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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 JULY 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b0368rlb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b0368pl2)
The Cooked Seed

Episode 5

Still battling to gain the elusive green card, Anchee Min has nevertheless saved enough money to get on the property ladder.

She begins to live the American dream the hard way and, while labouring to keep up with the mortgage payments, she finally finds her voice.

Read by Chipo Chung
Abridged and produced by Jane Marshall
A Jane Marshall production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0368rld)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0368rlg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0368rlj)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b0368rll)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0368s30)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra of the Muslim Council of Britain.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b0368s32)
"I couldn't compromise myself anymore" - An iPM listener talks about working at the Care Quality Commission. She tells us that those who challenged the organisation "were pretty much slapped down". And one listener gives us her answer to nuisance calls. Presented by Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Email iPM@bbc.co.uk.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b0368rln)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b0368rlq)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b0368kpj)
A Tale of Three Piers

Helen Mark takes a day at the seaside to visit the romance of piers. They have been hailed as great examples of Victorian architecture but the cost of maintenance and repair from weather damage or fire can run into millions. She visits Weston-super-Mare in Somerset where the now hi-tech restored Grand Pier overlooks the damaged remains of Birnbeck. Actors Timothy West and Prunella Scales join her in Clevedon to visit the 'pier of the year' which was once only a vote away from demolition. It was described by Sir John Betjeman as 'delicate as a Japanese print in the mist' but it may have a fragile future. They welcome the paddle steamer Waverley as it docks - revisiting memories of Timothy's childhood holidays.

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b036j3q3)
Farming Today This Week

Farm work is one of the most dangerous jobs there is. Only 1% of the UK's working population is employed in agriculture, yet the sector is responsible for a fifth of all deaths at work each year.

Charlotte Smith travels to Northern Ireland where, over the last two years, 24 lives have been lost on farms. That's one death a month. Charlotte meets Barclay Bell, deputy president of the Ulster Farmers' Union who farms cereals and livestock in County Down, and Brian Monson from Northern Ireland's Health and Safety Executive.

As the first ever Farm Safety Awareness Week draws to a close, they explore the most common dangers on farms and discuss what's being done to try and save lives.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Anna Jones.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b0368rls)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b036j3q7)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b036j3q9)
Composer Debbie Wiseman and Gryff Rhys Jones's Inheritance Tracks

Sian Williams and Richard Coles with film and television composer Debbie Wiseman and the Inheritance Tracks of Griff Rhys Jones. John McCarthy meets co-operative walkers in the Lake District, twins Marcus and Alex Lewis reveal the effect of an abusive upbringing on their memories, Rosa Rebecka relates the appeal of a hand-me-down guitar and John Viney tells what it's like to be a mystery shopper. As usual there are the thank you messages of listeners this week with a haggis flavoured anecdote.


SAT 10:30 Zeitgeisters (b036j3qc)
Series 1

Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng

As part of Radio 4's Year of Culture initiative, the BBC Arts Editor Will Gompertz meets the cultural entrepreneurs who are shaping our lives and defining the very spirit of our age.

These are not Turner Prize winners or the recipients of grants from the Arts Council or the Lottery Fund. These are the people behind the scenes, pulling the strings and plotting a path of consumer-driven success. They are the designers of the latest 'must have' piece of technology or clothing, the brains behind an artist's development, and the tastemakers that know what will work at the box office and what will sell on the high street. Their impact goes beyond mere commerce, it shapes contemporary culture. They are the Zeitgeisters and it's about time we met them.

Programme 4. In the final programme of the series, Will meets Daphne Koller & Andrew Ng, co-founders of Coursera, the company that is revolutionising education much in the same way that Amazon and iTunes turned publishing and music on their heads. Daphne and Andrew have together created a platform which allows anyone from anywhere in the world (who has internet access) to attend lectures and classes given by the best teachers in the world - for free. Universities as we know them may soon be a thing of the past.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b036j3qf)
Sue Cameron of the Telegraph looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The row between the Labour leader Ed Milliband and the Unite union over the selection of a candidate in Falkirk uncovers tensions between the left and right wings of the party. The furore over cyber-snooping refuses to go away, and MPs wonder how acceptable it would be to take a pay rise. Plus how do political parties go about shaping their policy ideas.
The editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b036j3qh)
You Can't Hug on Facebook

Portuguese people are leaving the country in their thousands, travelling to the country's former colonies in search of work - Emma Jane Kirby's in Porto and Lisbon learning how recession's driving many away from their family and loved ones. The exodus from conflict-ridden Syria continues too - Kieran Cooke meets a family from Damascus now selling shoes in the Armenian capital, Yerevan. Kevin Connolly's in Cairo and asks how the military will react at the next election if the people once again select an Islamist candidate to be the country's leader. Beth McLeod has been finding out that a high proportion of Vietnam's successful businesses are run by women - she suggests the country's turbulent history may point at some of the reasons why. And far out in the Pacific, John Pickford's on Christmas Island where he stumbles across a reminder that this was the place where Britain carried out some of its first nuclear weapons testing.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b036j3qk)
Uncoupling your financial affairs; Who makes the most out of plastic; Mobile phone charges; Investigating insurance renewals

The City regulator is investigating insurance companies for overcharging customers when they let their house or car insurance policy renew automatically. Money Box revealed in March that some customers who allow their policies to roll over year after year were paying hundreds of pounds more than new customers would pay. This weekend it's emerged that the Financial Conduct Authority is investigating automatic renewal and whether it treats customers fairly.

Breaking up is always emotionally draining. And if you have joint financial affairs - especially a joint bank account - pulling those apart can be financially draining too. With joint accounts either party can use all of the money. And if it goes overdrawn both parties are liable for all of the debt. How can you stop a departing partner making off with the cash and leaving you in hock?

Who makes money when you pay with plastic? Almost everyone but you. Your card provider, the retailer's bank, and of course Visa or Mastercard. And how much of your money goes to each of them before the retailer sees a penny? It is very hard to say. The EU wants to step into this process and ban or at least cut some of the interchange fees and make them clear to customers. Card companies say 'no'. Retailers answer 'yes'. Where does the consumer sit in all this arguing?

Not so much a slope more a staircase. A major mobile phone firm is planning to charge some customers for a minute when they talk for an extra second. Rounding up every call to the nearest minute is not unique in the mobile phone world. But why is Vodafone choosing now to move from per second billing to per minute for some of its pay-as-you-go customers? And who now charges the least for those short and infrequent calls?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b0368rf4)
Series 81

Episode 2

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Susan Calman, Jason Cook and Hugo Rifkind.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b0368rlv)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b0368rlx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b0368rfb)
Graham Brady, Tim Farron, Emma Reynolds, Paul Nuttall

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Keswick in the Lake District with Liberal Democrat President Tim Farron, Shadow Europe Minister Emma Reynolds MP, Deputy leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall and Leader of the 1922 Committee Graham Brady MP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b036j3qm)
A chance for Radio 4 listeners to have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions. Today, should foreigners be charged for using the NHS? And would a £200 levy be enough? Should the Labour party reconsider how it's funded, following its spat with Unite? Is a referendum on the EU the right way to decide a complex issue? And is it ok to use our mobiles at supermarket checkouts, or does 'phonegate' show how society has lost touch with common courtesy ?

The producer is Katy Takatsuki.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01mnxzn)
The Martin Beck Killings

Murder at The Savoy

The Martin Beck books were written over ten years from 1965-75 by the Swedish husband and wife team of Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö. They featured the dogged and complex figure of D.I. Martin Beck and his colleagues in the national Police Homicide Department in Stockholm, and were written to give a realistic, unsentimental portrait of Sweden at the time: a society suffering from stifling bureaucracy and the creeping corruption of a liberal society.

In Murder at the Savoy, Martin Beck and Lennart Kollberg are called to Malmö in Southern Sweden when an industrialist is shot whilst having dinner at the city's best hotel. There are people in high places who want the case cleared up quietly and quickly, but Beck refuses to give way to pressure.

Cast:
Narrators ..... Lesley Sharp and Nicholas Gleaves
Martin Beck ..... Steven Mackintosh
Lennart Kollberg ..... Neil Pearson
Gunvald Larsson ..... Ralph Ineson
Per Månsson ..... Tom Mannion
Zachrisson ..... Joe Sims
Åsa Torell ..... Clare Corbett
Malm ..... Nicholas Murchie
Edvarsson ..... Will Howard
Mats Linder ..... Paul Mundell
Charlotte Palmgren ..... Philippa Stanton
Bertil Svensson ..... Rick Warden
Sara Moberg ..... Joanna Brookes
Sister ..... Carolyn Pickles
Gun Kollberg ..... Sally Orrock
Helena Hansson ..... Hannah Wood
Broberg ..... Michael Shelford
Victor Palmgren ..... Robert Blythe

Original Music composed by Elizabeth Purnell
Directed by Sara Davies
Novels written by Maj Sjöwall & Per Wahlöö
Translated by Amy and Ken Knoespel
Dramatised for radio by Jennifer Howarth


SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b0367sl2)
Series 16

Lili Marlene

A new series of SOUL MUSIC begins with stories of love, loss and friendship through the WWII favourite Lili Marlene, made famous by Marlene Dietrich and sung by soldiers on both sides.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b036j3qp)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Being powerful; Sigrid Rausing; Baby names

Advice on how to be a powerful woman from Ruby McGregor Smith, Chief Executive of MITIE Group plc, and other guests at our programme launching six powerlist films. Powerlister Sigrid Rausing on her philanthropy and publishing. Facts and figures behind domestic violence statistics; Dr Catherine Donovan from Sunderland University, Jane Keeper from Refuge and Ian who was abused by a former partner discuss.

Brene Brown on her book, The Power of Vulnerability. How late can you leave it to try to conceive naturally? Kate Garraway, journalist and ambassador for the Get Britain Fertile Campaign, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Liverpool Women's Hospital Charles Kingswood and Claudia Spahr author of Right Time Baby discuss later motherhood.

Writer, broadcaster and stand-up comedian, Viv Groskop on 'extreme retro' baby names. Florence Knight Cooks the Perfect...warm salad of chargrilled courgette, pecorino cheese and honey.


SAT 17:00 PM (b036j3qr)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b0368nzj)
Managing in a Crisis

What do you do when it all goes wrong? How to manage corporations in times of crisis is the subject under discussion by Evan Davis and his guests.

Business leaders should expect the ride sometimes to be bumpy - but what is it reasonable to expect? And what is the best way to proceed when the truly unexpected happens?

Guests
Michael Woodford, former chief executive & president, Olympus Corporation
Ann Cairns, President International Markets, Mastercard
Eddie Bensilum, Director, Regester Larkin

Producer : Rosamund Jones.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0368rlz)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b0368rm1)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0368rm3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b036j3qt)
Derren Brown, Rich Hall, Richard Madeley, Isy Suttie, To Be Frank, Ralfe Band

Clive Anderson talks to Derren Brown, the multi-award winning master of psychological illusion on his return to the West End stage with his new one-man show DERREN BROWN: INFAMOUS. The show plays at The Palace Theatre until Aug 17 2013.

Isy Suttie is a Sony award-winning stand-up comedian, actress, writer, composer and musician. Isy is currently filming the second series of Comedy Central UK's Alternative Comedy Experience. She'll talk to Clive about her latest projects as well as her role as Dobby in The Peep Show and being in the final series of Shameless.

American Comedian Rich Hall talks to Nikki Bedi about his late night comedy/music extravaganza, Rich Hall's Hoedown and his latest album Waitin' On a Grammy.

Richard Madeley, presenter of Channel 4's Richard & Judy for seven years, talks to Clive about his debut novel, Some Day I'll Find You.

And there is live music in the Loose Ends studio: Ralfe Band with their single Come On Go Wild and To Be Frank with If You Love Her.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b036j3qw)
Series 14

Desperately Seeking Snowden

Fast turn-around drama by writer and broadcaster, Hardeep Singh Kohli. This award-winning series sees writers create a fictional response to a major story from the week's news. While the whereabouts of the fugitive US intelligence leaker, Edward Snowden, remains a mystery, a down at heel journalist gets a lucky break when he bonds with a fellow traveller in an airport departure lounge.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b036j3qy)
Kenneth Branagh in Macbeth

Kenneth Branagh and Alex Kingston star in a much-anticipated production of Macbeth at the Manchester International Festival. The venue has been kept from ticket holders until almost the last moment... will the production live up to the expectation?

Also from the Festival, intense music meets powerful documentary and extraordinary visuals in Massive Attack v Adam Curtis. And do it 2013: an art exhibition in which instructions - some to be done there in the gallery, some to be carried out later at home, some active, some philosophical - are given to participants.

Ben Wheatley's new film A Field in England, set in the English Civil War and starring Reece Shearsmith, blends history, horror and humour ultimately to defy categorisation. It has a groundbreaking simultaneous cinema and home viewing release.

And Harry Eyres' new book Horace and Me: Eyres' memoir of sorts that also reveals the Roman poet Horace's insight into life - still offering illumination in our own times.

Joining Tom Sutcliffe to review are the poet Paul Farley, writer Emma Jane Unsworth and classicist and presenter Tom Holland.

Producer: Sarah Johnson.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b036j3r0)
Churchill's Secret Cabinet

Clement Attlee once claimed that Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War through his words. But what influenced these words and their delivery?

The answer lies in a wooden cabinet containing not only Churchill's private collection of gramophone records, but also rare recordings of his unknown speeches.

In this Archive on 4, historian Andrew Roberts joins archivists, historians, musicians, even Churchill's own family, to discover how these rapidly disintegrating discs - some of them over a hundred years old - offer new clues about his oratorical style. Their survival depends on the fast action of the Cambridge archivists in a race against time to digitise them, before they quite literally turn to dust.

The work has turned up some surprising revelations - including a glimpse into Churchill's very own desert island discs. The apparently unmusical Churchill turns out to be someone who treasures songs of satire, humour and intense patriotism. We discover recordings of black swans enjoyed by a nature loving Churchill we rarely see, and then there are those fascinating newly discovered recordings of Churchill's own voice - including the first known recording of him, from the early 20th century.

From these records, Andrew Roberts gleans valuable insights into that famous titan of British oratory - how it was not just his words, but his unique musical delivery that came to reflect and even embody the hopes of a nation.

Producer: Kati Whitaker.
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 The Stuarts (b0367c3b)
To Make the Plough Go before the Horse

by Mike Walker. James I & VI. Charting the life and reign of the loneliest boy in the world, through his relationships, with his one love, Esme, his bullying tutor, Buchanan, his charming Queen, Anne, to his favourite, George Villiers.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole & Sasha Yevtushenko
Sound design by Colin Guthrie

Production co-ordinator: Phil Hawkins
Studio managers: Martha Littlehailes, Anne Bunting, Alison Craig

Notes

Becoming King of England does not free James from the prison of his past or his nature; on the other hand it does allow him a vastly broader canvas on which both his virtues and his faults show clearly. He seeks to vindicate his mother's memory and attacks those who attacked her; he encourages learning and discourages foreign adventures, he supports brilliant men and women but, when convenient, or when bullied, allows them to be destroyed. At his death, will he leave as difficult an inheritance to his son as his mother did to him?


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b0368rm5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b0368fx6)
Transparency and Secrets

The 16th century philosopher Francis Bacon is widely credited with coining the phrase "knowledge is power". If he was alive today he would surely have appreciated the irony of the government this week launching its consultation on transparency and open data while the news is full of stories about spying and under cover surveillance. The goal of "transparency" has become something of mantra across a wide section of our society. It is held up as a moral virtue; an unambiguously Good Thing that should be pursued at all costs. Vascular surgeons are the latest to have the "spotlight" of transparency shone upon them. The NHS is publishing league tables of their results and doctors who refuse to co-operate will be named and shamed. Transparency has become not just a descriptive term, but an ideology - something that should be actively strived for and is a fundamental human right that underpins democracy. But by investing so much moral capital in transparency have we done the opposite of what those who champion it wanted? Instead of a more trusting society, do we now automatically assume that what goes on behind closed doors is not to be trusted and always capable of being corrupted? Is the CIA whistleblower Edward Snowden a hero who's exposed the scale of state surveillance on its citizens, or a traitor who has undermined our capacity to fight terrorism? In an age when digital data about every aspect of our life is so easy to generate, how much of a right do "they" have to know about us and how much of a right do we have to know about "them?" Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Anne McElvoy and Kenan Malik. Witnesses: David Leigh - The Guardian's investigations editor until 2013, and professor of journalism at City University, London UK, Dame Pauline Neville-Jones - Former Chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee, Professor Gwythian Prins - Visiting professor of War Studies Buckingham University and member of the Chief of the Defence Staff's Strategic Advisory Panel, Shami Chakrabarti - Director of Liberty.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b0367mxg)
Series 27

Episode 9

(9/13)

Paul Gambaccini welcomes three more music enthusiasts to the last of the heats in the current Counterpoint series. Taking part, at the BBC Philharmonic's studio at MediaCity in Salford, are contestants from Liverpool, Newcastle and Wombourne in Staffordshire.

Which other female recording artist apart from Adele has won six Grammy awards in a single ceremony? And which controversial classical pianist was the subject of a TV drama featuring Victoria Wood, shown last year?

These and many other questions will be testing the mettle of today's contestants - and they'll also have to pick a specialist musical topic to answer individual questions on, with no advance warning of what the choice of topics will be.

As always, Paul will be providing musical extracts and anecdotes to entertain whatever your taste.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b0367c3g)
Homer Made Anew

Roger McGough introduces poems after Homer by Alice Oswald and Michael Longley. Poems from the beginnings of Western literature made new. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 07 JULY 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b036hth4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b014q005)
Face It

Together

The first of three short story commissions on the theme of social networking.

Together by Naomi Alderman walks the line between science fiction and our own near future, in a love story involving eight loosely-networked friends.

Read by Dan Stevens

Produced by Robert Howells

Naomi Alderman won the Orange New Writers Award for her first novel Disobedience and has subsequently been named as the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year. She has published prize-winning short fiction in Prospect, Woman and Home, the Sunday Express and a number of anthologies and in 2009 was shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award. From 2004 to 2007 Naomi was lead writer on the BAFTA-shortlisted alternative reality game Perplex City.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036hth6)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036hth8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036hthb)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b036hthg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b036jc3t)
The bells of the Church of Holy Trinity, Penn, Buckinghamshire.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b0368fx8)
Series 4

Kevin Allen

Advertising guru Kevin Allen tells a tale of missing cutlery on passenger jets to show where business leaders go wrong. Success, he says, belongs to the "buoyant" leader, riding high on the esteem of the workforce, rather than ruling by fear.

