gift to the town and intended to commemorate Benjamin Britten - the composer inspired by this stretch of the East Anglian coast and who created a music festival that brought the town international recognition.

Maggi explains the origins and development of the piece and why Scallop is, in her view, 'the most beautiful thing' she's made and the work by which she would like to be remembered. We tell the story of that making with the Peggs, the local metal fabricators, and of the extreme difficulty she had securing permission to site the sculpture on the beach.

We also consider the strong opposition it stirred in Aldeburgh. Why was the piece daubed with graffiti 13 times in the years after its unveiling? The row raises questions about public consultation, about whether the planning system is the appropriate way to make decisions about public art, and about public attitudes to Britten himself.

In Britten's centenary year, Scallop became a focal point of many people's visit to Aldeburgh, but it still raises hackles.

With contributions from Mel Gooding, Simon Loftus, Jonathan Reekie, Dennis Pegg, Ray Herring and Humphrey Burton.

Producer: Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b03hvn5x)
Series 9

Risk

The Infinite Monkey Cage returns in the first of a new series and turns its gaze on the science of risk.

Professor Brian Cox and comedian Robin Ince bring their witty and irreverent take on the world to a programme all about the science of risk. Together with guests David Spiegelhalter, Sue Ion and former Goodie, Graeme Garden, the team explores such questions as: why is seven the safest age to be? Should badgers wear bicycle helmets? How safe is nuclear power and how worried should we be by the threat of asteroid impact? Producer: Rami Tzabar.


MON 17:00 PM (b03hvn62)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03hczn5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b03hvn68)
Series 60

Episode 2

The 60th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the Playhouse Theatre in Weston-super-Mare. Regulars Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by John Finnemore with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b03hvn6g)
Dan had a lively night out with friends. Shula apologises for Darrell's presence in the house. He'll be gone soon.

Kenton has volunteered for the role of the Sherriff of Nottingham - a perfect foil to Rob's dashing Robin, Lynda feels. Helen has to tell Kirsty that Lynda wants to rehearse her love duet with Rob. Helen's all over the place. She's angry with Rob for acting like nothing ever happened between them, and bitter for his letting Henry down. But she loved him like no other man.

Shula breaks the news to Dan that his Granddad Reg has died. As she comforts him, Darrell approaches holding a letter from the council regarding his deposit bond. His timing's awful. As Dan goes, awkward Shula offers to take Darrell through what this means for him. It looks like good news.

Rob meets musical director Patrick and they share a joke. But Kirsty's dreading her duet. She and Rob struggle, as Lynda becomes exasperated at their lack of chemistry.

Kirsty asks Patrick to make up a foursome for drinks one night with her, Tom and Helen - just as mates.

Worried Shula heads to bed and leaves a message on Dan's phone, hoping he's ok, wherever he is...


MON 19:15 Front Row (b03hvn6j)
Catching Fire review; Evening Standard Theatre Awards; Michael Ignatieff; Alison Wilding

With Mark Lawson.

The Hunger Games : Catching Fire is the second adaptation of Suzanne Collins' runaway bestselling trilogy of novels. Jennifer Lawrence is Katniss Everdeen in the post-apocalyptic state of Panem, where the Hunger Games are a televised fight to the death between teenagers. Rosie Swash gives her verdict.

The realities of the modern political world come under scrutiny in Michael Ignatieff's new book Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics. The Canadian academic, writer and broadcaster shelved his university career to enter politics, becoming leader of the country's Liberal Party in 2008. On the line from Toronto - where the city's controversial mayor is fighting for political survival - Ignatieff reflects on his bruising electoral defeat and what he learnt on the front line of 21st century politics.

Adrian Lester, Rory Kinnear and Lucy Kirkwood were among the winners at last night's Evening Standard Theatre Awards. Mark spoke to the night's winners as they reflected on the past year on stage.

Tate Britain re-opens today after a major refurbishment. The Duveen galleries are hosting works by Alison Wilding, one of Britain's foremost sculptors known for her inventive approach to form and materials. She tells Mark about making a model of one of her pieces - Harbour - from a piece of cheese before working it in alabaster, and how she'll stop schoolchildren touching her work if she spots them.

Following the announcement of the death of Doris Lessing on 17 November we pay tribute with an excerpt from a Front Row interview in 2008, where she talks about the effect of winning the Nobel Prize for literature on the sales of her books.

Producer: Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hng1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Machiavelli: Devil or Democrat? (b03hvn6l)
Five hundred years ago, Niccolo Machiavelli, a former senior official in renaissance Florence, who had been sacked when the Medici returned to power, was drafting a study on the realities of politics. When his ground-breaking work was later published after his death, it was given the title, 'The Prince'. The book's frank account of princely power soon made its author's name synonymous with cunning and evil: Shakespeare's "murderous Machiavel" is the best known of many pejorative literary references.
But in this programme Jonathan Freedland re-assesses Machiavelli and finds that his malign reputation has overshadowed his much greater achievement as a champion of republican government. When Machiavelli commented in 'The Prince' that he would 'leave out all discussion of republics, inasmuch as in another place I have written of them at length', he was referring to 'The Discourses', his major study of ancient Rome. In 'The Discourses', written between 1513 and 1519, Machiavelli re-asserts the republican ideals of ancient Rome and transmits them to the modern world.
Machiavelli's impact has been felt far beyond renaissance Florence. After the execution of the English king, Charles I, in 1649, radical thinkers such as James Harrington and Algernon Sidney adapted Machiavelli's republicanism. In the 1720s, 'Cato's Letters' reflected Machiavelli's republican thinking in their attacks on corruption and patronage, and made an impact in Britain's American colonies. Later, Machiavelli's revival of republicanism influenced Americans in their fight for independence and inspired the 'founding fathers' when they framed the United States constitution.
Producer, Rob Shepherd.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b03hvn6n)
Roberto Unger

Renowned social theorist Roberto Unger believes that left-of-centre progressives - his own political side - lack the imagination required to tackle the fundamental problems of society. In the run-up to the US presidential elections of 2012, he declared that his former student Barack Obama "must be defeated". Professor Unger argued that President Obama had failed in his first term in office to advance the progressive cause. There was, Unger maintained, effectively no difference between the Democrat and Republican political programmes.

In front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Roberto Unger discusses with presenter Jo Fidgen the reasons for his critical appraisal of the progressive left in the United States and Europe. He sets out what he believes its alternative agenda should be and gives his verdict on another of his former students: Ed Miliband.

Roberto Mangabeira Unger is the Roscoe Pound professor at Harvard Law School. He served as a minister in the Brazilian government of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva from 2007-2009. His books include: "The Left Alternative"; "Democracy Realised"; and "The Self Awakened". His new book, published next year, will address a new theme: "The Religion of the Future".

#LSEProgressive

Producer: Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b03h30g8)
Sequoia - Nowhere to Go

Climate change is causing some National parks in America to re-think their boundaries. As the earth warms many species try to move to cooler climates but national parks are rooted in one place. The Sequoia National Park in California runs mainly east-west but now plans are being formed to shift it to run north-south, allowing species that need cooler temperatures to thrive. But in an increasingly crowded world, and with climate change continuing to change the earth, can we protect our treasured areas? Monty Don explores how climate change, national parks, wildlife and people are sharing the earth.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b03hng16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b03hczn7)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b03hvn6q)
Violent clashes in Libya;
Did corruption in the Philippines make effects of typhoon worse?
NASA launches new Mars mission.
Is executive pay too high?
With Carolyn Quinn.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03hvn6t)
The Lowland

Episode 6

Indira Varma reads Jhumpa Lahiri's Man Booker-listed new novel, The Lowland, spanning India and America, and exploring the price of idealism and the enduring power of love.
It is the 1960s, and revolution has come to India and America. Two brothers, Subhash and Udayan, born in Calcutta just fifteen months apart, have been inseparable since birth, but their paths are diverging. Udayan - charismatic and impulsive - finds himself drawn to the Communist movement sweeping Bengal. He will risk all for what he believes. But Subhash, the dutiful son, does not share his brother's political passion, and leaves home to pursue a life of scientific research in a quiet corner of America. But when Subhash learns what happened to his brother in the lowland outside their family's home, he returns to India, hoping to pick up the pieces of a shattered family, and to heal the wounds Udayan left behind.
Today: a trip back to Calcutta threatens to unearth deeply buried family secrets.

Jhumpa Lahiri shot to fame with her Pulitzer-winning story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, followed by novel The Namesake and another collection, Unaccustomed Earth. The Lowland is her latest work, and has been short-listed for the Man Booker Prize.
Reader: Indira Varma is an acclaimed stage, film and television actor. Her recent TV credits include: Rome, Luther and What Remains.
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett.


MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b03hvn6z)
Series 3

David Crosby (A-Side)

John Wilson returns with a new series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 2, A-side. "If I Could Only Remeber My Name" with David Crosby

Double inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, David Crosby talkes John Wilson back to the making of his debut solo album, If I Could Only Remember My Name.

Released in 1971, it was one of four high-profile solo albums released more or less simultaneously by each member of the legendary super-group, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. David's If I Could Only Remember My Name boasted a stellar line-up that not only included Neil Young and Graham Nash, but also featured Joni Mitchell and the leading members of both Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead. Initially met with mixed reviews, the album has never been out of print and features some of his most impressive vocal and songwriting work - including the haunting Laughing, the mantra-like Music Is Love and the extended, impressionistic Cowboy Movie.

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard tomorrow at 3.30pm

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03hvn75)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 19 NOVEMBER 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b03hczp2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b03hng18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03hczp4)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03hczp6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03hczp8)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b03hczpb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03j9mh3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Frances Finn.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b03hvql1)
The Government's recent record on protecting wildlife comes under scrutiny in a report published by environmental groups including the RSPB, Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, and WWF.

We continue our look at how nearly £20 billion of CAP money might be shared out once the latest round of CAP reforms come into force after 2015. Will hill farmers really be the winners?

And it's a crucial time of year for deer farmers: the rut.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx2w1)
Dunlin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Dunlin. Dunlins are a stirring sight, en masse, as their flocks twist and turn over the winter shoreline. When the tide turns they take to the air in a breath-taking aerobatic display. Around 350,000 Dunlin winter here, travelling from Scandinavia and Russia.


TUE 06:00 Today (b03hvql3)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Politics of Architecture (b03hvql5)
Episode 1

Jonathan Glancey investigates the forces that shape the design of our everyday buildings, and how this could be improved.

In this first episode, Jonathan visits an example of what he calls 'anywhere architecture' - a decade-old housing estate outside Ely.

He talks to a resident and a local planner about why the development was designed as it was and its strengths and weaknesses.

And he talks to the Chief Executive of Barratt Homes, Mark Clare, about Barratt's approach at the time, and how he has been improving their approach to architecture and place design over the last few years.

He hears from the Architecture Minister Ed Vaizey and the Shadow Planning Minister Roberta Blackman-Woods about why they think design needs to be improved.

And he finds out how architects lost influence over the building process to project managers and contractors. Design may have suffered - but cost control is now much better.

Jonathan visits a retail park outside King's Lynn in Norfolk to see how, amid many examples of the 'shed' approach to retail building design, one supermarket chain has taken a new approach - paying attention to the outside of the building as well as the inside.

And he explains why he thinks the type of brick used in our housing and supermarket design can make a huge difference to the appearance of these buildings - and demonstrates the difference between hand-made and industrial bricks with the help of a hammer.

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.


TUE 09:30 15 by 15 (b037t1rr)
Series 2

Check

Hardeep Singh Kohli chooses a word and sets off on an exploration into its origins, meeting people for whom it has different associations. He hopes to learn 15 things along the way.

Today's word is 'check' and Susie Dent is on hand to explain that all the meanings that 'check' has developed come from the game of chess.

Hardeep's other encounters include 9 year old Samuel, a pupil at one of the many schools that takes part in the Chess in Schools initiative, founded by Malcolm Pein.

