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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 JULY 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b036vvzq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b036wdt1)
Permanent Present Tense

Episode 5

Suzanne Corkin's story of the life and legacy of the man with no memory, Henry Molaison. Today, Henry's final years, and how his brain continues to contribute to memory research and an understanding of who we are.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036vvzs)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036vvzv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036vvzx)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b036vvzz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b036wj84)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Venerable Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b036wj86)
The programme that starts with its listeners.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b036vw01)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b036vw03)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b036w39q)
Herriot Country

James Herriot's books about life as a country vet in the 1970s sold 60 million copies worldwide. Later many of the stories were made into feature films and a very popular TV series, 'All Creatures Great and Small'. Herriot's real name was James 'Alf' Wight, and he was known as 'Alf' by local people. He practiced as a vet in Thirsk, a small market town just a few miles from the North York Moors, as did his son, Jim Wight. Felicity Evans visits 'Herriot Country' to meet Jim Wight and talk about his father, the changes there have been in veterinary practice since the 1940s and the legacy 'James Herriot' left both the town and the local farming community.

Jim Wight takes Felicity to the old surgery in 23, Kirkgate, Thirsk where Alf served the local community as a vet, initially working with Donald Sinclair, who became Siegfried Farnon in the books. Jim lived here until he was ten and later when he followed his father into the practice, it was also his place of work. Now it's 'The World of James Herriot Museum', where the rooms are lovingly preserved and visitors can see the old dispensary and the veterinary instruments used in the post war era. The visit brings back many memories for Jim including sharing some of the humorous stories that made his father's books so famous.

The farming industry has also changed since Alf Wight's time and Felicity visits John Bowes and his son Jonathan, one of the few remaining dairy farmers now left in the area who remember Alf Wight's visits. She also meets the Town's Mayor, Janet Watson who talks of the 'Herriot effect' on business in the town and proudly shows her the newly laid cobblestones in the Market Square and the restored town clock.

Felicity ends her visit to Thirsk by observing a veterinary consultation at the Skeldale Veterinary practice. Peter Wright talks about the loss of many family run farms who kept livestock which has given way to a veterinary practice that is now dominated by small animals. Happily both Peter and Jim Wight believe that the changes, particularly in disease control, are very much for the better.

Producer: Sarah Pitt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b03727gc)
Farming Today This Week

Pemberley, Downton Abbey, Brideshead...the romanticism of the English country estate has long had a place in the imagination and affection of the public. But how like their nostalgic and fictional counterparts are country estates today, and do they still have a place in modern rural communities?

From weddings to tour groups and holiday cottages, landed estates are increasingly diversifying into other businesses, away from their traditional agricultural roots. Charlotte Smith heads to the Ragley Hall Estate in Warwickshire which is hosting the Country Land and Business Association Game Fair this weekend to find out what challenges face country estates in the 21st century, and how they're adapting in a world where agriculture is no longer their main source of income.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Datshiane Navanayagam.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b036vw05)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b0371x1t)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and John Humphrys, including:

0809
Five prison officers have been suspended while police investigate allegations of assault on Michael Adebolajo, one of the men suspected of the Woolwich murder. He's accused of murdering Fusilier Lee Rigby. Peter McParlin, chair of the Prison Officers Association, explains that there has been "sensationalist reporting" of the incident.

0812
Detroit was once rich and successful, but now it has gone bust: the biggest municipal bankruptcy in American history. The BBC's North America correspondent Jonny Dymond reports from Detroit.

0817
Police commissioners are showing a "worrying" ability to evade the rules when it comes to sacking chief constables, the Home Affairs Select committee of MPs has concluded. Keith Vas, Home Affairs Select Committee Chair, and Maritin Surl, independent Police and Crime Commissioner for Gloucestershire Constabulary, debate the claim.

0823
As well as unusually hot weather during the day, a lot of the UK has also been subject hot temperatures over night. The Today programme's reporter, Nicola Stanbridge, looks at how we are coping with these restless summer nights.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b03727gf)
Lenny Henry, Cyrille Regis, John McCarthy

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with actor and comedian Lenny Henry, The Inheritance Tracks of former footballer Cyrille Regis, forensic anthropologist Heather Bonney, The Queen of Yorkshire Comedy, Jo Little on Cromer Pier, John McCarthy travels round the Lake District in Mike Hardings camper van and JP Devlin with a crowdscape from Dudley.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 The Twelve Bar Blues (b0372ct1)
You've heard of the twelve bar - it's time to learn what exactly it is.

It is the DNA of popular music. Three chords played in a set sequence over twelve bars.
The twelve bar is an American invention. It was originally taken up by rural blues musicians. The first commercial example was W.C. Handy's 'St Louis Blues'. Then it became the staple of the New Orleans jazz repertoire, the big bands, Chicago blues . And in the fifties, just about every other pop song was written around the twelve bar chord sequence.

It is also the common ground for musicians who want to get to know each other. You might not know the same songs, but you know a twelve bar, and you jam. It's a musical level playing field.
You might not know it but a lot of very familiar songs are twelve bars. Here are twelve:

Hound Dog
Mustang Sally
Can't Buy Me Love
Subterranean Homesick Blues
Green Onions
Making Your Mind Up
Folsom Prison Blues
Mercy (Duffy)
Stormy Monday
Money
In The Mood
Sweet Home Chicago

Nick Barraclough has played a few twelve bars in his time. In this programme he talks to bluesologists, a couple of jazzers and a banjo player about why the twelve bar works so well. They illustrate what can be done with this simple sequence and how much fun it can be to mess with it.

Producer: John Leonard

A Smooth Operation production for BBC Radio 4


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b0372ct3)
Steve Richards looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Angry exchanges in the House of Commons this week over responsibility for excessive mortality rates in hospitals lead to accusations of playing politics with the health service. Is it wise for politicians to argue over who best guards the NHS? Two former health secretaries, Stephen Dorrell and Frank Dobson, give their views on managing expectations in the health service.
It was the last Prime Minister's Questions of the session this week, and it was predictably noisy. Do these weekly battles do anything for the stature of the party leaders or do they, as the Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow claims, turn people off politics? Two parliamentary sketch writers, Ann Treneman of The Times and Donald McIntyre of the Independent, discuss the merits of political combat.
The government suffered 26 defeats in the House of Lords last year. It remains unreformed despite the efforts of the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, but does it function well nevertheless? Baroness Hollis and Baroness Wheatcroft explain how in their view the Lords best fulfils its remit.
And finally what might the political classes read in their summer holidays? Keith Simpson MP, parliamentary aide to the Foreign Secretary William Hague, on what to take to the beach.

The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b0372ct5)
Mrs Wong and Mrs Lim Go Shopping

Correspondents around the world tell their stories and examine news developments in their region. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b0377cn9)
A major charity donations site has been closed down by the Charity Commission over serious concerns about its mismanagement and the loss of 'a minimum of £250,000' in donations made via the site which may now never reach their intended good cases. We hear from a listener whose son has just completed a gruelling 200 mile hike for charity collecting money using Charitygiving.co.uk. He wants to no what's happened to his sponsorship money.

Swinton Insurance Group has been fined £7.4 million by the Financial Conduct Authority for mis-selling add-on insurance policies to hundreds of thousands of customers. They were sold on the phone to people who rang up to insure their car but ended up with personal accident cover or home emergency insurance or even a breakdown service that they may already have from another firm. The FCA found that the policies and their costs were not clearly explained.

A law centre has published a payday loan survival guide explaining how to stop repayment, challenge charges, and get good advice on dealing with debt. The trade body for some of the biggest payday lenders responds.

Where to put your money in a volatile world? Shares are doing well as USA and UK central banks go cool on Quantitative Easing. Inflation remains stubbornly high - much higher than yields on cash or government bonds. Investors have become more cautious on emerging markets and gold has been plummeting in price. Two top advisers give their different views.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b036wg0h)
Series 81

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With panellists Jeremy Hardy, Jon Richardson, Vicki Pepperdine and the Telegraph's Michael Deacon.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b036vw07)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b036vw09)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b036wgjb)
Lord Lawson, Lord Ashdown, Kate Hoey, Baroness Neuberger

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Bridport in Dorset with Lord Ashdown, Kate Hoey MP, Baroness Julia Neuberger and former Chancellor of the Exchequer Lord Lawson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b0372ct7)
Listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01mny0r)
The Martin Beck Killings

The Locked Room

Steven Mackintosh and Neil Pearson star as Martin Beck and Lennart Kollberg in the Swedish detective series that inspired a generation of crime writers.

The Locked Room. On his return to work after recuperating from a bullet wound in the chest, Martin Beck's first case is a conundrum: the body of a man who has been shot dead is discovered in a sealed room, but there is is no gun. Meanwhile, Kollberg and Larsson are on the trail of a pair of bank robbers.

Narrator 1 ... Lesley Sharp
Narrator 2 ... Nicholas Gleaves
Martin Beck ... Steven Mackintosh
Lennart Kollberg ... Neil Pearson
Gunvald Larsson ... Ralph Ineson
Einar Rönn ... Wayne Foskett
Bulldozer Olsson ... Michael Maloney
Malm ... Nick Murchie
Sten/Police Commissioner ... Rick Warden
Mauritzon ... Ewan Bailey
Ake/Manager/Doctor ... Ben Crowe
Monita ... Philippa Stanton
Clerk/Insurance Woman ... Joanna Brookes
Pathologist/Ingela ... Hannah Wood
Gustavsson ... David Seddon
Rhea ... Nadine Marshall
Zachrisson ... Joe Sims
Hjelm/Warehouse man - old ... Robert Blythe
Detective Sergeant/Warehouse man - young ... Matthew Watson
Original music by Elizabeth Purnell
Directed by Mary Peate
Dramatised by Katie Hims

Original novels by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö
Translated by Paul Britten Austin


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b036v094)
Series 16

Make Me a Channel of Your Peace

The hymn 'Make Me a Channel of Your Peace' found its way into weddings, funerals and school assemblies and in this week's 'Soul Music' we hear how it has also embedded itself into the hearts of peace campaigners, charity workers and reformed alcoholics.

The simplicity of this hymn often belies the challenges at its heart. Its lyrics call for unconditional love and forgiveness in the toughest situations. The words are based on a poem which has often been attributed to St Francis of Assisi. However, Franciscan Historian, Dr Christian Renoux, suggests it was most likely to have been written by an anonymous French noble women.

The poem travelled across the globe with translations published during the first and second world wars, subsequently bringing inspiration to public figures ranging from Mother Theresa to President Roosevelt.

In 1967 it caught the eye of South African born musician and 'yogi' Sebastian Temple who put these words to its most famous musical arrangement. It's Sebastian's version that was played at Princess Diana's funeral and that has also touched the hearts of millions worldwide.

Mathew Neville of children's charity 'World Vision' recalls his encounter with this hymn in the Democratic Republic of Congo, whilst closer to home Wendy and Colin Parry share their memories of this music and the role it played in remembering their son Tim, who was killed in the 1993 Warrington Bombings.

In Minnesota former lawyer Mike Donohue reflects on how this hymn has guided him on a journey through alcohol abuse and dementia and Sarah Hershberg remembers her good friend Sebastian Temple, who first played this simple hymn in her front room before it went on to travel the world.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b0372ct9)
Bryony Kimmings; Yvette Cooper; What Women Want

Bryony Kimmings on her Credible Likeable Superstar Role Model she created with the help of her niece Taylor. Jane spends a day with shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper MP in her constituency.
Female sexual desire: psychotherapist Susie Orbach and journalist Daniel Bergner discuss his book, What Do Women Want. Dr Bryan Mendleson and Dr Felicity Mehendelay talk about why people have cosmetic surgery. Haiffa Al-Mansour on her film, Wadjda, and being the first female director from Saudi Arabia. The women organising music festivals - Tania Harrison from Latitude and Becky Burchell from Bestival. Laura Mvula sings She.


SAT 17:00 PM (b0372ctc)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b036w3b6)
Water

Water is the world's most precious resource. It's also big business. As climate changes and populations shift, getting water where it needs to be is a huge global challenge. And that's without the added problem of leakage. And how much should consumers pay for something that none of us can live without?
Evan Davis and guests discuss an industry which has changed almost beyond recognition in just a few decades - from state-owned water providers to international business players.
Guests:
Peter Simpson, CEO Anglian Water
Bryan Harvey, Vice President CH2M HILL
Olivier Bret, CEO Veolia Water UK
Producer : Rosamund Jones.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b037gktm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b036vw0h)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036vw0k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b0372ctf)
Toby Jones, Nigel Planer, Antony Hegarty, Gruff Rhys, Neon Neon

Clive talks Flower Power with star of 'The Young Ones', actor Nigel Planer, who shot to fame as hippie housemate Neil in the student life sitcom. Nigel's currently playing Grandpa Joe in Roald Dahl's deliciously dark tale of young Charlie Bucket and the mysterious confectioner Willy Wonka. 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' is at Theatre Royal, London until 31st May 2014.

Clive's joined by musician Antony Hegarty, whose band 'Antony and the Johnsons' won the Mercury Prize in 2005 for their album 'I Am A Bird Now'. The band are about to perform 'Swanlights'; an evolution of their third album 'The Crying Light', envisioned as a meditation on light, nature, and femininity. Antony performs 'I Fell in Love with a Dead Boy' on the Loose Ends Steinway. 'Antony and The Johnsons: Swanlights' is on 25th and 26th July at London's Royal Opera House.

Nikki Bedi chats to Super Furry Animal Gruff Rhys, whose electro pop outfit Neon Neon have collaborated with National Theatre Wales to create an immersive gig, featuring songs from their album 'Praxis Makes Perfect' and imagining the life of Giangiacomo Feltrinelli; the millionaire Italian communist at the heart of some of the most extraordinary events of the twentieth century. Neon Neon perform 'Hammer & Sickle' in the studio. 'Praxis Makes Perfect' is at Festival No. 6, Portmeiron from 12th to 15th September.

Clive talks to the Infamous actor Toby Jones about playing such characters as Dobby the house elf in the 'Harry Potter' films and Alfred Hitchcock in 'The Girl'. Toby's currently starring in 'Circle Mirror Transformation', about five lost people who come together at a community centre class to try and find some meaning in their lives. It's at the Rose Lipman Building, London until 3rd August.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b0372cth)
Samantha Cameron

Edward Stourton profiles Samantha Cameron. There's been debate this week about the degree to which her views influence government policy. But what do we actually know about the Prime Minister's wife?

The daughter of a baronet with a family estate in Lincolnshire, Samantha Cameron was born Samantha Sheffield. She grew up in Oxfordshire but moved to Marlborough College in Wiltshire, where she took her A' Levels before studying Art at Camberwell College and Bristol Polytechnic.

She met David Cameron through his sister - a close schoolfriend - and they married the same year that she started her career at the British luxury accessories brand, Smythson. She has been credited with reinventing the brand by introducing a popular line of handbags.

Three years into her role as Prime Minister's wife, how is she handling life in Number 10?


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b0372ctk)
The World's End; A Season in the Congo; Burton and Taylor reimagined on BBC4

Simon Pegg and Rosamund Pike star in the film The World's End, the last of the so-called Cornetto Trilogy following Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, directed by Edgar Wright. Can Gary King make it through the pub crawl he failed to finish as a teenager in his home town of Newton Haven?

Joe Wright directs Chiwetel Ejiofor in A Season in the Congo at the Young Vic, a powerful political play by Aime Cesaire charting the rise and fall of Patrice Lumumba in the early days of Congolese independence.

Rachel Joyce's novel Perfect tells the story of Byron, an 11-year-old boy who becomes deeply troubled by the prospect of two seconds needing to be added to time in the year 1972. Can it match the success of her debut novel, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry?

A major retrospective and consideration of the ethos of the architect Richard Rogers: Inside Out is at the Royal Academy in Burlington Gardens, London - the title reflects his architectural style, putting the inner workings of a building on the outside, as he did in his collaboration with Renzo Piano on the Centre Pompidou.

And Burton and Taylor come to BBC4 - in the shape of Dominic West and Helena Bonham Carter, taking on the roles of the stage and screen superstars over a period in 1983 when they acted together on the New York stage in Coward's Private Lives, shortly before Burton's death.

Sarfraz Manzoor is joined by the author Joe Dunthorne, the journalist Maev Kennedy and the cultural commentator Ekow Eshun.

Producer: Sarah Johnson.


SAT 20:00 Meeting Myself Coming Back (b0372ctm)
Series 5

Martin Amis

From debut novelist to outspoken critic, the writer Martin Amis meets his younger self in the BBC sound archive and discusses his reaction to what he hears with John Wilson.

Martin Amis achieved success at a young age. His debut novel "The Rachel Papers", written in his 20s, won the same prize that had been awarded to his father Kingsley Amis. His success as a writer has continued with novels including "Money" and "London Fields" and collections of journalism and essays.

But the real life of Martin Amis has prompted as many headlines as his fiction. With stories about his earnings, his teeth, and more recently his views on Islam and elderly people, his name has regularly appeared in the papers and his opinions have often been controversial.

In the first of a new series of "Meeting Myself Coming Back", Martin Amis hears clips from key moments in his life and discusses his reaction to them with John Wilson. In an honest and penetrating look back at his career, he discusses his achievements and his mistakes.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.


SAT 21:00 The Stuarts (b036tqpv)
This War Without an Enemy

by Mike Walker. Charles I's best qualities come to the fore only in defeat, when there are no more decisions to take but only courage and calm to see him through. Only in this moment of perfect stillness can he begin to understand what has brought him here.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole & Sasha Yevtushenko
Sound design by Colin Guthrie

Production co-ordinator: Selina Ream
Studio managers: Martha Littlehailes, Alison Craig.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b036vw0m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b036vvrn)
The Morality of Place

This week the Moral Maze asks "are mixed communities a moral good?" With the government rolling out its benefits cap and a study claiming that high rents mean a third of Britain is effectively off-limits to lower-income working families, some campaigners are arguing that the less well-off are the victims of social cleansing. It's argued the lack of affordable housing means that large parts of the country, especially London, are being turned in to homogenised gated communities reserved for the well off and where the poor are welcome to work, but not to live. Does that really matter? Should we let the free market solve these problems, or use planning laws to make sure property developers build social housing alongside more expensive homes? Should the tax and benefits system be used not just to make sure that people have a roof over their heads, but also to shape the social make up of our communities and nation? Are pluralist, socially diverse communities inherently better - a sign that we're a healthier, tolerant, more democratic society? Or have we for too long been beguiled by the dream of a melting pot? And not only is it human nature to want to live in a community with people who have the same kind of background, values and aspirations, but those communities also create virtues such as neighbourliness, trust and social solidarity. By trying to create more diverse and integrated communities are we undermining the strong social ties that create truly cohesive communities? Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Anne McElvoy, Giles Fraser and Matthew Taylor. Witnesses: David Goodhart - Director of think tank Demos, Professor Jane Wills - Department of Geography and The City Centre, Queen Mary University of London, Philip Booth - Editorial and Programme Director at the Institute of Economic Affairs and Ruth Davison - Director of Policy at National Housing Federation.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b036twt1)
Series 27

Episode 11

(11/13)
Paul Gambaccini hosts the second semi-final of the wide-ranging music quiz, with three more competitors who've come through the heats stage and now stand a chance of gaining a place in the Final at the end of July.