Four Thought is a series of thought-provoking talks combining personal stories with ideas of contemporary relevance. Speakers air their thinking in front of a live audience, hosted by David Baddiel.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b036hthp)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b036jc3w)
Keeping the Past Alive

Samira Ahmed considers the value of reviving, re-examining and re-connecting with the past. She explores the significance of bringing back lost traditions, values, stories and memories in order to re-experience them in the present.

Brandyn Shaw is a young man who is recreating a 1930's life for himself in the 21st Century. He dresses in period clothes, sings Al Bowlly songs in 30's clubs and he even has an iron from the 1930's to get his shirts properly starched. For Brandyn, this is a life of escape into what he perceives as a gentler way of living.
So, can the past teach us lessons to address the challenges of the present? Or can it only offer moments of rose tinted, historical escapism?

The programme includes John Agard's poem John Edmonstone, Old Tongue by Jackie Kay and Nostalgia by Billy Collins. Plus music by Perotin, Joan Baez and Kate Rusby.

Produced by Rosie Boulton
A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b036jc3y)
28 miles from Land's End, the Isles of Scilly have a mild enough climate to allow flowers to be grown outside in the fields. This year, though, the weather has been less than kind. At Churchtown Farm on St Martin's Ben and Zoe Julian's harvest of their summer crop, Pinks, is just getting up to speed, weeks behind schedule. Sarah Swadling follows the blooms from field to post boat, finds out the secrets of flower picking from an old hand who's been doing it for 20 years, and learns why Pinks are so called (nothing to do with the colour).

Presented and Produced by Sarah Swadling.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b036htj1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b036htj5)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b036jc40)
John Tavener, Child Soldiers, Call to Prayer

Composer John Taverner talks about his spiritual life as three new works are premiered at the Manchester International Festival. A special report from Nadene Ghouri from Uganda which details when she met child soldiers who have been reunited with their families. Robert Mickens reports from Rome on the scandal and intrigue surrounding the Vatican bank, as Pope Frances orders a rigorous enquiry and we also look at the significance of the pope's first Encyclical. Trevor Barnes reports from the Church of England General Synod in York, looking at some of the key issues being debated. Throughout Ramadan, Channel 4 will be broadcasting the early morning call to prayer. The Director of Didsbury Mosque, Dr Hassan al Katib will sing the call to prayer and explain its meaning, followed by a discussion with writer and journalist Nesrine Malik and Imam Ibrahim Mogra from the Muslim Council of Britain over whether this is a month-long publicity stunt or instead, contributing to furthering Britain's Islamic education? Patrick Kingsley, the Guardian's Egypt correspondent and Dr Omar Ashour from Exeter University, debate what's gone wrong with Democracy in Egypt and what does the future hold? And Alison Murdoch explains what Buddhism has to do with the Wimbledon men's final.

Credits:

Christine Morgan Editor
Carmel Lonergan Producer
Peter Everett Producer

Contributers:

John Taverner
Robert Mickens
Dr Hassan al Katib
Nesrine Malik
Ibrahim Mogra
Patrick Kingsley
Omar Ashour
Alison Murdoch.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b036jc42)
AfriKids

Sierra Leonean journalist Sorious Samura presents the Radio 4 Appeal for AfriKids
Reg Charity:1141028
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope AfriKids.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b036htj7)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b036htj9)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b036jc44)
'God's Grandeur'
Live from Eton College Chapel.
Senior Chaplain Canon Keith Wilkinson explores the themes of faith, celebration, loss and suffering to be found in the poetry of Gerald Manley Hopkins.
With music from singers on the first of this year's Eton Choral courses.
Director of Music: Tim Johnson
Organist: David Goode
Producer: Simon Vivian.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b0368rfd)
Gender Matters

At a party to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the feminist press Virago last week, writes Sarah Dunant, the current head of the company told the story of how one night she asked one of Virago's founders why she had started the company. "To change the world of course" was the reply.

Forty years on, Sarah, a Virago author herself, wonders just how much Virago has changed the world.

She talks about how, a few weeks ago, as she waited for an hour in the studio of the Today Programme to be interviewed for a piece about female characters in fiction, she didn't hear a single women's voice.

She tells how last month, the Australian writer and academic, Kathryn Heyman, got into a very public spat with The London Review of Books because of a dearth of women writers in its pages.

And the ousting of Julia Gillard as Australia's Prime Minister last week is the most striking example that Virago's mission is not yet complete.

But Sarah takes some comfort from the fact that Kevin Rudd, the new PM, has an unprecedented six new women in his cabinet.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvggm)
Corn Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall begins May with the corn bunting. Corn buntings may be plain-looking birds which sing their scratchy songs from cornfields, but their private lives are a colourful affair and a single male bird may have up to 18 partners.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b036jc46)
Sunday morning magazine programme.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b036jc48)
Lilian rejects an idea out of hand, and Emma's trying to give George something else to think about.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b036jc4b)
Jane Somerville

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the cardiologist Jane Somerville.

Now an Emeritus Professor in her discipline at Imperial College London she's gained a worldwide reputation for her pioneering work on congenital heart disease.

She began studying medicine in the early 1950s when only a very few women were admitted through the doors of medical school. Since then she's been responsible for ground-breaking advances in cardiovascular treatment and founded the World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology.

She had something of a role model in her mother, a hard-working, clever, successful woman too. Her early years as a pupil at a boys' school in Wales must also have prepared her for making her way in such a heavily male-dominated profession.

She has a reputation for being straight-talking, and her late husband used to urge her to be more "prudent", but, she says, "it wasn't fun to be prudent: it was much more fun to be mafioso and naughty."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b0367mxq)
Series 59

Episode 1

The fifty-ninth series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the City Hall in Salisbury, where regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel by Tony Hawks, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b036jc4d)
Valentine Warner and Magnus Nilsson's Food Exchange

In a two part special Valentine Warner and Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson swap food stories from their own very different food cultures.

Magnus Nilsson comes from the hunting culture of northern Sweden, a region called Jamtland. The long, harsh winters and shorter but still intense summers, inform this now world famous chef's work. Valentine Warner has a lifelong passion for seasonal cooking and sourcing ingredients from the wild.

In part one, Valentine invites Magnus to venture into woodland in east Sussex woods to search for British wild boar.

In southern England indigenous wild boar populations were wiped out generations ago, but in recent years, after farmed boar escaped into the wild, measures have had to be put in place to control pockets where a new population has been outgrowing their habitat.

Valentine and Magnus meet Simon Barr, an experienced hunter, and the man licensed to control a population of boar on the Sussex and Kent border to share a food experience long disappeared, to hunt and cook a British wild boar.

In part two, Valentine travels to Jamtland to experience a food story Magnus is determined to share.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b036htjc)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b036jc4g)
The latest national and international news, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace (b0367nrt)
Espionage

The first of three programmes about the virtual world where they steal, spy and wage war. The British government recently declared that one of the greatest threats to national security emanates from cyberspace. Hostile nation states are conducting a war over the internet, while Western companies face the wholesale plundering of their economic life-blood. There is increasing tension as China and the United States square up to each other, while North Korea and Iran are both thought to have launched attacks.

BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera reports from London, Washington and Beijing. He talks to those who are holding the line, including top intelligence officials, political leaders and the heads of some of the world's largest companies which stand to lose millions from the theft of their intellectual property. "Britain is under attack," says Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague. "Most countries are under attack and certainly many industries and businesses are under attack." Who is responsible and where will it end?

Producer: Mark Savage.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0368rdj)
Gressenhall, Norfolk

Peter Gibbs chairs BBC Radio 4's horticultural panel programme from Gressenhall in Norfolk, where he is joined by gardening experts Chris Beardshaw, Matthew Wilson and James Wong who field the questions from gardening enthusiasts.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:
Q. Why is my rhubarb so spindly?!

A. Rhubarb thrives in quite moisture-retentive soil rich in organic matter, often in semi-shade - clay is the ideal soil-type.

Q. Have the panel ever used historic garden archives for their own needs?

A. What is fascinating about past-practices in gardening is how much it has changed over the years. There are methods from the past that make good sense practically as they were developed before the science and technology of gardening was developed.

Q. Is interest in 'grow your own' fading as a result of this year's bad weather? What crops would the panel suggest to spark continued interest?

A. Sow edibles such as Pak Choi, Chrysanthemum Coronarium, Borage and Wasabi - these will fare better in cool conditions than in full sun. Choose your plants and environments carefully in order to build confidence.

Q. Could the panel suggest hardy plants to give a tropical or exotic feel to my garden?

A. Persicaria Polymorpha is recommended, mixed in with Macleaya Cordata. The combination will offer plenty of growth, exuberance and lavish foliage. One of the compact hardy palms, Chamaerops Humilis, could also be added. Also suggested are Thalictrum 'Black Stockings' and Actaea 'Black Negligee'!

Q. A thirty-fifth wedding anniversary is represented by coral and jade. Which plants on this theme would the panel recommend as an anniversary gift for my wife?

A. Clivia, Clianthus and Kolkwitzia Amabilis 'Pink Cloud' are recommended for their coral-coloured flowers. Tiarella 'Coral', Macleaya Cordata 'Coral Plume', Hemerocallis 'Jade Flutters' and the Jade plant (also known as the 'lucky plant' or 'money plant') are suggested. Finally, the Pink Oyster Mushroom looks just like table coral and can be grown easily.

Q. Should I be concerned about the state of my red and white currant leaves, which look blistered?

A. The sample provided looks like it is infected with blister aphid. However, this is a cosmetic problem and will not affect the health of the plant. If the plant is fruiting well, it is not worth treating.

Q. What is the best soil mix to use for growing a Zantedeschia 'Crowborough' in a terracotta pot?

A. Plenty of moisture and nutrition is needed to grow these plants, and in this country, in a pot, this plant would do best in a frost-free glass house. After New Year's Day (or thereabouts), stand the container in a saucer of water, which will encourage the plant into growth. Once the frosts are over, the pot can be placed outside - in dappled shade ideally. Keep it well fed, with a liquid feed or standard hanging basket compost.

Q. Can the panel tell me why it has taken over 50 years for me to become obsessed with gardening?!

A. It gets to all of us eventually - congratulations on resisting for so long!


SUN 14:45 Witness (b036q5bz)
The Crate Escape

In the summer of 1984, an exiled Nigerian politician was kidnapped outside his London home. He was bundled into a crate in an attempt to smuggle him out of the UK. Hear what happened next in the bizarre story of Umaru Dikko.


SUN 15:00 The Stuarts (b036jf33)
A World of Fools and Knaves

by Mike Walker. Henrietta Maria - Charles I's Catholic queen - watches her husband, the 'second-best-King', fail to keep a hold on the reins of government.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole & Sasha Yevtushenko
Sound design by Colin Guthrie

Production co-ordinator: Selina Ream
Studio managers: Martha Littlehailes, Alison Craig

Notes:
An inauspicious marriage of three people changes when the third member, the Duke of Buckingham is assassinated. Charles becomes closer to his Queen Henrietta Maria and what started a marriage of convenience, becomes much deeper as the two try to support each other through turbulent times. Neither of them is able to read the signs of the times as politics and political philosophy take radical new directions. A man of great artistic taste, Charles is both too thoughtful and too indecisive to rule successfully and despite his hatred of war, war becomes his inheritance. Like many fundamentally decent men, Charles lacks iron: the ability to be utterly ruthless when necessary and merciful when expedient.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b036jf35)
Audrey Niffenegger - The Time Traveler's Wife

Audrey Niffenegger discusses her bestselling novel The Time Traveler's Wife with James Naughtie.

It's a romantic story about a man - Henry - with a gene that causes him to involuntarily time travel, and the complications it creates for his marriage to Clare.

The book opens when they meet in a Chicago library, and they both understand that he is a time traveller. But Clare knows much more than this about him as he has not yet been to the times and places where they have met before, and she remembers him from when she was just six years old.

He falls in love with her, as she has already with him, but his continuing unavoidable absences time travelling - and then returning with increasing knowledge of their future - makes things ever more difficult for Clare.

Audrey Niffenegger explains how she created a set of rules for the book, such as there would be no sex between the couple before Clare reaches 18; and how Henry's disorder is genetic rather than magical, meaning that when he time travels he arrives naked and with no money or useful possessions.

She also talks about the morality of her tale - the consequences of Henry's criminal behaviour, and how she dealt with a male character who effectively moulds the character of Clare as she grows up.

Recorded at BBC Broadcasting House in London, Bookclub with Audrey Niffenegger includes questions from the studio audience.

August's Bookclub choice : Tulip Fever by Deborah Moggach

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b036jht9)
New Poems from Old Stories

Roger McGough introduces new poems made out of the oldest stories. Simon Armitage remakes Ezra Pound and Camille O'Sullivan sings Shakespeare. Owen Sheers has been reading Homer while Paula Meehan has been hanging out with an Irish polar bear. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b0367snq)
NHS: Pricing Patients

NHS hospitals in England are back in the spotlight with a crisis in A&E and a growing number of cancelled operations. But does the real problem lie in the way the Government is currently funding them?
The Department of Health uses a system called Payment by Results to try to ensure better patient care is delivered more efficiently. However Allan Urry hears from hospitals which say they're being treated unfairly and losing millions because of perverse tariffs which short-change them. Critics say the payments system is no longer fit for purpose.
So how deep is the financial crisis facing our hospitals? Could budget cuts and the rising costs of admissions push some of them over the edge?

PRODUCER: EMMA FORDE
EDITOR: DAVID ROSS.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b036j3qw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b036htjf)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b036htjh)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036htjk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b036jhtc)
Andy Kershaw's Pick of the Week takes us right back to the origins of radio and into the chaos of Kinshasa. There's a revolutionary stockbroker on the streets of Cairo and a fearless report from the front lines of fake tanning. You'll hear some of the best and most concise analysis of the turbulence in the middle east and the origins of that, and there's music from The Staves and the Alabama Shakes. And if you thought you imagined you saw John Humphrys wandering around Glastonbury last weekend because you were hallucinating you weren't.

Programmes chosen this week:

In Our Time - The Invention of Radio - Radio 4
I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue - Radio 4
The Food Programme - Radio 4
Food for Thought - Tuesday episode - Radio 4
From Our Own Correspondent - Radio 4
Today - Thursday - Radio 4
The World Tonight - Monday - Radio 4
Alabama Shakes on 6 music's Glastonbury coverage - Saturday - 6Music
Tanning Tales - Radio 4
World Routes - Radio 3
Analysis - Syria - Radio 4
The Essay - A Taste of Summer in America - Corn on the Cob - Radio 3
Outlook - Thursday 4 July - World Service
Today - John Humphrys at Glastonbury - Saturday 29 June - Radio 4

Produced by Louise Clarke.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b036jhtf)
It's Freddie and Sorrell the heifer's big day at the Borsetshire Show. All goes well until Sorrell is spooked by another beast and Josh has to jump in to calm her. David thinks it was really bad luck but that Freddie did well. Freddie thought it was exciting. He never expected to get a place anyway. Undeterred, he plans to enter again next year.

George is thrilled that Emma has come to church. He explains that Will's dog Meg died but it's ok as he got to say a prayer over her. Afterwards Emma agrees to come again. Nic hopes to see her next time but explains that she may be too busy with Junior Church. Emma sarcastically wonders how St Stephen's ever managed without her.

Lilian confides in Jolene that the holiday was a disaster. She told the whole sorry scenario to a random stranger in a church. When she went back to Matt she discovered he had known for a while about Paul. All the time he had just been playing with her. Matt didn't make it to the airport, saying he had things to do. How can they put things right if she doesn't know where he is or if he's ever coming back?


SUN 19:15 Dave Podmore (b036jhtl)
Dave Podmore's Ashes Shame

It's an Ashes summer Radio One County's Andy Hamer finds England's sleaziest ex-cricketer Pod at the lowest of unfair ebbs - suspended from his radio programme for disloyal tweets to a rival broadcaster and stripped of his role as global ambassador for cheapfags.com.

When the nation bids farewell to a controversial yet iconic figure from the East Midlands - his beloved dog Saxon - Pod blows his questionably-gotten fortune on the funeral.

With his prospects in the gutter, and bailiffs turning up faster than grey streaks in his mullet, has Pod finally met his match? Or can a precocious young Tyke help him save the day?

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Chris Paling - Words and Music (b036jhtp)
My Old Man

A series of stories by novelist Chris Paling, in which the music plays as important a role as the words.

Episode 2: My Old Man
Bee loves Brad but she's worried they're stuck in a rut. He seems to care more for his guitar than he does for her. When the skater boy next door shows an interest in her she begins to wonder if there's not a better world for her somewhere else.

But Brad has his own concerns - concerns about his health he can only voice in the darkness of his room when he plays his guitar. Soon, even that is not enough, and finally they have to face the fact it's more than music keeping them apart.

Read by Suranne Jones
Music composed and performed by Andrew Cresswell-Davis
Director: Celia de Wolff

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b0368rf0)
Is the BBC impartial? What does impartiality really mean? Questions posed in the latest review by the BBC Trust. The Breadth of Opinion report is part of the Trust's rolling programme of impartiality reviews and looks at how the BBC covers immigration, Europe, and religion - three areas listeners regularly write to Feedback about. We speak to the review's author, Stuart Prebble, to find out whether the BBC is living up to its impartial reputation.

Also, the acting editor of The Archers, Julie Beckett, is back in the Feedback hotseat. Roger Bolton asks her why a major Archers plot revelation was only heard in the new series of Ambridge Extra, which began this week on the digital station Radio 4 Extra. Some Archers devotees are not happy.

Radio comedy is something that regularly leaves audiences unamused. Perhaps that's why Radio 4 commissioned you, the listener, to pen its latest comedy offering The Show What You Wrote on Thursday nights. Roger speaks to two fledgling comedy writers about what it takes to get the nation laughing.

And it's not only comedy that's divisive. Last week, Recycled Radio producer Miles Warde fought off strong listener criticism about his series, which takes well-known voices from the archive, chops them up, and creates something new. But after that edition of Feedback aired, admirers of the series immediately came to its defence.

