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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b03ct9n4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b03cv46x)
Heston Blumenthal - Historic Heston

Episode 5

Heston Blumenthal's name is synonymous with cutting edge cuisine but his inspiration comes from the history of British cooking. In 'Historic Heston' he chooses twenty eight dishes which span from medieval times to the late 19th Century. He takes them apart, then puts them together again with his own inimitable twist, so creating a sublime 21st Century take on ancient delicacies.

Today, as an avowed fan of Alice in Wonderland, Heston unveils the inspiration for one of his signature dishes, Mock Turtle Soup. The original recipe for the soup appeared in a cookbook written by the first Professor of Botany at Cambridge University in 1732, but the dish quickly made it into the mainstream and the craze for it lasted well into the Victorian age.

Written by Heston Blumenthal
Read by Heston Blumenthal and Hugh Dennis

Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03ct9n6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03ct9n8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03ct9nb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b03ct9nd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03cv4cg)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b03cv4cj)
'My daughter asked if my grandchild could live with me' - iPM explores grandparenthood with a listener whose grandchild just moved into her house. And Your News is read by Tim Harford. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b03ct9ng)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b03ct9nj)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b03ct4nq)
Series 25

The Same Walk 365 Times

This week's walk is a little unusual. The guest, Cathy Dreyer, wrote to the programme to suggest we join her on a short, local route which she has chosen to walk 365 times.

Cathy began her project after reading the first few pages of Robert Macfarlane's book, 'The Old Ways'. She was filled with envy at his freedom to walk in exciting, far flung places. But rather than moan about her domestic responsibilities, Cathy thought she'd respond by doing a very short walk, 365 times over.

Cathy says she is using the walk to examine "what's really there" in both the natural world and in her domestic life as a parent which is repetitive and intimate, going over and over the same worn but wonderful ground. Motherhood and work means it's taking longer than a year to complete the project, something Cathy is chronicling in a blog www.walkinginacircle.wordpress.com

The theme of this series of Ramblings is listeners' walks, and this week's presenter is a previous Ramblings' guest: the broadcaster, actor and musician, Toyah Willcox.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b03d7v57)
Farming Today This Week

Charlotte Smith visits a new straw-fired power station which is taking in its first bales to be turned into power. The plant near Sleaford in Lincolnshire will power more than 65 thousand homes and take in 238,000 tonnes of straw a year from farms within a 40 mile radius. This new power station isn't the only one using farm waste to create bioenergy. We hear how chicken litter from henhouses is also being incinerated for power.

Both of these projects support the UK Government's ambitions for 15% of the energy we consume to be generated from renewable sources by 2020. The NFU says that farmers can get involved, and this week DEFRA has announced £3 million of new funding for farmers to build anaerobic digester-based mini-power plants on their land.

The energy from the Sleaford power plant will be sold into the national grid, as well as powering a district heating system in the town. While the new power plant will provide a market for farmers to sell their straw, not everyone's been able to find an outlet to sell their farm-grown fuel. We hear from one farmer who's struggling to find a market for his willow, and explore the latest research from the University of Southampton which has mapped areas of supply and demand for energy crops such as miscanthus. We also meet a tomato grower in Evesham producing his own natural gas using a mixture of plant matter, slurry and specially grown energy crops in a giant anaerobic digester.

But will power plants like Sleaford be springing up all over the country to meet our increasing demand for energy? And is a straw-fired station actually bad news for livestock farmers, who could be using the straw for their animals?

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Jules Benham.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b03ct9nl)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b03d7v59)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b03d7v5c)
Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Richard Coles and Suzy Klein meet space scientist Maggie Aderin-Pocock, a female trainee astronaut from the early 1960s, Jerri Truhill, and amateur rocketeer John Jacomb. Matt Eagles explains what is like to have had Parkinson's disease since the age of eight, Matthew Baylis tells the story of the cult religions of Vanuatu and June Lady Chichester enthuses about camels. MOBO founder Kanya King picks her Inheritance Tracks.


SAT 10:30 Don't Log Off (b03d7v5f)
Series 4

Escape

Alan Dein crosses the world via Facebook and Skype, hearing the real life dramas of random strangers as Don't Log Off comes to Saturday mornings for the first time.

And in this first programme, Alan speaks to a range of people looking for escape - in a range of honest and moving encounters which take him right around the globe. He hears from a female human rights activist in Saudi Arabia trying to flee the country after hearing her life is in danger - and a Marilyn Manson fan yearning to escape Russia.

There are lighter moments, too, as Alan speaks to a Japanese man about his dashed hopes of a career singing love songs and a Ugandan hoping for a happy ending to his romance with a woman in Finland.

Hooked up to a computer into the early hours of the morning, Alan crosses continents online - inviting anyone and everyone to talk to him. He never knows who he will be speaking to next or what secrets they will reveal.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b03d7v5h)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks at the relationship between police and politicians in light of the 'plebgate' affair. He asks if the Royal Mail was sold off too cheaply. What can be done to breathe life back into hard-up towns? And tales from the hustings in the battle to be Deputy Speaker of the Commons.

The Editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b03d7v5k)
The Migrants Who Made it

The Via Roma in the Italian island of Lampedusa -- Alan Johnston says that for the migrants who make it in from the sea, this is the road which may take them to better lives in a richer world. Owen Bennett Jones studies the contrast between the lives of the women who present programmes on Pakistani TV and those who live in distant villages. There's a heated debate in France about what they should do about their seriously overcrowded prisons. Christian Fraser's been to one of the country's biggest jails. Lynne O'Donnell in Afghanistan finds out what can be learned in a visit to some of the world's oldest, most magnificent and archaeologically significant sites. And it's been a tense and anxious few days for some in the Senegalese capital, Dakar and all, Thomas Fessy tells us, because of the price of sheep.

The producer is Tony Grant.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b03d7v5m)
British Gas prices; Star fund managers; Credit unions square up; Asda angers customers

British Gas has announced to its customers that their bills will rise by 9% from the end of next month.
This comes a week after SSE announced a hike in average dual fuel bills of 8.2%. Why are prices soaring? And what can we do about it? And are there still deals to switch to which will freeze your prices for four winters?

Neil Woodford, Invesco Perpetual 's star manager and one of the most consistently successful fund managers of the last few decades, is to leave the firm in April to found his own company. Should the people with £30 billion invested in his funds try to follow him? Or stick with his successors. Can you make money following star managers from fund to fund?

Can Credit Unions compete with payday lenders for low value short term loans? They clearly can on price. But can they offer loans in ten minutes and create public awareness through advertising? The Government would like to think so and is providing £13m a year to fund their infrastructure. But some credit unions have collapsed during the downturn. Money Box looks at the long term future of credit unions.

Asda Mobile has angered some customers after it announced that they cannot transfer any unused credit when its pay-as-you-go service moves to a new provider later this year. A compliance expert tells the programme whether Asda is breaching its contract with its customers.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b03cv47w)
Series 41

Episode 4

Steve Punt and Jon Culshaw present a comedic look at the week's news, providing a topical mix of stand-up, sketches and songs that tell you everything you need to know. With Lloyd Langford, Nathan Caton, Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin and Vikki Stone.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b03ct9nn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b03ct9nq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b03cv482)
David Willetts, Hilary Benn, Lesley Riddoch, Mark Littlewood

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Rothbury in the North East with Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Hilary Benn MP; Minister of State for Universities and Science David Willetts MP; the writer and broadcaster Lesley Riddoch; and the Director General of the Institute for Economic Affairs, Mark Littlewood.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b03d836m)
Caring for the elderly and Chinese investment in UK essential services

A coroner has ruled that neglect contributed to deaths of 5 residents at a West Sussex care home, described as being riddled with "institutionalised abuse". How do we ensure our elderly are better cared for in future?

And after George Osborne's agreement that Chinese companies can take a stake in British nuclear power plants, how welcoming should we be of foreign investment in essential services like energy supply?

The phone number is 03700 100 444. E-mail anyanswers@bbc.co.uk, tweet using the hashtag BBCAQ, text 84844.

The presenter is Anita Anand. The producer is Alex Lewis.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b03d836p)
Goodbye

Lizzie and Jen first met in childhood and have been best friends ever since, sharing everything; their hopes, fears and all the pivotal moments of their lives. Jen has been beside Lizzie to witness her marriage to Matt and the birth of their children Cissy, Maddy, and Billy, while Lizzie has been Jen's shoulder to cry on for as long as she can remember.

When Lizzie is diagnosed with Breast Cancer their worlds are turned upside down. Together the friends negotiate the stages of her treatment and see their friendship tested and redefined in ways they could not have predicted. As a young mother Lizzie struggles to come to terms with the effects of the disease on her family and her body, while Jen finds herself, for the first time, hiding a secret from Lizzie, unable to confide in the friend she desperately wants to support.

And when they learn that Lizzie doesn't have much time left, they struggle to do the hardest thing of all. To say Goodbye.

An extraordinary story of friendship by Morwenna Banks, starring Olivia Colman as Lizzie and Natascha McElhone as Jen.

Some of the drama was based on writing by Deborah Keily before her death from Breast Cancer.

A stellar cast also includes Darren Boyd, John Simm and Alison Steadman.

The drama is dedicated to Deborah, Victoria, and Bethany.

Morwenna Banks is a writer, actress and performer who first became known for co-writing and appearing in four series of Chanel 4's cult sketch show 'Absolutely'. She has appeared in numerous television comedies, dramas and films.


SAT 15:45 Witness (b03fh1zg)
The Death of Grenada's Revolution

On October 19th 1983, Grenada's leftist Prime Minister, Maurice Bishop, was killed following a coup. Six days later the US invaded the tiny Caribbean island. We hear from Ann Peters, who was with Maurice Bishop in his final hours.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b03ddnf5)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Cher; Gloria de Piero; Patsy Kensit

Cher - singer, actress, campaigner tells Jenni about her life, her look and her family.

Caroline Lucas MP explains why she thinks there's no place for lads' mags alongside the weekly groceries.

Gloria de Piero MP, the new shadow minister for women and equalities, tells us about why she posed topless aged 15 years, her Bradford upbringing and why she thinks it's important to bring more working-class people into politics.

Patsy Kensit on peas, Elizabeth Taylor's diamond and the loss of both her parents when she was a young woman.

Campaigner and former supermodel, Waris Dirie winner of the 2013 Women of the Year Campaigning Award. She tells about her Desert Flower Foundation which is trying to stop the worldwide practice of female genital mutilation.

Women tricked into relationships by under cover officers talk about their experiences.

Daria Cybulska of Wikimedia and neuropsychologist Emma Claire Palmer explain why they want to get more female science and technology experts in the pages of Wikipedia.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Steven Williams.


SAT 17:00 PM (b03ddnfc)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b03ctfp4)
Digital Marketplaces

Where can you find a hand-stitched crochet blanket, the latest Lady Gaga video or sell your old sofa? Trading online makes it easier than ever to find a marketplace and gives the consumer a different and faster way to shop and browse. On The Bottom Line Evan Davis discusses the issues with:

Nic Jones, Senior Vice President International, VEVO;
Nicole Vanderbilt, MD Etsy; and
François Coumau, General Manager for Continental Europe, eBay.
Producer : Smita Patel.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b03ct9ns)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b03ct9nv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03ct9nx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b03ddnff)
David Mitchell, Mark Kermode, Walter Mosley, Joanna Bowen, Emma Freud, Mary Coughlan, Lanterns on the Lake

Clive's at the Peep Show with comedian and actor David Mitchell, who's starring as Keith Davis in comedy drama 'The Ambassadors'. As the newly appointed British Ambassador of Tazbekistan, one of the ex-Soviet 'Stans': newly oil rich and corrupt, ambitious Keith intends to make his mark in the posting. 'Ambassadors' starts on Wednesday 23rd October at 21.00 on BBC Two.

Clive's at the flicks with the UK's leading film critic Mark Kermode, whose new book takes us on a journey across the modern cinematic landscape. Like its predecessor, 'The Good, The Bad and The Multiplex', 'Hatchet Job' blends historical analysis with trenchant opinion, bitter personal prejudices, autobiographical diversions and anecdotes, and laugh-out-loud acerbic humour.

Are you sitting comfortably? Emma Freud's spinning a yarn with Festival curator and actress Joanna Bowen, whose Fireside Storytelling Festival features a wide variety of traditional storytellers, anecdotal stories, some comic, some serious and inspiring. It's taking place in Baldock, Hertfordshire over two weekends from Friday 18th to Sunday 27th October.

Clive's Gone Fishin' with bestselling novelist Walter Mosley, whose new Easy Rawlins mystery 'Little Green' sees private detective and war veteran Easy wake from a coma to find his friend's son is missing. As he wades into the squats and LSD dens of Sunset Boulevard, what Easy discovers will take him on a journey into the dark underbelly of 1960s culture.

With music from Irish jazz and folk musician Mary Coughlan, who performs 'I'd Rather Go Blind' from her album 'The Whole Affair: The Very Best of Mary Coughlan'.

And from Newcastle's Lanterns on the Lake, who perform 'Until The Colours Run' from their album of the same name.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b03ddnfh)
Rufus Norris

It's 40 years since the National Theatre was led by someone who wasn't a Cambridge graduate, but this week it was announced that Rufus Norris - who spent his late teens as a painter and decorator - would succeed Sir Nicholas Hytner as the theatre's director. So why is Norris such a popular choice for British theatre's top job? Mary Ann Sieghart looks at the making of a director whose work includes collaborations with Damon Albarn and the London Community Gospel Choir and a musical about a real-life serial killer.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b03ddnfk)
David Tennant as Richard II; The Goldfinch; Enough Said

Tom Sutcliffe and guests Sarfraz Manzoor, Natalie Haynes and Peter Kemp discuss David Tennant's starring role in Richard II, in Gregory Doran's first production as Artistic Director at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford, following on from David Tennant's successful performance as Hamlet in 2008. Richard II is the first in a cycle of Shakespeare's history plays which will be performed over subsequent seasons.

Donna Tartt's long awaited third novel is The Goldfinch, published 11 years after The Little Friend and 21 years after her memorable debut The Secret History. The entire book revolves around a stolen painting, Dutch artist Carel Fabritius's The Goldfinch, which in reality hangs in The Hague's Royal Picture Gallery. Starting like her previous two novels with a gripping account of a death, will it live up to the hype?

The Ey Exhibition Paul Klee - Making Visible opens at Tate Modern Bankside, and focuses on the decade Klee spent teaching and working at the Bauhaus, the hotbed of modernist design. The abstract canvases Klee produced there, such as the rhythmical composition Fire in the Evening 1929, took his reputation to new international heights.

James Gandolfini and Julia Louis-Dreyfus star in Nicole Holofcener's new film, a rom com Enough Said. Gandolfini starred in the hit television series The Sopranos and died suddenly of a heart attack earlier this year.

And in a new BBC Two comedy drama, David Mitchell and Robert Webb star as the British ambassador and his Mission deputy who are busy in Tazbekistan, trying to secure a 2 billion pound helicopter deal for the British government.

Producer: Sarah Johnson.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b03ddnfm)
Not Enough Hours in the Day

In this Archive on Four Claudia Hammond traces the history of the time use survey.She explores how social change has transformed the way people use their time, with more women working outside the home and the rise of supposedly labour-saving devices. These days men have an average of 5 hours and 48 minutes spare and women have 5 hours and 23 minutes, far more time than most people realise. Going back to the BBC archives and others such as those at Sussex University Claudia compares now with the past.

Eighty years ago the BBC conducted Britain's first ever survey of time use. Its aim was to discover whether anyone would have time to take up a brand new leisure activity - watching TV. In fact last year's time use survey in the US tells us that if people gain any unexpected spare time they spend it watching TV.

But we are unreliable chroniclers of our time: even in the last fortnight we remember only between nine and fifteen things we have done.

The programme will trace the history of the time-use surveys and why they are much harder to conduct than you might think. People hate filling them in. Lawyers have to account for every six minutes of their time in order to charge the right clients, so they're experts on time use, but they detest doing it because it reminds them how fast time goes.

Using the BBC written archives and first-hand accounts of time-use from the Mass Observation Archive at Sussex University Claudia follows the changes in the way time-use has been measured.

We'll also learn hear the idiosyncratic stories of the individuals who recorded their own time use. The Reverend Robert Shields has written what is thought to be the longest diary in the world. It's 30 times longer than Pepys' diary and it fills 91 cardboard boxes. Using six typewriters he noted down everything he did, describing everything from his dreams to his urination. He died in 2007 and won't allow most of it to be read until 2057, but a few pages are available. Then there's Gordon Bell who works for Microsoft and is chronicling every 20 seconds of his life with a photograph and employs people to scan every page he reads from books, so that there's a complete digital record of his life.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b03cdh4l)
Evelyn Waugh - Sword of Honour

Officers and Gentlemen, part one

by Evelyn Waugh
dramatised by Jeremy Front.

Sent home in disgrace following a misbegotten raid in Dakar, Guy is again looking for useful employment. But his next posting takes him somewhere totally unexpected.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b03ct9nz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b03969vt)
Grayson Perry: Playing to the Gallery: 2013

Democracy has bad taste

In the first of four lectures, recorded in front of an audience at Tate Modern in London in 2013, the artist Grayson Perry reflects on the idea of quality and examines who and what defines what we see and value as art. He argues that there is no empirical way to judge quality in art. Instead the validation of quality rests in the hands of a tightknit group of people at the heart of the art world including curators, dealers, collectors and critics who decide in the end what ends up in galleries and museums. Often the last to have a say are the public.
Perry examines the words and language that have developed around art critique, including what he sees as the growing tendency to over-intellectualise the response to art. He analyses the art market and quotes – with some irony – an insider who says that certain colours sell better than others. He queries whether familiarity makes us like certain artworks more, and encourages the public to learn to appreciate different forms of art through exploration and open-mindedness.
Perry was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003, and is known for his ceramic works, printmaking, drawing, sculpture and tapestry as well as for his cross-dressing and alter-ego, Claire.
The lecture series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.
Producer: Jim Frank


SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b03cf03b)
(5/12)
Why might an animated lion, an English concert hall, a satanic baby's mother and a hologram of Lord Olivier all converge in a Yorkshire seaside town?