This week's semi-finalists are from London, Glasgow and Cardiff, and they'll face questions on the widest possible range of musical styles and performers. From operas based on Classical mythology, to the movie themes of Bernard Herrmann - and plenty of points in between.

There are musical extracts to identify, some familiar, some surprising - and no shortage of anecdotes, as Paul Gambaccini welcomes a lively audience to the BBC Radio Theatre in London.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b036tqpz)
An Ark of Animal Poems

Roger McGough takes a new job as Noah at the helm of an ark of animal poems. A back to nature edition of poetry requests with poems from Alice Oswald, Simon Armitage, Michael Symons Roberts and James Lasdun. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 21 JULY 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0371wn5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b014qt0b)
Face It

Confirm/Ignore

The third of three short story commissions on the theme of social networking.

Confirm/Ignore, by Nikesh Shukla, is a moving story about coping with grief in the age of social media.

Read by Nikesh Shukla

Produced by Robert Howells

Nikesh Shukla is a London-based author and poet. His first book, 'Coconut Unlimited' was shortlisted for the Costa First Book Award 2010.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0371wn7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0371wn9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0371wnc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0371wnf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b0372v85)
The sound of church bells.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b0372cth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0371wnh)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0372v87)
Desire

Sarah Cuddon reflects on the nature of desire - full of passion, ambition, creativity and, potentially, danger.

She draws on the writings of Sharon Olds, Marie Colvin and Gwendolyn Brooks; the music of Edith Piaf, Felix Mendelssohn and Sweet Honey in the Rock and she talks to 90 year old Josephine about the undimmed power of her desires.

Produced by Alan Hall.
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b0372v89)
The race is on to harvest the perfect pea. On average, everyone in Britain eats about 9,000 peas a year - and farmers have just 150 minutes to get them from the field to the freezer.

At this time of year, the harvesters are working around the clock to make sure no quality is lost between the field fresh vegetable and the frozen pea we buy from the shops months later.

In this edition of On Your Farm, Sybil Ruscoe meets the team at Fen Peas in Lincolnshire, a producer organisation growing around 5,200 acres of peas. With their 82 farmers, they have to manage this operation with military precision.

Sybil learns about every stage of the process - from the staff pinpointing the exact time the pea is perfect, to the trucks winding their way down rural roads towards the blast freezer at nearby processors in Boston.

With just two and half hours, will they make it? Start the clock!

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Angela Frain.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b0371wnk)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0371wnm)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0372v8c)
The Rt Rev James Jones; Pope Francis in Rio; Church art row

The Rt Rev James Jones will retire as Bishop of Liverpool on his 65th birthday this August. He joins Edward in the studio to discuss his 15 years in post.

A fierce debate about race relations has gripped the USA after George Zimmerman was cleared of murdering Trayvon Martin in Florida. Edward is joined by Valerie Houston, the pastor of Allen Chapel AME Church in Sanford who is one of a group of local pastors who have united to explain events to their congregations.

As thousands of young Catholics from across the globe descend on Rio for World Youth Day, Robert Mickens discusses Pope Francis' first trip means to Latin America.

Should a church be allowed to sell a painting worth millions? An altarpiece by the artist Benjamin West, is to be sold by the City of London church St Stephen of Walbrook. Ann Sloman is the Chair of the Church Buildings Council explains why she believes the painting should stay where it is.

Matt Wells reports from New Jersey on a small group of Catholic priests and nuns called "Catholic Whistleblowers" who have decided to speak out against some church leaders who they say continue to protect "sexual predators".

St Georges German Lutheran Church is the oldest German church in Britain. On its 250th anniversary Trevor Barnes visits the church in London's East End to discover the history of the German community in London.

As tensions mount in Belfast Edward speaks to Father Martin McGill and Reverend Norman Hamilton to discuss whether religious leaders are doing enough to address the problems during marching season.

Credits
Series Producer: Amanda Hancox
Producers: Annabel Deas Carmel Lonergan
Contributors:
The Rt Rev James Jones
Pastor Valerie Houston
Robert Mickens
Ann Sloman
Fr Martin McGill
Rev Norman Hamilton.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b0372v8f)
The Cambodia Trust

Chris Moon, motivational speaker, amputee ultra distance athlete and former landmine clearance specialist,
presents the Radio 4 Appeal for The Cambodia Trust
Reg Charity:1032476
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope The Cambodia Trust.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b0371wnp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0371wnt)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b037524k)
The Sound of Salvation

Canon Chris Chivers and the Revd Ian Browne explore the power of music to express the sound of salvation in a service during the Organists' course of the Oundle International Festival with the Choir of Jesus College Cambridge and the Festival Chorus directed by Mark Williams and James Lloyd Thomas. Organist: Robert Quinney. Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b036wgjg)
A Big Day for Bert and Ernie?

The recent New Yorker cover showing Sesame Street's Bert and Ernie as a gay couple, delighted by the American Supreme Court ruling that the Defence of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, prompts Sarah Dunant to reflect on the power of cartoons to convey social messages.
"Those cartoon characters - or their puppet equivalents - which touch us at our most formative moments of early childhood will become part of the bedrock of our cultural belonging."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b02twnw4)
Herring Gull

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the herring gull.

Herring gulls now regularly breed inland and that's because of the way we deal with our refuse. Since the Clean Air Acts of 1956 banned the burning of refuse at rubbish tips, the birds have been able to cash in on the food that we reject: And our throwaway society has provided them a varied menu. We've also built reservoirs around our towns on which they roost, and we've provided them with flat roofs which make perfect nest sites.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b037524m)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b037524p)
For detailed synopsis, see daily episodes.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b037524r)
Russell Brand

Russell Brand, comedian & actor, is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs.

Actor, comic, writer, Russell Brand is a compelling cultural phenomenon who in 2006 was, in his own words, "plucked from a life of hard drugs and petty crime and rocketed into the snugly carcinogenic glare of celebrity."

Along with an athletic wit and a florid turn of phrase he specialises in going too far - reckless acts of self-destruction and a degree of chaos seem to be his companions along life's winding path. It's been five years since he rocked the foundations of the BBC with what became known as the Ross Brand scandal. He's since gone on to international success with a movie career, best-selling books and all the trappings of life on the "A" list.

His most recent notable appearances have included testifying to a Parliamentary Select Committee on the importance of funding for drugs rehabilitation programmes and an appearance as a panellist on Question Time.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b036twt9)
Series 59

Episode 3

The nation's favourite wireless entertainment pays a visit to the Winding Wheel Theatre in Chesterfield. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Miles Jupp, with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell provides piano accompaniment.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b037524t)
Rethinking Veganism

The word 'vegan' has for the nearly seventy years of its existence - represented a diet and a way of eating that has not captured hearts - or stomachs - beyond a small, dedicated group of people calling themselves vegan.

In this edition of The Food Programme, Sheila Dillon hears from two influential and meat-loving food writers, Mark Bittman and Alex Renton, who have found themselves looking again at a vegan plant-based diet.

Sheila Dillon joins in at a Vegan Potluck and discovers a new chain of German vegan supermarkets and asks if there is a wider shift in attitudes towards veganism underway.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b0371wnw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b037524w)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace (b036twth)
Warfare

The last of three programmes about the virtual world where they steal, spy and wage war. The British government recently declared that one of the greatest threats to national security emanates from cyberspace. Hostile nation states are conducting a war over the internet, while Western companies face the wholesale plundering of their economic life-blood. There is increasing tension as China and the United States square up to each other, while North Korea and Iran are both thought to have launched attacks.
BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera reports from London, Washington and Beijing. He talks to those who are holding the line, including top intelligence officials, political leaders and the heads of some of the world's largest companies which stand to lose millions from the theft of their intellectual property. "Britain is under attack," says Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague. "Most countries are under attack and certainly many industries and businesses are under attack." Who is responsible and where will it end?
Producer: Mark Savage.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b036wg05)
Staffordshire

Eric Robson hosts this week's episode of Gardeners' Question Time in Staffordshire. Answering the audience's questions on gardening are panelists Matt Biggs, Christina Walkden and Chris Beardshaw.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. Which plants would provide a splash of colour and attract wildlife in the cobbled or tarmac alleys running behind rows of houses?

A. These alleys are likely to have one side in deep shade and the other in sunshine. For the warm, sunny side Wall Valerian, Sweet Peas, 'Spanish Flag', Petunias, as well as scented Pelargoniums or tumbling tomatoes in hanging baskets are recommended. Hydrangea Petiolaris, Hostas, Heucheras, Tiarellas, Corydalis Lutea and Alchemilla Mollis are suggested for the shady side. Toadflax and wild Geraniums are also recommended.

Q. Can the panel advise why Lupins will not grow in my garden? The soil is neutral, neither sandy nor clay.

A. If this is a repeated problem it may be as a result of the allelopathic effect of one or other of the plants already growing in the garden. Lupins thrive on being slightly raised and earthed up - planting them too deep could be the cause of the problem. Try growing them in a tub to see if this improves the growth. The variety 'Masterpiece' is particularly hardy. Tree Lupins are also recommended.

Q. I have an unruly fig tree - 15ft wide by 9ft tall (4.5m by 2.5m) - growing against a south-facing wall. How should it be pruned to maximise the fruit it yields?

A. Pruning figs tends to encourage more lush growth. Try feeding it with a potash-rich fertiliser to try and rein it in that way. Eventually it will settle down! The roots have probably gone down into moisture rich fertile ground. If possible dig down around the roots and sever some in order to compromise the root system. More generally, prune out any stem that is older than two years and fan-train the new stems against the wall.

Q. A 25 year old Yucca has grown two enormous side shoots along the ground. If these are removed to tidy the plant, could they be replanted?

A. Part of the shoots may have already rooted. New material can usually be replanted, but substantial material may not survive being removed from the main plant. Score some of the bark off the underside of the shoot and earth it up - within a season or so, this may have sent down its own roots, after which point it should be removed from the main plant.

Q. Two years ago I planted a damson tree. When can I expect it to fruit?

A. Fruit should not be removed from the plant for three or four years post-planting, whilst the plant is becoming established. It should start to fruit after five or six years.

Q. Would it be possible to move by 16ft (5m) tall Taxus Baccata? If so, when?

A. Try root pruning over the course of two years in order to get some fibrous root onto the tree. This will make it more likely to survive the move. Once the tree is showing signs of growth in May or June, use a chainsaw to reduce the height by around half and remove most of the side shoots before moving into a prepared pit. Water regularly throughout the summer and it should recover well.

Q. Would it be possible to grow plants in plastic guttering 2in deep by 4in wide (5cm by 10cm), fixed on a southwest-facing wall? Can the panel suggest any edible or decorative plants that may be suitable?

A. The gutter will need to be on a slight gradient for drainage and will need the gutter ends on to keep the compost contained. Smaller herbs, such as chamomile, thyme or Corsican mint are recommended. With enough water flowing through, watercress could be grown. Mini Hostas would also be happy in these conditions. Florist's foam and capillary matting are suggested as a way of ensuring that moisture is retained along the length of the guttering.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b037524y)
Haile Selassie visits Jamaica

In 1966, Haile Selassie the Emperor of Ethiopia made his first and only visit to Jamaica - home of the Rastafari movement which revered him. Alex Last has been speaking to two Jamaicans who witnessed his historic arrival.


SUN 15:00 Patrick O'Brian - Desolation Island (b0375250)
Episode 1

August, 1811. Jack Aubrey sets sail for Australia in his new command, HMS Leopard. His mission - to transport a group of convicts to Botany Bay, including a woman, Louisa Wogan, who has been spying for the Americans.

Stephen Maturin joins Jack once again as ship's surgeon - but his real mission is to watch Mrs Wogan. When a fever breaks out among the prisoners and crew, Jack decides to head for Recife - but he is pursued through the South Atlantic by a powerful Dutch warship.

Patrick O'Brian's novel dramatised in two-parts by Roger Danes.

Jack Aubrey ...... David Robb
Stephen Maturin ...... Richard Dillane
Louisa Wogan ...... Teresa Gallagher
Michael Herapath ...... Samuel Barnett
Lt Pullings ...... David Holt
Barratt Bonden ...... Sam Dale
Preserved Killick ...... Jon Glover
Lt Grant ...... Jonathan Tafler
Byron ...... Nick Underwood
Sir Joseph Blaine ...... Michael Bertenshaw
Peggy Barnes ...... Hannah Wood
Josiah Plaice ...... Lloyd Thomas

Other parts played by the cast.

Producer/director: Bruce Young

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2013.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b0375252)
Summer in literature; Rilla Askew on Kind of Kin; David Mitchell

Summer in English Literature has appeared in many guises and inspired a multitude of authors in myriad ways, from P.G. Wodehouse's description of a genteel countryside slumbering during a summer afternoon, the promise of a new life and the bounty of the British season in Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist, to the lethargy of an American town in the deep South in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. In this return to our 'writing the seasons' feature Mariella Frostrup discusses how summer has been reflected in literature with novelists Horatio Clare and Justin Cartwright.

Novelist Rilla Askew has imagined the everyday impact on small communities and individuals of big events from the Tulsa Race Riots in her American Book Award winning Fire in Beulah to the disaster of the Dustbowl migrations through the eyes of a love-struck young couple in Harpsong. The common denominator in much of Rilla's writing, alongside those themes, is her home state of Oklahoma, the setting for so many tipping points in American history. She explains why she chose the controversial immigration laws of 2007 as the topic of her latest book Kind of Kin.

Two times Booker shortlisted novelist David Mitchell, author of the likes of Cloud Atlas and Numbers9Dream is the next author to share with us the book he would never lend. David has turned to early 20th century America for his treasured tome - The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder.

Producer: Andrea Kidd.


SUN 16:30 Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus - Dancing the Orange (b0375254)
Karen Leeder is fascinated by one of the great modernist works of literature of 1922; not James Joyce's 'Ulysses', published in February, nor 'The Waste Land' by T. S. Eliot, but Maria Rainer Rilke's 'Sonnets to Orpheus'.

After a lifetime wandering about Europe Rilke was at last able to settle when his patron, Werner Reinhart, bought the Château de Muzot in the Swiss Valais so that he could live there, and write. His aim was to complete his monumental work,'The Duino Elegies'. But this plan was interrupted in February when, 'completely unexpected' the 'Sonnets to Orpheus' broke upon him'. Within three weeks he had completed 55 poems, of great variety, but all sonnets.

Rilke didn't like English and never visited Britain. Yet the 'Sonnets to Orpheus' have fascinated English language readers and writers ever since they appeared. There have been translations every decade, the most recent, and brilliant, by Martyn Crucefix, published just last year. Don Paterson's 'Orpheus', which he calls versions, rather than translations of the sonnets, is considered his finest work.

Karen Leeder talks to both writers, and the Greman scholar and poet Rüdiger Görner, teasing out the major issues they address; death, love and, the creation and role of poetry - for Rilke a song of praise for life, and even death, in a creation without God, through which meaning is accomplished.

Karen, who is the Professor of German at Oxford University, and one of the editors of 'The Cambridge Companion to Rilke' visits the Château de Muzot. With Nanni Reinhart, who lives there now, she considers the impact of the place of their composition on the poems. Leading us through the nuances of their meaning, she alerts us to the beauty and power of Rilke's 'Sonnets to Orpheus'.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b036v9hj)
Tobacco: The Lobbyists

Last week, the Government dropped plans to introduce plain packaging for cigarettes in England. It said it wanted to wait and see what happens in Australia where the measure was introduced earlier this year.
Labour and health campaigners accused the Government of caving in to the tobacco lobby. A claim it has denied.
In Europe, too, MEPs are considering a new law aimed at deterring young people from smoking. The Tobacco Products Directive proposes, among other things, a ban on flavoured cigarettes and increasing the size of health warnings.
Jane Deith travels to Brussels and hears claims and counter-claims: of questionable tactics by the tobacco industry and from tobacco lobbyists who say their actions are above board and they have the right to protect their companies' interests.
And she also talks to the main players in an alleged corruption scandal which some say could have brought down the European Commission itself.
Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Paul Grant.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b0372cth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0371wpb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b0371wpf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0371wph)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0375257)
Shari Vahl's Pick of the Week

This week we hear the fascinating and appalling result of total memory loss and how one man's suffering benefitted science. The agonies faced by Central American migrants travelling on a train known for good reason as... the Beast. The humorous bits of heart failure... and why a wee wee could help you say oui...Amongst purring frogs, talking dogs, and lessons on conversing with aliens - we hear a brand new use for duct tape and what you'll need if you want to push a potato out of a cow...

Programmes featured this week:

A Guide to Garden Wildlife - ponds - Radio 4
Book of the Week - Permanent Present Tense ep 2 - Radio 4
When I Lost You - Radio 4
BBC Proms 2013 - Monday - Mahler's 5th Symphony - Radio 3
Richard Tyrone's Big Heart - Radio 4
Outlook - Monday - World Service
Three Pieces in the Shape of a Pear - Radio 4
Dog Days ep 2 - Flush - Radio 4
The Twelve Bar Blues - Radio 4
PM - Wednesday - Radio 4
Word of Mouth - How do you talk to an alien? - Radio 4
You and Yours - Thursday - Radio 4
Open Country - Radio 4
Heart and Soul - Through the Valley of Death - World Service
Private Passions - Lord Sacks - Radio 3

Produced by Louise Clarke.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b0375259)
Jazzer's planning to play the bagpipes at today's Highland Games. Jim's not keen on his music suggestions though.
David's relieved that Kenton finally asked Jolene to marry him. Kenton can't believe Jolene accepted. His Mum's happy. He just hopes everyone will be. Fallon jokes with David that it's strange he will be her uncle.
Kathy's disappointed by the white elephant crockery from for former boss Toby, who has recently moved on from managing the golf club. Hungover Jamie's distracted by the vision of Jazzer appearing in his kilt, accompanied by his friend the clan chief Dougie.
Lynda inspects porridge bowls as Robert tries 'bash a rat'. Jamie gives a fine effort at tossing the caber. Eddie wins the Maide Leisg ('lazy stick' - a one-on-one tug of war) and Jim manages to dunk the vicar.
Lynda's not convinced Dougie is a genuine clan chief. After Kathy realises she knows him from a chip shop in Borchester, Lynda angrily berates Jazzer. But Jim points out that Dougie comes from a long line of Scottish ancestors, and has a strong case for founding a new clan. Lynda apologies to Jazzer but it's quickly forgotten as Lynda spots an opportunity. She'll ask Dougie to Address the Haggis at her next Burns' Night supper.
Kenton asks Fallon an important question: does she approve of him marrying Jolene? Fallon's thrilled about it, and welcomes Kenton to the family.