One Feedback listener - part-time songwriter Dave Summers - liked Recycled Radio so much that he's dedicated one of his songs to everyone who didn't get it. You can hear 'I Heard it on Radio 4' in this week's Feedback and in full below.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b0368rds)
A computer pioneer, a Hungarian politician, a choral director, an animator and a Native American tribal executive

Douglas Engelbart, pioneer of the Internet and inventor of the computer mouse.

John D Wilson, the animator behind the title sequence of the film 'Grease', whose other credits include The Lady and the Tramp.

The man credited with helping bring down the Iron Curtain, Hungarian politician Gyula Horn. He was the country's last Communist Foreign Minister.

Marjorie Anderson, American Chippewa tribal executive, and the first woman to lead the Mille Lacs tribal band in Minnesota. She was in charge when the band successfully sued to retain hunting and fishing rights that were promised in 19th century treaties.

Richard Marlow, Director of Music at Trinity College, Cambridge, for 40 years. He was a pioneer in bringing women's voices to the fore in cloistered choirs.

Bernie Nolan, lead singer with the Nolans, who went on to act in Brookside and found a new audience in the talent show 'Popstar to Operastar'.


SUN 21:02 Egypt's Challenge (b037dxpg)
Earlier this year, Shaimaa Khalil travelled across Egypt, hearing the voices of her fellow countrymen as they discussed their hopes and fears. From her grandmother in Alexandria, disturbed by the rising violence on the streets, to the veiled women who turned against the Islamist government, to the minibus driver queuing all night just to buy diesel, she finds a nation both angry and divided. These voices are the background to the dramatic events of the last few days which saw the country's first democratically elected president deposed. Producer: Daniel Tetlow.


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b036jc42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b0367nrw)
Syria and the New Lines in the Sand

Where the Arab Spring overthrew dictators, is the Middle East now dismantling the very 'lines in the sand' imposed by Britain and France a century ago? Edward Stourton investigates.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b036jky2)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b036jky4)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks back at a week of Murray Mania, events in Egypt, the newspapers' thoughts on Mark Carney, and reports of Charles Saatchi's divorce.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0368kpl)
Ben Wheatley on A Field in England; Mark Gatiss on TV classics on the big screen

Sightseers director Ben Wheatley talks to Matthew Sweet about his new civil war film, A Field in England which is the first UK film to be available in the cinema, on DVD and Blu Ray, on television and download simultaneously. He describes his fascination with periods of revolution and the European sense of history.
Sofia Coppola explores celebrity emulation that leads to house-breaking in her film The Bling Ring and explains why the designer gear these teenagers steal holds no attraction for her.
Almost 40 years after the release of Werner Herzog's The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, it's back, showing at the British Film Institute and selected cinemas nationwide. It's based on the story of a youth found in 1828 in a German town, barely able to speak or walk having been kept in a cellar since birth. Critics Mike Catto and Leslie Felperin, whose son has autism, look at how this film plays now and assess the figure of the idiot savant and other outsiders in modern cinema.
And the writer and comedian Mark Gatiss discusses the big screen films spawned by classic TV shows from the 1960s and 70s. He begins with Steptoe and Son and its dark, bleak, movie incarnation. Next week, he tackles Are You Being Served?

Producer: Elaine Lester.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b036jc3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 08 JULY 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b036htkk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b0368fwt)
Northern Ireland Sectarianism and Civility; The Global Pigeon

The Global Pigeon - our complex and contradictory relationship with the quintessential city bird.
Laurie Taylor talks to Colin Jerolmack, an American sociologist, who spent over 3 years studying pigeon/human interaction across 3 continents. Pigeons were domesticated thousands of years ago as messengers, as well as a source of food. These days they're either treated as a nuisance or scarcely noticed on our city streets and roofs. This new study uncovers the many and versatile lives of these anonymous looking birds; the ways in which people have kept them for sport, for pleasure and profit: From the 'pigeon wars' waged by breeding enthusiasts in the skies over Brooklyn to the Million Dollar Pigeon Race held every year in South Africa. The author argues that our interactions with pigeons offer surprising insights into city life, community, culture, and politics.

Also, sectarianism and civility in Northern Ireland - Dr Lisa Smyth explores how mothers from different religious communities 'get along' in the shared spaces of inner city Belfast.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b036jc3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036htkm)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036htkp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036htkr)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b036htkt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b036pczj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra of the Muslim Council of Britain.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b036k1rz)
Farmers are calling for fly-gazing to be made a criminal, rather than a civil, offence. The National Farmers' Union says an increasing number of horses and ponies are being abandoned on other people's land, and it's become a huge problem in some areas. Toby Field visits a horse sanctuary in Somerset, to see what impact fly-grazing has.

And £2 million is being spent on research into breeding strawberries which are more resistant to disease.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced in Bristol by Emma Weatherill.


MON 05:56 Weather (b036htkw)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvys6)
Osprey

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the osprey. Ospreys are fish-eaters and the sight of one of these majestic birds plunging feet first to catch its prey is a sight to cherish. The return of the ospreys is one of the great UK conservation stories. After extinction through egg-collecting and shooting in the 19th and early 20th centuries, birds returned in the 1950s and have responded well to protection.


MON 06:00 Today (b036k1s1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 A Dark Magic (b036k1s3)
Think of a trading floor in the City or Wall Street. What springs to mind? Frantic men, ties loose, sweat beading on brows, gesturing and shouting into telephones? That's how it was for decades. But no longer. In our IT era, computer code - algorithms - rather than humans are placing most of the orders to buy or sell on Wall Street.

Trading pits have been replaced by huge warehouses with row upon row of computer servers, or black boxes, and the traders have been made redundant by clever computer programmes called "algos".

The triumph of the machines has not only been at investment banks and hedge funds. Most financial institutions, including our high street banks and pension funds, rely on algorithmic code. These algorithms are having a powerful influence on your savings, including your pension fund. Competing algorithms clash with each other and, on occasion, have caused market meltdowns.

The BBC's Business Editor Robert Peston investigates this murky world of financial algorithms. Speaking to traders, data miners, the head of the London stock exchange and the geeks taking over Wall Street, Peston asks what it means when the machines are in control and who it is benefiting. Are these magical mechanical minds fulfilling the function of the market and plumping up our pension funds, or are they causing increasing volatility in markets that have barely recovered from the 2008 financial crash?

As the models become complex, beyond most people's comprehension, what happens when humans step aside and hand over responsibility for the markets to the black boxes?

Producer: Gemma Newby
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 09:30 A Guide to Garden Wildlife (b036k1s5)
Log Piles and Long Grass

What looks like a woodlouse, can roll up into a ball, and was at one time thought to cure digestive disorders when swallowed? Well the answer can be found in the first of a new series of five programmes in which Brett Westwood joins naturalist Phil Gates in a garden near Bristol, and with the help of wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, they offer a practical and entertaining guide to the wildlife which you're most likely to see and hear in different habitats around the garden, beginning with log piles and long grass. Here they find "tiggy hogs and coffin cutters", local names for woodlice; endearing little armoured scavengers that feed mostly on fungi. And where you find woodlice you might also find their predators; a spider, "which has got these enormous fangs and the woodlice meets a sticky end!". The decaying leaves which accumulate in log piles are also good hibernation sites for bumblebees; which in spring will emerge to collect nectar and pollinate garden plants. So log piles can help ensure pollination! In the long grass nearby, Brett and Phil go looking for cuckoo spit, and an insect which can catapult itself to a height of 140 times its body length! They are also attracted by a hive of activity; the sounds of red mason bees buzzing around artificial nesting sites which have been built for them; these are short lengths of drainpipe containing dozens of hollow tubes in which the bees make their nests and lay their eggs. Artificial nests are a great way of encouraging pollinators into your garden. Finally they discuss the merits of wood mice in a garden and the creatures they attract; "What could better than being in bed at night and hearing Tawny Owls hunting in your garden, wood mice are something you really do need!"

Producer Sarah Blunt.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b036k1s7)
A Long Walk Home

Episode 1

Penny Downie reads the remarkable story of Judith Tebbutt's 192 days in captivity at the hands of Somali pirates.
In September 2011, Judith Tebbutt and her husband David embarked on a dream holiday on an idyllic beach resort in Kenya. On the first night, their worst nightmares became reality, when they are awoken by violent intruders, and Judith is dragged away towards a waiting motor-boat. And so begins the story of Judith's near 7-month ordeal at the hands of ruthless Somali pirates, and so ends the life she knew and loved.

Today: Judith and her husband embark on a dream holiday in Kenya, when her worst nightmare becomes reality.

Writer: Judith Tebbutt
Abridger: Miranda Davies
Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Penny Downie.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b036k1s9)
KT Tunstall; Women Bishops; Mrs Wintringham

Scottish singer songwriter KT Tunstall gives a live performance of her upcoming single from the new album she recorded in Arizona. Could the Church of England be about to pave the way for the first women bishops? We hear an update from the debate at the General Synod. Margaret Wintringham was the first British-born woman to take her seat in the House of Commons in 1921. We talk to her niece and hear about her 'double act' with the better known MP Nancy Astor. Why writer Lottie Moggach has chosen on-line relationships and the right to die as the themes of her debut novel, Kiss Me First. Children's TV presenter Cerrie Burnell talks about why she's used her own experience as the basis for a play in which the main character is young girl with one hand who dreams of becoming a ballerina.
Presenter: Jane Garvey.
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.


MON 10:45 The Cazalets (b036k1sc)
Casting Off

Episode 6

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan.

Diana and Edward are finally living together, but their happiness isn't quite complete, whilst Villy finds solace from an unexpected quarter.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.
This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.
With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


MON 11:00 The Blonde Women of India (b036k1sf)
I've grown up watching my parents settle into life in the UK, and as a second generation British Asian I've grown up living between two cultures - overall it's been a rich and fulfilling experience for me. However, whenever I return to India I feel at times more 'English' than 'Indian'. I get frustrated with the pushing, the shoving and the constant peeping of horns. If I struggle when I'm on holiday here, what about those people who've chosen to make India their home, particularly if they're white?

Heather Chathley was a trainee nurse, he was a trainee Indian Doctor and they both met while at the Royal Victoria hospital in Belfast. When Heather went for her first holiday to India she ended up marrying her Doctor, and since 1979 the city of Moga in the Punjab has been home.

For Nancy Joyce Margaret Jones her life in India spans almost 70 years - pre Indepependence and partition with a planned wedding blessing from Mahatma Gandhi, Nancy Rajni Kumar tells how India "caught her in its web".

She was working in the financial sector and he was Banker - that's how Christine Pemberton met her husband in the 1980s. Now living in Delhi - a City which she says is at times not an easy place to live in - it has become her "forever home".

However, for Lindsay Singh - who has been in India for over thirteen years, she and her Indian husband have decided to see if they can now start a new life in the UK - but with her changed values and attitudes Lindsay's now not sure where they'll end up.

These are 'The Blonde Women of India'.

Producer/Presenter: Perminder Khatkar.


MON 11:30 Bleak Expectations (b01pfy5w)
Series 5

A Loved-Up Life Potentially Totally Annihilated

The inappropriately named arbiter of all evil Mister Gently Benevolent unveils an advent calendar of evil that will culminate on Christmas day with the total destruction of the universe.

Only one man can prevent the end of everything for all time. But at a terrible terrible cost. Is this the end for our hero Pip? Or is it curtains for the whole of creation? And does that mean Harry needn't get Pippa a Christmas present?

Mark Evans's epic Victorian comedy in the style of Charles Dickens.

Sir Philip ...... Richard Johnson
Young Pip Bin ...... Tom Allen
Gently Benevolent ...... Anthony Head
Harry Biscuit ...... James Bachman
Servewell ...... James Bachman
Clampvulture ...... Geoffrey Whitehead
Ripely ...... Sarah Hadland
Lily ...... Sarah Hadland
Pippa ...... Susy Kane
The Ghost of Christmice ...... Mark Evans

Producer: Gareth Edwards

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2012.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b036k1sh)
Research suggests that the public's trust in lawyers is lower than other professions. It also shows that many people with a legal problem avoid seeing a lawyer, preferring instead to tackle it themselves. So what can the profession do to improve its public image?
A think tank is claiming that London and the South East of England get more than their fair share of investment in public transport. If that is the case, what is the impact on areas far from the capital?
It has been a difficult year on the High Street with lots of big retail names closing their doors. But how are the small independent stores faring? They are often family-owned and run, and some succeed in attracting a large and loyal customer base. But for others, the last few months have been really challenging.
Cycling is enjoying a new wave of popularity. But as more people have taken to two wheels, a new genre of fashion has been spawned. Is cycle chic here to last?
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Julian Worricker.


MON 12:57 Weather (b036htky)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b036k1sk)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b036k1sm)
Series 2

Greece - Inspector Costas Haritos

To accompany BBC Radio 4's dramatisations of the Martin Beck novels, which established crime fiction as a form for exploring social change, Mark Lawson presents five more 'Foreign Bodies' focusing on Greece, Argentina, Northern Ireland, South Africa and fictional TV crime-scenes including Broadchurch.

Examining subjects including the way in which crime novels have portrayed transitional societies in South Africa and Northern Ireland and explored the legacy of military rule in Argentina, in this first programme Lawson, in Athens, talks to writers including Petros Markaris, whose detective series featuring Inspector Costas Haritos has both predicted and depicted the Greek financial crisis.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b036jhtf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b036k3sc)
James Lees-Milne

Sometimes Into the Arms of God

by Christopher William Hill

Once described as 'the man who saved England', James Lees-Milne's work for the National Trust in the 1930s and 40s was instrumental in securing innumerable architectural gems for the nation. His waspish and witty diaries, which have inspired these three linked plays, chart the decline and fall of the English country house.

It's 1942 and Lees-Milne is billeted with the National Trust at West Wycombe Park - a world away from Blitz-ridden London. Lees-Milne is a rising star of the Trust. Invalided out of the army, he's looking for his own battles to fight and is determined to save the house and preserve it for the nation. But times are hard and the Trust is reliant on a considerable endowment before they can acquire a property - an endowment which the incumbent inhabitants, Johnnie and Helen Dashwood, can ill-afford to pay. Helen is an imperious host, but is desperate for paying guests - so when Nancy Mitford comes to stay, she's welcomed with open arms. Lees-Milne is delighted for the distraction, but it's difficult for guests to throw themselves into the house party spirit in sub-zero conditions. Fortunately, Nancy is obsessed with the Antarctic explorers and Captain Scott, even nicknaming the upstairs lavatory 'The Beardmore' (after the glacier of the same name), much to Helen's chagrin. But it's a brittle peace, as cloistered together, all the guests attempt to block out the war for as long as possible.

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

The three plays star Tobias Menzies (Rome; Game of Thrones ) as James Lees-Milne and Victoria Hamilton (Lark Rise to Candleford; Doctor Foster) as the novelist Nancy Mitford and chart four years during the war when Lees-Milne was at his most industrious, trying to save properties for the National Trust. In this first play, Samuel Barnett (The History Boys; Twenty Twelve) makes a guest appearance as Cecil Beaton.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b036k5s9)
Series 27

Episode 10

(10/13)
Which British political scandal is the subject of a musical Andrew Lloyd Webber is currently writing? Which jazz pianist, who worked closely with Louis Armstrong, was known by the nickname 'Fatha'?

The 2013 Counterpoint tournament reaches the semi-final stage, with three contestants who've proved the breadth of their musical knowledge in the heats returning to compete for a place in the Final.

Paul Gambaccini is in the chair and will be testing the competitors on all aspects of music - whether it be the classics, jazz, musical theatre or the pop charts, there's something to suit every taste in today's programme.

The contestants are from Hove, Bristol and Newcastle.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b036jc4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Hersch on Herschel (b036k5sh)
William Herschel was a German-born British composer and astronomer who discovered Uranus, observed Saturn's rings and discovered the existence of infrared radiation. In his spare time he composed 24 symphonies.

Rainer Hersch is a British-born German comedian and musician who is equally at home closing the show at the famous Comedy Store or conducting the Philharmonia at the Festival Hall. In his spare time he is a keen amateur astronomer with a telescope in his back garden - like Herschel. For 25 years, he has been an active member of his local astronomy society.

Now Hersch wants to know more about his namesake and why he is not better known. It's a good time to do it - in April 2013, the mission of the Herschel Space Observatory, named after William Herschel, came to an end. It was the biggest Infra-Red satellite ever launched and had been observing the Universe in the IR band - but it finally ran out of coolant.

Rainer's journey begins in the garden of the Bath house where, in 1781 William Herschel became the first human to discover a new planet, Uranus, or Georgium Sidus (George's Star) as Herschel insisted on naming it to gain patronage from George III. He finds out how Herschel constructed the most powerful telescopes then in existence and how this led him also to predict the shape of the Milky Way. Herschel also discovered Infra-Red radiation. And, despite his erroneous predictions about life on the moon and the sun, he went from being an obscure German immigrant military musician and amateur astronomer to one of the most celebrated British scientists of the day.

Producer: Julian Mayers

A Testbed production first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in July 2013.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b036k5sm)
Series 8

Space Tourism

Space Tourism

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by actor and space enthusiast Brian Blessed, Director of Virgin Galactic Stephen Attenborough and space medicine expert Dr Kevin Fong to talk about the possibilities of space exploration for mere mortals. Is travel beyond our own planet the reserve of highly trained astronauts and cosmonauts, or are we about to see a new era of space travel, where a round trip to the moon is not beyond the grasp of many ordinary members of the public, and is it a good idea?


MON 17:00 PM (b036k73l)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036htl2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b036k73n)
Series 59

Episode 2

The fifty-ninth series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the City Hall in Salisbury. Regulars Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by Tony Hawks with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell.

Producer - Jon Naismith.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b036k73q)
Susan thinks George praying is sweet but his behaviour is getting Emma down. She thought the news of William's new puppy would distract but now he's considering biblical names for the puppy!

Jennifer collars Oliver and Susan about the swishing evening. She hopes Caroline will sort out some clothes to donate and asks Susan if she could run the cloakroom.

On her first day back at work, Lilian is very terse with Brenda. She doesn't appreciate being questioned about Matt. It's none of Brenda's business. When Brenda tries to pin Lilian down she announces she's off to get her hair and nails done as a birthday treat.

Emma helps Susan sort through her clothes for the swishing event. Susan is panicking as none of her clothes are classy enough to take. Emma says that Susan should go to a charity shop and find something good enough. Susan thinks it's a great plan. It will save her embarrassment. She promises to look for something at the swishing from Sabrina for Emma.