The answer might be found in Round Britain Quiz, if the panellists can unravel the meaning behind the clues. This week it's the turn of Fred Housego and Marcel Berlins of the South of England to pit their wits against the Scots, Alan Taylor and Michael Alexander.

Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair to steer their deliberations in the right direction whenever required - and to award points for their efforts.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b03cdy32)
Canals, rivers, boats and lakes

This year National Poetry Day has taken the theme of water and Poetry Please has thrown off its clothes and jumped in with a selection of poems about lakes, rivers, boats and canals. All recorded live at the Birmingham literature festival in the new Library of Birmingham, amidst the many waterways of the venice of the Midlands.



SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b03d49ps)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b013q20y)
F Scott Fitzgerald - The Pat Hobby Stories

Pat Hobby's Secret

Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Adapted by Archie Scottney.

Alfred Molina reads F. Scott Fitzgerald's brilliant stories of late 1930s Hollywood, directed by Martin Jarvis. Since the advent of the talkies, hack screen writer Pat Hobby has fallen on hard times and hard liquor.

Now, desperately in need of a studio writing job, he pursues a drunken movie director and obtains some secret information about a crucial film script idea. Producer Banizon is prepared to buy the idea from Pat, because the knowledge could save his next movie. So can Pat Hobby, at last, hold the studio up to ransom before spilling the beans? Maybe. But death and desperation make things even more problematic than usual for Pat.

Producer/Director: Martin Jarvis
A Jarvis & Ayres Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03d49pv)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03d49px)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03d49pz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b03d49q1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b03ddz83)
The bells of St Mary's Church in Dunsford, Devon.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b03ddnfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b03d49q3)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b03ddz85)
Wine

Mark Tully uncorks a bottle with the Bishop of Arundel and Brighton to consider the symbolism of wine, the dangers of wine snobbery and the debt wine-lovers owe to medieval monks.

From Bacchus and ancient Rome to modern philosophers, and from Gerard Manley Hopkins to Roald Dahl, Mark draws together thoughts on the delights, pitfalls and significance of the fermented grape. He is invited to discover the joy of the unexpected in a bottle of wine, despite being a confirmed beer drinker, and is left to ponder the opinion of the Sufi poet Hafiz that, "The mystery of time can only be found in a glass of wine".

Presenter: Mark Tully
Readers: Grainne Keenan, Joe Kloska

Producer: Frank Stirling

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b03ddz87)
White Maize in Enfield

Charlotte Smith visits a farmer originally from Zimbabwe who's growing white maize and white sweetcorn in Hertfordshire. David Mwanaka came to Britain in the early 1990s and was surprised to discover that white maize was not grown or even known about. He missed eating it so much that he started to grow the crop himself, in a muddy field in Enfield. But this is not an easy task in a climate much colder than his native Africa.

Charlotte sees David and his family bringing in the last of this year's harvest by hand. He tells her that white maize should be picked, delivered and eaten all on the same day. Charlotte watches as the crop travels from field to plate, and tastes it for herself.

Presenter: Charlotte Smith
Producer: Beatrice Fenton.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b03d49q5)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b03d49q7)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b03ddz89)
Pay Day Loans; Christenings; Chief Rabbi

It's four years since the first Global Anglican Futures Conference met in Jerusalem. This grouping of traditionalist Anglicans grew out of disaffection with the direction the Anglican church was taking in the USA and UK, particularly in relation to the issue of homosexuality. The second conference is taking place next week in Nairobi, and William Crawley will be hearing about its current agenda from its chairman, Archbishop Eliud Wabukala. l

The new Chief Rabbi has come under fire from ultra orthodox Jews for his decision to atttend the educational Limmud conference in December. Does this decision mark a change in relationships between the Chief Rabbinate and ultra-orthodoxy?

A new survey on loneliness suggests that religious people may be more likely to be lonely than those without a faith. Trevor Barnes considers whether the church's focus on the family can alienate those who live alone.

And - to baptise, give thanks or simply to party? Guardians, godparents or "oddparents"? Prince George's parents will give him a traditional christening next week , but what do the rest of us do?

Producers: Rosie Dawson
Annabel Deas

Guests:
Archbishop Eliud Wabukala
George Conger
Justin Cohen
Geoffrey Alderman
Stephen Evans
Bishop John Holbrook
Isobel Russo
Sheikh Mohammad Yacoubi.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b03ddz8c)
Friends of the Elderly

Baroness Boothroyd presents the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Friends of the Elderly
Reg Charity:226064
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope Friends of the Elderly.
Give Online www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/appeal.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b03d49q9)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b03d49qc)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b03ddz8f)
A Glorious Kingdom

A pilgrimage among the saints of Hereford Cathedral led by the Dean with the cathedral choir. The Very Rev'd Michael Tavinor tells the stories of St.Ethelbert, the Anglo Saxon boy king, St Thomas Cantilupe, an academic bishop in the 14th century and Thomas Traherne, the inspirational poet from the 17th century. Each has inspired Christians by light of their faith and witness and continues to draw pilgrims to their shrines in the cathedral today.
Director of Music: Geraint Bowen
Producer: Clair Jaquiss.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b03cv484)
Machine Intelligence

Lisa Jardine compares the contributions of Ada Lovelace and Alan Turing a century later to computer science and contrasts their views on the potential of and limits to machine intelligence.

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bks90)
Jack Snipe

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Jack Snipe. The song of the Jack snipe has been likened to the sound of a distant horse cantering along a road. To hear it though, you need to visit Scandinavian bogs and mires where these small waders breed. When the ice seals their northern breeding areas jack snipes head south and west and many winter in the British Isles.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b03ddz8h)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b03ddz8k)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b03ddz8m)
Jeremy Hutchinson

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the former barrister and member of The House of Lords, Jeremy Hutchinson.

His life spans eleven decades of British history and he has spent much of it at the very centre of the action. Born during the First World War, he was brought up in the company of some of the greatest artists and writers of the day.

In World War II, he escaped his bombed-out ship clinging to a life raft with Lord Mountbatten.

At the Bar he played a central role in many of the seismic trials of the day - among them defending the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover against obscenity charges and Christine Keeler in the Profumo Affair trial. His brilliance in cross-examination inspired John Mortimer's creation of the character Rumpole of The Bailey.

He enjoyed two long marriages - his first to the actress Peggy Ashcroft, his second, for 40 years, to June Osborn, and he spent 23 years as an active member of The House of Lords.

He says, "I had the luck to live when the world of the Establishment was being dismantled. The whole of one's career was to do with what was going on in society."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 The Museum of Curiosity (b03cf03n)
Series 6

Ingrams, Bussmann, Stringer

Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Humphrey Ker welcome:

Private Eye founder and editor of The Oldie Richard Ingrams
Comedian and "world's worst foreign correspondent" Jane Bussmann
Former head of Sony and the CBS network Sir Howard Stringer

Up for discussion: libel, lucky scrapes, African warlords, dozy judges and the difficulties of depicting a famous chat-show host's body parts in a cartoon.

Producers: Richard Turner and Dan Schreiber

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2013.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b03ddz8p)
Cider: Britain's Most Misunderstood Drink?

Award winning drinks writer Pete Brown joins Sheila Dillon to explain why bottles of cider should be the drink of choice on the UK's dinner tables.

A cider revival has been building for a number of years, many credit the "over-ice" advertising campaigns of the last decade for raising mainstream interest. What's happened since that time has been fascinating to watch for producers and drinkers alike.

At the premium, craft end of the cider business more and more small scale producers have arrived on the scene. Wales alone, which all but lost its cider making culture, now has more than 40 new ciders being produced. Pete Brown, author of the recently published, World's Best Cider, has travelled across the globe to document the fact that this is a revival that's spread far beyond the United Kingdom.

As part of this world tour Sheila and Pete tell the story of the Tieton Cider Works, a new cider business in Washington State in North West America. The Tieton producers are experimenting with new techniques and flavours, including the use of hops and natural fruits. This might sound like a step too far for many traditionalists and in the programme Sheila and Pete give their verdict.

Meanwhile in high-street pubs, supermarkets and off-licences more big brands have moved into the cider market, including Carlsberg and Stella Artois, they along with more familiar names like Bulmers and Thatchers have launched a wide range of fruit ciders. It's this part of the market that is really booming, but is it really cider? Sheila looks at the often confusing world of the ingredients and liquids that are allowed to become part of a glass of cider.

Produced by Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b03d49qf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b03ddz8r)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 I Can't Stand Up for Falling Down (b038c0f4)
Every comedian, however famous or successful, has memories of stand-up shows which didn't go to plan.

Many comics will agree that 'dying' on stage is a rite of passage from which a lot can be learned - and swapping stories of on-stage humiliation can bind comedians together. Rich Morton has performed with most of Britain's best loved stand-ups down the years, and in this programme he gets some of them to confess their memories of the nightmare gigs they'd rather forget.

Realising too late that your material is completely inappropriate for the audience, finding the crowd was expecting someone else, having to deal with the heckler from hell - whatever the situation, most comics have been there, and have emerged from the experience with some hilarious stories to tell.

Jo Brand, Tim Clark, Jack Dee, Mike Gunn, Milton Jones, Lucy Porter and Ian Stone share their recollections.

Producer: Paul Bajoria

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03cv47k)
RHS Rosemoor

Peter Gibbs is at RHS Rosemoor where he is joined by panellists Bunny Guinness, Matthew Wilson and Bob Flowerdew. We take practical tips while out and about in the grounds and find out how putting some extra work in during autumn can save you time next season.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:

Q. North Devon is famous for the Victorian Fern craze. Can the team make some "ferntastic" plant suggestions for 2014?

A. There are so many different times of fern, but the Hart's Tongue is very popular. Polystichum provide a good ground cover and require hardly any maintenance. Shuttlecock ferns are fantastic, offering lime-green foliage that unfurls in the spring.

Q. Is it true that runners should be cut out of roses because they take strength from the plant?

A. Gardeners did used to be told to cut off the suckers, but nowadays they are less of a problem as the root stocks have been changed. If you plant them with the root stock well below the ground then you shouldn't have any problems with suckers. If one does appear, it is best to pull it off as you will get the root stock on top rather than the plant you have bought. However, if the foliage looks similar to the rest of the plant it could actually be a basal stem.

Q. What would the panel suggest planting in a small flowerbed that faces northeast and has dry, clay soil conditions?

A. The first thing to do is to improve the soil. Spend about a year applying organic matter in layers to the surface and allow it to break down. Plants such as Japanese Anemone, Bergenias and Polystichums may do well. Bulbs could also work as they are woodland plants and are used to dappled shade. Most of them will flower early when some of the moisture from the winter still remains.
Cannas such as canna iridiflora often don't need as much water as people think and can withstand a lot of shade. These could be framed by a pattern of topiary box for a structure throughout the winter.

Q. Why would butternut squash planted on compost heaps start to split?

A. This is caused by an irregular water supply. The heap must have been moist enough for them to start growing but then there will have been a dry period. This will have caused the skin to harden and when more water arrived they will have expanded and split.

Q. How can one grow Wild Foxgloves and Welsh Yellow Poppies from seed without scattering them naturally?

A. They could be developed as plug plants. If you sow them now they should come up over the winter months ready for planting in spring.

Q. Is it possible to graft a New Zealand Taylor's Gold Pear Tree from a seed?

A. You could have the Taylor's Gold grafted from bud wood, but a pip may not be successful. There are other varieties available in the UK that turn a yellow colour, such as Souvenir du Congris or Doyenne du Comice.

Q. Which plant does the panel think will become the new invasive weed of the twenty-first century?

A. It's not necessarily a case of how easily a plant spreads that is the problem but how hard it is to remove. It also depends on the area and climate. Many woodlands are being invaded by Lamium. It could also be oil seed rape because it is escaping from fields could cross breed. There are nearly twenty plants that have been marked as potential threats.

Q. What would be the best recipe for a free materials compost when growing tomatoes?

A. Each garden differs because ingredients such as manure will vary in nitrogen content. But if you were to add manure to a clay soil along with something such as wood ash you will get an excellent crop. You can add seaweed as a tonic and leaf mould will add structure. Alternatively, a bag of well rotted-down grass turf will also do the job.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b03df778)
Sunday Edition - Family Support

Fi Glover introduces conversations between grandparents, a grandchild, and a mother and daughter
in the Sunday Edition of Radio 4's series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. The strength of their relationships and their enduring support shines through all three.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b03f86lk)
Evelyn Waugh - Sword of Honour

Officers and Gentlemen, part 2

by Evelyn Waugh
dramatised by Jeremy Front.

Guy's unit have been posted to Egypt where they are surrounded more by rumour than action. But the chaos of war is approaching.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b03df77b)
Conn Iggulden; Autumn in literature; The best non-fiction

Conn Iggulden made publishing history by topping the fiction and non-fiction hardback bestseller lists simultaneously with the first in his Genghis Khan series, Wolf of the Plains and the nostalgic How To manual he co-authored with his brother, The Dangerous Book for Boys. Subsequent instalments of Khan's Mongolian adventures sold millions, as did his series set in Julius Caesar's Ancient Rome.

Conn explains why for his latest series, which starts with the novel Stormbird, he has turned his attention to the Wars of the Roses; a turbulent time in British history, when the Houses of Lancaster and York battled for control of the throne.

From a touch of spring fever to the 'full glow and luxuriance of summer', we are now in the season of 'mists and mellow fruitfulness' as Keats would have it. Continuing our series looking at the influence of the seasons on literature, authors Horatio Clare and Susie Boyt discuss the creative power of Autumn.

Caroline Sanderson is a fervent advocate of non-fiction, which she says combines "the allure of a marvellous story with the telling of real things we really should know." She explores the best of the current crop of non-fiction works, gives suggestions for book groups and explains why she feels that non-fiction can do anything fiction does and often does it better.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b03df77d)
From the Birmingham Literature Festival

Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry requests from an audience at the Birmingham Literature Festival. the selection is drawn from the top ten most requested poems in the history of the show and includes Adelstrop by Edward Thomas, How Do I Love Thee by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Not Waving but Drowning by Stevie Smith. The audience also tell Roger about what the requested poems mean to them.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b03cn72s)
The Syrian Connection

It is estimated more than 100 British people could be fighting with opposition forces in Syria. At least one is known to have been killed in action earlier this year. File on 4 investigates who these men are and why they have gone to fight.

While some are believed to have strong Syrian connections and are motivated by personal opposition to the government, there are concerns that others have travelled there to join hardline Islamist groups. Jenny Cuffe examines how fighters are recruited and the routes they use to join up with rebel forces. The programme hears from people who have travelled to Syria and asks what danger, if any, they may pose when they return to the UK.

Producer: Paul Grant.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b03ddnfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b03d49qh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b03d49qk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03d49qm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b03df77g)
Helen Fawkes chooses the best of BBC Radio this week

Do you fancy a pudding made of meat, a custom made car or a ticket to travel? Well, you can have all of them on Pick of the Week. We also explore life and death. There's a powerful drama which explores what happens to best friends when one of them becomes terminally ill. We have some of the finest BBC reporting from abroad. Prepare to be shocked. And to be amazed. We hear how a teenager took just five minutes to earn more than 100 thousand pounds for his granddad...

Programmes chosen this week:

It's Your Round - Radio 4 Extra
Betty in the Sky with a Suitcase - World Service
Selling British Luxury - Radio 4
The Reith lecture - Radio 4
Book of the Week - Historic Heston - ep 3 - Radio 4
Simon Mayo's Drivetime - Monday - Radio 2
Saturday Drama - Goodbye - Radio 4
Words and Music - After Life - Radio 3
Nuala McGovern's report from Malta - Monday news bulletins on World Service and Radio 4
Today - Monday - Radio 4
Newshour - Monday - World Service
Don't Log Off - Radio 4
Man who bet on his grandson's football career - Drive - Wednesday - Five Live

Helen's programme about her list for living "The Bucket List" was on the World Service this week
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01j9ghq.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b03df77j)
Auditions for the upcoming production of Robin Hood are underway. However turnout has underwhelmed Lynda somewhat, who then conspires with Robert as to how else they can approach this production. Robert might have had a brainwave, but is Ambridge really home to the kind of modern day Hepburn this production needs? Lynda has someone special in mind...

Meanwhile word of the fall out of Ray's disastrous time at Grey Gables has reached Ambridge, it appears Ray is now facing a divorce. The general consensus is not one of sympathy.

Tom is enjoying a busy period as ready meal orders have been upped but Helen, on the other hand, is still feeling rather woeful following her break up. Even when she joins Tom and Kirsty tidying the reeds she can't get away from mention of Rob, and decides she might be better just going home. Tom is confused by Helen's quick escape and turns to Kirsty in order to try and shed some light on the situation. A torn Kirsty suggests Tom would be better to ask Helen himself.


SUN 19:15 Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section (b01dtmb8)
Series 1

Kevin Eldon

Comedian Alex Horne is joined by his own 5 piece jazz band for music and comedy as they try interactive cookery.

With special guest: comedian Kevin Eldon.

Host .... Alex Horne
Trumpet/banjo .... Joe Auckland
Saxophone/clarinet ....Mark Brown
Double Bass/Bass .... Will Collier
Drums and Percussion .... Ben Reynolds
Piano/keyboard .... Joe Stilgoe
Guest performer ....Kevin Eldon

Producer: Julia McKenzie

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2012..


SUN 19:45 Stories From the South Downs (b03df88n)
Poor Lily Never-Quite-the-Ticket

A series of readings from new writers to radio evoking the South Downs. Recorded in front of an audience at the Church of St Pancras, Kingston (near Lewes) - a little village nestled at the bottom of the Downs.

Episode 2: Poor Lily Never-Quite-The-Ticket by T W Robinson
Jill dreads her drive through the South Downs to Bognor Regis to visit her somewhat spiky elderly Grandmother, but after the death of her mother she is the only relation she has left and makes the journey nonetheless.

When, one day, she finds a family photograph she is unaware of the story that is about to unfold. On seeing the picture her grandmother reluctantly unravels her past and, in the telling of the story, Jill comes to understand why her grandmother is like she is. Wounds are healed and a new journey begins. Suddenly the drive to the South Downs doesn't seem so bad.

Read by Celia Imrie.

Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b03cv47r)
Does the BBC still need to balance climate change science with sceptical views on the other side? After the World At One gave airtime to a climate change denier, Bob Carter, Feedback listeners questioned whether this was impartiality gone mad. We speak to Professor Steve Jones, who wrote a report for the BBC Trust on the impartiality and accuracy of the BBC's science coverage, about where to draw the line.

Nobel Prize winners, top-selling novelists, former presidents and Russell Brand. There's stiff competition for a place on Desert Island Discs. Regardless of the guest, the much-loved series rarely causes Feedback listeners to comment, but when naturalist and TV presenter Chris Packham was castaway with Kirsty Young last week, many wrote to say how moved they were by his honesty and refreshing musical choices. We hear Chris' view of the experience.

Also this week, have you heard CBeebies radio? No? Well neither had any of the parents surveyed in a recent BBC Trust review into children's services. Feedback reporter Catherine Carr visits four mums who have agreed to give it a go.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b03cv47p)
A Buddhist leader, a cookery writer, a Motown stylist, an Australian criminal and a whisky distiller

Aasmah Mir on Tibetan Buddhist Choje Akong Rinpoche who founded the first monastery in the West.

Also: cookery writer and teacher Marcella Hazan who introduced authentic Italian cooking to Americans in the 1970s and 1980s.

The woman who taught early Motown artists how to walk and what to wear - Maxine Powell

Mark 'Chopper' Read - the Australian criminal and author whose autobiography was turned in to a hit film in 2000

And the best-trained 'nose' in Britain - Charles Craig, successful distiller of Scotch whisky

Producer: Neil George.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b03d7v5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b03ddz8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b03cmnzs)
What Are Charities For?

Charities have been drawn into the world of outsourced service provision, with the state as their biggest customer and payment made on a results basis. It is a trend which is set to accelerate with government plans to hand over to charities much of the work currently done by the public sector.

But has the target driven world of providing such services as welfare to work support and rehabilitating offenders destroyed something of the traditional philanthropic nature of charities? Fran Abrams investigates.

Producer: Mukul Devichand.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b03df88s)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b03df88x)
A look at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b03ctc1p)
Paul Greengrass on Captain Phillips; David Gordon Green on Prince Avalanche; Robin Wright in The Congress

Director Paul Greengrass talks to Francine Stock about his latest ship-hijacking movie 'Captain Phillips' and how his family's own history on the high seas informed his film making. Actress Robin Wright talks about being immortalized by motion capture and how she felt seeing herself in cartoon form in 'The Congress'. David Gordon Green discusses his surreal comedy 'Prince Avalanche' - the story of two quirky men painting road markings in the middle of nowhere. And master of Japanese cinema Hirokazu Koreeda shares the secret to getting such brilliant performances out of children in his films.

Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b03ddz85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 21 OCTOBER 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b03d49rk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b03cngzw)
Section 136 and Mental Health Act; BBC World Service

Laurie Taylor explores The World Service, talking to Marie Gillespie about her study into the role of the diasporic broadcasters at the heart of the BBC's foreign service. Even though the Service has derived much of its creative and diplomatic significance from these men and women, they've been largely absent from academic work and public debate. Professor Gillespie's work brings to light the invisible writers and intellectuals who've been responsible for the BBC's credibility as an international broadcaster. She's joined by Ramy Aly, a Middle Eastern scholar who has studied the BBC Arabic Service, in particular. Also, who decides when someone is a danger to themselves or others? Professor Gillian Bendelow discusses her research into the use of section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b03ddz83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03d49rm)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03d49rp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03d49rr)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b03d49rt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03dfc7y)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b03dfc80)
Sales of organic food increased by 0.6% in the last 3 months, compared with the same time last year. It's a small rise, but welcome news for organic farmers, as it follows five years of decline during tough economic times.

The recession has hit the jobs market for horse vets too. The British Equine Veterinary Association estimates there was one post for every five graduates in 2012, and it's urging students to consider carefully before choosing to specialise.

And, on Apple Day, conservationists are warning that a third of Wales' surviving traditional orchards are under threat from neglect.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:56 Weather (b03d49rw)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bksqt)
Crested Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Crested Tit. Although crested tits are quite common in Continental Europe, they are confined in the UK to the central Highlands of Scotland. They're the only small British bird with a crest so identification shouldn't be a problem and their black eye-stripe contrasts well with their grey and white face.


MON 06:00 Today (b03dfc82)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b03dfc84)
Paul Collier on Immigration Controls

On Start the Week Stephanie Flanders asks the head of the British Red Cross, Sir Nick Young, whether the charity's principle of neutrality is still as relevant today as it was 150 years ago. The journalist Lindsey Hilsum has reported on the major international conflicts and atrocities in the last few decades and wrestles with the moral complexities of being neutral and impartial. Making judgements about who deserves to be helped and how many, concerns the economist Paul Collier, as he attempts to defuse the explosive subject of immigration. And the Conservative MP Kwasi Kwarteng proposes selling working visas to the highest bidder.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b03dfc86)
Jennifer Saunders - Bonkers: My Life in Laughs

Episode 1

Award winning comedian Jennifer Saunders reads her funny, honest and touching memoir.

Jennifer Saunders has been making us laugh for three decades and is best known for the long running sketch show French and Saunders which she co-wrote and starred in with her comedy partner, Dawn French. Later she created the worldwide hit series Absolutely Fabulous in which she also played champagne swilling, Edina Monsoon. She has won three BAFTAs (including the Bafta Fellowship), an International Emmy, a British Comedy Award, a Rose d'Or, two Writers' Guild Awards and a People's Choice Award.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03dff15)
Which party guests?; Images of motherhood; Rape awareness

Throwing a party - who gets the invites and who doesn't? Writer Liz Brewer and party organiser Suzette Field discuss how to avoid giving offence. Can campaigns intended to raise awareness about rape unintentionally lead to victims being blamed? Rhiannon Hedge, NUS Wales Women's Officer and Professor Joanna Bourke, historian at Birkbeck, University of London and author of Rape, a history from 1860 to the present, join Jane to discuss. Images that challenge sentimental views of motherhood. Photographers Elinor Carucci and Ana Casa Broda talk about why they've chosen to portray themselves and their children in this way. Post-cancer breast reconstruction - making the decision. Women share their stories in a series of newly launched films. 85 year-old author Lore Segal discusses her latest novel which tackles fears of dementia, the unravelling of minds, and the impact on families.

Presenter: Jane Garvey.
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dfh0p)
Jane Harris - Gillespie and I

Episode 6

Victorian gothic mystery by Jane Harris, set in Glasgow during the International Exhibition of 1888. The Gillespies' younger daughter, Rose, has been kidnapped. Meanwhile, her elder sister, Sibyl, is recovering after setting fire to herself with paraffin. Dramatised by Chris Dolan.

Gillespie And I (first published in 2011) is the second novel by Jane Harris. Her acclaimed debut novel, The Observations (first published in 2006) was also adapted for Radio 4 as a ten-part serial by dramatist Chris Dolan and producer/director Bruce Young in 2007.


MON 11:00 Meet the Jewslims (b03dfh0r)
In Britain there are so many kinds of mixed relationships, people of different colour, culture and religion getting hitched.... So why is it when Jewish and Muslim people get married there are such strong reactions? Both are Abrahamic faiths and have a lot in common in terms of food with Kosher and Halal, circumcision, wearing modest clothes and yet there is such a powerful taboo surrounding this mix.

Jewish/Muslim couples are often cut off from their families and communities. Zubeida Malik tells the story of three couples who crossed this boundary between the personal and the political.

Maryiam has a word to describe her children: "Jewslims." They are, she says, neither Muslims nor Jews. Those like Mariyam in a Jewish/ Muslim relationship in contemporary Britain are in a growing minority, living under a veil of discretion.

Zubeida starts by meeting Mariyam and her family. She is Shia Muslim. Her husband is Jewish. Both practice their religions. When the pair met 33 years ago, Mariyam's uncles wanted to lock her up and send her back to Tanzania. She was saved by her broad-minded mother.
Lenny is the son of a Holocaust survivor. He and his Iranian wife, Sheherazade, are passionately in love but there was so much tension over Middle East politics that Sheherazade no longer spends sabbath eve with Lenny's parents. The couple cannot help arguing about Israel - and tell Zubeida it is something they enjoy doing.

Omar and Rachel, who are in their late 20s, met at university. He is a south east Asian Muslim and she is Israeli Jewish. Just three months after meeting they knew they were going to get married and that there were certain issues that needed to be resolved before they finally tied the knot. So over the next couple of years they decided which religion their children would be bought up in, where they stood on the politics of the Middle East and most importantly, they wanted to prepare their families.

Producer: Lucy Ash.


MON 11:30 Dilemma (b017lfd5)
Series 1

Episode 3

Sue Perkins puts Shappi Khorsandi, Simon Munnery, Fi Glover and Hugo Rifkind through the moral and ethical wringer in the show where there are no "right" answers - but some deeply damning ones...

Can the panel manage to justify the murder of a pet - and the theft of a girlfriend?

Devised by Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ed Morrish.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2011.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b03dfh0t)
Automatic insurance renewals; The price of a parcel

Automatic insurance renewals are being looked at by the Financial Conduct Authority as part of a wide ranging review into the insurance sector. We'll put the comments of You & Yours' listeners who want to see the system overhauled to the Association of British Insurers. Programme favourite and all-round travel guru Simon Calder has tips on how to book the cheapest hotel rooms. Plus, we'll find out why sending a Royal Mail parcel to the next village can cost more than to Australia.


MON 12:57 Weather (b03d49s2)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b03dfh0w)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Terror Through Time (b03dfh0y)
Hijack!

On the 6th of September 1970 the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine launched one of the most spectacular acts of terror ever attempted. Three aircraft were to be hijacked on the same day and taken to Dawson's Field, an ex-RAF airfield in Jordan. The intention was two-fold; to force the release of Palestinian militants being held in prison in Germany, Switzerland and Israel and to raise the profile of the Palestinian demands for statehood.

One of the hijackers was a young woman, Leila Khaled. She was charged with the toughest job, taking over an El Al aircraft flying from Amsterdam to New York. The attempt went badly wrong. Shlomo Vider, an El Al steward was seriously injured, hi-jacker, Patrick Argeullo was shot dead by an Israeli security guard and Khaled was forced to the floor as the pilot landed at Heathrow Airport.

Fergal Keane talks to Khaled about the events of that day and the sudden British involvement in Palestinian affairs. PFLP sympathisers seized a British Airways jet to force Khaled's release from Ealing police station, leaving the Heath government with little apparent choice but to negotiate with hijackers.

Fergal is joined by Peter Snow who was an ITN journalist at the time, Keith Goulbourn, son of the hijacked British pilot and government official, Baron Wilson of Dinton to consider an affair that turned Khaled into an icon of Palestinian resistance and set some very uncomfortable precedents.

Producer: Polly Weston.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b03df77j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b03dfl00)
Series 1

Episode 1

A new long-running drama series from G F Newman based on the characters from the multi-award winning writer's best-selling crime novel. Spanning six decades, it plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

Joey Oldman is a Russian Jew, who arrived in Britain before the war with only two words of English and married Cathy Braden. They had a son, Brian, and a daughter, Rose. Cathy's widowed mother, Gracie, takes up with a famous and glamorous gangster, Billy Hill, while her brother Jack wants to become World Light Heavyweight Boxing Champion. Both the army and the Kray twins interfere with this ambition. Jack is left feeling bitter and angry and plunges headlong into crime, running protection rackets and claiming a piece of other criminals' sometimes infamous pies. His actions become ever more savage and bizarre and harder to reconcile.

Haunted by the murder of his grandfather which he witnessed when he was six, Brian Oldman holds a terrible secret that he must keep for fear of his life as he falls deeper under his mother's spell. But there is a more disturbing secret he has yet to discover - one that will threaten his very existence. All the while he becomes a willing participant in the criminal underworld in the 1950s, where gangs such as the Krays and the Richardson are emerging to challenge the old guard in savage battles for territory.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b03dfl02)
(6/12)
The panellists from Wales and Northern Ireland join Tom Sutcliffe for the latest cryptic contest in the 2013 season of the quiz. They need to draw on all their powers of recall and obscure knowledge in tackling Tom's questions, such as:

'Why would Umberto Eco be interested in a Polish-born revolutionary, a time-travelling Tyler, Mrs Gorbachev and Laurie's Miss Burdock?'

Writer Roisin McAuley and historian Brian Feeney play for Northern Ireland, while the Welsh team consists of defending Round Britain Quiz champions Myfanwy Alexander and David Edwards.

As always, Tom will be picking the best of the questions submitted to the programme by listeners in recent months, to put to the teams.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b03ddz8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Auditioning for Auntie (b03dfl04)
Pete Paphides delves into the BBC auditions process for aspiring bands in the 1950s and 60s such as The Rolling Stones, Elton John, The Who and Pink Floyd.

Throughout this era, any artist hoping to achieve wider national recognition would try and secure national radio exposure. To do this, they would have to meet the exacting standards of a small but powerful board of assessors within the BBC. Producers and sound engineers of the time remember the sessions and we hear musicians recalling their audition process - including Peter Hammill of Van der Graaf Generator, Judy Dyble of Fairport Convention and Alvin Stardust.

The audition panels' notes are carefully kept to this day in the BBC archive. Nick Drake's notes, for example, read as follows: "Suitable to broadcast, but would probably only be in specialist late night programmes. Type of artist who would appear on 'John Peel' record label – underground, folky. YES."

Among the artists the BBC wasn't initially convinced about were the Rolling Stones, while the errant behaviour of other groups recording BBC sessions – Pink Floyd, for example – threatened their relationship with the Corporation.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 2013.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b03dfl06)
Series 4

Wander

Aleks Krotoski explores whether technology has impaired our ability to wander. Now that off-grid is on-grid and we can send emails from mountaintops, have we sacrificed the pleasure of travelling to discover new places and ourselves?


MON 17:00 PM (b03dfl08)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03d49s4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b03dfl0b)
Series 6

Herring, Lippincott, Clemente

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Humphrey Ker welcome the art historian and former director of the Greenwich Observatory Dr Kristin Lippincott; comedian, chat show host and blogger Richard Herring and animal locomotion expert Dr Christofer Clemente. Topics for illumination include Time, inspiration, writer's block, sticky ants' feet, Russia's Greatest Love Machine lizards doing wheelies and the most controversial moustache in history.

The show was researched by James Harkin, Molly Oldfield and Stevyn Colgan of QI.

The producers were Richard Turner and Dan Schreiber.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b03dfpjm)
The notorious Anthea is causing quite a stir amongst some of the Ambridge locals and has even managed to subdue Jazzer! Maurice is incredibly impressed with her forthright attitude towards Tom and his 'overpriced convenience food'. Although he seems keen, Maurice mentions to Jazzer that she is in fact married. A minor detail, as Jazzer points out, that would not stop some people in Ambridge!

Eddie reveals to Ruth that he still has concerns about Joe who even with his cast removed seems to be a shadow of his former self. Eddie's worried that Joe might not even make it to the micro-brewery visit, which poor Jim is really looking forward to. To top it off, Joe still feels they should have accepted the £1500 compensation offer from Grey Gables.

Maurice is shocked when Lynda approaches him for the eponymous leading role in the Robin Hood production. He is quick to reject Lynda's big plans, having no inclination at all to make his debut now. His reluctance is a real blow to Lynda who seeks advice from Jazzer on the situation. When they talk of the casting of Maid Marian, Jazzer thinks he might have sussed Maurice's weak spot.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b03dfpjp)
Susan Hill; Pop art design; GF Newman; Fake movie trails

With Mark Lawson.

Writer Susan Hill is now probably best known for her ghost story The Woman in Black, which became a long-running play and a major film. Her new novel Black Sheep is set in a mining village, and like many of her books, it's full of emotional claustrophobia, isolated characters and set at an unspecified time in the 20th century. She reflects on her long career and her approach to fiction.

The Corrupted, a major new Radio 4 drama series, plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime, as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment. Mark talks to its creator G F Newman, the award-winning writer of Judge John Deed and Law And Order.

Pop Art Design is the first major exhibition in this country to examine the relationship between artists such as Andy Warhol, Richard Hamilton and Roy Lichtenstein and the world of commercial design - from posters to album sleeves to architecture. Critic William Feaver delivers his verdict.

Producer Dymphna Flynn.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dfh0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Invention of... (b03dfpjr)
Italy

Episode 2

Misha Glenny presents a compelling new history of Italy from 1494 to the end of the First World War.

In October 1860, on a misty road north of Naples, Giuseppe Garibaldi met the future king of Italy and handed over control of the south. This brief moment in the story of the new Italian state has been often mythologised, but it is not as straightforward as it seems. Violence, civil war, the birth of the mafia - these elements in the story are often overlooked.

Beginning with Napoleon's call to the peoples of Italy in 1796, Misha Glenny picks his way through Italian unification with clarity and care. Rome only became part of this new European country under a century and a half ago - and even then the Pope ordered his followers neither to stand in nor vote in elections for the new state. Small wonder some claim that Italy is not really unified yet.

With expert contributions from Christopher Duggan, Marco Meriggi, Leoluca Orlando, Lucy Riall, Lucy Hughes-Hallet, Filippo de Vivo, David Gilmour, Beppe Severgnini, Simon Winder, Joze Serbec and David Laven.

The presenter is Misha Glenny, who previously collaborated with producer Miles Warde on the Invention of Germany and the Invention of Spain.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b03dfpjt)
Quantitative Easing: Miracle Cure or Dangerous Addiction?

Quantitative Easing was the drug prescribed by economists to keep Western economies functioning in a moment of crisis. Sunday Telegraph economic commentator Liam Halligan argues that the policy of money creation has now become a dangerous addiction.