SUN 19:15 Richard Tyrone Jones's Big Heart (b037525c)
Of Coke Dealers and Cardioverters

Series Title: Richard Tyrone Jones's Big Heart
Programme/episode title: Of Coke Dealers and Cardioverters

Richard Tyrone Jones, healthy, gym-going poet, man about town and aspirant womaniser, finds himself, on his thirtieth birthday, stricken by an unexpected present: heart failure. Confined to hospital with a a dilated, literally-big heart, surrounded by old men, stuck on drugs and drips and forced to cope with curious medical procedures and even curiouser fellow patients, will he die, or worse, be doomed to life in a mobility scooter at home with his parents in Dudley?

Based on Richard's Wellcome Trust supported solo show each episode illuminates a different aspect of the experience of illness and facing your own mortality. Half-way between a sitcom and real-life storytelling, Richard will explain some of his illness's progression through direct address and his own poems.

Richard Tyrone Jones is a poet and writer and director of spoken word at the Edinburgh Festival Free Fringe.

It was written by Richard Tyrone Jones
With additional material by Michael Mixy Riccardi

Studio engineer and editor - Matt Katz

Produced by Nick Walker
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Opening Lines (b037525f)
Series 15

The Underwater Cathedral

The series which gives first-time and emerging short story writers their radio debut.

In Martin Cathcart Froden's beguiling tale about humankind's desire to conquer the natural world, a young man answers the siren call of the sea and pushes his body to extremes.

Read by Stuart McLoughlin
Produced by Gemma Jenkins.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b036wg0c)
This week the BBC announced that the Today programme is to get a new presenter - a female one. Mishal Husain will join the Today line-up in the Autumn and, along with Sarah Montague, will take the ratio from 1 in 5 female to male presenters, to 2 in 6. Feedback listeners welcome the announcement.

But it's not all jubilation. We hear reaction to the BBC's Annual Report. Some of it made for "grim reading" according to the DG Lord Hall. £5 million spent on three separate inquiries into the Jimmy Savile scandal, as well as £25 million paid out in severance payments, and £98 million lost on the failed Digital Media Initiative.

Roger Bolton speaks to Lord Hennessy and asks whether his new Radio 4 series 'Reflections' is a bit too soft on his political interviewees. We explore the art of the political interview with a man who's met them all.

And as outraged comments about The Archers' Matt and Lilian story that was only broadcast digitally continue to fill our postbag, we ask the boss of Digital Radio UK how easy and widespread digital listening really is.

Finally - Operation Drop-out returns! It's time, once again, to call on the good men and women who so diligently wrote to us last year with their examples of interviews where dropped telephone lines, sub-standard digital connections, and woeful mobiles had disrupted their listening pleasure. Listeners spotted some telephonic trouble in the Today studio this week - but are Today the only culprits? We'll be putting questions to the technology department soon so consider yourself conscripted for the cause.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b036wg09)
A footballer, a Scottish nationalist, painter, an evolutionary theorist, a Liberal activist and a TV producer

Matthew Bannister on

Bert Trautmann, the former German prisoner of war who became a celebrated goalkeeper for Manchester City Football Club. He famously broke his neck in the 1956 FA Cup Final, but kept on playing. Bob Wilson pays tribute.

Kay Matheson. In 1950 with three others, she took part in a raid on Westminster Abbey to "liberate" the Stone of Scone on which Scottish kings were crowned and take it North of the border. We hear from one of her accomplices.

Elaine Morgan whose book "The Descent of Woman" became an important text for the feminist movement.

Lord Chitnis who was an effective backroom organiser for the Liberal Party. Lord Steel pays tribute.

And Ray Butt the TV comedy producer who made Only Fools and Horses and many other hit shows.


SUN 21:00 Face the Facts (b01smkpw)
Safety on the Line?

John Waite investigates how a culture of rule-breaking and corner-cutting has crept into contractors carrying out work for Network Rail. Many contractors now rely on labour agencies for manpower, and railway workers reveal their concerns at the short notice of shifts they often receive and the long distances they sometimes travel before starting work. They describe how they are expected to work without rest breaks, ignore rules on shift length, and why they do not report safety incidents for fear of being blacklisted. John meets the mother of Scott Dobson, a 26 year old railway worker who was killed in an accident near Saxilby in December 2012. He finds evidence that the contractor now under investigation has a history of breaking safety rules and how before the accident it had been warned by the regulator to improve.

Presenter: John Waite
Producer: Richard Hooper
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b0372v8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b036twtk)
Scottish Nationalism: From Protest to Power

Just what does the Scottish National Party want? And what could it mean for the UK?

Douglas Fraser investigates the SNP's long search for an independence vision that works. He talks to insiders about the party's turbulent past, torn, as one leader put it, between 'Jacobites and Jacobins'. How has the party tried to build a vision of Scottish identity that keeps pace with social change? Does it aim to preserve the old British welfare state, or try something different? What do its plans for continued close links with the rest of the UK mean for its vision of a separate Scotland?

Scotland may be diverging more and more from England, whatever happens in next year's independence referendum. With that vote fast approaching, where this debate is heading matters for everyone in the UK. The SNP's journey reveals much about this important change.

Presenter: Douglas Fraser
Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Innes Bowen.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b037525h)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b037525k)
A look at how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b036w39s)
The World's End; Mark Gatiss On the Buses; Breathe In; Hans Zimmer

Matthew Sweet talks dangerous nostalgia with Edgar Wright, director of the comedy The World's End. Starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, the plot follows the group of friends as they return to their home town to complete a pub crawl from their youth. Their mission is thrown off course by aliens. Edgar Wright reveals an autobiographical bent to the tale.
The Oscar-winning composer Hans Zimmer has written scores for countless films from The Lion King to Driving Miss Daisy to Gladiator. He describes the moment he got his big break, composing the music for Rain Man.
Felicity Jones and director Drake Doremus are back with a new film Breathe In, about an English exchange student whose arrival in upstate New York throws the perfect lives of her host family into chaos. The pair previously made Like Crazy together and explain their love of improvisation and risk-taking with performance.
Mark Gatiss is also dabbling in nostalgia. As part of his series on 70s sitcom cinema spin offs, he looks back at Holiday On The Buses, a distinctly uncomfortable watch.
And on the Film Programme website, White Elephant. Newly released on dvd, this film explores the lives of priests working in the slums of Buenos Aires. The director Pablo Trapero describes working in these areas as a teenager and how this inspired his latest film. Its release proved timely as the new Pope had also worked in the slums and granted the film crew permission to approach the priests there when making this feature.

Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0372v87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 22 JULY 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0371wqj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b036vvr8)
Raising Middle-Class Black Children; Neon

Neon - Laurie Taylor discusses a history of the flickering light which illuminated the modern world. Professor of American Studies, Christoph Ribbat, charts the rise and fall of neon. From seedy back alleys to gaudy Las Vegas, its blinking presence has electrified the contemporary city. So why did the theorist, Theodor Adorno, so despise these glowing tubes? How did neon become such a recurrent metaphor for modernity in popular culture, ranging from the writings of Vladimir Nabokov to the art of Tracy Emin? And why has the gas which once lit up our lives begun to fade into oblivion? They're joined by the cultural critic, Matthew Sweet.

Also, the first dedicated UK study of black Caribbean middle-class families, and their strategies and priorities in relation to their children's education. The role of 'extra-curricular' activities in the process by which black middle-class parents seek to raise and develop their children.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b0372v85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0371wql)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0371wqn)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0371wqq)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0371wqs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03754hm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Venerable Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b03754hp)
Farming Today ranges from agriculture's future - which could include robots in the fields - to farming's role as custodian of the past, as we explore the balance between growing crops and preserving the archaeology which lies beneath them.

And Anna Hill reports on new soil research which reveals the scientific reasons why growing different crops in succession, or rotation, improves yields.

Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:56 Weather (b0371wqv)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02txxkl)
Dotterel

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the dotterel.

Dotterels are waders, rather like small plovers with a broad white-eye stripe. In the UK, they're almost confined as breeding birds to the Scottish Highlands. They don't tend to fly away when approached which led our ancestors to believe that they are stupid. "Dotterel" derives from the same source as "dotard" and this tameness meant that the birds were easy prey for Victorian collectors.


MON 06:00 Today (b03754hr)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Privacy Under Pressure (b03757ck)
Episode 2

2/3 Continuing his series on the state of privacy in Britain today, Steve Hewlett looks at whether the UK is becoming more and more of a surveillance society, and the questions this raises.

We are used to being photographed in public places by the many CCTV cameras across the country, for which there is a high degree of public support. But how, in future, might people feel about being recorded by a tiny camera in someone's glasses, or by a drone high up in the sky?

And will technological developments render all these images storable, searchable, and even personally identifiable, as face recognition technology improves?

What could be the impact of networks of tiny sensors in homes and workplaces which are likely to become increasingly common, bringing benefits of convenience, but also capable of gathering information?

And are the internet giants holding back on details of this for fear that the public will feel the technology "is over the freaky line"?

Producer: Jane Ashley.


MON 09:30 A Guide to Garden Wildlife (b03757cm)
Hedges

Ever wondered what causes the semi-circular holes in your rose bushes, and what is it that raids the honeysuckle for nectar? Well the answers to these garden mysteries are revealed when Brett Westwood is joined by naturalist Phil Gates in a garden near Bristol and with the help of recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson and Geoff Sample, they offer a practical and entertaining guide to the wildlife which you're most likely to see and hear in a garden hedge. Hedgerows provide food, shelter and nesting sites for birds, climbing frames for plants and food for insects. Male wrens build multiple nests (often in hedges) and the female then selects one in which to lay her eggs. Wrens are also notable for their song; it's a very loud explosive song for such a small bird "The whole bird seems to vibrate". Brett and Phil then turn their attention from song to scent; and to the honeysuckle which grows in this garden around the porch, but is often entwined in hedges and likely to attract the lovely Twenty-plume Moth - so called because "their wings look like beautiful Chinese fans ... and each wing is divided into what look like little feathers", and although its called the Twenty-plume Moth, it actually has 24 plumes, six on each of the four wings; a really exquisite moth. They also look for signs of leafcutter bees, before finally discussing hedgehogs, the ardent adventures of one particular male in Phil's garden, their extraordinarily noisy courtship, and the importance of hedges as highways and corridors between gardens.

PRODUCER: Sarah Blunt.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b03757cp)
Florian Illies - 1913

Episode 1

In Paris, Proust sets out in search of lost time in a sound-proofed study, Stravinsky creates musical mayhem, and Duchamp finds a wheel; in Prague, Einstein yearns for Elsa and Kafka for Felice; in Munich, Lulu is banned, and Münter captures her Klee; in Vienna, Freud falls out with Jung, and Stalin and Hitler stroll, and maybe meet, in the grounds of a palace.

This is Europe in 1913 - the year before the storm. Florian Illies captures a world on the edge of a cataclysm, in which armies are enlarged and and nationalistic lines are drawn.

But Illies' snapshots are of a Europe, though laden with premonition, that is still vibrant and creative. The Futurists, Fauvists and Expressionists are redefining art; Proust and Joyce are reshaping literature; Freud and Jung are battling their way through the subconscious; Stravinsky has tapped a primative nerve in music; and Einstein is, well, Einstein.

The anecdotes and observations embrace Picasso, Braque, the Mona Lisa (mostly missing), Thomas Mann, Duchamp, Franz Ferdinand, Kirchner, Klee, Klimt, Kandinsky, Kafka, Wedekind, Einstein, King George V, Stalin, Hitler, Redl, Machu Picchu, Münter and many more.

Florian Illies trained as an art historian at Bonn and Oxford. He was editor of FAZ's 'Berliner Seiten' and the arts section of 'Die Ziet', and he co-founded the arts magazine 'Monopol'. He is currently a managing partner at the fine art auction house Villa Grisebach in Berlin. 1913: The Year Before The Storm has so far sold over 200,000 copies in Germany.

Writer: Florian Illies
Translators: Shaun Whiteside and Jamie Lee Searle

Reader: Michael Maloney
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03757cr)
David Cameron on tackling online porn; powerlister Karren Brady

The Prime Minister David Cameron talks to Jane Garvey about how the Government is going to tackle the availability of pornography online. In true Apprentice style, Jane meets Powerlister Karren Brady in the boardroom of her football club, where they talk about how she reached the top and her commitment to seeing more women succeed in business. And Dr Richard Keen, consultant rheumatologist and listener Jean Duggleby, who has osteoporosis and has suffered five fractures in the last ten years, talk about the condition and how to manage it. And a live performance from Tennessee singer Valerie June, who blends folk, soul, gospel, and blues to make "organic moonshine roots music.".


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03757ct)
Melissa Murray - Good News

Episode 1

by Melissa Murray.

Part 1

Following a serious misdiagnosis, Adrienne is forced to confront some unexpected issues.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


MON 11:00 Postcode Profiling: Winners and Losers (b03757cw)
Episode 2

Aasmah Mir looks at how postcode profiling affects our lives, by visiting what new profiling research suggests is the least affluent place in the UK, and asking local people what they think about that.

This is new research from one of the largest providers of postcode profiling, which classifies all postcodes into neighbourhood types, which can then be used by commercial companies for marketing purposes or by the public sector.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 11:30 Births, Deaths and Marriages (b03757cy)
Series 2

The X Father

Births, Deaths and Marriages - returning for a second series - is the sitcom set in a Local Authority Register Office where the staff deal with the three greatest events in anybody's life.

Written by David Schneider (The Day Today, I'm Alan Partridge), he stars as chief registrar Malcolm Fox who is a stickler for rules and would be willing to interrupt any wedding service if the width of the bride infringes health and safety. He's single but why does he need to be married? He's married thousands of women.

Alongside him are rival and divorcee Lorna who has been parachuted in from Car Parks to drag the office (and Malcolm) into the 21st century. To her, marriage isn't just about love and romance, it's got to be about making a profit in our new age of austerity.

There's also the ever spiky Mary, geeky Luke who's worried he'll end up like Malcolm one day, and ditzy Anita who may get her words and names mixed up occasionally but, as the only parent in the office, is a mother to them all.

In the second episode, X-Factor voice-over man Peter Dickson comes into the office to register the death of his father. But Malcolm's the only one who's never heard of him. Or the show. Lorna wants to beat her rivals in Parking in the annual talent contest, while everyone else is trying to cope with Jackie, the work experience girl from hell.

Producer: Simon Jacobs
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b03757d0)
Jessops stores eight months on, Scottish stamp duty scrapped, heatwave winners

Exclusive research by You & Yours reveals what's happened to the 187 Jessops stores that closed earlier this year. We hear from new lease holders who've opened up in their place and look at the stores that are still vacant.

Disabled people are turning in desperation to high-cost loans and sometimes illegal lenders to pay bills and make ends meet. Stamp duty in Scotland is being replaced by a new land tax after the Scottish Parliament take control of more of their state finances.

The BBC has confirmed it will stop broadcasting in 3D after a 2 year project with the format flopped - what about those with 3D TV's? We hear from the O'Boyle family after their weekend at the Latitude Festival in Sussex.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Simon Browning.


MON 12:57 Weather (b0371wqx)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b03757d2)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life (b0375byp)
The Beginnings of the Modern Office

Writer and satirist Lucy Kellaway traces the origins of today's corporate culture

In today's Britain, more of us spend more time at an office than ever before. It dominates our lives. It's made more of us middle class, transformed the lot of women, raised standards in education and been the reason for many technological advances.

But the office itself seems to have no history. We accept without question the way we work now. We endure the charade of the annual appraisal. We gawp at endless PowerPoint presentations in interminable meetings. We work in open plan offices where we can overhear our colleagues phone calls to their plumber. That's how things are done. But why?

For the last twenty years, writer Lucy Kellaway has been an observer of the peculiarities of corporate culture in her column for the Financial Times. In this series, she looks back at the history of office life. How did it end up like this?

In this episode, Lucy looks at essayist Charles Lamb's account of life at the East India Company in the early 1800s.

From its headquarters in Leadenhall street in the city of London, the East India Company created a complex bureaucracy to enable the governing of empire. Charles Lamb worked there for over thirty years and left a rich account of the frustrations and consolations of office life. With Huw Bowen of Swansea University.

Readings by Richard Katz, Sasha Pick, Adam Rojko and Kerry Shale
Historical Consultant: Michael Heller

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b0375259)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0375byr)
Nick Warburton - Irongate

James Fleet and Emma Fielding star in Nick Warburton's two-hander play about love and loss. A woman walks once a year along the Thames, from Kew to Tower Bridge. Why?

Directed by Peter Kavanagh.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b0375byt)
Series 27

Episode 12

Paul Gambaccini welcomes the last of this year's Counterpoint semi-finalists to the BBC Radio Theatre, for the contest that will decide which of them appears in the 2013 Final.

At stake is a real chance to lift the silver trophy as the 27th Counterpoint champion. This week's semi-finalists are from Cheltenham, Bury St Edmunds and Debden in Essex.

To make it through to the Final they'll have to draw on the widest possible musical knowledge, from Wagner and Beethoven to Stevie Wonder and Bruce Springsteen. As always there are plenty of musical extracts to identify, both familiar and surprising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b037524t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b0375byw)
Hannah Gordon

Actress Hannah Gordon chooses her favourite readings, including poems by Joyce Grenfell, Noel Coward and Wendy Cope. There's Hannah's party piece, Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 'Shall I compare the to a summer's day?' and a sparkling extract from 'Shirley Valentine'.

Recorded at the BBC Radio Theatre with readers Michael Pennington and Eleanor Bron.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b0375byy)
Series 8

Alfred Russel Wallace

Brian Cox and Robin Ince discuss the life and works of Alfred Russel Wallace, the lesser known co-founder of the theory of evolution by natural selection. They are joined on stage by biologists Steve Jones and Aoife McLysaght and comedian Tony Law to ask whether Wallace is the great unsung hero of biology and why it was Darwin who seems to have walked away with all the glory.


MON 17:00 PM (b0375bz0)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0371wqz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0375d6f)
Series 59

Episode 4

The antidote to panel games pays a return visit to the Winding Wheel Theatre in Chesterfield. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Miles Jupp with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell attempts piano accompaniment.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0375d6h)
While putting pheasant poults in the release pens, Will and Eddie agree what fun the games and fete were. Eddie is keen to talk about baby names but Will is not impressed with his suggestions. Eddie thinks Joe would be touched if they picked either Joseph or Josephine. Will has had his own problems dissuading Nic against Adele. It would be too confusing giving the baby the same name as Eddie's ferret.
Once finished, Will has a meeting at Grey Gables with Brian and Martyn Gibson to discuss the corporates they are inviting to the shoot.
Lynda and Oliver are busy at work as Caroline is still off sick. Impressive Lynda solves various logistical problems. But when Will arrives for his meeting, she rather officiously insists he use the side entrance, because he's in his work clothes.
Lilian is thrilled to hear Jolene's news that she and Kenton are getting married but is slightly distracted because an Amside cheque has bounced.
At the bank, the business advisor Guy Mowlam shows that Matt (in Russia) has been drawing heavily on Amside's accounts. Furious Lilian gives written instruction to stop his cards.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b0375d6k)
Burton and Taylor; Denise Mina; Noah Baumbach; Mark Ravenhill's Cultural Exchange

With Mark Lawson.