Jennifer thinks Lilian looks tied. Lilian brushes it off, claiming she had a fabulous holiday. Matt has stayed behind to explore a property investment. Probably nothing will come of it but it's worth a punt. Jennifer wishes her a happy birthday.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b036k73s)
Kenneth Branagh's Macbeth; The xx; Monsters University

With Mark Lawson.

Sir Kenneth Branagh returns to performing and directing Shakespeare, taking the title role in a new production of Macbeth at the Manchester International Festival. This follows a decade-long hiatus in his long relationship with Shakespeare - from his RSC years, through the Renaissance Theatre Company and films including Henry V, Hamlet and Love's Labours Lost. Dramatist Charlotte Keatley reviews.

Monsters University is a prequel to Monsters, Inc, the 2001 film from the animation studio Pixar. The film sees Mike and Sulley (voiced by Billy Crystal and John Goodman) attend the classes of Dean Abigail Hardscrabble (Helen Mirren), to learn how to scare children. Mark Eccleston reviews.

When the South London band The xx released their debut album in 2009, its quiet ambience gained critical acclaim, became the soundtrack for several TV programmes and won the Mercury Music Prize. Its follow up, Coexist, topped the UK charts. As they prepare for start of their Manchester International Festival residency, Romy Madley Croft and Oliver Sim of The xx discuss playing in a small secret venue.

For Cultural Exchange, in which creative minds share a favourite art-work or design, Penelope Curtis, Director at Tate Britain, chooses buildings designed by Chamberlin, Powell and Bon at the University of Leeds. Created in the 1960s and 70s, and including the Grade II* listed Roger Stevens Building, the designs are seen as key examples of modernist architecture.

Producer Nicki Paxman.


MON 19:45 The Cazalets (b036k1sc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace (b036k73v)
Sabotage and Subversion

The second of three programmes about the virtual world where they steal, spy and wage war. The British government recently declared that one of the greatest threats to national security emanates from cyberspace. Hostile nation states are conducting a war over the internet, while Western companies face the wholesale plundering of their economic life-blood. There is increasing tension as China and the United States square up to each other, while North Korea and Iran are both thought to have launched attacks.
BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera reports from London, Washington and Beijing. He talks to those who are holding the line, including top intelligence officials, political leaders and the heads of some of the world's largest companies which stand to lose millions from the theft of their intellectual property. "Britain is under attack," says Britain's Foreign Secretary William Hague. "Most countries are under attack and certainly many industries and businesses are under attack." Who is responsible and where will it end?
Producer: Mark Savage.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b036k73x)
They're Coming for Your Money

Paul Johnson, the director of the widely-respected independent Institute for Fiscal Studies, has been looking at the latest projections for how much the government will spend in the next five years and how much revenue it will receive. Despite the recent announcement of further cuts in spending, tax rises look difficult to avoid.

Paul explores the reasons for this gap in the budget and asks what taxes could help to fill it. With tax avoidance and evasion now at the top of world leaders' agendas, he asks if the increasingly tax-averse companies sector can be made to pay more and how much the rich and wealthy could contribute. He also considers the taxation of our houses and pensions and whether more will be taken from them.

Then he focuses on the three levies which contribute the lion's share of government revenue - income tax, national insurance and VAT - and, with politicians, economists and tax experts, finds out how much we are all - young and old, better and worse off - likely to pay. He also drops in on a young family in Norfolk to discover what taxpaying voters think of the choices and what they will be expected to pay.

Among those taking part: Nigel Lawson (former Conservative Chancellor of the Exchequer); Kitty Ussher (former Labour Treasury minister); Bill Dodwell (head of tax policy at Deloitte); Julian McCrae (former top Treasury official now at the Institute for Government); Gavin Kelly (chief executive of the Resolution Foundation who worked during the Blair/Brown years in Downing Street and the Treasury); and Malcolm Gammie QC (a leading tax lawyer).

Producer Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 Shared Planet (b0367rwq)
Valuing Nature

How much is a honey bee worth? Can you put a price tag on a mountain? Monty Don explores the value of nature. Some believe the only way to preserve nature is to show that it can pay its way in a world driven by money, others disagree saying nature is too precious to be left to the whim of markets. Monty Don discusses if we should put a price tag on nature and if so how do we value it? This week there is a report from St. Andrews in North East Scotland where Trai Anfield explores the value of the Eden Estuary to both nature conversation and human activity. Estuaries and mud flats protect our coastlines and filter water entering the sea, as well as provide food for many birds - but here and all over the world coastlines are under threat from development. Jonathan Aylen from the Manchester Business School thinks valuing eco-system services is a good idea in theory but very hard to put into practice. Environmentalist Tony Juniper and Dr Bill Adams from the Department of Geography at University of Cambridge also join Monty in the studio to discuss the pros and cons of valuing nature.


MON 21:30 A Dark Magic (b036k1s3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b036htl4)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b036k73z)
Could Egypt descend into civil war?
North Wales child abuse: another damning report.
Newspapers respond to Leveson.
Special report from Dagestan ahead of Boston bombing trial.
With Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b036k741)
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Episode 1

Attending a family funeral back in his native Sussex countryside our narrator finds himself drawn to visit the Hempstock's farmhouse, the home of three generations of women who played a pivotal and extraordinary role in his childhood; a visit which reawakens lost memories of curious events and strange fantastical occurrences that took place many years before.
For when he was seven, the South African Opal miner who lodged at his parents' house committed suicide, an act which triggers an unusual chain of events and awakens something ancient - ancient and dangerous. Something from beyond this world has found its way into our world and is threatening to destroy not only the young boy's family, but his life.
Befriended by Lettie Hempstock, her mother, and grandmother, they must try to send the creature home, but doing so involves terrifying forces which endangers their lives and the very fabric of the world itself.
However perhaps most mysterious of all is Lettie Hempstock's curious insistence that the duck pond at the end of the lane is really an ocean.

A novel about memory, about the adventures, experiences and enchantment of childhood and the power of stories, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is Neil Gaiman's highly anticipated first adult novel in eight years. Gaiman is the acclaimed and award-winning author of the novels American Gods, Stardust, Anansi Boys, Neverwhere, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. His work has been adapted for film, television, and radio, including Stardust (2007) and the BAFTA-winning and Oscar-nominated animated feature film Coraline (2009), while Neverwhere which began life as a BBC TV series has recently been adapted for Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra.

Abridged by Doreen Estall
Producer Heather Larmour
Reader Michael Sheen.


MON 23:00 Arthur Smith's Balham Bash (b01075pz)
Series 3

Episode 2

Arthur Smith with more music and comedy from his actual flat in Balham, south London.

Jenny Eclair is in the front room, Simon Evans on the landing, John Smallshaw delivers poetry and Alex Wilson and his salsa combo are in the kitchen.

Producer: Alison Vernon-Smith

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2011.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b036k743)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 09 JULY 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b036htlz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b036k1s7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036htm1)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036htm3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036htm5)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b036htm7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b036prpn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra of the Muslim Council of Britain.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b036k7ct)
Are there too many horses in Britain? The charity World Horse Welfare claims thousand of horses are at risk of needing rescuing and rehoming, and is urging owners to think twice before breeding from their mares. Anna Hill discusses the issue with Tony Tyler, from World Horse Welfare, and Alison Bridge, editor-in-chief of Horse and Rider magazine. Staying with the equine theme, Anna visits Newmarket Racecourse in the build up to the world-famous racing festival.

Meanwhile Toby Field makes the most of the glorious sunshine and goes in search of the large blue butterfly in Somerset.

And we bring you the latest from our appeal for unshorn sheep!

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced in Bristol by Anna Jones.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tw3ns)
Corncrake

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the corncrake.

The rasping repeated call of the corncrake was once a familiar sound of hay meadows throughout the UK. However these birds were no match for mechanical mowers which destroyed their nests and they're now mainly found in the north and west where conservation efforts are bringing them back to lush meadows and crofts.


TUE 06:00 Today (b036k7cw)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and John Humphrys, including:

0749
Egypt's interim leader has outlined his timetable for new elections, amid continuing unrest in the country. The Today programme's James Naughtie reports.

0810
Ed Miliband will promise to make politics more "open, transparent and trusted" by reforming Labour's relationship with trade unions. The BBC's political editor gives analysis and Billy Hayes, the general secretary of the Communication Workers Union (CWU), reacts to the news.

0820
There's a new app being launched in Chicago this month which aims to warn people where they will have to wait in a queue. Terry Green, who co-founded Q-matic which tries to solve company's queuing problems, gives his view on the utility of the app.

0831
The European Court of human rights will rule today on whether judges in the UK can lawfully sentence offenders to spend their whole life in prison, with no chance of review. Simon Crichton, the murderer Douglas Vinter's solicitor and the former Labour MP Vera Baird, who was solicitor general in the last Labour government, and is now police and crime commissioner for Northumbria, discuss whether a whole life sentence is in breach of human rights.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b036k7cy)
International Surveillance

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present. In light of the recent revelations by whistleblower, Edward Snowden, Jonathan and his guests explore international surveillance. The documents leaked by the former US National Security Agency contractor reveal that America and Britain have been tapping into global internet communication. Germany is outraged.

Almost 100 years ago, Britain sat astride the global telegraph and cable industry. During WW1, Churchill set up a small team of cryptographers and put them in Room 40 at the Admiralty in Whitehall. Their mission: to intercept all telegram traffic. In January 1917, whilst snooping on the US diplomatic cable they intercepted a German telegram from the German foreign ambassador, Arthur Zimmerman which would alter the course of WW1. One big problem - how to present the information to the US ambassador who had no idea that Britain was tapping into its friendly nations' communication systems.

Joining Jonathan Freedland are: Sir Malcolm Rifkind, Chairman of the Intelligence and Security Committee; historian Professor Edward Higgs; BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera; Thomas Kielinger, London Correspondent for Die Welt; Shami Chakrabati, director of Liberty. Actor Geoffrey Streatfeild who played IT supremo Callum in BBC 1 'Spooks' is the reader.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


TUE 09:30 Pop-Up Ideas (b036k7d0)
Series 1

Malcolm Gladwell: Listening in Vietnam

Tim Harford (the Financial Times' 'Undercover Economist' and presenter of Radio 4's More or Less) is joined by Malcolm Gladwell, David Kilcullen and Gillian Tett for a new series, 'Pop-up Ideas'.

Following on from his earlier Radio 4 series 'Pop-up Economics', Tim and the others use key ideas in anthropology and the social sciences to tell fascinating stories about how we - and the world - work.

The talks are recorded in front of an audience at the Southbank Centre in London.

Malcolm Gladwell, staff writer at the New Yorker and best-selling author of books such as The Tipping Point and Outliers, tells an extraordinarily powerful story about how listening more carefully might have shortened the Vietnam War.

One of the world's most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Killcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as 'revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West', talks about how future instability will emanate from rapidly-growing coastal megacities.

The financial journalist Gillian Tett describes how her background in anthropology led her to predict the financial crisis in 2008.

Tim Harford explores the concept of 'The Tragedy of the Commons' - a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay.

Tim compares Hardin's work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b036k7d2)
A Long Walk Home

Episode 2

Penny Downie reads the remarkable story of Judith Tebbutt's 192 days in captivity at the hands of Somali pirates.
In September 2011, Judith Tebbutt and her husband David embarked on a dream holiday on an idyllic beach resort in Kenya. On the first night, their worst nightmares become reality, when they are awoken by violent intruders, and Judith is dragged away towards a waiting motor-boat. And so begins the story of Judith's more than 6-month ordeal at the hands of ruthless Somali pirates, and so ends the life she knew and loved.
Today: as Judith speeds through the waves, away from tourist-friendly Kenya towards the lawless state of Somalia, she clings on to the hope that her husband is free - and will somehow save her.
Writer: Judith Tebbutt
Abridger: Miranda Davies
Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Penny Downie.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b036k7d4)
Women in Egypt; Emma Pooley

Women in Egypt. Emma Pooley on why she thinks it's time for a women's Tour de France. Angry women in fiction with Clare Massud and Joanna Briscoe. How to be an Ambitious Woman - lessons from the Woman's Hour Power List with Heather McGregor. Jamila Abbas on her new app for African farmers. Presented by Jane Garvey.


TUE 10:45 The Cazalets (b036k7d6)
Casting Off

Episode 7

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan.

Polly and Christopher are faced with decisions about their future and Rupert comes to the wrong conclusion about Clary's pregnancy.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.
As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.
This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.
With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...
When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


TUE 11:00 Shared Planet (b036k7d8)
Building in Wildlife

Monty Don presents Shared Planet, the series that looks at the crunch point between human population and the natural world. In this week's programme the focus is towns and cities, with a report from North America about their largest Swallow, the Purple Martin. Purple Martins are totally dependent on human habitation east of the Rockies for nest sites. West of the mountain range they largely nest in their ancestral way using abandoned woodpecker cavities. As we clear land to build the world's towns and cities what is the impact on the natural world and are there ideas to embrace wildlife in built environment planning?


TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b036k8v8)
Series 16

Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez for Guitar

Written by Joaquin Rodrigo in 1939, the Concierto de Aranjuez is a guitar classic. It was written amid the chaos of the Spanish Civil War, and in circumstances of poverty and personal tragedy. This programme explores how the piece touches and changes people's lives.

The composer's daughter Cecilia Rodrigo explains how the blind composer was inspired by the fountains and gardens of the palace of Aranjuez. Nelício Faria de Sales recounts an unforgettable performance deep inside one of Brazil's largest caves, while David B Katague remembers how the piece got him through a difficult period of separation from his family in the Philippines.

Guitarist Craig Ogden explains the magic of the piece for a performer, and actor Simon Callow recalls how hearing the piece was a formative experience for him during his schooldays, when it turned rural Berkshire into a piece of Spain.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b036k8vb)
Call You and Yours: Is it time to feel good about British sport?

On Saturday, The Lions beat Australia in a rugby test series for the first time in sixteen years. Then on Sunday Andy Murray was the first Brit to win the men's singles title at Wimbledon in seventy seven years. It builds on the Olympics and Tour De France wins of 2012.

So has investment into British sport created an unstoppable winning momentum? Are we about to become - maybe we are already - a nation of winners? Is it time to feel good about British Sport?
Or are many sports still struggling to prosper at grassroots level despite what we were told about the Olympic legacy and the impact of brilliant individual performances?

Call You & Yours on 03700 100 400
email youandyours@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Simon Browning.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b036htm9)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b036k8vd)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b036k8vg)
Series 2

Argentina - Superintendent Perro Lascano

Mark Lawson explores how Argentinian crime writers have dramatised the country's transition from dictatorship to democracy. He talks to Ernesto Mallo - whose cop, Lascano, works during the years of the military junta - and Claudia Pineiro, who argues that no Argentinian police officer can be a hero.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b036k73q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b036kbl2)
James Lees-Milne

The Unending Battle

by Christopher William Hill

It's 1944 and James Lees-Milne - and the National Trust - have returned to London. Comfortably accommodated in a flat in Cheyne Walk, Lees-Milne is attempting to secure a nearby property to house the musical collection of Boer War veteran, Major Benton Fletcher. Late one night, whilst trying to telephone a friend, Lees-Milne has a crossed line and makes the acquaintance of an anonymous woman. A friendship grows over the telephone wires, but at the woman's insistence they both keep their identities secret. When Lees-Milnes's childhood friend Tom Mitford returns unexpectedly from the continent, a sexual attraction is reawakened. Tom, however, has been a committed red-blooded male since Eton and is now determined to settle down after the war and raise a family - expecting James to help him sift through a list of potential wives. Tom is now a realist in love, but Lees-Milne is still an idealist. When disaster strikes, Lees-Milne must rely on the mysterious woman at the end of the telephone more than ever before.

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

The three plays star Tobias Menzies (Rome; Game of Thrones ) as James Lees-Milne and Victoria Hamilton (Lark Rise to Candleford; Victoria & Albert) as the novelist Nancy Mitford and chart four years during the war when Lees-Milne was at his most industrious in trying to secure properties for the National Trust. In this play, Joseph Mison (Salmon Fishing in the Yemen; Lost in Austen) stars as Tom Mitford.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b036kbl4)
Series 4

Belfast

Jay Rayner hosts the first episode in the new series of BBC Radio 4's culinary panel programme, recorded at the MAC Theatre in Belfast.

Tackling the audience's culinary concerns are food-writer and restaurateur Tim Hayward; Glaswegian cook and expert on Catalan cooking, Rachel McCormack; chef and food-writer Sophie Wright, and The Kitchen Cabinet's resident food historian Dr Annie Gray.

The panel discuss, among other things, the best way to cook duck, the virtues of electric versus gas cookers, the perfect potato salad recipe and the rights and wrongs of squirty cream.

Local chef and broadcaster, BBC Radio Ulster's Paula McIntyre, talks the team through Northern Irish soda farls, an Ulster Fry and, of course, the potato.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Peggy Sutton.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b036kbl6)
Series 2

Episode 2

None of us are really bad at heart are we? We may do the odd bad thing, but it's always for a good reason. We may have jumped a red light, but we needed to pick our children up from school - we're so very different from these vile public figures who end up mired in scandal, committing heinous crimes for their own nefarious ends, abusing the trust we place in them.

Look closely though, and you'll see that most public scandals start with a minor, apparently inconsequential misdeed - not unlike jumping that red light. One leads to another and another, then the cover ups begin and before they know it they are a figure of public hate embroiled in a very public scandal.

In this week's programme Michael Blastland, Professor Nick Chater and Timandra Harkness explore how our very human foibles can lead us into scandal. We hear from a disgraced, now reformed, public figure, and show through a devious experiment how we are all prone to that little bit of dishonesty that could lead us into deeper waters.

The Human Zoo, where we see public decisions viewed through private thoughts, is presented by Michael Blastland, with the trusted guidance of Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School.

Producer: Toby Murcott
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 The Man Who Saves Life Stories (b01jhnyf)
Irving Finkel collects ordinary people's lives. He hoards their life stories in diary form and has amassed a collection of hundreds of handwritten volumes. But Irving has a problem. What should he do with them? The diaries are crammed onto shelves and piled up in corners of his small office. Irving's day job is Assistant Keeper in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum.

With a couple of trusty recruits, Polly North and Laura Barnicoat, Irving sets out to find a home for his collection and turn it into a 'proper' archive. The plan is to create a repository for unwanted private diaries written by ordinary people.