Hardeep stands in the middle of Carnaby Street with fashion lecturer Amber Butchart on the look-out for checks as they pass by, and he encounters the check list with one of the many people who need a 'to do list' to help them organise their lives and check off what they have to do that day.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b03j4xdr)
CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters

Episode 2

Originally broadcast in 2013, in the week marking the fiftieth anniversary of CS Lewis's death, and which saw a memorial stone to the author unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, Radio 4's Book of the Week marked the occasion with a reading of his famous letters from a senior to a junior devil.
Read by Simon Russell Beale
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall.
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03hvql7)
Women playwrights; Does the education system fail boys?

Does the education system fail boys? Sally Nicholls on her new ghost story for teenagers about the legacy of fostering and adoption. Can you control what pictures of your children appear online? The 100 great female playwrights. With Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hvql9)
Love and Mettle

Episode 2

Love and Mettle episode 2/5
by Andrea Earl

Comic and touching true story of the writer's own experience as a mother and wife, risking her husband's entire pension on building a house. The build begins and catastrophe strikes when the council inform Mrs T she has not protected the ancient trees in the garden properly and the build is ordered to cease immediately. They are threatened with 250K in fines. The couple face financial ruin.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b03hvqlc)
Traditional Societies

Traditional societies and the wildlife that depends on them are disappearing. Can we preserve these fragile species? Or is the pressure to develop too great in our world? This week's field report comes from Ethiopia where one of the most endangered birds in the world, the Ethiopian Bush Crow, teeters on the verge of extinction as the traditional societies they rely upon disappear. This beautiful bird needs a particular regime of grazing and scrub to survive, but the societies that provide the right habitat are fast disappearing as development and modernisation takes over. Can we, should we, pour resources into protecting the crow when there is so much demand for money and space? Monty Don explores, with renowned writer Jared Diamond, the value of traditional societies and what we lose when they finally vanish.


TUE 11:30 Curlew River (b03hvqlf)
The works of Benjamin Britten have been performed all over the world, from Aldeburgh (where so many of them were written) to Kuala Lumpur.

Tenor Ian Bostridge introduces us to Curlew River, one of Britten's strangest and most remarkable musical works. The chamber opera was first performed in Orford Church, but was born out of Britten's tour of the Far East in 1956. It's set in East Anglia, on the banks of the imaginary River Curlew, but is inspired by Japanese Noh theatre.

Ian Bostridge is playing the role of a mother who has lost her child in a production at St Giles, Cripplegate, in London. We follow him through the rehearsal process, hear what it's like to perform the part, and learn how Britten incorporated Eastern music and drama into a Christian parable set in the fenlands of medieval England.

Producer: Isabel Sutton
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b03hvqlh)
Call You and Yours: Do you get what you want from your bank?

Call You and Yours: Do you get what you want from your bank?
Since the collapse of 2008, the big banks have struggled to build a better public image.
Stories of inflated bonuses for bosses, and poor treatment of customers have left the industry with a poor reputation. But what kind of service have you received from your bank?
When you need help or advice, are they there for you - on the high street, online or on the phone? And do you feel you can trust the advice you receive?
People often complain about banks, but do we expect too much from them?
We want to hear your experiences and your views. Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b03hczpd)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b03hvr31)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b03j50qn)
Prosperity

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), tells the story of a transformation in personal life in Britain, through the numbers that capture change on the grand scale.

He delves into the data for the big patterns and trends in history, finding new ways of thinking about the whole shape of the population - the balance between adults and children, for example, or the shifting shape of what we do with our lives, from infancy to retirement and death. He seeks answers in history to some of the problems that perplex us now, such as how badly austerity has bitten or the paradox of why no-one seems able to afford a house but so many people own one. And he tells these stories not just with data, but through people and the real experiences that bring the numbers to life.

In the search for data to measure how we've changed, the programme counts rotten teeth and adds up what people ate, what they own and throw away. What did we earn through the centuries, how do we know, and what could we do with it? What was our health like, or our homes, our jobs or education? What was the status and experience of women? And how has it all changed?

This is all presented with innovative radio techniques to capture data in sound - for example, new ways of creating graphs for the senses so that we can not just know, but feel, the changes.

Each of these ten programmes takes one theme, to explore how far we have made progress, and why it might continue, or falter.

Prosperity
Andrew Dilnot continues the story of Britain in numbers by looking at the history of how well off we have been over the years. He reveals the rich man's income from only a few generations ago that would be worth less than today's minimum wage, and uses striking audio techniques to capture the changes in our prosperity.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

From 2013.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b03hvn6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b03j5775)
Two Pipe Problems

The House on the Marsh

In this final Two Pipe Problem, William and Sandy travel to a windswept wintry Suffolk in search of William's inheritance, where they are haunted by ghosts from the past and threats from the present, and William makes a life changing decision about his future.

This week marks the centenary of the birth of Benjamin Britten, and his opera Peter Grimes is woven into this final episode of Two Pipe Problems. The opera is set in Aldeburgh, on the Suffolk coast from which Britten drew so much inspiration. Writer Michael Chaplin was inspired to create a story that drew on that landscape and the creation of Peter Grimes, but also paid homage to the genius of MR James' ghost story, Oh Whistle And I'll Come You, My Lad.

Stanley Baxter is once again joined by Geoffrey Palmer playing William, and Stephen Critchlow and Linda Broughton playing a mother and son who bear a grudge, in this haunting story - an entertaining and touching farewell to the series.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Producer: Catherine Bailey

A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b03hvr33)
Series 5

Manchester

Jay Rayner and the team travel to Manchester for this week's episode of Radio 4's culinary panel programme. Answering questions from the audience are food scientist Peter Barham, restaurateur Henry Dimbleby, chef Sophie Wright and food writer Tim Hayward.

As well as giving us their views on how to cook the perfect poached egg and the age-old dilemma of whether to add the pasta to the sauce or vice versa, the panel taste Manchester's own spin on the Scotch Egg, discuss the history of Black Pudding, the origins of cordials in the Temperance Movement and the best way to eat an Eccles Cake.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Peggy Sutton.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b03hvr35)
Series 3

David Crosby (B-Side)

John Wilson continues with his new series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Programme 2, the B-side. Having discussed the making of "If I Could Only Remember My Name", his 1971 album (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 18th November and available online), David Crosby responds to questions from the audience and performs live versions of some the tracks from that debut solo album and from his as yet unreleased solo album, "Croz"

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 16:00 Spin the Globe (b03hvx6p)
Series 1

1066

Michael Scott continues his new series which takes famous dates in British History and finds out what was happening at the same time in other corners of the world. It's an attempt to break out of the modular way in which historic dates are traditionally drummed into children as well as connecting previously diverse events in cultural, political and economic history all over the globe.
In programme two, we look at 1066. Complicated family succession politics result in the eventual battle of Hastings - the death of Harold in October and William's coronation in Westminster Abbey on Christmas Day 1066. Meanwhile, five days later in Spain, a brutual massacre takes place with a clash of Muslim and Jewish politics.

Headline news in China is scholar, Sima Guang's eight volume Tongzhi a groundbreaking history of China. Spin the Globe again and we visit the Seljuk empire which is in its ascendancy.
It's a programme full of surprises, connections and a sense that events across the world move at different rates and through different phases only occasionally brushing against each other.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b03hvx6r)
Michael Dobbs and Katie Puckrik

Michael Dobbs, author of House of Cards, and broadcaster Katie Puckrik talk to Harriett Gilbert about their favourite books.

They include the highly-praised A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan, the devastating Watching the Door - Cheating Death in 1970s Belfast by Kevin Myers and Of Love and Other Demons by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b03hvx6t)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03hczpg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 It's Your Round (b01b8zw3)
Series 2

Episode 6

Angus Deayton presides over the show where the format is, there isn't one.

Instead, each of the four panellists has brought their own round for the other panellists to play. How will each round play out? And, more importantly, who will be beaten at their own game?

Featured rounds in this episode:

Alex Horne's "Font, Fighter or Fragrance" in which panellists are given a word and they must guess whether that word refers to a typographical font, the name of a Gladiator from ITV's show "Gladiators" or a "Lynx deodorant" fragrance.

Roisin Conaty's "Four Second Pitch" in which panellists have but four seconds to pitch Angus the elements of an idea for a blockbuster film and a new religion.

Paul Sinha's "World Record Recall" in which panellists have to fill in the missing details from the description of a real record from the Guinness Book of World Records.

And Rufus Hound's "Which Lady Done Say That Thing" in which panellists must guess which audience member said a certain phrase. As the title suggests.

Producer: Sam Michell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b03hvx6w)
Shula's unhappy with Dan, who stayed at Jamie's. She was worried about him last night.

Shula's annoyed that Dan spoke to Eddie about Darrell - the matter is private. She asks Dan if he's ok about his granddad, and he acts fine. Dan gets angry when Shula suggests he invites friends like Jamie round. How can he, with Darrell staying?

Dan privately opens up to Alistair about Darrell being in the way. Angry Alistair takes this to Shula and confronts her over Darrell. It's time he moved out. But Shula says he needs time to find a flat.

Ed has a set-to with Will, who's on Ed's pasture with his dogs. Will belittles Ed's signs about keeping dogs away, as well as Ed's livelihood. He cruelly suggests it's a matter of time before he goes bust.

Alistair checks on one of Ed's milkers. She's lame and not responding to routine treatment. He reiterates that the neospora was probably only in the cattle that Vicky bought in. But Ed's taking no chances. He's on a knife edge. He can't afford any more losses.

Alistair talks to Alan about a hostel place for Darrell and tells Shula there could be one in Felpersham. Shula's concerned, but Alistair's firm. Shula has to decide who's more important: Darrell or Dan.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b03hvx6y)
Blue Is the Warmest Colour; Mojo revival; Sally Wainwright

With Mark Lawson.

Blue Is The Warmest Colour won the top prize, the Palme D'Or at this year's Cannes Film Festival, but was quickly mired in controversy when the actresses Lea Seydoux and Adele Exarchopolous complained about gruelling love scenes which took days to film. Subsequently, the director Abdellatif Kechiche said that the movie should not be released, as it had been sullied by accusations that it was a "horrible" shoot. Briony Hanson, a former programmer of the London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival delivers her verdict.

Last Tango in Halifax won the 2013 Bafta for Best Drama Series and went on to be broadcast in America to great acclaim. Series two begins tonight on BBC One and picks up where we left Derek Jacobi and Anne Reid's reunited childhood sweethearts. Writer Sally Wainwright discusses how she approached the follow-up.

With news today that film producers are to make a sequel to the Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life", film critic Mark Eccleston explores some other surprising and unlikely film sequels.

Writer Jez Butterworth and director Ian Rickson had one of the biggest critical hits of the last decade with their 2008 play Jerusalem. Now they have returned to the work which set light to their careers in 1995, Mojo. The new West End production of Mojo stars Rupert Grint, Brendan Coyle and Ben Whishaw as gangsters in 1950s Soho. Jez Butterworth and Ian Rickson discuss Mojo, Jerusalem and two decades of working together.

Producer: Ellie Bury.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hvql9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 Gettysburg (b03hvx70)
On 19th November 1863, Abraham Lincoln stood in a field in Pennsylvania and delivered a short speech to a crowd that could hardly hear a word that he said. Exactly one hundred and fifty years on, James Naughtie tells the story behind what is now seen as possibly the greatest political speech of them all.

The Gettysburg Address is a priceless political jewel. It's probably the most famous single speech of the democratic era, which not only distilled an idea of the United States after a bitter civil war but became a touchstone for generations of Americans wrestling with racial division, until a Civil Rights Act was passed exactly a hundred years after the speech was delivered.