Helena Bonham Carter and Dominic West star as the ultimate celebrity couple, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, in a new BBC Drama written by William Ivory. Focusing on the period when they appeared together on Broadway in Noel Coward's Private Lives, Burton and Taylor imagines the complex relationship between the ex-husband and wife. Linda Grant reviews.

Writer Denise Mina has received the Theakstons Old Peculier crime novel award, for the second year running. Her winning novel, For Gods and Beasts, weaves together three stories of Glasgow's criminal underworld. She explains why she had to re-write it over a weekend and reveals the flaws in her books.

Director Noah Baumbach discusses Frances Ha, his acclaimed black and white drama about the misadventures of a twentysomething dancer, played by co-writer Greta Gerwig. He also reveals what his parents thought of his break-through film, The Squid And The Whale, which was inspired by the fall-out from their divorce

For Cultural Exchange, dramatis Mark Ravenhill chooses Casanova, the first television series from Dennis Potter, starring Frank Finley as Casanova.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03757ct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Bishop and the Bankers (b0375d6m)
Episode 1

The financial crash of 2008 has led to the biggest economic crisis the country and the world has faced since the 1930s. Was this crisis a moral as well as an economic one, and if it was, what are the lessons that might be drawn from it? In this three part series the Bishop of Liverpool, James Jones, steps back from the technical analysis of risk and derivatives to consider the morality of individuals, organisations and the platform on which our economic system is built. He is joined by senior bankers, former bankers and opinion formers to reflect on why some people behave badly while others behave well, how you might build a virtuous company, and whether Capitalism encourages or discourages the human values that are needed for society to flourish.

The focus of today's programme is on individuals in the world of banking and big business, their personal stories, the dilemmas they faced, and how they ( and we) make moral choices. James hears from former city and Wall street traders about the effect on their behaviour of the culture of the city; - the long hours and testosterone, the speed of trading which leaves no time for reflection, and the competitive process during which the human story can be lost.

The programme begins in a casino - a metaphor, say some, of the mentality that characterised the recent behaviour of the bankers. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, tells James about the buzz of closing a deal as an oil executive and how he found a way to resist the temptations that working in the industry offered. James discusses the extent to which individuals should take the blame for the crisis with Johnny Cameron, former head of RBS's investment division, and the chief executive of Barclays Antony Jenkins.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b0375db5)
The Rule of Law v the Rule of Man

With huge concern over tax avoidance, tax officials are the latest to be given increased powers of discretion. They will be able to penalise people who have obeyed the letter of the law, but who have contravened the spirit of the tax code - as determined by the officials themselves, based on certain criteria. The use of official discretion is now applying across the UK's legal systems, from areas such as tax and finance to crime and hate speech.

Philosopher Jamie Whyte asks: is this growth in the Rule of Man undermining the Rule of Law? If officials can punish you, despite the fact that you followed the rules on the books, doesn't that raise the danger of injustice?

Even though few tears are being shed for tax avoiders, couldn't the lack of legal clarity lead to uncertainty? Would that drive business away from Britain? Jamie unravels the methods of sophisticated tax lawyers, and speaks to academic thinkers and legislators. He asks if we are we creating a culture where it pays to cosy up to officials. And he explores the deeper philosophy of the Rule of Law and whether it is being diminished in our uncertain times.

Producer: Mukul Devichand.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b036v092)
Living with Carnivores

Monty Don presents Shared Planet, the series that looks at the crunch point between human population and the natural world. In this week's programme we report from India where John Aitchison revels in the sight of two tigers, who magnificent though they are, are now in effect in an island population, separated from the farmland that surrounds the National Park by an electric fence. Lion biologist Craig Packer from the University of Minnesota will be speaking to Monty about his observations in Tanzania where upward of 100 people a year are being killed by lions raiding villages, the lions allegedly being driven to switch their prey to people by lack of their preferred prey outside the national parks. David Macdonald, Professor of Wildlife Conservation at Oxford University, will be exploring this area of conflict with Monty in the Shared Planet studio.


MON 21:30 Privacy Under Pressure (b03757ck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b0371wr1)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0375db7)
World's media awaits news of Royal birth.
Is Japan becoming more nationalistic?
Will Brazil's government deliver on promised reforms?
Why wolves sing in choirs.
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0375dl6)
Their Eyes Were Watching God

Episode 6

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston

Episode 6

Janie has noticed that Joe is getting older but the older he gets the more he criticises her for being middle aged. Then one day she turns on him in front of the customers in the store and the pride of the Mayor of Eatonville is irrevocably damaged.

Read by Adjoa Andoh
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4

A 1930s African-American classic which tells Janie's story in dazzling Southern prose

This African-American classic was first published in the 1930s and is seen as one of the greatest American novels of the twentieth century. The author, Zora Neale Hurston, grew up in Eatonville, Florida, the first incorporated black town in America. Nearly every black woman writer of significance, including Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, acknowledges Zora Neale Hurston as her literary foremother.

"A rigorous, convincing and dazzling piece of prose, as emotionally satisfying as it is impressive." Zadie Smith.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b036v89y)
How do you talk to an alien?

For more than fifty years, scientists with radio telescopes have been trying to make contact with extra-terrestrial intelligence. Nothing has been found, but recent discoveries of new solar systems and their planets give the astronomical explorers hope. In the first of a new series of Word of Mouth, Chris Ledgard examines some of the questions surrounding inter-stellar discourse - the response we might make if we detect a message, the usefulness of human language in this kind of communication, and whether it might be wiser to say nothing at all.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0375dl8)
MPs have gone off for their summer break, but the Lords are still in business, and Susan Hulme reports on the anger of one Labour peer on the way some British soldiers have been made redundant.
Also on the programme.
* Simon Jones covers peers exchanges on the foreign ownership of British utility companies.
* Kristiina Cooper listens to Lord Winston's views on air pollution.
* Mark D'Arcy listens to Home Office Minister Mark Harper on the rights of migrant workers.



TUESDAY 23 JULY 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0371wrw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b03757cp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0371wry)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0371ws0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0371ws2)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0371ws4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0375p7v)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Venerable Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0375p7x)
More than 200,000 visitors are expected at this year's Royal Welsh Agricultural Show at Llanelwedd near Builth Wells, the 50th on this site. Anna Hill meets Lloyd Jones who has been to the last 76 shows, many as a show judge. She also puts hill farmers' concerns to Welsh government minister, Alun Davies.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ty530)
Lesser Black-backed Gull

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the lesser black-backed gull.

These smart gulls are charcoal grey on top and white beneath. Like herring gulls, their close relatives LBBs have moved into urban areas and now breed on flat roofs in the centre of cities. It seems almost any flat surface will do. In just three hours, one bird in Gloucester built a nest on a car roof and laid an egg in.


TUE 06:00 Today (b0375p7z)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb and Sarah Montague, including:

810
The Duchess of Cambridge has given birth to a baby boy, Kensington Palace has announced. The author Lady Antonia Fraser and broadcaster William Shawcross analyse the news.

0818
The Chancellor, George Osborne, has called house builders and mortgage lenders to a meeting to discuss how the second part of the Help to Buy scheme will work. Sajid Javid, the economic secretary to the Treasury, defends the scheme against criticisms that have been levied against it.

0823
Terry Hayes, the man behind Mad Max 2, Dead Calm and Bangkok Hilton has spent the last few years writing a 700-page thriller called I Am Pilgrim. The BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz hears why he has strayed from the film industry in Hollywood.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b0375p81)
Tax Avoidance

Jonathan Freedland is joined by Margaret Hodge MP to look at controversies surrounding tax avoidance now and in the 8th Century, when the monk the Venerable Bede was similarly exercised by the issue.
Historical readings are provided by Sunny Ormonde who plays Lilian Bellamy in the Archers - appropriately, Lilian was herself a tax exile in Guernsey for 10 years.
In 734, Bede wrote to his former pupil Egbert to complain that lay people were setting themselves up as monasteries in order to avoid paying taxes - creating the tax havens of their day. Bede's calls for reform came to nothing until a few centuries later when a new system of taxation was brought in order to pay off the Vikings. Even then, though, one Bishop managed to get round the rules - Bishop Wulfstan of Worcester.
Jonathan and guests debate the lessons for today. On the panel, Chair of the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee, Margaret Hodge MP, as well as Conservative MP Mark Field, campaigner Andrew Simms of the New Economics Foundation & Global Witness and Ray McCann, former HMRC Inspector, now a partner at Pinsent Masons law firm.
Producer: Laurence Grissell.


TUE 09:30 Pop-Up Ideas (b0375p83)
Series 1

David Kilcullen: Feral Cities

One of the world's most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Kilcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as "revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West", talks about the time-bomb of rapidly-growing coastal mega-cities.

"It took all of human history until 1960 for the world to get 3 billion people," he says. "But the latest estimate is that we're going to add the same number of people in just the next thirty years - and they'll all be going into cities, on coastlines, in the developing world".

Through the story of a Somali commander he met in Mogadishu, David tells how the urban overstretch that tore Mogadishu apart in the 1990s, with frightening consequences, is happening in cities all over Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b037h02q)
Florian Illies - 1913

Episode 2

In Paris, Proust sets out in search of lost time in a sound-proofed study, Stravinsky creates musical mayhem, and Duchamp finds a wheel; in Prague, Einstein yearns for Elsa and Kafka for Felice; in Munich, Lulu is banned, and Münter captures her Klee; in Vienna, Freud falls out with Jung, and Stalin and Hitler stroll, and maybe meet, in the grounds of a palace.

This is Europe in 1913 - the year before the storm. Florian Illies captures a world on the edge of a cataclysm, in which armies are enlarged and and nationalistic lines are drawn.

But Illies' snapshots are of a Europe, though laden with premonition, that is still vibrant and creative. The Futurists, Fauvists and Expressionists are redefining art; Proust and Joyce are reshaping literature; Freud and Jung are battling their way through the subconscious; Stravinsky has tapped a primative nerve in music; and Einstein is, well, Einstein.

The anecdotes and observations embrace Picasso, Braque, the Mona Lisa (mostly missing), Thomas Mann, Duchamp, Franz Ferdinand, Kirchner, Klee, Klimt, Kandinsky, Kafka, Wedekind, Einstein, King George V, Stalin, Hitler, Redl, Machu Picchu, Münter and many more.

Florian Illies trained as an art historian at Bonn and Oxford. He was editor of FAZ's 'Berliner Seiten' and the arts section of 'Die Ziet', and he co-founded the arts magazine 'Monopol'. He is currently a managing partner at the fine art auction house Villa Grisebach in Berlin. 1913: The Year Before The Storm has so far sold over 200,000 copies in Germany.

Writer: Florian Illies
Translators: Shaun Whiteside and Jamie Lee Searle

Reader: Michael Maloney
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0375p86)
Professor Dame Sally Davies

Professor Dame Sally Davies, the Chief Medical Officer for England. Brenda Edwards on X Factor success and her new recording career. Buying your first bra. Jane Garvey presents.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0375qt4)
Melissa Murray - Good News

Episode 2

by Melissa Murray.

Part 2

With the discovery that her friend Adrienne is not going to die, fellow teacher Louise tries to come to terms with the good news.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b0375qt6)
Oil & Wildlife

Monty Don presents Shared Planet, the series that explores the crunch point between human population and the natural world. In this week's programme we have a report from the Arabian Gulf off the coast of Qatar where we witness oil rig legs encrusted with life, pods of dolphins and work monitoring the arrival of migrant whale sharks to the area. With the Deep Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico still fresh in many minds are oil rigs and ocean wildlife in conflict or can oil and wildlife share the same space. David Paterson, Executive Director of the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland is in the Shared Planet studio to explore the issues.


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b0375qt8)
Series 16

Don't Leave Me This Way

Don't Leave Me This Way was written in the early 1970s by songwriters Huff, Gamble and Gilbert who were the composers behind the famous black American Philadelphia Sound. It was first performed by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, featuring Teddy Pendergrass on lead vocals, and later became a hit for Thelma Houston and the Communards. As the title suggests, the song is all about longing, yearning and loss. Remarkable stories in this edition of Soul Music reflect the pain expressed in this soul classic, including one told by Dr Dan Gottlieb, a quadriplegic therapist who befriended Teddy Pendergrass after he became paralysed in a car accident. Sharon Wachsler recalls dancing to the version made famous by The Communards in 1986 before a devastating illness left her housebound and reliant on her beloved service dog Gadget, who gave her a reason to keep going. When he died, the song was the only way she could express her grief over his loss. The Reverend Richard Coles, formerly of The Communards, talks about the significance of Don't Leave Me This Way as a dancefloor anthem for young gay men in the 1980s that was later to become associated with the AIDS epidemic that took so many of their lives.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b0375qtb)
Call You and Yours: Childhood

The sense of well-being among children in the UK may now be in decline, and has failed to improve since 2008. That's the conclusion of a report from The Children's Society published today, a conclusion they describe as "incredibly worrying". They interviewed 42,000 eight to seventeen year olds and found that it's fourteen and fifteen year olds who are the least happy. Concern about school, unhappiness with their appearance and a lack of freedom topped their list of worries.

The same report also concludes that well-being can be improved by external factors. We want your views on what those factors are. What more can be done to make life easier and happier for children in the UK? What would make life simpler for say a child born today or tomorrow?

We want to hear your experiences and your views. 03700 100 400 is the phone number, e-mail youandyours@bbc.co.uk or text 84844.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b0371ws6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b0375qtd)
As the government rolls out its latest help for homebuyers, we discuss whether it is a much needed boost for the housing market ... or 'mad' as the Institute of Directors says. Housing Minister Mark Prisk responds.

We debate if and how the new generation of the Royal family can remain relevant into the next century.

The conductor of Westminster Abbey's Company of Ringers describes how they'll keep the bells ringing for three hours in celebration of the birth of the new Prince.

Plus what attacks on two of Baghdad's largest prisons means for security in Iraq.

Comment on Twitter #WATO.


TUE 13:45 Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life (b0375qtg)
Getting a Job: Nepotism or Meritocracy?

Writer and satirist Lucy Kellaway traces the origins of today's corporate culture.

In this episode, Lucy reveals how hiring the 'best man for the job' wasn't always the way it was done.

In the 19th century, office jobs were often obtained by patronage rather than qualifications. In the Northcote-Trevelyan report of 1853, Sir Charles Trevelyan campaigned to introduce meritocratic recruitment to the civil service. But his ideas were met with hostility in many quarters. Lucy visits the Houses of Parliament and speaks to John Greenaway of East Anglia University


Readings by Richard Katz, Sasha Pick, Adam Rojko and Kerry Shale
Historical Consultant: Michael Heller

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0375d6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b01f5lcz)
The People's Passion

Betrayal

Cathedrals still dominate our city centres: once symbols of temporal power, of technological wonder, a vital part of our musical health, and more recently the focus of protest and appeals to a new morality - what do they mean to us now?

Originally broadcast in Holy Week, The People's Passion explores how our great cathedrals offer an image of the contradictions of faith in twenty-first century Britain.

The People's Passion Mass and Easter Anthem, composed specially for the series by Sasha Johnson Manning, with lyrics written by the poet Michael Symmons Roberts, not only features in the programmes, but was made freely available by the BBC, and sung by a hundred and fifty choirs around Britain and across the world, during Easter 2012, including Easter Day Worship on Radio 4, from Manchester Cathedral.

2/5: Betrayal

by Nick Warburton

Callum has no job and nothing to fill his days, but he loves to sing in the Cathedral's Voluntary choir. With the choir, he is rehearsing the newly commissioned Easter Anthem, to perform on Good Friday. Who would dream of stopping him? But temptation can whisper in all sorts of ears...

Produced and Directed by Jonquil Panting

Original music by Sasha Johnson Manning, with lyrics by Michael Symmons Roberts.

Performed by:
Manchester Chamber Choir, directed by Christopher Stokes, with Jeffrey Makinson (organ), Rob Shorter (tenor), Rebecca Whettam (cello), Jahan Hunter (trumpet) and Holly Marland (recorder).
BBC Singers with Eleanor Gregory (soprano), Margaret Cameron (alto), Chris Bowen (tenor), Stephen Charlesworth (bass) and Andrew Earis (piano).
Andrew Kirk (organ), and the choir of Saint Mary Redcliffe, Bristol.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0375qtj)
Series 4

Bakewell

Jay Rayner and the panel are in Bakewell in Derbyshire for this episode of food panel programme The Kitchen Cabinet.

Tackling the audience's culinary concerns about topics including gooseberries, picnics, bananas, cooked breakfasts, ice cream and, of course, Bakewell Pudding, are: writer and restaurateur Henry Dimbleby; Michelin Star chef Angela Hartnett, and 2011 Masterchef-winner, originally from Wisconsin, Tim Anderson. Plus food scientist Peter Barham explains the science behind pastry-making and unusual flavour combinations.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Peggy Sutton.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b0375sf9)
Series 2

Episode 4

Present someone with something they find disgusting and they will invariably draw back in horror. This "yuk!" response is universal - as far as we know, all humans have it.

But, perhaps more surprisingly, what people consider disgusting varies considerably across cultures. Jellyfish, sheep eyes or live grubs can induce disgust or delight depending on what we're used to eating.

And there's another, even more intriguing side to disgust: it can influence our moral judgements about the person or object we see as disgusting. The Liverpool football player Luis Suarez was called disgusting for biting an opponent and received a major penalty, a ten match ban, as a result. Yet he did little damage and other footballers routinely get away with causing far more harm with little, if any, moral outrage. Suarez bit and the disgust his action induced in others arguably made him a moral deviant, potentially influencing the severe punishment.

The surprising psychology of disgust is the subject of this episode of The Human Zoo. It's presented by Michael Blastland, with the trusted guidance of Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School.

Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b0375sfc)
Babel

"...confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech." The Babel story is one of best known in the Bible, the splintering of one global language into thousands of tongues. Chris Ledgard takes a linguistic look at the first nine verses of Genesis chapter 11, exploring the story itself, the idea of original languages and how we are able to reconstruct them, and the Babel theme of language, division and conflict.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b0375sff)
Meera Syal and Stephen Grosz

Writer, comedian and actor Meera Syal and psychoanalyst and author Stephen Grosz discuss favourite books with Harriett Gilbert.

A Russian romance, a very English murder, and the poverty of India are the themes in books by Chekhov, Agatha Christie and Katherine Boo.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 17:00 PM (b0375sfh)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0371ws8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b0375sfk)
Series 2

Episode 3

Justin Moorhouse, Bridget Christie and Ainsley Harriott each nominate someone they know well to answer a series of questions and they than have to second guess how they answered.