Interviewees include:

Dr Adam Posen, President of the Petersen Institute for International Economics in Washington DC
Stephen King, Chief Economist of HSBC
Jim Rickards, author of Currency Wars
Professor Richard Werner, Chair in International Banking at Southampton University
Dan Conaghan, author of The Bank: Inside the Bank of England
Dr Philippa Malmgren, former financial markets advisor to the US President

Producer: Phil Kemp.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b03cmt4t)
Soil Science

Shared Planet explores the link between a growing human population and wildlife and there is no other part of the natural world that is under as much pressure as the earth's soils. We rely on them to grow healthy crops, which they can only do if they support an appropriate community of bacterial, fungal and invertebrate life. Wildlife too depends on this diverse life that thrives in the soil, everything from birds to plants to insects. The earth worm is the surprising champion of soils and an animal that looks vulnerable in the face of human population pressure.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b03dfc84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b03d49s6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b03dfwvx)
New nuclear plant - was this the best deal?
Latest from Grangemouth dispute;
National Theatre celebrates 50th birthday;
Protests in Brazil at offshore oil auction.
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03dfwvz)
The Goldfinch

Tiny Yellow Bird, Faint beneath a Veil of Dust

Donna Tartt shot to fame with her iconic first novel, The Secret History, an instant bestseller. This was followed by The Little Friend in 2002. Now, eleven years later, her eagerly awaited, much anticipated third novel, The Goldfinch, comes to Book at Bedtime, beginning on the eve of world wide publication.

At the heart of the novel lies a masterwork by the Dutch painter Carel Fabritius, a picture of a small chained bird, The Goldfinch. This tiny painting becomes the only certainty for thirteen year old Theo Decker when his secure world with his devoted mother is shattered and life becomes fallible and frightening. From the vagaries of existence with his foolish, reckless father, and a passionate friendship with the chaotic, warm-hearted, wild Boris, to the drawing rooms of the Upper East Side and a dusty downtown antique shop, Theo is left to find his own way through his teenage years and into adulthood. The painting is his talisman, his touchstone, until it draws him into a murky criminal underworld of drugs, art theft and fatal dealings.

Tartt follows Theo through grief, teenage delinquency, passionate friendship and obsessive love, in a story of enthralling suspense, peopled with unforgettable characters. As the drama reaches its gripping conclusion, Theo may or may not find out how to survive.
In today's opening episode: 'Tiny yellow bird, faint beneath a veil of dust'. Theo finds a treasure amid the rubble.
Donna Tartt was born in Greenwood, Mississippi, and is a graduate of Bennington College. She is the author of the novels The Secret History, The Little Friend, and The Goldfinch.

The reader is Jamie Parker. His credits include The History Boys, Valkyrie and Parade's End. The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


MON 23:00 Verse Illustrated (b013q3ny)
Episode 4

In the last in the series of illustrated poems, spoken word artists Inua Ellams and Ross Sutherland tell two very different stories.

'The Ballad of Abdul Hafiz' written and performed by Inua Ellams
An encounter on a bus with a drunk Algerian man, who has a story to tell: "I looked at him intently, at the almost black neckline at dried saliva on his lips, I wished he'd tell me why."

'Parade' written and performed by Ross Sutherland
A hypnotic carnival of the subconscious: "How unreal these buildings now seem. Their facades thin, like sets of Westerns. The wind faked with pulleys, the windows painted on. With LEDs mimicking the reflection of the sun."

Actors... Peter Polycarpou and Alex Tregear.

Directed by James Robinson


MON 23:15 Warhorses of Letters (b01pcqkr)
Series 2

Episode 4

It's the eve of Waterloo and our two heroes face the prospect of seeing each other face to face, if only it was not across a battlefield. And is Marengo's life at risk from another more immediate enemy?

The continuing romantic correspondence between two of history's most important horses: Napoleon's mount Marengo and the Duke of Wellington's own Copenhagen.

Marengo ..... Stephen Fry
Copenhagen ..... Daniel Rigby
Narrator ..... Tamsin Greig

Written by Robbie Hudson and Marie Phillips.

Producer: Gareth Edwards.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2012.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03dfww1)
The Energy Secretary insists to MPs that a deal to build a new nuclear reactor will be good for taxpayers and consumers.
Ed Davey said the move was "essential to keep the lights on" and would help lower energy bills. Labour backs the development, but critics claim consumers will end up paying higher bills.
MPs take evidence on how to make railway level crossings safer.
Peers back changes that will make it easier for the Health Secretary to close hospital services.
And MPs debate the future of the BBC.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 22 OCTOBER 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b03d49t9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b03dfc86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03d49tc)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03d49tf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03d49th)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b03d49tk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03dsk46)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b03dsk48)
The organic dairy industry is losing farmers and isn't expecting any new ones to join their books over the next year. Caz Graham meets Kevin Beaty who has a herd of 250 Jersey cows just south of Carlisle. After trying to make a go of organic milk, he gave up and went back to conventional production. Anna Hill speaks to Richard Hampton, chief operating officer at the Organic Milk Suppliers Cooperative, to find out why organic milk production is failing on some farms.
The Ulster Farmers Union has conducted a survey of meat on supermarket shelves and says some supermarkets are not sourcing enough of their lamb and beef from Northern Ireland.

Tesco has revealed it generated almost 30,000 tonnes of food waste in the first six months of 2013. It is now dropping some food promotions after finding that half its bread and nearly 70% of bagged salad is binned. Farming Today wanted to know what the impact might be on growers if we only bought what we really needed, instead of buy one get one free deals. Anna Hill meets Stuart Piccaver who produces salads for most supermarkets to get his side of the story.

And the Ulster Farmers Union has conducted a survey of meat on supermarket shelves and says some supermarkets are not sourcing enough of their lamb and beef from Northern Ireland.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced in Bristol by Anna Jones.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkt07)
Yellow-Browed Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Yellow-Browed Warbler. The delicate yellow-browed warbler breeds in Siberia and winters in south-east Asia. Several hundred birds, sometimes many more, turn up each autumn anywhere between the Isles of Scilly and Shetland.


TUE 06:00 Today (b03dsk4b)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b03dsk4d)
Grayson Perry: Playing to the Gallery: 2013

Beating the Bounds

The award-winning artist Grayson Perry asks whether it is really true that anything can be art. We live in an age when many contemporary artists follow the example of Marcel Duchamp, who famously declared that a urinal was a work of art. It sometimes seems that anything qualifies, from a pile of sweets on a gallery floor to an Oscar-winning actress asleep in a box. How does the ordinary art lover decide?
In a lecture delivered amidst the Victorian splendour of St. George's Hall in Liverpool, Perry analyses with characteristic wit the common tests - from commercial worth to public popularity to aesthetic value. He admits the inadequacies of such yardsticks, especially when applied to much conceptual and performance art. And he concludes that in his opinion, the quality most valued in the art world is seriousness.
Producer: Jim Frank


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b03dsk4g)
Jennifer Saunders - Bonkers: My Life in Laughs

Episode 2

In Bonkers: A Life in Laughs award winning comedian, Jennifer Saunders, recollects a life filled with laughter and the occasional bit of heartache, but very little misery. Today, it is 1981 and life on the comedy circuit begins.

Jennifer Saunders has been making us laugh for three decades and is best known for the long running sketch show French and Saunders which she co-wrote and starred in with her comedy partner, Dawn French. Later she created the worldwide hit series Absolutely Fabulous in which she also played champagne swilling, Edina Monsoon. She has won three BAFTAs (including the Bafta Fellowship), an International Emmy, a British Comedy Award, a Rose d'Or, two Writers' Guild Awards and a People's Choice Award.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03dsk4j)
Alexandra Roach; Dr Clare Gerada; Obesity; 'Pretty or Ugly' videos

Dr Clare Gerada, a Woman's Hour Powerlister, joins Jane Garvey to talk about her role as Chair of the Council of the Royal College of GPs. She'll also be discussing the advice that GPs give to people who are obese. NICE guidelines recommend that Doctors should be respectful. Alexandra Roach is in the film One Chance where she plays the wife of Paul Potts, the Britain's Got Talent winner. Janet Love, a South African Human Rights Commissioner joins Jane to talk about her work to promote equality for women. And the artist Louise Orwin created a number of online personalities in order to research 'Pretty or Ugly' videos in which young girls post pictures of themselves for other viewers to rate. She talks to Jane about what she discovered.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dsk4l)
Jane Harris - Gillespie and I

Episode 7

Victorian gothic mystery by Jane Harris. The police arrest a suspect for the kidnap of Rose Gillespie. Starring Phyllis Logan, Liam Brennan and Kate Dickie. Dramatised by Chris Dolan.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b03dsk4n)
Fragility and Niche

Some wildlife is fragile and will die out if it loses particular conditions. Some butterflies need a particular rare plant, or some birds certain trees for example. This week's field report comes from the heart of England where the needs of the Duke of Burgundy butterfly are revealed, our most endangered butterfly. In an increasingly crowded world is it possible to preserve fragile wildlife with so much demand on space. Monty Don explores whether it is possible for fragile wildlife to thrive in a world where the use of land changes from one generation to another, often linked to demand from an increasing global population.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


TUE 11:30 Who Sold the Soul? (b03dsk4q)
Empire State of Mind

Jazz, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Rock 'n' Roll, Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop; there's no question African American musical creativity has fuelled the modern music industry. But faced with racism and cultural theft for decades, African-American musicians, DJs, businessmen and women have struggled to have any real control or ownership in the business. In this three part series financial educator, broadcaster and music obsessive Alvin Hall examines the political economy of African American music, from jazz to Jay Z.

In this final part, Alvin looks at the 1980s and beyond. Beginning with the black pop of Michael Jackson, Prince and Whitney Houston the series concludes with the rise of hip-hop, today American's most dominant form of popular music. Many people suggest that rap's rise to the top demonstrates African Americans now exert real power in the music industry. But is that really the case?
Contributors include writer Kevin Powell, Jay Z's former business partner Damon Dash and rapper and activist KRS-One.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b03dsk4s)
Call You and Yours: Trust in the Police

How much faith do you have in the police?

Have recent controversies affected your view of the their ability to tackle crime?
What has your experience been of dealing with the police locally?
If you have worked for the police - how do you think you're seen by the public?

Email youandyours@bbc.co.uk or tweet #youandyours.

On Wednesday the chief constables of three forces will appear before MPs to explain their handling of "Plebgate" - when officers claimed they'd been called 'plebs' by the former chief-whip Andrew Mitchell. It comes after apologies for the police handling of Hillsborough and the death of Ian Tomlinson.

The policing minister said a recent poll suggesting that two-thirds of the public still have confidence in the police is "quite surprising" given various reports of misconduct.

Sir Hugh Orde president of the Association of Chief Police Officers says confidence in the police is remarkably stable.

So do you still trust the police?

03700 100 444 is the number to call, email youandyours@bbc.co.uk or text us on 84844

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Joe Kent.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b03d49tm)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b03dsk4v)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Terror Through Time (b03dsk4x)
Carlos: International Terrorist

To his friends Carlos the Jackal was a charming bon viveur, a lover of fine wine and glamorous women. To western intelligence agencies in the 1970s, he was Public Enemy Number One, an unpredictable assassin, as likely to kill for money as for the Palestinian cause he claimed to support.

Fergal Keane follows the trail of Carlos from his Marxist up-bringing in Venezuela to university in Moscow and guerrilla training camps before his entry onto the international scene with a series of spectacular attacks against perceived enemies of the Palestinians.

Fergal talks to the French judge who eventually tracked him down and convicted him and to Bassam Abu Sharif, the Palestinian spokesman who first spotted his capacity to grab the imagination of the media.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b03dfpjm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b03dvzwx)
Series 1

Episode 2

A new long-running drama series from G F Newman based on the characters from the multi-award winning writer's best-selling crime novel. Spanning six decades, it plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

Joey Oldman is a Russian Jew, who arrived in Britain before the war with only two words of English and married Cathy Braden. They had a son, Brian, and a daughter, Rose. Cathy's widowed mother, Gracie, takes up with a famous and glamorous gangster, Billy Hill, while her brother Jack wants to become World Light Heavyweight Boxing Champion. Both the army and the Kray twins interfere with this ambition. Jack is left feeling bitter and angry and plunges headlong into crime, running protection rackets and claiming a piece of other criminals' sometimes infamous pies. His actions become ever more savage and bizarre and harder to reconcile.

Haunted by the murder of his grandfather which he witnessed when he was six, Brian Oldman holds a terrible secret that he must keep for fear of his life as he falls deeper under his mother's spell. But there is a more disturbing secret he has yet to discover - one that will threaten his very existence. All the while he becomes a willing participant in the criminal underworld in the 1950s, where gangs such as the Krays and the Richardson are emerging to challenge the old guard in savage battles for territory.

With Ross Kemp as Narrator.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b03dsk4z)
Series 4

The Trip

Josie Long goes on a series of unusual journeys as she presents a sequence of mini documentaries about adventurous trips.

From searching for teenage misadventure through to finding yourself, we travel from the British seaside to the freezing landscape of Minnesota altering minds and bodies along the way.

Frank Education
Feat. Philip Bill Bruckner
Prod. Hana Walker-Brown

St Audries
Feat. Margaret Pepper
Prod. Olivia Humphreys

My Father Takes a Vacation
Prod. Martin Johnson

Cold in Minnesota
Originally broadcast on the Unfictional Podcast
Prod. Bob Carlson

Series producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b03dsk51)
Our Neighbours Are Elephants!

Urban sprawl is now impacting on the habitats of wildlife in countries around the world, so how can wildlife and city dwellers live together?

Reports from cities around the world ask what should be done if your new next door neighbours turn out to be wild animals: Bob Walker reports from Malaysia on the Management and Ecology of Malaysian Elephants project that Nottingham University are working on to find out what is being done there to maintain a harmonius balance between humans and huge beasts that can cause a lot of damage.

Julian Rush discovers if animals and humans can live harmoniously as cities spread across their habitats.

Presenter: Julian Rush
Producer: Steve Peacock.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b03dsk53)
Chemical Weapons and the Law

In this week's programme Law in Action charts the history of laws forbidding the use of chemical weapons, and reveals how they first emerged in India over 2000 years ago. Today, with Syria now signing up to the chemical weapons convention, could we be on the brink of abolishing chemical weapons for good?

Joshua Rozenberg interviews Karim Hammoud from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is responsble for enforcing the treaty, and asks why we need special laws for chemical weapons - what distinguishes them other deadly weapons?

Also: The programme reflects on the first public lecture given by the new Lord Chief Justice, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, presented at Gray's Inn in London. Titled 'Justice in One Place or Several?', Lord Thomas reveals his proposal to enhance the role of courts outside of London.

Joshua also debates the merits of allowing TV cameras into the Court of Appeal with Baroness Helena Kennedy QC - will it help open up an understanding of the law to the public?

Contributors:

Jean Pascal Zanders, chemical weapons expert and consultant, founder of the-trench.org

Karim Hammoud, Senior Legal Officer, Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

Baroness Helena Kennedy QC.

British veterans of World War I, archive courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London.

Producer: Mike Wendling
Series Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith
Editor: Richard Knight.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b03dsk55)
Brendan O'Neill and Gabriel Gbadamosi

Harriett Gilbert talks to Brendan O'Neill and Gabriel Gbadamosi about their favourite books, from Graham Greene to a wild new twist on the Sherlock Holmes story to a Norwegian classic...

Brendan O'Neill, editor of the online magazine Spiked, chooses a late and rather different Graham Greene - Monsignor Quixote.

Writer Gabriel Gbadamosi recommends a little-known but compelling Norwegian classic: The Ice Palace by Tarjei Vesaas.

And presenter Harriett Gilbert's choice offers a new perspective on Sherlock Holmes. It's The Last Sherlock Holmes Story by Michael Dibdin, author of the Aurelio Zen detective series.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b03dsk57)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03d49tq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 It's Your Round (b018wb95)
Series 2

Episode 2

Angus Deayton presides over another episode of the show conceived not for the panellists but by them. This time, Sandi Toksvig, Clive Anderson, Humphrey Ker and Milton Jones have each brought their own rounds for them all to play.

The rounds this episode include:

Clive Anderson's "I Fought The Law", a selection of questions based around the idiosyncrasies of British Law.

Sandi Toksvig's "Lost for Words", in which panellists must guess the meaning of various foreign words that have no direct translation in English.

Humphrey Ker's "Pet, Lunch or Hat", a variation on "Snog, Marry, Avoid".

And Milton Jones' "Joke Jeopardy" in which panellists are given punchlines to cracker jokes and the panellists must guess the set-ups.

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b03dsk59)
It's a nerve wracking day for Mike who is waiting on the test results following the death of two calves. But when Alistair calls by with good news - that BVD is not in the herd - Mike feels he can breathe easy.

Having received Joe's rejection of their £1500 compensation offer, Caroline and Oliver are unsure how to proceed. On the one hand, an increased offer could put an end to whole thing. On the other, a renewed offer could be seen as a sign of weakness and cause Joe's solicitor's to push for more.
Caroline is further set back when she finds out Kathy has been offered a job at a Reedles hotel. She will be leaving the health club, taking all of her creativity and expertise with her.

Helen is feeling overwhelmed at a time when she really just wants to be left alone. Pat is trying her hardest to cheer her up but is puzzled by Helen's prevailing mood. Tony and Pat later discuss what could be the cause. Pat suspects Helen may have had a boyfriend she didn't tell them about..


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b03dsk5c)
From Derry-Londonderry, UK City of Culture 2013

Mark Lawson presents a special programme from Derry~Londonderry, UK City of Culture 2013.

This year's Turner Prize for contemporary art is on show in Derry~Londonderry and features artists Tino Sehgal, Laure Prouvost, David Shrigley and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. David Shrigley and Laure Prouvost discuss their work and critic Philip Hensher delivers his verdict on the show.

Derry-based writer Jennifer Johnston was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for her novel Shadows on Our Skin. Her Three Monologues, in response to The Troubles, are being performed as part of the City of Culture celebrations and her new novel A Sixpenny Song is published this month. She discusses the impact of the 2013 celebrations on the atmosphere in the city.

Gerald Barry's comic opera The Importance of Being Earnest is being performed in Derry this week and then in Belfast, Cork and Dublin later in the year. He explains how he went about filleting Oscar Wilde's text and why Lady Bracknell was always going to be cast as a basso profondo.

The inaugural City of Derry International Choral Festival is being hosted by local chamber choir Codetta. The festival's artistic director Dónal Doherty and soprano Laura Sheerin discuss how it feels to be taking part.

Producer Ellie Bury.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dsk4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b03dslf1)
What Price Social Housing?

Ministers have set a target of 170,000 new affordable homes in the next two years. But the Housing Associations which must take a major part in delivering them are under increasing financial strain.
With their incomes squeezed by benefit reform and grant cuts, many are taking a more commercial approach. But there's concern some are taking too many financial risks.
And MPs have voiced fears that the regulator charged with monitoring the associations' viability is not up to the job.
Fran Abrams investigates.