Two hundred and seventy-two words that thread their way through a century and a half of American history and are a great story in themselves: Lincoln scribbling in the train from Washington... the speech itself that very few people present could actually hear... the slow transmission of the famous phrases across the country... and the eventual adoption of the speech - still read in full by visitors who visit the Lincoln Memorial - as a kind of national statement.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b03hvx72)
Eye treatment waiting lists; Blind tarot reader

Peter White talks to Clara Eaglen, from RNIB and Helen Jackman from the Macular Society about the overly long waiting lists for initial eye treatment for people with various eye conditions.
The RNIB has produced a survey which reveals that eye clinicians are over-stretched and cannot keep up with the demand for appointments.

The Macular Society has contacted every Clinical Commissioning Groups in England and Wales and found that guidance from the Royal College of Ophthalmology is not being adhered to and some patients are having to wait weeks longer for treatment than the guidance stipulates.

Lee Kumutat meets John Perry a blind tarot card reader who explains how he does his work.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b03hvx74)
The first ever edition of All in the Mind was broadcast 25 years ago. In the second of three anniversary programmes Claudia Hammond and guests look back at archive editions of the programme to examine what impact psychology research has had on our lives over the last 25 years. How does evidence-based psychology affect policy decisions? Is psychology just 'proving the obvious' or has it offered insights into ourselves which we could never have guessed?


TUE 21:30 The Politics of Architecture (b03hvql5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b03hczpj)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b03hvx76)
Double bombing at Iranian embassy in Beirut.
Doing business in Iraq.
Why is Guantanamo Bay still open?
Monty Python team to re-form.
With Carolyn Quinn.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03hvx78)
The Lowland

Episode 7

Indira Varma reads Jhumpa Lahiri's Man Booker-listed new novel, The Lowland, spanning India and America, and exploring the price of idealism and the enduring power of love.
It is the 1960s, and violent revolution has come to India and America. Two brothers, Subhash and Udayan, born in Calcutta just fifteen months apart, have been inseparable since birth, but their paths are diverging. Udayan - charismatic and impulsive - finds himself drawn to the Communist movement sweeping Bengal. He will risk all for what he believes. But Subhash, the dutiful son, does not share his brother's political passion, and leaves home to pursue a life of scientific research in a quiet corner of America. But when Subhash learns what happened to his brother in the lowland outside their family's home, he returns to India, hoping to pick up the pieces of a shattered family, and to heal the wounds Udayan left behind.
Today: Subhash and Bela return from Calcutta, to shocking news.

Jhumpa Lahiri shot to fame with her Pulitzer-winning story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, followed by novel The Namesake and another collection, Unaccustomed Earth. The Lowland is her latest work, and has been short-listed for the Man Booker Prize.
Reader: Indira Varma is an acclaimed stage, film and television actor. Her recent TV credits include: Rome, Luther and What Remains.
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b03hvn5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03hvx95)
The Health Secretary announces a blueprint for restoring trust in the NHS following the scandal at Stafford Hospital. Facebook and Twitter discuss online security with MPs. And UKIP's Lord Pearson tells peers Islam has a "dark side". Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 20 NOVEMBER 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b03hczqf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b03j4xdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03hczqh)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03hczqk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03hczqm)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b03hczqp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03j9mhh)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Frances Finn.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b03hwbqx)
More than a hundred horses have been put down in Wales after RSPCA officers were called to a site in the Vale of Glamorgan. Farming Today finds out how this is one of the country's worst ever horse neglect cases, and hears how the Welsh Assembly is considering legislation to tackle the problem of fly-grazing.

Reform means money from the Common Agricultural Policy can be used to fund rural development projects, instead of going direct to farmers. A boost for some rural businesses, but a cause of resentment among farmers. We ask who's right.

And we meet the dairy farmer in Somerset whose stock are still grazing outside in November, thanks to the late warm autumn.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Emma Campbell.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx2x8)
Marsh Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Marsh Tit. The marsh tit is badly-named. It doesn't live in marshes, and is most at home in older broad-leaved woodlands. "Oak tit" might be a better name. Unlike some other tit species they don't travel far, holding and defending their woodland territories throughout the winter.

ProducerBrett Westwood,MRS SARAH PITT,Sarah Blunt.


WED 06:00 Today (b03hwbqz)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b03hwbr1)
Andy McNab; Cheryl Knight; Joseph Boyden; John Lloyd

Libby Purves meets former soldier-turned-writer Andy McNab; Cheryl Knight, who is in charge of shoes at the Royal Opera House; author Joseph Boyden and producer John Lloyd.

Andy McNab is a former SAS soldier-turned-writer. He was a foundling who joined the infantry with the Royal Green Jackets, progressing to the SAS. In the Gulf War he commanded the Bravo Two Zero patrol and later wrote a book about his experiences. He has just spent the last year as the Reading Agency's literacy ambassador for the 6 Book Challenge visiting prisons and factories to encourage young people to read.

Cheryl Knight is opera footwear supervisor at the Royal Opera House and in her spare time performs as Joyce Grenfell in her one-woman show, Turn Back the Clock. The show is Cheryl's tribute to the writer and performer who died in 1979 and is remembered for her witty monologues - including her popular sketch as a harassed nursery school teacher. Cheryl is currently assembling the shoe collection for two Royal Opera House productions - Parsifal and Carmen. Turn Back the Clock is at Waterloo East Theatre.

Joseph Boyden is a prize-winning Canadian author whose new book, the Orenda, draws on his own background. He is a descendant of Canada's First Nations and was educated by Jesuits. The Orenda is set in the wilds of 17th century North America when Europeans were colonising the region and the First Nation tribes fought among themselves and suffered under the invaders. The Orenda is published by Oneworld.

Producer and writer John Lloyd is best known for his work on comedy programmes including Not the Nine O'Clock News, Spitting Image, the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and QI. He is currently the Radio 4 presenter of the Museum of Curiosity, a spin-off from QI. His new book Afterliff - the New Dictionary of Things There Should Be Words For, written with Jon Canter, is published by Faber and Faber.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b03j4y80)
CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters

Episode 3

Originally broadcast in 2013, in the week marking the fiftieth anniversary of CS Lewis's death, and which saw a memorial stone to the author unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, Radio 4's Book of the Week marked the occasion with a reading of his famous letters from a senior to a junior devil.
Read by Simon Russell Beale
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall.
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03hwbr3)
Allegra McEvedy; CSA changes; Lady Helen Hamlyn

Chef and food writer Allegra McEvedy Cooks The Perfect pork chops - with lentils and pear. We discuss the likely impact of changes to the Child Support Agency with the Minister responsible for Child Benefit, Steve Webb MP, and Caroline Davey of Gingerbread. Lady Helen Hamlyn - one of Britain's best-known philanthropists, and Woman's Hour Powerlister, on the ethos of The Helen Hamlyn Trust and its donations.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Caroline Donne.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hwbr5)
Love and Mettle

Episode 3

Love and Mettle - episode 3/5
by Andrea Earl

The comic and touching true story of the writer's own extraordinary experience as a mother and wife, risking her husband's entire pension on building a house. Mrs T realises that she and Dr T have gone into this blindly. She keeps her worries about money under wraps; but Dr T is suspicious and starts to resent having given her the authority to spend his money.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.


WED 11:00 Batting for the Middle Kingdom (b03hwbr7)
In 2012, 24-year-old Jiang Shuyao made sporting history when he became the first mainland Chinese cricketer to play for an English league side.

Jiang's debut season with Cleethorpes Cricket Club drew attention to the rising popularity of the quintessentially British sport in the People's Republic of China.

The Chinese Cricket Association has set itself the target of achieving Test match status and playing against the likes of England, Australia and South Africa by 2020.

A grass roots campaign to get the game taught in schools is well underway, and in the city of Shenyang in Liaoning province in North Eastern China, the country's top side is fast becoming a nurturing ground for the star players of the future.

If China were to one day become a cricketing nation, the International Cricket Council has estimated that global revenues for the game could increase by as much as 40 per cent.

Fred Dove has been meeting some of China's finest cricketers, and talking to those attempting to make the game of WG Grace and Donald Bradman part of the Chinese way of life.

Producer: Jessie Levene
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


WED 11:30 Hard to Tell (b03hwbr9)
Series 2

Episode 2

Second series of the relationship comedy written by Jonny Sweet.

It tells its central love story through the couple's individual conversations with their family and friends. In the process, we are introduced to all manner of relationships from a father and his cherished tour van to two women rivalling for the position of Best Friend, from a brother and sister comparing notes on Brazilians to a vicar and his new parish, and from a lodger's historic fling with a local waitress to a mum's lack of control over her desire to monitor her son's life.

Recorded on location, Hard To Tell's naturalistic, contemporary and conversational style brings new meaning to restaurants, funerals, French dressers and monkey puzzle trees.

Jonny Sweet is also the writer of Radio 4's Party and co-writer/co-star of Chickens on Sky 1.

Episode 2:
It's Valentine's Day and Tom is determined to protect his relationship from the threat of Ellen's ex-boyfriend. He organises a surprise trip and borrows his Dad's old tour van.

Producer: Lucy Armitage
A Tiger Aspect production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b03hwbrc)
How to give up smoking

Giving up smoking can be hard. Louise Minchin hears how support from a local group might help. Plus, the training you can get if you're ever in front of a tough select committee.


WED 12:57 Weather (b03hczqr)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b03hwbrf)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b03j4y82)
Health

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority, tells the story of a transformation in personal life in Britain, through the numbers that capture change on the grand scale.

He delves into the data for the big patterns and trends in history, finding new ways of thinking about the whole shape of the population - the balance between adults and children, for example, or the shifting shape of what we do with our lives, from infancy to retirement and death. He seeks answers in history to some of the problems that perplex us now, such as how badly austerity has bitten or the paradox of why no-one seems able to afford a house but so many people own one. And he tells these stories not just with data, but through people and the real experiences that bring the numbers to life.

In the search for data to measure how we've changed, the programme counts rotten teeth and adds up what people ate, what they own and throw away. What did we earn through the centuries, how do we know, and what could we do with it? What was our health like, or our homes, our jobs or education? What was the status and experience of women? And how has it all changed?

This is all presented with innovative radio techniques to capture data in sound - for example, new ways of creating graphs for the senses so that we can not just know, but feel, the changes.

Each of these ten programmes takes one theme, to explore how far we have made progress, and why it might continue, or falter.

3. Health
Andrew Dilnot explores the history of our health numbers, turning statistics into sound to reveal the startling changes in what we have come to think of as normal, and discovering how the numbers translated into lives through the centuries.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b03hvx6w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b010m2fg)
Ten Lessons in Love

An eclectic mix of writers explores one of the most important human emotions. Ten short plays; encompassing romance, heart break and some adult themes; each one is a very different perspective on love.

David uses 'the machine' to revisit his old memories - he wants to pinpoint the exact moment he fell in love. But when it malfunctions, it catapults us into the stories of a variety people, all of whom are attempting to make sense of love.

Lesson 1: You never know when you're going to fall in love
By Nick Warburton
David ... Sean Baker
Young David ... Nyasha Hatendi
Young Eleanor ... Alex Tregear

Lesson 2: More often than not, your dream date will be a nightmare
By Bola Agbaje
Laide ... Zawe Ashton
Femi ... Femi Oyeniran

Lesson 3: Beware of skeletons in the closet
Written and performed by Josie Long

Lesson 4: Remain interested; don't yawn at least
By Tim Key
Derek Monet ... Tim Key
Marie ... Alex Tregear
Waiter ... Stuart McLoughlin

Lesson 5: When your heart freezes it's time to leave the building
By Rebecca Lenkiewicz
Jeanie ... Sally Orrock
Ken ... Daniel Rabin

Lesson 6: Love is fickle
Written and performed by Josie Long

Lesson 7: Being alone doesn't have to mean being lonely
By Nick Payne
Jim ... Stuart McLoughlin
Sarah ... Alex Tregear

Lesson 8: Love's worth fighting for
The real-life story of Dane and Lenka
Produced by Rich Ward

Lesson 9: Love can't be pinned down
Written and performed by Josie Long

Lesson 10: Ignore all previous lessons
David ... Sean Baker
Eleanor ... Jane Whittenshaw
Young David ... Nyasha Hatendi
Young Eleanor ... Alex Tregear
Clive ... Stuart Mcloughlin

Directed by James Robinson.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b03hwbrh)
Saving and Investing

Looking for the top cash savings rate or a better investment return? To ask the Money Box investment team for their view, call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Have you checked your savings interest rate recently? Whether you're looking for an easy access account, a cash ISA or you're prepared to lock your money away for a while, we'll have the best rates.