Host Miles Jupp tests Bridget on how well she knows her best friend Rebecca Sewell, Ainsley his best friend, pitch doctor Paul Boross, and Justin his former radio producer Sean Gibson.

What is the one thing that DJ Justin does not like talking about? What is Bridget's worst fear? And who is Ainsley's worst habit?

All answers and more will be revealed.

Producer: Sam Michell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2013.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0375tdc)
Helen and Fallon chat at Jaxx about all the love in the air. Brenda has met a new chap in Russia but Helen thought it best not to tell Tom. Helen wants to know how Jolene and Kenton's wedding plans are coming along. They speculate on what is going on with Lilian and Matt. Helen comments how awful it must be to be stuck in the wrong relationship.
Rob is at the golf club, taking photos for his welcome pack for the new dairy staff. Committee member Martyn Gibson arrives to see Kathy. After Toby's departure, the club committee wants him to check how effectively they are operating.
After a quick look round, Martyn notes that trade is very quiet. He will need to burrow deeper and asks Kathy to give him figures going back to at least 2010, by next Monday.
Helen pops to see Rob to suggest he includes photos of Arkwright Hall, the lake and nature reserve in his pack. Helen is planning to take Henry there on Saturday and invites Rob along. This is awkward for Rob, as Jess is coming to Ambridge for the first time this weekend. Helen quickly takes her leave, saying she hopes to meet Jess and wishing them a great weekend.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0375tdf)
The Wolverine, Ian Dury's art, Man Booker longlist, James Blake

With John Wilson.

Hugh Jackman returns to the role of Wolverine in his new film, embroiled in a conflict that forces him to confront his own demons. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh reviews The Wolverine.

The late singer-songwriter Ian Dury is best known as the front man for Ian Dury and the Blockheads and for writing songs including Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick. But before he became an entertainer, Dury trained at the Royal College of Art and had a career as an artist that lasted nearly a decade. As an exhibition of his work opens at the RCA, Dury's daughter Jemima and his old Kilburn and the Highroads band-mate Humphrey Ocean discuss his art and his legacy.

Following today's announcement of the longlist for this year's Man Booker Prize for Fiction, Robert Macfarlane, chair of judges, joins John to discuss the 13 books and their authors. The shortlist will be announced on 10 September, and the winner - who will receive a £50,000 prize - will be announced on 15 October.

For Cultural Exchange, the musician James Blake chooses Stalker, a film made in 1979 film by the Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky.

Producer Olivia Skinner.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0375qt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0375tdh)
Coal Comfort?

The amount of coal burned in Britain's power stations rocketed in 2012 with ministers relying on the fuel to help keep the lights on in the next few years.
But coal mining in Britain is now in deep trouble.
Two of the UK's major mining firms have collapsed and a third is in trouble following a huge underground fire in February.
The fire was at Daw Mill in Warwickshire, one of the few remaining deep mines in the UK.
Coming on the back of competition from cheap coal from abroad, the costly fire plunged mine operators UK Coal into financial crisis and has put the pensions of workers at serious risk.
As the government negotiates to try to help pick up the pieces Julian O'Halloran discovers UK Coal's problems come on top of heavy penalties imposed in recent years by safety regulators over fatal accidents underground.
Meanwhile the collapse of two key operators in Scotland has left a trail of unrestored opencast sites which local people say are blighting their areas. They blame national and local government for failing to force the mining companies to clear up their mess.
So what does the future hold for the industry, the miners and local communities. And at what cost to the taxpayer?
Producer: Nicola Dowling.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0375tdl)
Peter White talks to Dr Mike Townsend about the latest technology designed to assit blind people, which was displayed at Sight Village.
Lee Kumutat reports from the government's first employment conference, aimed at encouraging employers to employ more disabled people.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b0375tdn)
NHS Health Checks, Blood Service, Crohn's Disease, Gestational diabetes

Dr Mark Porter reports on NHS Health Checks which are available to everyone between 40 and 74.
Public Health England's Professor Kevin Fenton says this could save at least 650 lives, prevent 1600 heart attacks and 4000 cases of diabetes. Inside Health's resident sceptic Dr Margaret McCartney isn't convinced.

We examine the truth behind rumours of a blood service sell off.

Inside Health visits Addenbrooke's Hospital to answer a listener's query about Crohn's disease.

Diabetes in pregnancy is a growing problem with potentially serious consequences for both the mother and baby. Mark meets a team which has developed an app to help women manage their diabetes.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b0375p81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b0371wsb)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0375tdq)
Syria: is the US preparing to support the rebels?
Royal baby leaves hospital with proud parents;
How fearful is the Muslim community of terror attacks?
Fighting erupts in DRC;
China's food scares.

With Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0375tdv)
Their Eyes Were Watching God

Episode 7

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston

Episode 7

Mayor Joe Starks has died. At the funeral Janie 'starched and ironed her face behind her veil.' Later as she emerges into her mourning white she has a host of admirers in and out of town but she's too busy basking in her new found freedom to take any notice. Then one day a newcomer comes into the store

Read by Adjoa Andoh
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4

A 1930s African-American classic which tells Janie's story in dazzling Southern prose.
This African-American classic was first published in the 1930s and is seen as one of the greatest American novels of the twentieth century. The author, Zora Neale Hurston, grew up in Eatonville, Florida, the first incorporated black town in America. Nearly every black woman writer of significance, including Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, acknowledges Zora Neale Hurston as her literary foremother.

"A rigorous, convincing and dazzling piece of prose, as emotionally satisfying as it is impressive." Zadie Smith.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b0375byy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0375tdx)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 24 JULY 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0371wt5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b037h02q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0371wt7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0371wt9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0371wtc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0371wtf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0375xtw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Venerable Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0375xty)
The effect of controversial housing benefit changes on rural areas comes under scrutiny. One rural housing association tells us that what critics call the 'bedroom tax' is causing problems. Hastoe Housing says a shortage of suitable properties can make downsizing in villages or market towns impossible, as well as undermining efforts to keep people in their local area.

We examine tensions, and collaboration, between farmers and metal detecting enthusiasts.

And, how Countryside Week aims to get people more connected with the landscape.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sarah Swadling.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02ty8nj)
Red-necked Phalarope

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the red-necked phalarope.

Red-necked phalaropes are among our rarest waders, small and colourful with needle-like bills and they breed in very limited numbers on the edges of our islands. There are probably only around 20 pairs of these birds in summer in the Outer Hebrides or Shetlands.


WED 06:00 Today (b0375xv0)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 What's the Point of...? (b0375xv2)
Series 5

The Chief Rabbi

Sir Jonathan Sacks stands down this August after more than 20 years in a job that some people have described as tougher than the Archbishop of Canterbury's - but with better jokes.

The office of the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregation of the United kingdom and the Commonwealth - to give it its full title - has always had close links to the political establishment.
First Edward V11 and now David Cameron have spoken of "My Chief Rabbi." A seat in the House of Lords seems to go with the territory these days. In September, Ephraim Mirvis will become the next Chief Rabbi, with ready access to the stars of the Cabinet and the Media. So what does the Chief Rabbi do? How much does it cost to run his office?

The full title is important. It's especially important to Reform and Liberal Jews who point out that the Chief Rabbi (of the United Hebrew Congregation of the United kingdom and the Commonwealth) doesn't represent them. In fact, he represents only about half of Jews affiliated to a synagogue. The fastest growing Jewish denomination is the ultra Orthodox - and he doesn't officially lead them either.

So what's the point of the Chief Rabbi? Historian Geoffrey Alderman thinks that, if there used to be a point to the office, there is no longer; Michael Howard thinks the point of the Chief Rabbi is to present a moderate religious voice in a world of growing religious extremism, and Vanessa Feltz thinks it's so that she has someone - other than herself - to argue with.

Producer: Rosie Dawson.


WED 09:30 Just So Science (b01ptbx8)
Series 1

How the Whale Got His Throat

How does the largest creature that has ever lived feed itself? Howard Roe and Nick Pyenson, discuss the wonders of the whale's "lunge feeding", said to be the largest biomechanical event on Earth.

Vivienne Parry presents the science behind some of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories, with wondrous tales of how things really came to be.

Rudyard Kipling tells us how the leopard got his spots, the camel his hump, the whale his throat and so forth. But what does science make of these lyrical tales? For the most part, just-so stories are to be dismissed as the antithesis of scientific reasoning. They're ad hoc fallacies, designed to explain-away a biological or behavioural trait, more akin to folklore than the laws of science. But on closer inspection, might Kipling's fantasies contain a grain of truth? And might the "truth" as science understands it, be even more fantastic than fiction?

Vivienne meets researchers whose work on some of Kipling's 'best beloved' creatures is helping us to answer a rather inconvenient question: how do traits evolve? Why are some animals the way they are?

Excerpts from five of the Just So Stories are read by Samuel West.

Producer: Rami Tzabar

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2013.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b037h08x)
Florian Illies - 1913

Episode 3

In Paris, Proust sets out in search of lost time in a sound-proofed study, Stravinsky creates musical mayhem, and Duchamp finds a wheel; in Prague, Einstein yearns for Elsa and Kafka for Felice; in Munich, Lulu is banned, and Münter captures her Klee; in Vienna, Freud falls out with Jung, and Stalin and Hitler stroll, and maybe meet, in the grounds of a palace.

This is Europe in 1913 - the year before the storm. Florian Illies captures a world on the edge of a cataclysm, in which armies are enlarged and and nationalistic lines are drawn.

But Illies' snapshots are of a Europe, though laden with premonition, that is still vibrant and creative. The Futurists, Fauvists and Expressionists are redefining art; Proust and Joyce are reshaping literature; Freud and Jung are battling their way through the subconscious; Stravinsky has tapped a primative nerve in music; and Einstein is, well, Einstein.

The anecdotes and observations embrace Picasso, Braque, the Mona Lisa (mostly missing), Thomas Mann, Duchamp, Franz Ferdinand, Kirchner, Klee, Klimt, Kandinsky, Kafka, Wedekind, Einstein, King George V, Stalin, Hitler, Redl, Machu Picchu, Münter and many more.

Florian Illies trained as an art historian at Bonn and Oxford. He was editor of FAZ's 'Berliner Seiten' and the arts section of 'Die Ziet', and he co-founded the arts magazine 'Monopol'. He is currently a managing partner at the fine art auction house Villa Grisebach in Berlin. 1913: The Year Before The Storm has so far sold over 200,000 copies in Germany.

Writer: Florian Illies
Translators: Shaun Whiteside and Jamie Lee Searle

Reader: Michael Maloney
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0375xv4)
Stephanie 'Steve' Shirley

Research into women's experience of so-called "trolling" when they take part in public events; how an 11 year old rape-victim has sparked an abortion row in Chile; Dame Stephanie "Steve" Shirley - philanthropist and Woman's Hour Powerlister; Marianne - symbol of La Republique, who appears on stamps in France - and now updated in an image inspired by a topless feminist protestor; and baby talk - what is the best way to speak to a young baby? Presenter: Jenni Murray. Producer: Emma Wallace.


WED 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0375xv6)
Melissa Murray - Good News

Episode 3

by Melissa Murray.

Part 3

Adrienne learns that while she was ill her husband Mal has been making plans for a life without her.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


WED 11:00 The Story of the Talmud (b0375xv8)
Episode 2

In the second of two programmes, Rabbi Naftali Brawer delves into one of the greatest books ever written which holds the key to unlocking Jewish thinking and history. Far from being an ancient text written in Hebrew and Aramaic, Naftali discovers that today, in orthodox circles, the Talmud is causing a Jewish revolution.

He encounters commuters on a train in New York who hold Talmud classes in the last carriage every morning on their way to work. They claim the wisdom of the Talmud informs the decisions they make in business, finance, law and everyday social matters. He discovers that the Chinese and South Koreans have an obsession with the Talmud, thinking it will give them business and financial success. There is even a Talmud hotel in Taiwan. Talking to one of the Jewish world's leading medical ethicists, Naftali hears how the Talmud informs medical decisions from start and end of life matters to genetic research.

Whilst in Jerusalem, Rabbi Naftali finds a twist in the tale of the Talmud. Previously being denied access to the Talmud, a growing number of women are now learning and teaching its ancient texts and wisdom. This in turn is bringing a challenge to orthodox male interpretation and hegemony. Despite being the Jewish Homeland, Israel is facing deep political schisms, financial crises and riots over the determination of the ultra-orthodox community to study the Talmud, and its related literature, rather than enter the employment market and take part in National Service. Talking to Knesset Member Ruth Calderon and ultra-orthodox students from one of Jerusalem's leading yeshivas, Rabbi Naftali encounters the intractable nature of this argument which is threatening the current Israeli coalition government.

Producer: Mark O'Brien.


WED 11:30 Paul Temple (b0376jjx)
Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair

Mr Davos Has an Alibi

Part 4 of a new production of a vintage serial from 1946.

From 1938 to 1968, Francis Durbridge's incomparably suave amateur detective Paul Temple and his glamorous wife Steve solved case after baffling case in one of BBC radio's most popular series. Sadly, only half of Temple's adventures survive in the archives.

In 2006 BBC Radio 4 brought one of the lost serials back to life with Crawford Logan and Gerda Stevenson as Paul and Steve. Using the original scripts and incidental music, and recorded using vintage microphones and sound effects, the production of Paul Temple and the Sullivan Mystery aimed to sound as much as possible like the 1947 original might have done if its recording had survived. The serial proved so popular that it was soon followed by three more revivals, Paul Temple and the Madison Mystery, Paul Temple and Steve, and A Case for Paul Temple.

Now, from 1946, it's the turn of Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair, in which Paul and Steve go on the trail of the mysterious and murderous Mr Gregory.

Episode 4: Mr Davos has an Alibi

Another death - and this time the killer comes very close to home.

Producer Patrick Rayner

Francis Durbridge, the creator of Paul Temple, was born in Hull in 1912 and died in 1998. He was one of the most successful novelists, playwrights and scriptwriters of his day.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b0376jxt)
New fines for speeding points

The fines for speeding are set to increase. Ben Fogle on his pet hate, why people don't clear up their dog mess, and we look at the first outfit for the latest Royal. Presenter: Winifred Robinson. Producer: John Neal.


WED 12:30 Face the Facts (b0376jxw)
The Marcos Mystery?

John Waite goes on the trail of the woman who, he's told, claims to be the daughter of the former President of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos, and is about to inherit his missing millions.

She says she is a good Samaritan but her critics disagree. Claiming to be on the verge of a huge inheritance she's borrowed tens of thousands of pounds from Filipinos in London, they say. Claiming to be employed by the Home Office she's said to have accepted hundreds of pounds for immigration advice. Claiming to be an investment guru it's alleged that she has taken hundreds of thousands more from Swedish investors, and as a fish trader it's said that she's left a trail of out-of-pocket fishmongers at Billingsgate Fish Market. They also say she's claimed to be an airline pilot and daughter of a former Miss Spain. Never interviewed before she tells John why she believes her many critics are simply just jealous liars.

Producer: Joe Kent
Presenter: John Waite.


WED 12:57 Weather (b0371wtk)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b0376jxy)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life (b0376jy0)
The Career Ladder

Writer and satirist Lucy Kellaway traces the origins of today's corporate culture.

In this episode, Lucy charts the emergence of the career ladder as a way to motivate staff. The late 19th century saw a huge growth in office clerks. With the increase in staff, came the concept of a career ladder as a way to make up for the drudgery. Lucy looks at the Scottish banks and their early version of the annual appraisal, which often included strikingly personal comments. With Alan McKinlay of Newcastle University

Readings by Richard Katz, Sasha Pick, Adam Rojko and Kerry Shale
Historical Consultant: Michael Heller

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0375tdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0376jy2)
Neurotics Anonymous

Iain is a list-ticking, tap-checking, badge-wearing member of the OCD Club (not an actual club). When he joins a support group, he falls in love with group leader Anna. But will his mother Elsie and group member Beany stand in his way? A day out brings it all to a head in this honest, warm hearted comedy written by Ben Crompton.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b0377cn9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b0375tdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0376ncq)
Food Work in Hospital Wards; The Bangladesh/India Border

The Bangladesh/India border - As India sets about constructing a metal curtain along the full length of its border with Bangladesh, Cambridge anthropologist, Delwar Hussain travelled to the remote village of Boropani, which straddles the frontier, to see how the lives of ordinary people are being affected by the tussle between Dhaka and its emerging superpower neighbour. He talks to Laurie Taylor about the social and intimate lives of the people he met and a cross border coal industry that has little respect for the past, people or the environment. By focusing on the peripheries, his research exposes the promise and danger at the heart of the globalised world.

'Dirty work', emotional labour and the professionalisation of nursing - a qualitative study of meal services for older people at 4 UK hospital sites. Around 60% of UK patients aged 65 or older are at risk of malnutrition while in hospital. Ben Heaven discusses timely research into 'food work' and feeding assistance on hospital wards.

Producer:Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0376ncs)
Covering the royal baby story

With the full coverage so far, spare a thought for those working on Sunday papers and on rolling news who have to come up with fresh ways of covering the royal baby story. Eleanor Mills, editorial director of the Sunday Times, Jonathan Levy, head of newsgathering at Sky news and Kevin Maguire of the (seven days a week) Mirror share their experiences and their plans for pacing the story over the coming days and weeks.

Channel 5 has overtaken Channel 4's weekly share of viewing for the first time in its history. Is this a blip or a symptom of an underlying issue for Channel 4? Mark Sweney, of the Guardian, gives his view.

And how practical might it be to impose the kind of effective filters on internet porn that David Cameron has announced this week? Dr Paul Bernal, lecturer in IT and law at the University of East Anglia talks through some of the issues, joined by Eleanor Mills, who has long campaigned to protect children from online pornography.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett
Producer: Simon Tillotson
Editor: Andy Smith.


WED 17:00 PM (b0376ncv)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0371wtp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Brig Society (b0376ncx)
Series 1

King of Scotland

Uh-oh - Marcus Brigstocke has been put in charge of a thing! Each week, Marcus finds he's volunteered to be in charge of a big old thing - a hospital, the railways, British Fashion, a prison - and each week he starts out by thinking "Well, it can't be that difficult, surely?" and ends up with "Oh - turns out it's utterly difficult and complicated. Who knew...?"

This week, he's been volunteered to be the King of Scotland. As an Englishmen, Marcus will be going out and about in an attempt to understand the arguments for and against independence, hopefully without getting himself a kilt.