Reporter: Fran Abrams
Producer: Nicola Dowling.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b03dslf3)
Touch Art Fair, Apple iOS7, rehabilitation workshop

How relevant is art to a blind person? Tom Walker meets some of the visually-impaired exhibitors and visitors at Touch Art Fair 2013, an accessible art exhibition in London.

Peter White talks to Robin Spinks from the RNIB about the ongoing issues with Apple's iOS7 for visually-impaired people.

And Tony Shearman goes to Portsmouth and attends a 2 day rehabiliation workshop for newly blind people.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b03dslf5)
Diabetes Type II; Obesity; Feedback on Anorexia and Shingles; Lyme Disease

With news that actor Tom Hanks has been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, how far in advance can doctors predict the onset of the condition and what can be done to delay it.

And is obesity a disease? It has been classified as such in America, so what are the implications and should the UK follow suit?

Plus the first ever conference on Lyme Disease - the tick borne infection that can cause serious complications.


TUE 21:30 The Human Zoo (b036kbl6)
Series 2

Episode 2

None of us are really bad at heart are we? We may do the odd bad thing, but it's always for a good reason. We may have jumped a red light, but we needed to pick our children up from school - we're so very different from these vile public figures who end up mired in scandal, committing heinous crimes for their own nefarious ends, abusing the trust we place in them.

Look closely though, and you'll see that most public scandals start with a minor, apparently inconsequential misdeed - not unlike jumping that red light. One leads to another and another, then the cover ups begin and before they know it they are a figure of public hate embroiled in a very public scandal.

In this week's programme Michael Blastland, Professor Nick Chater and Timandra Harkness explore how our very human foibles can lead us into scandal. We hear from a disgraced, now reformed, public figure, and show through a devious experiment how we are all prone to that little bit of dishonesty that could lead us into deeper waters.

The Human Zoo, where we see public decisions viewed through private thoughts, is presented by Michael Blastland, with the trusted guidance of Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School.

Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b03d49ts)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b03dslf7)
Sir John Major calls for windfall tax on utility companies;
Germans doing business in Poland;
Syria talks in London;
With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03dslf9)
The Goldfinch

Ring the Green Bell

Donna Tartt shot to fame with her iconic first novel, The Secret History, an instant bestseller. This was followed by The Little Friend in 2002. Now, eleven years later, her eagerly awaited, much anticipated third novel, The Goldfinch, comes to Book at Bedtime, beginning on the eve of world wide publication.
At the heart of the novel lies a masterwork by the Dutch painter Carel Fabritius, a picture of a small chained bird, The Goldfinch. This tiny painting becomes the only certainty for thirteen year old Theo Decker when his secure world with his devoted mother is shattered and life becomes fallible and frightening. From the chaos of existence with his foolish, reckless father, and a passionate friendship with the crazy, warm-hearted, wild Boris, to the drawing rooms of the Upper East Side and a dusty downtown antique shop, Theo is left to find his own way through his teenage years and into adulthood. The painting is his talisman, his touchstone, until it draws him into a murky criminal underworld of drugs, art theft and fatal dealings.
Tartt follows Theo through grief, teenage delinquency, passionate friendship and obsessive love, in a story of enthralling suspense, peopled with unforgettable characters. As the drama reaches its gripping conclusion, Theo may or may not find out how to survive.

In today's episode: 'Hobart and Blackwell. Ring the Green Bell' Having survived the Museum bombing, Theo must make a new life - and trace the owner of the antique ring.

Donna Tartt was born in Greenwood, Mississippi, and is a graduate of Bennington College. She is the author of the novels The Secret History, The Little Friend, and The Goldfinch.
The reader is Jamie Parker.
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


TUE 23:00 Small Scenes (b03dslfc)
Series 1

Episode 1

Dipping in and out of odd stories, there's commentary from the World Ham Shouting Championships and meet a couple who are being harassed by a former England football hero.

A successful pilot show sparked series one of the symphonious sketch show.

Starring:

Daniel Rigby
Mike Wozniak
Sara Pascoe
Henry Paker

Written by the cast and Benjamin Partridge with additional material from Chris Allen and Marc Jones.

Producer: Simon Mayhew-Archer

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2013.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03dslff)
Alicia McCarthy reports on a change of tack on immigration, an insight into the Cooperative Bank, and a row about disclosures in the Guardian.

Editor: Peter Mulligan.



WEDNESDAY 23 OCTOBER 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b03d49vm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b03dsk4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03d49vp)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03d49vr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03d49vt)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b03d49vw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03dslgv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b03dslgx)
Members of the National Trust are due to vote this weekend on whether culling would be appropriate on its land. Some members are opposed to the cull whilst the majority of trustees are in favour. The trust has written to Defra for reassurance that the current pilot culls are being carried out in a scientifically rigourous manner. However Defra's chief vet says that whilst the current extension in Gloucestershire is still being considered by Natural England, he says the culls are essential in tackling bovine TB.

All this week, Farming Today is looking at organic produce. Anna Hill visits a farmer in Peterborough who grows around 10 per cent of his vegetables organically. He tells her how, a few years ago he saw a downturn in the amount of organic carrots he produced, but now demand for his veg is on the increase.

And 60 years after the dairy scientist Robert Boutflour pioneered methods to create the 10,000 litre cow, we speak to a professor at the Royal Agricultural University about the vision to double milk yields in dairy herds to an average of 20,000 litres.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Jules Benham.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkt1q)
Sooty Shearwater

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Sooty Shearwater. Sooty Shearwaters are rather scarce seabirds around our islands as they breed on islands off South America and the coasts of eastern Australia and New Zealand. After breeding, the shearwaters head north to feeding grounds in the North Pacific and North Atlantic undertaking one of the longest journeys of any migratory animal.


WED 06:00 Today (b03dslgz)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b03dsm3p)
Paul Michael Glaser, Thomasina Lowe, Emily Maguire, Harry Ritchie

Libby Purves meets Thomasina Lowe, daughter of President Kennedy's official photographer; actor and director Paul Michael Glaser; singer Emily Maguire and writer Harry Ritchie.

Thomasina Lowe is the daughter of the late Jacques Lowe, President Kennedy's presidential campaign photographer. Jacques had unprecedented access to the personal and professional life of one of the most charismatic and powerful leaders of the 20th Century. He took over 40,000 photographs of JFK at work and with his family, showing both the public and private man. Jacques's priceless negatives, which were stored in the World Trade Center, were destroyed during the events of 9/11. His prints - which he kept at home - form the exhibition My Kennedy Years at Proud Chelsea. His memoir of the same name is published by Thames and Hudson.

Paul Michael Glaser is an actor, director and writer, best known for playing David Starsky in the TV series, Starsky and Hutch. His is currently playing Tevye in a UK touring production of the musical Fiddler on the Roof, directed by Craig Revel Horwood. In addition to his work on stage and screen, Paul Michael Glaser writes poetry and children's literature. He is Honorary Chairman of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric Aids Foundation. Fiddler on the Roof is touring the UK and Ireland.

A classically-trained musician, singer Emily Maguire's song-writing was born out of adversity. In her teens she contracted fibromyalgia pain syndrome, a chronic disorder which affects the central nervous system. Her illness kept her at home where she taught herself to write songs. In her twenties Emily was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and moved to Australia to help stabilise her illness and make music. Emily's breakthrough came in 2007 when she supported Don Maclean on tour, culminating in a show at the Royal Albert Hall. Her new album, Bird Inside A Cage, is released on Shaktu Records. She is currently touring.

Harry Ritchie is a writer and former literary editor of the Sunday Times. His latest book, English for the Natives, outlines the rules and structures of the English language as they are taught to foreign students. English for the Natives - Discover the Grammar You Don't Know You Know is published by John Murray.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b03dsm3r)
Jennifer Saunders - Bonkers: My Life in Laughs

Episode 3

In Bonkers: A Life in Laughs award winning comedian, Jennifer Saunders, recollects a life filled with laughter and the occasional bit of heartache, but very little misery. Today, it is 1991 and Absolutely Fabulous is about to hit our TV screens.

Jennifer Saunders has been making us laugh for three decades and is best known for the long running sketch show French and Saunders which she co-wrote and starred in with her comedy partner, Dawn French. Later she created the worldwide hit series Absolutely Fabulous in which she also played champagne swilling, Edina Monsoon. She has won three BAFTAs (including the Bafta Fellowship), an International Emmy, a British Comedy Award, a Rose d'Or, two Writers' Guild Awards and a People's Choice Award.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03dsm3t)
Indhu Rubasingham; Spying on your children; Dolores Huerta

How female senators played a key role in the US shut down negotiations.

Artistic Director Indhu Rubasingham on bringing 'unheard voices' to the Tricycle Theatre.

When does supervision of your children become spying? Do you snoop on their texts and would you ever put a camera in their room?

Conflicting advice on what to eat during pregnancy confuses many women. The charity 'Food and Behaviour Research' brings us up to date with the latest on pregnancy nutrition.

Dolores Huerta spoke to Valeria Perasso as part of the BBC World Service series The Age of Reason, a celebration of women in their 70s and 80s who are global leaders in their chosen field.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced Louise Corley.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dsm3w)
Jane Harris - Gillespie and I

Episode 8

Victorian gothic mystery by Jane Harris, set in Glasgow during the International Exhibition in 1888. Three accused go on trial - but two of the kidnappers are determined to lay the blame on the person they claim is the ringleader. Dramatised by Chris Dolan.


WED 11:00 Silk (b03dsm3y)
Episode 1

Silk production began, according to legend, when a Chinese Empress dropped a silkworm's cocoon into her tea some five thousand years ago. Noticing the threads come loose, she started unravelling them, and thus began one of the oldest and most fascinating of industries. The production of silk helped drive trade around the world, creating a near global trading system long before the term globalisation was ever dreamt of. Along the way it held drive industrial development with the pre-cursor of in the industrial revolution in 16th century China, and technological innovation which continues to the present day, with scientists examining the properties of silk in order to utilise its remarkable strength in a range of settings - including military.
In this two part series, Steph McGovern looks at both the bigger story of silk production, but also takes a close look (in part one) at how silk shaped one particular town - Macclesfield in Cheshire. Here, silk has been processed, woven and printed for four centuries, and had a profound effect not just upon the built environment but also the social world in which its inhabitants lived. Steph finds out about the history of the town, where once over seventy mills stood proud, and also the present day story - with a couple of silk factories still trading on the town's history, and also a new generation of business owners weighing up how far they should exploit the town's connection with silk as a means of branding themselves. Steph also discovers how silk proved a vital tool in helping World War Two prisoners of war make their escape.


WED 11:30 Hard to Tell (b015zpdv)
Series 1

Episode 2

One of those parties that starts out as a great way to get to know each other better, but promptly gets taken over by fake tans, jerk chicken, insomniac parents and berets.

Hard To Tell is a four part relationship comedy by Jonny Sweet (Edinburgh Comedy Award for Best Newcomer 2009). It conjures up characters depicting every relationship from father and daughter to the mirror in the bathroom and the feller hiding at a party; from the stalker and the stalked to dog owners and their dogs; and from lifelong friends to long term partners and their dearly departed.

The series revolves around Tom Sheffield (played by Jonny himself), his immediate family (Getting On's Vicki Pepperdine, The Thick Of It's Alex MacQueen and Not Going Out's Katy Wix), and Tom's longed-for-and-lusted-after new girlfriend Ellen (played by Charlotte Ritchie), her best friend Hermione (Him & Her's Sarah Solemani) and Ellen's zealously protective father (Simon Greenall).

Tim Key and Tom Basden both make deliciously awkward cameo appearances.

Recorded on location, Hard To Tell's naturalistic, contemporary and conversational style brings new meaning to pub toilets, themed parties, early morning phone calls and Christmas Editions of Jonathan Creek.

Producer: Lucy Armitage
A Tiger Aspect production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b03dv1bv)
Poorly trained psychotherapists, inheriting air-miles, rail-fare loopholes

Consumer news with Winifred Robinson, discussing poorly trained psychotherapists, inheriting air-miles, and rail-fare loopholes.


WED 12:57 Weather (b03d49vy)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b03dv1bx)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Terror Through Time (b03dv1bz)
State of Terror

From the very beginnings of the Northern Ireland state, the Stormont government had special powers to combat violence. Internment without trial had been used in response to various IRA campaigns since the 1920s, but was most widely and controversially applied in the 1970s.

In this programme, Fergal Keane speaks to Professor Conor Gearty of the London School of Economics about the human rights implications of such special powers legislation and to Paddy Joe McClean who took a successful case to the European Court of Human Rights in response to his experience of torture when an internee.

A former RUC Special Branch officer describes the use of paramilitary informers to gather intelligence on behalf of the state and former paramilitary Billy Hutchinson explains the impact of informers upon his organisation's operations.

Producer: Owen McFadden.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b03dsk59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b03dv1c1)
Series 1

Episode 3

A new long-running drama series from G F Newman based on the characters from the multi-award winning writer's best-selling crime novel. Spanning six decades, it plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

Joey Oldman is a Russian Jew, who arrived in Britain before the war with only two words of English and married Cathy Braden. They had a son, Brian, and a daughter, Rose. Cathy's widowed mother, Gracie, takes up with a famous and glamorous gangster, Billy Hill, while her brother Jack wants to become World Light Heavyweight Boxing Champion. Both the army and the Kray twins interfere with this ambition. Jack is left feeling bitter and angry and plunges headlong into crime, running protection rackets and claiming a piece of other criminals' sometimes infamous pies. His actions become ever more savage and bizarre and harder to reconcile.

Haunted by the murder of his grandfather which he witnessed when he was six, Brian Oldman holds a terrible secret that he must keep for fear of his life as he falls deeper under his mother's spell. But there is a more disturbing secret he has yet to discover - one that will threaten his very existence. All the while he becomes a willing participant in the criminal underworld in the 1950s, where gangs such as the Krays and the Richardson are emerging to challenge the old guard in savage battles for territory.

With Ross Kemp as Narrator.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b03dv381)
Energy Saving and Bills

Want to cut the cost of your energy bill or resolve a problem? Ruth Alexander and guests take your calls on Money Box Live. Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Just as we start to feel an autumn chill domestic energy prices are rising. SSE and British Gas have been the first to announce with SSE customers facing average increases of 8.2% from 15 November and British Gas warning that average household bills will rise by 9.2% one week later.

If you're concerned by price rises and want to snap up the cheaper offers before they vanish, why not call the energy team on Wednesday.

You may want to ask about schemes to make your home more energy efficient or help with energy costs.

Are you aware of the Warm Home Discount Scheme, Winter Fuel or Cold Weather Payments?

Could the Green Deal be for you?

Or perhaps you want some advice about switching providers or resolving a dispute?

If you want to find out more, presenter Ruth Alexander and guests will be waiting to answer your question. Joining Ruth will be:

Audrey Gallacher, Director of Energy at Consumer
Joe Malinowski, Founder, The Energy Shop
David Weatherall, Domestic Energy Expert, Energy Saving Trust

To talk to the team call 03700 100 444 between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b03dslf5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b03dv383)
Muslim Fundamentalism; Customer Abuse to Service Workers

Muslims against Muslim Fundamentalism - Laurie Taylor talks to Karima Bennoune, US Professor of Law and author of a groundbreaking book which addresses resistance to religious extremism in Muslim majority contexts. Over a 3 year period, she interviewed nearly 300 people from almost 30 countries, from Afghanistan to Mali, Egypt, Israel/Palestine, Niger and Russia.They include teachers, journalists, doctors, musicians, street vendors and women's rights activists - some of whom have risked death. Her subjects range from the secular to the devout, yet all share a desire to challenge religion inspired violence and oppression. She's joined by Professor Stephen Vertigans, a sociologist who has studied Islamic movements globally. Also, Marek Korczynski discusses his research into the abuse of service workers by customers.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b03dv385)
Black audiences; Moderating online; The end of Millionaire?

Yesterday, the BBC DG Lord Hall was asked what the BBC was doing to improve programmes for black audiences - he said he wasn't satisfied the BBC appeals enough. Steve asks Pat Younge, the BBC's most senior black executive, how big a problem there is for black viewers. Journalist Bim Adewunmi and Simone Pennant of The TV Collective, a former TV producer, discuss whether the main channels need to change.

A recent ruling in the European Court of Human Rights has given cause for concern to publishers of online comments. It suggests that publishers have editorial control over comments and should prevent clearly unlawful ones from appearing. The current practice is to take down comments once notified of a complaint, though the extent to which complaints are investigated first differs from one publisher to another. Law consultant David Banks looks at the laws and Justine Roberts, founder of Mumsnet, considers the implications.

And Chris Tarrant is to retire from Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, 15 years after its launch. ITV confirms that it has no plans to make further special programmes, beyond those already in the pipeline. David Liddiment, who commissioned the show for ITV, looks back at the launch and why its initial success was far from guaranteed.

Producer: Simon Tillotson
Editor: Fiona Couper.


WED 17:00 PM (b03dv387)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03d49w0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap (b01rgmfd)
Series 1

Episode 4

Bridget investigates women in comedy as she answers that old chestnut 'Are Women Funny?'

Last of a four-part stand-up comedy series on the state of British feminism today.

With Fred MacAulay

Producer; Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in March 2013.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b03dv389)
Jim devises an ingenious tactic to persuade Joe to finally leave the house. He mentions that Bert Fry has never visited Wesley's micro-brewery.

However, Jill's driving almost puts an end to the trip before it's even started. When they finally do reach the brewery, old habits die hard for Joe with the cider flowing. Jim worries he might have another accident on his hands.

On a mission to recruit her leading lady for the Christmas Robin Hood production, Lynda is looking to Anthea, who refuses. When pressed, Anthea tells Lynda a scandalous tale from theatrical days gone by. She attracted the affections of Lynda's old rival Larry Lovell, much to the annoyance of her husband. For the sake of her marriage, Anthea just can't accept this role. Lynda's search must continue.

Vicky fears that her skills as a mother leave a lot to be desired when she loses her patience with little Bethany. But the health worker is quick to remind Vicky that being a mother isn't easy. Even though Beth might be a little more demanding, Vicky is doing an excellent job.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b03dv38c)
Judi Dench, Julian Barnes on Daumier, Ambassadors, Ibsen's Ghosts

With Mark Lawson.