Perhaps you want to ask about riskier stock market investments? Should you consider a Stocks and Shares ISA?

How do Unit Trusts and Open-Ended Investment Companies (OEICs) work and how much will you pay in charges?

What should you consider if you want to be a DIY investor?

Maybe you have a question about investment jargon?

Whatever you need to know, presenter Ruth Alexander will be joined by:

Justin Modray, Director, Candid Financial Advice.
Louise Oliver, Partner, Taylor Oliver Chartered Financial Planners.
Ben Yearsley, Head of Investment Research, Charles Stanley Direct.

To talk to the team call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b03hvx74)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b03hwbrk)
The Poppy; Traveller Children in Schools

The Poppy - a cultural history. Laurie Taylor talks to renowned archaeologist and anthropologist, Nicholas Saunders, about his account of the origins, history and many meanings of the Remembrance Day Poppy. From ancient Egypt to Flanders Field to Afghanistan. How did a humble flower of the field become a worldwide icon? They're joined by Professor of History, Joanna Bourke. Also, Reader in Education, Kalwant Bhopal, discusses her research into the experience of traveller children in schools.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b03hwbrm)
Independent Scotland; BBC North; Young Journalist Award

In this week's Media Show from Salford, Steve speaks to the Scottish minister for culture Fiona Hyslop on her vision for broadcasting in an independent Scotland. It's been suggested that Scotland would have its own public service broadcaster based on the existing staff and assets of BBC Scotland, should it gain independence, so could this work? And Steve questions how the government could ensure people could get access to popular programmes, like Eastenders, should the BBC cease to exist in the country.

It's been 18 months since the controversial BBC move to Salford was completed. A wide range of programmes including Match of the Day, Blue Peter, and BBC Sport are now produced there. However, questions have been raised about the cost of the move and the scale of the allowances paid to some staff to relocate. Steve talks to Peter Salmon, Director of BBC North, about whether the move has met it's key objectives to better serve audiences in the north, and improve the quality of content.

And a young journalist from the developing world will be announced as the winner of a new award being sponsored by the Thomson Foundation. The finalists are all under 30, working in countries with a GDP per capital of less than $20,000. They are Judy Kosgei, a former childrens radio presenter from Kenya; investigative journalist Neha Dixit from India, and award-winning science writer Toyosi Ogunseye from Nigeria. Steve speaks to the winner about how the award will better their career in journalism.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.


WED 17:00 PM (b03hwbrp)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03hczqt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b03hwbrr)
Series 1

Out of Our Tree

Tom's father is engrossed in putting together the Wrigglesworth Family Tree which is leaving Tom's mother at a loose end. Tom suggests she gets in a lodger for company.

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang Ups is a 30 minute phone call from Tom ringing his parents for his weekly check-in. As the conversation unfolds, Tom takes time out from the phone call to explain the situation, his parent's reactions and relate various anecdotes from the past which illustrate his family's views. And sometimes he just needs to sound-off about the maddening world around him and bemoan everyday annoyances.

A fascinating and hilarious glimpse into Tom Wrigglesworth, his family background and the influences that have shaped his temperament,opinions and hang-ups.

During all this Hang Ups explores class, living away from 'home', trans-generational phenomena, what we inherit from our families and how the past repeats in the present. All in a 30 minute phone call.

'Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-ups' gets underneath the skin of Tom and the Wrigglesworth family, so sit back and enjoy a bit of totally legal phone hacking.

Cast:

Tom Wrigglesworth ...Tom
Judy Parfitt ... Granny
Paul Copley ... Dad
Kate Anthony ... Mum
David Reed ... Henry

Written by Tom Wrigglesworth and James Kettle
Additional Material by Miles Jupp

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b03hwbrt)
It's Brian's birthday. He's miffed that Debbie has sent him a newspaper from the day he was born. He doesn't need to be reminded of his age. Brian's equally annoyed with the giant badge on Alice's card. He claims his sensitivity about his age is purely for business reasons. He doesn't want the BL board thinking he's ready to retire. Brian is rather happier with Jenny's present - a holiday in a beachside villa in Mauritius.

David plans to order some special silver jewellery for Ruth, for their anniversary.

As Josh sets off on his bike, he skids to avoid Jill's car, almost being hit as she pulls up. Mortified Jill apologises. She didn't see him. Jill agrees it's time to visit the opticians, and decides not to drive in the meantime.

At his party, Brian notices that Shula and Alistair aren't exactly in festive mood. Annabelle turns up. They discuss the decorations at Grey Gables, where they're clearly starting early for Christmas. Phoebe has a surprise ready for Brian. Everyone enjoys Ian's canapés and Brian advises David on the best ways to enjoy Budapest

Brian gives a heartfelt speech, before Jennifer finally reveals a cake spelling out the number 70. Up to now Brian has been coy about his age. The crowd start a rousing rendition of Happy 70th Birthday. Brian wryly accept the inevitable.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b03hwbrw)
Anjelica Huston; City of Culture 2017; Strangers on a Train; Turner

With Mark Lawson.

As the first part of her autobiography is published, actress Anjelica Huston discusses her unconventional childhood with her father, film director John Huston, and why he encouraged her to roll cigars and drink sherry as a child, and what a Samurai warrior was doing in her kitchen.

Hull has been named as UK City of Culture 2017, beating competition from Swansea Bay, Leicester and Dundee. John Godber, playwright and former Artistic Director of Hull Truck Theatre Company, and writer and journalist David Mark discuss Hull's historic and contemporary cultural significance.

Lawrence Fox and Imogen Stubbs star in a new stage version of Strangers on a Train by Craig Warner, based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith, and famously filmed by Hitchcock. Critic Peter Kemp was at the opening night.

Turner & the Sea at the National Maritime Museum claims to be the first full-scale examination of J.M.W. Turner's lifelong fascination with the sea. The exhibition features 120 works by Turner and his contemporaries, including The Fighting Temeraire. Art critic Charlotte Mullins gives her response to this latest Turner show.

Producer: Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hwbr5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b03hwbry)
Public v Private Life

Even before his assassination 50 years ago this week, John F Kennedy was an iconic figure for many - his administration a "Camelot" for a shining new age. Public opinion polls show that the American people consistently rate Kennedy as one of the greatest leaders in US history. The reality of the man was much darker. In private, he was a drug-taking philanderer with links to the Mafia. But that's exactly how his personal life remained - private. Loyal staff, collusion of the press and no question of leaking the detailed FBI reports on his indiscretions meant the presidential image remained untouched. The contrast with public life today couldn't be more striking. Now we believe that there should be no separation of the public and the private and we have a right to know even the most intimate details of the private lives of politicians and those in positions of trust so that in the "public interest" we can pass judgment on their character. Others argue, they can and should be separated and that our prurience has damaged civil society. Should we always expect our leaders to moral exemplars and free from stain? Or are we all guilty of mass hypocrisy? Demanding moral standards in our leaders that we'd never apply in our own lives, or the lives of our friends? Should we welcome the shining spotlight of transparency as raising the moral standards in public life, or has it made us a much less forgiving and understanding society?

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Michael Portillo, Melanie Phillips, Claire Fox and Kenan Malik.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b03hwbs0)
Series 4

Ambivalence: For and Against

Mark O'Connell argues that in an age of strong opinions, we should embrace ambivalence.

As a child, Mark's constitutional ambiguity meant his mother considered printing the phrase 'I might and I mightn't' on a t-shirt. Today, Mark's job as a writer for Slate magazine is to take strong positions. In this fascinating look at the role of ambiguity in our society, he attempts to square the circle - or should that be circle the square - in his determination to have the courage of his own ambivalence.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b03hwbs2)
The Power of the Unconscious

We like to think that we are in control of our lives, of what we do, think and feel. But, as Geoff Watts discovers, scientists are now revealing that this is just an illusion.

A simple magic trick reveals just how limited our conscious awareness of the world is, and how easy it is to fool us.

So if our conscious brain can cope with so little, what is responsible for the rest? Science is starting to reveal the crucial role of a silent partner inside our heads, that we are completely unaware of - our unconscious.

In this programme, Geoff enlists the help of not just brain scientists, but a conjuror and a musician to reveal the pivotal role the unconscious plays in pretty much everything we do, think and feel. This new-found knowledge is enabling scientists to harness its powers for both medical and military benefit.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b03hwbr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b03hczqw)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b03hwbs4)
Tonight Ritula Shah reports live from the US base in Guantanamo Bay.

President Obama promised to close the facility in 2008 but 164 men are still being held. Will the president spend precious political capital to overcome the legal and practical hurdles that still stand in the way of its closure?

The World Tonight has been given access to the base to see what the conditions are like for the detainees and to talk to the people who guard them.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03hwbs6)
The Lowland

Episode 8

Indira Varma reads Jhumpa Lahiri's Man Booker-listed new novel, The Lowland, spanning India and America, and exploring the price of idealism and the enduring power of love.
It is the 1960s, and revolution has come to India and America. Two brothers, Subhash and Udayan, born in Calcutta just fifteen months apart, have been inseparable since birth, but their paths are diverging. Udayan - charismatic and impulsive - finds himself drawn to the Communist movement sweeping Bengal. He will risk all for what he believes. But Subhash, the dutiful son, leaves for a quiet life of study in America. But when Subhash learns what happened to his brother in the lowland outside their family's home, he returns to India, hoping to heal the wounds Udayan left behind.
Today: Bela returns home with shocking news, and Subhash musters the courage to tell her what she deserves to know.
Jhumpa Lahiri shot to fame with her Pulitzer-winning story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, followed by novel The Namesake and another collection, Unaccustomed Earth. The Lowland is her latest work, and has been short-listed for the Man Booker Prize.
Reader: Indira Varma is an acclaimed stage, film and television actor. Her recent TV credits include: Rome, Luther and What Remains.
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett.


WED 23:00 Before They Were Famous (b03hwd2h)
Series 2

Episode 6

Even the most successful of writers have, at some point, had to take day jobs to pay the bills.

Ian Leslie presents the second series of this Radio 4 spoof documentary, which sheds light on the often surprising jobs done by the world's best known writers in the days before they were able to make a living from their art.

In a project of literary archaeology, Leslie unearths archive examples of early work by great writers, including Fortune Cookie messages written by Germaine Greer, a political manifesto by the young JK Rowling, and a car manual written by Dan Brown. In newspaper articles, advertising copy, and company correspondence, we get a fascinating glimpse into the embryonic development of our best-loved literary voices.

We may know them today for their novels, plays or poems but, once upon a time, they were just people with a dream - and a rent bill looming at the end of the month.

Producers: Anna Silver and Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Irish Micks and Legends (b01nxw2q)
Series 1

Children of Lir

Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram become Ais and Yaz and are the very best pals. They are taking their role as Ireland's freshest story-tellers to the British nation very seriously indeed but they haven't had the time to do much research, learn their lines or work out who is doing which parts.

The girls' unconventional way of telling stories involves a concoction of thoroughly inappropriate modern-day metaphors and references to many of the ancient Irish stories.

With a natural knack for both comedy and character voices Yasmine Akram and Aisling Bea will bring you warm, modern re-workings of popular ancient Irish stories.

Today it's Children of Lir.

Written and performed by Aisling Bea and Yasmine Akram.