As the project takes shape, the diarist's life stories take over. There's Godfrey, a retired JP who kept chickens and made an entry in his diary every day for 76 years. There's an unnamed catastrophist, who notes only deaths, diseases and disasters. Whilst Laura's grandmother, at 18, shows a flair for bagging boyfriends and wonderful prose.

And finally, there's a mystery. Why did a war time school girl write in code?

Producer: Tamsin Hughes
A Testbed Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b036kbm1)
Richard Osman and Jacqueline Wilson

Children's author Dame Jacqueline Wilson and TV presenter and producer Richard Osman discuss their favourite books with Harriett Gilbert.

A 1950's Kentish childhood is evoked in Jacqueline Wilson's pick, The Orchard on Fire, by Shena MacKay.

Richard Osman's choice is brimful of liquid lunches and smoke-filled rooms at the end of a golden era on Fleet Street: Michael Frayn's hilarious Towards the End of the Morning.

And though Richard and Jacqueline wouldn't normally go for a book about Norwegian lumberjacks, they find Harriett Gilbert's selection, Out Stealing Horses, by Per Petterson, a deeply moving delight.

Presenter: Harriett Gilbert. Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 17:00 PM (b036kbm3)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036htmc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b036kbm5)
Series 2

Episode 1

What is Frankie Boyle's worst habit? What is the best piece of advice Diane Morgan's dad ever gave her? Which government department did Alan Johnson most like being in charge of?

All these questions, and more, will be answered in the show hosted by Miles Jupp, where panellists are tested on how well they know their nearest and dearest.

In this case, Alan Johnson picks his son Jamie, Diane Morgan her father Peter and Frankie Boyle his mate Stuart to answer questions about each other.

Producer: Sam Michell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b036kbm7)
Tom and Tony load Lonely Cow - their last - to take to market. Brian calls round and finds Tom full of his Bellingham's launch next week. Brian counsels Tom to proceed with caution. Supermarkets can be tricky. Tony is subdued when he returns even though he got a good price for the cow. Tony asks Tom round for dinner on Thursday as Helen has invited Rob over, but Tom is too busy.

Kenton walks in on Jolene trying on tops to donate to the swishing evening. Kenton is reluctant to suggest any go. Especially not the one she wore on their first date. They playfully reminisce and make plans.

When Lilian arrives at work, Brenda doesn't think she looks well. When asked about pressing work matters, Lilian becomes tearful and rushes off. Seeing this, Brian asks if it's a bad time. Brenda confides in Brian that Lilian has not been herself for some time.

Later Lilian and Brenda clash again. Brenda is fed up with Lilian's attitude. Lilian explodes. She won't be spoken to like that. She and Matt have made her. Without them she's just another kid in the village with horizons that don't stretch beyond the Borchester bypass. Accusations fly and Brenda tells Lilian she can stuff her job.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b036kbm9)
Murray Gold on Doctor Who; Olivia Colman in Run; Maggi Hambling

With Mark Lawson.

Composer Murray Gold discusses his music for Doctor Who, to be performed in two BBC Proms concerts this weekend. He also explains his aims when writing for such a much-loved series, and how advances in technology have affected his work.

Run is a four part Channel 4 series of interlinked stories, with each episode concentrating on a different character. The cast includes Olivia Colman, Lennie James, Katie Leung and Jamie Winstone, and the first episode stars Olivia Colman as a single mother with some difficult choices to make, whilst trying to keep her family together after an act of random violence. Writer Dreda Say Mitchell reviews.

Black and white films have returned to the big screen in recent weeks, with Joss Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing and Ben Wheatley's A Field in England, and Noah Baumbach's Frances Ha arrives in the UK later this month. Film critic Ryan Gilbey reflects on why these directors have forsaken colour photography, and considers other directors who have followed a similar route recently.

Artist Maggi Hambling discusses her Cultural Exchange choice: the Bacchus series of cascading blood red paintings by the American painter Cy Twombly.

Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


TUE 19:45 The Cazalets (b036k7d6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b036kbmc)
Faith, Hope and... Tax Avoidance

While the G8 summit of world leaders has agreed a global deal to ensure big business pays its dues, concerns about tax avoidance go wider.

A group of MPs has just examined the case of the Cup Trust, a charity which tried to claim £46 million in tax relief but spent just £55,000 on good works. The Chair of the Public Accounts Committee, Margaret Hodge, concluded the Trust's purpose "was to avoid tax".

And she said this wasn't an isolated case. The Committee heard that HMRC investigates around 300 charities a year over concerns about tax fraud.

In this week's File on 4 Fran Abrams examines the blurred lines around charities and tax.

What happens when genuine charities find 'donations' are designed so the donors can claim Gift Aid payments from the tax man? And how easy is it to register a charity whose main aim is actually tax avoidance?

Is the 160 year-old Charity Commission up to the job of policing 21st Century charities?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b036kbmf)
Peter White talks to Andrew Jones about Blind Veterans UK's No One Alone campaign, in which the charity is seeking ex servicemen who are blind or visually-impaired.

David Poyner is a service user and talks of the way Blind Veterans UK help him.

Tony Shearman tries riding a prototype 'Ultra' bike, fitted with a sonic echo-location device which warns blind riders about obstacles by emitting pulses through the handlebars.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b036kbmh)
Measles, Prostate, Juvenile arthritis, Scruffy docs, Xenon lung scanner

Prostate cancer and Sir Michael Parkinson's comments this week that the test 'is if you can pee against the wall from 2 foot' - Inside Health brings you the verdict. And stiff painful joints are usually associated with getting old, but imagine being told your toddler has arthritis - Mark Porter investigates. And why the change in doctors' dress code may be doing more for Private Medicine than infection control.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b036k7cy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b036htmf)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b036kbmk)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b036rkvc)
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Episode 2

Attending a family funeral back in his native Sussex countryside our narrator finds himself drawn to visit the Hempstock's farmhouse, the home of three generations of women who played a pivotal and extraordinary role in his childhood; a visit which reawakens lost memories of curious events and strange fantastical occurrences that took place many years before.
For when he was seven, the South African Opal miner who lodged at his parents' house committed suicide, an act which triggers an unusual chain of events and awakens something ancient - ancient and dangerous. Something from beyond this world has found its way into our world and is threatening to destroy not only the young boy's family, but his life.
Befriended by Lettie Hempstock, her mother, and grandmother, they must try to send the creature home, but doing so involves terrifying forces which endangers their lives and the very fabric of the world itself.
However perhaps most mysterious of all is Lettie Hempstock's curious insistence that the duck pond at the end of the lane is really an ocean.

A novel about memory, about the adventures, experiences and enchantment of childhood and the power of stories, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is Neil Gaiman's highly anticipated first adult novel in eight years. Gaiman is the acclaimed and award-winning author of the novels American Gods, Stardust, Anansi Boys, Neverwhere, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. His work has been adapted for film, television, and radio, including Stardust (2007) and the BAFTA-winning and Oscar-nominated animated feature film Coraline (2009), while Neverwhere which began life as a BBC TV series has recently been adapted for Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra.

Abridged by Doreen Estall
Producer Heather Larmour

Reader Michael Sheen.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b036k5sm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b036kbmm)
The Home Secretary announces that the UK is to opt out of EU law and justice measures. Sean Curran covers the Home Secretary's statement and gauges MPs reaction to it. Also on the programme.
* Rebecca Keating explains how it could soon be easier to move your account from one bank to another.
* Alicia McCarthy reports on the story of how postmasters claim to have been prosecuted because of Post Office computer software errors.
* Simon Jones reports on the offer given by Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg to the Labour party to help solve its problems over party funding.
* Kristiina Cooper listens to a home affairs committee session featuring London Mayor Boris Johnson.



WEDNESDAY 10 JULY 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b036htnf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b036k7d2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036htnh)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036htnl)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036htnp)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b036htnr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b036prq6)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra of the Muslim Council of Britain.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b036knvj)
The National Farmers Union claims British Sugar is trying to intimidate growers into signing their contracts before a price has been agreed for next years crop. British Sugar deny the accusations stating that their growers have until the 31st July to return their contracts and no grower has been advised that they will have their contract taken away. Also on Farming Today, the body responsible for training farriers in England has been shut down, following a damning Ofsted report. The report published in April said the quality of teaching by The National Farriers Training Agency was inadequate and cited significant examples of bullying and harassment by approved trainers. Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Anna Varle.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tw750)
House Martin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the house martin.

House martins are often confused with swallows , but look shorter-tailed and lack the rusty throats. They're compact birds which build their with pellets of mud under our eaves and although they're so familiar to us in summer, we still can't be certain where they spend the winter. Ornithologists believe that they may spend our winter catching insects high over African rainforests.


WED 06:00 Today (b036knvl)
Morning news and current affairs with Sarah Montague and Evan Davis, including:.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b036knvn)
Natalie Cole, Joan Shepard, Liz Jones, Tom Wrigglesworth

Libby Purves meets singer Natalie Cole; actor Joan Shepard; columnist Liz Jones and comedian Tom Wrigglesworth.

Natalie Cole is the multi Grammy award-winning singer/songwriter and daughter of Nat King Cole. Her new album, Natalie Cole en Español, is recorded entirely in Spanish and features duets with her father and siblings. The album is a tribute to her late father, who recorded three albums in Spanish, and her own love of the region's music and culture. Natalie Cole en Español is released on Decca Records

Veteran actor Joan Shepard is celebrating 73 years in show business this year. She was born in London and brought up in New York. She made her debut on Broadway at the age of seven, having been spotted in the crowd by Sir Laurence Olivier. She went on to work with Tallulah Bankhead, Quentin Crisp and Lenny Bruce. Confessions of an Old Lady #2 is at St James Theatre, London and the Edinburgh Fringe Festival at Fingers Piano Bar.

Liz Jones is fashion editor and columnist for the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday. Columnist of the Year in 2012, her copy features intimate details of her personal life and the lives of her friends and family. Her sharp observations about women in particular have caused rifts with several celebrities. Her autobiography Girl Least Likely to - 30 years of Fashion, Fasting and Fleet Street reveals details of her anorexia, sexual encounters and experiences of cosmetic surgery. Girl Least Likely to - 30 years of Fashion, Fasting and Fleet Street is published by Simon and Schuster

Tom Wrigglesworth is a comedian and a regular performer and presenter on BBC Radio 4. He won a Sony Radio award in 2011. His show Tom Wrigglesworth: Utterly at Odds with the Universe is partly a celebration of his grandfather and partly his take on our throwaway society. Tom Wrigglesworth: Utterly at Odds with the Universe is at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival at the Pleasance Courtyard.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b036knvq)
A Long Walk Home

Episode 3

Penny Downie reads the remarkable story of Judith Tebbutt's 192 days in captivity at the hands of Somali pirates.
In September 2011, Judith Tebbutt and her husband David embarked on a dream holiday on an idyllic beach resort in Kenya. On the first night, their worst nightmares become reality, when they are awoken by violent intruders, and Judith is dragged away towards a waiting motor-boat. And so begins the story of Judith's more than 6-month ordeal at the hands of ruthless Somali pirates, and so ends the life she knew and loved.

Today: after nearly a month of captivity, Judith finally gets a phone call - but worryingly it's from her son, rather than from her husband...

Writer: Judith Tebbutt
Abridger: Miranda Davies
Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Penny Downie.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b036knvs)
Zora Neale Hurston; Mumsnot; Do Looks Matter At Work?

The influence and inspiration Zora Neale Hurston and her acclaimed novel 'Their Eyes Were Watching God' have had on generations of black women writers. Mumsnot: If a woman doesn't have any kids, does she have any value? Lulu Le Vay tells Jenni Murray about being made to feel marginalised just because she's child free. Dr Sarah Blagden on the impact of ovarian cancer treatment on women's sex lives.


WED 10:45 The Cazalets (b036knvv)
Casting Off

Episode 8

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
Dramatised by Lin Coghlan.

Louise finds herself feeling unexpected pity for her father, whilst Sid is rescued by an old friend.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.

This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.

With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...

When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


WED 11:00 One Billion Digitally Identified Indians (b036kscl)
India is rolling out the largest and most technologically ambitious digital identity scheme in the world. Already 400 million of its 1.2 billion population have signed up, submitting to fingerprint and iris scans at 30,000 enrolment centres around the country.

"India has become the ultimate lab for digital identification technology. No country has ever tried to collect this much information in this short a period of time, with this new a technology," says American researcher Tarun Wadhwa, author of a forthcoming book on national ID schemes. "That's why the world is watching so closely. If you can make it work in India, you can make it work almost anywhere in the world."

National ID cards have been firmly rejected in the UK and elsewhere because of concerns about data security. But the Indian Unique Identity Scheme, known as UID or Aadhaar, has forged ahead without legislation to regulate such a massive data collection exercise.

The scheme is voluntary yet millions of people are queuing up to enrol. Mukti Jain Campion discovers why as she visits urban and rural enrolment centres around the country and meets the chairman of the project, Nandan Nilekani, former CEO of the outsourcing giant Infosys, who believes the scheme will transform India and help to lift millions out of poverty.

Producer: Mukti Jain Campion
A Culture Wise production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Paul Temple (b036kscn)
Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair

Introducing Sir Donald Murdo

Part 2 of a new production of a vintage serial from 1946.

From 1938 to 1968, Francis Durbridge's incomparably suave amateur detective Paul Temple and his glamorous wife Steve solved case after baffling case in one of BBC radio's most popular series. Sadly, only half of Temple's adventures survive in the archives.

In 2006 BBC Radio 4 brought one of the lost serials back to life with Crawford Logan and Gerda Stevenson as Paul and Steve. Using the original scripts and incidental music, and recorded using vintage microphones and sound effects, the production of Paul Temple and the Sullivan Mystery aimed to sound as much as possible like the 1947 original might have done if its recording had survived. The serial proved so popular that it was soon followed by three more revivals, Paul Temple and the Madison Mystery, Paul Temple and Steve, and A Case for Paul Temple.

Now, from 1946, it's the turn of Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair, in which Paul and Steve go on the trail of the mysterious and murderous Mr Gregory.

Episode 2: Introducing Sir Donald Murdo

Paul and Steve take a walk to a lonely clifftop cottage.

Producer Patrick Rayner

Francis Durbridge, the creator of Paul Temple, was born in Hull in 1912 and died in 1998. He was one of the most successful novelists, playwrights and scriptwriters of his day.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b036kscq)
Standing charges; a cheaper future for IVF

A detailed look at standing charges across the energy market. We investigate why average personal credit ratings are up over the past three years and speak to a man who's still paying the price of a missed mobile phone payment from four years ago. We debate the future of the Green Deal. As food companies come under increasing pressure to sell us healthier snacks we look at what replaces the sugar and salt. Plus, we'll have tips on how to book the best holiday for the lowest price.


WED 12:57 Weather (b036htnt)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b036kscs)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b036kscv)
Series 2

Ireland - Inspector Benedict Devlin

In the "borderlands" between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, Mark Lawson meets novelist Brian McGilloway, whose books explore the long shadows of the Troubles, and talks to him and other authors from Belfast about the wave of crime-writing that the peace process has provoked.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b036kbm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b036kscx)
James Lees-Milne

What England Owes

by Christopher William Hill

As WW2 nears its conclusion, James Lees-Milne is sent to assess Faringdon House in Berkshire for the National Trust. Faringdon is home to the composer, artist and poet Gerald, Lord Berners, who has returned to England under a cloud, having spent most of the war in Rome. Lord Berners is an eccentric through-and-through - a man given to dying his doves to co-ordinate with the food he's serving and the once proud owner of a pet giraffe. Together with the handsome Robert Heber Percy and his wife, Jennifer, Lord Berners is part of an apparently successful ménage a trois. Lees-Milne finds it an inspirational relationship and is convinced it would be the perfect and most civilised lifestyle to lead. Berners is determined that provision must be made for his beloved Robert if the house is acquired by the Trust. And as Lees-Milne contemplates mortality, he considers what his own legacy will be.

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

The three plays star Tobias Menzies (Rome; Game of Thrones ) as James Lees-Milne and Victoria Hamilton (Lark Rise to Candleford; Victoria & Albert) as the novelist Nancy Mitford and chart four years during the war when Lees-Milne was at his most industrious in trying to secure properties for the National Trust. In this play, Christopher Godwin (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; My Family & Other Animals) stars as the eccentric Gerald, Lord Berners.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b036kscz)
Pension planning and retirement choices

What's the best way to build up a pension and what are the choices at retirement? To ask our pension panel for their view call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Are you being automatically enrolled into your workplace pension? Up to 11 million workers are, but will you qualify and is this the best pension for you?

Perhaps you don't have access to an employer scheme and want to make your own arrangements.

How do you estimate what you need to save?

If you've a number of smaller pensions should you consider combining them?

And what are the options when you finally retire? You'll need to decide when to take your pension and whether to buy an annuity or to leave your fund invested and draw an income.

To answer your questions, presenter Vincent Duggleby will be joined by:

Stuart Bayliss, Director, Annuity Exchange
Tom McPhail, Head of Pensions Research, Hargreaves Lansdown
Claire Walsh, Independent Financial Adviser, Pavilion Financial Services

E-mail questions to moneybox@bbc.co.uk now or call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday. Calls cost the same as 01 and 02 numbers, calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b036kbmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b036ksd2)
Terrorism Studies

'Terrorism Studies' - how it emerged as a new academic field in the post 9/11 world. Laurie Taylor talks to Harvard social scientist, Lisa Stampinitzky, about the themes of her new book "Disciplining Terror: How Experts Invented 'Terrorism' ". She argues that terrorists are now constructed as pathological and evil personalities who are beyond our understanding, unlike the pre 70s era when the acts of political violence, that we now call terrorism, were seen as the work of rational actors with strategic goals. This transformation of political violence into terrorism is held to have led to the current 'war on terror'. Drawing on archival research as well as interviews with terrorism experts, she traces the struggles through which experts made terrorism, and terrorism made experts. John Bew, a British expert on terrorism, considers and contests the arguments.