Dame Judi Dench discusses her role in the new film Philomena, in which she plays a 70-year-old Irish woman who is looking to trace her son, taken away from her when she was a teenager. She discusses portraying and meeting the real Philomena Lee, and working with Steve Coogan, who co-scripted and co-stars in the film as Martin Sixsmith, the man who helped Philomena find her child.

Honoré Daumier was a French printmaker, sculptor and painter whose work offered a social commentary on 19th Century French life. A new exhibition, Visions of Paris, explores his legacy. Booker Prize-winning novelist Julian Barnes reviews the show.

Henrik Ibsen's play Ghosts is enjoying two very different new productions at the moment. In English Touring Theatre's staging, the sets take inspiration from designs originally made for the play by Edvard Munch in 1906. In Richard Eyre's new version, at the Almeida Theatre, London, the transparent walls of the set provide a stark contrast to the secrets hidden by the characters. Tim Hatley who designed the Almeida's production and Sue Prideaux, Munch's biographer, discuss the different approaches to representing the text.

Peep Show stars David Mitchell and Robert Webb reunite in Ambassadors, a TV comedy-drama series about the inner-workings of an embassy in the fictional country of Tazbekistan. Briony Hanson of the British Council delivers her verdict.

Producer Jerome Weatherald.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dsm3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b03dv38f)
Morality and the Bottom Line

When a cleric talks about the moral responsibility of energy companies not to squeeze their customers to maximise their profits there's a temptation to dismiss it as hollow moralising. But when it's an archbishop who's also a former oil company executive and who's also taken on payday lenders to some acclaim then his thoughts are not so easily dismissed. But you do wonder if npower had read Justin Welby comments before they announced they were raising their prices by 10%. The Archbishop of Canterbury says energy companies must be "conscious of their social obligations" and should be obliged to "behave with generosity and not merely to maximise opportunity". Why? Of course it would be nice to have lower energy bills, but do businesses really have a moral obligation beyond the bottom line? We'd like individuals to behave philanthropically, but would we ever threaten them with legislation if they put their own interests, and the interest of their family first? Why should businesses and the free market be any different? Those campaigning for a reformed, more morally driven business environment talk of companies having a social licence to operate but If they act legally and pay their taxes isn't that enough? And does that concept hold any water when only two of the big six energy suppliers in the UK are British owned and we have to get funding from the French and Chinese. Is talk of corporate morality a category error? Individuals have moral agency, so is any attempt to embody that in to a business ethic at best a sloganizing and at worst a kind of "morality PR" aimed at increasing profits? Morality and the bottom line - the Moral Maze. Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. Panellists: Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Sunder Katwala. Witnesses: Philip Booth, Editorial and Programme Director at the Institute of Economic Affairs; Loughlin Hickey, Archbishop Vincent Nichols's representative on a Unilever- backed project to promote ethical business; Peter Fleming, Professor of Business and Society, Cass Business School, London; John Drummond, Chairman of the consultancy firm "Corporate Culture".


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b03dv38h)
Series 4

Empires of Attention

Matt Locke traces the stories of three 'empires of attention' to examine how our attention, and the way it was measured, has shaped our culture.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b03dsk51)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Evan Davis Meets Alan Greenspan (b03h6w63)
Alan Greenspan was the world's most powerful central banker for nearly two decades. As Chairman of the US Federal Reserve, he was a believer in free markets and was sceptical of regulation. He famously warned about the dangers of "irrational exuberance" in financial markets yet presided over several years of boom, and a US housing market bubble.

The financial crisis which hit the world three years after Alan Greenspan left office, has forced him to question his earlier economic assumptions. The results of this rethink are detailed in his new book, The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting.

Evan Davis, Today programme presenter and former BBC Economics Editor, travelled to Washington to talk to Alan Greenspan about his part in the crash of 2008 and his predictions for the future of the world's economies.

Producers: Simon Hamer, Kent DePinto, Charlotte McDonald.


WED 21:58 Weather (b03d49w2)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b03dv38k)
Petrochemicals plant at Grangemouth to close after bitter dispute. Review of decision not to bring misconduct charges against police officers in plebgate affair. Italy still in recession on eve of EU summit. Presented by Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03dv6cm)
The Goldfinch

A Morphine Lollipop

Donna Tartt shot to fame with her iconic first novel, The Secret History, an instant bestseller. This was followed by The Little Friend in 2002. Now, eleven years later, her eagerly awaited, much anticipated third novel, The Goldfinch, comes to Book at Bedtime, beginning on the eve of world wide publication.

At the heart of the novel lies a masterwork by the Dutch painter Carel Fabritius, a picture of a small chained bird, The Goldfinch. This tiny painting becomes the only certainty for thirteen year old Theo Decker when his secure world with his devoted mother is shattered and life becomes fallible and frightening. From the chaos of existence with his foolish, reckless father, and a passionate friendship with the crazy, warm-hearted, wild Boris, to the drawing rooms of the Upper East Side and a dusty downtown antique shop, Theo is left to find his own way through his teenage years and into adulthood. The painting is his talisman, his touchstone, until it draws him into a murky criminal underworld of drugs, art theft and fatal dealings.

Tartt follows Theo through grief, teenage delinquency, passionate friendship and obsessive love, in a story of enthralling suspense, peopled with unforgettable characters. As the drama reaches its gripping conclusion, Theo may or may not find out how to survive.

In today's episode: 'A Morphine Lollipop', Theo finds a new and rare friendship in a dusty old antique shop - and is reunited with the girl with the golden-brown eyes.

Donna Tartt was born in Greenwood, Mississippi, and is a graduate of Bennington College. She is the author of the novels The Secret History, The Little Friend, and The Goldfinch.
The reader is Jamie Parker.
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


WED 23:00 Before They Were Famous (b03dv6cp)
Series 2

Episode 2

Even the most successful of writers have, at some point, had to take day jobs to pay the bills.

Ian Leslie presents the second series of this Radio 4 spoof documentary, which sheds light on the often surprising jobs done by the world's best known writers in the days before they were able to make a living from their art.

In a project of literary archaeology, Leslie unearths archive examples of early work by great writers, including Fortune Cookie messages written by Germaine Greer, a political manifesto by the young JK Rowling, and a car manual written by Dan Brown. In newspaper articles, advertising copy, and company correspondence, we get a fascinating glimpse into the embryonic development of our best-loved literary voices.

We may know them today for their novels, plays or poems but, once upon a time, they were just people with a dream - and a rent bill looming at the end of the month.

Producers: Anna Silver and Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Helen Keen's It Is Rocket Science (b01jhdhr)
Series 2

Episode 4

Last in the series of Helen Keen's quirky comic but true look at the past and future of space exploration. This week looks at what we could do if a giant asteroid was heading straight for us and looks at where else we might be able to go in the solar system if Earth was destroyed, and how we might get there. And we ask the most searching of all questions, why didn't the dinosaurs avoid extinction by developing a space programme of their own? And if they had, how could a T Rex have flown a spaceship with those tiny arms?

With Helen Keen
Peter Serafinowicz
Susy Kane

Written by Helen Keen and Miriam Underhill
Produced by Gareth Edwards.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03dv84m)
David Cameron promises a review of green taxes and a new competition test in a bid to tackle household energy bills which he says are "unacceptable".
The Labour leader, Ed Miliband, says the Prime Minister is "changing his policy every day" and what is needed is a price freeze.
Three police officers facing accusations of trying to discredit the former Cabinet minister, Andrew Mitchell, during the "plebgate" row appear before MPs.
The closure of the Grangemouth petrochemical plant is regrettable, says the Energy Secretary. Ed Davey insists robust plans are place to meet Scotland's energy needs.
And Schools Minister, David Laws, gives a warning that schools in England may run out of space to take on more pupils.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 24 OCTOBER 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b03d49x1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b03dsm3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03d49x3)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03d49x5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03d49x7)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b03d49x9)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03dvbyc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b03dvbyf)
The six week badger cull in Gloucestershire has been extended by eight weeks. Natural England has granted the extra time, after the farmer-owned cull company killed just 30% of the badgers in the area, rather that the required 70%. The Badger Trust plans to challenge the decision in court.

Is the best way to sell organic produce just not to mention that it's organic? A Gloucestershire farmer tells us his customers associate the word "organic" with "expensive", so he's doing away with the label. Is he right?

And research into plants' body-clocks. Charlotte Smith finds out about the potential for increasing yields through understanding more about the natural rhythms of crops.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Campbell.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkt3d)
Leach's Storm Petrel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Leach's Storm-Petrel. Only the most far-flung islands around our coasts provide sanctuary for Leach's Storm-Petrels, one of the most difficult of our breeding birds to see. Chris Watson tells the story of a perilous 2am climb he made to record the sounds of Leach's Storm-Petrel's in their breeding burrows on cliff ledges on the Island of Hirta in the St Kilda group.


THU 06:00 Today (b03dvbyh)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b03dvbyk)
The Corn Laws

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the Corn Laws. In 1815 the British Government passed legislation which artificially inflated the price of corn. The measure was supported by landowners but strongly opposed by manufacturers and the urban working class. In the 1830s the Anti-Corn Law League was founded to campaign for their repeal, led by the Radical Richard Cobden. The Conservative government of Sir Robert Peel finally repealed the laws in 1846, splitting his party in the process, and the resulting debate had profound consequences for the political and economic future of the country.

With:

Lawrence Goldman
Fellow in Modern History at St Peter's College, Oxford

Boyd Hilton
Former Professor of Modern British History at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Trinity College

Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey
Reader in Political Science at the London School of Economics

Producer: Thomas Morris.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b03dvbym)
Jennifer Saunders - Bonkers: My Life in Laughs

Episode 4

In Bonkers: A Life in Laughs award winning comedian, Jennifer Saunders, recollects a life filled with laughter and the occasional bit of heartache, but very little misery. Today, the creator of Absolutely Fabulous is off to India, to write a screenplay with Ruby Wax.

Jennifer Saunders has been making us laugh for three decades and is best known for the long running sketch show French and Saunders which she co-wrote and starred in with her comedy partner, Dawn French. Later she created the worldwide hit series Absolutely Fabulous in which she also played champagne swilling, Edina Monsoon. She has won three BAFTAs (including the Bafta Fellowship), an International Emmy, a British Comedy Award, a Rose d'Or, two Writers' Guild Awards and a People's Choice Award.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03dvbyp)
Joanna Trollope; Natalie Coleman

Joanna Trollope on rewriting Austen and her version of Sense and Sensibility. Canadian Anthropologist Margaret Lock discusses her latest book, The Alzheimer Conundrum with Alison Cook from the Alzheimer's Society. Are we in danger of turning parts of natural ageing into illness, and is research being carried out in the right areas of dementia?

Masterchef winner Natalie Coleman Cooks the Perfect...scallops. Sally Bolton, CEO of the Rugby League World Cup on organising the event. Gaiutra Bahadur tells us about her family history that led to her book "Coolie Woman" about the indentured workers who replaced slaves on sugar plantations.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Rebecca Myatt.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dvbyr)
Jane Harris - Gillespie and I

Episode 9

Victorian gothic mystery by Jane Harris set in Glasgow during the International Exhibition in 1888. The court considers the identity of the veiled woman who lured Rose away from her family.
Starring Phyllis Logan. Dramatised by Chris Dolan.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b03dvbyt)
Don't Mention the War!

As one of the last heroes of the Vietnam War is laid to rest, Rajan Datar hears young people there keen to move on from those years of conflict, to instead celebrate a land rich in culture and economic opportunity; Jonah Fisher talks of the debate in swiftly-changing Myanmar about what exactly makes a detainee a political prisoner; as Greece continues its punishing austerity programme, Alexa Dvorson has been finding out how they are coping out in the countryside, away from the main cities; 'let there be light' seems to be the message in Lagos: Neal Razzell has been to see a state government initiative in Nigeria's biggest city introduce street lighting to many formerly-dark and threatening streets and the BBC's bureau in Moscow has been celebrating fifty years of existence. Steve Rosenberg has been looking at news reporting there then and now.

The producer is Tony Grant.


THU 11:30 Past Perfect (b03dvbyw)
Penelope Fitzgerald died in 2000, having never been a literary celebrity, though she was a regular nominee on prize shortlists and a Booker winner in 1979. In recent years her handful of novels has come to be regarded as one of the most consistent and perfect bodies of work by any 20th century writer in English. With a major new biography of this remarkable writer about to appear, Michael Alexander assesses Penelope Fitzgerald's growing reputation.

She was the daughter of an editor of Punch, Edmund Knox, and his wife Christina who was one of the first women to go to Oxford University. Her father's three scholarly brothers were also illustrious figures: two of them writers and theologians, and a third who was a leading cryptanalyst in both wars. With this background it seems inevitable that she should have been a writer, and surprising that her first book, a biography of the painter Burne-Jones, appeared in 1975, when she was 59. Two years later her first novel appeared, and from then until her death she wrote constantly, and to great acclaim.

Hear early novels drew directly on her own life experience. She had worked as a teacher at the Italia Conti drama school, as an assistant in a bookshop, in an all-night coffee stall, and as a Recorded Programmes Assistant at the BBC. All of these settings surface in her early novels. Offshore, her 1979 Booker prizewinner, is set on a houseboat on the Thames; she had herself lived on just such a boat (which later sank).

She nevertheless seems to confound the truism about 'writing about what you know'. After some years she moved onto historical novels and, if anything, they drew even greater praise, for their intelligent prose and the clarity with which they imagined the lives of their long-dead characters. Whether set just before the Russian Revolution, in late 18th-century Germany, or in an imaginary Cambridge college in 1912, the novels recreate the surroundings and the mindset of the characters with perfect clarity. Yet Penelope Fitzgerald never patronised her readers with excessive detail, description or explanation, making critics use words like 'understated' and 'economical' when describing her books.

The programme includes archive recordings of Penelope Fitzgerald talking about her work, along with analysis from prominent literary admirers such as Julian Barnes, Fiona MacCarthy and the author of her forthcoming biography, Dame Hermione Lee.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b03dvbyy)
Info for Brazil World Cup visitors

If you're planning to go to the World Cup in Brazil we've the latest on flights, hotels and tickets. There's a shortage of the shingles vaccine in England, but why? And the highstreet bank that says you're better protected if you use its own anti-virus software.


THU 12:57 Weather (b03d49xc)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b03dvbz0)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Terror Through Time (b03dvbz2)
Six Against Sixty Million

Throughout the 1970s a small group of young people, mostly from comfortable middle class backgrounds, waged a campaign of violence against the German state, designed to change the course of national, even international, politics.

In this edition of "Terror Through Time", Fergal Keane tells the story of the Baader Meinhof Gang, whose brand of glamorised violence earned them an enduring place in popular culture. He travels to Stuttgart, to the prison where the founder members of the gang committed suicide in 1977, after their attempt to blackmail the government into setting them free spectacularly failed.

He visits their graves and discovers that their struggle still divides opinion in Germany today. He meets Jorg Schleyer, the son of their most famous victim, the industrialist Hans Martin Schleyer. With Bommi Baumann, former member of the anarchist group June 2nd Movement, and Dr. Kay Schiller of Durham University.

Producer: Isobel Eaton.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b03dv389)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b03dvbz4)
Series 1

Episode 4

A new long-running drama series from G F Newman based on the characters from the multi-award winning writer's best-selling crime novel. Spanning six decades, it plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

Joey Oldman is a Russian Jew, who arrived in Britain before the war with only two words of English and married Cathy Braden. They had a son, Brian, and a daughter, Rose. Cathy's widowed mother, Gracie, takes up with a famous and glamorous gangster, Billy Hill, while her brother Jack wants to become World Light Heavyweight Boxing Champion. Both the army and the Kray twins interfere with this ambition. Jack is left feeling bitter and angry and plunges headlong into crime, running protection rackets and claiming a piece of other criminals' sometimes infamous pies. His actions become ever more savage and bizarre and harder to reconcile.

Haunted by the murder of his grandfather which he witnessed when he was six, Brian Oldman holds a terrible secret that he must keep for fear of his life as he falls deeper under his mother's spell. But there is a more disturbing secret he has yet to discover - one that will threaten his very existence. All the while he becomes a willing participant in the criminal underworld in the 1950s, where gangs such as the Krays and the Richardson are emerging to challenge the old guard in savage battles for territory.

With Ross Kemp as Narrator.
Other parts played by members of the cast.
Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b03dvbz6)
Series 25

John McCarthy walks with volunteer rangers on the South Downs

John McCarthy is this week's guest presenter, while Clare is away.

The theme of this series of Ramblings is listeners' walks .Today's guests are volunteer rangers on the South Downs Way, Anni Townend and Ian Lock. Anni wrote to the programme to suggest we walk with her on a six mile stretch of the Way from Housedean Farm to Southease. This is her 'patch', which - as a ranger - she walks every month carrying out conservation work including scrub clearance and hedge laying, as well as improving public access and surveying wildlife and plantlife.

OS Explorer 122 South Downs Way, Steyning to Newhaven 1:25,000

Producer: Karen Gregor.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b03ddz8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b03df77b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b03dvbzw)
Ken Loach; Halloween re-release; Persistence of Vision

As British director Clio Barnard enjoys warm reviews of her film The Selfish Giant, about two young boys who collect scrap metal, she describes casting her two lead teenage performances. And Francine Stock talks to Ken Loach, an acknowledged influence on Barnard, about how to get the best performances from young people.

Composer Neil Brand is back at the piano, exploring the world of vampires from Nosferatu to Dracula and Buffy and explains why he thinks the blood sucker is actually just looking for love.
Scott Jordan Harris discusses why he thinks Halloween directed by John Carpenter is well worth a second look as it's released on Blu Ray 35 years on.

And documentary maker Kevin Schreck describes his new film Persistence of Vision about the best animation film never made - the 30 year odyssey by pioneering artist Richard Williams.

Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b03dvc0d)
Nuclear Waste; Exoplanets; BBC time and pips, Synthetic Biology Olympics

Britain's legacy of nuclear waste dates back 60 plus years and a long term solution to deal with it hasn't yet been found. After this week's announcement that the UK will have a new nuclear power station, Hinkley C in Somerset, Dr Adam Rutherford asks Professor Sue Ion, former Director of Technology at British Nuclear Fuels and Chair of the European Commission's Science and Technology Committee, Euratom, how much extra waste this new plant will add to the radioactive stockpile.