Producer: Raymond Lau

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2012.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03hwftd)
The Government faces a rebellion over plans to expand the Army Reserve to 30,000 to offset cuts of 20,000 regular troops.

David Cameron and Ed Miliband clash over the running of the Co-op Bank and its former chair Paul Flowers' links with the Labour Party.

MPs call for tough action against Spain following an illegal incursion into Gibraltar's territorial waters.

And some of the Government's biggest private company contractors face a grilling by MPs following two critical reports from the spending watchdog, the NAO.

Alicia McCarthy and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 21 NOVEMBER 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b03hczrq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b03j4y80)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03hczrs)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03hczrv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03hczrx)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b03hczrz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03j9mr5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Frances Finn.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b03hwhcz)
All lambs in England will have to be electronically tagged from 2015 to improve traceability. Farmers claim it could cost the industry more than £1 million.

We continue our look at how CAP reform will be implemented, with a visit to the RSPB's Hope Farm in Cambridgeshire.

And 27 new Marine Conservation Zones will be designated today.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx6nq)
Willow Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Willow Tit. Willow Tits are declining rapidly in many areas: they are very similar to marsh tits, so alike in fact that no-one realised that they existed here until 1897 and their identity as a breeding bird in the UK was confirmed three years later.


THU 06:00 Today (b03hwn07)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b03hwn09)
Pocahontas

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the life of Pocahontas, the Native American woman who to English eyes became a symbol of the New World. During the colonisation of Virginia in the first years of the seventeenth century, Pocahontas famously saved the life of an English prisoner, John Smith. Later captured, she converted to Christianity, married a settler and travelled to England where she was regarded as a curiosity. She died in 1617 at the age of 22 and was buried in Gravesend; her story has fascinated generations on both sides of the Atlantic, and has been reinterpreted and retold by many writers and artists.

With:

Susan Castillo
Harriet Beecher Stowe Emeritus Professor of American Studies at King's College London

Tim Lockley
Reader in American Studies at the University of Warwick

Jacqueline Fear-Segal
Reader in American History and Culture at the University of East Anglia

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b03j593b)
CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters

Episode 4

Originally broadcast in 2013, in the week marking the fiftieth anniversary of CS Lewis's death, and which saw a memorial stone to the author unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, Radio 4's Book of the Week marked the occasion with a reading of his famous letters from a senior to a junior devil.
Read by Simon Russell Beale
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall.
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03hwn0c)
Female NEETs; Women Bishops

As the Church of England's legislative body gives first approval to new proposals that could eventually allow women to become bishops we talk to Susie Leafe, director of the conservative evangelical group Reform and a lay member of the synod who voted against female bishops and Reverend Jody Stowell part of the campaign group YES 2 Women Bishops.

Why are so many young women not in employment, education or training? We talk to two NEETs, Markita and Stephanie, and to Employment Minister Esther McVey and Kayte Lawson from the thinktank IPPR about how to get more into work.

Professor Elizabeth Kuipers from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London on receiving a WISE life-time achievement award for her work on mental illness.

Marion Trestler's new book tells the stories of Austrian women who were recruited to work in the UK after WW2. We speak to Marion, along with Erika Slowman and Erika Lang who both moved to England in the late 1940s

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Kirsty Starkey.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hwn0f)
Love and Mettle

Episode 4

Love and Mettle - episode 4/5
by Andrea Earl

The true story of the writer's own experience of building a house. Mrs T has a virtual meltdown when it becomes apparent that they have been working off the wrong plans and don't have Planning Permission for the house they have already built. And secondly because Mrs T, wrongly thinking the spending was almost over, learns that there is at least another 50k to spend.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b03hwn0h)
Moldova - Sour Grapes

Wine making in Moldova is a source of national pride - they have been growing vines for centuries. During Soviet times the country was encouraged to become one of the USSR's major wine suppliers and it has remained so ever since. But recently Russia banned the importation of Moldovan wine for the second time in a decade.

Tessa Dunlop visits the prestigious Cricova winery - whose cellars have 120km of underground roads and holds bottles for the likes of Angela Merkel and President Putin - to see how the ban is affecting the poorest country in Europe.

Moldova fears that a continuing embargo will devastate its fragile economy. The Moldovan president has condemned it as an aggressive move by Russia to bully Moldova into reconsidering its comittment to forging closer relations with the European Union. Many Moldovans believe Russia wants to make their country reconsider ratifying an agreement with the EU at the end of November.

The result is that growers have vats maturing wine that may have no market. Enterprising younger wine producers, many of whom bought out former state enterprises, fear their investment may have been a mistake. Workers are concerned they may lose their jobs with little chance of alternative employment in the poorest country in Europe.

For Moldova this is symbolic of a bigger problem - it wants to join the EU party and become part of Europe but its economy remains heavily dependent on Russia for gas and cash. Meanwhile the 14th Russian army is based just miles from their capital in the disputed territory of Transnistria.

Moldova faces difficult choices

Producer: Jane Beresford.


THU 11:30 The Songs of Molly Drake (b03hwn0k)
Pete Paphides tells the story behind the privately recorded songs of Molly Drake, mother of cult singer Nick Drake, and how those songs influenced her famous son who ended his own life in 1974 at the age of 30. Nick's sister Gabrielle Drake talks extensively about her mother's music and poetry and their connection with Nick's life and work.

When Nick Drake's producer and mentor Joe Boyd heard the songs, he was moved to declare that, "This is the missing link in the Nick Drake story". Tracey Thorn of Everything But The Girl is also a fan of the songs of Molly and has recorded two covers of the songs specially for this programme.

During the course of the interview, Gabrielle revealed that Molly Drake wrote several songs about Nick when he was a child, including The Bath Song which she quotes in the programme. Molly also penned Poor Mum in response to Nick's Poor Boy - though it is unlikely that Nick ever heard this song.

Molly's is a voice rarely heard - the songs reflect her life but also chart the life of a suburban middle class mother and a lost era when people 'got on with it'. They are hauntingly evocative and Nick's melancholy is also to be heard in Molly's songs.

Up until recently, it was not known that Nick's mother also wrote songs at the piano. She recorded them for private use only and, for many years, Gabrielle looked after the material. In 2004 Gabrielle put two of the songs on a posthumous Nick Drake rarities album, which got some attention from artists like Tracey Thorn, but some of the other songs have only recently been released.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b03hwn0m)
Consumer news with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b03hczs1)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b03hwn0p)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b03j53lh)
Stuff

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017), tells the story of a transformation in personal life in Britain, through the numbers that capture change on the grand scale.

He delves into the data for the big patterns and trends in history, finding new ways of thinking about the whole shape of the population - the balance between adults and children, for example, or the shifting shape of what we do with our lives, from infancy to retirement and death. He seeks answers in history to some of the problems that perplex us now, such as how badly austerity has bitten or the paradox of why no-one seems able to afford a house but so many people own one. And he tells these stories not just with data, but through people and the real experiences that bring the numbers to life.

In the search for data to measure how we've changed, the programme counts rotten teeth and adds up what people ate, what they own and throw away. What did we earn through the centuries, how do we know, and what could we do with it? What was our health like, or our homes, our jobs or education? What was the status and experience of women? And how has it all changed?

Each of these ten programmes takes one theme, to explore how far we have made progress, and why it might continue, or falter.

Stuff
Andrew Dilnot's history of the big trends in history in numbers continues with the story of stuff - the things we consume, from light to concrete - packed with revealing statistics and stories of the way stuff changed our lives.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

From 2013.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b03hwbrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b03hwn0r)
Series 5

Lyall Park

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz.

Episode 1: Lyall Park

The immortal wanderer William Palmer - Pilgrim – comes to Lyall Park where he uncovers an astonishing and disturbing family secret.

William Palmer ..... Paul Hilton
Kenny ..... Sean Murray
Harry ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Colville ..... Annette Badland
Bryony ..... Carolyn Pickles
Lavinia ..... Priyanga Burford
Threadgold ..... James Lailey
Cashier ..... Georgie Fuller
Sound ..... Colin Guthrie

Directed by Marc Beeby

A fifth series of four dark adventures. Pilgrim, cursed with immortality by the King of the Greyfolk, is forever forced to walk between the human world and the world of Faerie in a never-ending quest to preserve the uneasy balance between the two. In this series, Pilgrim finds himself in pursuit of the mysterious Radiant Boy. On the way he encounters a ballroom filled with un-dead dancers, a cursed village, a woman in love with a man with a fox's tail and a medium who takes him across the line between life and death...


THU 15:00 Open Country (b03hwn0t)
The Birds of Lindisfarne

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is probably best known for its medieval religious heritage and in the summer months pilgrims from all walks of life flock to the island and swell its community of 160 to over 650,000. But in the winter it's the birds that flock here, taking refuge on this holy land during their winter migration. Helen Mark arrives on Holy Island just as the birds do and learns about their unique relationship with this island.

Bird Historian, Ian Kerr has been visiting the island for more than 30 years and knows of 318 species that have been recorded. He also knows the long and complex relationship the birds have with this landscape and the generations of islanders. Legend has it that St Cuthbert laid down rules for the protection of nesting Eiders, making him Britain's first conservationists - whilst in later centuries, islanders recruited Goldcrests to clear their cottages of spiders and flies.

Laura Scott is a ranger at the Lindisfarne National Nature Reserve which annually welcomes over half the world's population of pale bellied Brent Geese. They are attracted to the mudflats and the special grasses that grow there. Whilst the birds come for the special habitats that the island provides, they bring with them many gifts. For Rev David Peel, a United Reformed Church Minister and long-time birder, they are a reflection of God's beauty and design, offering moments of transcendence. For award winning Northumberland based writer Ann Cleeves, author of ITV's Drama Series 'Vera' and BBC's 'Shetland' series, the birds are an integral part of building a landscape and creating an atmosphere and Holy Island - a place that she first visited with her retired RSPB warden and keen birder husband Tim - is full of this rich bird life and atmosphere.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b03hmngv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b03hn1m5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b03hwrxf)
The Family; Blue Is the Warmest Colour; Catching Fire; 47 Ronin

Francine Stock talks to Stanley Tucci, camp compere of the deadly Hunger Games, on the constant reinvention of the character actor. Based on the young adult novels of Suzanne Collins, part two of the Hunger Games series, Catching Fire, is released this month and stars Jennifer Lawrence and Woody Harrelson.

Abdellatif Kechiche, the director of Blue is the Warmest Colour, explains why he wants to break free from the conventions of cinema, whether it's content, form or duration. Winner of this year's Palme D'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, the film is an explicit and affecting tale of two young women and their tempestuous relationship. He also answers complaints that he was an excessively demanding director for both cast and crew.

Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer discuss The Family, a story of a mob family in hiding and their increasingly farcical - and murderous - attempts to fit into their new lives incognito.

Plus 47 Ronin, the Japanese legend of the masterless samurai, retold in an American produced film with Keanu Reeves released this Christmas. Alexander Jacoby of Oxford Brookes University explores its reincarnations across the generations.

Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b03hwrxh)
Bird Atlas; Flywheels; Energy capture; Science lessons for MPs

Every twenty years there's a detailed survey of the birds of the UK and Ireland and today, the 2007-2011 Bird Atlas is published. Adam Rutherford hears from Dawn Balmer from the British Trust for Ornithology about the citizen scientists, the forty thousand volunteers who collected data on a staggering 19 million birds - 502 different species - and meets their record breaking volunteer, Chris Reynolds. A 73 year old retired maths teacher, Chris took part in the previous three atlases and walked thousands of miles in all seasons across his patch in the Outer Hebrides. Dawn describes the avifaunal picture revealed in this latest Atlas.