Also, Christine Fair discusses a groundbreaking study which finds that support for political violence in Pakistan is lower amongst the poor than the middle classes.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b036ksd4)
BBC Called to Account

This afternoon, the BBC's Chairman and Director General are before the MPs on the Public Accounts Committee. Lord Patten and Lord Hall are answering questions about the size of compensation payments made to senior executives who left the BBC in the last few years, some of them greater than contractually allowed. Tara Conlan reports from the hearing - she is a long term BBC watcher in her role at the Guardian. One of the questions raised by the National Audit Office report into the payments relates to the BBC Trust and whether it can adequately supervise or inspect the BBC board decisions. Tim Suter, a founding partner of Ofcom and Claire Enders of Enders Analysis discuss what changes need to be made to the way the BBC is governed, if any, in the interests of licence payers.

Brian Cathcart is a founder of the Hacked Off campaign. He responds to the announcement this week of plans for a replacement to the Press Complaints Commission, proposed by the industry. These plans are linked to the so-called Rival Royal Charter which the industry has put forward and is being considered by the Privy Council today.

And what impact might the secret recording of his meeting at The Sun have on Rupert Murdoch? The Commons Media Select Committee has invited him to return to explain his comments, which relate to a range of controversial subjects including the extent to which Fleet Street paid police for information. Claire Enders and Brian Cathcart are joined by Peter Preston, former Guardian editor.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett
Producer: Simon Tillotson

Editor: Andy Smith.


WED 17:00 PM (b036ksd6)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036htnx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The Brig Society (b036ksd8)
Series 1

Prison

Uh-oh - Marcus Brigstocke has been put in charge of a thing!

Each week, Marcus finds he's volunteered to be in charge of a big old thing - a hospital, the railways, British fashion, a prison. And each week he starts out by thinking "Well, it can't be that difficult, surely?" and ends up with "Oh - turns out it's utterly difficult and complicated. Who knew...?"

This week, Marcus has been volunteered to run a prison - so while he's serving his thirty-minute term, he'll be looking into such urgent issues as overcrowding, rehabilitation, radicalisation and the difficulties of dining-hall protest tray-banging syncopation.

Banged up with him are Rufus Jones (Hunderby, Holy Flying Circus), William Andrews (Sorry I've Got No Head) and Margaret Cabourn-Smith (Miranda).

The show is produced by Marcus's long-standing accomplice, David Tyler, who also produces Marcus' appearances as the inimitable as Giles Wemmbley Hogg.

Written by Marcus Brigstocke, Jeremy Salsby, Toby Davies, Nick Doody, Steve Punt and Tom Neenan.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b036ksdb)
Brenda explains to Roy and Hayley she's jacked in her job and feels great. She is ignoring the calls she is receiving from Lilian but listens to a voicemail. Lilian says the situation is ridiculous and Brenda is overreacting. She hopes Brenda will call her back and talk it through. Brenda has a good chuckle, hearing how harassed Lilian sounds dealing with the constant ringing of office phones.

Brenda decides to go shopping, leaving Roy and Hayley to deal with Lilian when she turns up. Brenda's had a day to cool off but Lilian expects her in the office tomorrow. Roy thinks Brenda shouldn't have just walked out but Hayley is more supportive.

Pip has her hands full now that David and Ruth are on holiday. Jill pops round to collect Ben's overnight bag. They have a laugh about David's long list of instructions and his constant texts. Jill is really proud of Pip and her commitment to the family farm, especially after learning that Pip has had to turn down some last-minute relief milking work.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b036ksdd)
Top of the Lake; Rachel Joyce; Pat Barker

With Mark Lawson.

Top of the Lake is a new TV drama series, directed by Oscar-winner Jane Campion, whose works include The Piano and Portrait of a Lady. The series, set in the remote mountains of New Zealand, stars Holly Hunter and Mad Men actress Elisabeth Moss. When a 12 year old girl disappears, Moss's character takes a keen interest in the police case, and returns to her hometown to pick up the investigating duties. Rachel Cooke reviews.

Rachel Joyce's novel, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, was the bestselling debut of 2012. She talks discusses her new book, Perfect, in which the usual parent/child roles are reversed, when the life mother of a ten year old boy starts to unravel.

The England and Wales Cricket Board has released a poem entitled #Rise For England, which is on the front cover of programmes throughout the Ashes series and features in a short film played on screen at all five match venues. Actor and cricket lover Michael Simkins reflects on the long tradition of poetry about the game and assesses whether poetry can inspire the players.

For Cultural Exchange, Booker Prize-winning novelist Pat Barker nominates Benjamin Britten's song cycle Who Are These Children?.

Producer Karla Sweet.


WED 19:45 The Cazalets (b036knvv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b036ksdg)
Mohammed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood government in Egypt may have only had a 51% majority in last year's election, but by all accounts it was a fair a free election, and with such a high turn-out it gave him the kind of democratic mandate that many politicians in the West would envy. At the time it was hailed as something of a triumph of democracy - the people had spoken - a military dictator was overthrown in a largely bloodless revolution and for the first time in that country's history Egyptians had the opportunity to choose their leaders. Well, the people have spoken again. They've taken to the streets in their millions to vent dissatisfaction with Mr Morsi's government; the army has taken charge and Mohammed Morsi and many of his party are now in prison. All this, we are told, is in the name of democracy. Is it ever acceptable to support the military overthrow of a democratically elected government? Is democracy always an absolute good and no matter how unpalatable, and to some the Islamist policies of the Muslim Brotherhood were very unpalatable, we should always stand by the result? Is democracy a morally unambiguous value? Should we always be on the sides of the masses regardless of the consequences to them and our national interests? Or is that debating club naivety? Is democracy only ever the means to an end and the only moral imperative for us in the West should be to always safeguard our interests? Is the reality that the last thing a volatile region like the Middle East needs is a religiously fuelled government and in the wider interest and our national interest, we should support the coup. And however contradictory it sounds is it right to see this coup as part of a democratic process and in this case the ends, of establishing a stable democratic government, justify the means? Or is that in fact thinly veiled anti-Islamic prejudice that is the start of a slippery slope that leads to Western interventionism? Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Anne McElvoy, Kenan Malik and Matthew Taylor. Witnesses: Mamoun Fandy- Director of London Global Strategy Institute, Dr Maha Azzam- Associate Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Rachel Shabi- author Not the Enemy: Israel's Jews from Arab Lands written extensively on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the Middle East, Con Coughlin - international terrorism expert and defence editor Daily Telegraph.


WED 20:45 Pop-Up Ideas (b036k7d0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:00 Frontiers (b036ksz2)
Crossrail - Tunnelling under London

Tracey Logan goes underground to find out how Crossrail is using the latest engineering techniques to create 26 miles of tunnels below London's tube network, sewers and foundations and through its erratic, sometimes unpredictable geology. She finds out about the latest science being used in Europe's biggest engineering project.

London sits on a varied geology of deposits of fine-grained sand, flint gravel beds, mottled clay, shelly beds which are sometimes mixed with pockets of water. This sheer variety has presented a challenge to London's tunnel engineers since the early 1800s.

Tracey goes on board one of the huge, 150 metre long, 1000 tonne tunnel boring machines as it makes its way beneath London's Oxford Street. At depths of up to 40 metres it can negotiate London's complex geology with incredible precision and can instantly adjust the pressure it applies at the cutting head to ensure there is no ground movement above.

Its precision engineering means it also follows a route which avoids the many existing foundations, sewers, and the tube network, sometimes travelling just centimetres past the London underground tunnels.

Tracey also finds out how unexploded ordnance from World War II still has to be carefully accounted for while digging beneath the capital.

The tunnel boring machines operate nearly 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and so even has an onboard kitchen and bathroom facilities for the 20 or so operators who make up its 'tunnel gang'.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b036knvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b036htp0)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b036ksz4)
Egypt prosecutor orders arrest of Muslim Brotherhood leader, Mohamed Badie. Royal Mail staff to get shares in business in biggest privatisation since early 1990s. And Irish MPs set for final vote on allowing limited abortion. Presented by Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b036rlkx)
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Episode 3

Attending a family funeral back in his native Sussex countryside our narrator finds himself drawn to visit the Hempstock's farmhouse, the home of three generations of women who played a pivotal and extraordinary role in his childhood; a visit which reawakens lost memories of curious events and strange fantastical occurrences that took place many years before.
For when he was seven, the South African Opal miner who lodged at his parents' house committed suicide, an act which triggers an unusual chain of events and awakens something ancient - ancient and dangerous. Something from beyond this world has found its way into our world and is threatening to destroy not only the young boy's family, but his life.
Befriended by Lettie Hempstock, her mother, and grandmother, they must try to send the creature home, but doing so involves terrifying forces which endangers their lives and the very fabric of the world itself.
However perhaps most mysterious of all is Lettie Hempstock's curious insistence that the duck pond at the end of the lane is really an ocean.

A novel about memory, about the adventures, experiences and enchantment of childhood and the power of stories, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is Neil Gaiman's highly anticipated first adult novel in eight years. Gaiman is the acclaimed and award-winning author of the novels American Gods, Stardust, Anansi Boys, Neverwhere, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. His work has been adapted for film, television, and radio, including Stardust (2007) and the BAFTA-winning and Oscar-nominated animated feature film Coraline (2009), while Neverwhere which began life as a BBC TV series has recently been adapted for Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra.

Abridged by Doreen Estall
Producer Heather Larmour
Reader Michael Sheen.


WED 23:00 Mark Steel's in Town (b01m0k9m)
Edinburgh Special

Mark uncovers the stories and characters that make up Leith in Edinburgh in this special one-off episode of the award winning stand-up comedy show, 'Mark Steel's in Town.'

As attention focuses on the Edinburgh festival, Mark Steel immerses himself in one of Edinburgh's lesser-known districts. Taking tales from the history, highways, and Hibs legends - not to mention the port workers, pub fights, and poetry - that make up this unique corner of Scotland's capital, Mark delivers a half hour of stand-up comedy about Leith. in front of an audience of born and bred Leithers.

Recorded at the BBC's Potterow venue in Edinburgh during the festival.
Produced by Sam Bryant.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b036ksz6)
David Cameron and Ed Miliband accuse each other of being "owned" by powerful vested interests in angry Commons clashes over party funding and the unions.
The Business Secretary, Vince Cable, confirms that the Government will sell Royal Mail through a flotation on the London Stock Exchange.
Senior BBC executives face questions from MPs over severance packages.
Doreen Lawrence gives evidence to the Home Affairs Committee following allegations that police tried to smear her family.
And the Foreign Secretary up-dates MPs on efforts to secure a Syrian peace conference.
Susan Hulme and team report on today's events in Parliament.



THURSDAY 11 JULY 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b036htpx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b036knvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036htpz)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036htq1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036htq3)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b036htq5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b036prv3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra of the Muslim Council of Britain.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b036kt0x)
Fears over the future of the rural postal service. Professor Mark Shucksmith believes that privatisation could lead to more expensive services which would affect rural businesses.

And smaller fishing businesses are celebrating after a High Court ruling means that they can keep their newly acquired fishing quotas.

Presented by Charlotte Smith, Produced by Emma Weatherill.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02twhqd)
Coal Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the coal tit.

Coal tits often visit our bird-tables but don't hang around. They dart off with food to hide it in crevices and crannies. What the bird is doing is hiding or cache-ing food to be eaten later. Coal tits are smaller than their relatives and have lower fat reserves, so they store food to compensate for any future shortages. In the winter they store seeds and in summer they will hide small insects.


THU 06:00 Today (b036kt0z)
Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and Evan Davis, including:

0810
The leaders of the health service in England have issued a stark warning that big decisions need to be made urgently about the organisation of hospitals and GP surgeries, to avoid a financial crisis or problems such as the Mid Staffs scandal. David Nicholson, chief executive of NHS England, explains that NHS England could be a funding gap of £30bn by the end of this decade, if nothing is done.

0819
The people of Scotland will vote on Independence next year, but Wales has traditionally seen much lower levels of support for independence than Scotland. Singer and broadcaster Cerys Matthews gives her personal view on whether Wales looks enviously or nervously, at the choice that Scottish voters have.

0832
After the controversy over the Labour candidate selection in Falkirk - Ed Miliband has announced that an open primary - where the public pick the parties candidate - will be used for selecting Labour's London mayoral candidate. Dr Sarah Wollaston, MP for Totnes since 2010, and Alex Massie, freelance journalist writing for the Spectator among others from Washington, discuss the method of using open primaries to choose officials.

0836
The government is announcing today it is making a £60m investment in the science which involves assembling artificial genes to create new materials. Drew Endy, assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford University, explains the importance of synthetic Biology.


THU 09:00 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b036kxth)
Series 1

Baroness Williams of Crosby (Shirley Williams)

In this new series, Peter Hennessy, the leading historian of modern Britain, asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. In each week's conversation, he invites his guest to explore what influenced their thinking and motivated them to enter politics, their experience of events and impressions of people they knew, and their concerns for the future.
Peter's guest in this week's programme is Baroness Williams of Crosby (Shirley Williams), the former Labour Cabinet Minister, member of the 'gang of four' who founded the SDP in 1981, and who is now a member of the Liberal Democrats.
Peter's other guests in this series are the former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw, former cabinet minister Norman Tebbit, and former Labour leader Neil Kinnock.
Presenter, Peter Hennessy. Producer, Rob Shepherd.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b036kxtk)
A Long Walk Home

Episode 4

Penny Downie reads the remarkable story of Judith Tebbutt's 192 days in captivity at the hands of Somali pirates.
In September 2011, Judith Tebbutt and her husband David embarked on a dream holiday on an idyllic beach resort in Kenya. On the first night, their worst nightmares become reality, when they are awoken by violent intruders in their beach-house...

Today: as Judith's ordeal stretches into months, she begins to fear for her sanity...

Writer: Judith Tebbutt
Abridger: Miranda Davies
Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Penny Downie.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b036kxtm)
Kate Nash; International Family Planning; Susan Greenfield

Kate Nash sings live in the studio. Keir Starmer, Director of Public Prosecutions, discusses the annual report on violence against women. Julia Bunting from the International Planned Parenthood Foundation talks about the state of family planning around the world. The neurologist, Baroness Susan Greenfield on her first novel 2121, which explores the impact technology might have had on our brains and relationships in the next century.


THU 10:45 The Cazalets (b036kxtp)
Casting Off

Episode 9

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan

Without Archie, Clary finds it impossible to stay alone in the cottage to write her novel and Rupert and Zoe finally admit their wartime secrets to one another.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.

This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.

With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...

When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b036kxtr)
Jan and the Whale

The recent feuding within Nelson Mandela's family have reminded us that within the anti-apartheid hero's myth is a man and family with very human frailties as Gabriel Gatehouse ponders when he visits a play in Johannesburg.

Yoland Knell pays a visit to the deported cleric Abu Qatada's new home - Jordan's al-Muwaqar Prison.

Jo Figen joins the crew of a Norwegian whale hunting boat.

Ed Stocker finds out why Bolivians can't afford to eat their staple food quinoa anymore.

And Dany Mitzman on the Calabrian mafia's most recent and high profile victim.

Producer: Jane Beresford.


THU 11:30 Burma's Zarganar: The Man Who Laughed at the Generals (b036kxtt)
Zarganar is Burma's greatest living comedian, but he is also much more than that. As a political activist, he was a fierce critic of Burma's generals who put him in jail several times, including five years in solitary confinement, for exposing their crimes and human rights violations.

The documentary film-maker Rex Bloomstein secretly interviewed Zarganar in Burma in 2007 for a film about freedom of expression. At the time Zarganar was banned from any artistic activity.

In 2008, he was arrested again and sentenced to 59 years in prison (later reduced to 35 years) for giving interviews to foreign media about the desperate situation of hundreds of thousands of people made homeless by Cyclone Nargis.

In 2010 Bloomstein again visited Burma secretly to make a new documentary about Zarganar's imprisonment. After a worldwide campaign, Zarganar was finally released in 2011 during an amnesty of political prisoners following elections and a series of reforms moving to a military-backed civilian government.

Bloomstein now travels openly to Burma to interview Zarganar in his home country for the first time since his release. Arriving just after the recent sectarian violence between Buddhists and Muslims in Meitila, he hears how Zarganar is trying to mediate between the two sides. He learns that the comedian has also been part of a commission looking at the violence and displacement of thousands of people in the western state of Rakhine.

Even though he is working with a government containing people that imprisoned and tortured him, Zarganar continues to use his unique satire to speak out as the country moves along an uncertain path to democracy.

Producers: Rex Bloomstein and Simon Jacobs
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b036kxtw)
Football ticket prices, e-cigarettes

Since 1989 the average price of a Premier League football ticket has gone up by over 700%. Is it time for clubs to agree to a cap on tickets? Also, we ask what's really in e-cigarettes. With Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b036htq7)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b036kxty)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b036kxv0)
Series 2

South Africa - Detective Captain Bennie Griessel

Translated from Afrikaans, the detective novels of Deon Meyer have become international best-sellers. Mark Lawson talks to Meyer about the fact and fiction of criminality in post-apartheid South Africa and meets Sifiso Mzobe, whose award-winning debut book features a young criminal in a Durban township.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b036ksdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b036kxv2)
Hangdog

by Cat Jones, winner of the 2011 Alfred Bradley Bursary Award with Glory Dazed. This is her first radio play.

An up-and-coming detective who's a stickler for the rules has his certainties tested by the brutal realities of everyday prison life when he investigates the suicide of a young inmate. Why does this particular suicide warrant investigation at such a high level and who is really to blame for Hangdog's death?

This gritty drama goes behind prison doors and looks at the unusual process of the investigation of a prison suicide.

In 2012, Cat won a Butler Trust Award, recognising her contribution in improving experiences and opportunities for prisoners during her five years working in prisons.

Produced and Directed by Sharon Sephton.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b036kxv4)
Teifi Valley

Felicity Evans introduces Open Country from the Teifi Valley in West Wales and finds that the River Teifi once supported the growth of the 19th century woollen industry and sustains traditional coracle making today. In search of the elusive lamprey she discovers a diversity of wildlife found in the river.

At Cenarth Falls she meets Peter Davis, the last coracle maker in the village, and talks about the traditional hand crafting process of this ancient vessel. Peter holds one of only twelve licences on the Teifi River which allows him to fish five days a week from a coracle where his favourite catch is sea trout. She also pops into the National Coracle Centre to talk to owner, Martin Fowler and see his collection of coracles from around the world. Here she discovers that coracles were used at Cenarth to encourage sheep in and out of the river so that their fleeces could be washed before shearing.