Eighteen years ago the first planet outside of our solar system was discovered, "51 Pegasi b". This week the tally of exoplanets passed one thousand, and as astronomer Dr Stuart Clark tells Adam, an earth twin isn't part of the planetary list.....yet.

Show Us Your Instrument: Public Astronomer Dr Marek Kukula introduces the original Six Pip Masterclock at the Greenwich Observatory. This clock was used in the 1920s to send the time signals down a telephone line to the BBC, for transmission to the whole country over the radio. That's not the case now, and Adam goes down into the basement of Broadcasting House in London in search of the atomic clock that's now used to generate the Greenwich Time Signal and the famous BBC pips.

iGEM is a global biology competition that allows students to build their own organisms. The UK has two teams going to the grand final next week. Adam goes to meet the team from Imperial College London, who have made a bacterium which produces plastic.

Producer: Fiona Hill.


THU 17:00 PM (b03dvc0x)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03d49xf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Clare in the Community (b01pp88x)
Series 8

On Expenses

With society collapsing all around us Social Worker Clare Barker is appalled to be stuck indoors bean counting. But as Clare discovers anomalies in the Sparrowhawk Family Centre's expense claims will friendship and loyalty win over professional integrity?

Sally Phillips stars as Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life. In her private life Clare is struggling to come to terms with Brian's infidelity. Will their relationship survive?

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Nali ...... Nina Conti
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Helen ...... Liza Tarbuck
Simon ...... Andrew Wincott
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Paul ...... Ben Crowe
Mrs Manjula ...... Bharti Patel

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2013.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b03dvggz)
Mike realises that bringing his stresses home is having a knock-on effect on Vicky, who continues to doubt her mothering skills. He vows to put an end to that.

But then Mike is hit with devastating news. Tests reveal the untreatable infectious parasite neospora caused the death of the two calves, which were in the group that Vicky funded. This could threaten the livelihood of the whole herd. Ed is worried that it could lead to a cull of his own cows, which will finish him.

Despite Alistair's best efforts, Darrell doesn't get organised in time and misses an important meeting at the jobcentre. Although he maintains it's fine and these things happen, Alistair is unconvinced.

Tom discusses with Helen the conversations he's been having with Rob. Helen is incensed at how Rob appears to be so normal while she is devastated. She is unable to hide her dismay. It all clicks into place for Tom, who realises why Helen has been so miserable recently. Determined to be a supportive brother, he offers Helen a shoulder to cry on even if he is shocked at what he has discovered.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b03dvgh1)
Earth, Wind and Fire; From Here to Eternity, Chinese paintings; Sir Anthony Caro

With Kirsty Lang.

From Here To Eternity is given the musical treatment by Sir Tim Rice, the lyricist who gave us Jesus Christ Superstar and Evita, with Pop Idol contestant Darius Campbell in the role of Sergeant Milt Warden, memorably played by Burt Lancaster in the film adaptation. Critic Jason Solomons delivers his verdict.

Earth, Wind And Fire, the American group behind hits September, Let's Groove and Boogie Wonderland in the late '70s, have just released their first studio album in eight years. Verdine White, Philip Bailey and Ralph Johnson, the three core members of the group - its founder Maurice White is no longer performing as a result of Parkinson's Disease - discuss the legacy of those early hits and the renewal of interest in their music following the success of Daft Punk.

Artist Maggi Hambling and Tim Marlow pay tribute to the sculptor Sir Anthony Caro, whose death at the age of 89 was announced today.

The V And A's new exhibition of Chinese painting promises to be "the most ambitious survey of one of the world's greatest artistic traditions". It covers 11 centuries and features an expansive collection ranging from scrolls which measure over 14 metres long, to intimate and poetic fan paintings. To find out whether the exhibition lives up to expectations, Chinese born artist Aowen Jin went to take a look.

Producer Stephen Hughes.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dvbyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b03dsk53)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b03dvgh3)
Who's the Boss?

What is the role of a business leader? To tell staff what to do or allow them to decide for themselves? One theory about management is that it should turn itself upside-down and permit those closest to the customer to dictate all sorts of business decisions including pricing, marketing and how to deal with complaints. Discussing these issues with Evan Davis are:

John Timpson, Chairman Timpson Group
Nikki King, CEO Isuzu Truck UK
Sir Gerry Robinson, Chairman Moto Hospitality

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b03dvc0d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b03dvbyk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b03d49xh)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b03dvgh5)
With David Eades

Angela Merkel talks about allegations her mobile phone was monitored. Does this damage the reputation of the US?

Politicians and trade unions try to save the Grangemouth oil refinery

Allan Little reports on the French far right

Should the National Anthem be played on television every day?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03dvgh7)
The Goldfinch

Under a Desert Sky

Donna Tartt shot to fame with her iconic first novel, The Secret History, an instant bestseller. This was followed by The Little Friend in 2002. Now, eleven years later, her eagerly awaited, much anticipated third novel, The Goldfinch, comes to Book at Bedtime, beginning on the eve of world wide publication.
At the heart of the novel lies a masterwork by the Dutch painter Carel Fabritius, a picture of a small chained bird, The Goldfinch. This tiny painting becomes the only certainty for thirteen year old Theo Decker when his secure world with his devoted mother is shattered and life becomes fallible and frightening. From the chaos of existence with his foolish, reckless father, and a passionate friendship with the crazy, warm-hearted, wild Boris, to the drawing rooms of the Upper East Side and a dusty downtown antique shop, Theo is left to find his own way through his teenage years and into adulthood. The painting is his talisman, his touchstone, until it draws him into a murky criminal underworld of drugs, art theft and fatal dealings.
Tartt follows Theo through grief, teenage delinquency, passionate friendship and obsessive love, in a story of enthralling suspense, peopled with unforgettable characters. As the drama reaches its gripping conclusion, Theo may or may not find out how to survive.
In today's episode: 'Under a Desert Sky'. The reappearance of his father changes Theo's life again, as he, and the painting, find themselves cast adrift in the harsh light of Las Vegas.

Donna Tartt was born in Greenwood, Mississippi, and is a graduate of Bennington College. She is the author of the novels The Secret History, The Little Friend, and The Goldfinch.
The reader is Jamie Parker.
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


THU 23:00 Seekers (b03dvgh9)
Series 1

The Scratchcard

Joe and Terry replace Stuart with new best friend Janice. She's never worked - except as a human guinea pig for pharmaceutical trials and she drinks during the day - she is officially the bestest person they've ever met.

As well as being usurped by Janice, Stuart is usurped by Gary Probert who has unbelievably and appallingly taken over his job at the Job Centre and is working very closely with Nicola.

Steven Burge’s comedy about the staff and the clients who frequent a Job Centre in the Essex town of Rayleigh.

Starring Matthew Horne and Daniel Mays.

Stuart ...... Mathew Horne
Joe ...... Daniel Mays
Terry ...... Tony Way
Mr Dancer ...... Tony Way
Nicola ...... Zahra Ahmadi
Janice ...... Sally Grace
Gary Probert ...... Steve Oram
Dave Manager ...... Alex Lowe
Kevin Rush ...... Alex Lowe
Teresa Glock ...... Bharti Patel
Mr Bishop ...... David Seddon

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2013.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03dvghc)
Sean Curran hears MPs debate energy prices. There's tough choices on airports, a blast at high speed rail, more blame for the banks - and taking the oath in Welsh.



FRIDAY 25 OCTOBER 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b03d49yb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b03dvbym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b03d49yd)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b03d49yg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b03d49yj)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b03d49yl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03dvjws)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b03dvjwv)
Bee farmers say they're not being offered enough help to increase the numbers of commercial beekeepers. The Bee Farmers Association say the mobile hives which are used to pollinate fruit trees and crops are essential for farmers. They say the overall number of hives in the UK has fallen by more than a half in the last 20 years and the Government's current plans don't do enough to boost bee populations.

This week, Defra have organised a meeting to create a new pollinator strategy, which will be published in December. They say that they recognise the need to address our declining numbers of bees, through environmental schemes and research into disease.

And we find out about a scheme to help children experience farming. The County Council's Farm-wise scheme this week hosted over 1000 kids, many of whom got up close to farm animals for the first time, as well as learning more about where their food comes from.

All this week, Farming Today is looking at the return of organic food. But it's not all about what's on the supermarket shelves. According to the Soil Association, box schemes have proved popular and good value for money. We speak to one scheme organiser in Brighton who says his production costs have been the same for the past six years

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith, and Produced by Jules Benham.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkt4n)
Cattle Egret

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Cattle Egret. Cattle egrets were originally birds of the African savannahs but they have become one of the most successful global colonisers of any bird species. In 2008 a pair of cattle egrets made ornithological history by breeding in the UK, on the Somerset Levels, for the first time.


FRI 06:00 Today (b03dvk1l)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b03ddz8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b03dvn0t)
Jennifer Saunders - Bonkers: My Life in Laughs

Episode 5

In Bonkers: A Life in Laughs award winning comedian, Jennifer Saunders, recollects a life filled with laughter and the occasional bit of heartache, but very little misery. Today, a final tour with Dawn and some unexpected news.

Jennifer Saunders has been making us laugh for three decades and is best known for the long running sketch show French and Saunders which she co-wrote and starred in with her comedy partner, Dawn French. Later she created the worldwide hit series Absolutely Fabulous in which she also played champagne swilling, Edina Monsoon. She has won three BAFTAs (including the Bafta Fellowship), an International Emmy, a British Comedy Award, a Rose d'Or, two Writers' Guild Awards and a People's Choice Award.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton.
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03dvn0w)
Helen Clark; Susie Orbach; Mariane Perle; Singing to survive; Sally Bolton

Former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark on women and leadership; Susie Orbach and Mariane Pearl discuss the media's portrayal of women; Val McDermid talks about her new novel; Singing to Survive - a concert to commemorate the women's Vocal Orchestra created in a Japanese prison camp during WW2.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Helen Lee.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dvn0y)
Jane Harris - Gillespie and I

Episode 10

Victorian gothic mystery by Jane Harris set in Glasgow during the International Exhibition of 1888. As the trial reaches its climax young Sybil is called to give evidence. Dramatised by Chris Dolan.


FRI 11:00 The Father of English Football (b03dvn10)
In this month 150 years ago, a group of sportsmen met at the Freemasons' Tavern in London's Covent Garden. In an age when football teams played by their own rules, each one differing from the other, the aim was to create a standard code. Their first decision in 1863 was to call themselves the Football Association and, over the course of six often dramatic meetings between October and December, they set down what became the cornerstone of the game of football. The prime mover was Ebenezer Morley.

Hardeep Singh Kohli considers Morley's reputation as the founding father of English football, and traces the arguments of those first meetings through the Minute Book, which many now consider the most valuable historical document in the creation of the modern game. The arguments were often heated and ended with a breakaway group dissenting and eventually forming themselves into the Rugby Union.

Hardeep talks to Jane Clayton, of the International Football Institute at the University of Central Lancashire, about the character of Ebenezer Morley and his colleagues. He visits the FA's headquarters at Wembley, and talks to the historian David Barber. They leaf through the pages of the 150 year old Minute Book, which describes the arguments that took place - particularly over the rules on whether the ball should be carried, and whether players should be allowed to kick, hack and trip an opponent.

Hardeep also meets David Elleray, Chairman of the FA Referees' Committee, who discloses how current rules are discussed and altered and how referees apply them.

Producer: Richard Bannerman
A Ladbroke production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 The Gobetweenies (b03dvn12)
Series 3

Episode 2

Mimi is having a hard time. She's freshly divorced and scared of her eggs going stale so she's decided to freeze them. But she didn't realise she had to give herself hormone injections. What's the divorced etiquette of asking an ex-husband to inject your torso? And how come she's not the favourite parent? Could it be because she was a complete failure trying to convince the mother of Tom's best friend that skateboarding was safe?

Joe is flailing too. And very broke. When Lucy sees him posing at her life drawing class she bolts. Does he think he can do a Lena Dunham and go naked at his age? She switches her allegiance to Mimi and gives her a make-over that turns her into Ernie from Sesame Street.

Meanwhile Tom is still proud of Dad. Joe talked Jennifer into letting Freddy skateboard. But his mum makes him wear so much protective gear he and Tom look like Team Pathetic. And with his big chrome bucket of a helmet, Freddy looks like Darth Vader - but stupid. Now the pair of them get pelted with KFC cartons and cans.

Maybe Mum can help. If she can recover from the smell of the vegan dog food Jennifer has given her.

Cast:
Joe...................Mark Bonnar
Mimi..................Sarah Alexander
Tom..................Finlay Christie
Lucy..................Phoebe Abbott
Tuberose..........Charlotte Richie
Jennifer.............Emily Bruni
Freddie..............Harry Nowell

Writer: Marcella Evaristi
Director: Marilyn Imrie

Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b03dvn14)
Highways Agency; Energy prices abroad; Music piracy

Peter White looks at sweeping changes planned for the Highways Agency and the impact they'll have on England's roads maintenance.
The impact piracy has had on the music industry in the UK.
And as the debate rumbles on over the cost of energy in the UK, we look at how much people in other EU countries are paying for their electricity and gas.


FRI 12:52 The Listening Project (b03dvn16)
Something to Prove - Marie and Colin

Fi Glover introduces a couple whose marriage finally cracked under the strain of PTSD; he wants to try again, she's not so sure. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b03d49yn)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b03dvn18)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Terror Through Time (b03dvx66)
Africa Erupts

Terrorist tactics had pushed the French from Algeria. Could they also be successfully used against South Africa's apartheid regime? Fergal Keane considers the dilemma faced by Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress, an organisation founded on the principals of non-violent protest.

With Ahmed Kathrada, who spent 26 years in prison alongside Nelson Mandela for his role in the ANC's struggle and Gillian Slovo, whose father, Joe Slovo was a leader of the ANC's armed wing. Her mother, the anti-apartheid campaigner, Ruth First, was killed by a letter bomb authorised by the South African police in 1982.

Fergal Keane visits Liliesleaf Farm near Johannesberg, the scene of the arrest of the leadership of the ANC's military wing in 1963, as they prepared to put their plans for a wider armed struggle against apartheid into action.

Producer: Isobel Eaton.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b03dvggz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b03dvx68)
Series 1

Episode 5

A new long-running drama series from G F Newman based on the characters from the multi-award winning writer's best-selling crime novel. Spanning six decades, it plots the course of one family against the backdrop of a revolution in crime as the underworld extends its influence to the very heart of the establishment, in an uncomfortable relationship of shared values.

Joey Oldman is a Russian Jew, who arrived in Britain before the war with only two words of English and married Cathy Braden. They had a son, Brian, and a daughter, Rose. Cathy's widowed mother, Gracie, takes up with a famous and glamorous gangster, Billy Hill, while her brother Jack wants to become World Light Heavyweight Boxing Champion. Both the army and the Kray twins interfere with this ambition. Jack is left feeling bitter and angry and plunges headlong into crime, running protection rackets and claiming a piece of other criminals' sometimes infamous pies. His actions become ever more savage and bizarre and harder to reconcile.

Haunted by the murder of his grandfather which he witnessed when he was six, Brian Oldman holds a terrible secret that he must keep for fear of his life as he falls deeper under his mother's spell. But there is a more disturbing secret he has yet to discover - one that will threaten his very existence. All the while he becomes a willing participant in the criminal underworld in the 1950s, where gangs such as the Krays and the Richardson are emerging to challenge the old guard in savage battles for territory.

With Ross Kemp as Narrator.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03dvx6b)
Leicester University and Botanic Gardens

Host Eric Robson and the panel are at Leicester University and Botanic Gardens. Answering questions from a local gardening audience are Matt Biggs, Bob Flowerdew and Anne Swithinbank.We find out about something nasty that could be lurking in our potting compost and Chris Beardshaw explores London's longest herbaceous border

Produced by Victoria Shepherd
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4

In reference to the Japanese Knotweed story, please go to the Environment Agency for general advice on rules and regulations.

Q. We are looking for a tree to provide dappled shade in a small garden. We have considered Vilmorin Rowan or Himalayan Silver Birch. Do the panel have any other suggestions?

A. Sorbus Joseph Rock is a neat, conical-shaped tree, providing yellow flowers and brilliant autumn colour. A Prunus Maackii called Amber Beauty that has spikes of white flowers and a coppery bark that peels back. Medlars are small fruit trees with very large apple blossom type flowers and could work. Azara Microphylla can be grown as a tree and has a leaf like a Cotoneaster. The wonderful thing is that in February and March a vanilla smelling fuzz appears on the back of the leaves. Sorbus Vilmorinii would work in a small garden because it is dainty. A variety of Magnolia such as a Loebneri would suit a limited space and they don't require particular soil conditions

Q. How long will builders' sand persist within the ground and will anything grow in that area?

A. The problem with builder's sand is that it is fine whereas gardeners prefer gritty sand. The drainage will be very good in that area meaning that the soil will be quite dry. Shrubs and trees would probably cope, but bedding plants wouldn't do very well
You could excavate it and mix it with potting compost. Carry out a pH test and think about how you can use it to your advantage. It has the potential to be a very good dry garden and you could grow plants such as a Pulsatilla.

Q. How could I encourage autumn colour in an ornamental grape, specifically Vitis Coignetiae growing on a west-facing wall? Each autumn the leaves turn brown and drop off.

A. If it is growing against a wall it may not be getting enough moisture towards the end of the year. On top of watering it, you could add potash feed to stimulate it.
You could take a cutting and relocate it to a more open site. Their natural habitat is woodland, where there is plenty of space and organic matter

Q. Which plants - other than box, Lavender and Rosemary - could be used to border a vegetable patch and deter slugs and snails?

A. Borage is very prickly and it will double up as a good bee plant. Slugs and snails don't like to traverse hard paths because they are open to predators and the sunshine, so slabs could help. Southernwood, a type of Artemisia, has a lovely scent and a strong smell makes it harder for pests to detect what they are looking for. A mulch of garden lime or crushed seashells would also discourage pests. Pelleted sheep's wool is also very effective

Q. Is it advisable to get rid of the Spanish Bluebells from my garden and replace them with a native British variety? If so, how would I go about it?