In 2009, Williams developed a flywheel - which temporarily stores energy - for their formula 1 car. After the Research and Development was done, the F1 governing body changed the rules, and there was no longer space for a flywheel on their car. No matter, these things have other uses. Mark Smout from Smout Allen has proposed a design for the Isle of Sheppey in Kent, which uses banks of these flywheels to regulate the energy from the nearby wind farm. It also uses spare electricity to grow a sea defence for the island. Marnie Chesterton reports on this flywheel technology and Tim Fox, energy expert at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers describes to Adam other potential solutions for storing energy on the National Grid.

Professor Bill Sutherland from the University of Cambridge is a co-author on a new "cheat sheet", published in this week's Nature, to help politicians and policy makers sort the good scientific research from the bad. He talks to Adam about why it's more important and faster, to teach a scientific approach than simply to teach facts.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


THU 17:00 PM (b03hwrxk)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03hczs3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Clare in the Community (b01qdxwn)
Series 8

The Parent Trap

Clare is relishing the role of acting Team Leader at the Family Centre but at home she's not relishing a visit from Brian's mother.

Sally Phillips is Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Megan ...... Nina Conti
Nali ...... Nina Conti
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Hazel ...... Hannah Gordon
Joan ...... Sarah Thom
Laura ...... Sarah Thom
Joe ...... Adam Nagaitis
Mike ...... Adam Nagaitis
Paul ...... Paul Stonehouse
Frank ...... Paul Stonehouse
Girl ...... Stephanie Racine

Producer Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2013.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b03hwrxm)
Emma's finishing off her cookbook with Lynda. They finally agree on a title: Appetising Ambridge. They enjoy a brownie and Emma spots that Lynda has changed another recipe. They discuss Ed's problem with Neospora - people and their dogs on his land are driving Ed crazy

Lynda reservedly updates Emma on Robin Hood progress. There's a small issue with her Robin and Marian, which she'll address this evening.

Joe's not feeling up to collecting holly and mistletoe anymore. Clarrie thinks Eddie's mad for wanting to get it from Grange Farm - it doesn't feel right, as they'd be beholden to Oliver and Caroline.

Emma has a card for Eddie and Clarrie, for their 32nd wedding anniversary. As a thank you for looking after him, Joe treats Eddie and Clarrie to £50 from his compensation to go somewhere fancy.

Eddie shares that he might have some good news for Darrell, before proposing a toast to Clarrie - the best wife in the world. Clarrie's touched.

Lynda surprises Rob and Kirsty with a private rehearsal, focusing on intimacy.
But Lynda's improvisational ideas backfire as Kirsty uses the scenario to dig at Rob, barely staying in character. Lynda vainly hopes the exercise has been useful. Kirsty admits they've been given lots to think about.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b03hwrxp)
Peter Blake; Gaslight; Sarah Ruhl; Leviathan

With Kirsty Lang.

The artist Peter Blake's new exhibition Under Milk Wood is the culmination of a 25-year project, in which he's created a series of illustrations, portraits, watercolours, and photographs based on Dylan Thomas's 'play for voices'. Peter Blake looks back over his ambitious project and discusses his fascination for Thomas's celebrated work.

A new film documentary, Leviathan, provides an insight into the harsh world of North Atlantic commercial fishing. With no narration, little dialogue, and long lingering shots of life aboard a fishing vessel, the film has divided audiences. Documentary film maker Molly Dineen gives her response.

Iain Sinclair and Professor Jeffrey Richards tell the story of the chequered history of Gaslight, Thorold Dickinson's adaptation of Patrick Hamilton's play, which was suppressed by a Hollywood studio when it bought up the rights. Legend has it that the film only survives now because the director smuggled out a copy under the cloak of darkness.

Sarah Ruhl's play In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) was nominated for three Tony Awards and a Pulitzer Prize after its initial Broadway run in 2009. Opening tonight at the St James Theatre in London, the play shows how 19th Century medicine used the female orgasm as a cure for hysteria, and how the invention of electricity transformed the treatment. Sarah Ruhl discusses the inspiration for the play and reflects on why it has been a hit in some surprising locations.

Producer: Stephen Hughes.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hwn0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b03hwrxr)
Energy Prices: The Truth

Hannah Barnes asks where the money from your energy bills goes. Do the energy companies have anything to hide and are customers are being ripped off? She visits Jane, an energy customer in Brighton, and finds her in a cold house waiting as long as she can to turn on her heating. Jane isnot alone - there are thousands like her who cannot afford to pay their bills. So why are they going up and are each of the different reasons given by the big six energy companies valid or are we paying too much.

Contributors:
Audrey Gallacher - Director of Energy, Consumer Futures
Reg Platt - Senior Research Fellow, IPPR
Omar Rahim - former energy trader and Editor, Energy Trader Daily
Keith Anderson - Chief Corporate Officer, Scottish Power
Alan Whitehead - Labour MP and member of the House of Commons, Energy and Climate Change Select Committee.
Stephen Fitzpatrick - Managing Director, Ovo Energy.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b03hwrxt)
Design

Decorating your home is big business - in the UK and around the world. In China and India the home decor market is evolving fast - but will the result be a global homogenous style? Who sets the trends? And what do you do if your products lose their fashionable edge? Evan Davis and guests discuss the volatile world of design.

Guests:
Kelly Hoppen, founder Kelly Hoppen Interiors
Andrew Graham, CEO Graham and Brown
Lois Jacobs, Global CEO Fitch

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b03hwrxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b03hwn09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b03hczs5)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b03hwydj)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03hwydl)
The Lowland

Episode 9

Indira Varma reads Jhumpa Lahiri's Man Booker-listed new novel, The Lowland, spanning India and America, and exploring the price of idealism and the enduring power of love.
It is the 1960s, and revolution has come to India and America. Two brothers, Subhash and Udayan, have been inseparable since birth, but their paths are diverging. Udayan - charismatic and impulsive - finds himself drawn to the Communist movement sweeping Bengal. He will risk all for what he believes. But Subhash, the dutiful son, leaves for a quiet life of study in America. But when Subhash learns what happened to his brother in the lowland outside their family's home, he returns to India, hoping to heal the wounds Udayan left behind.
Today: Gauri is forced to confront her past after an unexpected letter from Subhash.
Jhumpa Lahiri shot to fame with her Pulitzer-winning story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, followed by novel The Namesake and another collection, Unaccustomed Earth. The Lowland is her latest work, and has been short-listed for the Man Booker Prize.
Reader: Indira Varma is an acclaimed stage, film and television actor. Her recent TV credits include: Rome, Luther and What Remains.
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett.


THU 23:00 Andrew Maxwell's Public Enemies (b03dv5n2)
The Internet

Andrew tackles the internet. Whether it's online pornography twisting our children's minds or GCHQ reading our emails, it seems only right to have a healthy distrust of the internet.

But surely, to paraphrase a former prime minister, there's no such thing as the Internet - there are men, and women, and lolcats. What is it about the internet that makes people on it so scary?

Andrew Maxwell is one of the UK's most informed and fearless stand ups. In this series of one-off stand up shows, he uses his trademark intelligence and political incisiveness to dig behind the clichés and assumptions about four possible threats to British society: food, the internet, drugs and Nationalism.

A series showcasing a comedian at the top of his abilities tackling difficult and important 'slow news' topics with a depth and perceptiveness that remains outside the remit of mainstream 'topical' comedy.

Written and performed by Andrew Maxwell.

Script edited by Paul Byrne.
Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2013.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03hwydn)
Sean Curran reports as MPs demand more police action on stalking. A cabinet minister says the badger cull is looking good in Somerset. Peers list human rights abuse round the world. And MPs clash on hiring out Parliament's facilities.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



FRIDAY 22 NOVEMBER 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b03hczt2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b03j593b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03hczt4)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03hczt6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03hczt8)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b03hcztb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03j9mrc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Frances Finn.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b03hxjqz)
A fall in consumer demand and high production costs are to blame for a slump in the Scottish chicken industry. That's according to one processor who may have to cut more than 200 jobs at its plant in Perthshire. But will a rescue plan for the Scottish Chicken industry help?
And the Scottish Government say their farmers will loose out on over £850 million pounds worth of European money in the latest Common Agricultural Policy reforms. Whilst each country in the UK decide how it will spend its allocation. The UK Government is in charge of dividing up the pot from the EU - and Defra has decided to share the money out equally.

The Welsh Government has said its pretty pleased with that, and like England, is looking at moving up to fifteen percent of the cash from direct farm payments to rural enterprise and agri environment schemes Similiary the assembly in Northern Ireland has accepted its share of the European money and will complete its consultation with farmers in mid-January.

But the Scottish Government says that the UK is getting extra cash from Europe which is aimed at those who get the lowest payments... And that this 'uplift' money is for their farmers, not for all UK farmers.
Meanwhile - we hear from one analyst who favours scrapping the CAP payments altogether.

And Anna Hill finds out about how the latest bird atlas, published by the British Trust for Ornithology, has been charting the changes in our farmland bird populations for over a decade.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Jules Benham.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx6vq)
Hawfinch

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Hawfinch. The Hawfinch is a large thickset finch with a massive bill. It uses this to crack open hawthorn and cherry stones as well as hornbeam seeds to get at the soft kernels inside. In doing so, it exerts a force of around 180 pounds per square inch.


FRI 06:00 Today (b03hxjr1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b03hmntl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b03j5czk)
CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters

Episode 5

Originally broadcast in 2013, in the week marking the fiftieth anniversary of CS Lewis's death, and which saw a memorial stone to the author unveiled in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey, Radio 4's Book of the Week marked the occasion with a reading of his famous letters from a senior to a junior devil.
Read by Simon Russell Beale
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall.
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03hxjr3)
Prostitution in France; Inventions for women; Men and body image

Heated debate in France on how to tackle prostitution - should it be made illegal to pay for sex? Jenni Murray takes a look at inventions for and by women. Reporter Jeff Bird tries wearing a muscle-enhancing top in public - how much do men worry about their body image? The Manchester Camerata and primary school children in South Manchester create a mini-opera about the Holocaust.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Helen Lee.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hxjr5)
Love and Mettle

Episode 5

Love and Mettle 5/5
by Andrea Earl

The true story of the writer's experience of building a house. A few weeks away from Xmas, and Dr. T. has collapsed and is in hospital. The house is nearly complete but Mrs T. doesn't care - she just wants her husband to be okay.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.


FRI 11:00 Forever Young (b03hxjr7)
Love and Marriage

What does it mean, in 21st Century Britain, to be an adult? In this series of 'documentary pop songs' we examine the shifting borders of adulthood in sexual, social and financial relations.

Personal relationships have always been central to the way young people define themselves - as child, girlfriend or boyfriend, fiance, spouse, or parent. But with changing approaches to sex education, a transformation in our understanding of sexuality and shifting attitudes towards the institutions that support personal choices, it's no longer appropriate to assume any inevitability about settling down with a life-partner and starting a family.

We hear from teenagers about how their education in sexual and personal relations is drawn from the internet and the playground as much as from the classroom, we gather the experiences of young parents, and we compare the attitudes of twin sisters Nuala and Niamh - one in a relationship', one 'very single', one straight, one gay.

For each episode of Forever Young, we've commissioned a new song on each of the three themes. The Love and Marriage song is written and performed by husband and wife pop duo Summer Camp.

Produced by Eleanor McDowall with Hana Walker-Brown.
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 The Gobetweenies (b03hxjr9)
Series 3

Episode 6

Tom's girlfriend Poppy has left him for Stevie - once a friendless snotball but now fit and much-fancied - but Tom is channelling Einstein to get his girl back, because Albert proved that linear time is a delusion and that everything that happens is still happening. And if that's true, Tom has no reason to move on.

So Tom is keeping early morning vigil outside Poppy's house holding up placards relating to quantum theory. His parents, Mimi and Joe, are worried. Is their son a little genius with a post-Newtonian grasp on the nature of time or a nutjob?