In the 19th century there were fifty-two water-powered mills making Welsh flannel, woven blankets and nursing shawls. A visit to the National Wool Museum reveals the value of the Welsh nursing shawl and 'The Mighty Mule' used for spinning threads. She also meets Raymond Jones, the last maker of traditional Welsh flannel left in Wales.

With the resurgence of interest in the use of traditional wool cloth for textile design a bright future is seen for those mills still in operation. However, there is now only one mill left in the valley which is water-powered. Felicity meets Donald Morgan at Rock Woollen Mill in Capel Dewi. Donald's family have woven cloth here for four generations and their mill once supplied electricity to the village. Now Donald makes a variety of woven textiles including woven purses and handbags favoured by the Japanese.

Producer: Sarah Pitt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b036jc42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b036jf35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b036kxv6)
Pacific Rim with Del Toro; Wikileaks; Mark Gatiss on small-screen spin-offs; silent film Blancanieves

The Mexican director Guillermo Del Toro tells Matthew Sweet about the joyful creative experience of making his summer blockbuster Pacific Rim, a film about sea monsters and super robots. After his Oscar-winning animation Pan's Labyrinth, he explains the attraction of CGI and big budgets.
As Alex Gibney's new documentary Wikileaks: We Sell Secrets is released, the film maker Roger Graef compares how the genre works on the big and small screen. Can contemporary films on events still very much unfolding really work at the movies?
And a beautiful silent film in black and white reworks Snow White. Blancanieves sets the fairytale in 1920s Seville. The director Pablo Berger and film historian Ian Christie discuss the rise of the new silent genre.
Mark Gatiss continues his series of cinema spin offs from British TV of the 70s with Are You Being Served? The sales team go on holiday to Costa Plonka...

Producer: Elaine Lester.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b036kxv8)
Bioscience to bioweapons; Synthetic diamonds; Stem cell transplants

Scientists investigate viruses in order to save lives. But could that same knowledge also help other people create dangerous viruses to use as weapons of terror?



This Thursday evening, a public debate is being held by the Society of Biology around these issues of "Dual Use" research. In an age of synthetic biology, mail order genes, and open access publication, what are the pros and cons of sharing virology research?



Also this week, a new centre for research into synthetic diamonds was opened by UK Science Minister David Willetts. Inside Science reporter Marnie Chesterton took a tour of the new facility to find out how diamonds might be a quantum computer's best friend.



Plus, the first formal trial of a stem cell based organ transplant is happening in the UK. Martin Birchall from University College London is working on replacing the larynx. But if a patient receives a new voicebox from a donor, whose voice will they have?


THU 17:00 PM (b036kxvb)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036htq9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My First Planet (b01gg8h2)
Series 1

The Noticeboard of Doom

Written by Phil Whelans

Day 27 and the colonists are torn between Richard's newsletter and Archer's hot pants. And which is more dangerous - Brian's monkey wrench or Lillian's "vitamin" drink"?

A sitcom set on a shiny new planet where we ask the question - if humankind were to colonise space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Welcome to the colony. We're aware that having been in deep cryosleep for 73 years, you may be in need of some supplementary information.

Personnel
Unfortunately, Burrows the leader of the colony has died on the voyage, so his Number 2, Brian (Nicholas Lyndhurst) is now in charge. He's a nice enough chap, but no alpha male, and his desire to sort things out with a nice friendly meeting infuriates the colony's Chief Physician Lillian (Vicki Pepperdine - "Getting On"), who'd really rather everyone was walking round in tight colour-coded tunics and saluting each other. She's also in charge of Project Adam, the plan to conceive and give birth to the first colony-born baby. Unfortunately, the two people hand-picked for this purpose - Carol and Richard - were rather fibbing about being a couple, just to get on the trip.

Add in an entirely unscrupulous Chief Scientist, Mason and also Archer, an idiot maintenance man who believes he's an "empath" rather than a plumber, and you're all set to answer the question - if humankind were to colonise space, is it destined to succumb to self-interest, prejudice and infighting? (By the way, the answer's "yes". Sorry.)

Produced & directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive Television Ltd Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b036kxvd)
Caroline's had a hard day. Oliver thinks it's about time Caroline recruits someone to replace Roy. They haven't been able to enjoy their time as Caroline has been so busy. He knows Caroline doesn't want to retire but he'd like her to pull back slightly. Caroline doesn't think that is financially viable, and doesn't need Oliver picking a fight.
Disapproving Pat thinks Helen is going to a lot of trouble preparing for Rob's arrival.
Rob enjoys Helen's meal and the two joke about Rob receiving culinary lessons from Helen. Pat remarks that Rob shouldn't need to cook for himself soon, as surely his wife will be moving to Ambridge. Rob is rather vague on this topic and the conversation soon turns to Rob's farming methods, which are very different to Bridge Farm's.
After dinner, Helen escorts Rob to his car and Pat takes the opportunity to disclose her feelings about Rob to Tony. She thinks there is something odd about him, and wonders why it is taking his wife so long to join him. She's not convinced by Rob's excuses, and wonders why he is always so vague about her.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b036kxzw)
Sergei Polunin, David Baddiel, Rankin

With John Wilson.

Sergei Polunin is the youngest dancer ever to be made a principal with the Royal Ballet, a role he unexpectedly quit after two years aged 21. Earlier this year he suddenly left the cast of a new ballet version of Midnight Express, days before its UK premiere. As he takes the lead in a Moscow production of Coppélia in London, Polunin discusses this role and his career highs and lows.

David Baddiel's first full stand-up show for over 15 years concentrates on the idea of celebrity. In Fame - Not The Musical, he argues that famous people don't talk about how the level of fame can fluctuate, and suggests that he is no longer as famous as he used to be. He discusses his return to the stage, and also reveals that he feels partly responsible for Sachsgate, the infamous prank calls made by Russell Brand and Jonathan Ross to Andrew Sachs.

In 1936 Dame Laura Knight became the first woman to be elected to the Royal Academy since 1769. As a new exhibition of her work opens at the National Portrait Gallery, Juliet Gardiner reassesses an artist who began painting circus scenes and went on to become an official war artist, creating a famous picture of the Nuremberg Trials.

In tonight's Cultural Exchange, the British portrait and fashion photographer Rankin - full name John Rankin Waddell - selects a short poem by Thomas Hardy which had a big influence on his decision to become a photographer while studying at Brighton Polytechnic.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


THU 19:45 The Cazalets (b036kxtp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b036ky00)
Undercover Police

After revelations that an undercover police officer spied on Stephen Lawrence's family and friends,
Melanie Abbott looks for the truth about undercover policing.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b036ky04)
Futurology for Business

Predicting the future is a skill that can earn investors and businesses a fortune - but get it wrong and disaster looms. In sectors like energy and technology planning decades ahead is an absolute necessity - but how can CEOs know what the world will look like in 2030 and how do they persuade shareholders and staff to come along for the ride? Evan Davis meets three business leaders who are placing massive bets on the future of farming, biomass fuel and the creation of a hyper-connected global society and finds out about timing, balancing risk and holding your nerve.

Also, the view from America, Sweden and the UK on corporate tax is discussed.

Guests:
Dorothy Thompson, CEO, Drax
Hans Vestberg, CEO, Ericsson
Jim Rogers, investor

Producer:
Lucy Proctor.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b036kxv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b036kxth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b036htqc)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b036kysg)
With Philippa Thomas

MPs could be in line for and 11 percent pay rise. Is there a growing disconnection between politicians and the public?

A special report on how Egyptian journalists are faring under the interim government

Answering your emails on holiday - does it make you sad or indispensable?


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b036rlnr)
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Episode 4

Attending a family funeral back in his native Sussex countryside our narrator finds himself drawn to visit the Hempstock's farmhouse, the home of three generations of women who played a pivotal and extraordinary role in his childhood; a visit which reawakens lost memories of curious events and strange fantastical occurrences that took place many years before.
For when he was seven, the South African Opal miner who lodged at his parents' house committed suicide, an act which triggers an unusual chain of events and awakens something ancient - ancient and dangerous. Something from beyond this world has found its way into our world and is threatening to destroy not only the young boy's family, but his life.
Befriended by Lettie Hempstock, her mother, and grandmother, they must try to send the creature home, but doing so involves terrifying forces which endangers their lives and the very fabric of the world itself.
However perhaps most mysterious of all is Lettie Hempstock's curious insistence that the duck pond at the end of the lane is really an ocean.

A novel about memory, about the adventures, experiences and enchantment of childhood and the power of stories, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is Neil Gaiman's highly anticipated first adult novel in eight years. Gaiman is the acclaimed and award-winning author of the novels American Gods, Stardust, Anansi Boys, Neverwhere, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. His work has been adapted for film, television, and radio, including Stardust (2007) and the BAFTA-winning and Oscar-nominated animated feature film Coraline (2009), while Neverwhere which began life as a BBC TV series has recently been adapted for Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra.

Abridged by Doreen Estall
Producer Heather Larmour
Reader Michael Sheen.


THU 23:00 The Show What You Wrote (b036kysj)
Series 1

Historical

The Show What You Wrote is a brand new sketch show, which is made up entirely from sketches sent in by the public. Recorded in Manchester in front of a live audience, and starring John Thomson, Helen Moon, Fiona Clarke and Gavin Webster.

We've picked the best sketches from thousands of submissions to make each show, and every week we'll be covering a different theme, from kitchen sink drama, to suspense heavy thrillers. This week's episode is Historical.

Script editor ...... Jon Hunter
Producers ..... Carl Cooper and Alexandra Smith.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b036kysl)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 12 JULY 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b036htrf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b036kxtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b036htrh)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b036htrk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b036htrm)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b036htrq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b036prv5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Sheikh Ibrahim Mogra of the Muslim Council of Britain.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b036l26d)
An investigation has been launched by the organisers of the Great Yorkshire Show, into allegations of cheating in the animal classes. They're looking into two alleged cases of "teat tampering", where chemicals or glue are thought to have been rubbed into cows' udders to make them look better and give them an advantage in the competition. With winners worth big money, cheats face being banned from future shows.

Are the old ways still the best ways? We visit a farm in Hampshire, where the heavy work is still done by horses not machines.

And Charlotte Smith meets the six-year-olds who are learning to grow their own bread.

Presented by Charlotte Smith. Produced by Emma Campbell.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02twjfh)
Tree Pipit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the tree pipit.

Tree pipits are small brown birds without any bright colours or distinctive features; but you can identify one from a distance when it is singing, because it has a very obvious display flight. The male bird sings from April to the end of July, launching himself from a treetop perch, then parachutes downwards like a paper dart.


FRI 06:00 Today (b036l26g)
Morning news and current affairs with Justin Wenn and James Naughtie, including:

0750
Ministers have accused two big private security firms, G4S and Serco, of over-charging the Government by "tens of millions of pounds" for tagging criminals. Tom Gash, director of research at the Institute for Government, and Chris Halward, director of professional development at the National Outsourcing Association, discuss news that G4S now faces a possible investigation by the Serious Fraud Office.

0810

The government is to postpone its plans to introduce standardised plain packaging for cigarettes in the UK. Ministers are expected to tell MPs that a decision on the policy has been formally delayed so that more time can be spent examining how similar plans have worked in Australia.

0820
The role played by women at armaments factories in the Second World War is being celebrated in a War Effort exhibition at the Coventry Transport Museum. Penny Summerfield, professor of modern history at Manchester University, looks at whether women's career opportunities were sown by that wartime experiences.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b036jc4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b036l26j)
A Long Walk Home

Episode 5

Penny Downie reads the remarkable true story of Judith Tebbutt's 192 days in captivity at the hands of Somali pirates.

In September 2011, Judith Tebbutt and her husband David embarked on a dream holiday on an idyllic beach resort in Kenya. On the first night, their worst nightmares become reality, when they are awoken by violent intruders, and Judith is dragged away towards a waiting motor-boat.

Today: After nearly seven months in captivity, Judith finally allows herself to believe that her ordeal could soon be over...

Writer: Judith Tebbutt
Abridger: Miranda Davies
Producer: Justine Willett
Reader: Penny Downie.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b036l26l)
Overindulgent grandparents, girls' education, Siobhan Reddy

How do you stop overindulgent grandparents from undermining your rules on parenting? Campaigning for girls' education on Malala Day; powerlister Siobhan Reddy; promoting women's football. Jenni Murray presents the programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 The Cazalets (b036l8xv)
Casting Off

Episode 10

by Elizabeth Jane Howard
dramatised by Lin Coghlan

Polly's wedding brings the Cazalet family together once more and Clary has a final surprise for Archie.

Produced and Directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

'Casting Off' is the final book in the Cazalet novels by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which together give a vivid insight into the lives, hopes and loves of three generations during the Second World War and beyond.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 are broadcasting dramatisations of all four novels between January and July 2013.
You can catch up with series three, The Cazalets: Confusion, on iPlayer.

This fourth series is set between the summer of 1945 and 1947.

With Rupert missing in France since Dunkirk, his beautiful young wife Zoe has had an affair with the American photographer, Jack, who has subsequently killed himself. Zoe has found solace in her daughter, Juliet and in Rupert's friend Archie, who is also a great source of support to her step-daughter, Clary. Should Rupert return, Archie is hoping for something more than friendship with Clary, but has kept this to himself. Meanwhile, Clary's cousin Polly has told Archie that she loves him and he has had to turn her down as gently as he can. Louise's marriage teeters on the brink, since her husband Michael destroyed a letter sent by her lover, Hugo whilst Edward's affair with Diana continues: she's almost certainly had two of his children. Sid, however, has finished her affair with her student, Thelma, hoping to bring Rachel back into her life again. But the best laid plans are wont to be sabotaged ...

When Elizabeth Jane Howard began writing the novels her aims were modest. "I wanted to write about my youth, and the ten years that straddled the Second World War. I also wanted to write about what domestic life was like for people at home. A lot has been written about the battles and the war in a more direct sense, but little had been said about the way the whole of England changed. When the war ended, everybody was in a different position from where they were when it started."
Two decades later, Howard's quartet of books -- The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off - charting the family's fortunes between 1937 and 1947 have sold over a million copies.
Martin Amis said of Elizabeth Jane Howard, "She is, with Iris Murdoch, the most interesting woman writer of her generation. An instinctivist, like Muriel Spark, she has a freakish and poetic eye, and a penetrating sanity."
A star cast includes Penelope Wilton as the narrator, Pip Torrens, Lisa Dillon, Naomi Frederick, Helen Schlesinger, Raymond Coulthard, Zoe Tapper, Alix Wilton Regan, Flora Spencer-Longhurst and Georgia Groome.
Casting Off is dramatised by Lin Coghlan.


FRI 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b036l26n)
Series 13

Rocking the Rails at Castle Cary

Location, location, location - it's everything for idyllic Castle Cary Station, a quiet, sleepy commuter stop on the Great Western train line - because this particular sleepy station in Somerset just happens to be the closest station to Worthy Farm - home of the Glastonbury Festival.

For 11 months and 3 weeks of the year all is peaceful and quiet, chattering birdsong in the hedgerows the only disturbance to a day-in-the-life of station master Paul Mitchell. Then, as Paul puts it - "Glasto comes around", and as no less than the Rolling Stones, Mumford and Sons, Portishead and the Arctic Monkeys pitch up in a field nearby, everything changes.
Normally manned by one station master at a time; Paul is one of three railway employees on rota - their duties include every aspect of station keeping; maintenance, guard duties, ticket sales, sweeping up and planting flower beds - and it is a job well done; they have even won awards for best kept station.

Sangita Myska follows the transformation of the station, peering through the well-polished ticket office window with station master Paul Mitchell, from quiet normal week to well managed chaos, as tens of thousands of wellie-wearing, tent carrying, over-excited music fans pour out of packed trains on their way to a weekend of mud and music.

And then they all go home again, and Paul gets back to his hanging baskets - checking to see if anyone has popped any mysterious and unexpected green plants in with his petunias.

Presenter: Sangita Myska

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


FRI 11:30 Hobby Bobbies (b036l2ld)
Series 1

Dangerous Minds

Geoff's decision to finally rebel against his domineering Dad doesn't go quite as he'd have liked.

Britain's longest serving PCSO is paired with the laziest in Dave Lamb's sitcom. (Dave is the voice of TV's Come Dine With Me)

Starring Richie Webb (Horrible Histories), Nick Walker and Noddy Holder (from Slade)

Geoff............................Richie Webb
Nigel............................ Nick Walker
The Guv....................... Sinead Keenan
Jermain.........................Leon Herbert
Bernie...........................Chris Emmett
Geoff's Dad.................. Noddy Holder

Producer: Steve Doherty

A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b036l2lg)
There's a new swindle which targets the over 75's. Criminals posing as police and bank staff are persuading victims to hand their bank card over to fake couriers.

Channel Four is enjoying tremendous success with their Sunday evening drama The Returned- the fact that it's in French and about zombies hasn't deterred two million viewers tuning in; are we losing our fear of subtitled TV.

Lyme Disease is a debilitating condition from which it is believed two to three thousand people a year in the UK are suffering in ignorance.

MySpace re-launch is hit by disappearing data.

How do foreign owned energy companies that operate in the UK treat their customers in their home markets.

Are cereals the right thing to eat at Breakfast?

How trading standards keep track of weights and measures.

The government say they are not now likely to pursue minimum alcohol pricing.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b036htrt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b036l2lj)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 Foreign Bodies (b036l2ll)
Series 2

Screenland - DS Ellie Miller, DI Sarah Lund, Captain Laure Berthaud

Crime dramas, home-made and imported, have become TV's most powerful genre. Mark Lawson talks to creative talent from the ITV hit Broadchurch, the Danish show The Killing and the French success Spiral about the medium's suitability as a crime-scene and the rise of female investigators.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b036kxvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01cks4p)
Rumpole and the Explosive Evidence

By John Mortimer
Adapted by Richard Stoneman

Starring Timothy West as Rumpole and Benedict Cumberbatch as the younger Rumpole.

Rumpole is in bed with flu, but more than happy to be called into work to escape the twenty four hour baby minding duties.

The case is the defence of a well known safe blower with lots of previous and Rumpole finds himself alone and without a leader, exposing the underhand behaviour employed by one Dirty Dickerson, a senior police officer who is quite prepared to tamper with evidence in order to frame well known criminals. In so doing however, he breaches one of the codes of procedure in court, and finds himself in danger of losing his right to work in court. However, help arrives from the intervention of a gentleman of the press.