Helping him chew the fat, and other Scottish delicacies are Rufus Jones ("Hunderby", "Holy Flying Circus"), William Andrews ("Sorry I've Got No Head") and Margaret Cabourn-Smith ("Miranda")

The show is a Pozzitive production, and is produced by Marcus's long-standing accomplice, David Tyler who also produces Marcus appearances as the inimitable as Giles Wemmbley Hogg. David's other radio credits include Jeremy Hardy Speaks To The Nation, Cabin Pressure, Another Case Of Milton Jones, Kevin Eldon Will See You Now, Armando Iannucci's Charm Offensive, The Castle, he 3rd Degree, The 99p Challenge, My First Planet, Radio Active & Bigipedia. His TV credits include Paul Merton - The Series, Spitting Image, Absolutely, The Paul Calf Video Diary, Three Fights Two Weddings & A Funeral, Coogan's Run, The Tony Ferrino Phenomenon and exec producing Victoria Wood's dinnerladies.

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt & Tom Neenan

Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for the BBC.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0376ncz)
Stressed Lilian has had to take a nap, which turned out longer than she expected. She's cross that Anthea didn't wake her when Bernard Whistler called with the asbestos results for the paper mill. Unperturbed Anthea gives her the news. It's only white asbestos. Felpersham Environmental will start the survey tomorrow to establish how much there is. Lilian's frustrated that there's still no building progress for her to tell the consortium.

Jolene just wants a simple wedding ceremony followed by a big party. She proves she's the perfect woman for Kenton when she makes a quick decision on an engagement ring. . They both agree that Kate and William will make great parents. Kenton jokes the little prince has perfected his royal wave.

Tom's playing catch-up after a shrink-wrap catastrophe but joins Rob at Arkwright Lake to help with photos for his welcome pack. It's an opportunity for Tom to quiz Rob about his successful food processing friend in Montreal. Sales at Bellingham's haven't been quite so good on Tom's second batch, and he doesn't want to lose momentum from the launch. Rob's advice is to think big and boost production now.

Rob's pleased with his photoshoot and understands why Helen suggested the place. He tells Tom how much he admires Helen for having Henry on her own. It can be tricky if you want a family and a career, even when there are two of you. Tom points out that Helen manages to do both. That's what impresses Rob.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b0376nd1)
Steve Coogan, Ruth Rendell's Cultural Exchange, Peter Bazalgette

With Mark Lawson.

Steve Coogan returns as his best-known character, Norwich radio DJ Alan Partridge, in a new film Alpha Papa, which sees Partridge involved in an unusual hostage situation at a local radio station. Steve Coogan discusses the evolution of the character from the small to the big screen, the pressure from fans to reprise his 'hit' character, and how his fears of turning into Alan Partridge himself inspire his performances.

For Cultural Exchange, crime writer Ruth Rendell discusses her choice of Handel's oratorio Solomon, based on the bible story and containing the sinfonia The Arrival of the Queen of Sheba.

On the day that Arts Council England announces investment plans for 2015 to 2018, Peter Bazalgette, its chairman, talks to Mark about what these plans will involve - in the light of cuts to local authority budgets.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0375xv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b0376nd3)
Meritocracy and Privilege

Around 14,000 babies will be born in the UK this week, but it's almost certain that none of them will have the same privileged start in life as the new royal baby. We're all born equal; some, of course, are more equal than others. But does it matter? And what should we do about it? Today politicians of all shades have signed up very publicly to the principle of equality of opportunity, but the reality is that our nation is as divided as ever. It's claimed that the richest 10% of the UK are more than 100 times as wealthy as the poorest 10%. For some the answer is not just to level the playing field, but to tip it in favour of the most disadvantaged; in the name of equality, positively to discriminate in favour of those who have been denied their chance in life by an accident of birth. Can you ever impose equality, or is the only just and fair answer to allow people to rise or fall on their own merit? If we really believed that inequality was unjust and morally indefensible, wouldn't we be doing something to redistribute incomes and opportunity? Or is the real moral problem the fact that most people - and certainly, most middle class people - sign up to the principles of egalitarianism, but only want "equal chances" for everyone else's children? When it comes to their own they'll do everything they can to ensure they get a head start. Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Matthew Taylor and Anne McElvoy. Witnesses: PROFESSOR PETER SAUNDERS - Professor of Sociology at the University of Sussex, JOHN CLARKE - Historian and writer, ANDREW LILICO - Economist with "Europe Economics" who writes for the Daily Telegraph, PROFESSOR JONATHAN WOLFF - Professor of Philosophy at University College London.


WED 20:45 Pop-Up Ideas (b0375p83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:00 Does Science Need the People? (b01ks52y)
Episode 1

Who should decide on whether funding for things like GM, nanotechnology, embryonic stem cell research or particle physics goes ahead? At the moment most of the money for science lies with the research councils, to whom scientists go cap in hand year after year. That's around 3 billion pounds of public money. So should the public have more of a say?

At the moment, it seems like trust in science is at a crossroads. Whilst increasingly we believe in the power of science to benefit society, a recent MORI survey suggested that over half of us are distrustful of scientists who "tamper with nature" and believe that "rules will not stop scientists doing what they want behind closed doors". Though we face global food and energy shortages and await the next mutated animal disease pandemic, barely a third of us believe that the benefits of research into things like GM, or nuclear power are worth the risk. But are we the people, able to best judge what road science should take?

But does this disconnect between science and society matter? How important is public opinion to the direction of scientific research? Is GM, gene therapy or nuclear power simply too important to be derailed by a public that only has a very basic understanding of risk? Or should scientists not only consult the public about controversial areas of research but even allow us to direct it? In the first of two programmes, Geoff Watts asks, Does Science need the people?

Producer: Rami Tzabar.


WED 21:30 What's the Point of...? (b0375xv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b0371wtr)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0376qls)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b0376qlv)
Their Eyes Were Watching God

Episode 8

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston

Episode 8

For the first time in her life Janie has fallen in love and she tells her friend Phoeby that she is selling up the store and leaving Eatonville to "go and live in Tea Cake's way." But Tea Cake has no money and Janie is a wealthy widow some years his senior, so the tongues start to wag.

Read by Adjoa Andoh
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4

A 1930s African-American classic which tells Janie's story in dazzling Southern prose
This African-American classic was first published in the 1930s and is seen as one of the greatest American novels of the twentieth century. The author, Zora Neale Hurston, grew up in Eatonville, Florida, the first incorporated black town in America. Nearly every black woman writer of significance, including Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, acknowledges Zora Neale Hurston as her literary foremother.

"A rigorous, convincing and dazzling piece of prose, as emotionally satisfying as it is impressive." Zadie Smith.


WED 23:00 The Lach Chronicles (b0376qlx)
Series 1

Kiss Loves You

Lach was the King of Manhattan's East Village and host of the longest running open mic night in New York. He now lives in Scotland and finds himself back at square one, playing in a dive bar on the wrong side of Edinburgh. His night, held in various venues around New York, was called the Antihoot.

He played host to Suzanne Vega, Jeff Buckley and many others, he discovered and nurtured lots of talent including Beck, Regina Spektor and the Moldy Peaches but nobody discovered him. Rock and Roll is about many things, but first you've got to get out of the house. Lach finds himself trying to find common ground with his small, and at times, unappreciative audience. What's so complicated about his love for four very hairy men?

Written and performed by Lach

Executive Producer: Richard Melvin

A Dabster production for BBC Radio 4

Sound design: Al Lorraine and Sean Kerwin.


WED 23:15 Strap In - It's Clever Peter (b01hxmxt)
Barry

Strap in for fifteen minutes of rip-roaring comedy as Clever Peter bring you a Health & Safety blowdart, a killer whale and a soufflé.

Clever Peter - the wild and brilliantly funny award-winning sketch team get their own Radio 4 show.

From the team that brought you Cabin Pressure and Another Case Of Milton Jones comes the massively bonkers and funny Clever Peter, hot off the Edinburgh Fringe and wearers of tri-coloured jerseys.

"If they don't go very far very soon there is no such thing as British justice" - Daily Telegraph
"A masterclass in original sketch comedy" - Metro
"Pretty much top of the class" - The Scotsman

So -
Why "Clever"?
Dunno

Why "Peter"?
Not a clue mate

Should I listen to the show?
Yes, of course! Derrr.

Starring Richard Bond, Edward Eales-White, William Hartley
and special guest Catriona Knox

Written by Richard Bond, Edward Eales-White, William Hartley & Dominic Stone

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive Television Ltd Production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0376qlz)
Peers are told that West Ham football club will have to pay off all its bank debt before it can move to the Olympic stadium.
But West Ham vice-chairman Karren Brady tells a House of Lords committee that the club was not getting the stadium on the cheap and that the deal was good value to the tax-payer.
Peers press the Government to consider alternative sewage solutions before it commits to handing over taxpayers' money to fund a "super sewer" tunnel in London.
And peers begin their consideration of the Government's plans for overhauling the banking system.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 25 JULY 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0371wvn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b037h08x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0371wvq)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0371wvs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0371wvv)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0371wvx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0376x70)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Venerable Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b0376x72)
The process to decide how much aid should be given to Scottish farmers affected by this year's snowstorms is underway.

In Scotland, one thousand farmers applied for help from the £6 million weather aid scheme set up after the extreme weather saw thousands of fallen livestock and ruined crops. It comes as governments across the UK have made extra money available. In Northern Ireland, the executive set aside £5 million to help affected farmers whilst both Wales and England gave money to rural charities.

Charlotte Smith hears how the amount of aid each farmer receives will be decided and when farmers can expect to get their cheques.

And we catch up with Tim FitzHigham - the man on a mission to recreate a 19th century bet - who appealed for an unshorn sheep on the programme a couple of weeks ago. Farming Today hears how one listener was able to help...

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Datshiane Navanayagam.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tycf8)
Black-browed Albatross

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the black-browed albatross.

Although they're residents of the Antarctic seas , black-browed albatrosses have turned up in the UK many times. For a while, Albert-or Albert Ross as he was christened by birdwatchers- was one of the most well-known birds in the British Isles. He was first spotted in the gannet colony on Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth in 1967. Sadly he failed to find a mate among the masses of gannets there.


THU 06:00 Today (b0376x74)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Webb and John Humphrys, including:

0752
A United Nations team tasked with investigating the alleged use of chemical weapons in Syria has begun a mission to Damascus, trying to hammer out with Syrian officials the terms for their investigation. Bernard Kouchner, former French foreign minister, outlines his concerns at the international community's approach to the conflict.

0810
A train has derailed in north-western Spain, killing at least 77 people and injuring more than 100, officials in the Galicia region have said. The BBC's correspondent Tom Burridge reports from the scene of the crash.

0816
The UK economy is expected to notch up an improved quarter of growth when official figures are published today, adding to hopes of a sustained recovery. The BBC's economics editor Stephanie Flanders and political editor Nick Robinson give their analysis.

0822
A study into generational differences for the Co-operative looked at the experiences of 2000 people and found that while one in 3 couples over 60 met as teenagers, for couples twenty years younger the number fell to just one in seven. Denise Robertson, a TV agony aunt, and Sathham Sanghera, an author, discuss whether young people have issues with commitment.


THU 09:00 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b0376x76)
Series 1

Lord Tebbit

In this series, Peter Hennessy, the leading historian of modern Britain, asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. In each week's conversation, he invites his guest to explore what influenced their thinking and motivated them to enter politics, their experience of events and impressions of people they knew, and their concerns for the future.
Peter's guest in this week's programme is Lord Tebbit (Norman Tebbit), the former Conservative Cabinet Minister and loyal ally of Margaret Thatcher. He served as Employment Secretary in the early 1980s and then became Conservative Party Chairman.
After serving in the RAF and working as an airline pilot, Norman Tebbit first entered Parliament in 1970 at the age of thirty-nine. His trenchant style of politics provoked Michael Foot to describe him as a "semi-house-trained polecat". Norman Tebbit was also nicknamed "the Chingford skinhead" (he was MP for Chingford) and was caricatured as a leather-clad "bovverboy" puppet in TV's 'Spitting Image'.
In October 1984, Norman Tebbit and his wife were seriously injured in the IRA's bomb attack on the Grand Hotel, Brighton. After the 1987 election, he left the Cabinet in order to ensure that his disabled wife received proper care. Norman Tebbit continues to voice his forthright views, notably on Britain's relationship with Europe, in the House of Lords.
Presenter, Peter Hennessy. Producer, Rob Shepherd.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b037h0f9)
Florian Illies - 1913

Episode 4

In Paris, Proust sets out in search of lost time in a sound-proofed study, Stravinsky creates musical mayhem, and Duchamp finds a wheel; in Prague, Einstein yearns for Elsa and Kafka for Felice; in Munich, Lulu is banned, and Münter captures her Klee; in Vienna, Freud falls out with Jung, and Stalin and Hitler stroll, and maybe meet, in the grounds of a palace.

This is Europe in 1913 - the year before the storm. Florian Illies captures a world on the edge of a cataclysm, in which armies are enlarged and and nationalistic lines are drawn.

But Illies' snapshots are of a Europe, though laden with premonition, that is still vibrant and creative. The Futurists, Fauvists and Expressionists are redefining art; Proust and Joyce are reshaping literature; Freud and Jung are battling their way through the subconscious; Stravinsky has tapped a primative nerve in music; and Einstein is, well, Einstein.

The anecdotes and observations embrace Picasso, Braque, the Mona Lisa (mostly missing), Thomas Mann, Duchamp, Franz Ferdinand, Kirchner, Klee, Klimt, Kandinsky, Kafka, Wedekind, Einstein, King George V, Stalin, Hitler, Redl, Machu Picchu, Münter and many more.

Florian Illies trained as an art historian at Bonn and Oxford. He was editor of FAZ's 'Berliner Seiten' and the arts section of 'Die Ziet', and he co-founded the arts magazine 'Monopol'. He is currently a managing partner at the fine art auction house Villa Grisebach in Berlin. 1913: The Year Before The Storm has so far sold over 200,000 copies in Germany.

Writer: Florian Illies
Translators: Shaun Whiteside and Jamie Lee Searle

Reader: Michael Maloney
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0377069)
Kim Cattrall

Kim Cattrall talks about her latest play and what drew her to the role of Alexandra Del Lagro, a fading Hollywood legend, in Tennessee William's Sweet Bird of Youth. An update on the campaign to get women represented on UK banknotes. Why the family of Anne Marie Ellement a Military Police Officer, who killed herself after making rape allegations, welcome the Ministry of Defences announcement to investigate the case. Plus Gabrielle Aplin, best known for her cover of The Power of Love, talks about her music and performs her latest single live. And how will families, schools and colleges cope this Autumn when it becomes compulsory for young people to stay on in education or training until they're 17.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b037706c)
Melissa Murray - Good News

Episode 4

by Melissa Murray.

Part 4

With the discovery that her mother is not terminally ill, Fred, Adrienne's indecisive daughter, is forced to reassess her life.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b037706f)
Spain: Operation FGM

In Barcelona, a doctor offers reconstructive surgery to women who had female genital mutilation when they were children. Recorded over 6 months, Linda Pressly hears the stories of Rosa and Wenkune - Spanish women of African origin. FGM has caused them both a good deal of trauma. Will the operation change how they feel about themselves? What difference will it make to their intimate relationships? And what motivates Dr Barri Soldevila - a busy surgeon in a private hospital - to prioritise these procedures and offer them free of charge?

Reporting FGM

The police are there to help if you have been a victim of Female Genital Mutilation or have any information about this crime taking place. They advise that you call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 11 or the NSPCC's FGM helpline on 0800 028 3550 to report this crime or for help, advice and support. Be reassured calls will be dealt with sensitively and you can remain anonymous.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Information from the FCO about female genital mutilation, and what to do if you know someone who is at risk of FGM.
https://www.gov.uk/female-genital-mutilation

If you or someone you know has been affected by FGM, the following organisations can offer information and support.

Daughters of Eve works to advance and protect the physical, mental, sexual and reproductive health rights of young people from female genital mutilation practising communities. If you have had any form of FGM they can give you advice, including about the different medical reversal options, advice about childbirth and how to live as healthily as possible with FGM. They can also give advice about what you can do to minimise the risk of FGM happening to you or someone you know. If you would like to contact Daughters of Eve you can email using the contact form on their website or get in touch by text
Text: 07983 030 488 www.dofeve.org

The Foundation for Women's Health, Research and Development (FORWARD) is a campaign and support charity providing help with FGM. If you have personal experience of, or know of anyone who has undergone FGM, FORWARD can provide support, advice and information about accessing specialist health care and counselling for girls and women affected by FGM. If you would like any help or advice or simply want to talk to someone about your experience you can get in touch - the charity is staffed by sensitive and approachable African women who, as well as English, speak Arabic and several other African languages.
Phone: 020 8960 4000 http://www.forwarduk.org.uk/
Details of specialist clinics run by experienced professionals that provide health care and assistance to girls and women affected by FGM
http://www.forwarduk.org.uk/resources/support/well-woman-clinics.


THU 11:30 Playing Ping Pong with Henry Miller (b037706h)
"Henry Miller, Norman Mailer and Charles Manson, the three pillars of misogyny," according to Gore Vidal - yet many women writers today cite Miller as an influence.
Using his time in California as a prism, acclaimed poet Kim Addonizio explores how, despite his reputation as a pornographic, unredeemed misogynist, Miller's time in Big Sur, California, transformed him into a family man and ping pong fanatic.
With an exclusive interview with his son Tony Miller, a visit to the Henry Miller Memorial Library, in Big Sur, Addonizio hears great stories of epic table tennis tournaments during the long winters, struggles to make ends meet, as she meets those who remember Miller's time in the woods during his 18 year stay.
She explores the roots of the personal growth movement that flourished on the Californian coast, at the time, of which Miller became an unexpected exponent of, at the world famous Esalen Institute, and tries to find out why he appeals to young women readers today.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b037706k)
'Worthless' ticket guarantee; booking plane seats; parking charge victory

We have a special report on the 'trusted seller' programmes quietly operated by the world's biggest secondary ticket websites. It's after one tout with trusted status fleeced THEM and left thousands of people with fake tickets.

The little shopping coupons still popular despite the digital age....

And how to sit where you want on a plane without paying over the odds.

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jon Douglas.


THU 12:57 Weather (b0371wvz)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b037706m)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life (b037706p)
The Arrival of Women in the Office

Writer and satirist Lucy Kellaway traces the origins of today's corporate culture.

In this episode, Lucy describes how women entered the white-collar workforce in the late 19th century. She visits the Bank of England to find out the story of their first female employee, Janet Hogarth. Such was the concern about women that offices featured different male and female entrances, staggered starting times, separated lunch areas and cordoned workspaces.


Readings by Richard Katz, Sasha Pick, Adam Rojko and Kerry Shale
Historical Consultant: Michael Heller

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0376ncz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b037d18g)
Christopher William Hill - Hush! Hush! Whisper Who Dares!

1969. Ernest Shepard looks forward to a V&A retrospective of his drawings for Winnie-the-Pooh. But then, in an imagined meeting with the now grown-up Christopher Robin Milne, some painful truths emerge. By Christopher William Hill.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b037706r)
A World in a Woodland

Woodlands are often the setting for fairy stories but also for the creation of a new childhood game, a secret adventure or a new den and are cherished places. Helen Mark heads to Gloucestershire to see how children, large and small, share a love for the forest.