On different days, Tom pretends to be different ages to escape the tyranny of time - it's all part of his quantum theory girlfriend retrieval strategy. As Lucy's boyfriend Chris says, Tom is not clever in any way that helps. Meanwhile Chris is causing Lucy problems. He says he empathizes with Tom because he knows the trauma of a broken heart. He tells her he once wrote heartbroken love songs to his ex-girlfriend Erica - the very same Erica that is currently rehearsing Titania to his Bottom. Lucy feels romantically demoted and asks her mother what she should do. Mimi advises doing nothing but Lucy figures Tom did nothing about Poppy's roving eye and now her brother is riding on his mind rocket to quantum town.

Cast:
Joe...................Mark Bonnar
Mimi.................Sarah Alexander
Tom..................Finlay Christie
Lucy.................Phoebe Abbott
Chris and Older Tom........Daniel Boyd

Writer: Marcella Evaristi
Director: Marilyn Imrie

Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b03hxjrc)
Heating oil costs, solar panel woes, shocking electrical work

As heating oil prices have more than doubled in 5 years, we hear how one family were forced to live in one room last winter, and ask the Energy Minister what can be done to help those in fuel poverty.

We'll hear how the airlines might be able to use your internet history to tailor what flights they offer you, and at what cost.

And as 1 in 4 of us use unqualified electricians carry out work on our homes, we'll find out how you avoid a shock when it comes to your wiring.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b03hxjrf)
Lily and Matilda - Best Friends

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who have had some disagreements through primary school and will soon be starting new schools on opposite sides of town, in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess


FRI 12:57 Weather (b03hcztd)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b03hxjrh)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 A History of Britain in Numbers (b03j5czm)
Homes

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority (2012-2017) tells the story of a transformation in personal life in Britain, through the numbers that capture change on the grand scale.

He delves into the data for the big patterns and trends in history, finding new ways of thinking about the whole shape of the population - the balance between adults and children, for example, or the shifting shape of what we do with our lives, from infancy to retirement and death. He seeks answers in history to some of the problems that perplex us now, such as how badly austerity has bitten or the paradox of why no-one seems able to afford a house but so many people own one. And he tells these stories not just with data, but through people and the real experiences that bring the numbers to life.

In the search for data to measure how we've changed, the programme counts rotten teeth and adds up what people ate, what they own and throw away. What did we earn through the centuries, how do we know, and what could we do with it? What was our health like, or our homes, our jobs or education? What was the status and experience of women? And how has it all changed?

Each of these ten programmes takes one theme, to explore how far we have made progress, and why it might continue, or falter.

Homes
Andrew Dilnot tackles the history of our homes in numbers, looking for the big trends and statistical details over the centuries that might help explain why housing has become a national obsession. Continues next week.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

From 2013.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b03hwrxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b03hxjrl)
Robin Brooks - Lewis and Tolkien - The Lost Road

Whether you like or loathe elves and talking lions, J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis each created compelling fictional worlds whose influence has become global.

C S Lewis was an academic and broadcaster whose prolific publication of literary criticism, novels, Christian apologia and the Narnia books for children brought him an international reputation in his lifetime.

By the time of his death in 1973, J R R Tolkien's 'The Lord of The Rings' and 'The Hobbit', (along with other published stories and poems which drew upon the mythology of Middle Earth), had already made him a cult figure around the world.

Haydn Gwynne, Tom Goodman-Hill and Pip Torrens star in Robin Brooks' playful tribute to the long friendship between the two men, and the way it shaped their achievements.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03hxjrp)
Shrewsbury

Peter Gibbs is joined by Chris Beardshaw, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank as he chairs this edition of GQT from Shrewsbury. Chris returns to the home of Emma Morris to catch-up on the development of her rural Shropshire garden, and the panelists talk topical tips whilst wandering along the banks of the River Severn.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

This week's questions:

Q. When planting late bulbs that are starting to sprout, would it better to place them in pots or to get them into the ground while the soil is still warm?

A. It has been a very late year. You will have to plant them into the ground at some point anyway, so try putting them straight into the soil and it will save you some time and effort. Tulips are very often planted at a later point in the season. If planting into the ground, be careful with the delicate embryonic roots and backfill the hole with some friable compost. You could try plunging pots into the ground for extra protection and removing the plants later on.

Q. I have a Christmas Cactus that is about to flower. How severe a haircut can I give it once the flowering is over?

A. It is the nature of a Schlumbergera to dangle, as they are jungle plants and hang from trees. You could raise them on a stand and allow them to take their natural form. If not, take some of the longer stems back to their origin. Don't prune it all at once but take back a little bit each year.

Q. I have left it rather late to prune this year. Should I now wait until spring?

A. Gardeners are often extreme when pruning, taking either too little or too much. There is a simple rule you can follow: prune after flowering rather than at a set time of year. Prune out the wood that has previously flowered. Don't worry too much if you don't get round to it this year, they will still flower next year anyway.

Q. Does the panel have any suggestions for a tree to commemorate the birth of my grandchild?

A. You could plant an apple tree with fruit that the child will be able to pick and eat. Perhaps Spartan or Braeburn as these are attractive and familiar. If you want to plant something with a real presence in the garden, try a Tulip Tree, a Wingnut such as Pterocarya Fraxinifolia, or the Golden Hope Tree. Catalpas also have a beautiful blossom and are known for their hanging Indian beans.

Q. What are the panel's favourite plants for autumn colour, and do they have any suggestions that will double up to provide colour in spring?

A. Blueberries have both a good autumn colour and pretty spring flowers. Aeronias have flowers like a Rowan in the spring but brilliant autumn foliage. Parrotia Persica also turns a magnificent colour.
Prunus Incisa Kojo-No-Mai is small cherry and has pink blossom. It can be grown very easily in a pot during its early life. Disanthus is a must have for autumn colour and turns a lovely salmon pink in spring.

Q. Other than taking cuttings from large Salvias is there any other way of 'over wintering' them?

A. Salvias don't like heavy, wet soil conditions. They will cope with some frost as long as the ground conditions are right. Use a free-draining site with plenty of grit and organic matter. Cut them back and then mound them up with generous amounts of organic matter. You can cover the entire crown to the full root spread. Herbaceous forms of Salvias will be best covered up to 1 foot (60cm) in diameter and 6 inches (15cm) in height.

Q. What is the best way to store Begonias after they have been removed from hanging baskets?

A. You could put them into a well-drained box with used compost. They just need somewhere that will keep them plumped up and frost-free. Take them out in February or March, and then set them in a propagating case with their little dishes exposed.


FRI 15:45 Where Were You When Kennedy Was Shot? (b03hxjrs)
The Levels

The 22nd November marks the fiftieth anniversary of one of the most significant and shocking events in 20th century history, the assassination of President John F Kennedy. Most people know exactly where they were and what they were doing when the news hit. Inspired by this concept, three major writers give their own spin on that day through fictional stories of ordinary people as their lives are caught in that precise moment, perhaps even undergoing monumental changes in their own lives?

November 1963, in a cottage hospital a pregnant woman anxiously awaits news on her unborn child and her husband's tardy arrival.

"The Levels" by Ashley Pharoah
Read by Natascha McElhone and Hugo Speer
Produced by Gemma McMullan.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b03hxkk7)
Frederick Sanger, Doris Lessing, Ray Gosling, Jock Kane, Austin John Marshall

Matthew Bannister on

Frederick Sanger, the only Briton - and one of only four people in the world - to win the Nobel Prize twice. His work underpinned the Human Genome Project.

Also another Nobel prize winner - the prolific novellist Doris Lessing. We have tributes from Brian Aldiss and Faye Weldon.

The broadcaster and gay rights campaigner Ray Gosling who made quirky and distinctive programmes for BBC Radio.

Jock Kane, who blew the whistle on security breaches at GCHQ.

And the record producer Austin John Marshall, best known for his work with his wife, the folk singer Shirley Collins. She pays tribute.

Producer: Neil George.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b03hxkk9)
Radio 4's Mastertapes returned for a third series last week, with John Wilson talking to musicians about a career-defining album in front of a live audience. The series began with Robbie Williams discussing his debut solo album Life Thru a Lens. But would the programme be more at home on a music network like Radio 2 or 6Music, rather than Radio 4? Roger Bolton talks to the series producer Paul Kobrak about the place for a programme like Mastertapes on a speech network.

When Any Questions visited the historic Chartwell House for last Friday's broadcast, presenter Jonathan Dimbleby was cut off just as the programme began, only to return seemingly on the telephone. And later in the week, James Naughtie was oblivious that he had dropped off the air for twelve seconds during the Today programme. Is Radio 4 the victim of sabotage or is there a ghost in the machine?

There is a takeover happening at the Beeb - some lucky listeners will be invading studios, cropping up as the voice of 'Previously on PM', and even visiting Ambridge (or at least the studio where The Archers is recorded). They're the winners of charity auctions to raise money for Children in Need. But some listeners wonder whether this type of fundraising is unfair to those without large sums of money to spare and ask whether a lottery would be fairer. Roger Bolton speaks to Children in Need's Head of Editorial, Gareth Hydes.

And we're looking for your questions for the Controller of BBC Radio 2, Bob Shennan. He'll be joining Roger Bolton next week to hear your comments and answer whatever you'd like to ask him. So please send your thoughts to us using the usual contact methods.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:56 The Listening Project (b03hxkkc)
Abbe, Lesley and Mark - Skin Deep

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about cross-cultural adoption as experienced by one family in the 1970s, and the positive impact on their lives that continues today, in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b03hxkkf)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03hcztg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b03hxkkh)
Series 82

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig, with panellists Rebecca Front and Phill Jupitus.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b03hxkkk)
Shula's buys groceries from Ambridge Organics for Jill, who's not comfortable driving at the moment. Shula reflects on Brian and Jennifer, who are on their way to Mauritius. How lovely it would be to leave it all behind, she and Helen agree.

Kirsty tells Tom about her excruciating rehearsals with Rob. She'll deserve an acting award to pull off their romance.

Helen feels like pulling out of the drinks tonight with Patrick, Kirsty and Tom. But Kirsty's determined Helen will let her hair down.

After some persuasion Helen, accepts a small glass of wine, but a little leads to a lot. Helen gets drunk and pours her heart out to Kirsty about how much she misses Rob, while Tom and Patrick have fun with the quiz machine. Kirsty wonders whether tonight was a good idea.

Eddie has some good news for Darrell. He has an offer of some cash-in-hand joinery work for a mate, on Neil's recommendation. Darrell's mood rockets. Shula's pleased for him, but wary about how he'll organise his benefits. She tries to warn overconfident Darrell not to get ahead of himself. But he reckons he'll get lots more work and will soon be out of her hair.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b03hxlg8)
Morecambe and Wise, Kate Tempest, Poets' Corner, the return of Blofeld

With Kirsty Lang.

Morecambe and Wise are remembered and revived in a new stage production called Eric And Little Ern, which follows on from a TV biopic of the double-act, a one-man show about Eric Morecambe, and the award-winning The Play What I Wrote. The writers and stars of this latest homage, Ian Ashpitel and Jonty Stephens, discuss the reasons for the comedians' enduring appeal.

Performance poet and rapper Kate Tempest won this year's Ted Hughes Prize for innovation in poetry for Brand New Ancients, an hour long spoken story depicting the intertwining lives of two families. As she begins a tour which will take the show all over the country, she explains who the Brand New Ancients are and reveals the play that changed her life.

James Bond producers found themselves embroiled in a legal dispute with Kevin McClory - a co-writer of the 1965 film Thunderball - over who invented the cat-stroking supervillain Blofeld. As a result, the character was left on the shelf for 30 years but with news that the relevant rights have been acquired from the McClory estate, it looks like our most famous screen villain could be given a new lease of life. To reflect on the character of Blofeld and why he has become so ubiquitous in popular culture, journalist Stephen Armstrong came to the rescue.

And 50 years after his death, the Chronicles of Narnia writer CS Lewis has been honoured with a memorial stone in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey. The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall, explains how the selection process works.