Meanwhile, at Froxbury mansions, Rumpole forms a strong bond with his infant son in the watches of the night, when he talks over the intricacies of the case with him, and discovers that Hilda really does care about his career, and their future together.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b036l5kq)
Ambleside

Chaired by Eric Robson, the GQT team is in Ambleside, Cumbria. Panellists Bunny Guinness, Anne Swithinbank and Toby Buckland take questions from a local gardening audience.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

This week's questions:

Q. Can the panel suggest a dwarf apple that will appeal to children and grow well in a raised bed?

A. Rootstock dictates the size of the tree, an M27 or M9 stock is recommended for dwarf fruit trees. Discovery is a good apple to have in a pot.
An alternative way of growing dwarf apples is to grow them as a low fence around the edge of the raised bed. Plant the tree in the bed and pull the first two shoots out along a bit of wire, which eventually will grow into a boundary.

Q. How do I successfully grow Poppies in my garden?

A. Fleshy rooted plants such as Poppies often do well when they are bare root planted, being put into the ground when they are dormant. The traditional method of growing is to do so in a deep long tom container. To help the plant establish in the ground put it into the ground in spring or autumn when it is starting to put nutrients into it's roots.

Q. Could the panel suggest a perennial to plant at the base of a Joseph Rock Ash tree with surfacing roots?

A. A mixture of herbaceous perennials is recommended, including Achillea
Moonshine with yellow flowers or Salvia Amistad, which should flower from May/June until the winter frost. A tougher Salvia is a Nachtvlinder, which should last just as long, both have flower in shades of purple.

Q. Do the panel have any tips for planting and maintaining a sedum garden on my flat top garage roof?

A. Sedum roofs attract weed seeds such as Rape Seed Oil and Chives so you need good access to be able to weed regularly. It is recommended to use a coir mat, this method will get nutrients simply from rainwater; added nutrient will allow unwanted grasses and weeds to grow.

Q. My Sambucas Nigra is taking over the garden. Can I prune without affecting the flowering for next year?

A. Sambucas Nigra respond very well to pruning. Prune in the autumn or late winter, allowing it to flower first. To ensure it flowers the following year thin the shrub by approximately a third annually.

Q. My 16 year old Wisteria died suddenly. What do the panel think may have been the cause? And can I plant another Wisteria in the same soil?

A. A sudden death suggests a problem at the root; ideally the soil should be replaced. If it can't be replaced try using mycorrhizal powder, which is full of 'friendly' fungi which will fight harmful fungi.

Q. My Hoster is growing rapidly, when do the panel suggest is the best time to split it up?

A. In the Autumn as the leaves are yellowing and dying down. Use a serrated edge kitchen knife or a straight edge craving knife. Aim to size the plant so the root bulb fits into both your hands.

Q. How can I encourage Wild Daffodils to flower?

A. Move them to fresh ground and add bone meal to the soil. When you dig them up check for narcissus fly in the centre of the bulb, the fly's grub eats the flower bud, leaving the plant to grow small side leaves instead of the flower.


FRI 15:45 Latido (b036l5ks)
Episode 1

Latido is Spanish for heartbeat, and is a leitmotif in these three stories by Louise Stern, written in Mexico in 2013.

Each story features a deaf central character, and has a Mexican setting:
"He felt the beat of his own heart in his chest and it seemed to play into the rhythm of the water in front of him. That heartbeat, and the faint electrical current that fuzzed steadily beneath his eyes, making him feel slightly queasy; that was the soundtrack of Mexico for him."

Louise Stern grew up in Fremont, California, and is the fourth generation of her family to be born deaf. She says, "I have always felt that Mexico is a country where words are flesh ... People there, hearing or deaf, are very comfortable with communicating via gestures. Mexico is the place where I feel the least deaf. Although the incidence of deafness is more or less the same in most of Mexico as in the rest of the world (less than one percent), there is a village in Yucatan state in Mexico where everyone uses sign language as a matter of fact, because there is a genetic quirk that means that more people than usual are deaf. This village is not the setting of these stories written for the BBC, but time spent there has influenced the stories."

Programme 1:
Steven feels settled and accepted in the village, until his lover's ex-husband starts causing trouble for him.

Louise Stern now lives and works in London as an artist and writer. Chattering, her first collection of short stories, was published in 2010. The Electric Box, her first commission for radio, featured in the Radio 4 series 'Where Were You' in 2012.

Reader: Louise Brealey
Director: Karen Rose
Sound Design: Jon Calver
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b036l8xd)
An Afghan police officer, a prisoner of war, a TV presenter, an Egyptian princess and an American jazz pianist

Matthew Bannister on

Globetrotting television presenter Alan Whicker.

Lieutenant Islam Bibi - the woman Afghan police officer who was shot dead in Helmand province.

Lord Campbell of Alloway the leading barrister who first made his name defending prisoners of war in Colditz.

Paul Smith, the jazz pianist and arranger who worked with stars like Sammy Davis Junior, Ella Fitzgerald and Doris Day.

And Princess Fawzia Fuad of Egypt whose arranged marriage with the Shah of Iran ended in divorce after six years.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b036l8xg)
Last week Roger Bolton spoke to the acting editor of The Archers, Julie Beckett, about the decision to put the moment of revelation in the Matt and Lilian saga in The Archers' digital-only offshoot Ambridge Extra. After the interview aired we received a deluge of complaints - more than about the coverage of the death and funeral of Baroness Thatcher. Listeners were "incandescent" with rage about both the decision itself and the interview, which many felt offered far from adequate answers.

Given the weight of correspondence, this week Roger puts your frustrations to Jeremy Howe, commissioning editor for drama on Radio 4 and 4 Extra.

And why has the BBC removed a free piece of technology, called Radio Downloader, which allowed listeners to download and keep BBC radio programmes? The BBC has promised to offer radio downloads from 2014. But how much radio will be available and for how long? Roger speaks to Mark Friend, Head of Multi-Platform for Radio.

Is sorry the hardest word? We hear from listeners who were outraged by the comments made by BBC Radio 5 Live presenter John Inverdale about Wimbledon women's champion Marion Bartoli, during the finals coverage. But many felt his on-air apology the following day was not enough.

We like to encourage creativity from our listeners - last week a song, before that some petite prose from our Twitter followers, and this week we hear from a listener who vents their spleen not in writing, nor on the telephone, or even on Twitter, but with an inventive mash-up of last week's interview with Julie Beckett.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b036l8xl)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news. Including Weather at 5.57pm.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b036htrw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b036l8xn)
Series 81

Episode 3

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. With Jeremy Hardy, Samira Ahmed, Francesca Martinez and Bob Mills.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b036l8xq)
Pat and Tony are discussing their difficultly in adjusting to having a farm without cows, when Rob arrives with some thank-you flowers for Pat. She is keen to get rid of Rob, but Tony offers to show him how the wetland system will work without cows.

Tony thinks Pat should be careful with her comments about Rob, as Helen has taken a shine to him. He feels Pat should make an effort for her daughter's sake as Helen doesn't make friends easily.

Mike is worried about Brenda and how quickly she's given up her relationship and her job. A quick phone call from Brenda reveals she is in London, but she doesn't have time to say why before she loses signal.

Brenda eventually returns with big news. She has taken a job with Matt and will be working in Russia for a few weeks. She has been in London organising her visa with the Embassy. She needs Vicky and Mike to keep her news a secret, though, as there is something strange going on between Lilian and Matt. Lilian mustn't find out about Matt's side project, so Brenda suggests Mike and Vicky say she has gone travelling with an old friend from university.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b036l8xs)
Architect Richard Rogers, Gospel Prom, Ian Rankin

With John Wilson.

Architect Richard Rogers, Baron Rogers of Riverside, is the subject of a retrospective exhibition at the Royal Academy in London. Timed to coincide with his 80th birthday, the show includes his designs for the Pompidou Centre, the Lloyds building and the Millennium Dome. Richard Rogers talks to John about dyslexia, Prince Charles and everybody's democratic right to see a tree from their window.

Preparations are underway for the first Gospel music Prom. Conductors Ken Burton and Rebecca Thomas join Prom host Pastor David Daniel to discuss the history of British gospel music, what it means today and whether having a religious belief is important to be a performer. To illustrate what audiences at the Royal Albert Hall and on BBC Radio 3 will hear, members of the London Adventist Chorale sing in the studio.

In tonight's Cultural Exchange, Ian Rankin chooses the 1973 album Solid Air by the British singer-songwriter and guitarist John Martyn.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


FRI 19:45 The Cazalets (b036l8xv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b036l8xx)
Grant Shapps, Chuka Umunna, Bronwyn Curtis, Rose Hudson-Wilkin

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Bushey in Hertfordshire with Chuka Umunna Shadow Business Secretary, Vice Chairman of the Society of Business Economists Bronwyn Curtis, Grant Shapps Chairman of the Conservative Party and the Speaker's Chaplain the Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b036l8xz)
A Sporting Catharsis

As Britain basks in post-Wimbledon glory, amid the Ashes, Sarah Dunant reflects on how sport has - throughout history - been used by the authorities to help populations let off steam.

In Florence, in the late 1500s, townspeople played a form of football that allowed them to wrestle, punch and immobilize their opponents in any way they liked. Venice had a spectacularly violent sport of bridge-fighting where opposing teams "armed with sticks...dipped in boiling oil beat the hell out of each other".

Civic sporting therapy - past and present - has for centuries, Sarah argues, "proved a creative alternative to our recurring tendency to kill each other".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Foreign Bodies (b036l8y1)
Series 2 Omnibus

To accompany BBC Radio 4's dramatisations of the Martin Beck novels, which established crime fiction as a form for exploring social change, Mark Lawson presents five more 'Foreign Bodies' focusing on Greece, Argentina, Northern Ireland, South Africa and fictional TV crime-scenes including Broadchurch.

Examining subjects including the way in which crime novels have portrayed transitional societies in South Africa and Northern Ireland and explored the legacy of military rule in Argentina, in the first programme Lawson, in Athens, talks to writers including Petros Markaris, whose detective series featuring Inspector Costas Haritos has both predicted and depicted the Greek financial crisis.
Programme 2: Argentina - Superintendent Perro Lascano
Mark Lawson explores how Argentinian crime writers have dramatised the country's transition from dictatorship to democracy. He talks to Ernesto Mallo - whose cop, Lascano, works during the years of the military junta - and Claudia Pineiro, who argues that no Argentinian police officer can be a hero.
Programme 3: Ireland - Inspector Benedict Devlin
In the "borderlands" between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, Mark Lawson meets novelist Brian McGilloway, whose books explore the long shadows of the Troubles, and talks to him and authors from Belfast about the wave of crime-writing that the peace process has provoked.
Programme 4: South Africa - Detective Inspector Bennie Griessel
Translated from Afrikaans, the detective novels of Deon Meyer have become international best-sellers. Mark Lawson talks to Meyer about the fact and fiction of criminality in post-apartheid South Africa and meets Sifiso Mzobe, whose award-winning debut book features a young criminal in a Durban township.
Programme 5: Screenland - DS Ellie Miller, DI Sarah Lund, Captain Laure Berthaud
Crime dramas, home-made and imported, have become TV's most powerful genre. Mark Lawson talks to creative talent from the ITV hit Broadchurch, the Danish show The Killing and the French success Spiral about the medium's suitability as a crime-scene and the rise of female investigators.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b036htry)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b036l8y3)
The latest on the Paris train crash, rioting has broken out tonight in Belfast, Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, has marked her sixteenth birthday with a speech at the UN headquarters in New York, the fugitive American intelligence analyst Edward
Snowden has told representatives of human rights organisations that he wants to request political asylum in Russia until he can travel to Latin America. With Philippa Thomas.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b036rmlr)
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Episode 5

Attending a family funeral back in his native Sussex countryside our narrator finds himself drawn to visit the Hempstock's farmhouse, the home of three generations of women who played a pivotal and extraordinary role in his childhood; a visit which reawakens lost memories of curious events and strange fantastical occurrences that took place many years before.
For when he was seven, the South African Opal miner who lodged at his parents' house committed suicide, an act which triggers an unusual chain of events and awakens something ancient - ancient and dangerous. Something from beyond this world has found its way into our world and is threatening to destroy not only the young boy's family, but his life.
Befriended by Lettie Hempstock, her mother, and grandmother, they must try to send the creature home, but doing so involves terrifying forces which endangers their lives and the very fabric of the world itself.
However perhaps most mysterious of all is Lettie Hempstock's curious insistence that the duck pond at the end of the lane is really an ocean.

A novel about memory, about the adventures, experiences and enchantment of childhood and the power of stories, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is Neil Gaiman's highly anticipated first adult novel in eight years. Gaiman is the acclaimed and award-winning author of the novels American Gods, Stardust, Anansi Boys, Neverwhere, Coraline, and The Graveyard Book. His work has been adapted for film, television, and radio, including Stardust (2007) and the BAFTA-winning and Oscar-nominated animated feature film Coraline (2009), while Neverwhere which began life as a BBC TV series has recently been adapted for Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra.

Abridger Doreen Estal
Producer Heather Larmour
Reader Michael Sheen.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b036kbm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b036l8y5)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Dark Magic 09:00 MON (b036k1s3)

A Dark Magic 21:30 MON (b036k1s3)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b036kbm1)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b036kbm1)

A Guide to Garden Wildlife 09:30 MON (b036k1s5)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b0368rfd)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b036l8xz)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b014q005)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b0367nrw)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b036k73x)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b036j3qm)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b0368rfb)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b036l8xx)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b036j3r0)

Arthur Smith's Balham Bash 23:00 MON (b01075pz)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b036kxv8)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b036kxv8)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b036jc3t)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b036jc3t)

Bleak Expectations 11:30 MON (b01pfy5w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b036k741)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b036rkvc)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b036rlkx)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b036rlnr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b036rmlr)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b0368pl2)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b036k1s7)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b036k1s7)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b036k7d2)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b036k7d2)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b036knvq)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b036knvq)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b036kxtk)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b036kxtk)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b036l26j)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b036jf35)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b036jf35)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b036jc46)

Burma's Zarganar: The Man Who Laughed at the Generals 11:30 THU (b036kxtt)

Chris Paling - Words and Music 19:45 SUN (b036jhtp)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b0367mxg)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b036k5s9)

Dave Podmore 19:15 SUN (b036jhtl)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b036jc4b)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b036jc4b)

Drama 14:15 MON (b036k3sc)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b036kbl2)

Drama 14:15 WED (b036kscx)

Drama 14:15 THU (b036kxv2)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b01cks4p)

Egypt's Challenge 21:02 SUN (b037dxpg)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b036j3q3)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b036k1rz)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b036k7ct)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b036knvj)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b036kt0x)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b036l26d)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b0368rf0)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b036l8xg)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b0367snq)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b036kbmc)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 MON (b036k1sm)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 TUE (b036k8vg)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 WED (b036kscv)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 THU (b036kxv0)

Foreign Bodies 13:45 FRI (b036l2ll)

Foreign Bodies 21:00 FRI (b036l8y1)

Four Thought 05:45 SUN (b0368fx8)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b036j3qw)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b036j3qw)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b036j3qh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b036kxtr)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b036k73s)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b036kbm9)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b036ksdd)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b036kxzw)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b036l8xs)

Frontiers 21:00 WED (b036ksz2)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b0368rdj)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b036l5kq)

Hersch on Herschel 16:00 MON (b036k5sh)

Hobby Bobbies 11:30 FRI (b036l2ld)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:00 SUN (b0367mxq)

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In Touch 20:40 TUE (b036kbmf)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b036kbmh)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b036kbmh)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 TUE (b036kbm5)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b0368rds)

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Latido 15:45 FRI (b036l5ks)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 FRI (b036l26n)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b036j3qt)

Mark Steel's in Town 23:00 WED (b01m0k9m)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b0368rlb)

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Midweek 09:00 WED (b036knvn)

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Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b036kscz)

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Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b0368fx6)

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My First Planet 18:30 THU (b01gg8h2)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b0368rll)

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News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b036hthp)

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News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b0368rm5)

News 13:00 SAT (b0368rlx)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b036jc3y)

One Billion Digitally Identified Indians 11:00 WED (b036kscl)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b0368kpj)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b036kxv4)

PM 17:00 SAT (b036j3qr)

PM 17:00 MON (b036k73l)

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Paul Temple 11:30 WED (b036kscn)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b036jhtc)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b0367c3g)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b036jht9)

Pop-Up Ideas 09:30 TUE (b036k7d0)

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Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0368s30)

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Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b036jc42)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b036jc42)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b036jc42)

Reflections with Peter Hennessy 09:00 THU (b036kxth)

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Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01mnxzn)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b036j3q9)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b036j3qy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b0368rlg)

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Shared Planet 21:00 MON (b0367rwq)

Shared Planet 11:00 TUE (b036k7d8)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b0368rm3)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b036jc3w)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b036jc3w)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b0367sl2)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b036k8v8)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b036jc44)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b036jc40)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b036jc48)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b036jhtf)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b036jhtf)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b036kxvd)

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The Blonde Women of India 11:00 MON (b036k1sf)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b0368nzj)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b036ky04)

The Brig Society 18:30 WED (b036ksd8)

The Cazalets 10:45 MON (b036k1sc)

The Cazalets 19:45 MON (b036k1sc)

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The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0368kpl)

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The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b036jc4d)

The Food Programme 15:30 MON (b036jc4d)

The Human Zoo 15:30 TUE (b036kbl6)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b036k5sm)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b036k5sm)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b036kbl4)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b036k7cy)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b036k7cy)

The Man Who Saves Life Stories 16:00 TUE (b01jhnyf)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b036ksd4)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b0368rf4)

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The Report 20:00 THU (b036ky00)

The Show What You Wrote 23:00 THU (b036kysj)

The Stuarts 21:00 SAT (b0367c3b)

The Stuarts 15:00 SUN (b036jf33)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b036j3qf)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b036jc4g)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b036k73z)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b036kbmk)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b0368fwt)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b036ksd2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b036k743)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b036j3q7)

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Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b02tvggm)

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Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace 13:30 SUN (b0367nrt)

Under Attack: The Threat from Cyberspace 20:00 MON (b036k73v)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b0368rlq)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b036jky2)

What the Papers Say 22:45 SUN (b036jky4)

Witness 14:45 SUN (b036q5bz)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b036j3qp)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b036k1sk)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b036k1sh)

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Zeitgeisters 10:30 SAT (b036j3qc)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b0368s32)