In Berkeley she meets children from a 'forest school' where lessons are taken outside and children are taught to use axes and saws, to identify trees and create and build. While the children teach her how to get involved, she hears it's not just the children who've changed through freedom outside the classroom.

Near Tetbury she meets James Shrives and his wife Debs who've crammed 1000 trees into an acre of garden space to create their own forest. The dense growth provides a sanctuary and draws in wildlife but will the pride they've taken in the growth make it heartbreaking to thin down the area?

Finally she heads to the edge of Bristol where a council-managed forest at Ashton Court provides an escape for city-dwellers. She joins a group of friends to see how the wild space inspires them and if it can rival their computers and meets author Ingrid Skeels whose own alternative education led her to create St Cuthbert's Wild School for Boys.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b0372v8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b0375252)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b037706t)
Frances Ha; Birth of a Nation; Porridge; box office trends

Matthew Sweet talks to the writer and star of Frances Ha, Greta Gerwig. Directed by Noah Baumbach it tells the story of a friendship between two women as their lives begin to take different paths. Greta ponders why female friendship isn't often seen as worthy of the big screen treatment.
As the hot weather continues, how are cinema takings holding up? Number cruncher Charles Gant and independent cinema owner Kevin Markwick chew over the trends, hits, misses and surprises at the box office so far this year and look ahead to what the rest of 2013 has in store.
The writer and comedian Mark Gatiss is back with the last of his cinema spin offs from 1970s sitcoms. This week it's Porridge, an altogether subtler affair, he argues, than the previously discussed movies of On The Buses and Are You Being Served.
The silent epic The Birth of a Nation was released in 1915 and has been controversial ever since, particularly for its depiction of race. It portrays the Civil War and has been described as a recruitment tool for the Ku Klux Klan. As the film is re-released, Professor Richard Dyer of King's College London and critic Karen Krizanovich discuss the influence of the film and how the Klan has been represented on the big screen since.

Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b037706w)
2D supermaterials; Inside an MRI; Antarctic architecture

Nobel Prize and - as of this week, Copley Medal - winner Andre Geim outlined in Nature today his vision for the next generation of super-materials.

Chemist Prof Andrea Sella joins Adam to explain how the discovery of graphene may have been the start of a remarkable new class of tailor made materials technically known as 'Van der Waals heterostructures'.

This week on Show Us Your Instrument, Prof Sophie Scott introduces the MRI machine and explains why you never press the 'quench' button, unless you want to blow the roof off.

Finally, an exhibition on Antarctic architecture opens on Friday 26th July in Glasgow, commissioned by the British Council and curated by The Arts Catalyst. We talk to Hugh Broughton who designed the new Halley VI base, a Thunderbirds inspired building, perched on top of stilts, on top of skis.

Plus, Adam calls the current Halley Base Commander, Agnieszka Fryckowska, to find out what it's like to live and work during three months of darkness.

Producer: Michelle Martin.


THU 17:00 PM (b037706y)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0371ww1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Meet David Sedaris (b01n0vhg)
Series 3

Attaboy; In the Waiting Room

The multi-award winning American essayist, David Seadris, brings more of his wit and charm to BBC Radio 4 with a series of audience readings.

Episode 1 (of 6):
This week childhood discipline in the Sedaris household is recalled in "Attaboy" and the perils of agreeing without understanding in a foreign country are examined in "In The Waiting Room".

Produced by Steve Doherty
A Boomerang Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0377070)
As David helps Ruth trim a cow's foot, they discuss Elizabeth's results at the English and Welsh wine awards. She didn't win but the judges complimented 'Chateau' Loxley. The cricket team won on Saturday but haven't been doing that well. As David goes into detail, Ruth tells him he's overestimating her interest in cricket. They note that the slog of harvest is about to begin.

In New Zealand, Meriel is delighted with the news of Kenton's engagement to Jolene. Kenton agrees she can be a bridesmaid and tells Jolene that purple is her favourite colour. Jolene hadn't planned on having bridesmaids but is happy to agree, although purple is pushing it!

Lilian admires Jolene's engagement ring. The asbestos at the paper mill is going to take all of next week to get out. Everything is much harder without Matt. He's still in Russia but after a row on the phone he won't speak to her. She's now regretting cutting off his access to the business account. To reinstate it, the bank would have to issue a new card. She's worried how he'll cope and is desperate to speak to him.

At Jolene's urging, Lilian leaves an apologetic voicemail message, begging Matt to let her know where he's staying, so she can get a new card to him.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b0377072)
Kevin McNally; new Fourth Plinth art; Terry Jones on Under Milk Wood

With Mark Lawson.

Kevin McNally has acted on stage opposite Jude Law and Kenneth Branagh, and has appeared in more than two dozen films, including all four Pirates of the Caribbean movies. He now stars in The Mill, a new four-part TV drama, which depicts events in rural-industrial England in 1833 and is based on the extensive archive of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire. He discusses the appeal of playing characters who are far from likeable, and reveals how he thinks it helped that he was a little tipsy when he auditioned for Pirates Of The Caribbean.

The latest artwork to be commissioned for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square has been unveiled by London Mayor Boris Johnson. Hahn / Cock by the German artist Katharina Fritsch is a sculpture of a giant blue cockerel. Katharina Fritsch and Boris Johnson explain what the latest statue to occupy the plinth means to them.

For Cultural Exchange, Monty Python's Terry Jones selects Under Milk Wood, the play for voices by Dylan Thomas, which was narrated by Richard Burton and first broadcast on the BBC Third Programme in 1954.

Producer Karla Sweet.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b037706c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b0377074)
Fight Over Falkirk

The Unite trade union has been accused of trying to manipulate the process for choosing the Labour Party's candidate to be the Falkirk MP in the next general election. Police are now investigating allegations that the UK's largest trade union signed people up to be members of the Labour Party, without their knowledge. In the wake of the Falkirk debacle, Labour leader Ed Miliband signalled that the historic links with the unions must change.

But what happened in Falkirk? Hannah Barnes travels to the Scottish constituency to find out whether the selection process was hijacked by outside forces.

Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b0377076)
Investor Relations

The power of investors and their role in changing how business functions and is run is the discussion for Evan Davis and his guests. What is it like to be voted off the board by your shareholders? And is investor activism here to stay? And how should a company boss best manage the owners of the company?

Guests
Alison Carnwath, chair Land Securities
Helena Morrissey, CEO Newton Asset Management
Nigel Wilson, Group CEO Legal & General

Producers: Rosamund Jones/Lucy Proctor.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b037706w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b0376x76)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b0371ww3)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0377078)
Spanish train crash: the latest;
Tunisian politician assassinated;
Is exam success down to nature not nurture?
Economic success in the Philippines.
With Carolyn Quinn.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b037707b)
Their Eyes Were Watching God

Episode 9

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston

Episode 9

Newly married to Tea Cake, Janie is truly happy living and working with him on 'the muck' in the Everglades. And in the evenings their homestead is the centre of all that's going on. Then one night there is a threat that the hurricane is coming.

Read by Adjoa Andoh
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4

A 1930s African-American classic which tells Janie's story in dazzling Southern prose

This African-American classic was first published in the 1930s and is seen as one of the greatest American novels of the twentieth century. The author, Zora Neale Hurston, grew up in Eatonville, Florida, the first incorporated black town in America. Nearly every black woman writer of significance, including Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, acknowledges Zora Neale Hurston as her literary foremother.

"A rigorous, convincing and dazzling piece of prose, as emotionally satisfying as it is impressive." Zadie Smith.


THU 23:00 North by Northamptonshire (b00sp454)
Series 1

Episode 1

Sheila Hancock heads a stunning cast including Mackenzie Crook, Penelope Wilton, Felicity Montagu and Kevin Eldon in this clever, funny and touching series about a small town in the middle of Northamptonshire as it prepares for a talent night.

Written by and also starring Katherine Jakeways.

Get to know the local supermarket manager who shares rather more than is usual about his private life over the store's tannoy system. Recently divorced Jan has been trying unsuccessfully to 'find herself' with a trip abroad to an elephant sanctuary. But it is at home in Wadenbrook that she starts to feel happier with herself as her friendship blossoms with ex-teacher Mary. And, joy of joys, could it be that Jan is going to experience a touch of romance at last?

Meet driving instructor and forthright self-defence teacher Esther and her gentle and put-upon Jonathan as they struggle to start a family and we meet possibly the only happy couple in town, Ken and Keith, as they attempt to teach their pet whippets to dance for the town talent night.

In this opening episode, Mary starts rehearsals for the town talent night and is shocked by 12 year old Gregory's slide show of Victorian ladies.
Meanwhile Esther sends her husband Jonathan out to collect money for the Leicestershire Infertile Males Project but he ends up at The Bricklayer's Arms looking at pictures of elephants with Jan.

Narrator ...... Sheila Hancock
Rod ...... Mackenzie Crook
Mary ...... Penelope Wilton
Jan ...... Felicity Montagu
Jonathan ...... Kevin Eldon
Esther ...... Katherine Jakeways
Keith ...... John Biggins
Landlord ...... Rufus Wright
Gregory ...... Sam Cotton

Producer: Claire Jones

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2010.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b037707d)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster, where Labour calls for urgent action to deal with pressure on accident and emergency departments. Also from the House of Lords: a return to the row over Lynton Crosby and cigarette packaging. And a special report on parliamentary privilege. Editor: Rachel Byrne.



FRIDAY 26 JULY 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0371wx5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b037h0f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0371wx7)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0371wx9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0371wxc)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0371wxf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b03775fm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Venerable Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b03775fp)
Scientists at Nottingham University have developed a seed treatment which they claim enables plants to extract nitrogen from the air. Most crops obtain nitrogen from the soil through their roots, and so fertilisers are used to boost the process. But some plants, notably peas and beans, can fix nitrogen from the atmosphere using nitrogen fixing bacteria. The team in Nottingham has come up with a way of putting those bacteria into the cells of plants, potentially allowing them to fix nitrogen from the air.

Also on Farming Today, as many as 1600 historic monuments are under threat from farmers. English Heritage warns that cultivation can damage sensitive sites and has been surveying farmers and land managers about how they farm, so it can advise on how to protect the archaeology.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anna Varle.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tydrm)
Whinchat

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the whinchat.

Whinchats are perky little summer visitors, about the size of a robin and migrate to the UK in spring from their wintering grounds south of the Sahara. They're birds of open country, preferring moors, heaths and rough ground and are often found where gorse bushes grow, which explains their common name, whin being a Scottish word for gorse.


FRI 06:00 Today (b03775fr)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b037524r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b037h0g0)
Florian Illies - 1913

Episode 5

In Paris, Proust sets out in search of lost time in a sound-proofed study, Stravinsky creates musical mayhem, and Duchamp finds a wheel; in Prague, Einstein yearns for Elsa and Kafka for Felice; in Munich, Lulu is banned, and Münter captures her Klee; in Vienna, Freud falls out with Jung, and Stalin and Hitler stroll, and maybe meet, in the grounds of a palace.

This is Europe in 1913 - the year before the storm. Florian Illies captures a world on the edge of a cataclysm, in which armies are enlarged and and nationalistic lines are drawn.

But Illies' snapshots are of a Europe, though laden with premonition, that is still vibrant and creative. The Futurists, Fauvists and Expressionists are redefining art; Proust and Joyce are reshaping literature; Freud and Jung are battling their way through the subconscious; Stravinsky has tapped a primitive nerve in music; and Einstein is, well, Einstein.

The anecdotes and observations embrace Picasso, Braque, the Mona Lisa (mostly missing), Thomas Mann, Duchamp, Franz Ferdinand, Kirchner, Klee, Klimt, Kandinsky, Kafka, Wedekind, Einstein, King George V, Stalin, Hitler, Redl, Machu Picchu, Münter and many more.

Florian Illies trained as an art historian at Bonn and Oxford. He was editor of FAZ's 'Berliner Seiten' and the arts section of 'Die Ziet', and he co-founded the arts magazine 'Monopol'. He is currently a managing partner at the fine art auction house Villa Grisebach in Berlin. 1913: The Year Before The Storm has so far sold over 200,000 copies in Germany.

Writer: Florian Illies
Translators: Shaun Whiteside and Jamie Lee Searle

Reader: Michael Maloney
Abridger: Pete Nichols

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b03775ft)
Suffragette Special

A Year of Revolution
100 years on, Woman's Hour takes a look at the year 1913 and what it meant to the suffrage movement both in the UK and abroad. Jenni Murray is joined by a panel of experts, as they discuss why the year before World War broke out was a revolutionary one for the women's movement. Emmeline Pankhurst was in and out of prison, the Cat and Mouse Act was passed by Parliament, Irish Home Rule was being debated in the House of Commons, a huge suffragette rally was organized in Hyde Park in London, and World War I loomed on the horizon. The panel discuss whether the British nation was 'under siege' in 1913, and to what extent this affected and shaped the suffrage movement.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b03775fw)
Melissa Murray - Good News

Episode 5

by Melissa Murray.

Part 5

With the discovery that she is not ill, Adrienne faces a life-changing dilemma: whether to sink back into old habits or break away from the routines of work and family life.

Directed by Marc Beeby.


FRI 11:00 Klatt's Last Tapes (b03775fy)
Dennis Klatt was an American pioneer of text to speech devices, enabling those without the ability to speak to have a voice. Before Klatt died in 1988, he produced the definitive history of speech synthesis, which included recordings he archived charting the progress of the technology in the 20th century.

Using Klatt's extensive research as her cornerstone, Lucy Hawking explores the history of synthesizing speech over the last 200 years, up to current research, which suggests people are disturbed by hearing artificial speech which is too human.

It was the showman and inventor Wolfgang von Kempelen who built the most celebrated speaking machine, in 1769. At Saarland University, in Germany, they have constructed a replica and Lucy tries her hand at some very basic mechanical speech.

In the 1930s, Homer Dudley produced the first electronic device. By the 1980s, Klatt's was producing highly sophicated speech synthesizers, including the DECtalk system, which is essentially the electronic voice that is used by Lucy's father, Professor Stephen Hawking.

We hear from Klatt's daughter Laura Fine, who worked with her father, as well as colleagues and researchers in the field of speech synthesis, and we raid the archives of the Acoustical Society of America (much of which was archived by Klatt) for recordings of the wonderful and sometimes weird speech synthesizers.

Featuring: Jürgen Trouvain and Fabian Brackhane from Saarland University, Mick Donegan, Michael Cubiss, Simon Fitzmaurice and Laura Fine.

Producer: Julian Mayer

Sound Designer: Nick Romero

A Sweet Talk Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in July 2013.


FRI 11:30 Hobby Bobbies (b03775g0)
Series 1

Dangerous Posters

The useless officers' crackdown on fly posting leads to the disappearance of "Daddy Warbucks" - and the sight of Bernie in a bright red wig.

Britain's longest serving PCSO is paired with the laziest in Dave Lamb's sitcom. (Dave is the voice of TV's Come Dine With Me)

Geoff............................Richie Webb
Nigel............................ Nick Walker
The Guv....................... Sinead Keenan
Jermain.........................Leon Herbert
Bernie...........................Chris Emmett
Geoff's Dad:...........................Noddy Holder

Producer: Steve Doherty

A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b03775g2)
Olympic legacy, Transit vans, plastic bag charges

The Olympic Park reopens to the public but the row goes on over the future of the Olympic Stadium.
The end is nigh for UK production of the Ford Transit, so what options are left if you want a British built van?
If you're in Wales and Northern Ireland you get charged for a carrier bag at the supermarket. Scotland's following suit but England isn't.
Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Mike Young.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b0371wxl)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b03775g4)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life (b03775g6)
The Telephone and New Office Technology

Writer and satirist Lucy Kellaway traces the origins of today's corporate culture.

Part 5 of 10: The Telephone And New Office Technology

New technology including the telephone, telegraph, typewriters, adding machines, and even filing cabinets revolutionised office work in the late 19th century. In particular the telephone was looked on suspiciously in the UK. Britain's chief post office engineer, Sir William Preece, told a House of Commons committee : 'I have one in my office, but more for show. If I want to send a message, I employ a boy to take it.'. Lucy visits the stores of the museum of London to see early examples of office technology, including an early private telephone belonging to the Rothschilds.

Readings by Richard Katz, Sasha Pick, Adam Rojko and Kerry Shale
Historical Consultant: Michael Heller

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0377070)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b03775g8)
Rowena the Wonderful

A real-life magician's assistant, Rowena is eleven years old.

She can't speak but she wants a voice, so that she can tell her extraordinary story of growing up, celebrity and love.

A unique drama-documentary to reflect the life of unique girl by award-winning writer Helen Cross ('My Summer of Love'). Dominique Moore stars in this uplifting, unusual and moving story.

Rowena was born with a rare chromosome disorder which means she can't speak. But she can understand the language of looks and the power of stories, of music and the love of her family.

She can do magic, and she will make herself heard.

Writer...Helen Cross
Rowena's voice...Dominique Moore
Director...Mary Ward-Lowery


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b03775gb)
RHS Tatton Flower Show

Eric Robson is at the RHS Tatton Flower Show for this week's episode of Gardeners' Question Time. Joining him are gardening experts Chris Beardshaw, Christine Walkden and Pippa Greenwood, who will be tackling the audience's horticultural questions.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. I recently lost a Clematis and have been told it was due to clematis wilt. For future reference, is there anything to cure clematis wilt?
A. With a Clematis there is a tendency to assume it was infected by clematis wilt if it becomes infected or starts to wilt however clematis wilt is considered quite rare so it is a good idea to check for signs of other infections. Firstly, check under the bark to see if it is still living, then check the base to see if the plant has not been infected by a bacteria or fungal infection such as Honey Fungus which can cause dramatic wilting.

Q. My garden has been left overgrown since 1850. It has long rough grass and very little topsoil. What can I do to maintain it without too much effort?
A. Hit the garden with a brushwood strimmer to take the vegetation down and reduce in height. Remove vigorous plants and allow a year of fallow. Then spot treat with a systemic herbicide any of the invasive perennial weeds. Choose a mix of vigorous exotic herbaceous plants and reasonably vigorous native grasses, which are resilient and will reduce the fertility of the soil. A good example would be Yellow Rattle, which is a hemi-parasitic.

Q. How long does it take for a Tulip Tree (Liriodendron Tulipifera) to bloom?
A. As a general rule it will take about 10 - 15 years. To induce your tree into flower you could stress it slightly by reducing its food. Give it a rose or tomato feed instead of a high nitrate fertiliser.

Q. My courgettes are grown in a poly tunnel and unfortunately seem to be rotting prematurely. Does the panel have any advice?
A. This is sometimes linked with fluctuating temperatures or is also a result of congested overgrown beds with too much foliage. Therefore a tunnel is not the best environment for courgettes, due to the muggy, humid atmosphere. One suggestion is to raise the plant up when the foliage starts to grow, using bricks, try to grow the plant off the ground so ventilation can flow through the plant. Also open both ends of the tunnel to allow as much air flow as possible.