Produced by Ella-mai Robey.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03hxjr5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b03hxlgb)
Sarah Wollaston MP, Chris Bryant MP, Steve Webb MP, George Monbiot

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the Godolphin School Salisbury, Wiltshire, with the environmentalist George Monbiot, Conservative backbencher Sarah Wollaston MP, Shadow Minister for Welfare Reform Chris Bryant MP and Pensions Minister Steve Webb MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b03hxlgd)
Rebuilding After 9/11

Will Self reflects from the top of the new One World Trade Center in New York on the challenge of rebuilding after the destruction of 9.11.

"The downtown site, mired in ground sacred to mammon, has mixed into it a complex mulch of private rights and public responsibilities: to harmonise these competing interests in the frozen music of architecture has proved a gruelling compositional task.".


FRI 21:00 A History of Britain in Numbers (b03hxlgg)
A History of Britain in Numbers: Omnibus

Episode 1

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the UK Statistics Authority, tells the story of a transformation in personal life in Britain, through the numbers that capture change on the grand scale.

He delves into the data for the big patterns and trends in history, finding new ways of thinking about the whole shape of the population - the balance between adults and children, for example, or the shifting shape of what we do with our lives, from infancy to retirement and death. He seeks answers in history to some of the problems that perplex us now, such as how badly austerity has bitten or the paradox of why no-one seems able to afford a house but so many people own one. And he tells these stories not just with data, but through people and the real experiences that bring the numbers to life.

In the search for data to measure how we've changed, the programme counts rotten teeth and adds up what people ate, what they own and throw away. What did we earn through the centuries, how do we know, and what could we do with it? What was our health like, or our homes, our jobs or education? What was the status and experience of women? And how has it all changed?

This is all presented with innovative radio techniques to capture data in sound - for example, new ways of creating graphs for the senses so that we can not just know, but feel, the changes.

Producer: Michael Blastland
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b03hcztj)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b03hxlgj)
Kerry flying to Geneva to join talks on Iran's nuclear programme. Five British Greenpeace activists released on bail in Russia. Bells toll in Dallas to mark moment 50 years ago when President Kennedy was assassinated. Presented by David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03hxlgl)
The Lowland

Episode 10

Indira Varma reads Jhumpa Lahiri's Man Booker-listed new novel, The Lowland, spanning India and America, and exploring the price of idealism and the enduring power of love.
It is the 1960s, and revolution has come to India and America. Two brothers, Subhash and Udayan, , have been inseparable since birth, but their paths are diverging. Udayan - charismatic and impulsive - finds himself drawn to the Communist movement sweeping Bengal. He will risk all for what he believes. But Subhash, the dutiful son, leaves for a quiet life of study in America. But when Subhash learns what happened to his brother in the lowland, he returns to India, hoping to heal the wounds Udayan left behind.
In today's final episode: after decades apart, mother and daughter finally meet.
Jhumpa Lahiri shot to fame with her Pulitzer-winning story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, followed by novel The Namesake and another collection, Unaccustomed Earth. The Lowland is her latest work, and has been short-listed for the Man Booker Prize.
Reader: Indira Varma is an acclaimed stage, film and television actor. Her recent TV credits include: Rome, Luther and What Remains.
Abridger: Sally Marmion
Producer: Justine Willett.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b03hvx6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03hxlnk)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster on the latest stage of the bill for a referendum on Britain's membership of the European Union. There was a vote on a controversial move -- opposed by Conservative leaders -- to bring forward a referendum to next year.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b03hxlnm)
Jamie and Valerie - First Among Equals

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about vulnerability and honesty between a male midwife and his wife, who is not entirely comfortable with the job her husband does, proving again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b03hng1d)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b03hng1d)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b03hvql9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b03hvql9)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b03hwbr5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b03hwbr5)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b03hwn0f)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b03hwn0f)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b03hxjr5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b03hxjr5)

15 by 15 09:30 TUE (b037t1rr)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b03hvx6r)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b03hvx6r)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 MON (b03hvn59)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 TUE (b03j50qn)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 WED (b03j4y82)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 THU (b03j53lh)

A History of Britain in Numbers 13:45 FRI (b03j5czm)

A History of Britain in Numbers 21:00 FRI (b03hxlgg)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b03h7gsr)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b03hxlgd)

A Very Powerful Politician? (The First Year of the Bristol Mayor) 11:00 MON (b03hnhjt)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b011vg9f)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b03hvx74)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b03hvx74)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b03gvslv)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b03hvn6n)

Andrew Maxwell's Public Enemies 23:00 THU (b03dv5n2)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b03hmh3r)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b03h7gsp)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b03hxlgb)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b03hmh46)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b03hwrxh)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b03hwrxh)

Batting for the Middle Kingdom 11:00 WED (b03hwbr7)

Before They Were Famous 23:00 WED (b03hwd2h)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b03hmngl)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b03hmngl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b03hvn6t)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b03hvx78)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b03hwbs6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b03hwydl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b03hxlgl)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b03h7grj)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b03hng18)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b03hng18)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b03j4xdr)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b03j4xdr)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b03j4y80)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b03j4y80)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b03j593b)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b03j593b)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b03j5czk)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b03hmnnd)

Clare in the Community 18:30 THU (b01qdxwn)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b03gtvty)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b03hn1m3)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b03hwn0h)

Curlew River 11:30 TUE (b03hvqlf)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b03hmntl)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b03hmntl)

Drama 14:15 MON (b03j5j4c)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b03j5775)

Drama 14:15 WED (b010m2fg)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b03hxjrl)

Ed Reardon's Week 11:30 MON (b03hnhjw)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b03hmf7k)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b03hng12)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b03hvql1)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b03hwbqx)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b03hwhcz)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b03hxjqz)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b03h7gs9)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b03hxkk9)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b03h3fx6)

Forever Young 11:00 FRI (b03hxjr7)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b03hwbs0)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b03hmh3m)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b03hvn6j)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b03hvx6y)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b03hwbrw)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b03hwrxp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b03hxlg8)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b03hwbs2)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b03h7gs3)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b03hxjrp)

Gettysburg 20:00 TUE (b03hvx70)

Hard to Tell 11:30 WED (b03hwbr9)

How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love My Albatross 10:30 SAT (b038xrjh)

I'm Dave Podmore, Get Me Out There 19:15 SUN (b03hn2rt)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b03gvsln)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b03hvn68)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b03hwn09)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b03hwn09)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b03hvx72)

Irish Micks and Legends 23:15 WED (b01nxw2q)

It's Your Round 18:30 TUE (b01b8zw3)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b03h7gs7)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b03hxkk7)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b03hmngq)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b03hmh40)

Machiavelli: Devil or Democrat? 20:00 MON (b03hvn6l)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b03hvn6z)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b03hvr35)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b03h6z3w)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b03hczkw)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b03hczmq)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b03hczp2)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b03hczqf)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b03hczrq)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b03hczt2)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b03hwbr1)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b03hwbr1)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b03hwbrh)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b03hmh3p)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b03hmh3p)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b03h429b)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b03hwbry)

Nadine Gordimer - A Flash of Fireflies 19:45 SUN (b03hn2rw)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b03h6z46)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b03hczl4)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b03hczmz)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b03hczpb)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b03hczqp)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b03hczrz)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b03hcztb)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b03hczl6)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b03h6z48)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b03hczlb)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b03hczlg)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b03h6z4s)

News 13:00 SAT (b03h6z4j)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b03hn1m5)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b03hn1m5)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b03h6yrx)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b03hwn0t)

PM 17:00 SAT (b03hmh3y)

PM 17:00 MON (b03hvn62)

PM 17:00 TUE (b03hvx6t)

PM 17:00 WED (b03hwbrp)

PM 17:00 THU (b03hwrxk)

PM 17:00 FRI (b03hxkkf)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b03hn2rp)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 THU (b03hwn0r)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b03h7gww)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b03j9m24)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b03j9mh3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b03j9mhh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b03j9mr5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b03j9mrc)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b03hmh42)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b03hmh42)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b03hmh42)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b03hmngv)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b03hmngv)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b03hmngv)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 13:30 SUN (b0376x76)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b03gvqm7)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b03hvn5j)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b03hmh3t)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b03hmh3h)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b03hmh44)

Scallop 16:00 MON (b03hvn5q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b03h6z42)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b03hczl0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b03hczmv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b03hczp6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b03hczqk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b03hczrv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b03hczt6)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b03h30g8)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b03hvqlc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b03h6z40)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b03h6z44)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b03h6z4l)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b03hczky)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b03hczl2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b03hczll)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b03hczms)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b03hczmx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b03hczp4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b03hczp8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b03hczqh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b03hczqm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b03hczrs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b03hczrx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b03hczt4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b03hczt8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b03h6z4q)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b03hczlq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b03hczn5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b03hczpg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b03hczqt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b03hczs3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b03hcztg)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b03hmngn)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b03hmngn)

Spin the Globe 16:00 TUE (b03hvx6p)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b03hng16)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b03hng16)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b03hmngx)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b03hmngs)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b03hmnng)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b03hn2rr)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b03hn2rr)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b03hvn6g)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b03hvn6g)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b03hvx6w)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b03hvx6w)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b03hwbrt)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b03hwbrt)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b03hwrxm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b03hwrxm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b03hxkkk)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b03h71c0)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b03hwrxt)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b03gtvv2)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b03hn1m7)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b03h6yrz)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b03hwrxf)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b03hmpwl)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b03hmpwl)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b03hx23j)

The Gobetweenies 11:30 FRI (b03hxjr9)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b03hvn5x)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b03hvn5x)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b03hvr33)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b03hmpwq)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b03hxjrf)

The Listening Project 16:56 FRI (b03hxkkc)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b03hxlnm)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b03hwbrm)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b03h7gsh)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b03hxkkh)

The Politics of Architecture 09:00 TUE (b03hvql5)

The Politics of Architecture 21:30 TUE (b03hvql5)

The Report 20:00 THU (b03hwrxr)

The Songs of Molly Drake 11:30 THU (b03hwn0k)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b03hmpwn)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b03hvn6q)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b03hvx76)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b03hwbs4)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b03hwydj)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b03hxlgj)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b03h428y)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b03hwbrk)

Tim Key's Easy USSR 15:30 SAT (b03h30gb)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b03hvn75)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b03hvx95)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b03hwftd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b03hwydn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b03hxlnk)

Today 07:00 SAT (b03hmh3f)

Today 06:00 MON (b03hng14)

Today 06:00 TUE (b03hvql3)

Today 06:00 WED (b03hwbqz)

Today 06:00 THU (b03hwn07)

Today 06:00 FRI (b03hxjr1)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 18:30 WED (b03hwbrr)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03dwxfp)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03dx2qh)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03dx2w1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03dx2x8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03dx6nq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03dx6vq)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b03h6z4b)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b03h6z4d)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b03h6z4g)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b03h6z4n)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b03hczl8)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b03hczld)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b03hczlj)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b03hczln)

Weather 05:56 MON (b03hczn1)

Weather 12:57 MON (b03hczn3)

Weather 21:58 MON (b03hczn7)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b03hczpd)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b03hczpj)

Weather 12:57 WED (b03hczqr)

Weather 21:58 WED (b03hczqw)

Weather 12:57 THU (b03hczs1)

Weather 21:58 THU (b03hczs5)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b03hcztd)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b03hcztj)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b03hn2ry)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b03hn2s0)

Where Were You When Kennedy Was Shot? 15:45 FRI (b03hxjrs)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b03hmh3w)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b03hng1b)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b03hvql7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b03hwbr3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b03hwn0c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b03hxjr3)

World at One 13:00 MON (b03hnhk0)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b03hvr31)

World at One 13:00 WED (b03hwbrf)

World at One 13:00 THU (b03hwn0p)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b03hxjrh)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b03hnhjy)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b03hvqlh)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b03hwbrc)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b03hwn0m)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b03hxjrc)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b03h7gwy)