A. It is a lot of work because Bluebells are very deep bulbs. You could cut back the area, repeatedly taking away the leaves. Bluebells don't have a large system from which they can grow back, so they will eventually die. Wait a few years before replanting just in case seedlings appear

Q. How should apple trees be pruned to avoid the growth of dense shoots?

If pruned in winter apple trees bounce back with lots of water shoots. These should be gradually removed during the summer to weaken the tree so that they won't grow back as strongly.
A dense tree should be thinned almost back to the branch origin. This will prevent water shoots from growing and produce a better crop of fruit.

Q. Our 100 year old indoor grapevine has always provided prolific crops. Over the past few years it has started to die back and this year we are left with only ten percent of the original. Is there anything we can do to save it?

A. This could be caused by vine weevils eating away at the roots. Use a nematode and apply it close to the stems.
It could be affected by the recent wet and cold conditions. The combination of water making the bark vulnerable and then the cold weather could have a bad affect on an old plant.
Something to encourage root growth, perhaps mulch, may encourage re-growth as a last effort.

Q. Sixteen laurels have recently been cut down on a local roundabout and what remains is a chipping and soil mix. Could the panel suggest plants that will require minimal pruning and work in these conditions?

A. Native gorse is a tough evergreen and copes in poor soils. Grasses such as Stipa gigantea or Miscanthus are low maintenance and last throughout the year. If you go for more vigorous plants they will remain manageable when in poor soil. Rake away the chippings, condition the soil and then reapply t


FRI 15:45 Edinburgh Haunts (b03dvx6d)
I Remember Yesterday

By Val McDermid.

A young woman haunts 'the Serpent's Back' of The Royal Mile in Edinburgh, seeking revenge to the 70s strains of Donna Summer's song 'I Remember Yesterday'. Read by Hannah Donaldson

The first of three brand new ghost stories from leading Scottish writers set in Edinburgh. Bestselling crime writer Val McDermid, whose Tony Hill detective novels were dramatised as TV series Wire in the Blood, kicks off our haunted Edinburgh tales.

The series continues with Susie Maguire's tale of an actor at the Edinburgh Festival whose performance of a Robert Louis Stevenson short story begins to take hold of him uncannily.

And thriller writer Louise Welsh concludes with a story that evokes the folklore of the doppelganger, or double, but is set in a contemporary Edinburgh town house. In traditional tales, your double is a shadow heralding your own death - if you see your own doppelganger in passing, it's very bad news.

Producer: Allegra McIlroy.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b03dvx6g)
A sculptor, a comedian, a social worker and Yugoslavia's First Lady

Matthew Bannister on

The sculptor Sir Anthony Caro - best known for his large and colourful abstract works placed directly on the ground.

Also Jovanka Broz - the second world war partisan fighter who married the Yugoslavian dictator Marshall Tito - but was reduced to poverty after his death.

Felix Dexter - the black comedian who made his name on the TV show The Real McCoy - and often satirised racial stereotyopes.

And Professor Olive Stevenson - the leading social work academic who devoted herself to improving the safety of vulnerable chidren and adults.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b03dvx6j)
In this week's Feedback, Roger Bolton speaks to the BBC's Director of Editorial Policy and Standards, David Jordan, about 'due impartiality' in climate change coverage.

And writer Morwenna Banks explains why she chose radio to tell a powerful story of friendship in the face of breast cancer. Her Radio 4 Saturday Drama Goodbye starred acting heavyweights Olivia Colman and Natascha McElhone as Lizzie and Jen, two friends struggling to say goodbye after Lizzie's terminal diagnosis. It left many Feedback listeners astounded by its realistic and emotional portrayal of the situation.

We revisit our listener panel of four mothers in Cambridge to find out how they got along when they tried to find and use CBeebies Radio. A recent BBC Trust survey found that not one parent they spoke to knew how to access the CBeebies radio service - did the Feedback mothers fare any better? And Roger speaks to the Controller of CBeebies, Kay Benbow, to find out what they are doing to publicise CBeebies Radio.

And from Raa Raa the Lion to Reith - we hear from some Feedback listeners' views on Grayson Perry's Reith Lectures.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:56 The Listening Project (b03dvx6l)
Itchy Feet - Ian and Judith

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a husband, who once set off on his motorbike for 4 months and came back 14 years later, and his wife. He's planning another trip, proving yet again that it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b03dvx6n)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b03d49yq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b03dvx6q)
Series 41

Episode 5

Steve Punt and Jon Culshaw present a comedic look at the week's news, providing a topical mix of stand-up, sketches and songs that tell you everything you need to know. With Jon Holmes, Sara Pascoe, Joe Stilgoe and Laura Shavin.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b03dvx6s)
It's the day of Kenton's stag do and the afternoon kicks off with a trip to a quad biking course, much to Kenton's initial dismay. But he soon picks it up and by the end of the day is the self-proclaimed 'King of the quads'. Jim even has a ride and surprises everyone with his unbounded enthusiasm.

Emma and Lynda embark on a day of culinary activities, choosing a selection of recipes to test before putting together the cookbook. Emma confides in Lynda her fears for her future with Ed following their bad news about the neospora in the herd. Although Lynda tries to stay upbeat, Emma is sure they will have to remain living at her parents' house, with an increasingly tense atmosphere.

Shula and David discuss Darrell. Shula is generally positive about his progress. Darrell has told her he managed to rearrange his appointment at the job centre and see the doctor all by himself.

Although Kenton spends the evening being thoroughly teased by the boys, he is still in very high spirits and thoroughly looking forward to the arrival of Mel and Meriel. An old school report reminds Kenton just what a positive influence Jolene has had on his life. He couldn't be happier.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b03dvxys)
With Kirsty Lang

Elizabeth Gilbert's memoir Eat, Pray, Love spent nearly 200 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list and was made into a film starring Julia Roberts and Javier Bardem. Elizabeth talks to Kirsty about returning to fiction for her new book The Signature of All Things, a story which spans the 18th and 19th centuries and sees its heroine, botanist Alma Whittaker, travel from Philadelphia to Tahiti and Amsterdam in search of answers, adventure, and love.

James Corden stars as Britain's Got Talent winner Paul Potts in the biopic One Chance.
The film also stars Julie Walters as his mother Yvonne and is directed by David Frankel (The Devil Wears Prada, Marley & Me). Larushka Ivan-Zadeh went to find out whether it matters that James Corden had to lip-sync to Paul's vocals.

Robert Webb and Tamzin Outhwaite star in Raving, a new play about competitive parenting and middle class status anxiety by Simon Paisley Day. Critic Viv Groskop delivers her verdict.

This week Qatar's Sheikha Al-Mayassa was deemed to be the most powerful person in the art world, topping The ArtReview Power 100 list. The sheikha and her family are estimated to spend more than £600 million per year on art. But do the tastes of the big art buyers influence what kind of art is produced? Art market watcher Sarah Thornton reflects on the impact of the new international tastemakers.

Produced by Ella-mai Robey.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03dvn0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b03dvxyv)
Charles Clarke, Bob Crow, Matt Hancock, Diane James

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Thetford Common Sense Club in Norfolk with former Home Secretary Charles Clarke, leader of the RMT Bob Crow, Diane James who's an MEP candidate for UKIP and Bis Minister Matt Hancock.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b03dvxyy)
Lisa Jardine: Reflections on IVF

Lisa Jardine reflects on the sensitive questions surrounding IVF as she comes to the end of her term as Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority. "I would have loved to have been able to have spoken more often and more publicly, with more words of caution for those preparing to undertake IVF, or postponing their family because IVF seems a reliable option should natural conception fail."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Terror Through Time (b03dvxz0)
Terror Through Time: Omnibus

The Internationalisation of Terror

Terrorism became a global tactic of choice for revolutionary groups of the 1970s. The success of Palestinian militants in attracting attention to their cause inspired Marxist and nationalist groups to try their hands at kidnap, hijack and assassination. It also encouraged nation states to make use of terrorist groups and tactics to wage low-intensity war against their opponents.

Fergal Keane examines the development of international terrorism and charts the changing tactics of counter-terrorism.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b03d49ys)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b03dvxz4)
Grangemouth petrochemical plant to stay open after union climbs down. US acknowledges latest spying claims have caused tensions with allies. Saudi authorities warn women against driving protest. Presented by David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03f31dx)
The Goldfinch

What Are You Doing Here?

Donna Tartt shot to fame with her iconic first novel, The Secret History, an instant bestseller. This was followed by The Little Friend in 2002. Now, eleven years later, her eagerly awaited, much anticipated third novel, The Goldfinch, comes to Book at Bedtime, beginning on the eve of world wide publication.
At the heart of the novel lies a masterwork by the Dutch painter Carel Fabritius, a picture of a small chained bird, The Goldfinch. This tiny painting becomes the only certainty for thirteen year old Theo Decker when his secure world with his devoted mother is shattered and life becomes fallible and frightening. From the chaos of existence with his foolish, reckless father, and a passionate friendship with the crazy, warm-hearted, wild Boris, to the drawing rooms of the Upper East Side and a dusty downtown antique shop, Theo is left to find his own way through his teenage years and into adulthood. The painting is his talisman, his touchstone, until it draws him into a murky criminal underworld of drugs, art theft and fatal dealings.
Tartt follows Theo through grief, teenage delinquency, passionate friendship and obsessive love, in a story of enthralling suspense, peopled with unforgettable characters. As the drama reaches its gripping conclusion, Theo may or may not find out how to survive.

In today's episode: 'What are you doing here?' In Las Vegas and under the hapless care of his father, Theo's life becomes increasingly anarchic - only his new friend Boris offers consolation.

Donna Tartt was born in Greenwood, Mississippi, and is a graduate of Bennington College. She is the author of the novels The Secret History, The Little Friend, and The Goldfinch.
The reader is Jamie Parker.
The abridger is Sally Marmion
The producer is Di Speirs.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b03dsk55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b03dvxz6)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster, where scientist Lord Winston urged the government to stand up for medical researchers who experiment on animals. Also, the Commons hears calls for new regulations to govern private landlords; and a backlash against whiplash as Mark hears from an MP who's trying to bring down the cost of car insurance. Editor: Alan Soady.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b03dvxz8)
Life Gets Cluttered - Lynn and Gordon

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about the challenges of de-cluttering. If boxes haven't been unpacked in 25 years, should they be got rid of? Not easy when they're full of memories.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can upload your own conversations or just learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b03dfh0p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b03dfh0p)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b03dsk4l)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b03dsk4l)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b03dsm3w)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b03dsm3w)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b03dvbyr)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b03dvbyr)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b03dvn0y)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b03dvn0y)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b03dsk55)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b03dsk55)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b03cv484)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b03dvxyy)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b013q20y)

Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section 19:15 SUN (b01dtmb8)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b03cmnzs)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b03dfpjt)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b03d836m)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b03cv482)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b03dvxyv)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b03ddnfm)

Auditioning for Auntie 16:00 MON (b03dfl04)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b03dvc0d)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b03dvc0d)

Before They Were Famous 23:00 WED (b03dv6cp)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b03ddz83)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b03ddz83)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b03dfwvz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b03dslf9)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b03dv6cm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b03dvgh7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b03f31dx)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b03cv46x)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b03dfc86)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b03dfc86)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b03dsk4g)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b03dsk4g)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b03dsm3r)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b03dsm3r)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b03dvbym)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b03dvbym)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b03dvn0t)

Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 18:30 WED (b01rgmfd)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b03ddz8h)

Clare in the Community 18:30 THU (b01pp88x)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b03cdh4l)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b03f86lk)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b03dsk51)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b03dsk51)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b03ddz8m)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b03ddz8m)

Dilemma 11:30 MON (b017lfd5)

Don't Log Off 10:30 SAT (b03d7v5f)

Edinburgh Haunts 15:45 FRI (b03dvx6d)

Evan Davis Meets Alan Greenspan 21:30 WED (b03h6w63)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b03d7v57)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b03dfc80)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b03dsk48)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b03dslgx)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b03dvbyf)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b03dvjwv)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b03cv47r)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b03dvx6j)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b03cn72s)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b03dslf1)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b03dv38h)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b03d7v5k)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b03dvbyt)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b03dfpjp)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b03dsk5c)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b03dv38c)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b03dvgh1)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b03dvxys)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 MON (b03dfl00)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 TUE (b03dvzwx)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 WED (b03dv1c1)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 THU (b03dvbz4)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 FRI (b03dvx68)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b03cv47k)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b03dvx6b)

Hard to Tell 11:30 WED (b015zpdv)

Helen Keen's It Is Rocket Science 23:15 WED (b01jhdhr)

I Can't Stand Up for Falling Down 13:30 SUN (b038c0f4)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b03dvbyk)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b03dvbyk)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b03dslf3)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b03dslf5)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b03dslf5)

It's Your Round 18:30 TUE (b018wb95)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b03cv47p)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b03dvx6g)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b03dsk53)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b03dsk53)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b03ddnff)

Meet the Jewslims 11:00 MON (b03dfh0r)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b03ct9n4)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b03d49ps)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b03d49rk)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b03d49t9)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b03d49vm)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b03d49x1)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b03d49yb)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b03dsm3p)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b03dv381)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b03d7v5m)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b03d7v5m)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b03dv38f)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b03ct9nd)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b03d49q1)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b03d49rt)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b03d49tk)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b03d49vw)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b03d49x9)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b03d49yl)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b03d49q3)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b03ct9ng)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b03d49q7)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b03d49qc)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b03ct9nz)

News 13:00 SAT (b03ct9nq)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b03ddz87)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b03df77b)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b03df77b)

PM 17:00 SAT (b03ddnfc)

PM 17:00 MON (b03dfl08)

PM 17:00 TUE (b03dsk57)

PM 17:00 WED (b03dv387)

PM 17:00 THU (b03dvc0x)

PM 17:00 FRI (b03dvx6n)

Past Perfect 11:30 THU (b03dvbyw)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b03df77g)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b03cdy32)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b03df77d)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b03cv4cg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b03dfc7y)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b03dsk46)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b03dslgv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b03dvbyc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b03dvjws)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b03ddnfh)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b03ddnfh)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b03ddnfh)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b03ddz8c)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b03ddz8c)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b03ddz8c)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b03ct4nq)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b03dvbz6)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b03cf03b)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b03dfl02)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b03d836p)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b03d7v5c)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b03ddnfk)

Seekers 23:00 THU (b03dvgh9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b03ct9n8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b03d49px)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b03d49rp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b03d49tf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b03d49vr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b03d49x5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b03d49yg)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b03cmt4t)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b03dsk4n)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b03ct9n6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b03ct9nb)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b03ct9ns)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b03d49pv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b03d49pz)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b03d49qh)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b03d49rm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b03d49rr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b03d49tc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b03d49th)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b03d49vp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b03d49vt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b03d49x3)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b03d49x7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b03d49yd)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b03d49yj)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b03dsk4z)

Silk 11:00 WED (b03dsm3y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b03ct9nx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b03d49qm)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b03d49s4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b03d49tq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b03d49w0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b03d49xf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b03d49yq)

Small Scenes 23:00 TUE (b03dslfc)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b03ddz85)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b03ddz85)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b03dfc84)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b03dfc84)

Stories From the South Downs 19:45 SUN (b03df88n)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b03ddz8f)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b03ddz89)

Terror Through Time 13:45 MON (b03dfh0y)

Terror Through Time 13:45 TUE (b03dsk4x)

Terror Through Time 13:45 WED (b03dv1bz)

Terror Through Time 13:45 THU (b03dvbz2)

Terror Through Time 13:45 FRI (b03dvx66)

Terror Through Time 21:00 FRI (b03dvxz0)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b03ddz8k)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b03df77j)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b03df77j)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b03dfpjm)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b03dfpjm)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b03dsk59)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b03dsk59)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b03dv389)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b03dv389)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b03dvggz)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b03dvggz)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b03dvx6s)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b03ctfp4)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b03dvgh3)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b03dfl06)

The Father of English Football 11:00 FRI (b03dvn10)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b03ctc1p)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b03dvbzw)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b03ddz8p)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b03ddz8p)

The Gobetweenies 11:30 FRI (b03dvn12)

The Human Zoo 21:30 TUE (b036kbl6)

The Invention of... 20:00 MON (b03dfpjr)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b03df778)

The Listening Project 12:52 FRI (b03dvn16)

The Listening Project 16:56 FRI (b03dvx6l)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b03dvxz8)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b03dv385)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:00 SUN (b03cf03n)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b03dfl0b)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b03cv47w)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b03dvx6q)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b03969vt)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b03dsk4d)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b03d7v5h)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b03ddz8r)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b03dfwvx)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b03dslf7)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b03dv38k)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b03dvgh5)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b03dvxz4)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b03cngzw)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b03dv383)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b03dfww1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b03dslff)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b03dv84m)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b03dvghc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b03dvxz6)

Today 07:00 SAT (b03d7v59)

Today 06:00 MON (b03dfc82)

Today 06:00 TUE (b03dsk4b)

Today 06:00 WED (b03dslgz)

Today 06:00 THU (b03dvbyh)

Today 06:00 FRI (b03dvk1l)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03bks90)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03bksqt)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03bkt07)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03bkt1q)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03bkt3d)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03bkt4n)

Verse Illustrated 23:00 MON (b013q3ny)

Warhorses of Letters 23:15 MON (b01pcqkr)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b03ct9nj)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b03ct9nl)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b03ct9nn)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b03ct9nv)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b03d49q5)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b03d49q9)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b03d49qf)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b03d49qk)

Weather 05:56 MON (b03d49rw)

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Weather 21:58 FRI (b03d49ys)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b03df88s)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b03df88x)

Who Sold the Soul? 11:30 TUE (b03dsk4q)

Witness 15:45 SAT (b03fh1zg)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b03ddnf5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b03dff15)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b03dsk4j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b03dsm3t)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b03dvbyp)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b03dvn0w)

World at One 13:00 MON (b03dfh0w)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b03dsk4v)

World at One 13:00 WED (b03dv1bx)

World at One 13:00 THU (b03dvbz0)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b03dvn18)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b03dfh0t)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b03dsk4s)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b03dv1bv)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b03dvbyy)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b03dvn14)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b03cv4cj)