Q. I have a deep west-facing windowsill - what suggestions to the panel have for a feeling of a garden indoors?
A. Christine would opt for ferns, philodendrons and tropical plants, for a sense of mystic and jungle. Chris would suggest exploring Bonsai, meaning a plant in a pot and surrounding your pot with other plants like Salaginella and Soleirolia which will give a forest floor environment. Finally Pippa would suggest growing your own herbs such as basil, lemon grass and coriander.

Q. I've never had any luck keeping a Poinsettia plant until Christmas. However this year my Poinsettia is still in full bloom, seven months later. Do I leave the plant to carry on growing or do I cut it back to allow it to grow again for next Christmas?
A. It would be best advised to leave the plant alone and continue the same regime. It if goes out of flower then consider cutting back, drying off and allowing it to grow for the next winter.

Q. Why are my radishes tiny and woody?
A. It could be due to the dry weather conditions. The swelling of the root is hugely linked to soil moisture levels therefore it needs a constant supply of moisture and fertile soil.

Q. I have just taken over an allotment full of Mare's Tail, could the panel suggest ways to clear it?
A. When spraying with a weed killer the plant add a small amount wetting agent such as washing up liquid and also damage the surface of the plant, which allows more of the spray to get into the body of the plant. This is because the plant has a very high silica content in it meaning you will often notice that water tends to gather and drop off the plant rather than soak in. Also, try and dig as much of it as possible rather than cutting it down.


FRI 15:45 Latido (b03775gd)
Episode 3

Latido is Spanish for heartbeat, and is a leitmotif in these three stories by Louise Stern, commissioned specially and written in Mexico earlier in 2013. Each story features a deaf central character, and each has a Mexican setting.

Louise Stern writes:

"I have always felt that Mexico is a country where words are flesh ... People there, hearing or deaf, are very comfortable with communicating via gestures. Mexico is the place where I feel the least deaf. Although the incidence of deafness is more or less the same in most of Mexico as in the rest of the world (less than one percent), there is a village in Yucatan state in Mexico where everyone uses sign language as a matter of fact, because there is a genetic quirk that means that more people than usual are deaf. This village is not the setting of these stories written for the BBC, but time spent there has influenced the stories."

Latido III

Itzel is weighed down with a secret, something all-too-human she witnessed by the shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe.

Louise Stern grew up in Fremont, California, and is the fourth generation of her family to be born deaf. She now lives and works in London as an artist and writer. 'Chattering', her first collection of short stories, was published in 2010. 'The Electric Box', her first commission for radio, featured in the series 'Where Were You ...' - also produced by Sweet Talk - in 2012.

Reader: Louise Brealey
Director: Karen Rose
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b03775gg)
A White House journalist, a comedian, an artist, a technology guru, and a blues musician

Matthew Bannister on

The tough talking White House correspondent Helen Thomas. She asked hard questions of Presidents from Kennedy to Bush. General Colin Powell pays tribute.

The Northern painter William Turner - who only achieved fame in his eighties.

The comedian and director Mel Smith: Stephen Poliakoff and Mary Kenny celebrate his acting talent.

Dr James Martin - the technologist and philanthropist who predicted the rise of the internet.

And the rackety life of bluesman T Model Ford - who fathered 26 children and served ten years in prison for a killing.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b03775gj)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.

George Alexander Louis is not yet a week old and already his name is known around the world, thanks in no small part to the BBC's coverage of the royal birth. But was it all a bit too much? Many of you think the BBC went baby mad.

Operation Dropout mobilises as Roger Bolton meets the man who looks into those awkward silences caused by technological failure - the BBC's Technology Controller for Journalism, Andy Bocking.

And while the controller sits on-high, we meet one of those on the front line - senior studio manager Bob Nettles. Feedback spends the day with Bob and puts listeners' audio queries to one of the best pairs of ears in the business.

Also, the emotional power of radio drama. We hear from the listener who was left dumbfounded by Nick Warburton's afternoon drama Irongate.

And we're looking for your questions, comments, and queries about this year's Proms. We'll be talking to the Director of the Proms, Roger Wright, who is also the Controller of BBC Radio 3, in a future edition of Feedback. So do send us your thoughts.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b03775gl)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0371wxp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b03775gn)
Series 81

Episode 5

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Jason Cook, Julia Hartley-Brewer, and Fred MacAulay.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b03775gq)
Rob is frustrated that Jess has decided at short notice not to come up to Ambridge this weekend. Helen takes him to her office for a chat and he appreciates the opportunity to air his frustration. Talking to Helen helps but he realises he should be talking things through with Jess.

Oliver catches ailing Caroline out of bed. She wants to know about Grey Gables. He assures her that everything's been taken care of.

Kathy's frustrated by Martyn Gibson. He's been throwing his weight about all week and she's sick of the sight of him but is worried he wants a scapegoat for the drop in income.

Pat thinks £15 is a lot for the silent movie evening but tickets are selling quite well. Kathy points out there's a free drink, and they have to make a profit for the organ fund.

Kathy remarks that Anya told her Helen was talking to Rob in her office. Pat is surprised to hear this. Helen claims he wanted to thank her for some ideas she'd given him for his welcome pack. Pat asks whether his wife is any closer to finding work locally. Unsettled Helen says she doesn't know and doesn't care.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b03775gs)
Birmingham's new library; Naturally 7; killer whale film Blackfish

With John Wilson.

In 2010 Dawn Brancheau, a trainer at the Seaworld theme park, died after being dragged into the water by Tilikum, Seaworld's largest performing Orca. A new documentary, Blackfish, explores how Tilikum came to be in captivity and asks whether whales kept as performing animals will inevitably become aggressive. Philip Hoare, author of Leviathan Or The Whale, reviews.

The vocal group Naturally 7 are about to perform at this year's BBC Proms. They demonstrate how they create the sounds of a variety of instruments using just their voices, and reveal how they build up a song, layer by layer.

A big new library is the flagship project of Birmingham City Council's plans for the regeneration of the city. Ahead of the opening early in September, John takes a tour of the £188 million building, with project director Brian Gambles, and Birmingham-born author Jonathan Coe.

Author Kamila Shamsie reveals her Cultural Exchange choice: the 1950 classic movie All About Eve, with Bette Davis as an aging Broadway star.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b03775fw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b03775gv)
Lord Hattersley, Jacob Rees-Mogg, Jessica Mann, Philip Collins

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Endellion, Cornwall with Lord Hattersley, writer Jessica Mann, Times columnist Phil Collins and Jacob Rees Mogg MP.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b03775gx)
Reforming Catholicism in 140 Characters

Sarah Dunant says Pope Francis should use his Twitter account to demonstrate that he's prepared to deal with the 'mess' inside the Catholic Church. Perhaps, she says, with this Tweet, he's already started: 'If we wish to follow Christ closely, we cannot choose an easy, quiet life'.


FRI 21:00 Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life (b03775gz)
Omnibus

Episode 1

Writer and satirist Lucy Kellaway traces the origins of today's corporate culture in an omnibus edition of the first week's episodes.

In today's Britain, more of us spend more time at an office than ever before. It dominates our lives. It's made more of us middle class, transformed the lot of women, raised standards in education and been the reason for many technological advances.

But the office itself seems to have no history. We accept without question the way we work now. We endure the charade of the annual appraisal. We gawp at endless PowerPoint presentations in interminable meetings. We work in open plan offices where we can overhear our colleagues phone calls to their plumber. That's how things are done. But why?

For the last twenty years, writer Lucy Kellaway has been an observer of the peculiarities of corporate culture in her column for the Financial Times. In this series, she looks back at the history of office life. How did it end up like this?

Readings by Richard Katz, Sasha Pick, Adam Rojko and Kerry Shale
Historical Consultant: Michael Heller

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b0371wxr)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b03775h1)
Former BBC broadcaster Stuart Hall's 15-month sentence for a series of indecent assaults has been doubled by the Court of Appeal, Tens of thousands of supporters and opponents of Egypt's ousted Islamist president attend rival rallies, with two people killed in clashes, commemorations have begun to mark 60 years since the end of the Korean War and Pope Francis has visited Copacabana beach, in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, to hold the greeting ceremony for World Youth Day with Philippa Thomas.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b03775h3)
Their Eyes Were Watching God

Episode 10

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston

Episode 10

A hurricane has hit the Everglades and the lake has breached its banks. When Janie got into trouble escaping the floods, Tea Cake came to her aid but he was bitten by a mad dog. Now safely back home he has become ill and Janie has gone to fetch the doctor.

Read by Adjoa Andoh
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4

A 1930s African-American classic which tells Janie's story in dazzling Southern prose
This African-American classic was first published in the 1930s and is seen as one of the greatest American novels of the twentieth century. The author, Zora Neale Hurston, grew up in Eatonville, Florida, the first incorporated black town in America. Nearly every black woman writer of significance, including Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, acknowledges Zora Neale Hurston as her literary foremother.

"A rigorous, convincing and dazzling piece of prose, as emotionally satisfying as it is impressive." Zadie Smith.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b0375sff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 From Worcester with Love (b01ntg53)
Episode 1

Fifty years ago Peter White, at the age of eleven, left home for Worcester College. Then it was a residential school for blind and partially sighted boys. He had a love-hate relationship with it, but freely admits now that it changed his life and gave him the tools to compete in a tough world. Throughout the last academic year, Peter has returned to Worcester, to follow his twenty-first century successors: seven eleven- and twelve-year-olds, who have come to the school from a variety of backgrounds.

Much has changed. In the 1960's it was almost universally assumed that blind children would be educated together; now its far more common for them to attend mainstream schools. Worcester, now known as New College, is still residential; but pupils live in small houses, not in the institution itself, where they learn to cook, care for their clothes, and generally look after themselves. Its co-educational, and children go home far more often. Throughout the year, through a mixture of exchanged letters, and frequent visits, Peter and the current year seven pupils have been getting to know each other and comparing their experiences of school.

Nothing's been off-limits: the pupils have discussed homesickness, getting lost, bullying, a case of racism; and how the experience of living at New College is changing them. We've not only heard from the pupils; but staff, house-parents, and the children's families. They have proved to be a very varied, and engaging group of youngsters, who have talked very honestly about their experiences: Rufus: self-contained, fascinated by technology and delighted with Peter's tales of bad behaviour back in the sixties; Grace; clever, full of common-sense, but suffering badly from missing home and family. And then there's Zoey, the form all-rounder; bookworm, athlete, and learning to play the organ: Ali, obsessed with rap and the London street life he has left: but not quite as tough as he would like to make out; William, who is struggling to make friends and settle in and Jess, who describes daily dramas as she gets lost, battles with bees and plans mammoth sleep-overs at her London home.

From Worcester with Love follows the group through the year, as work gets harder, and the novelty wears off. Listeners will be able to track the engaging ins and outs as Will and Ali attempt to settle their differences and to find out how Angel, who revealed at the beginning of her year that she'd never had real friends before, copes with living away from home. Meanwhile Jess is considering whether to swap the hothouse atmosphere of a residential special school for the familiarities of home and the more Laissez-faire attitude of her local comprehensive. Peter follows what happens and is given pause for thought by an old school friend who actually works at the school today. How have things changed and what might life be like for those starting their secondary education at the blind school which played such an important role in shaping Peter's life.

Producer: Susan Mitchell
(Repeat).




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b03757ct)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b03757ct)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0375qt4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0375qt4)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 WED (b0375xv6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0375xv6)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b037706c)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b037706c)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b03775fw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b03775fw)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b0375sff)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b0375sff)

A Guide to Garden Wildlife 09:30 MON (b03757cm)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b036wgjg)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b03775gx)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b014qt0b)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b036twtk)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b0375db5)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b0372ct7)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b036wgjb)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b03775gv)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b037706w)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b037706w)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b0372v85)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b0372v85)

Births, Deaths and Marriages 11:30 MON (b03757cy)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b0375dl6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b0375tdv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b0376qlv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b037707b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b03775h3)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b036wdt1)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b03757cp)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b03757cp)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b037h02q)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b037h02q)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b037h08x)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b037h08x)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b037h0f9)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b037h0f9)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b037h0g0)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b037524m)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b036twt1)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b0375byt)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b037706f)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b037524r)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b037524r)

Does Science Need the People? 21:00 WED (b01ks52y)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0375byr)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b01f5lcz)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0376jy2)

Drama 14:15 THU (b037d18g)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b03775g8)

Face the Facts 21:00 SUN (b01smkpw)

Face the Facts 12:30 WED (b0376jxw)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b03727gc)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b03754hp)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0375p7x)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0375xty)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b0376x72)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b03775fp)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b036wg0c)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b03775gj)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b036v9hj)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0375tdh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b0372ct5)

From Worcester with Love 23:30 FRI (b01ntg53)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0375d6k)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0375tdf)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0376nd1)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0377072)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b03775gs)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b036wg05)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b03775gb)

Hobby Bobbies 11:30 FRI (b03775g0)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b036twt9)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b0375d6f)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0375tdl)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b0375tdn)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b0375tdn)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 TUE (b0375sfk)

Just So Science 09:30 WED (b01ptbx8)

Klatt's Last Tapes 11:00 FRI (b03775fy)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b036wg09)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b03775gg)

Latido 15:45 FRI (b03775gd)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b0372ctf)

Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life 13:45 MON (b0375byp)

Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life 13:45 TUE (b0375qtg)

Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life 13:45 WED (b0376jy0)

Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life 13:45 THU (b037706p)

Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life 13:45 FRI (b03775g6)

Lucy Kellaway's History of Office Life 21:00 FRI (b03775gz)

Meet David Sedaris 18:30 THU (b01n0vhg)

Meeting Myself Coming Back 20:00 SAT (b0372ctm)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b036vvzq)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0371wn5)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0371wqj)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0371wrw)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0371wt5)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0371wvn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0371wx5)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b0377cn9)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b0377cn9)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b036vvrn)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b0376nd3)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b036vvzz)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0371wnf)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0371wqs)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0371ws4)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0371wtf)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0371wvx)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0371wxf)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0371wnh)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b036vw01)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0371wnm)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0371wnt)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b036vw0m)

News 13:00 SAT (b036vw09)

North by Northamptonshire 23:00 THU (b00sp454)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b0372v89)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b0375252)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b0375252)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b036w39q)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b037706r)

Opening Lines 19:45 SUN (b037525f)

PM 17:00 SAT (b0372ctc)

PM 17:00 MON (b0375bz0)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0375sfh)

PM 17:00 WED (b0376ncv)

PM 17:00 THU (b037706y)

PM 17:00 FRI (b03775gl)

Patrick O'Brian - Desolation Island 15:00 SUN (b0375250)

Paul Temple 11:30 WED (b0376jjx)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0375257)

Playing Ping Pong with Henry Miller 11:30 THU (b037706h)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b036tqpz)

Pop-Up Ideas 09:30 TUE (b0375p83)

Pop-Up Ideas 20:45 WED (b0375p83)

Postcode Profiling: Winners and Losers 11:00 MON (b03757cw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b036wj84)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b03754hm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0375p7v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b0375xtw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b0376x70)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b03775fm)

Privacy Under Pressure 09:00 MON (b03757ck)

Privacy Under Pressure 21:30 MON (b03757ck)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b0372cth)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0372cth)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0372cth)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b0372v8f)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b0372v8f)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b0372v8f)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 09:00 THU (b0376x76)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 21:30 THU (b0376x76)

Richard Tyrone Jones's Big Heart 19:15 SUN (b037525c)

Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus - Dancing the Orange 16:30 SUN (b0375254)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01mny0r)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b03727gf)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b0372ctk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b036vvzv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0371wn9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0371wqn)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0371ws0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0371wt9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0371wvs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0371wx9)

Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b036v092)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b0375qt6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b036vvzs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b036vvzx)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b037gktm)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0371wn7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0371wnc)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0371wpb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0371wql)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0371wqq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0371wry)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0371ws2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0371wt7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0371wtc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b0371wvq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0371wvv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0371wx7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0371wxc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b036vw0k)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0371wph)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0371wqz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0371ws8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0371wtp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0371ww1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0371wxp)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0372v87)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0372v87)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b036v094)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b0375qt8)

Strap In - It's Clever Peter 23:15 WED (b01hxmxt)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b037524k)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0372v8c)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b037524p)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b0375259)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b0375259)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0375d6h)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0375d6h)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0375tdc)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0375tdc)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0376ncz)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0376ncz)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0377070)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0377070)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b03775gq)

The Bishop and the Bankers 20:00 MON (b0375d6m)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b036w3b6)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b0377076)

The Brig Society 18:30 WED (b0376ncx)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b036w39s)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b037706t)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b037524t)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b037524t)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b0375sf9)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b0375byy)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b0375byy)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b0375qtj)

The Lach Chronicles 23:00 WED (b0376qlx)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b0375p81)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b0375p81)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0376ncs)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b036wg0h)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b03775gn)

The Report 20:00 THU (b0377074)

The Story of the Talmud 11:00 WED (b0375xv8)

The Stuarts 21:00 SAT (b036tqpv)

The Twelve Bar Blues 10:30 SAT (b0372ct1)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0372ct3)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b037524w)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0375db7)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0375tdq)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0376qls)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0377078)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b03775h1)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b036vvr8)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0376ncq)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0375dl8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b0375tdx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b0376qlz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b037707d)

Today 07:00 SAT (b0371x1t)

Today 06:00 MON (b03754hr)

Today 06:00 TUE (b0375p7z)

Today 06:00 WED (b0375xv0)

Today 06:00 THU (b0376x74)

Today 06:00 FRI (b03775fr)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b02twnw4)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b02txxkl)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02ty530)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b02ty8nj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b02tycf8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b02tydrm)

Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace 13:30 SUN (b036twth)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b036vw03)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b036vw05)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b036vw07)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b036vw0h)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b0371wnk)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b0371wnp)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b0371wnw)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b0371wpf)

Weather 05:56 MON (b0371wqv)

Weather 12:57 MON (b0371wqx)

Weather 21:58 MON (b0371wr1)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b0371ws6)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b0371wsb)

Weather 12:57 WED (b0371wtk)

Weather 21:58 WED (b0371wtr)

Weather 12:57 THU (b0371wvz)

Weather 21:58 THU (b0371ww3)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b0371wxl)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b0371wxr)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b037525h)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b037525k)

What's the Point of...? 09:00 WED (b0375xv2)

What's the Point of...? 21:30 WED (b0375xv2)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b0375byw)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b037524y)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b0372ct9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b03757cr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0375p86)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0375xv4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0377069)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b03775ft)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b036v89y)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b0375sfc)

World at One 13:00 MON (b03757d2)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0375qtd)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0376jxy)

World at One 13:00 THU (b037706m)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b03775g4)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b03757d0)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b0375qtb)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b0376jxt)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b037706k)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b03775g2)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b036wj86)